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Sample records for octupole traps structural

  1. Cryogenically cooled octupole ion trap for spectroscopy of biomolecular ions.

    PubMed

    Boyarkin, Oleg V; Kopysov, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    We present here the design of a linear octupole ion trap, suitable for collisional cryogenic cooling and spectroscopy of large ions. The performance of this trap has been assessed using ultraviolet (UV) photofragmentation spectroscopy of protonated dipeptides. At the trap temperature of 6.1 K, the vibrational temperature of the ions reaches 9.1 K, although their estimated translational temperature is ~150 K. This observation suggests that, despite the significant translational heating by radio-frequency electrical field, vibrational cooling of heavy ions in the octupole is at least as efficient as in the 22-pole ion traps previously used in our laboratory. In contrast to the 22-pole traps, excellent radial confinement of ions in the octupole makes it convenient for laser spectroscopy and boosts the dissociation yield of the stored ions to 30%. Overlap of the entire ion cloud by the laser beam in the octupole also allows for efficient UV depletion spectroscopy of ion-He clusters. The measured electronic spectra of the dipeptides and the clusters differ drastically, complicating a use of UV tagging spectroscopy for structural determination of large species.

  2. Crystallization of Ca+ ions in a linear rf octupole ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Kunihiro; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Takayanagi, Toshinobu; Wada, Michiharu; Schuessler, Hans A.; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2007-03-01

    A laser-cooling experiment with Ca+ ions trapped in a linear rf octupole ion trap is presented. The phase transition of the laser-cooled Ca+ ions from the cloud to the crystal state is observed by an abrupt dip of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum and indicates that mK temperatures are obtained. We have also performed molecular dynamics simulations under various conditions to confirm this property by deducing axially symmetric structures of Coulomb crystals and by evaluating the translational temperatures of the laser-cooled ions. The simulation results show that for small numbers of ions novel ring-shaped crystals are produced. As the number of ions is increased, cylindrical layers in the ring crystal are sequentially formed. For more than 100 ions, also hexagonal and spiral structures emerge in parts of the large-size ion crystal, which has a length on the order of millimeters for the present geometrical arrangement and voltages. An advantage of the linear rf octupole trap is its large almost-field-free region in the middle of the trap, where the micromotion amplitude is small for trapped ions. These results demonstrate that such a multipole trap has attractive features for quantum computing and ultracold ion-atom collision studies.

  3. Periodic orbits and shell structure in octupole deformed potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Heiss, W.D. ); Nazmitdinov, R.G. ); Radu, S. )

    1995-01-15

    The effect of an octupole term in a quadrupole deformed single-particle potential is studied from the classical and quantum-mechanical viewpoint. Whereas the problem is nonintegrable, the quantum-mechanical spectrum nevertheless shows some shell structure in the superdeformed prolate case for particular, yet fairly large octupole strengths; for spherical or oblate deformation the shell structure disappears. This result is associated with classical periodic orbits that are found by employing the removal of resonances method; this approximation method allows determination of the shape of the orbit and of the approximate octupole coupling strength for which it occurs. The validity of the method is confirmed by solving numerically the classical equations of motion. The quantum-mechanical shell structure is analyzed using the particle-number dependence of the fluctuating part of the total energy. In accordance with the classical result, this dependence turns out to be very similar for a superdeformed prolate potential plus octupole term and a hyperdeformed prolate potential without octupole term. In this way the shell structure is explained at least for some few hundred levels. The Fourier transform of the level density further corroborates these findings.

  4. Construction and Operational Experience with a Superconducting Octupole Used to Trap Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wanderer P.; Escallier, J.; Marone, A.; Parker, B.

    2011-09-06

    A superconducting octupole magnet has seen extensive service as part of the ALPHA experiment at CERN. ALPHA has trapped antihydrogen, a crucial step towards performing precision measurements of anti-atoms. The octupole was made at the Direct Wind facility by the Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The magnet was wound with a six-around-one NbTi cable about 1 mm in diameter. It is about 300 mm long, with a radius of 25 mm and a peak field at the conductor of 4.04 T. Specific features of the magnet, including a minimal amount of material in the coil and coil ends with low multipole content, were advantageous to its use in ALPHA. The magnet was operated for six months a year for five years. During this time it underwent about 900 thermal cycles (between 4K and 100K). A novel operational feature is that during the course of data-taking the magnet was repeatedly shut off from its 950 A operating current. The magnet quenches during the shutoff, with a decay constant of 9 ms. Over the course of the five years, the magnet was deliberately quenched many thousands of times. It still performs well.

  5. Octupole fragmentation and the structure of the O(6)-like Ba nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zamfir, N.V.; Casten, R.F.; Cottle, P.D.

    1996-10-01

    The low energy octupole states in {sup 134}Ba were examined using proton inelastic scattering. The data show that there is no significant octupole strength in addition to that corresponding to the lowest 3{sup -} state. Consequently, the strong fragmentation of the low energy octupole state expected for a {gamma} soft nucleus does not occur in {sup 134}Ba. The apparent contradiction that the positive parity states in this nucleus present an O(6) type structure and the negative parity ones do not follow the selection rules of the E3 operator for the O(6) symmetry might be explained by noticing that the wave function of an O(6) nucleus has a significant overlap with the wave function of an U(5) - SU(3) transitional nucleus. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Neutron lifetime measurements and effective spectral cleaning with an ultracold neutron trap using a vertical Halbach octupole permanent magnet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. K. H.; Geltenbort, P.; Ivanov, S.; Rosenau, F.; Zimmer, O.

    2016-10-01

    Ultracold neutron (UCN) storage measurements were made in a trap constructed from a 1.3-T Halbach octupole permanent (HOPE) magnet array aligned vertically, using the TES port of the PF2 source at the Institut Laue-Langevin. A mechanical UCN valve at the bottom of the trap was used for filling and emptying. This valve was covered with Fomblin grease to induce nonspecular reflections and was used in combination with a movable polyethylene UCN remover inserted from the top for cleaning of above-threshold UCNs. Loss from UCN depolarization was suppressed with a minimum 2-mT bias field. Without using the UCN remover, a total storage time constant of (712 ±19 )s was observed; with the remover inserted for 80 s and used at either 80 cm or 65 cm from the bottom of the trap, time constants of (824 ±32 )s and (835 ±36 )s were observed. Combining the latter two values, a neutron lifetime of τn=(887 ±39 ) s is extracted after primarily correcting for losses at the UCN valve. The time constants of the UCN population during cleaning were observed and compared to calculations based on kinetic theory as well as Monte Carlo studies. These calculations are used to predict above-threshold populations of ˜5 % ,˜0.5 % , and ˜10-12% remaining after cleaning in the no-remover, 80-cm remover, and 65-cm remover measurements. Thus, by using a nonspecular reflector covering the entire bottom of the trap and a remover at the top of the trap, we have established an effective cleaning procedure for removing a major systematic effect in high-precision τn experiments with magnetically stored UCNs.

  7. Appraising nuclear-octupole-moment contributions to the hyperfine structures in 211Fr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-11-01

    Hyperfine structures of 211Fr due to the interactions of magnetic dipole (μ ), electric quadrupole (Q ), and magnetic octupole (Ω ) moments with the electrons are investigated using the relativistic coupled-cluster theory with the single, double, and important valence triple excitations approximations. The validity of our calculations is substantiated by comparing these values with the available experimental results. Its Q value has also been elevated by combining the measured hyper-fine-structure constant of the 7 p 2P3 /2 state with our improved calculation. Considering the preliminary value of Ω from the nuclear shell model, its contributions to the hyperfine structures up to the 7 d 2D5 /2 low-lying states in 211Fr are estimated. Hyperfine energy-level splittings of many states have been assessed to find the suitability for carrying out their precise measurements so that Ω of 211Fr can be inferred from them unambiguously.

  8. Octupole correlations in the heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of octupole correlations on the nuclear structure of the heavy elements are discussed. The cluster model description of the heavy elements is analyzed. The relevance of 2/sup 6/-pole deformation and fast El transitions to an octupole model is considered. 30 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Modified octupoles for damping coherent instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Corbett, W.J. ); Halbach, K. )

    1991-05-01

    The introduction tune spread in circular e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} accelerators with modified octupoles to reduce the loss of dynamic aperture is discussed. The new magnet design features an octupole of field component on-axis and a tapered field structure off-axis to minimize loss of dynamic aperture. Tracking studies show that the modified octupoles can produce the desired tune spread in SPEAR without compromising confinement of the beam. The technique for designing such magnets is presented, together with an example of magnets that give the required field distribution. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  11. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  12. Observation of the Nuclear Magnetic Octupole Moment of 137Ba+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Matthew

    Single trapped ions are ideal systems in which to test atomic physics at high precision, which can in turn be used for searches for violations of fundamental symmetries and physics beyond the standard model, in addition to quantum computation and a number of other applications. The ion is confined in ultra-high vacuum, is laser cooled to mK temperatures, and kept well isolated from the environment which allows these experimental efforts. In this thesis, a few diagnostic techniques will be discussed, covering a method to measure the linewidth of a narrowband laser in the presence of magnetic field noise, as well as a procedure to measure the ion's temperature using such a narrowband laser. This work has led to two precision experiments to measure atomic structure in 138Ba+, and 137Ba+ discussed here. First, employing laser and radio frequency spectroscopy techniques in 138Ba+, we measured the Lande- gJ factor of the 5D5/2 level at the part-per-million level, the highest precision to date. Later, the development of apparatus to efficiently trap and laser cool 137Ba+ has enabled a measurement of the hyperfine splittings of the 5D3/2 manifold, culminating in the observation of the nuclear magnetic octupole moment of 137Ba+.

  13. Contrasting behavior in octupole structures observed at high spin in {sup 220}Ra and {sup 222}Th

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.F.; Cocks, J.F.C.; Schulz, N.; Aieche, M.; Bentaleb, M.; Butler, P.A.; Hannachi, F.; Jones, G.D.; Jones, P.M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kulessa, R.; Lubkiewicz, E.; Plochocki, A.; Riess, F.; Ruchowska, E.; Savelius, A.; Sens, J.C.; Simpson, J.; Wolf, E. |||||||

    1995-08-07

    Alternating-parity states connected by strong {ital E}1 transitions, characteristic of a reflection-asymmetric rotor, have been observed to high spins in the isotones {sup 220}Ra and {sup 222}Th. This level structure is observed up to {ital J}{sup {pi}}=29{sup {minus}}(31{sup {minus}}) in {sup 220}Ra while it cannot be seen beyond {ital J}{sup +}=24{sup +}(25{sup {minus}}) in {sup 222}Th. These observations are consistent with Woods-Saxon-Bogolyubov cranking calculations which predict that the yrast band of {sup 222}Th will undergo a shape transition at {ital J}=24{h_bar}, in contrast to that of {sup 220}Ra which maintains its reflection asymmetry to higher spins.

  14. Spins, Parity, Excitation Energies, and Octupole Structure of an Excited Superdeformed Band in {sup 194}Hg and Implications for Identical Bands

    SciTech Connect

    Hackman, G.; Khoo, T.L.; Carpenter, M.P.; Lauritsen, T.; Calderin, I.J.; Janssens, R.V.; Ackermann, D.; Ahmad, I.; Agarwala, S.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Fischer, S.M.; Nisius, D.; Reiter, P.; Young, J.; Amro, H.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Hannachi, F.; Korichi, A.; Amro, H.; Moore, E.F.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Do Nakatsukasa, T.

    1997-11-01

    An excited superdeformed band in {sup 194}Hg , observed to decay directly to both normal-deformed and superdeformed yrast states, is proposed to be a K{sup {pi}}=2{sup {minus}} octupole vibrational band, based on its excitation energies, spins, and likely parity. The transition energies are identical to those of the yrast superdeformed band in {sup 192}Hg , but originate from levels with different spins and parities. The evolution of transition energies with spin suggests that cancellations between pairing and particle alignment are partly responsible for the identical transition energies. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Oligossacharide structure determination on an ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Asam, M.R.; Glish, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    Oligosaccharides are important elements in intra- and inter-cellular/molecular recognition mechanisms. Linkage types are part of the information that determine the tertiary structure of oligosaccharides and the tertiary structure is what determines specific recognition, so easily obtained linkage sequences will provide valuable information for computer and other modeling of cellular signaling interactions. Hofmeister et al. have shown that lithium cationized oligosaccharides have specific MS/MS dissociation patterns indicative of the carbohydrate linkage under low energy CID conditions in a hybrid mass spectrometer. The authors have used electrospray ionization on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer to examine MS/MS disaccharide dissociation patterns under ion trap conditions. These studies have concentrated on disaccharides complexed with lithium and sodium.

  16. Nonaxial-octupole effect in superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-S.; Sun, Yang; Gao Zaochun

    2008-06-15

    The triaxial-octupole Y{sub 32} correlation in atomic nuclei has long been expected to exist but experimental evidence has not been clear. We find, in order to explain the very low-lying 2{sup -} bands in the transfermium mass region, that this exotic effect may manifest itself in superheavy elements. Favorable conditions for producing triaxial-octupole correlations are shown to be present in the deformed single-particle spectrum, which is further supported by quantitative Reflection Asymmetric Shell Model calculations. It is predicted that the strong nonaxial-octupole effect may persist up to the element 108. Our result thus represents the first concrete example of spontaneous breaking of both axial and reflection symmetries in the heaviest nuclear systems.

  17. Electric Octupole Order in Bilayer Rashba System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, Takanori; Yanase, Youichi

    2016-12-01

    The odd-parity multipole is an emergent degree of freedom, leading to spontaneous inversion symmetry breaking. The odd-parity multipole order may occur by forming staggered even-parity multipoles in a unit cell. We focus on a locally noncentrosymmetric bilayer Rashba system, and study an odd-parity electric octupole order caused by the antiferro stacking of local electric quadrupoles. Analyzing the forward scattering model, we show that the electric octupole order is stabilized by a layer-dependent Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The roles of the spin-orbit coupling are clarified on the basis of the analytic formula of multipole susceptibility. The spin texture allowed in the D2d point group symmetry and its magnetic response are revealed. Furthermore, we show that the parity-breaking quantum critical point appears in the magnetic field. The possible realization of the electric octupole order in bilayer high-Tc cuprate superconductors is discussed.

  18. A novel antiproton radial diagnostic based on octupole induced ballistic loss

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-03-15

    We report results from a novel diagnostic that probes the outer radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds. The diagnostic allows us to determine the profile by monitoring the time history of antiproton losses that occur as an octupole field in the antiproton confinement region is increased. We show several examples of how this diagnostic helps us to understand the radial dynamics of antiprotons in normal and nested Penning-Malmberg traps. Better understanding of these dynamics may aid current attempts to trap antihydrogen atoms.

  19. Nature of Collective Dipole and Octupole Transitions in Neutron-Rich Barium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, B.; Zhu, S.; ANL, LBNL, LLNL, Rochester, FSU, Liverpool, Maryland, Notre Dame, Ohio, W. Scotland Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Recently, a direct measurement of octupole strength in 144Ba was carried out via Coulomb excitation with a radioactive beam from Argonne's CARIBU facility using GRETINA and CHICO2. The results verify the presence of enhanced octupole collectivity in this isotope, as predicted by theory. In the neighboring isotope 146Ba, however, the importance of octupole correlations is more uncertain. Specifically, the electric dipole strength, expected to be closely correlated with the octupole one, displays what is perhaps the most significant drop in strength between neighboring isotopes of any medium- to heavy-mass nuclei. To address this puzzling question, a Coulomb excitation experiment was also performed on 146Ba under the same conditions. The new measurement yields an enhanced octupole strength of the same magnitude as that observed in 144Ba. This supports the notion that the strong-weak dipole behavior in this region results from the unique single-particle structure characteristic of Z 56 and N 90 in the presence of a pear-shaped mean-field potential. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL), DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL, GRETINA), DOE DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and NSF.

  20. Collective states of odd nuclei in a model with quadrupole-octupole degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Minkov, N. Drenska, S. B.; Yotov, P.; Bonatsos, D. Scheid, W.

    2007-08-15

    We apply the collective axial quadrupole-octupole Hamiltonian to describe the rotation-vibration motion of odd nuclei with Coriolis coupling between the even-even core and the unpaired nucleon.We consider that the core oscillates coherently with respect to the quadrupole and octupole axialdeformation variables. The coupling between the core and the unpaired nucleon provides a split paritydoublet structure of the spectrum. The formalism successfully reproduces the parity-doublet splitting in a wide range of odd-A nuclei. It provides model estimations for the third angular-momentum projection K on the intrinsic symmetry axis and the related intrinsic nuclear structure.

  1. Trapping of branched DNA in microfabricated structures.

    PubMed Central

    Volkmuth, W D; Duke, T; Austin, R H; Cox, E C

    1995-01-01

    We have observed electrostatic trapping of tribranched DNA molecules undergoing electrophoresis in a microfabricated pseudo-two-dimensional array of posts. Trapping occurs in a unique transport regimen in which the electrophoretic mobility is extremely sensitive to polymer topology. The arrest of branched polymers is explained by considering their center-of-mass motion; in certain conformations, owing to the constraints imposed by the obstacles a molecule cannot advance without the center of mass first moving a short distance backwards. The depth of the resulting local potential well can be much greater than the thermal energy so that escape of an immobilized molecule can be extremely slow. We summarize the expected behavior of the mobility as a function of field strength and topology and point out that the microfabricated arrays are highly suitable for detecting an extremely small number of branched molecules in a very large population of linear molecules. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7624337

  2. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

  3. Crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis anti-TRAP protein, an antagonist of TRAP/RNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsov, Mikhail B.; Chen, Yanling; Gollnick, Paul; Antson, Alfred A.

    2005-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis the anti-TRAP protein (AT) is produced in response to the accumulation of uncharged tRNATrp. AT regulates expression of genes involved in tryptophan biosynthesis and transport by binding to the tryptophan-activated trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) and preventing its interaction with several mRNAs. Here, we report the x-ray structure of AT at 2.8 Å resolution, showing that the protein subunits assemble into tight trimers. Four such trimers are further associated into a 12-subunit particle in which individual trimers are related by twofold and threefold symmetry axes. Twelve DnaJ-like, cysteine-rich zinc-binding domains form spikes on the surface of the dodecamer. Available data suggest several possible ways for AT to interact with the 11-subunit TRAP. Interaction between the two symmetry-mismatching molecules could be assisted by the flexible nature of AT zinc-binding domains. PMID:16306262

  4. Enhanced light trapping in periodically truncated cone silicon nanowire structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Qiu; Yuhua, Zuo; Tianwei, Zhou; Zhi, Liu; Jun, Zheng; Chuanbo, Li; Buwen, Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Light trapping plays an important role in improving the conversion efficiency of thin-film solar cells. The good wideband light trapping is achieved using our periodically truncated cone Si nanowire (NW) structures, and their inherent mechanism is analyzed and simulated by FDTD solution software. Ordered cylinder Si NW structure with initial size of 80 nm and length of 200 nm is grown by pattern transfer and selective epitaxial growth. Truncated cone Si NW array is then obtained by thermal oxidation treatment. Its mean reflection in the range of 300-900 nm is lowered to be 5% using 140 nm long truncated cone Si NW structure, compared with that of 20% using cylinder counterparts. It indicates that periodically truncated Si cone structures trap the light efficiently to enhance the light harvesting in a wide spectral range and have the potential application in highly efficient NW solar cells. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51072194, 61021003, 61036001, 61376057).

  5. Anharmonicity of the excited octupole band in actinides using supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolos, R. V.; von Brentano, P.; Casten, R. F.

    2013-09-01

    Background: Low-lying octupole collective excitations play an important role in the description of the structure of nuclei in the actinide region. Ground state alternating parity rotational bands combining both positive and negative parity states are known in several nuclei. However, only recently it has been discovered in 240Pu an excited positive parity rotational band having an octupole nature and demonstrating strong anharmonicity of the octupole motion in the band head energies.Purpose: To suggest a model describing both ground state and excited alternating parity bands, which includes a description of the anharmonic effects in the bandhead excitation energies and can be used to predict the energies of the excited rotational bands of octupole nature and the E1 transition probabilities.Methods: The mathematical technique of the supersymmetric quantum mechanics with a collective Hamiltonian depending only on the octupole collective variable which keeps axial symmetry is used to describe the ground state and excited alternating parity rotational bands.Results: The excitation energies of the states belonging to the lowest negative parity and the excited positive parity bands are calculated for 232Th, 238U, and 240Pu. The E1 transition matrix elements are also calculated for 240Pu.Conclusions: It is shown that the suggested model describes the excitation energies of the states of the lowest negative parity band with the accuracy around 10 keV. The anharmonicity in the bandhead energy of the excited positive parity band is described also. The bandhead energy of the excited positive parity band is described with the accuracy around 100 keV.

  6. Search for two-phonon octupole excitations in 146Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orce, J. N.; Kumar Raju, M.; Khumalo, N. A.; Dinoko, T. S.; Jones, P.; Bark, R. A.; Lawrie, E. A.; Majola, S. N. T.; Robledo, L. M.; Rubio, B.; Wiedeking, M.; Easton, J.; Khaleel, E. A.; Kheswa, B. V.; Kheswa, N.; Herbert, M. S.; Lawrie, J. J.; Masiteng, P. L.; Nchodu, M. R.; Ndayishimye, J.; Negi, D.; Noncolela, S. P.; Ntshangase, S. S.; Papka, P.; Roux, D. G.; Shirinda, O.; Sithole, P. S.; Yates, S. W.

    2016-06-01

    The low-spin structure of the nearly spherical nucleus 146Gd was studied using the 144Sm(4He, 2n) fusion-evaporation reaction. High-statistics γ - γ coincidence measurements were performed at iThemba LABS with 7× 109 γ- γ coincidence events recorded. Gated γ-ray energy spectra show evidence for the 6+2 → 3-1 → 0+1 cascade of E3 transitions in agreement with recent findings by Caballero and co-workers, but with a smaller branching ratio of I_{γ} = 4.7(10) for the 6+2 → 3-1 1905.1 keV γ ray. Although these findings may support octupole vibrations in spherical nuclei, sophisticated beyond mean-field calculations including angular-momentum projection are required to interpret in an appropriate way the available data due to the failure of the rotational model assumptions in this nucleus.

  7. Effect of pore structure on gas trapping in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadian, Sadjad; Geistlinger, Helmut; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Capillary trapping of nonwetting phase in porous media plays an important role in many geological processes. For example, large portions of hydrocarbons cannot be extracted from reservoirs due to capillary forces, while in carbon sequestration processes; capillary trapping might improve the storage efficiency. An important case is when the wetting phase (mostly water) displaces a low-viscosity low-density fluid. In such cases, like water encroachment into gas reservoirs or rising of water table in soils, competition of gravity, viscous, and capillary forces determines the final configuration of the fluids in invaded zone. The trapped nonwetting phase and its distribution within the porous media will affect many other processes such as flow of the other fluids and mass transfer phenomena. Thus, investigating the parameters affecting phase trapping and distribution, especially their relation to pore structure, which controls the capillary action, is required. The aim is to predict gas trapping from structural properties of the material. We conducted a series of column experiments, in which water displaces air at a range of flow rates in different glass-bead packs. The final 3D configuration and morphology of fluids was observed using X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT). We extracted 3D structure of porous media as well as of the trapped gas phase, and quantified them in terms of volume ratios, interfacial area, and morphology. Then we investigated the relations of the trapped phase to capillary forces (pore structure) and viscous forces (front velocity). The results give us new insights to explore the flow and dissolution processes: We found no systematic dependency of the front velocity of the invading water phase in the velocity range from 0.1 to 0.6 cm/min what corresponds to capillary numbers from 2 to 12 ×10^-6. Our experimental results indicate that the capillary trapping mechanism is controlled by the local pore structure and local connectivity and not by

  8. Octupole correlations in N =88 154Dy : Octupole vibration versus stable deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimba, G. L.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Jones, P.; Bvumbi, S. P.; Masiteng, L. P.; Majola, S. N. T.; Dinoko, T. S.; Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Negi, D.; Papka, P.; Roux, D.; Shirinda, O.; Easton, J. E.; Khumalo, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    We report on low-spin states of 154Dy populated via the reaction 155Gd (3He,4 n ) with a beam energy of 37.5 MeV from the Separated Sector Cyclotron at iThemba Laboratory. The AFRODITE γ-ray spectrometer was used to establish new E 1 transitions between bands of opposite parity. The measurements broaden the N =88 systematics on the relationship between the first excited positive-parity pairing isomer band and the lowest-lying negative-parity band as the nuclear quadrupole deformation decreases with increasing proton number. In a region of strong octupole correlations the data suggest that the spectroscopy of N =88 nuclei is driven by stable octupole deformations and not by vibrations.

  9. Simultaneous quadrupole and octupole shape phase transitions in Thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. P.; Song, B. Y.; Yao, J. M.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.

    2013-11-01

    The evolution of quadrupole and octupole shapes in Th isotopes is studied in the framework of nuclear Density Functional Theory. Constrained energy maps and observables calculated with microscopic collective Hamiltonians indicate the occurrence of a simultaneous quantum shape phase transition between spherical and quadrupole-deformed prolate shapes, and between non-octupole and octupole-deformed shapes, as functions of the neutron number. The nucleus 224Th is closest to the critical point of a double phase transition. A microscopic mechanism of this phenomenon is discussed in terms of the evolution of single-nucleon orbitals with deformation.

  10. Design of Octupole Channel for Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, Sergey; Carlson, Kermit; Castellotti, Riccardo; Valishev, Alexander; Wesseln, Steven

    2016-06-01

    We present the design of octupole channel for Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). IOTA is a test accelerator at Fermilab, aimed to conduct research towards high-intensity machines. One of the goals of the project is to demonstrate high nonlinear betatron tune shifts while retaining large dynamic aperture in a realistic accelerator design. At the first stage the tune shift will be attained with a special channel of octupoles, which creates a variable octupole potential over a 1.8 m length. The channel consists of 18 identical air-cooled octupole magnets. The magnets feature a simple low-cost design, while meeting the requirements on maximum gradient - up to 1.4 kG/cm³, and field quality - strength of harmonics below 1%. Numerical simulations show that the channel is capable of producing a nonlinear tune shift of 0.08 without restriction of dynamic aperture of the ring.

  11. Microscopic analysis of quadrupole-octupole shape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Kosuke

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the quadrupole-octupole collective states based on the microscopic energy density functional framework. By mapping the deformation constrained self-consistent axially symmetric mean-field energy surfaces onto the equivalent Hamiltonian of the sdf interacting boson model (IBM), that is, onto the energy expectation value in the boson coherent state, the Hamiltonian parameters are determined. The resulting IBM Hamiltonian is used to calculate excitation spectra and transition rates for the positive- and negative-parity collective states in large sets of nuclei characteristic for octupole deformation and collectivity. Consistently with the empirical trend, the microscopic calculation based on the systematics of β2 - β3 energy maps, the resulting low-lying negative-parity bands and transition rates show evidence of a shape transition between stable octupole deformation and octupole vibrations characteristic for β3-soft potentials.

  12. Chaos in axially symmetric potentials with octupole deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Heiss, W.D.; Nazmitdinov, R.G.; Radu, S. Departamento de Fisica Teorica C-XI, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049, Madrid )

    1994-04-11

    Classical and quantum mechanical results are reported for the single particle motion in a harmonic oscillator potential which is characterized by a quadrupole deformation and an additional octupole deformation. The chaotic character of the motion is strongly dependent on the quadrupole deformation in that for a prolate deformation virtually no chaos is discernible while for the oblate case the motion shows strong chaos when the octupole term is turned on.

  13. Evidence for Octupole Correlations in Multiple Chiral Doublet Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Wang, S. Y.; Bark, R. A.; Zhang, S. Q.; Meng, J.; Qi, B.; Jones, P.; Wyngaardt, S. M.; Zhao, J.; Xu, C.; Zhou, S.-G.; Wang, S.; Sun, D. P.; Liu, L.; Li, Z. Q.; Zhang, N. B.; Jia, H.; Li, X. Q.; Hua, H.; Chen, Q. B.; Xiao, Z. G.; Li, H. J.; Zhu, L. H.; Bucher, T. D.; Dinoko, T.; Easton, J.; Juhász, K.; Kamblawe, A.; Khaleel, E.; Khumalo, N.; Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Majola, S. N. T.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S.; Ndayishimye, J.; Negi, D.; Noncolela, S. P.; Ntshangase, S. S.; Nyakó, B. M.; Orce, J. N.; Papka, P.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Shirinda, O.; Sithole, P.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Wiedeking, M.

    2016-03-01

    Two pairs of positive-and negative-parity doublet bands together with eight strong electric dipole transitions linking their yrast positive- and negative-parity bands have been identified in 78Br. They are interpreted as multiple chiral doublet bands with octupole correlations, which is supported by the microscopic multidimensionally-constrained covariant density functional theory and triaxial particle rotor model calculations. This observation reports the first example of chiral geometry in octupole soft nuclei.

  14. Octupole response and stability of spherical shape in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrosimov, V. I.; Davidovskaya, O. I.; Dellafiore, A.; Matera, F.

    2003-11-01

    The isoscalar octupole response of a heavy spherical nucleus is analyzed in a semiclassical model based on the linearized Vlasov equation. The octupole strength function is evaluated with different degrees of approximation. The zero-order fixed-surface response displays a remarkable concentration of strength in the 1ℏ ω and 3ℏ ω regions, in excellent agreement with the quantum single-particle response. The collective fixed-surface response reproduces both the high- and low-energy octupole resonances, but not the low-lying 3 - collective states, while the moving-surface response function gives a good qualitative description of all the main features of the octupole response in heavy nuclei. The role of triangular nucleon orbits, that have been related to a possible instability of the spherical shape with respect to octupole-type deformations, is discussed within this model. It is found that, rather than creating instability, the triangular trajectories are the only classical orbits contributing to the damping of low-energy octupole excitations.

  15. Consistent quadrupole-octupole collective model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolski, A.; Mazurek, K.; Góźdź, A.

    2016-11-01

    Within this work we present a consistent approach to quadrupole-octupole collective vibrations coupled with the rotational motion. A realistic collective Hamiltonian with variable mass-parameter tensor and potential obtained through the macroscopic-microscopic Strutinsky-like method with particle-number-projected BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) approach in full vibrational and rotational, nine-dimensional collective space is diagonalized in the basis of projected harmonic oscillator eigensolutions. This orthogonal basis of zero-, one-, two-, and three-phonon oscillator-like functions in vibrational part, coupled with the corresponding Wigner function is, in addition, symmetrized with respect to the so-called symmetrization group, appropriate to the collective space of the model. In the present model it is D4 group acting in the body-fixed frame. This symmetrization procedure is applied in order to provide the uniqueness of the Hamiltonian eigensolutions with respect to the laboratory coordinate system. The symmetrization is obtained using the projection onto the irreducible representation technique. The model generates the quadrupole ground-state spectrum as well as the lowest negative-parity spectrum in 156Gd nucleus. The interband and intraband B (E 1 ) and B (E 2 ) reduced transition probabilities are also calculated within those bands and compared with the recent experimental results for this nucleus. Such a collective approach is helpful in searching for the fingerprints of the possible high-rank symmetries (e.g., octahedral and tetrahedral) in nuclear collective bands.

  16. Constraints on interpretations structural trap in 4 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsch, K.D.; Kowalik, W.S.; Kluth, C.F.

    1995-04-01

    Interpretation of the geometry of the structural hydrocarbon trap continues to be one of the fundamental risks in exploration for, and production of, hydrocarbons. New geometric and computer tools are being developed to improve those interpretations by allowing the incremental restoration of structures in three dimensions. This adds powerful constraints on the structural interpretation because it requires that the interpretation be rational and consistent not only for the structure in the line of one cross section at the present time, but also for all moments during its development in 3 dimensions. It is possible to gather information, such as juxtaposition of different reservoir units through time to evaluate the development of seals or leaks with respect to trap formation and to maturation and migration of hydrocarbons. In addition, software is available to produce interactive 3D images of the data that allow the interpreter to see the 4D restoration as it proceeds, but also to change the viewing orientation. This allows the interpreter to {open_quotes}move{close_quotes} through the restoration and examine areas critical for the interpretation as the restoration proceeds while viewing in 3D. While some of these tools are still under development, we have applied them successfully to model and real data sets.

  17. Measurement of tune spread in the Tevatron versus octupole strength

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, John; Martens, Mike; /Fermilab

    1996-08-01

    An experiment was performed in the Tevatron to measure the tune spread versus octupole strength. The experiment is sensitive to the relationship between octupole strength and current in the T:OZF circuit and to the octupole (and other non-linear focusing fields) in the Tevatron. The major motivation for the experiment was to determine the value of octupole excitation that minimizes the tune spread: this value is an estimate of the value required to obtain ''zero'' total octupole excitation in the extraction process. The experiment was performed using the strip-line kickers at A17 and the resonant Schottky pickups. The horizontal proton kicker was excited with a sine-wave from a vector signal analyzer (HP-89440A) and the horizontal proton signal was received. The gating circuitry normally used to select proton or antiproton bunches was by-passed. The response function was measured and recorded on a floppy disk. Measurements were initially made with a 200 Hz span (0.250 Hz frequency bins) and later with a 100 Hz span (0.125 Hz frequency bins).

  18. High-accuracy optical clock based on the octupole transition in 171Yb+.

    PubMed

    Huntemann, N; Okhapkin, M; Lipphardt, B; Weyers, S; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E

    2012-03-02

    We experimentally investigate an optical frequency standard based on the 467 nm (642 THz) electric-octupole reference transition (2)S(1/2)(F=0)→(2)F(7/2)(F=3) in a single trapped (171)Yb(+) ion. The extraordinary features of this transition result from the long natural lifetime and from the 4f(13)6s(2) configuration of the upper state. The electric-quadrupole moment of the (2)F(7/2) state is measured as -0.041(5)ea(0)(2), where e is the elementary charge and a(0) the Bohr radius. We also obtain information on the differential scalar and tensorial components of the static polarizability and of the probe-light-induced ac Stark shift of the octupole transition. With a real-time extrapolation scheme that eliminates this shift, the unperturbed transition frequency is realized with a fractional uncertainty of 7.1×10(-17). The frequency is measured as 642 121 496 772 645.15(52) Hz.

  19. Search for octupole deformation in neutron rich Xe isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bentaleb, M.; Schulz, N.; Lubkiewicz, E.

    1994-07-01

    A search for octupole deformation in neutron rich Xe isotopes has been conducted through gamma-ray spectroscopy of primary fragments produced in the spontaneous fission of {sup 248}Cm. The spectrometer consisted of the Eurogam array and a set of 5 LEPS detectors. Level schemes were constructed for Xe isotopes with masses ranging from 138 to 144. Except for {sup 139}Xe, none of them exhibit an alternating parity quasimolecular band, {alpha} feature usually encountered in octupole deformed nuclei. Substantial evidence for reflection asymmetric shape in the intrinsic system of the nucleus exists for the light actinide nuclei.

  20. Structure of the signal transduction protein TRAP (target of RNAIII-activating protein)

    PubMed Central

    Henrick, Kim; Hirshberg, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of the signal transduction protein TRAP is reported at 1.85 Å resolution. The structure of TRAP consists of a central eight-stranded β-­barrel flanked asymmetrically by helices and is monomeric both in solution and in the crystal structure. A formate ion was found bound to TRAP identically in all four molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:22750855

  1. Glassy Structural Trapping in Soft Multi-Face Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priestley, Rodney

    Nanoparticles with soft, heterogeneously patterned surfaces often exhibit unique, multi-functional behaviors in response to environmental stimuli. The soft, polymeric nature of the particle surface, moreover, allows for the tailoring of both surface architecture and chemical composition towards particular applications. We have recently demonstrated that Precipitation-Induced Self Assembly (PISA) can be used to form soft Janus colloids as well as multi-faceted colloids in a scalable approach in which many colloidal characteristics can be controlled independently. Here, we present evidence not only of kinetic trapping in the formation of rapidly precipitated, multi-surface polymer particles; but also delineate the role of polymer vitrification in the determination of multi-faceted particle structures.

  2. Extraterrestrial Helium Trapped in Fullerenes in the Sudbury Impact Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    1996-01-01

    Fullerenes (C60 and C70) in the Sudbury impact structure contain trapped helium with a He-3/He-4 ratio of 5.5 x 10(exp -4) to 5.9 x 10(exp -4). The He-3/He-4 ratio exceeds the accepted solar wind value by 20 to 30 percent and is higher by an order of magnitude than the maximum reported mantle value. Terrestrial nuclear reactions or cosmic-ray bombardment are not sufficient to generate such a high ratio. The He-3/He-4 ratios in the Sudbury fullerenes are similar to those found in meteorites and in some interplanetary dust particles. The implication is that the helium within the C60 molecules at Sudbury is of extraterrestrial origin.

  3. Evidence for octupole excitations in the odd-odd neutron-rich nucleus {sup 142}Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S. H.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Hwang, J. K.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Zhu, S. J.; Ma, W. C.; Daniel, A. V.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.

    2010-05-15

    High-spin states in the neutron-rich nucleus {sup 142}Cs are reinvestigated from a study of the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf with the Gammasphere detector array. A new level scheme is built and spin-parities are assigned to levels based on angular correlation measurements and systematics. The new structure of {sup 142}Cs is proposed to be related to octupole correlations. The electric dipole moment of {sup 142}Cs is measured and a dramatic decrease of the dipole moments with increasing neutron numbers in the Cs isotopic chain is found.

  4. Experimental progress with novel surface electrode ion trap structures for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Craig; Blain, Matthew; Benito, Francisco; Chou, Chin-Wen; Descour, Mike; Ellis, Rob; Haltli, Ray; Heller, Edwin; Kemme, Shanalyn; Sterk, Jon; Tabakov, Boyan; Tigges, Chris; Maunz, Peter; Stick, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Segmented surface electrode ion traps are one of the most mature platforms among candidates for scalable quantum information processing. In this poster, an overview of current results from four specific projects will be presented. Two projects involve increased light collection from trapped ion for state detection and/or remote entangling of distant ions. The first involves cavity integration into a linear surface trap, and the second, involves integration of diffractive optical elements into a linear surface trap for increased light collection. Another project involves a trap with a ring geometry which could be used to trap long chains of equally spaced ions. Finally, we report on initial testing of a trap structure with vastly improved in-plane optical access. In this structure in-plane beams can be focused to less than 8 microns while keeping a distance of at least 5 beam radii to the trap structure. Along with these projects other relevant progress from Sandia National Laboratory's ion trap group will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Surface ion trap structures with excellent optical access for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunz, P.; Blain, M.; Benito, F.; Chou, C.; Clark, C.; Descour, M.; Ellis, R.; Haltli, R.; Heller, E.; Kemme, S.; Sterk, J.; Tabakov, B.; Tigges, C.; Stick, D.

    2013-05-01

    Microfabricated surface electrode ion traps are necessary for the advancement of trapped ion quantum information processing as it offers a scalable way for realizing complex trap structures capable of storing and controlling many ions. The most promising way of performing two-qubit quantum gates in a chain of trapped ions is to focus laser beams on individual ions of the chain to drive gates. However, in surface ion traps the close proximity of the ions to the surface and the size of the chips usually cannot accommodate the tightly focused laser beams necessary to address individual ions parallel to the chip surface. Here we present a surface electrode ion trap monolithically fabricated in standard silicon technology that implements a linear quadrupole trap on a bowtie shaped chip with a narrow section that is only 1.2 mm wide. Laser beams parallel to the surface can be focused down to a waist of 4 μm with enough separation from the trap chip to prevent light scattering. The trap structure incorporates two Y-junctions for reordering ions and is optimized for quantum information processing. This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Precise rainbow trapping for low-frequency acoustic waves with micro Mie resonance-based structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Yuan, Baoguo; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    We have realized the acoustic rainbow trapping in the low frequency region (200-500 Hz) through micro Mie resonance-based structures. The structure has eight channels with a high refractive index obtained by coiling space, that can excite strong interactions with incident waves and support various orders of multipoles due to the Mie resonances of the microstructure. By utilizing the structure, the precise spatial modulation of the acoustic wave is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. The effect of trapping broadband acoustic waves and spatially separating different frequency components are ascribed to the monopolar Mie resonances of the structures. The trapping frequency is derived and the trapping positions can be tuned arbitrarily. With enhanced wave-structure interactions and tailored frequency responses, such micro structures show precise spectral-spatial control of acoustic waves and open a diverse venue for high performance acoustic wave detection, sensing, filtering, and a nondestructive test.

  7. Device-structure dependence of shift in SQUID characteristics by flux trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Toshikazu; Takeda, Eriko; Takagi, Kazumasa

    1994-02-01

    Shifts in voltage-flux characteristics of a SQUID by flux trapping have been measured to study effectiveness of guard ring structure on shielding of magnetic field. The measurements are made under controlled magnetic field. Magnitude of the shift depends on the device structure. It is found that there exists a threshold field for the flux trapping, and the field is reduced by introducing the guard-ring in the SQUID. Comparing to the SQUID without the structure, the SQUID with it needs higher-grade shielding to prevent the flux trapping during cooling down.

  8. Particle trapping: A key requisite of structure formation and stability of Vlasov–Poisson plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schamel, Hans

    2015-04-15

    Particle trapping is shown to control the existence of undamped coherent structures in Vlasov–Poisson plasmas and thereby affects the onset of plasma instability beyond the realm of linear Landau theory.

  9. Radiation-induced trapped charge in metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor structure

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Fujimaki, T.; Yoshikawa, M.

    1999-12-01

    The radiation-induced trapped charge in insulation layer of metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (MNOS) structure has been investigated. The mechanism of charge trapping under irradiation is studied by the radiation-induced mid-gap voltage shift using a simple charge trap model. The depth profile of fixed charge in insulator before irradiation was evaluated by the mid-gap voltage of MNOS structures with varying insulator thicknesses using slanted etching method. The irradiation tests were carried out using Co-60 gamma ray source up to 1 Mrad(Si) with the gate voltage of +6 or {minus}6 V. The calculated results using the model can be fitted well to the experimental results, and the authors confirmed the model is very useful to discuss the radiation-induced trapped charge. By simulating the mid-gap voltage shift of MNOS structures, they considered the possibility for radiation hardened device.

  10. Particle trapping and impedance measurement using bilayer electrodes integrated with microcavity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guan-Ting; Liu, Chia-Feng; Jang, Ling-Sheng; Li, Shun-Lai; Wang, Min-Haw

    2017-03-01

    Traditional planar electrodes for single-particle impedance measurement have difficulty in trapping and positioning particles. This paper proposes a microfluidic device for single-particle trapping and impedance measurement with a microcavity configuration. A carbon dioxide (CO2) laser technique was used to fabricate the microcavity structure, which can capture 15 µm diameter particles without requiring additional trapping structures. The measurement electrodes on both sides of the microcavity were fabricated using electroplating and deposition techniques. The advantages of the microcavity structure and electrodes are discussed. The bottom electrode spreads into the microcavity to increase measurement sensitivity and shrink the exit aperture to around 10 µm for particle trapping. The experimental results show that the device successfully captured particles and distinguished the impedance of a particle from that of phosphate-buffered saline solution.

  11. How to assess light trapping structures versus a Lambertian Scatterer for solar cells?

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christian S; Bozzola, Angelo; Andreani, Lucio C; Krauss, Thomas F

    2014-03-10

    We propose a new figure of merit to assess the performance of light trapping nanostructures for solar cells, which we call the light trapping efficiency (LTE). The LTE has a target value of unity to represent the performance of an ideal Lambertian scatterer, although this is not an absolute limit but rather a benchmark value. Since the LTE aims to assess the nanostructure itself, it is, in principle, independent of the material, fabrication method or technology used. We use the LTE to compare numerous proposals in the literature and to identify the most promising light trapping strategies. We find that different types of photonic structures allow approaching the Lambertian limit, which shows that the light trapping problem can be approached from multiple directions. The LTE of theoretical structures significantly exceeds that of experimental structures, which highlights the need for theoretical descriptions to be more comprehensive and to take all relevant electro-optic effects into account.

  12. Octupole deformation in sup 221 Fr; E1 transition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.F.; Peghaire, A. ); Sheline, R.K. )

    1990-07-10

    Experimental data following the alpha decay of{sup 225}Ac are interpreted in terms of a spectroscopy in {sup 221}Fr consistent with octupole deformation. However, the measured E1 transition probabilities suggest that the low lying bands in {sup 221}Fr are considerably more mixed than in nuclei with slightly higher mass number. It is suggested that this mixing of states in {sup 221}Fr is indicative of the partial collapse of Nilsson-like orbitals into more degenerate shell model orbitals.

  13. Second order phase transitions from octupole-nondeformed to octupole-deformed shape in the alternating parity bands of nuclei around 240Pu based on data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolos, R. V.; von Brentano, P.; Jolie, J.

    2012-08-01

    Background: Shape phase transitions in finite quantal systems are very interesting phenomena of general physical interest. There is a very restricted number of the examples of nuclei demonstrating this phenomenon.Purpose: Based on experimental excitation spectra, there is a second order phase transition in the alternating parity bands of some actinide nuclei.Method: The mathematical techniques of supersymmetric quantum mechanics, two-center octupole wave functions ansatz, and the Landau theory of phase transitions are used to analyze the experimental data on alternating parity bands.Results: The potential energy of the octupole collective motion is determined and analyzed for all observed values of the angular momentum of the alternating parity band states in 232Th, 238U, and 240Pu.Conclusion: It is shown that as a function of increasing angular momentum there is a second order phase transition from the octupole-nondeformed to the octupole-deformed shape in the considered nuclei.

  14. High-spin octupole yrast levels in {sup 216}Rn{sub 86}

    SciTech Connect

    Debray, M.E.; Davidson, J.; Davidson, M.; Kreiner, A. J.; Cardona, M. A.; Hojman, D.; Napoli, D.R.; De Angelis, G.; De Poli, M.; Gadea, A.; Lenzi, S.; Bazzacco, D.; Lunardi, S.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Ur, C.A.; Medina, N.

    2006-02-15

    The yrast level structure of {sup 216}Rn has been studied using in-beam spectroscopy {alpha}-{gamma}-{gamma} coincidence techniques through the {sup 208}Pb({sup 18}O, 2{alpha}2n) reaction in the 91-93 MeV energy range, using the 8{pi} GASP-ISIS spectrometer at Legnaro. The level scheme of {sup 216}Rn resulting from this study shows alternating parity bands only above a certain excitation energy. From this result, the lightest nucleus showing evidence of octupole collectivity at low spins is still {sup 216}Fr, thereby defining the lowest-mass corner for this kind of phenomenon as N{>=}129 and Z{>=}87.

  15. Investigation of 3-dimensional structural morphology for enhancing light trapping with control of surface haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyeongsik; Shin, Myunghun; Kim, Hyeongseok; Kim, Sunbo; Le, Anh Huy Tuan; Kang, Junyoung; Kim, Yongjun; Pham, Duy Phong; Jung, Junhee; Yi, Junsin

    2017-04-01

    A comparative study of 3-dimensional textured glass morphologies with variable haze value and chemical texturing of the glass substrates was conducted to enhance light trapping in silicon (Si) thin film solar cells (TFSCs). The light trapping characteristics of periodic honeycomb structures show enhanced transmittance and haze ratio in numerical and experimental approaches. The periodic honeycomb structure of notched textures is better than a random or periodic carved structure. It has high transmittance of ∼95%, and haze ratio of ∼52.8%, and the haze property of the angular distribution function of transmittance shows wide scattering angles in the long wavelength region because of the wide spacing and aspect ratio of the texture. The numerical and experimental approaches of the 3-D texture structures in this work will be useful in developing high-performance Si TFSCs with light trapping.

  16. Local modulation and trapping of energetic particles by coherent magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessein, Jeffrey A.; Ruffolo, David; Matthaeus, William H.; Wan, Minping

    2016-04-01

    Recent observational studies show strong statistical associations between features of interplanetary suprathermal energetic particle (EP) data and rapid changes in the interplanetary vector magnetic field. The latter are connected to intermittency and coherent magnetic structures, including classical discontinuities. Here we discuss these observations in the context of two appealing theoretical ideas: First, magnetic structures bounding flux tubes can cause local or temporary topological trapping, thus influencing EP transport. Second, charged particles may be accelerated by interacting with dynamic flux tubes, either through reconnection, trapping in secondary islands, or a betatron mechanism. We present observations that support interpretation in terms of trapping boundaries associated with changes in EP flux and also find a case in which an EP peak lies near a coherent magnetic structure that is not a shock, with changing particle anisotropy consistent with outflow from the structure, suggestive of local particle acceleration.

  17. Effects of oxide thickness on charge trapping in metal-nitride-oxide- semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Vikram J.; Delatore, James P.

    1982-07-01

    Charge trapping in chemically vapor-deposited Si3N4 thin films of metal-nitride-oxide- semiconductor (MNOS) structures has been studied using the internal photoelectric-effect technique in combination with high-frequency capacitance-voltage measurements. The trapped charge density in the Si3N4 film was investigated as a function of the experimental parameters of the internal photoelectric-effect technique and the oxide thickness (300-20 Å) of the MNOS structure. The optimum trapped electron density in the Si3N4 film was measured to be 1.5×1018/ cm3 using 4.14-eV photon energy, 3.0-mW/cm2 light intensity, and -20-V applied gate voltage bias for the MNOS structures whose oxide thicknesses were greater than 70 Å. The photoinjection of holes from Si into Si3N4 was inhibited in thick-oxide (300-43 Å) MNOS structures due to the large barrier height at the Si-SiO2 interface. This eliminated simultaneous trapping of holes and electrons in the Si3N4 film. As the oxide thickness of the MNOS structure was reduced below the critical thickness of 43 Å, the photoinjection of holes from Si into Si3N4 was enhanced substantially with subsequent dominant hole trapping in the Si3N4 film.

  18. Suppression of Quadrupole and Octupole Modes in Red Giants Observed by Kepler *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stello, Dennis; Cantiello, Matteo; Fuller, Jim; Garcia, Rafael A.; Huber, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    An exciting new theoretical result shows that observing suppression of dipole oscillation modes in red giant stars can be used to detect strong magnetic fields in the stellar cores. A fundamental facet of the theory is that nearly all the mode energy leaking into the core is trapped by the magnetic greenhouse effect. This results in clear predictions for how the mode visibility changes as a star evolves up the red giant branch, and how that depends on stellar mass, spherical degree, and mode lifetime. Here, we investigate the validity of these predictions with a focus on the visibility of different spherical degrees. We find that mode suppression weakens for higher degree modes with a reduction in the quadrupole mode visibility of up to 49%, and no detectable suppression of octupole modes, in agreement with theory. We find evidence for the influence of increasing mode lifetimes on the visibilities along the red giant branch, in agreement with previous independent observations. These results support the theory that strong internal magnetic fields cause suppression of non-radial modes in red giants. We also find preliminary evidence that stars with suppressed dipole modes on average have slightly lower metallicity than normal stars.

  19. Trapping of a single DNA molecule using nanoplasmonic structures for biosensor applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Dae; Lee, Yong-Gu

    2014-01-01

    Conventional optical trapping using a tightly focused beam is not suitable for trapping particles that are smaller than the diffraction limit because of the increasing need of the incident laser power that could produce permanent thermal damages. One of the current solutions to this problem is to intensify the local field enhancement by using nanoplasmonic structures without increasing the laser power. Nanoplasmonic tweezers have been used for various small molecules but there is no known report of trapping a single DNA molecule. In this paper, we present the trapping of a single DNA molecule using a nanohole created on a gold substrate. Furthermore, we show that the DNA of different lengths can be differentiated through the measurement of scattering signals leading to possible new DNA sensor applications. PMID:25136478

  20. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Prost, Spencer A; Webb, Ian K; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tohnachev, Aleksey V.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Baker, Erin S.; Anderson, Gordon A; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    A new Structures for Lossless lon Manipulations (SUM) module, having electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB), was constructed and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at a pressure of 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF voltages to a series of inner rung electrodes with alternating phase on adjacent electrodes, in conjunction with positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC :field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potentials applied to the inner rung electrodes to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trapping region. We show that ions can be trapped and accumulated with up to 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 h with no significant losses, and then could be rapidly ejected from the SUM trap. The present results provide a foundation for the development of much more complex SUM devices that facilitate extended ion manipulations. PMID:25971536

  1. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Venkata BS; Prost, Spencer A.; Webb, Ian K.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Anderson, Gordon A.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-16

    A structure for lossless ion manipulation (SLIM) module was constructed with electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB) separated by 5 mm and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF having alternating phases on a series of inner rung electrodes and by positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potential of the inner rung electrodes so as to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trap. We show that ions could be trapped and accumulated with 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 hours with no losses, and could be rapidly ejected from the SLIM trap.

  2. Stability and structure of an anisotropically trapped dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate: Angular and linear rotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. D.; Blakie, P. B.

    2012-11-01

    We study theoretically Bose-Einstein condensates with polarized dipolar interactions in anisotropic traps. We map the parameter space by varying the trap frequencies and dipolar interaction strengths and find an irregular-shaped region of parameter space in which density-oscillating condensate states occur, with maximum density away from the trap center. These density-oscillating states may be biconcave (red-blood-cell-shaped), or have two or four peaks. For all trap frequencies, the condensate becomes unstable to collapse for sufficiently large dipole interaction strength. The collapse coincides with the softening of an elementary excitation. When the condensate mode is density oscillating, the character of the softening excitation is related to the structure of the condensate. We classify these excitations by linear and angular characteristics. We also find excited solutions to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, which are always unstable.

  3. Relative spins and excitation energies of superdeformed bands in {sup 190}Hg: Further evidence for octupole vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, B.; Carpenter, M.; Janssens, R.; Blumenthal, D.; Timar, J.; Wilson, A.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. |; Nakatsukasa, T.; Ahmad, I.; Astier, A.; Azaiez, F.; du Croux, L.; Gall, B.; Hannachi, F.; Khoo, T.; Korichi, A.; Lauritsen, T.; Lopez-Martens, A.

    1995-04-01

    An experiment using the Eurogam phase II {gamma}-ray spectrometer confirms the existence of an excited superdeformed (SD) band in {sup 190}Hg and its very unusual decay into the lowest SD band over 3--4 transitions. The energies of the transitions linking the two SD bands have been firmly established, and their angular distributions are consistent with a dipole character. Comparisons with calculations using random-phase approximation indicate that the excited SD band can be interpreted as an octupole-vibrational structure.

  4. Ion trap mass spectrometry in the structural analysis of haemoglobin peptides modified by epichlorohydrin and diepoxybutane.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Nadia; Basile, Adriana; Pieri, Maria; Acampora, Antonio; Malorni, Livia; De Giulio, Beatrice; Sannolo, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Ion trap mass spectrometry has been shown to be particularly suitable for the structural analysis of high molecular weight peptides directly fragmented in the mass analyser without needing further sub-digestion reactions. Here we report the advantages of using multi-stage ion trap mass spectrometry in the structural characterisation of haemoglobin alkylated with epichlorohydrin and diepoxybutane. Alkylated globins were digested with trypsin and the peptide mixtures were analysed by MS(3). This technique allows the sequential fragmentation of peptides under analysis, giving rise to MS(3) product ion spectra with additional information with respect to MS(2) mass spectra. The results obtained complete the previously reported structural characterisation of alkylated haemoglobin, demonstrating the potential of ion trap mass spectrometry.

  5. NLC Collimation Study Update: Performance with Tail Folding Octupoles (LCC-0118)

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A

    2004-03-16

    This note describes an update to the study of linear collider collimation system performance performed by the collimation task force and presented in [1, 2, 3]. In particular, the performance of the NLC collimation system with the addition of ''tail-folding'' octupoles is described. These octupoles allow the betatron collimation gaps to be opened by more than a factor of three. We present the optimized gap settings, the location of additional photon masks, and the resulting synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The studies confirm that the tail-folding octupoles are efficient, give additional flexibility, and enhance the collimation system performance.

  6. On quadrupole and octupole gravitational radiation in the ANK formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozameh, Carlos N.; Ortega, R. G.; Rojas, T. A.

    2017-04-01

    Following the approach of Adamo-Newman-Kozameh (ANK) we derive the equations of motion for the center of mass and intrinsic angular moment for isolated sources of gravitational waves in axially symmetric spacetimes. The original ANK formulation is generalized so that the angular momentum coincides with the Komar integral for a rotational Killing symmetry. This is done using the Winicour-Tamburino Linkages which yields the mass dipole-angular momentum tensor for the isolated sources. The ANK formalism then provides a complex worldline in a fiducial flat space to define the notions of center of mass and spin. The equations of motion are derived and then used to analyse a very simple astrophysical process where only quadrupole and octupole contributions are included. The results are then compared with those coming from the post newtonian approximation.

  7. Plasma resistivity measurements in the Wisconsin levitated octupole

    SciTech Connect

    Brouchous, D. A.

    1980-11-01

    Resistivity measurements parallel to the magnetic field were made on gun injected plasmas ranging in density from 10/sup 9/cm/sup -3/ to 10/sup 1/parallelcm/sup -3/ in the Wisconsin levitated octupole with toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields. The 10/sup 9/cm/sup -3/ plasma was collisionless with lambda/sub mfp/ > 100 mirror lengths, had T/sub e/ = 10 eV, T/sub i/ = 30 eV and was found to have anomalous resistivity scaling like eta = ..sqrt..T/sub e//n/sub e/ when E/sub parallel/ > E/su c/ is the Dreicer critical field. The 10/sup 12/cm/sup -3/ plasma was collisional with lambda/sub mfp/ < mirror length, had T/sub e/ = T/sub i/ approx. = .2 eV and was found to have Spitzer resistivity when E/sub parallel/ < E/sub c/.

  8. Mechanism of DNA Trapping in Nanoporous Structures during Asymmetric Pulsed-Field Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ya; Harrison, D. Jed

    2014-03-01

    DNA molecules (>100kbp) are trapped in separation sieves when high electric fields are applied in pulsed field electrophoresis, seriously limiting the speed of separation. Using crystalline particle arrays, to generate interstitial pores for molecular sieving, allows higher electric fields than in gels, (e.g 40 vs 5 V/cm), however trapping still limits the field strength. Using reverse pulses, which release DNA from being fully-stretched, allows higher fields (140 V/cm). We investigate the trapping mechanism of individual DNA molecules in ordered nanoporous structures. Two prerequisites for trapping are revealed by the dynamics of single trapped DNA, hernia formation and fully-stretched U/J shapes. Fully stretched DNA has longer unhooking times than expected by simple models. We propose a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force reduces the mobility of segments at the apex of the U or J, where field gradients are highest, based on simulations. A modified model for unhooking time is obtained after the DEP force is introduced. The new model explains the unhooking time data by predicting an infinite trapping time when the ratio of arm length differences (of the U or J) to molecule length Δx / L < β . β is a DEP parameter that is found to strongly increase with electric field. The work was supported by grant from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the National Institute for Nanotechnology (NINT).

  9. Mobility-Selected Ion Trapping and Enrichment Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; ...

    2016-01-11

    The integration of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with mass spectrometry (MS) and the ability to trap ions in IMS-MS measurements is of great importance for performing reactions, accumulating ions, and increasing analytical measurement sensitivity. The development of Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) offers the potential for ion manipulations in a more reliable and cost-effective manner, while opening opportunities for much more complex sequences of manipulations. Here, we demonstrate an ion separation and trapping module and a method based upon SLIM that consists of a linear mobility ion drift region, a switch/tee and a trapping region that allows the isolationmore » and accumulation of mobility-separated species. The operation and optimization of the SLIM switch/tee and trap are described and demonstrated for the enrichment of the low abundance ions. Lastly, we observed a linear increase in ion intensity with the number of trapping/accumulation events using the SLIM trap, illustrating its potential for enhancing the sensitivity of low abundance or targeted species.« less

  10. Mobility-Selected Ion Trapping and Enrichment Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Zhang, Xing; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Deng, Liulin; Karnesky, William E.; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-11

    The integration of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with mass spectrometry (MS) and the ability to trap ions in IMS-MS measurements is of great importance for performing reactions, accumulating ions, and increasing analytical measurement sensitivity. The development of Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) offers the potential for ion manipulations in a more reliable and cost-effective manner, while opening opportunities for much more complex sequences of manipulations. Here, we demonstrate an ion separation and trapping module and a method based upon SLIM that consists of a linear mobility ion drift region, a switch/tee and a trapping region that allows the isolation and accumulation of mobility-separated species. The operation and optimization of the SLIM switch/tee and trap are described and demonstrated for the enrichment of the low abundance ions. Lastly, we observed a linear increase in ion intensity with the number of trapping/accumulation events using the SLIM trap, illustrating its potential for enhancing the sensitivity of low abundance or targeted species.

  11. Structural, Bioinformatic, and In Vivo Analyses of Two Treponema pallidum Lipoproteins Reveal a Unique TRAP Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-05-25

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP), and tp0958 (the symporter), are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of 'tetratricopeptide repeat' (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPATs (TPR-protein-associated TRAP-Ts) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s).

  12. Structural, bioinformatic, and in vivo analyses of two Treponema pallidum lipoproteins reveal a unique TRAP transporter

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP- independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP) and tp0958 (the symporter) are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of “tetratricopeptide repeat” (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPR-protein associated TRAP transporters (TPATs) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s). PMID:22306465

  13. Simulations of octupole compensation of head-tail instability at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Meiqin Xiao; Tanaji Sen; Frank Schmidts

    2003-05-28

    The proton lifetime in the Tevatron depends sensitively on chromaticities. Too low chromaticities can make the beam unstable due to the weak head-tail instability. One way to compensate this effect is to introduce octupoles to create a larger amplitude dependent betatron tune spread. However, the use of octupoles will also introduce additional side effects such as second order chromaticity, differential tune shifts and chromaticities on both proton and anti-proton helices. The non-linear effects may also reduce the dynamic aperture. There are 67 octupoles in 4 different circuits in the Tevatron which may be used for this purpose. We report on a simulation study to find the best combinations of polarities and strengths of the octupoles.

  14. Description of nuclear octupole and quadrupole deformation close to axial symmetry: Octupole vibrations in the X(5) nuclei Nd150 and Sm152

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzeti, P. G.; Bizzeti-Sona, A. M.

    2010-03-01

    The model, introduced in a previous paper, for the description of the octupole and quadrupole degrees of freedom in conditions close to the axial symmetry is used to describe the negative-parity band based on the first octupole vibrational state in nuclei close to the critical point of the U(5)-to-SU(3) phase transition. The situation of Nd150 and Sm152 is discussed in detail. The positive-parity levels of these nuclei, and also the in-band E2 transitions, are reasonably accounted for by the X(5) model. With simple assumptions on the nature of the octupole vibrations, it is also possible to describe the negative-parity sector with comparable accuracy without changing the description of the positive-parity part.

  15. Influence of the octupole mode on nuclear high-K isomeric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkov, Nikolay; Walker, Phil

    2014-05-01

    The influence of quadrupole-octupole deformations on the energy and magnetic properties of high-K isomeric states in even-even actinide (U, Pu, Cm, Fm, No), rare-earth (Nd, Sm and Gd), and superheavy (^{270}\\text{Ds}) nuclei is examined within a deformed shell model with pairing interaction. The neutron two-quasiparticle (2qp) isomeric energies and magnetic dipole moments are calculated over a wide range in the plane of quadrupole and octupole deformations. In most cases the magnetic moments exhibit a pronounced sensitivity to the octupole deformation. At the same time, the calculations outline three different groups of nuclei: with pronounced, shallow, and missing minima in the 2qp energy surfaces with respect to the octupole deformation. The result indicates regions of nuclei with octupole softness as well as with possible octupole deformation in the high-K isomeric states. These findings show the need for further theoretical analysis as well as of detailed experimental measurements of magnetic moments in heavy deformed nuclei.

  16. Structural insights into trapping and dissociation of small molecules in K⁺ channels.

    PubMed

    Linder, Tobias; Saxena, Priyanka; Timin, Eugen; Hering, Steffen; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna

    2014-11-24

    K(+) channels play a critical role in numerous physiological and pathophysiological processes rendering them an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. However, the hERG K(+) channel poses a special challenge in drug discovery, since block of this channel by a plethora of diverse chemical entities can lead to long QT syndrome and sudden death. Of particular interest is the so-called trapping phenomenon, characterized by capture of a drug behind closed channel gates, which harbors an increased pro-arrhythmic risk. In this study we investigated the influence of trapped blockers on the gating dynamics and probed the state dependence of dissociation in K(+) channels by making use of the quaternary tetrabutylammonium. By applying essential dynamics simulations and two-electrode voltage clamp we obtained detailed insights into the dynamics of trapping in KcsA and hERG. Our simulations suggest that the trapped TBA influences the F656 flexibility during gate closure. Based on these findings, we provide a structural hypothesis for drug trapping. Further our simulations reveal the extent of gate opening necessary for drug dissociation.

  17. Dynamic interfacial trapping of flexural waves in structured plates

    PubMed Central

    Craster, R. V.; Movchan, A. B.; Movchan, N. V.; Jones, I. S.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents new results on the localization and transmission of flexural waves in a structured plate containing a semi-infinite two-dimensional array of rigid pins. In particular, localized waves are identified and studied at the interface boundary between the homogeneous part of the flexural plate and the part occupied by rigid pins. A formal connection has been made with the dispersion properties of flexural Bloch waves in an infinite doubly periodic array of rigid pins. Special attention is given to regimes corresponding to standing waves of different types as well as Dirac-like points that may occur on the dispersion surfaces. A single half-grating problem, hitherto unreported in the literature, is also shown to bring interesting solutions. PMID:27118892

  18. Structural evolution of the Permian-Triassic Cooper basin, Australia: Relation to hydrocarbon trap styles

    SciTech Connect

    Apak, S.N.; Stuart, W.J.; Lemon, N.M.; Wood, G.

    1997-04-01

    The structural and depositional history of the Cooper basin in eastern central Australia has revealed that the basin is a mildly compressional structural depression controlled by northwestrending and northeast-trending pre-Permian basement features. Pronounced pre-Permian compressions are indicated by northeast-trending major structures, the Gidgealpa-Merrimelia-Innamincka and Murteree-Nappacoongee trends. Detailed chronostratigraphic facies analysis, with closely spaced palynological control, of the Patchawarra Formation revealed that two pronounced phases of uplift occurred during the Sakmarian. The major intrabasin highs were rejuvenated during these tectonic events, as documented by crestal unconformities (middle and upper Patchawarra unconformities). Evidence of each event is dominantly tectonic in character, with similar depositional patterns over these highs related to each event. These events are also recognizable in midflank areas and basin margins with contemporaneous deposition in deeper parts of the basin. Results from this research show potential for future hydrocarbon discoveries within structural, stratigraphic, and structural/stratigraphic traps in the Cooper basin. Various trap styles are closely associated with faults, unconformities, and lateral facies changes. Lowside fault closures, onlap plays, and unconformity traps are expected to be well developed along intrabasinal highs, basin margins, and preexisting structures. The primary reservoir targets would be deltaic sequences comprising shoreline sandstones, distributary and delta-mouth bar deposits that may be well developed in synclinal areas, and flanks of intrabasin highs in the Copper basin.

  19. Disulfide Trapping for Modeling and Structure Determination of Receptor:Chemokine Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Holden, Lauren G.; Qin, Ling; Zheng, Yi; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent breakthrough advances in GPCR crystallography, structure determination of protein-protein complexes involving chemokine receptors and their endogenous chemokine ligands remains challenging. Here we describe disulfide trapping, a methodology for generating irreversible covalent binary protein complexes from unbound protein partners by introducing two cysteine residues, one per interaction partner, at selected positions within their interaction interface. Disulfide trapping can serve at least two distinct purposes: (i) stabilization of the complex to assist structural studies, and/or (ii) determination of pairwise residue proximities to guide molecular modeling. Methods for characterization of disulfide-trapped complexes are described and evaluated in terms of throughput, sensitivity, and specificity towards the most energetically favorable cross-links. Due to abundance of native disulfide bonds at receptor:chemokine interfaces, disulfide trapping of their complexes can be associated with intramolecular disulfide shuffling and result in misfolding of the component proteins; because of this, evidence from several experiments is typically needed to firmly establish a positive disulfide crosslink. An optimal pipeline that maximizes throughput and minimizes time and costs by early triage of unsuccessful candidate constructs is proposed. PMID:26921956

  20. Cambrian-Ordovician Knox production in Ohio: Three case studies of structural-stratigraphic traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, R.A.; Wicks, J.; Thomas, Joan

    2002-01-01

    The Knox Dolomite (Cambrian-Ordovician) in Ohio consists of a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sequence deposited in a tidal-flat to shallow-marine environment along a broad continental shelf. Knox hydrocarbon production occurs in porous sandstone and dolomite reservoirs in the Copper Ridge dolomite, Rose Run sandstone, and Beekmantown dolomite. In Ohio, historical Knox exploration and development have been focused on paleogeomorphic traps within the prolific Morrow Consolidated field, and more recently, within and adjacent to the Rose Run subcrop. Although these paleogeomorphic traps have yielded significant Knox production, structural and stratigraphic traps are being largely ignored. Three Knox-producing pools demonstrate structural and stratigraphic traps: the Birmingham-Erie pool in southern Erie and southwestern Lorain counties, the South Canaan pool in northern Wayne County, and the East Randolph pool in south-central Portage County. Enhanced porosity and permeability from fractures, as evident in the East Randolph pool, are also an underexplored mechanism for Knox hydrocarbon accumulation. An estimated 800 bcf of gas from undiscovered Knox resources makes the Knox one of the most attractive plays in the Appalachian basin.

  1. Hole Trapping in Thermal Oxides Grown under Various Oxidation Conditions Using Avalanche Injection in Poly-Silicon Gate Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Hole Trapping in Thermal Oxides Grown under Vaious Oxidation Conditions Using Avalanche Injection in Poly-Silicon Gate Structures Contractor... Avalanche In ection in Poly-Silicon Gate Structureac 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) K.V. Anand, B.R. Cairns, R.J. Strain 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME...Trapping, Oxidation Conditions, Avalanche Injection, Poly-Silicon Gates, Oxide Traps 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse If necenry W Identify by block

  2. An ingenious replica templated from the light trapping structure in butterfly wing scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhiwu; Niu, Shichao; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Junqiu; Yin, Wei; Ren, Luquan

    2013-08-01

    Although the physical mechanism of light trapping property of butterfly wings is well understood, it remains a challenge to create artificial replicas of these natural functional structures. Here, we synthesized a SiO2 inverse replica of a light trapping structure in butterfly wing scales using a method combining a sol-gel process and subsequent selective etching. First, the reflectance spectrum was taken to measure the reflectivity. Then, FESEM and TEM were used to observe the coupling structure of scales and the replicas. Afterwards, assisted by SEM and TEM data, 3D optimized models of the structures and fabrication process were generated by software. Finally, the parametric comparisons of the morphologies and structures between the original template and the inverse SiO2 replica were carefully conducted, and it was found that the original structures of bio-templates were well inherited by the structures of the inverse replica. This work would open up possibilities for an extensive study of mimicking novel bio-inspired functional materials, and the reported biomimetic technique confirms the feasibility of extending the functional structures in butterfly wings to particular optical devices in the field of space exploration, space equipment, photoelectrical devices and photo-induced sensors.Although the physical mechanism of light trapping property of butterfly wings is well understood, it remains a challenge to create artificial replicas of these natural functional structures. Here, we synthesized a SiO2 inverse replica of a light trapping structure in butterfly wing scales using a method combining a sol-gel process and subsequent selective etching. First, the reflectance spectrum was taken to measure the reflectivity. Then, FESEM and TEM were used to observe the coupling structure of scales and the replicas. Afterwards, assisted by SEM and TEM data, 3D optimized models of the structures and fabrication process were generated by software. Finally, the parametric

  3. Quantitative analysis of seismic trapped waves in the rupture zone of the Landers, 1992, California earthquake: Evidence for a shallow trapping structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Michael, A. J.; Zhu, L.

    2002-12-01

    Waveform modeling of seismic fault zone (FZ) trapped waves has been claimed to provide a high resolution imaging of FZ structure at seismogenic depth. We analyze quantitatively a waveform data set generated by 238 Landers aftershocks recorded by a portable seismic array (Lee, 1999). The array consists of 33 three-component L-22 seismometers, 22 of which on a line crossing the surface rupture zone of the mainshock. A subset of 93 aftershocks were also recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network, while the other events were recorded only by the FZ array. We locate the latter subset of events with a "grid-search relocation method" using accurately picked P and S arrival times, a half-space velocity model, and back-azimuth adjustment to correct the effect of low velocity FZ material on phase arrivals. Next we determine the quality of FZ trapped wave generation from the ratio of trapped waves to S-wave energy for stations relatively close to and far from the FZ. Energy ratios exceeding 4, between 2 and 4, and less than 2, are assigned quality A, B, and C of trapped wave generation. We find that about 70% of nearby events with S-P time less than 2 sec, including many clearly off the fault, generate FZ trapped waves with quality A or B. This distribution is in marked contrast with previous claims that trapped waves at Landers are generated only by sources close to or inside the fault zone (Li et al., 1994, 2000). The existence of trapped waves due to sources outside the Landers rupture zone indicates that the generating structure is shallow, as demonstrated in recent 3D calculations of wave propagation in irregular FZ structures (Fohrmann et al., 2002). The time difference between the S arrivals and trapped wave group does not grow systematically with increasing source-receiver distance along the fault, in agreement with the above conclusion. The dispersion of trapped waves at Landers is rather weak, again suggesting a short propagation distance inside the low

  4. The structure of the ribosome with elongation factor G trapped in the post-translocational state

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yong-Gui; Selmer, Maria; Dunham, Christine M.; Weixlbaumer, Albert; Kelley, Ann C.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2013-01-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) is a GTPase that plays a crucial role in the translocation of tRNAs and mRNA during translation by the ribosome. We report a crystal structure refined to 3.6 Å resolution of the ribosome trapped with EF-G in the post-translocational state using the antibiotic fusidic acid. Fusidic acid traps EF-G in a conformation intermediate between the GTP and GDP forms. The interaction of EF-G with ribosomal elements implicated in stimulating catalysis, such as the L10-L12 stalk and the L11 region, and of domain IV of EF-G with P-site tRNA and mRNA shed light on various aspects of EF-G function in catalysis and translocation. The stabilization of the mobile stalks of the ribosome also results in a more complete description of its structure. PMID:19833919

  5. Comparison between periodic and stochastic parabolic light trapping structures for thin-film microcrystalline Silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, M; Battaglia, C; Forberich, K; Bläsi, B; Sahraei, N; Aberle, A G

    2012-12-31

    Light trapping is of very high importance for silicon photovoltaics (PV) and especially for thin-film silicon solar cells. In this paper we investigate and compare theoretically the light trapping properties of periodic and stochastic structures having similar geometrical features. The theoretical investigations are based on the actual surface geometry of a scattering structure, characterized by an atomic force microscope. This structure is used for light trapping in thin-film microcrystalline silicon solar cells. Very good agreement is found in a first comparison between simulation and experimental results. The geometrical parameters of the stochastic structure are varied and it is found that the light trapping mainly depends on the aspect ratio (length/height). Furthermore, the maximum possible light trapping with this kind of stochastic structure geometry is investigated. In a second step, the stochastic structure is analysed and typical geometrical features are extracted, which are then arranged in a periodic structure. Investigating the light trapping properties of the periodic structure, we find that it performs very similar to the stochastic structure, in agreement with reports in literature. From the obtained results we conclude that a potential advantage of periodic structures for PV applications will very likely not be found in the absorption enhancement in the solar cell material. However, uniformity and higher definition in production of these structures can lead to potential improvements concerning electrical characteristics and parasitic absorption, e.g. in a back reflector.

  6. Micromachined Dust Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H.; Bradley, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromachined traps devised to capture dust particles for analysis without contaminating them. Based on micromachined structures retaining particles, rather than adhesives or greases interfering with scanning-electron-microscope analysis or x-ray imaging. Unlike maze traps and traps enmeshing particles in steel wool or similar materials, micromachined traps do not obscure trapped particles. Internal geometries of traps range from simple cones to U-shapes, all formed by etching silicon.

  7. Search for stable octupole deformation in the nucleus /sup 225/Fr

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.G.; Kurcewicz, W.; Loevhoeiden, G.; Nyboe, K.; Thorsteinsen, T.F.; Gietz, H.; Kaffrell, N.; Rogowski, J.; Naumann, R.A.; Borge, M.J.G.; and others

    1987-12-10

    The level structure of /sup 225/Fr has been studied from the /sup 225/Rn(..beta../sup -/) decay in on-line experiments at the ISOLDE facility. A level scheme was constructed on the basis of gamma--gamma coincidence data, and the multipolarities of many transitions were established by conversion electron measurements. Levels in /sup 225/Fr were also studied with the /sup 226/Ra(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 225/Fr reaction at the McMaster University Accelerator Laboratory, using a target of /sup 226/Ra(T/sub 1/2/ = 1600y) and a magnetic spectrograph to analyze the alpha spectra. The first three excited states, at 28.5, 82.5 and 128.2 keV, are interpreted as rotational band members based on the ground state, which is known to have I = 3/2. The (t,..cap alpha..) strengths to these levels indicate a 3/2/sup -/(532) assignment to the ground state. No evidence for an octupole deformation in /sup 225/Fr has been found so far, although analysis of data for other excited states is continuing.

  8. Search for the two-phonon octupole vibrational state in {sup 208}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, D.J.; Henning, W.; Janssens, R.V.F.

    1995-08-01

    We performed an experiment to search for the two-phonon octupole vibrational state in {sup 208}Pb. Thick targets of {sup 208}Pb, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 58,64}Ni, and {sup 160}Gd were bombarded with 1305 MeV beams of were bombard {sup 208}Pb supplied by ATLAS. Gamma rays were detected using the Argonne-Notre Dame BGO gamma-ray facility, consisting of 12 Compton-suppressed germanium detectors surrounding an array of 50 BGO scintillators. We identified some 30 known gamma rays from {sup 208}Pb in the spectra gated by the 5{sup -} {yields} 3{sup -} and 3{sup -} {yields} 0{sup +} transitions in {sup 208}Pb. In addition, after unfolding these spectra for Compton response, we observed broad coincident structures in the energy region expected for the 2-phonon states. Furthermore, we confirmed the placement of a 2485 keV line observed previously in {sup 207}Pb and find no evidence consistent with the placement of this line in {sup 208}Pb. We are currently in the process of investigating the origin of the broadened lines observed in the spectra, extracting the excitation probability of states in {sup 208}Pb, and determining the relative probability of mutual excitation and neutron transfer in this reaction. An additional experiment is also being performed to collect much higher statistics germanium-germanium coincidence data for the thick {sup 208}Pb target.

  9. Periodic dielectric structures for light-trapping in InGaAs/GaAs quantum well solar cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Sam; Mokkapati, Sudha; Jolley, Greg; Fu, Lan; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-05-06

    We study dielectric diffraction gratings for light-trapping in quantum well solar cells and compare their performance with plasmonic and Lambertian light-trapping structures. The optimum structural parameters are identified for symmetric uni-periodic, symmetric bi-periodic and asymmetric bi-periodic gratings. The enhancement in short-circuit current density from the quantum well region with respect to a reference cell with no diffraction grating is calculated. The ratio of this enhancement to the maximum achievable enhancement (i.e. no transmission losses) is 33%, 75% and 74%, respectively for these structures. The optimum asymmetric and symmetric bi-periodic structures perform closest to Lambertian light-trapping, while all three optimum grating structures outperform optimum plasmonic light-trapping. We show that the short-circuit current density from the quantum well region is further enhanced by incorporating a rear reflector.

  10. Fabrication of the replica templated from butterfly wing scales with complex light trapping structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhiwu; Li, Bo; Mu, Zhengzhi; Yang, Meng; Niu, Shichao; Zhang, Junqiu; Ren, Luquan

    2015-11-01

    The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) positive replica templated twice from the excellent light trapping surface of butterfly Trogonoptera brookiana wing scales was fabricated by a simple and promising route. The exact SiO2 negative replica was fabricated by using a synthesis method combining a sol-gel process and subsequent selective etching. Afterwards, a vacuum-aided process was introduced to make PDMS gel fill into the SiO2 negative replica, and the PDMS gel was solidified in an oven. Then, the SiO2 negative replica was used as secondary template and the structures in its surface was transcribed onto the surface of PDMS. At last, the PDMS positive replica was obtained. After comparing the PDMS positive replica and the original bio-template in terms of morphology, dimensions and reflectance spectra and so on, it is evident that the excellent light trapping structures of butterfly wing scales were inherited by the PDMS positive replica faithfully. This bio-inspired route could facilitate the preparation of complex light trapping nanostructure surfaces without any assistance from other power-wasting and expensive nanofabrication technologies.

  11. Crustal seismic structure beneath the Deccan Traps area (Gujarat, India), from local travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Srichand; Kukarina, Ekaterina; Mishra, Santosh

    2016-03-01

    The Gujarat region in western India is known for its intra-plate seismic activity, including the Mw 7.7 Bhuj earthquake, a reverse-faulting event that reactivated normal faults of the Mesozoic Kachchh rift zone. The Late Cretaceous Deccan Traps, one of the largest igneous provinces on the Earth, cover the southern part of Gujarat. This study is aimed at bringing light to the crustal rift zone structure and likely origin of the Traps based on the velocity structure of the crust beneath Gujarat. Tomographic inversion of the Gujarat region was done using the non-linear, passive-source tomographic algorithm, LOTOS. We use high-quality arrival times of 22,280 P and 22,040 S waves from 3555 events recorded from August 2006 to May 2011 at 83 permanent and temporary stations installed in Gujarat state by the Institute of Seismological Research (ISR). We conclude that the resulting high-velocity anomalies, which reach down to the Moho, are most likely related to intrusives associated with the Deccan Traps. Low velocity anomalies are found in sediment-filled Mesozoic rift basins and are related to weakened zones of faults and fracturing. A low-velocity anomaly in the north of the region coincides with the seismogenic zone of the reactivated Kachchh rift system, which is apparently associated with the channel of the outpouring of Deccan basalt.

  12. Tuning heat transport in trapped-ion chains across a structural phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, A.; Alonso, D.; Plenio, M. B.; del Campo, A.

    2014-06-01

    We analyze the heat transport in an ion chain that is confined in a strongly anisotropic Paul trap. To drive a heat current across the chain different pairs of counterpropagating laser beams are applied to the ions on the edges. The lasers behave as heat reservoirs operating at different temperatures, and a nonequilibrium heat flow can be sustained. The control of the spatial distribution of the ions in the chain by variation of the trapping frequencies makes ion chains an ideal testbed to study heat transport properties in finite open systems of low dimensionality with tunable nonlinearities. We explore heat transport across a structural phase transition between the linear and zigzag configurations, identifying the condition for optimal heat transport.

  13. Microscopic description of collective states near the yrast line of nuclei with stable octupole deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvasil, J.; Nazmitdinov, R. G.

    1985-06-01

    Collective states near the yrast line in nuclei with stable octupole deformation are discussed in the framework of the random phase approximation (RPA) based on the cranking model. These vibrational states are characterized by the quantum number of generalized signature (eigenvalue of the operator Sx = PRx-1( π)). In the zero-octupole deformation limit the RPA equations of motion are reduced to the well-known ones characterized by both values of parity and signature, respectively. The connection of the translational and rotational symmetry of the model hamiltonian with the spurious solutions of the RPA equation of motion is discussed. Expressions for the reduced probabilities B(E1), B(E2) and B(E3) are obtained. These expressions confirm the conclusions of phenomenological models for the strong E1 and E3 intraband transitions in nuclei with stable octupole deformation.

  14. Nuclear collective motion with a coherent coupling interaction between quadrupole and octupole modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkov, N.; Yotov, P.; Drenska, S.; Scheid, W.; Bonatsos, D.; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D.

    2006-04-01

    A collective Hamiltonian for the rotation-vibration motion of nuclei is considered in which the axial quadrupole and octupole degrees of freedom are coupled through the centrifugal interaction. The potential of the system depends on the two deformation variables β2 and β3. The system is considered to oscillate between positive and negative β3 values by rounding an infinite potential core in the (β2,β3) plane with β2>0. By assuming a coherent contribution of the quadrupole and octupole oscillation modes in the collective motion, the energy spectrum is derived in an explicit analytic form, providing specific parity shift effects. On this basis several possible ways in the evolution of quadrupole-octupole collectivity are outlined. A particular application of the model to the energy levels and electric transition probabilities in alternating parity spectra of the nuclei Nd150, Sm152, Gd154, and Dy156 is presented.

  15. Multiple trapping on a comb structure as a model of electron transport in disordered nanostructured semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sibatov, R. T. Morozova, E. V.

    2015-05-15

    A model of dispersive transport in disordered nanostructured semiconductors has been proposed taking into account the percolation structure of a sample and joint action of several mechanisms. Topological and energy disorders have been simultaneously taken into account within the multiple trapping model on a comb structure modeling the percolation character of trajectories. The joint action of several mechanisms has been described within random walks with a mixture of waiting time distributions. Integral transport equations with fractional derivatives have been obtained for an arbitrary density of localized states. The kinetics of the transient current has been calculated within the proposed new model in order to analyze time-of-flight experiments for nanostructured semiconductors.

  16. Structure and biomechanics of trapping flower trichomes and their role in the pollination biology of Aristolochia plants (Aristolochiaceae).

    PubMed

    Oelschlägel, Birgit; Gorb, Stanislav; Wanke, Stefan; Neinhuis, Christoph

    2009-12-01

    *Catching insects to ensure pollination is one of the most elaborate and specialized mechanisms of insect-plant interactions. Phylogenetically, Aristolochiaceae represent the first angiosperm lineage that developed trap flowers. Here we report the structure and function of specific trichomes contributing to the highly specialized trapping devices. *Investigations were carried out on six Mediterranean Aristolochia species. The morphology and arrangement of the trapping trichomes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cryo-SEM. To demonstrate frictional anisotropy of the trapping trichome array, a microtribological approach was used. *The results of our experiments support a hypothesis long proposed, but never tested, regarding the trapping mechanism in proterogynous Aristolochia flowers: that an array of highly specialized trichomes arranged eccentrically to the underlying surface is responsible for the easy entrance of insects into flowers but impedes their escape. As they enter the male stage of anthesis, flowers significantly modify their inner surface characteristics, allowing insects to leave. *We have demonstrated the substantial contribution of trapping trichomes to the capture, retention and release of pollinators, an important prerequisite for making cross-pollination possible in most Aristolochia species. Finally, we compare trapping trichomes of Aristolochia with similar structures found in other trapping flowers as well as in pitchers of carnivorous plants not optimized for insect release.

  17. Building spatially-structured biofilms with single-cell control using laser trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodesney, Christopher; Hutchison, Jaime; Kaushik, Karishma; Le, Henry; Hurwitz, Daniel; Irie, Yasuhiko; Gordon, Vernita

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms are sessile communities of microbes adhered to each other and to an interface. Biofilm infections are notoriously difficult to eradicate, and this arises in part from phenotypic changes due to the spatial structure of the biofilm. Spatial structure controls the microenvironment and intercellular associations, which in turn controls gene expression, virulence, and antibiotic resistance. There are few tools available for elucidating the role of spatial structure in biofilms. We present a method for controlling the positions of bacteria on a surface using optical trapping without impinging cell viability. Initial positions propagate into the developing biofilm, creating spatial structure. The native growth, motility, and surface adhesion of positioned cells are preserved, as shown for model organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. We demonstrate statistically-significant effects of spatial structure on the growth of monoculture P. aeruginosa biofilms and for co-culture biofilms of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Because the laser trap we use is very basic and the other equipment required is inexpensive and standard, we believe that our technique will be a widely-usable tool for biological and physical collaborators at many types of institutions.

  18. Possible octupole deformation in Cs and Ba nuclei from their differential radii

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, R.K.; Jain, A.K.; Jain, K.

    1988-12-01

    The odd-even staggering of the differential radii of Fr and Ra and the Cs and Ba nuclei is compared. This staggering is inverted in the region of known octupole deformation in the Fr and Ra nuclei. The normal staggering is eliminated in the Cs nuclei and attenuated in the Ba nuclei for neutron numbers 85--88. This fact is used to suggest the possible existence of octupole deformation and its neutron number range in the Cs and Ba nuclear ground states.

  19. Specifications of the octupole magnets required for the ATF2 ultra-low ß* lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E.; Modena, M.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Tomas, R.; White, G.R.; /SLAC

    2014-05-28

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) aims to test the novel chromaticity correction for higher chromaticity lattices as the one of CLIC. To this end the ATF2 ultra-low ß* lattice is designed to vertically focus the beam at the focal point or usually referred to as interaction point (IP), down to 23 nm. However when the measured multipole components of the ATF2 magnets are considered in the simulations, the evaluated spot sizes at the IP are well above the design value. The designed spot size is effectively recovered by inserting a pair of octupole magnets. In this note we address the technical specifications required for these octupole magnets.

  20. Time-dependent Hartree-Fock Study of Octupole Vibrations in doubly magic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simenel, C.; Buete, J.; Vo-Phuoc, K.

    2016-09-01

    Octupole vibrations are studied in some doubly magic nuclei using the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory with a Skyrme energy density functional. Through the use of the linear response theory, the energies and transition amplitudes of the low-lying vibrational modes for each of the nuclei were determined. Energies were found to be close to experimental results. However, transition amplitudes, quantified by the deformation parameter β3, are underestimated by TDHF. A comparison with single-particle excitations on the Hartree-Fock ground-state shows that the collective octupole vibrations have their energy lowered due to attractive RPA residual interaction.

  1. Community structure and diversity of tropical forest mammals: data from a global camera trap network

    PubMed Central

    Ahumada, Jorge A.; Silva, Carlos E. F.; Gajapersad, Krisna; Hallam, Chris; Hurtado, Johanna; Martin, Emanuel; McWilliam, Alex; Mugerwa, Badru; O'Brien, Tim; Rovero, Francesco; Sheil, Douglas; Spironello, Wilson R.; Winarni, Nurul; Andelman, Sandy J.

    2011-01-01

    Terrestrial mammals are a key component of tropical forest communities as indicators of ecosystem health and providers of important ecosystem services. However, there is little quantitative information about how they change with local, regional and global threats. In this paper, the first standardized pantropical forest terrestrial mammal community study, we examine several aspects of terrestrial mammal species and community diversity (species richness, species diversity, evenness, dominance, functional diversity and community structure) at seven sites around the globe using a single standardized camera trapping methodology approach. The sites—located in Uganda, Tanzania, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Suriname, Brazil and Costa Rica—are surrounded by different landscape configurations, from continuous forests to highly fragmented forests. We obtained more than 51 000 images and detected 105 species of mammals with a total sampling effort of 12 687 camera trap days. We find that mammal communities from highly fragmented sites have lower species richness, species diversity, functional diversity and higher dominance when compared with sites in partially fragmented and continuous forest. We emphasize the importance of standardized camera trapping approaches for obtaining baselines for monitoring forest mammal communities so as to adequately understand the effect of global, regional and local threats and appropriately inform conservation actions. PMID:21844049

  2. Community structure and diversity of tropical forest mammals: data from a global camera trap network.

    PubMed

    Ahumada, Jorge A; Silva, Carlos E F; Gajapersad, Krisna; Hallam, Chris; Hurtado, Johanna; Martin, Emanuel; McWilliam, Alex; Mugerwa, Badru; O'Brien, Tim; Rovero, Francesco; Sheil, Douglas; Spironello, Wilson R; Winarni, Nurul; Andelman, Sandy J

    2011-09-27

    Terrestrial mammals are a key component of tropical forest communities as indicators of ecosystem health and providers of important ecosystem services. However, there is little quantitative information about how they change with local, regional and global threats. In this paper, the first standardized pantropical forest terrestrial mammal community study, we examine several aspects of terrestrial mammal species and community diversity (species richness, species diversity, evenness, dominance, functional diversity and community structure) at seven sites around the globe using a single standardized camera trapping methodology approach. The sites-located in Uganda, Tanzania, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Suriname, Brazil and Costa Rica-are surrounded by different landscape configurations, from continuous forests to highly fragmented forests. We obtained more than 51 000 images and detected 105 species of mammals with a total sampling effort of 12 687 camera trap days. We find that mammal communities from highly fragmented sites have lower species richness, species diversity, functional diversity and higher dominance when compared with sites in partially fragmented and continuous forest. We emphasize the importance of standardized camera trapping approaches for obtaining baselines for monitoring forest mammal communities so as to adequately understand the effect of global, regional and local threats and appropriately inform conservation actions.

  3. Structural properties of invasion percolation with and without trapping: Shortest path and distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzer, Stefan; Havlin, Shlomo; Bunde, Armin

    1999-03-01

    We study several structural properties including the shortest path l between two sites separated by a Euclidean distance r of invasion percolation with trapping (TIP) and without trapping (NIP). For the trapping case we find that the mass M scales with l as M~ldl with dl=1.510+/-0.005 and l scales with r as l~rdmin with dmin=1.213+/-0.005, whereas in the nontrapping case dl=1.671+/-0.006 and dmin=1.133+/-0.005. These values further support previous results that NIP and TIP are in distinct universality classes. We also study numerically using scaling approaches the distribution N(l,r) of the lengths of the shortest paths connecting two sites at distance r in NIP and TIP. We find that it obeys a scaling form N(l,r)~rdf-1-d minf(l/rdmin). The scaling function has a power-law tail for large x values, f(x)~x-h, with a universal value of h~2 for both models within our numerical accuracy.

  4. Depth-dependent structure of the Landers fault zone from trapped waves generated by aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Gang; Vidale, John E.; Aki, Keiiti; Xu, Fei

    2000-03-01

    We delineate the internal structure of the Johnson Valley and Kickapoo faults (Landers southern rupture) at seismogenic depth using fault zone trapped waves generated by aftershocks. Trapped waves recorded at the dense linear seismic arrays deployed across and along the surface breaks of the 1992 M7.5 Landers earthquake show large amplitudes and dispersive wave trains following the S waves. Group velocities of trapped waves measured from multiple band-pass-filtered seismograms for aftershocks occurring at different depths between 1.8 km and 8.2 km show an increase in velocity with depth. Velocities range from 1.9 km/s at 4 Hz to 2.6 km/s at 1 Hz for shallow events, while for deep events, velocities range from 2.3 km/s at 4 Hz to 3.1 km/s at 1 Hz. Coda-normalized amplitude spectra of trapped waves peak in amplitudes at 3-4 Hz for stations located close to the fault trace. The amplitude decays rapidly with the station offset from the fault zone. Normalized amplitudes also decrease with distance along the fault, giving an apparent Q of 30 for shallow events and 50 for deep events. We evaluated depth-dependent fault zone structure and its uncertainty from these measurements plus our previous results from near-surface explosion-excited trapped waves [Li et al., 1999] in a systematic model parameter-searching procedure using a three-dimensional (3-D) finite difference computer code [Graves, 1996]. Our best model of the Landers fault zone is 250 m wide at the surface, tapering to 100-150 m at 8.2 km depth. The shear velocity within the fault zone increases from 1.0 to 2.5 km/s and Q increases from 20 to 60 in this depth range. Fault zone shear velocities are reduced by 35 to 45% from those of the surrounding rock and also vary along the fault zone with an increase of ˜10% near ends of the southern rupture zone.

  5. Coulomb structures of charged macroparticles in static magnetic traps at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, M. M.; Petrov, O. F.; Statsenko, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    Electrically charged (up to 107 e) macroscopic superconducting particles with sizes in the micrometer range confined in a static magnetic trap in liquid nitrogen and in nitrogen vapor at temperatures of 77-91 K are observed experimentally. The macroparticles with sizes up to 60 μm levitate in a nonuniform static magnetic field B ~ 2500 G. The formation of strongly correlated structures comprising as many as ~103 particles is reported. The average particle distance in these structures amounts to 475 μm. The coupling parameter and the Lindemann parameter of these structures are estimated to be ~107 and ~0.03, respectively, which is characteristic of strongly correlated crystalline or glasslike structures.

  6. Effect of interface traps parameters on admittance characteristics of the MIS (metal-insulator-semiconductor) tunnel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasiński, Jakub; Mazurak, Andrzej; Majkusiak, Bogdan

    2016-12-01

    Interface traps density (Nit) and gate insulator thickness (tox) impact on MIS tunnel structure electrical characteristics is discussed in respect to bias voltage range corresponding to inversion in the semiconductor substrate region. Effect of Nit and tox on equilibrium and non-equilibrium operation regime of the device is presented. Different models of the small-signal response of interface traps are proposed and discussed in respect to several phenomena related to the traps charging and discharging processes. Presented analysis was performed for the MIS structures with the gate dielectric made of silicon dioxide (SiO2) and hafnium oxide (HfOx). The obtained results proved that the surface density of interface traps (Nit) and the insulator thickness (tox) have correlated impact on the transition between equilibrium and non-equilibrium operation of the MIS tunnel structures.

  7. Plasmonic light trapping in an ultrathin photovoltaic layer with film-coupled metamaterial structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Liping

    2015-02-01

    A film-coupled metamaterial structure is numerically investigated for enhancing the light absorption in an ultrathin photovoltaic layer of crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs). The top subwavelength concave grating and the bottom metallic film could not only effectively trap light with the help of wave interference and magnetic resonance effects excited above the bandgap, but also practically serve as electrical contacts for photon-generated charge collection. The energy absorbed by the active layer is greatly enhanced with the help of the film-coupled metamaterial structure, resulting in significant improvement on the short-circuit current density by three times over a free-standing GaAs layer at the same thickness. The performance of the proposed light trapping structure is demonstrated to be little affected by the grating ridge width considering the geometric tolerance during fabrication. The optical absorption at oblique incidences also shows direction-insensitive behavior, which is highly desired for efficiently converting off-normal sunlight to electricity. The results would facilitate the development of next-generation ultrathin solar cells with lower cost and higher efficiency.

  8. Plasmonic light trapping in an ultrathin photovoltaic layer with film-coupled metamaterial structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Liping

    2015-02-15

    A film-coupled metamaterial structure is numerically investigated for enhancing the light absorption in an ultrathin photovoltaic layer of crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs). The top subwavelength concave grating and the bottom metallic film could not only effectively trap light with the help of wave interference and magnetic resonance effects excited above the bandgap, but also practically serve as electrical contacts for photon-generated charge collection. The energy absorbed by the active layer is greatly enhanced with the help of the film-coupled metamaterial structure, resulting in significant improvement on the short-circuit current density by three times over a free-standing GaAs layer at the same thickness. The performance of the proposed light trapping structure is demonstrated to be little affected by the grating ridge width considering the geometric tolerance during fabrication. The optical absorption at oblique incidences also shows direction-insensitive behavior, which is highly desired for efficiently converting off-normal sunlight to electricity. The results would facilitate the development of next-generation ultrathin solar cells with lower cost and higher efficiency.

  9. Escherichia coli and Candida albicans Induced Macrophage Extracellular Trap-Like Structures with Limited Microbicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chengshui; Liu, Xiaolei; Du, Jing; Shi, Haining; Wang, Xuelin; Bai, Xue; Peng, Peng; Yu, Lu; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Mingyuan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of extracellular traps (ETs) has recently been recognized as a novel defense mechanism in several types of innate immune cells. It has been suggested that these structures are toxic to microbes and contribute significantly to killing several pathogens. However, the role of ETs formed by macrophages (METs) in defense against microbes remains little known. In this study, we demonstrated that a subset of murine J774A.1 macrophage cell line (8% to 17%) and peritoneal macrophages (8.5% to 15%) form METs-like structures (METs-LS) in response to Escherichia coli and Candida albicans challenge. We found only a portion of murine METs-LS, which are released by dying macrophages, showed detectable killing effects on trapped E. coli but not C. albicans. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that, in vitro, both microorganisms were entrapped in J774A.1 METs-LS composed of DNA and microbicidal proteins such as histone, myeloperoxidase and lysozyme. DNA components of both nucleus and mitochondrion origins were detectable in these structures. Additionally, METs-LS formation occurred independently of ROS produced by NADPH oxidase, and this process did not result in cell lysis. In summary, our results emphasized that microbes induced METs-LS in murine macrophage cells and that the microbicidal activity of these METs-LS differs greatly. We propose the function of METs-LS is to contain invading microbes at the infection site, thereby preventing the systemic diffusion of them, rather than significantly killing them. PMID:24587206

  10. Entropy-driven structural transition and kinetic trapping in formamidinium lead iodide perovskite

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianran; Foley, Benjamin J.; Park, Changwon; Brown, Craig M.; Harriger, Leland W.; Lee, Jooseop; Ruff, Jacob; Yoon, Mina; Choi, Joshua J.; Lee, Seung-Hun

    2016-01-01

    A challenge of hybrid perovskite solar cells is device instability, which calls for an understanding of the perovskite structural stability and phase transitions. Using neutron diffraction and first-principles calculations on formamidinium lead iodide (FAPbI3), we show that the entropy contribution to the Gibbs free energy caused by isotropic rotations of the FA+ cation plays a crucial role in the cubic-to-hexagonal structural phase transition. Furthermore, we observe that the cubic-to-hexagonal phase transition exhibits a large thermal hysteresis. Our first-principles calculations confirm the existence of a potential barrier between the cubic and hexagonal structures, which provides an explanation for the observed thermal hysteresis. By exploiting the potential barrier, we demonstrate kinetic trapping of the cubic phase, desirable for solar cells, even at 8.2 K by thermal quenching. PMID:27819055

  11. Entropy-driven structural transition and kinetic trapping in formamidinium lead iodide perovskite.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianran; Foley, Benjamin J; Park, Changwon; Brown, Craig M; Harriger, Leland W; Lee, Jooseop; Ruff, Jacob; Yoon, Mina; Choi, Joshua J; Lee, Seung-Hun

    2016-10-01

    A challenge of hybrid perovskite solar cells is device instability, which calls for an understanding of the perovskite structural stability and phase transitions. Using neutron diffraction and first-principles calculations on formamidinium lead iodide (FAPbI3), we show that the entropy contribution to the Gibbs free energy caused by isotropic rotations of the FA(+) cation plays a crucial role in the cubic-to-hexagonal structural phase transition. Furthermore, we observe that the cubic-to-hexagonal phase transition exhibits a large thermal hysteresis. Our first-principles calculations confirm the existence of a potential barrier between the cubic and hexagonal structures, which provides an explanation for the observed thermal hysteresis. By exploiting the potential barrier, we demonstrate kinetic trapping of the cubic phase, desirable for solar cells, even at 8.2 K by thermal quenching.

  12. Structure of the transporter associated with antigen processing trapped by herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Michael L; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Chen, Jue

    2016-12-09

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter essential to cellular immunity against viral infection. Some persistent viruses have evolved strategies to inhibit TAP so that they may go undetected by the immune system. The herpes simplex virus for example evades immune surveillance by blocking peptide transport with a small viral protein ICP47. In this study, we determined the structure of human TAP bound to ICP47 by electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) to 4.0 Å. The structure shows that ICP47 traps TAP in an inactive conformation distinct from the normal transport cycle. The specificity and potency of ICP47 inhibition result from contacts between the tip of the helical hairpin and the apex of the transmembrane cavity. This work provides a clear molecular description of immune evasion by a persistent virus. It also establishes the molecular structure of TAP to facilitate mechanistic studies of the antigen presentation process.

  13. Phonon-coupled trap-assisted charge injection in metal-nitride-oxide-silicon/silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasyrov, K. A.; Shaimeev, S. S.; Gritsenko, V. A.; Han, J. H.

    2009-06-01

    A phonon-coupled trap model is proposed for trap-assisted injection mechanism in silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS)/metal-nitride-oxide-silicon (MNOS) structures at low voltages. On the basis of this model, a theory of charge injection in SONOS/MNOS has been developed. Charge injection experimental data was fitted by this theory. Obtained trap parameters are close to those previously reported [K. A. Nasyrov et al., J. Appl. Phys. 96, 4293 (2004)], where the current dependence on temperature and electric field was investigated in MNOS.

  14. Electron trapping in evolving coronal structures during a large gradual hard X-ray/radio burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruggmann, G.; Vilmer, N.; Klein, K.-L.; Kane, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    Gradual hard X-ray/radio bursts are characterized by their long duration, smooth time profile, time delays between peaks at different hard X-ray energies and microwaves, and radiation from extended sources in the low and middle corona. Their characteristic properties have been ascribed to the dynamic evolution of the accelerated electrons in coronal magnetic traps or to the separate acceleration of high-energy electrons in a 'second step' process. The information available so far was drawn from quality considerations of time profiles or even only from the common occurrence of emissions in different spectral ranges. This paper presents model computations of the temporal evolution of hard X-ray and microwave spectra, together with a qualitative discussion of radio lightcurves over a wide spectral range, and metric imaging observations. The basis hypothesis investigated is that the peculiar 'gradual' features can be related to the dynamical evolution of electrons injected over an extended time interval in a coronal trap, with electrons up to relativistic energies being injected simultaneously. The analyzed event (26 April. 1981) is particularly challenging to this hypothesis because of the long time delays between peaks at different X-ray energies and microwave frequencies. The observations are shown to be consistent with the hypothesis, provided that the electrons lose their energy by Coulomb collisions and possibly betatron deceleration. The access of the electrons to different coronal structures varies in the course of the event. The evolution and likely destabilization of part of the coronal plasma-magnetic field configuration is of crucial influence in determining the access to these structures and possibly the dynamical evolution of the trapped electrons through betatron deceleration in the late phase of the event.

  15. Direct evidence of octupole deformation in neutron-rich 144Ba

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, B.; Zhu, S.; Wu, C. Y.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Cline, D.; Hayes, A. B.; Albers, M.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Butler, P. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Clark, J.; Crawford, H. L.; Cromaz, M.; David, H. M.; Gregor, E. T.; Kondev, F. G.; Harker, J.; Hoffman, C. R.; Kay, B. P.; Korichi, A.; Lauritsen, T.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Pardo, R. C.; Richard, A.; Riley, M. A.; Savard, G.; Scheck, M.; Seweryniak, D.; Smith, M. K.; Wiens, A.; Vondrasek, R.

    2016-03-17

    Here, the neutron-rich nucleus 144Ba (t1/2 = 11.5 s) is expected to exhibit some of the strongest octupole correlations among nuclei with mass numbers A less than 200. Until now, indirect evidence for such strong correlations has been inferred from observations such as enhanced E1 transitions and interleaving positive- and negative-parity levels in the ground-state band. In this experiment, the octupole strength was measured directly by sub-barrier, multistep Coulomb excitation of a post-accelerated 650-MeV 144Ba beam on a 1.0–mg/cm2 208Pb target. The measured value of the matrix element, < 31–∥M(E3)∥01+ >= 0.65(+17–23) eb3/2, corresponds to a reduced B(E3) transition probability of 48(+25–34) W.u. This result represents an unambiguous determination of the octupole collectivity, is larger than any available theoretical prediction, and is consistent with octupole deformation.

  16. Direct evidence of octupole deformation in neutron-rich 144Ba

    DOE PAGES

    Bucher, B.; Zhu, S.; Wu, C. Y.; ...

    2016-03-17

    Here, the neutron-rich nucleus 144Ba (t1/2 = 11.5 s) is expected to exhibit some of the strongest octupole correlations among nuclei with mass numbers A less than 200. Until now, indirect evidence for such strong correlations has been inferred from observations such as enhanced E1 transitions and interleaving positive- and negative-parity levels in the ground-state band. In this experiment, the octupole strength was measured directly by sub-barrier, multistep Coulomb excitation of a post-accelerated 650-MeV 144Ba beam on a 1.0–mg/cm2 208Pb target. The measured value of the matrix element, < 31–∥M(E3)∥01+ >= 0.65(+17–23) eb3/2, corresponds to a reduced B(E3) transition probabilitymore » of 48(+25–34) W.u. This result represents an unambiguous determination of the octupole collectivity, is larger than any available theoretical prediction, and is consistent with octupole deformation.« less

  17. Microscopic description of octupole shape-phase transitions in light actinide and rare-earth nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.; Vretenar, D.; Nikšić, T.; Lu, Bing-Nan

    2014-02-01

    A systematic analysis of low-lying quadrupole and octupole collective states is presented based on the microscopic energy density functional framework. By mapping the deformation constrained self-consistent axially symmetric mean-field energy surfaces onto the equivalent Hamiltonian of the sdf interacting boson model (IBM), that is, onto the energy expectation value in the boson condensate state, the Hamiltonian parameters are determined. The study is based on the global relativistic energy density functional DD-PC1. The resulting IBM Hamiltonian is used to calculate excitation spectra and transition rates for the positive- and negative-parity collective states in four isotopic chains characteristic for two regions of octupole deformation and collectivity: Th, Ra, Sm, and Ba. Consistent with the empirical trend, the microscopic calculation based on the systematics of β2-β3 energy maps, the resulting low-lying negative-parity bands and transition rates show evidence of a shape transition between stable octupole deformation and octupole vibrations characteristic for β3-soft potentials.

  18. Time-resolved soft-x-ray spectroscopy of a magnetic octupole transition in nickel-like xenon, cesium, and barium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Boyce, K; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Szymkowiak, A

    2005-11-11

    A microcalorimeter with event mode capability for time-resolved soft-x-ray spectroscopy, and a high-resolution flat-field EUV spectrometer have been employed at the Livermore EBIT-I electron beam ion trap for observations and wavelength measurements of M1, E2, and M3 decays of long-lived levels in the Ni-like ions Xe{sup 26+}, Cs{sup 27+}, and Ba{sup 28+}. Of particular interest is the lowest excited level, 3d{sup 9}4s {sup 3}D{sub 3}, which can only decay via a magnetic octupole (M3) transition. For this level in Xe an excitation energy of (590.40 {+-} 0.03eV) and a level lifetime of (11.5 {+-} 0.5 ms) have been determined.

  19. Evidence for octupole vibration in the triaxial superdeformed well of {sup 164}Lu.

    SciTech Connect

    Bringel, P.; Engelhardt, C.; Hubel, H.; NeuBer-Neffgen, A.; Odegard, S. W.; Hagemann, G. B.; Hansen, C. R.; Herskind, B.; Sletten, G.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Seweryniak, D.; Ma, W. C.; Roux, D. G.; Chowdhury, P.; Physics; Univ. Bonn; Univ. of Oslo; Niels Bohr Inst.; Mississippi State Univ.; Univ. of Massachusetts

    2007-01-01

    High-spin states in {sup 164}Lu were populated in the {sup 121}Sb({sup 48}Ca,5n) reaction at 215 MeV and {gamma}-ray coincidences were measured with the Gammasphere spectrometer. Through this experiment the eight known triaxial superdeformed bands in {sup 164}Lu could be confirmed. Some of these bands were extended to higher as well as to lower spins. Evidence is reported for the first time for weak {delta}I=1,E1 transitions linking TSD3 and TSD1. This observation may imply coupling to octupole vibrational degrees of freedom. The decay mechanism is different from the one observed in the neighboring even-N isotopes, which exhibit wobbling excitations built on the {pi}i{sub 13/2} structure with E2(M1),{delta}I=1 interband decay. An additional sequence decaying at high spin into TSD1 was observed up to I{sup {pi}}=(50{sup -}). This band has a constant dynamic moment of inertia of {approx}70({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sup 2}MeV{sup -1} and an alignment that is {approx}2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) larger than that found for TSD1. A revision of the assumed spin-parity-assignment of TSD2 is based on the observed decay-out to normal-deformed structures. The parity and signature quantum numbers of TSD2 are now firmly assigned as ({pi},{alpha})=(+,0), in disagreement with the former assignment of ({pi},{alpha})=(-,1), which was based on the assumption that TSD2 is the signature partner of TSD1. TSD1 and TSD2 show an alignment gain at ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}{approx}0.67 and 0.60 MeV, respectively. In TSD1 the involvement of the j{sub 15/2} neutron orbital is suggested to be responsible for the high-frequency crossing.

  20. Evidence for octupole vibration in the triaxial superdeformed well of {sup 164}Lu

    SciTech Connect

    Bringel, P.; Engelhardt, C.; Huebel, H.; Neusser-Neffgen, A.; Odega ring rd, S. W.; Hagemann, G. B.; Hansen, C. R.; Herskind, B.; Sletten, G.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Seweryniak, D.; Ma, W. C.; Roux, D. G.; Chowdhury, P.

    2007-04-15

    High-spin states in {sup 164}Lu were populated in the {sup 121}Sb({sup 48}Ca,5n) reaction at 215 MeV and {gamma}-ray coincidences were measured with the Gammasphere spectrometer. Through this experiment the eight known triaxial superdeformed bands in {sup 164}Lu could be confirmed. Some of these bands were extended to higher as well as to lower spins. Evidence is reported for the first time for weak {delta}I=1,E1 transitions linking TSD3 and TSD1. This observation may imply coupling to octupole vibrational degrees of freedom. The decay mechanism is different from the one observed in the neighboring even-N isotopes, which exhibit wobbling excitations built on the {pi}i{sub 13/2} structure with E2(M1),{delta}I=1 interband decay. An additional sequence decaying at high spin into TSD1 was observed up to I{sup {pi}}=(50{sup -}). This band has a constant dynamic moment of inertia of {approx}70({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sup 2}MeV{sup -1} and an alignment that is {approx}2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) larger than that found for TSD1. A revision of the assumed spin-parity-assignment of TSD2 is based on the observed decay-out to normal-deformed structures. The parity and signature quantum numbers of TSD2 are now firmly assigned as ({pi},{alpha})=(+,0), in disagreement with the former assignment of ({pi},{alpha})=(-,1), which was based on the assumption that TSD2 is the signature partner of TSD1. TSD1 and TSD2 show an alignment gain at ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}{approx}0.67 and 0.60 MeV, respectively. In TSD1 the involvement of the j{sub 15/2} neutron orbital is suggested to be responsible for the high-frequency crossing.

  1. Perfect light trapping in nanoscale thickness semiconductor films with a resonant back reflector and spectrum-splitting structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang-Tao; Deng, Xin-Hua; Yang, Wen; Li, Jun

    2015-02-07

    The optical absorption of nanoscale thickness semiconductor films on top of light-trapping structures based on optical interference effects combined with spectrum-splitting structures is theoretically investigated. Nearly perfect absorption over a broad spectrum range can be achieved in <100 nm thick films on top of a one-dimensional photonic crystal or metal films. This phenomenon can be attributed to interference induced photonic localization, which enhances the absorption and reduces the reflection of the films. Perfect solar absorption and low carrier thermalization loss can be achieved when the light-trapping structures with a wedge-shaped spacer layer or semiconductor films are combined with spectrum-splitting structures.

  2. A slanted etching method to analyze the trapped charge distribution in the insulators of MIS structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Imaki, S.; Okada, K.; Yoshikawa, M.

    1995-12-31

    There are problems concerned with reliability of integrated circuits due to charge trapping in the oxide such as hot carrier injection, ionizing radiation, etc. Trapped charges in the insulators change the threshold voltage of MOSFET and increase the leakage currents in IC. Generally, the density of oxide charge has been calculated by assuming that it is located near the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface. This assumption is a good approximation in many cases. However, it would introduce serious errors in cases where the oxide charge has a spatial distribution, in particular where both positive and negative charges are present. In this paper, the authors propose a method for measuring the charge distribution in the oxide layer. They will explain about the slanted etching method that they proposed and describe the results of applying this method to silicon dioxide with and without ammonia anneal and silicon dioxide-nitride films. They will investigate the charge distributions both in the oxide layer of MOS structure with and without ammonia annealing and in the insulators of MOS and MNOS structures before and after irradiation.

  3. Nonlinear dispersive evolution of coherent trapped particle structures in collisionless plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Debraj; Sharma, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    The nonlinear limit of the collective perturbations in plasma is characterized by the onset of amplitude dependence in the wave dispersion. In a special class of nonlinear effects having origin in plasma kinetic theory, this amplitude dependence is removed only by collisions such that perturbations have no linear counterpart in collisionless limit and must follow a nonlinear dispersion relation (NDR). Exploring whether these fundamentally nonlinear perturbations can be driven unstable without entropy production might transform the character of the linear threshold based operating mechanism of the plasma turbulence that relies on well defined discrete spectrum prescribed by the linear plasma dispersion. In our multiscale, exact mass ratio, kinetic simulations the evolution of fundamentally nonlinear trapped particle structures is explored on both fast and slow ion and electron acoustic branches of the associated Nonlinear dispersion relation, respectively. The propagating structures that mutually interact exhibit a near continuum of the phase velocities and show microscopic evolution of the separatrix between streaming and trapped particle regions in the phase space, describing the subtle continuity between discrete and continuum bases of the plasma turbulence.

  4. Observation of hyperfine mixing in measurements of a magnetic octupole decay in isotopically pure nickel-like 129Xe and 132Xe ions

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V

    2006-12-21

    We present measurements of high statistical significance of the rate of the magnetic octupole (M3) decay in nickel-like ions of isotopically pure {sup 129}Xe and {sup 132}Xe. On {sup 132}Xe, an isotope with zero nuclear spin and therefore without hyperfine structure, the lifetime of the metastable level was established as (15.06 {+-} 0.24) ms. On {sup 129}Xe, an additional fast (2.7 {+-} 0.1 ms) decay component was established that represents hyperfine mixing with a level that decays by electric quadrupole (E2) radiation.

  5. Light trapping in thin-film silicon solar cells with photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, Lucio C.; Bozzola, Angelo; Kowalczewski, Piotr; Liscidini, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Efficient photovoltaic conversion of solar energy requires optimization of both light absorption and carrier collection. This manuscript reviews theoretical studies of thin-film silicon solar cells with various kinds of ordered and disordered photonic structures. Light trapping capabilities of these systems are analyzed by means of rigorous coupled-wave analysis and compared with the so-called Lambertian limit as given by a fully randomizing light scatterer. The best photonic structures are found to require proper combinations of order and disorder, and can be fabricated starting from pre-patterned rough substrates. Carrier collection is studied by means of analytic models and by full electro-optical simulations. The results indicate that thin-film silicon solar cells can outperform bulk ones with comparable material quality, provided surface recombination is kept below a critical level, which is compatible with present-day surface passivation technologies.

  6. Structural features of northern Tarim basin: Implications for regional tectonics and petroleum traps

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Jia; Juafu Lu; Dongsheng Cai

    1998-01-01

    The rhombus-shaped Tarim basin in northwestern China is controlled mainly by two left-lateral strike-slip systems: the northeast-trending Altun fault zone along its southeastern side and the northeast-trending Aheqi fault zone along its northwestern side. In this paper, we discuss the northern Tarim basin`s structural features, which include three main tectonic units: the Kalpin uplift, the Kuqa depression, and the North Tarim uplift along the northern margin of the Tarim basin. Structural mapping in the Kalpin uplift shows that a series of imbricated thrust sheets have been overprinted by strike-slip faulting. The amount of strike-slip displacement is estimated to be 148 km by restoration of strike-slip structures in the uplift. The Kuqa depression is a Mesozoic-Cenozoic foredeep depression with well-developed flat-ramp structures and fault-related folds. The Baicheng basin, a Quaternary pull-apart basin, developed at the center of the Kuqa depression. Subsurface structures in the North Tarim uplift can be divided into the Mesozoic-Cenozoic and the Paleozoic lithotectonic sequences in seismic profiles. The Paleozoic litho-tectonic sequence exhibits the interference of earlier left-lateral and later right-lateral strike-slip structures. Many normal faults in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic litho-tectonic sequence form the negative flower structures in the North Tarim uplift; these structures commonly directly overlie the positive flower structures in the Paleozoic litho-tectonic sequence. The interference regions of the northwest-trending and northeast-trending folds in the Paleozoic tectonic sequence have been identified to have the best trap structures. Our structural analysis indicates that the Tarim basin is a transpressional foreland basin rejuvenated during the Cenozoic.

  7. Noncontact interface trap determination of SiO2-4H-SiC structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oborina, E. I.; Hoff, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    A sequence of noncontact corona-Kelvin metrology is introduced that enables the determination and monitoring of interface properties in dielectric/wide band gap semiconductor structures. The technique involves the incremental application of precise and measured quantities of corona charge, QC, onto the dielectric surface followed by determination of the contact potential difference, VCPD, as the material structure response. The V-Q characteristics obtained are used to extract the surface barrier, VSB, response related to the applied corona charge. The described approach differs from the common noncontact method applied in the case of dielectric/silicon structures where for each quanta of applied charge the value of surface barrier voltage, VSB, is obtained. Materials with wide band gaps and high concentrations of deep levels, as suggested for silicon carbide, do not permit quick determination of VSB by modulation of the band bending in the semiconductor with light. Light exposure in the case of SiC results in a long recovery time required to approach the nominal value of the preillumination VCPD value. The metrology approach presented determines an intersection of the VCPD-QC characteristic obtained in the dark with the Vox-QC characteristic representing the dielectric response. The specific VSB-QC dependence surrounding the reference VFB value is obtained from this approach and enables the noncontact determination of the dielectric interface trap density and its spectrum. Application of the modified metrology method to thermal oxide on n-type 4H-SiC demonstrates the modification of the Dit distribution by Fowler-Nordheim stress. In addition, an ability to quantify and separate trapped charge components is shown.

  8. Structured inquiry-based learning: Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap characterization in an undergraduate laboratory course.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Christopher R; Cillo, Anthony R; Glick, Danielle R; John, Katherine; Johnson, Cody; Kanwal, Jaspinder; Malik, Brian T; Mammano, Kristina; Petrovic, Stefan; Pfister, William; Rascoe, Alexander S; Schrom, Diane; Shapiro, Scott; Simkins, Jeffrey W; Strauss, David; Talai, Rene; Tomtishen, John P; Vargas, Josephine; Veloz, Tony; Vogler, Thomas O; Clenshaw, Michael E; Gordon-Hamm, Devin T; Lee, Kathryn L; Marin, Elizabeth C

    2014-12-01

    We have developed and tested two linked but separable structured inquiry exercises using a set of Drosophila melanogaster GAL4 enhancer trap strains for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory methods course at Bucknell University. In the first, students learn to perform inverse PCR to identify the genomic location of the GAL4 insertion, using FlyBase to identify flanking sequences and the primary literature to synthesize current knowledge regarding the nearest gene. In the second, we cross each GAL4 strain to a UAS-CD8-GFP reporter strain, and students perform whole mount CNS dissection, immunohistochemistry, confocal imaging, and analysis of developmental expression patterns. We have found these exercises to be very effective in teaching the uses and limitations of PCR and antibody-based techniques as well as critical reading of the primary literature and scientific writing. Students appreciate the opportunity to apply what they learn by generating novel data of use to the wider research community.

  9. Crystal Structures of EF-G-Ribosome Complexes Trapped in Intermediate States of Translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jie; Lancaster, Laura; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F.

    2013-11-12

    Translocation of messenger and transfer RNA (mRNA and tRNA) through the ribosome is a crucial step in protein synthesis, whose mechanism is not yet understood. The crystal structures of three Thermus ribosome-tRNA-mRNA–EF-G complexes trapped with β,γ-imidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (GDPNP) or fusidic acid reveal conformational changes occurring during intermediate states of translocation, including large-scale rotation of the 30S subunit head and body. In all complexes, the tRNA acceptor ends occupy the 50S subunit E site, while their anticodon stem loops move with the head of the 30S subunit to positions between the P and E sites, forming chimeric intermediate states. Two universally conserved bases of 16S ribosomal RNA that intercalate between bases of the mRNA may act as “pawls” of a translocational ratchet. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ribosomal translocation.

  10. Investigation of charge trapping mechanism for nanocrystal-based organic nonvolatile floating gate memory devices by band structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lim, Ki-Tae; Park, Eung-Kyu; Shin, Ha-Chul; Kim, Chung Soo; Park, Kee-Chan; Ahn, Joung-Real; Bang, Jin Ho; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the charge trapping mechanism and electrical performance of CdSe nanocrystals, such as nanoparticles and nanowires in organic floating gate memory devices. Despite of same chemical component, each nanocrystals show different electrical performances with distinct trapping mechanism. CdSe nanoparticles trap holes in the memory device; on the contrary, nanowires trap electrons. This phenomenon is mainly due to the difference of energy band structures between nanoparticles and nanowires, measured by the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Also, we investigated the memory performance with C- V characteristics, charging and discharging phenomena, and retention time. The nanoparticle based hole trapping memory device has large memory window while the nanowire based electron trapping memory shows a narrow memory window. In spite of narrow memory window, the nanowire based memory device shows better retention performance of about 55% of the charge even after 104 sec of charging. The contrasting performance of nanoparticle and nanowire is attributed to the difference in their energy band and the morphology of thin layer in the device. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Hydrogen trapping in δ-Pu: insights from electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher D; Hernandez, Sarah C; Francis, Michael F; Schwartz, Daniel S; Ray, Asok K

    2013-07-03

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to provide details of the structural and charge-transfer details related to the solid solution of hydrogen in (δ)-plutonium. We follow the Flanagan model that outlines the process by which hydrogen interacts with a metal to produce hydride phases, via a sequence of surface, interstitial and defect-bound (trapped) states. Due to the complexities of the electronic structure in plutonium solid-state systems, we take the pragmatic approach of adopting the 'special quasirandom structure' to disperse the atomic magnetic moments. We find that this approach produces sound structural and thermodynamic properties in agreement with the available experimental data. In δ-Pu, hydrogen has an exothermic binding energy to all of the states relevant in the Flanagan model, and, furthermore, is anionic in all these states. The charge transfer is maximized (i.e. most negative for hydrogen) in the hydride phase. The pathway from surface to hydride is sequentially exothermic, in the order surface < interstitial < grain boundary < vacancy < hydride (hydride being the most exothermic state). Thus, we find that there is no intermediate state that involves an endothermic increase in energy, consistent with the general experimental observations that the hydriding reaction in plutonium metal can proceed with zero apparent activation barrier.

  12. Enhancing the absorption capabilities of thin-film solar cells using sandwiched light trapping structures.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, S; Kirah, K; Ghannam, R; Khalil, A S G; Anis, W

    2015-06-10

    A novel structure for thin-film solar cells is simulated with the purpose of maximizing the absorption of light in the active layer and of reducing the parasitic absorption in other layers. In the proposed structure, the active layer is formed from an amorphous silicon thin film sandwiched between silicon nanowires from above and photonic crystal structures from below. The upper electrical contact consists of an indium tin oxide layer, which serves also as an antireflection coating. A metal backreflector works additionally as the other contact. The simulation was done using a new reliable, efficient and generic optoelectronic approach. The suggested multiscale simulation model integrates the finite-difference time-domain algorithm used in solving Maxwell's equation in three dimensions with a commercial simulation platform based on the finite element method for carrier transport modeling. The absorption profile, the external quantum efficient, and the power conversion efficiency of the suggested solar cell are calculated. A noticeable enhancement is found in all the characteristics of the novel structure with an estimated 32% increase in the total conversion efficiency over a cell without any light trapping mechanisms.

  13. Variability and spatial fine structure of precipitating and trapped medium-energy electron fluxes in the noon sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, J. K.; Birch, M. J.; Evans, D. S.

    2014-02-01

    The relationships between the precipitating and trapped components of magnetospheric electron flux for energy ranges exceeding 30 and 100 keV have been investigated using data from polar orbiting satellites, the study being restricted to a limited geographic region at auroral latitudes in the noon sector. The electron flux of these energies is the cause of auroral radio absorption. The data are analyzed at two levels of detail. Variations between different passes are studied using their median values, and variations within passes are derived from individual data points at 2 s intervals, equivalent to about 10 km in distance. Several types of behavior are recognized. Basically, the ratio of precipitating to trapped flux at energies exceeding 30 keV varies in proportion to the trapped flux, though there is a limiting upper value where the two components are approximately equal. The precipitating flux never exceeds the trapped flux by any significant amount. These types appear to be consistent with weak and strong pitch angle scatterings, respectively. The precipitation at >100 keV varies somewhat with the >100 keV trapped flux but more strongly with the >30 keV component, consistent with scattering by chorus waves produced by electrons less energetic than those being scattered. Comparison between the two energy ranges shows that the precipitating component is always softer than the trapped. The detailed relationship between the precipitating and trapped components varies from pass to pass by an amount related to the east-west component of the interplanetary magnetic field. Superimposed on the above behavior are large reductions of precipitation, spatial rather than temporal in nature, during which the trapped flux remains virtually unchanged. These reductions appear to be due to structures some tens of kilometers across, perhaps related to "ducts" within the magnetosphere. Some theoretical considerations based on the Kennel and Petscheck theory of scattering are

  14. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia Lazanu, Sorina

    2014-10-06

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  15. Structure of the transporter associated with antigen processing trapped by herpes simplex virus

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Michael L; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Chen, Jue

    2016-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter essential to cellular immunity against viral infection. Some persistent viruses have evolved strategies to inhibit TAP so that they may go undetected by the immune system. The herpes simplex virus for example evades immune surveillance by blocking peptide transport with a small viral protein ICP47. In this study, we determined the structure of human TAP bound to ICP47 by electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) to 4.0 Å. The structure shows that ICP47 traps TAP in an inactive conformation distinct from the normal transport cycle. The specificity and potency of ICP47 inhibition result from contacts between the tip of the helical hairpin and the apex of the transmembrane cavity. This work provides a clear molecular description of immune evasion by a persistent virus. It also establishes the molecular structure of TAP to facilitate mechanistic studies of the antigen presentation process. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21829.001 PMID:27935481

  16. Modeling of tunneling current in ultrathin MOS structure with interface trap charge and fixed oxide charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Huang, Shi-Hua; Wu, Feng-Min

    2013-01-01

    A model based on analysis of the self-consistent Poisson—Schrodinger equation is proposed to investigate the tunneling current of electrons in the inversion layer of a p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure. In this model, the influences of interface trap charge (ITC) at the Si—SiO2 interface and fixed oxide charge (FOC) in the oxide region are taken into account, and one-band effective mass approximation is used. The tunneling probability is obtained by employing the transfer matrix method. Further, the effects of in-plane momentum on the quantization in the electron motion perpendicular to the Si—SiO2 interface of a MOS device are investigated. Theoretical simulation results indicate that both ITC and FOC have great influence on the tunneling current through a MOS structure when their densities are larger than 1012 cm-2, which results from the great change of bound electrons near the Si—SiO2 interface and the oxide region. Therefore, for real ultrathin MOS structures with ITC and FOC, this model can give a more accurate description for the tunneling current in the inversion layer.

  17. Hydrogen trapping in δ-Pu: insights from electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher D.; Hernandez, Sarah C.; Francis, Michael F.; Schwartz, Daniel S.; Ray, Asok K.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to provide details of the structural and charge-transfer details related to the solid solution of hydrogen in (δ)-plutonium. We follow the Flanagan model that outlines the process by which hydrogen interacts with a metal to produce hydride phases, via a sequence of surface, interstitial and defect-bound (trapped) states. Due to the complexities of the electronic structure in plutonium solid-state systems, we take the pragmatic approach of adopting the ‘special quasirandom structure’ to disperse the atomic magnetic moments. We find that this approach produces sound structural and thermodynamic properties in agreement with the available experimental data. In δ-Pu, hydrogen has an exothermic binding energy to all of the states relevant in the Flanagan model, and, furthermore, is anionic in all these states. The charge transfer is maximized (i.e. most negative for hydrogen) in the hydride phase. The pathway from surface to hydride is sequentially exothermic, in the order surface < interstitial < grain boundary < vacancy < hydride (hydride being the most exothermic state). Thus, we find that there is no intermediate state that involves an endothermic increase in energy, consistent with the general experimental observations that the hydriding reaction in plutonium metal can proceed with zero apparent activation barrier.

  18. Crestal unconformities as indicators of clastic stratigraphic traps: genetic relation of Berlin field and Elk City structure, deep Anadarko basin

    SciTech Connect

    Lyday, J.R.

    1988-02-01

    The Berlin fan-delta gas reservoir in the deep Anardarko basin was deposited during the late Atokan (Pennsylvanian) as a response to the initial uplift and erosion of the Elk City structure. During the late Atokan pulse of the episodic Pennsylvanian orogeny in the south-central US, abrupt epeirogenic uplift and brittle deformation created an interregional unconformity on positive areas around foreland and cratonic basins. The Elk City structure within the deep Anadarko basin originated as a distinct, subaerially exposed upthrust-block during the late Atokan tectonic event. A crestal unconformity developed on the emergent upthrust block concurrent with its uplift. Terrigenous, detrital Atoka dolomite, originally sourced from the Arbuckle dolomite (Cambrian-Ordovician) of the Amarillo-Wichita uplift, was eroded from the upthrust block and recycled northward as the Berlin fan-delta. Today, the Berlin recrystallized, recycled detrital dolomite fan-delta is a large 41 mi/sup 2/ overpressured gas reservoir with 242-362 bcf reserves at 15,000 ft. The Berlin field is genetically related to the late Atokan crestal unconformity of the Elk City structure, and is an example of the association of crestal unconformities and clastic stratigraphic traps. Such stratigraphic traps originated in marine environments proximal to active structures that have become subaerially exposed. With adequate seals and favorable structural position, detrital deposits recycled from local uplifts can form significant stratigraphic traps. Such stratigraphic traps can occur in compressional, extensional, and diapiric regions.

  19. Morphing structures of the Dionaea muscipula Ellis during the trap opening and closing.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Forde-Tuckett, Victoria; Volkova, Maya I; Markin, Vladislav S

    2014-01-01

    The Venus flytrap is a marvelous plant that has intrigued scientists since the times of Charles Darwin. This carnivorous plant is capable of very fast movements to catch a prey. We found that the maximal speed of the trap closing in the Dionaea muscipula Ellis is about 130,000 times faster than the maximal speed of the trap opening. The mechanism and kinetics of this movement was debated for a long time. Here, the most recent Hydroelastic Curvature Model is applied to the analysis of this movement during closing and opening of the trap with or without a prey. Equations describing the trap movement were derived and verified with experimental data. Chloroform and ether, both anesthetic agents, induce action potentials and close the trap without the mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs. We tested this by dropping 10 μL of ether on the midrib inside the trap without touching any of the mechanosensitive trigger hairs. The trap closed slowly in 10 s. This is at least 20 times slower than the closing of the trap mechanically or electrically. The similar effect can be induced by placing 10 μL of chloroform on the midrib inside the trap, however, the lobes closing time in this case is as fast as closing after mechanical stimulation of the trigger hairs.

  20. Morphing structures of the Dionaea muscipula Ellis during the trap opening and closing

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Alexander G; Forde-Tuckett, Victoria; Volkova, Maya I; Markin, Vladislav S

    2014-01-01

    The Venus flytrap is a marvelous plant that has intrigued scientists since the times of Charles Darwin. This carnivorous plant is capable of very fast movements to catch a prey. We found that the maximal speed of the trap closing in the Dionaea muscipula Ellis is about 130 000 times faster than the maximal speed of the trap opening. The mechanism and kinetics of this movement was debated for a long time. Here, the most recent Hydroelastic Curvature Model is applied to the analysis of this movement during closing and opening of the trap with or without a prey. Equations describing the trap movement were derived and verified with experimental data. Chloroform and ether, both anesthetic agents, induce action potentials and close the trap without the mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs. We tested this by dropping 10 μL of ether on the midrib inside the trap without touching any of the mechanosensitive trigger hairs. The trap closed slowly in 10 s. This is at least 20 times slower than the closing of the trap mechanically or electrically. The similar effect can be induced by placing 10 μL of chloroform on the midrib inside the trap, however, the lobes closing time in this case is as fast as closing after mechanical stimulation of the trigger hairs. PMID:24618927

  1. Symmetry enriched U(1) topological orders for dipole-octupole doublets on a pyrochlore lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yao-Dong; Chen, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Symmetry plays a fundamental role in our understanding of both conventional symmetry breaking phases and the more exotic quantum and topological phases of matter. We explore the experimental signatures of symmetry enriched U(1) quantum spin liquids (QSLs) on the pyrochlore lattice. We point out that the Ce local moment of the newly discovered pyrochlore QSL candidate Ce2Sn2O7 , is a dipole-octupole doublet. The generic model for these unusual doublets supports two distinct symmetry enriched U(1) QSL ground states in the corresponding quantum spin ice regimes. These two U(1) QSLs are dubbed dipolar U(1) QSL and octupolar U(1) QSL. While the dipolar U(1) QSL has been discussed in many contexts, the octupolar U(1) QSL is rather unique. Based on the symmetry properties of the dipole-octupole doublets, we predict the peculiar physical properties of the octupolar U(1) QSL, elucidating the unique spectroscopic properties in the external magnetic fields. We further predict the Anderson-Higgs transition from the octupolar U(1) QSL driven by the external magnetic fields. We identify the experimental relevance with the candidate material Ce2Sn2O7 and other dipole-octupole doublet systems.

  2. Effect of boron incorporation on slow interface traps in SiO2/4H-SiC structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Dai; Sometani, Mitsuru; Harada, Shinsuke; Kosugi, Ryoji; Yonezawa, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    The reason for the effective removal of interface traps in SiO2/4H-SiC (0001) structures by boron (B) incorporation was investigated by employing low-temperature electrical measurements. Low-temperature capacitance-voltage and thermal dielectric relaxation current measurements revealed that the density of electrons captured in slow interface traps in B-incorporated oxide is lower than that in dry and NO-annealed oxides. These results suggest that near-interface traps can be removed by B incorporation, which is considered to be an important reason for the increase in the field-effect mobility of 4H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. A model for the passivation mechanism is proposed that takes account of stress relaxation during thermal oxidation.

  3. Extraterrestrial Helium (He@C60) Trapped in Fullerenes in the Sudbury Impact Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, L.; Bada, J. L.; Poreda, R. J.; Bunch, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    Fullerenes (C60 and C70) have recently been identified in a shock-produced breccia (Onaping Formation) associated with the 1.85-Ga Sudbury Impact Crater. The presence of parts-per-million levels of fullerenes in this impact structure raises interesting questions about the processes that led to the formation of fullerenes and the potential for delivery of intact organic material to the Earth by a large bolide (e.g., asteroid or comet). Two possible scenarios for the presence of fullerenes in the Sudbury impact deposits are that (1) fullerenes are synthesized within the impact plume from the C contained in the bolide; or (2) fullerenes are already present in the bolide and survived the impact event. The correlation of C and trapped noble gas atoms in meteorites is well established. Primitive meteorites contain several trapped noble gas components that have anomalous isotopic compositions, some of which may have a presolar origin. Several C-bearing phases, including SiC, graphite, and diamond, have been recognized as carriers of trapped noble gases. It has also been suggested that fullerenes (C60 and C70) might be a carrier of noble gas components in carbonaceous chondrites. Recently, fullerenes have been detected in separate samples in the Allende meteorite. Carbon-60 is large enough to enclose the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe, but it is too small to contain diatomic gases such as N2 or triatomic gases such as CO2. Recent experimental work has demonstrated that noble gases of a specific isotopic composition can be introduced into synthetic fullerenes at high temperatures and pressures; these encapsulated gases can then be released by the breaking of one or more C bonds during step-heating under vacuum. These thermal-release patterns for He encapsulated within the C60 molecule (He@C60) are similar to the patterns for acid residues of carbonaceous chondrites, suggesting that fullerenes could be an additional carrier of trapped noble gases in acid residues of

  4. Three-dimensional nonlinear lattices: from oblique vortices and octupoles to discrete diamonds and vortex cubes.

    PubMed

    Carretero-González, R; Kevrekidis, P G; Malomed, B A; Frantzeskakis, D J

    2005-05-27

    We construct a variety of novel localized topological structures in the 3D discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The states can be created in Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in strong optical lattices and crystals built of microresonators. These new structures, most of which have no counterparts in lower dimensions, range from multipole patterns and diagonal vortices to vortex "cubes" (stack of two quasiplanar vortices) and "diamonds" (formed by two orthogonal vortices).

  5. Observation of structural relaxation during exciton self-trapping via excited-state resonant impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mance, J. G.; Felver, J. J.; Dexheimer, S. L.

    2015-02-28

    We detect the change in vibrational frequency associated with the transition from a delocalized to a localized electronic state using femtosecond vibrational wavepacket techniques. The experiments are carried out in the mixed-valence linear chain material [Pt(en){sub 2}][Pt(en){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}]⋅(ClO{sub 4}){sub 4} (en = ethylenediamine, C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N{sub 2}), a quasi-one-dimensional system with strong electron-phonon coupling. Vibrational spectroscopy of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton is carried out using a multiple pulse excitation technique: an initial pump pulse creates a population of delocalized excitons that self-trap and equilibrate, and a time-delayed second pump pulse tuned to the red-shifted absorption band of the self-trapped exciton impulsively excites vibrational wavepacket oscillations at the characteristic vibrational frequencies of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton state by the resonant impulsive stimulated Raman mechanism, acting on the excited state. The measurements yield oscillations at a frequency of 160 cm{sup −1} corresponding to a Raman-active mode of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton with Pt-Cl stretching character. The 160 cm{sup −1} frequency is shifted from the previously observed wavepacket frequency of 185 cm{sup −1} associated with the initially generated exciton and from the 312 cm{sup −1} Raman-active symmetric stretching mode of the ground electronic state. We relate the frequency shifts to the changes in charge distribution and local structure that create the potential that stabilizes the self-trapped state.

  6. Validity of the prey-trap hypothesis for carnivore-ungulate interactions at wildlife-crossing structures.

    PubMed

    Ford, Adam T; Clevenger, Anthony P

    2010-12-01

    Wildlife-exclusion fencing and wildlife-crossing structures (e.g., underpasses and overpasses) are becoming increasingly common features of highway projects around the world. The prey-trap hypothesis posits that predators exploit crossing structures to detect and capture prey. The hypothesis predicts that predation events occur closer to a highway after the construction of fences and crossing structures and that prey species' use of crossings increases the probability that predators will attack prey. We examined interactions between ungulates and large carnivores at 28 wildlife crossing structures along 45 km of the Trans-Canada Highway in Banff National Park, Alberta. We obtained long-term records of locations where ungulates were killed (kill sites) before and after crossing structures were built. We also placed remote, motion-triggered cameras at two crossing structures to monitor predator behavior following ungulate passage through the structure. The proximity of ungulate kill sites to the highway was similar before and after construction of fencing and crossing structures. We found only five kill sites near crossing structures after more than 32,000 visits over 13 years. We found no evidence that predator behavior at crossing structures is affected by prey movement. Our results suggest that interactions between large mammals and their prey at wildlife-crossing structures in Banff National Park are not explained by the prey-trap hypothesis.

  7. One-dimensional {alpha}-MnO{sub 2}: Trapping chemistry of tunnel structures, structural stability, and magnetic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Li Liping; Pan Yinzhen; Chen Lijuan; Li Guangshe

    2007-10-15

    Highly crystalline one-dimensional (1D) {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} nanostructures were synthesized by a hydrothermal method. All samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimeter, and infrared spectroscopy. During the formation reactions, the tunnel structure of 1D {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} was simultaneously modified by NH{sub 4}{sup +} species and water molecules. The amount of NH{sub 4}{sup +} species that were trapped in the tunnels is almost independent on the reaction temperature, while the total water content increased with the reaction temperature. The average diameter of {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} nanorods increased from 9.2 to 16.5 nm when the reaction temperature increased from 140 to 220 deg. C. 1D {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} was destabilized by a subsequent high-temperature treatment in air, which is accompanied by a structural transformation to 1D Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} of a cubic structure. At low temperatures, all 1D {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} nanorods showed two magnetic transitions that were characterized by a decreased Neel temperature with rod diameter reduction. According to the effective magnetic moments experimentally measured, Mn ions presented in the nanorods were determined to be in a mixed valency of high spin state Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+}. - Graphical abstract: Highly crystalline one-dimensional (1D) {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} nanostructures were achieved to have tunnel structures modified by NH{sub 4}{sup +} species and water molecules. By tuning the diameters. 1D {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} showed two magnetic transition as indicated by hump and kink peaks at low temperatures. Mn ions presented in 1D {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} were determined to be in a mixed valency of high spin state Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+}.

  8. Role of bioengineering structures made of willow cuttings in marly sediment trapping: a real size experiment in the Francon catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Freddy; Labonne, Sophie

    2013-04-01

    Improving the understanding of the role of vegetation and bioengineering structures on erosion and sedimentation control is a key issue today for the scientific community working both in geosciences and restoration ecology. In the Southern French Alps, ecological rehabilitation works were carried out in April 2008 in a marly basin (Francon, 73 ha) belonging to an experimental catchment of the Draix-Bléone complex, labellized Observatoire of Research in Environment (ORE). It focused on 30 gullies on 20 ha and consisted in the set-up of 672 bioengineering structures of two different types: brush layers of cuttings on deadwood microdams (BL) and brush layers and brush mats of cuttings on deadwood microdams (BLM). 25.000 cuttings of willows (Salix purpurea and S. eleagnos) were used for this purpose. Our objective was to validate former results and to improve the knowledge on the performance of bioengineering structures for sediment trapping during heavy rainfall events. Measurements were made on 305 structures (38 BL and 267 BLM) in 25 gullies. After 5 years (2008 to 2012), results revealed a mean annual trapping of 0.05 m3.yr-1 of sediment per structure, with 0.03 m3.yr-1 for BL and 0.06 m3.yr-1 for BLM. These results show lower values compared to those obtained in previous studies, due to damages on a large part of the structures by high intensity rainfall events. These damages have been mainly observed in case of low vegetation cover on gully sides and when gully floors showed steep slopes. On opposite cases, works were not damaged due to vegetation roughness which limits runoff concentration. We observed that 78 of these structures annually trapped more than 0.05 m3, with maximum values of up to 0.25 m3 per structure, thus showing the potential of efficient structures for sediment trapping. The bioengineering strategy has therefore been improved by implanting vegetation on bare gully sides to avoid damages and allow efficient sediment trapping. Measurements will

  9. INFLUENCE OF FILM STRUCTURE AND LIGHT ON CHARGE TRAPPING AND DISSIPATION DYNAMICS IN SPUN-CAST ORGANIC THIN-FILM TRANSISTORS MEASURED BY SCANNING KELVIN PROBE MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Moth, M.; Anthony, J.

    2012-05-03

    Herein, time-dependent scanning Kelvin probe microscopy of solution processed organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) reveals a correlation between film microstructure and OTFT device performance with the location of trapped charge within the device channel. The accumulation of the observed trapped charge is concurrent with the decrease in I{sub SD} during operation (V{sub G}=-40 V, V{sub SD}= -10 V). We discuss the charge trapping and dissipation dynamics as they relate to the film structure and show that application of light quickly dissipates the observed trapped charge.

  10. Microscopic description of quadrupole-octupole coupling in Sm and Gd isotopes with the Gogny energy density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Robledo, L. M.; Sarriguren, P.

    2012-09-01

    The interplay between the collective dynamics of the quadrupole and octupole deformation degree of freedom is discussed in a series of Sm and Gd isotopes both at the mean-field level and beyond, including parity symmetry restoration and configuration mixing. Physical properties such as negative-parity excitation energies and E1 and E3 transition probabilities are discussed and compared to experimental data. Other relevant intrinsic quantities such as dipole moments, ground-state quadrupole moments or correlation energies associated with symmetry restoration and configuration mixing are discussed. For the considered isotopes, the quadrupole-octupole coupling is found to be weak and most of the properties of negative-parity states can be described in terms of the octupole degree of freedom alone.

  11. Non-Axial Octupole Deformations and Tetrahedral Symmetry in Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, Katarzyna; Dudek, Jerzy

    2005-11-21

    The total energies of about 120 nuclei in the Thorium region have been calculated within the macroscopic-microscopic method in the 5-dimensional space of deformation parameters {alpha}20, {alpha}22, {alpha}30, {alpha}32 and {alpha}40. The macroscopic energy term contains the nuclear surface-curvature dependence as proposed within the LSD approach. The microscopic energies are calculated with the Woods-Saxon single particle potential employing the universal set of parameters.We study a possible presence of the octupole axial and non-axial degrees of freedom all-over in the ({beta}, {gamma})-plane focussing on the ground-states, secondary minima and in the saddle points. In fact, a competition between axial and tri-axial octupole deformation parameters is obtained at the saddle points and in the secondary minima for many isotones with N > 136. The presence of the tetrahedral symmetry minima is predicted in numerous nuclei in the discussed region, although most of the time at relatively high excitation energies.

  12. 2.4 Å resolution crystal structure of human TRAP1NM, the Hsp90 paralog in the mitochondrial matrix.

    PubMed

    Sung, Nuri; Lee, Jungsoon; Kim, Ji Hyun; Chang, Changsoo; Tsai, Francis T F; Lee, Sukyeong

    2016-08-01

    TRAP1 is an organelle-specific Hsp90 paralog that is essential for neoplastic growth. As a member of the Hsp90 family, TRAP1 is presumed to be a general chaperone facilitating the late-stage folding of Hsp90 client proteins in the mitochondrial matrix. Interestingly, TRAP1 cannot replace cytosolic Hsp90 in protein folding, and none of the known Hsp90 co-chaperones are found in mitochondria. Thus, the three-dimensional structure of TRAP1 must feature regulatory elements that are essential to the ATPase activity and chaperone function of TRAP1. Here, the crystal structure of a human TRAP1NM dimer is presented, featuring an intact N-domain and M-domain structure, bound to adenosine 5'-β,γ-imidotriphosphate (ADPNP). The crystal structure together with epitope-mapping results shows that the TRAP1 M-domain loop 1 contacts the neighboring subunit and forms a previously unobserved third dimer interface that mediates the specific interaction with mitochondrial Hsp70.

  13. 2.4 Å resolution crystal structure of human TRAP1 NM , the Hsp90 paralog in the mitochondrial matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Nuri; Lee, Jungsoon; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Chang, Changsoo; Tsai, Francis T. F.; Lee, Sukyeong

    2016-07-13

    TRAP1 is an organelle-specific Hsp90 paralog that is essential for neoplastic growth. As a member of the Hsp90 family, TRAP1 is presumed to be a general chaperone facilitating the late-stage folding of Hsp90 client proteins in the mitochondrial matrix. Interestingly, TRAP1 cannot replace cytosolic Hsp90 in protein folding, and none of the known Hsp90 co-chaperones are found in mitochondria. Thus, the three-dimensional structure of TRAP1 must feature regulatory elements that are essential to the ATPase activity and chaperone function of TRAP1. Here, the crystal structure of a human TRAP1NMdimer is presented, featuring an intact N-domain and M-domain structure, bound to adenosine 5'-β,γ-imidotriphosphate (ADPNP). The crystal structure together with epitope-mapping results shows that the TRAP1 M-domain loop 1 contacts the neighboring subunit and forms a previously unobserved third dimer interface that mediates the specific interaction with mitochondrial Hsp70.

  14. Fabrication of broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with ultra-light-trapping structures by picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid method consisting of ultrafast laser-assisted texturing and chemical fluorination treatment was applied for efficiently enhancing the surface broadband antireflection to fabricate black titanium alloy surface with ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructure. Based on the theoretical analysis of surface antireflective principle of micro-nanostructures and fluoride film, the ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructures have been processed using a picosecond pulsed ultrafast laser on titanium alloy surfaces. Then fluorination treatment has been performed by using fluoroalkyl silane solution. According to X-ray diffraction phase analysis of the surface compositions and measurement of the surface reflectance using spectrophotometer, the broadband antireflective properties of titanium alloy surface with micro-nano structural characteristics were investigated before and after fluorination treatment. The results show that the surface morphology of micro-nanostructures processed by picosecond laser has significant effects on the antireflection of light waves to reduce the surface reflectance, which can be further reduced using chemical fluorination treatment. The high antireflection of over 98 % in a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to infrared on the surface of metal material has been achieved for the surface structures, and the broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with an extremely low reflectance of ultra-light-trapping structures have been obtained in the wavelength range from ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared, middle-wave infrared. The average reflectance of microgroove groups structured surface reaches as low as 2.43 % over a broad wavelength range from 200 to 2600 nm. It indicates that the hybrid method comprising of picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination can effectively induce the broadband antireflective black metal surface. This method has a potential application for fabricating antireflective surface used to improve the

  15. One-phonon octupole vibrational states in 211At, 212Rn, 213Fr and 214Ra with N = 126

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    Excited high spin states in 211At, 212Rn, 213Fr and 214Ra with N = 126 are reorganized and interpreted in terms of the stretched weak coupling of an octupole 3- phonon. Nearly identical sequences of levels with ΔI = 3 and the parity change are found, for the first time, up to 25- for 20 states of 214Ra, up to 35- for 36 states of 212Rn and up to 53/2+ for 16 states of 213Fr. The stretched weak coupling of an octupole phonon is extended up to the highest excitation energy of 11355 keV for 212Rn which has the largest experimental B( E3) value of 44.1(88) W.u. for the 11- → 8{2/+} transition. The stretched weak coupling of an octupole 3- phonon needs to be considered when single particle configurations are assigned to high spin states. Average octupole excitation energies of 657(51) keV for 211At, 1101(28) keV for 212Rn, 667(25) keV for 213Fr, and 709(25) keV for 214Ra are obtained. The calculated level enegies are in a good agreement with the experimental level energies within the error limit of 4.3%.

  16. Optimal structure of light trapping in thin-film solar cells: dielectric nanoparticles or multilayer antireflection coatings?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongxiang; Chen, Fei; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Lianmeng

    2014-08-10

    Recent research has found an alternative way to enhance light trapping of thin-film solar cells by using dielectric nanoparticles deposited on the cell surface. To improve the performance of light trapping, a systematic study on the influence of dielectric nanoparticles on enhancement efficiency is performed in this paper. We prove that the optimal dielectric nanoparticles are substantially equivalent to the multilayer antireflection coatings (ARCs) with a "low-high-low" dielectric constant profile. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the use of a simple two-layer SiO2/SiC ARC can reach 34.15% enhancement, which has exceeded the ideal limit of 32% of nanoparticles structure including plasmonic Ag nanoparticles, dielectric SiC, and TiO2 nanoparticles. That means the optimal multilayer ARCs structure is obviously superior to the optimal dielectric nanoparticles structure, and the deposition of a simple two-layer SiO2/SiC structure on top of a thin-film silicon solar cell can significantly enhance photoelectron generation and hence, result in superior performance of thin-film solar cells.

  17. Complete structural characterization of ceramides as [M-H](-) ions by multiple-stage linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Fong-Fu

    2016-11-01

    Ceramide is a huge lipid family consisting of diversified structures including various modifications in the fatty acyl chain and the long chain base (LCB). In this contribution, negative-ion ESI linear ion-trap multiple-stage mass spectrometric method (LIT MS(n)) towards complete structural determination of ceramides in ten major families characterized as the [M-H](-) ions is described. Multiple sets of fragment ions reflecting the fatty acyl chain and LCB were observed in the CID MS(2) spectrum, while the sequential MS(3) and MS(4) spectra contain structural information for locating the double bond and the functional groups, permitting realization of the fragmentation processes. Thereby, differentiation of ceramide molecules varied by chain length, the LCB (sphingosine, phytosphigosine, 6-hydroxy-sphingosine), and by the modification (α-hydroxy-, β-hydroxy-, ω-hydroxy-FA) can be achieved; and many isomeric structures in the biological specimen can be revealed in detail.

  18. Broadband light-trapping in ultra-thin nano-structured solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, Clément; Massiot, Inès.; Cattoni, Andrea; Vandamme, Nicolas; Dupuis, Christophe; Bardou, Nathalie; Gerard, Isabelle; Naghavi, Negar; Guillemoles, Jean-François; Pelouard, Jean-Luc; Collin, Stéphane

    2013-03-01

    Conventional light trapping techniques are inefficient at the sub-wavelength scale. This is the main limitation for the thickness reduction of thin-film solar cells below 500nm. We propose a novel architecture for broadband light absorption in ultra-thin active layers based on plasmonic nano-cavities and multi-resonant mechanism. Strong light enhancement will be shown numerically for photovoltaic materials such as CIGSe and GaAs. First experiments on ultrathin nano-patterned CIGSe solar cells will be presented.

  19. Rotation induced octupole correlations in the neutron-deficient 109Te nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; Fahlander, C.; Gadea, A.; Farnea, E.; Bazzacco, D.; Belcari, N.; Blasi, N.; Bizzeti, P. G.; Bizzeti-Sona, A.; de Acuña, D.; de Poli, M.; Grawe, H.; Johnson, A.; Lo Bianco, G.; Lunardi, S.; Napoli, D. R.; Nyberg, J.; Pavan, P.; Persson, J.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Rudolph, D.; Schubart, R.; Spolaore, P.; Wyss, R.; Xu, F.

    1998-10-01

    High spin states in the neutron deficient nucleus 109Te have been populated with the 58Ni+54Fe reaction at 220 MeV and investigated through γ-spectroscopy methods at the GASP spectrometer making use of reaction channel selection with the ISIS Si-ball. The level scheme has been extended up to an excitation energy of ~12.1 MeV. The spins and parities of the observed levels are assigned tentatively supporting the identification of two bands of opposite parity connected by strong dipole transitions inferred to be of E1 character. Octupole correlations in 109Te induced by rotation are suggested as the cause of this effect.

  20. Nano-Photonic Structures for Light Trapping in Ultra-Thin Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Pathi, Prathap; Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2017-01-13

    Thick wafer-silicon is the dominant solar cell technology. It is of great interest to develop ultra-thin solar cells that can reduce materials usage, but still achieve acceptable performance and high solar absorption. Accordingly, we developed a highly absorbing ultra-thin crystalline Si based solar cell architecture using periodically patterned front and rear dielectric nanocone arrays which provide enhanced light trapping. The rear nanocones are embedded in a silver back reflector. In contrast to previous approaches, we utilize dielectric photonic crystals with a completely flat silicon absorber layer, providing expected high electronic quality and low carrier recombination. This architecture creates a dense mesh of wave-guided modes at near-infrared wavelengths in the absorber layer, generating enhanced absorption. For thin silicon (<2 μm) and 750 nm pitch arrays, scattering matrix simulations predict enhancements exceeding 90%. Absorption approaches the Lambertian limit at small thicknesses (<10 μm) and is slightly lower (by ~5%) at wafer-scale thicknesses. Parasitic losses are ~25% for ultra-thin (2 μm) silicon and just 1%-2% for thicker (>100 μm) cells. There is potential for 20 μm thick cells to provide 30 mA/cm² photo-current and >20% efficiency. This architecture has great promise for ultra-thin silicon solar panels with reduced material utilization and enhanced light-trapping.

  1. Nano-Photonic Structures for Light Trapping in Ultra-Thin Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pathi, Prathap; Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2017-01-01

    Thick wafer-silicon is the dominant solar cell technology. It is of great interest to develop ultra-thin solar cells that can reduce materials usage, but still achieve acceptable performance and high solar absorption. Accordingly, we developed a highly absorbing ultra-thin crystalline Si based solar cell architecture using periodically patterned front and rear dielectric nanocone arrays which provide enhanced light trapping. The rear nanocones are embedded in a silver back reflector. In contrast to previous approaches, we utilize dielectric photonic crystals with a completely flat silicon absorber layer, providing expected high electronic quality and low carrier recombination. This architecture creates a dense mesh of wave-guided modes at near-infrared wavelengths in the absorber layer, generating enhanced absorption. For thin silicon (<2 μm) and 750 nm pitch arrays, scattering matrix simulations predict enhancements exceeding 90%. Absorption approaches the Lambertian limit at small thicknesses (<10 μm) and is slightly lower (by ~5%) at wafer-scale thicknesses. Parasitic losses are ~25% for ultra-thin (2 μm) silicon and just 1%–2% for thicker (>100 μm) cells. There is potential for 20 μm thick cells to provide 30 mA/cm2 photo-current and >20% efficiency. This architecture has great promise for ultra-thin silicon solar panels with reduced material utilization and enhanced light-trapping. PMID:28336851

  2. Spill-point analysis and structural trapping capacity in saline aquifers using MRST-co2lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Møll Nilsen, Halvor; Lie, Knut-Andreas; Møyner, Olav; Andersen, Odd

    2015-02-01

    Geological carbon storage represents a substantial challenge for the subsurface geosciences. Knowledge of the subsurface can be captured in a quantitative form using computational methods developed within petroleum production. However, to provide good estimates of the likely outcomes over thousands of years, traditional 3D simulation methods should be combined with other techniques developed specifically to study large-scale, long-term migration problems, e.g., in basin modeling. A number of such methods have been developed as a separate module in the open-source Matlab Reservoir Simulation Toolbox (MRST). In this paper, we present a set of tools provided by this module, consisting of geometrical and percolation type methods for computing structural traps and spill paths below a sealing caprock. Using concepts from water management, these tools can be applied on large-scale aquifer models to quickly estimate potential for structural trapping, determine spill paths from potential injection points, suggest optimal injection locations, etc. We demonstrate this by a series of examples applied on publicly available datasets. The corresponding source code is provided along with the examples.

  3. Greatly Increasing Trapped Ion Populations for Mobility Separations Using Traveling Waves in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Webb, Ian K.; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Baker, Erin S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-10-18

    The initial use of traveling waves (TW) for ion mobility (IM) separations using a structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) employed an ion funnel trap (IFT) to accumulate ions from a continuous electrospray ionization source, and limited to injected ion populations of ~106 charges due to the onset of space charge effects in the trapping region. Additional limitations arise due to the loss of resolution for the injection of ions over longer periods (e.g. in extended pulses). In this work a new SLIM ‘flat funnel’ (FF) module has been developed and demonstrated to enable the accumulation of much larger ion populations and their injection for IM separations. Ion current measurements indicate a capacity of ~3.2×108 charges for the extended trapping volume, over an order of magnitude greater than the IFT. The orthogonal ion injection into a funnel shaped separation region can greatly reduce space charge effects during the initial IM separation stage, and the gradually reduced width of the path allows the ion packet to be increasingly compressed in the lateral dimension as the separation progresses, allowing e.g. efficient transmission through conductance limits or compatibility with subsequent ion manipulations. This work examined the TW, RF, and DC confining field SLIM parameters involved in ion accumulation, injection, transmission and separation in the FF IM module using both direct ion current and MS measurements. Wide m/z range ion transmission is demonstrated, along with significant increases in signal to noise (S/N) ratios due to the larger ion populations injected. Additionally, we observed a reduction in the chemical background, which was attributed to more efficient desolvation of solvent related clusters over the extended ion accumulation periods. The TW SLIM FF IM module is anticipated to be especially effective as a front end for long path SLIM IM separation modules.

  4. Concentric Magnetic Structures for Magnetophoretic Bead Collection, Cell Trapping and Analysis of Cell Morphological Changes Caused by Local Magnetic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Concentric magnetic structures (ring and square) with domain wall (DW) pinning geometry are designed for biological manipulation. Magnetic beads collection was firstly demonstrated to analyse the local magnetic field generated by DWs and the effective regions to capture magnetic targets of size 1 μm. Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are magnetically labeled by internalizing poly (styrene sulfonic acid) stabilized magnetic nanoparticles (PSS-MNPs) and then are selectively trapped by head-to-tail DWs (HH DWs) or tail-to-tail DWs (TT DWs) to be arranged into linear shape or cross shape. The morphologies and the nuclear geometry of the cells growing on two kinds of concentric magnetic structures are shown to be distinctive. The intracellular magnetic forces generated by the local magnetic field of DWs are found to influence the behaviour of cells. PMID:26270332

  5. Optical selection, manipulation, trapping, and activation of a microgear structure for applications in micro-optical-electromechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, R C; Tait, R N; Mende, H; Pawlowicz, C

    2001-02-20

    The optical processes involved in laser trapping and optical manipulation are explored theoretically and experimentally as a means of activating a micrometer-size gear structure. We modeled the structure by using an enhanced ray-optics technique, and results indicate that the torque present on the gear can induce the gear to rotate about the gear-arm plane center with light as the driving energy source. We confirmed these findings experimentally by using gears manufactured with conventional semiconductor techniques and from a layer of polyimide. It is expected that such a simple gear design activated by use of light could lead to an entire new class of micro-optical-electromechanical systems.

  6. Effective Light Trapping in Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells with Nano- and Microscale Structures on Glass Substrate.

    PubMed

    Bong, Sungjae; Ahn, Shihyun; Anh, Le Huy Tuan; Kim, Sunbo; Park, Hyeongsik; Shin, Chonghoon; Park, Jinjoo; Lee, Younjung; Yi, Junsin

    2016-05-01

    For thin film silicon-based solar cells, effective light trapping at a broad range of wavelengths (400-1100 nm) is necessary. Normally, etching is only carried out with TCOs, such as SnO2:F and impurity doped ZnO, to form nano-sized craters in the surface morphology to confer a light trapping effect. However, in this study, prior to ZnO:Al etching, periodic structures on the glass substrates were made by photolithography and wet etching to increase the light scattering and internal reflection. The use of periodic structures on the glass substrate resulted in higher haze ratios in the range from 550 nm to 1100 nm, which is the optical absorption wavelength region for thin film silicon solar cells, than obtained by simple ZnO:Al etching. The periodically textured glass with micro-sized structures compensates for the low haze ratio at the middle and long wavelengths of wet etched ZnO:Al. ZnO:Al was deposited on the periodically textured glass, after which the ZnO:Al surface was also etched randomly using a mixed acid solution to form nano-sized craters. The thin film silicon solar cells with 350-nm-thick amorphous silicon absorber layer deposited on the periodic structured glass and etched ZnO:Al generated up to 10.68% more photocurrent, with 11.2% increase of the conversion efficiency compared to the cell deposited on flat glass and etched ZnO:Al.

  7. On the nonlinear trapping nature of undamped, coherent structures in collisionless plasmas and its impact on stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamel, Hans; Mandal, Debraj; Sharma, Devendra

    2017-03-01

    An outstanding notion for collisionless plasmas is the essential nonlinear character of their coherent structures, which in the stationary, weak amplitude limit are described by a continuum of cnoidal electron and ion hole modes governed by a multiparametric nonlinear dispersion relation. The well-known discrete structure of undamped linear plasma modes is seamlessly embedded in this nonlinear continuum as the microscopic texture of plasma begins to reveal itself in the high temperature collisionless plasma limit. This transforms the linear-threshold-based operating mechanism of plasma turbulence into a fundamental nonlinear, multifaceted one. Based on a comprehensive three-level description of increasing profundity, a proof of this novel dictum is presented, which makes use of the joint properties of such structures, their coherency and stationarity, and uses in succession a fluid, linear Vlasov and a full Vlasov description. It unifies discrete and continuum limits by resolving the inevitable resonant region and shows that coherent electrostatic equilibria are generally controlled by kinetic particle trapping and are hence fundamentally nonlinear. By forging a link between damped and growing wave solutions, these modes render plasma stability complex and difficult to evaluate due to the entangled pattern of the stability boundary in function and parameter space, respectively. A direct consequence is the existence of negative energy modes of arbitrarily small amplitudes in the subcritical region of the two-stream instability as well as the failure of linear Landau (Vlasov, van Kampen) theory, whenever resonant particles are involved, in addressing the onset of instability in a current-carrying plasma. Responsible for this subtle phase space behavior is hence the thresholdless omnipresence of the trapping nonlinearity originating from coherency. A high resolution, exact-mass-ratio, multispecies, and collisionless plasma simulation is employed to illustrate

  8. Charge Carriers in Planar and Meso-Structured Organic-Inorganic Perovskites: Mobilities, Lifetimes, and Concentrations of Trap States.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Eline M; Eperon, Giles E; Stranks, Samuel D; Savenije, Tom J

    2015-08-06

    Efficient solar cells have been obtained using thin films of solution-processed organic-inorganic perovskites. However, there remains limited knowledge about the relationship between preparation route and optoelectronic properties. We use complementary time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements to investigate the charge carrier dynamics in thin planar films of CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x), CH3NH3PbI3, and their meso-structured analogues. High mobilities close to 30 cm(2)/(V s) and microsecond-long lifetimes are found in thin films of CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x), compared to lifetimes of only a few hundred nanoseconds in CH3NH3PbI3 and meso-structured perovskites. We describe our TRMC and PL experiments with a global kinetic model, using one set of kinetic parameters characteristic for each sample. We find that the trap density is less than 5 × 10(14) cm(-3) in CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x), 6 × 10(16) cm(-3) in the CH3NH3PbI3 thin film and ca. 10(15) cm(-3) in both meso-structured perovskites. Furthermore, our results imply that band-to-band recombination is enhanced by the presence of dark carriers resulting from unintentional doping of the perovskites. Finally, our general approach to determine concentrations of trap states and dark carriers is also highly relevant to other semiconductor materials.

  9. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  10. Optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention just over 20 years ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology and physics. Capabilities have evolved from simple manipulation to the application of calibrated forces on—and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of—optically trapped objects. We review progress in the development of optical trapping apparatus, including instrument design considerations, position detection schemes and calibration techniques, with an emphasis on recent advances. We conclude with a brief summary of innovative optical trapping configurations and applications. PMID:16878180

  11. Photorefractive polymer composite trapping properties and a link with chromophore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, K. S.; West, D. P.; Rahn, M. D.; Shakos, J. D.; Wade, F. A.; Khand, K.; King, T. A.

    1998-12-01

    The photorefractive properties and the phase stability of polymer composites are dependent on the detail of the alkyl chain substituent attached to the electro-optic dye within the composite. Photorefractive composites based on poly (N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK), sensitized with trinitrofluorenone (TNF) and mixed with a concentration of 47.5 wt. % of electro-optic dye have been tested for photorefractive performance. Two alternative azo dyes of identical molecular weight have been used to produce alternative composites; both dyes were modified to suppress spatial isomerism and incorporated an eight carbon alkyl chain at the electropositive end of the chromophore: either a straight octyl chain or a branched ethylhexyl chain was substituted. The reorientational enhancement of photorefractive performance is similar in the composites resulting from these dyes. The dye with a straight octyl chain led to a composite with improved holographic performance. The dye with a branched ethylhexyl chain led to a composite exhibiting lower diffraction efficiency, but with superior phase stability. A tentative explanation is offered for these differences based on the shape of the alkyl substituent and its effect on a trapping mechanism involving the dye molecules and the sensitisor anions in PVK:TNF-based photorefractive composites.

  12. Optical trapping of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Jarrah; Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana; Ghaffari, Saeedeh; Pang, Yuanjie; Gordon, Reuven

    2013-01-15

    Optical trapping is a technique for immobilizing and manipulating small objects in a gentle way using light, and it has been widely applied in trapping and manipulating small biological particles. Ashkin and co-workers first demonstrated optical tweezers using a single focused beam. The single beam trap can be described accurately using the perturbative gradient force formulation in the case of small Rayleigh regime particles. In the perturbative regime, the optical power required for trapping a particle scales as the inverse fourth power of the particle size. High optical powers can damage dielectric particles and cause heating. For instance, trapped latex spheres of 109 nm in diameter were destroyed by a 15 mW beam in 25 sec, which has serious implications for biological matter. A self-induced back-action (SIBA) optical trapping was proposed to trap 50 nm polystyrene spheres in the non-perturbative regime. In a non-perturbative regime, even a small particle with little permittivity contrast to the background can influence significantly the ambient electromagnetic field and induce a large optical force. As a particle enters an illuminated aperture, light transmission increases dramatically because of dielectric loading. If the particle attempts to leave the aperture, decreased transmission causes a change in momentum outwards from the hole and, by Newton's Third Law, results in a force on the particle inwards into the hole, trapping the particle. The light transmission can be monitored; hence, the trap can become a sensor. The SIBA trapping technique can be further improved by using a double-nanohole structure. The double-nanohole structure has been shown to give a strong local field enhancement. Between the two sharp tips of the double-nanohole, a small particle can cause a large change in optical transmission, thereby inducing a large optical force. As a result, smaller nanoparticles can be trapped, such as 12 nm silicate spheres and 3.4 nm hydrodynamic radius

  13. A shallow fault-zone structure illuminated by trapped waves in the Karadere-Duzce branch of the North Anatolian Fault, western Turkey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ben-Zion, Y.; Peng, Z.; Okaya, D.; Seeber, L.; Armbruster, J.G.; Ozer, N.; Michael, A.J.; Baris, S.; Aktar, M.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the subsurface structure of the Karadere-Duzce branch of the North Anatolian Fault based on analysis of a large seismic data set recorded by a local PASSCAL network in the 6 months following the Mw = 7.4 1999 Izmit earthquake. Seismograms observed at stations located in the immediate vicinity of the rupture zone show motion amplification and long-period oscillations in both P- and S-wave trains that do not exist in nearby off-fault stations. Examination of thousands of waveforms reveals that these characteristics are commonly generated by events that are well outside the fault zone. The anomalous features in fault-zone seismograms produced by events not necessarily in the fault may be referred to generally as fault-zone-related site effects. The oscillatory shear wave trains after the direct S arrival in these seismograms are analysed as trapped waves propagating in a low-velocity fault-zone layer. The time difference between the S arrival and trapped waves group does not grow systematically with increasing source-receiver separation along the fault. These observations imply that the trapping of seismic energy in the Karadere-Duzce rupture zone is generated by a shallow fault-zone layer. Traveltime analysis and synthetic waveform modelling indicate that the depth of the trapping structure is approximately 3-4 km. The synthetic waveform modelling indicates further that the shallow trapping structure has effective waveguide properties consisting of thickness of the order of 100 m, a velocity decrease relative to the surrounding rock of approximately 50 per cent and an S-wave quality factor of 10-15. The results are supported by large 2-D and 3-D parameter space studies and are compatible with recent analyses of trapped waves in a number of other faults and rupture zones. The inferred shallow trapping structure is likely to be a common structural element of fault zones and may correspond to the top part of a flower-type structure. The motion amplification

  14. Structural Characterization of Unsaturated Glycerophospholipids by Multiple-stage Linear Ion-trap Mass Spectrometry with Electrospray Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Fong-Fu; Turk, John

    2008-01-01

    Structural elucidation of glycerophospholipids (GPLs), including the polar head group, the position of double bond(s) along the fatty acyl substituents, and the positions of acyl groups on the glycerol backbone using multiple-stage liner ion-trap (LIT) mass spectrometric approach is described in this paper. While the product-ion spectra from MSn (n = 2, 3) on the [M + Li]+ or [M − H + 2Li]+ ions of GPL are readily applicable for discerning the phospholipid classes and for identifying and locating the fatty acid substituents on the glycerol backbone, the structural information from further dissociation of the dilithiated fatty acid cations produced from MSn (n = 3,4) on the [M − H + 2Li]+ ion of GPLs, as well as from further dissociation of the monolithiated fragment ion that bears the unsaturated fatty acid moiety produced from subsequent MSn (n= 3,4) on the [M + Li]+ ions of GPLs affords assignment of the position of double bond(s) along the fatty acyl groups. The application of the present method in the structural characterization of GPL molecules from the lipid extracts of biological origin, including mixtures of phosphatidylglycerol and of phosphatidylserine without prior chromatographic separation, is also demonstrated. Since lithiated molecular species of GPL are readily formed by ESI, this multiple-stage LIT mass spectrometric approach provides a direct means for the near-complete structural characterization of all the GPLs, including the molecules in the lysophospholipid and plasmalogen subclasses. PMID:18771936

  15. Atomic structure of Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 reveals that Hsp90 traps and stabilizes an unfolded kinase.

    PubMed

    Verba, Kliment A; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Arakawa, Akihiko; Liu, Yanxin; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Agard, David A

    2016-06-24

    The Hsp90 molecular chaperone and its Cdc37 cochaperone help stabilize and activate more than half of the human kinome. However, both the mechanism by which these chaperones assist their "client" kinases and the reason why some kinases are addicted to Hsp90 while closely related family members are independent are unknown. Our structural understanding of these interactions is lacking, as no full-length structures of human Hsp90, Cdc37, or either of these proteins with a kinase have been elucidated. Here we report a 3.9 angstrom cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 kinase complex. Surprisingly, the two lobes of Cdk4 are completely separated with the β4-β5 sheet unfolded. Cdc37 mimics part of the kinase N lobe, stabilizing an open kinase conformation by wedging itself between the two lobes. Finally, Hsp90 clamps around the unfolded kinase β5 strand and interacts with exposed N- and C-lobe interfaces, protecting the kinase in a trapped unfolded state. On the basis of this structure and an extensive amount of previously collected data, we propose unifying conceptual and mechanistic models of chaperone-kinase interactions.

  16. Protein crystallography for aspiring crystallographers or how to avoid pitfalls and traps in macromolecular structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Wlodawer, Alexander; Minor, Wladek; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    The number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank now approaches 100 000, with the vast majority of them determined by crystallographic methods. Thousands of papers describing such structures have been published in the scientific literature, and 20 Nobel Prizes in chemistry or medicine have been awarded for discoveries based on macromolecular crystallography. New hardware and software tools have made crystallography appear to be an almost routine (but still far from being analytical) technique and many structures are now being determined by scientists with very limited experience in the practical aspects of the field. However, this apparent ease is sometimes illusory and proper procedures need to be followed to maintain high standards of structure quality. In addition, many noncrystallographers may have problems with the critical evaluation and interpretation of structural results published in the scientific literature. The present review provides an outline of the technical aspects of crystallography for less experienced practitioners, as well as information that might be useful for users of macromolecular structures, aiming to show them how to interpret (but not overinterpret) the information present in the coordinate files and in their description. A discussion of the extent of information that can be gleaned from the atomic coordinates of structures solved at different resolution is provided, as well as problems and pitfalls encountered in structure determination and interpretation. PMID:24034303

  17. Stratigraphic traps 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains studies of fields with traps that are mainly stratigraphic in nature. Structure plays a role in the traps of several fields, but overall, it is clear that the main trapping features with the group of fields in this volume are stratigraphic. The first six fields in this volume, Alabama Ferry, Rospo Mare, Walker Creek, Bindley, Lexington, and Newburg/South Westhope, have carbonate reservoirs. The latter two of these, Lexington and Newburg/South Westhope, also have sandstone reservoirs. The remaining fields, East Texas, East Clinton, Stockholm Southwest, Sorrento, Port Acres, and Lagoa Parda, have only sandstone reservoirs.

  18. Lenticular stretch structures in eastern Nevada - possible trapping mechanism in supposed graben

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.T.; Dennis, J.G.; Lumsden, W.W.

    1986-04-01

    Eastern Nevada is widely recognized as a region of tectonic extension. The dominant structures are generally agreed to be low-dipping, younger over older faults and steeper listric faults that are responsible for the basins (grabens) and ranges (horsts). In the Schell Creek-Duck Creek Range, east of Ely, and in the White Pine Range, southwest of Ely, small lenticular structures bounded by tectonic discontinuities can be clearly seen in the field. These lenticular units, or stretch structures, range in length from a few meters to more than 200 m. All lenticular stretch structures that can be clearly seen in the field are stratigraphically restricted; the stretched formations are the Eureka Quartzite, the Pilot Shale, the Joana Limestone, and the Chainman Shale. Still larger stretch structures, which may include several formations, are inferred, and the authors suggest that extension has created lenticular structures at all scales. The Duck Creek and Schell Creek Ranges east of Ely consist mostly of Devonian and older rocks. They are separated by a topographically lower area containing mostly Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks. This structure, which separates the ranges, has been referred to as a graben, but field evidence suggests that it is a large-scale lenticular stretch structure. Unlike a true graben, the structure does not extend downward. For example, in several places within the supposed graben, Cambrian and Ordovician rocks project through a cover of Carboniferous Chainman Shale and Ely Limestone, suggesting the Chainman-Ely is a thin sheet underlain by Cambrian-Ordovician rocks. Accordingly, they suggest that extension in the Duck Creek-Schell Creek Ranges stretched the formations into lenticular bodies. Between the Duck Creek and Schell Creek Ranges, the Cambrian-Ordovician is attenuated, and the resulting tectonic depression is occupied by a lenticular mass of Carboniferous rocks.

  19. Backbending in the pear-shaped Th22390 nucleus: Evidence of a high-spin octupole to quadrupole shape transition in the actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maquart, G.; Augey, L.; Chaix, L.; Companis, I.; Ducoin, C.; Dudouet, J.; Guinet, D.; Lehaut, G.; Mancuso, C.; Redon, N.; Stézowski, O.; Vancraeyenest, A.; Astier, A.; Azaiez, F.; Courtin, S.; Curien, D.; Deloncle, I.; Dorvaux, O.; Duchêne, G.; Gall, B.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.; Herzan, A.; Hauschild, K.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Nieminen, P.; Petkov, P.; Peura, P.; Porquet, M.-G.; Rahkila, P.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rousseau, M.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Uusitalo, J.

    2017-03-01

    Relatively neutron-rich thorium isotopes lie at the heart of a nuclear region of nuclei exhibiting octupole correlation effects. The detailed level structure of 223Th has been investigated in measurements of γ radiation following the fusion-evaporation channel of the 208Pb(18O,3 n )223Th reaction at 85 MeV beam energy. The level structure has been extended up to spin 49 /2 , and 33 new γ rays have been added using triple-γ coincidence data. The spins and parities of the newly observed states have been confirmed by angular distribution ratios. In addition to the two known yrast bands based on a K =5 /2 configuration, a non-yrast band has been established up to spin 35 /2 . We interpret this new structure as based on the same configuration as the yrast band in 221Th having dominant K =1 /2 contribution. At the highest spin a backbending occurs around a rotational frequency of ℏ ω =0.23 MeV, very close to the one predicted in 222Th, where a sharp transition to a reflection-symmetric shape is expected.

  20. Evidence for octupole vibration in the superdeformed well of {sup 190}Hg from eurogam

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, B.; Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.

    1995-08-01

    Gammasphere experiments in 1993-94 brought to light the existence of an excited superdeformed (SD) band in {sup 190}Hg with the unusual property of decaying entirely to the lowest (yrast) SD band over 3-4 transitions, rather than to the normally deformed states as is usually the case in the A {approximately} 150 and A {approximately} 190 regions of superdeformation. Although M1 transitions between signature-partner SD bands were previously observed in {sup 193}Hg, no such mechanism was available to explain the situation in the even-even nucleus {sup 190}Hg, whose yrast SD band has no signature partner. The best explanation appears to lie in long-standing theoretical predictions that the SD minimum in the potential energy surface would be quite soft with respect to octupole vibrations. This would lead to enhanced E1 transitions connecting the one-phonon and zero-phonon states. The data and this interpretation were published. A shortcoming of the Gammasphere experiments was that they did not allow the definitive measurement of the energies of the gamma-ray transitions connecting the two bands, due to the very weak population of the excited band ({approximately}0.05% of the {sup 190}Hg channel) and also partly, we believed, to the angular distributions of the transitions, which were peaked near 90 degrees, where Gammasphere had few detectors.

  1. The crystal structure of UehA in complex with ectoine-A comparison with other TRAP-T binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Lecher, Justin; Pittelkow, Marco; Zobel, Silke; Bursy, Jan; Bönig, Tobias; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz; Bremer, Erhard

    2009-05-29

    Substrate-binding proteins or extracellular solute receptors (ESRs) are components of both ABC (ATP binding cassette) and TRAP-T (tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter). The TRAP-T system UehABC from Silicibacter pomeroyi DSS-3 imports the compatible solutes ectoine and 5-hydroxyectoine as nutrients. UehA, the ESR of the UehABC operon, binds both ectoine and 5-hydroxyectoine with high affinity (K(d) values of 1.4+/-0.1 and 1.1+/-0.1 microM, respectively) and delivers them to the TRAP-T complex. The crystal structure of UehA in complex with ectoine was determined at 2.9-A resolution and revealed an overall fold common for all ESR proteins from TRAP systems determined so far. A comparison of the recently described structure of TeaA from Halomonas elongata and an ectoine-binding protein (EhuB) from an ABC transporter revealed a conserved ligand binding mode that involves both directed and cation-pi interactions. Furthermore, a comparison with other known TRAP-T ESRs revealed a helix that might act as a selectivity filter imposing restraints on the ESRs that fine-tune ligand recognition and binding and finally might determine the selection of the cognate substrate.

  2. SEARCH FOR TWO-PHONON OCTUPOLE VIBRATIONAL BANDS IN 88, 89, 92, 93, 94, 96Sr AND 95, 96, 97, 98Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Brewer, N. T.; Wang, E. H.; Luo, Y. X.; Zhu, S. J.

    2012-09-01

    Several new gamma transitions were identified in 94Sr, 93Sr, 92Sr, 96Zr and 97Zr from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Excited states in 88, 89, 92, 94, 96Sr and 95, 96, 97, 98Zr were reanalyzed and reorganized to propose the new two-phonon octupole vibrational states and bands. The spin and parity of 6+ are assigned to a 4034.5 keV state in 94Sr and 3576.4 keV state in 98Zr. These states are proposed as the two-phonon octupole vibrational states along with the 6+ states at 3483.4 keV in 96Zr, at 3786.0 keV in 92Sr and 3604.2 keV in 96Sr. The positive parity bands in 88, 94, 96Sr and 96, 98Zr are the first two-phonon octupole vibrational bands based on a 6+ state assigned in spherical nuclei. It is thought that in 94, 96Sr and 96, 98Zr a 3- octupole vibrational phonon is weakly coupled to an one-phonon octupole vibrational band to make the two-phonon octupole vibrational band. Also, the high spin states of odd-A95Zr and 97Zr are interpreted to be generated by the neutron 2d5/2 hole and neutron 1g7/2 particle, respectively, weakly coupled to one- and two-phonon octupole vibrational bands of 96Zr. The high spin states of odd-A87Sr are interpreted to be caused by the neutron 1g9/2 hole weakly coupled to 3- and 5- states of 88Sr. New one- and two-POV bands in 95, 97Zr and 87, 89Sr are proposed, for the first time, in the present work.

  3. A DEAD-box RNA helicase promotes thermodynamic equilibration of kinetically trapped RNA structures in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ruminski, Dana J.; Watson, Peter Y.; Mahen, Elisabeth M.; Fedor, Martha J.

    2016-01-01

    RNAs must assemble into specific structures in order to carry out their biological functions, but in vitro RNA folding reactions produce multiple misfolded structures that fail to exchange with functional structures on biological time scales. We used carefully designed self-cleaving mRNAs that assemble through well-defined folding pathways to identify factors that differentiate intracellular and in vitro folding reactions. Our previous work showed that simple base-paired RNA helices form and dissociate with the same rate and equilibrium constants in vivo and in vitro. However, exchange between adjacent secondary structures occurs much faster in vivo, enabling RNAs to quickly adopt structures with the lowest free energy. We have now used this approach to probe the effects of an extensively characterized DEAD-box RNA helicase, Mss116p, on a series of well-defined RNA folding steps in yeast. Mss116p overexpression had no detectable effect on helix formation or dissociation kinetics or on the stability of interdomain tertiary interactions, consistent with previous evidence that intracellular factors do not affect these folding parameters. However, Mss116p overexpression did accelerate exchange between adjacent helices. The nonprocessive nature of RNA duplex unwinding by DEAD-box RNA helicases is consistent with a branch migration mechanism in which Mss116p lowers barriers to exchange between otherwise stable helices by the melting and annealing of one or two base pairs at interhelical junctions. These results suggest that the helicase activity of DEAD-box proteins like Mss116p distinguish intracellular RNA folding pathways from nonproductive RNA folding reactions in vitro and allow RNA structures to overcome kinetic barriers to thermodynamic equilibration in vivo. PMID:26759451

  4. Structural style and hydrocarbon trap of Karbasi anticline, in the Interior Fars region, Zagros, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Z.; Arian, M.; Solgi, A.

    2014-07-01

    Karbasi anticline between west-northwest parts of Jahrom town is located in northwest 40 km distance of Aghar gas anticline in interior Fars region. This anticline has asymmetric structure and some faults with large strike separation observed in its structure. The operation of Nezamabad sinistral strike slip fault in west part of this anticline caused fault plunge change in this region. Because of complication increasing of structures geometry in Fars region and necessity to exploration activities for deeper horizons especially the Paleozoic ones, the analysis of fold style elements, which is known as one of the main parts in structural studies seems necessary. In this paper because of some reasons such as Karbasi anticline structural complication, importance of drilling and hydrocarbon explorations in Fars region, it is proceed to analysis and evaluation of fold style elements and geometry with emphasis on Nezamabad fault operation in Interior Fars region. According to fold style elements analysis results, it became clear that in east part of anticline the type of fold horizontal moderately inclined and in west part it is upright moderately plunging, so west evaluation of anticline is affected by more deformation. In this research the relationship present faults especially the Nezamabad sinistral strike slip one with folding and its affection on Dehram horizon and Bangestan group were modeled. Based on received results may be the Nezamabad fault is located between G-G' and E-E' structural sections and this fault in this area operated same as fault zone. In different parts of Karbasi anticline, Dashtak formation as a middle detachment unit plays an important role in connection to folding geometry, may be which is affected by Nezamabad main fault.

  5. A DEAD-box RNA helicase promotes thermodynamic equilibration of kinetically trapped RNA structures in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ruminski, Dana J; Watson, Peter Y; Mahen, Elisabeth M; Fedor, Martha J

    2016-03-01

    RNAs must assemble into specific structures in order to carry out their biological functions, but in vitro RNA folding reactions produce multiple misfolded structures that fail to exchange with functional structures on biological time scales. We used carefully designed self-cleaving mRNAs that assemble through well-defined folding pathways to identify factors that differentiate intracellular and in vitro folding reactions. Our previous work showed that simple base-paired RNA helices form and dissociate with the same rate and equilibrium constants in vivo and in vitro. However, exchange between adjacent secondary structures occurs much faster in vivo, enabling RNAs to quickly adopt structures with the lowest free energy. We have now used this approach to probe the effects of an extensively characterized DEAD-box RNA helicase, Mss116p, on a series of well-defined RNA folding steps in yeast. Mss116p overexpression had no detectable effect on helix formation or dissociation kinetics or on the stability of interdomain tertiary interactions, consistent with previous evidence that intracellular factors do not affect these folding parameters. However, Mss116p overexpression did accelerate exchange between adjacent helices. The nonprocessive nature of RNA duplex unwinding by DEAD-box RNA helicases is consistent with a branch migration mechanism in which Mss116p lowers barriers to exchange between otherwise stable helices by the melting and annealing of one or two base pairs at interhelical junctions. These results suggest that the helicase activity of DEAD-box proteins like Mss116p distinguish intracellular RNA folding pathways from nonproductive RNA folding reactions in vitro and allow RNA structures to overcome kinetic barriers to thermodynamic equilibration in vivo.

  6. Carrier trapping and escape times in p-i-n GaInNAs MQW structures.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hagir M; Balkan, Naci

    2014-01-13

    We used a semi-classical model to describe carrier capture into and thermionic escape from GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs) situated within the intrinsic region of a GaAs p-i-n junction. The results are used to explain photocurrent oscillations with applied bias observed in these structures, in terms of charge accumulation and resonance tunnelling.

  7. Structural characterization of metabolites of the X-ray contrast agent iopromide in activated sludge using ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Sandra; Eichhorn, Peter; Celiz, Mary Dawn; Aga, Diana S

    2006-03-15

    Identification of degradation products of environmental contaminants is a challenging task because not only are they present in very low concentrations but they are also mixed with complex matrixes that interfere with detection. This work illustrates a simple approach using ion trap mass spectrometry combined with H/D-exchange experiments to elucidate the structures of iopromide metabolites formed during biodegradation in activated sludge. Iopromide is an X-ray contrast agent that has been detected frequently in effluents of wastewater treatment plants and in surface waters due to its persistence and high usage. Three metabolites produced by oxidation of the primary alcohols (forming carboxylates) on the side chains of iopromide were identified in a batch reactor with mixed liquor from a conventional activated sludge. Derivatization of the carboxylic acid to form a methyl ester and interpretation of the MS2 data of this derivative aided in the confirmation of the identities of these metabolites. Furthermore, one metabolite formed by dehydroxylation at the two side chains was identified in a batch reactor with mixed liquor from a nitrifying activated sludge. The MS2 fragmentation pattern of iopromide and its metabolites revealed that the iodinated ring remains intact and that minor transformations in the structure occur during biodegradation of iopromide in biological wastewater treatment plants.

  8. Carrier trapping and escape times in p-i-n GaInNAs MQW structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We used a semi-classical model to describe carrier capture into and thermionic escape from GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs) situated within the intrinsic region of a GaAs p-i-n junction. The results are used to explain photocurrent oscillations with applied bias observed in these structures, in terms of charge accumulation and resonance tunnelling. PMID:24417767

  9. Crystal structure of a trapped catalytic intermediate suggests that forced atomic proximity drives the catalysis of mIPS.

    PubMed

    Neelon, Kelly; Roberts, Mary F; Stec, Boguslaw

    2011-12-07

    1-L-myo-inositol-phosphate synthase (mIPS) catalyzes the first step of the unique, de novo pathway of inositol biosynthesis. However, details about the complex mIPS catalytic mechanism, which requires oxidation, enolization, intramolecular aldol cyclization, and reduction, are not fully known. To gain further insight into this mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of the wild-type mIPS from Archaeoglobus fulgidus at 1.7 Å, as well as the crystal structures of three active-site mutants. Additionally, we obtained the structure of mIPS with a trapped 5-keto-glucose-6-phosphate intermediate at 2 Å resolution by a novel (to our knowledge) process of activating the crystal at high temperature. A comparison of all of the crystal structures of mIPS described in this work suggests a novel type of catalytic mechanism that relies on the forced atomic proximity of functional groups. The lysine cluster is contained in a small volume in the active site, where random motions of these side chains are responsible for the progress of the complex multistep reaction as well as for the low rate of catalysis. The mechanism requires that functional groups of Lys-274, Lys-278, Lys-306, and Lys-367 assume differential roles in the protonation/deprotonation steps that must occur during the mIPS reaction. This mechanism is supported by the complete loss of activity of the enzyme caused by the Leu-257 mutation to Ala that releases the lysine containment.

  10. Evolution of the hourglass structures in the Laminaria High, Timor Sea: Implications for hydrocarbon traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çiftçi, N. Bozkurt; Langhi, Laurent

    2012-03-01

    In cross-section, an hourglass structure can be visualized as an older horst block and superimposed, younger graben. Bounding faults of the horst and graben blocks represent separate conjugate fault systems formed by two distinct episodes of extension in the Timor Sea during Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous (1st-phase) and Middle Miocene - Pliocene (2nd-phase); with an ∼120 My hiatus of limited or no fault activity in-between. Horst blocks were formed by the 1st-phase of extension and buried post-deformation. With the onset of the 2nd-phase of extension, the hourglass geometry began to form by nucleation of the graben-bounding faults in the shallow sedimentary section, in isolation from the horst-bounding faults. Location of the graben is biased by the buried horst block and graben-bounding faults grew down-dip from the shallow locus of nucleation toward the underlying horst block on which only minor reactivation occurred. Detachment of the two systems in this way was predominantly controlled by the first-order mechanical layering. A thick, shale-rich, ductile layer separates the horst- and graben-bounding fault systems and acts as a barrier to vertical fault propagation. Confinement of the graben-bounding faults into the shallow section was also facilitated by outer-arc style extension due to lithospheric flexure controlling the 2nd-phase strain in the region. The complex evolution history and the composite nature of the hourglass structures resulted in systematic along-dip variation of displacement. This variation predominantly relates to syn-kinematic deposition and location of fault tips that are controlled by the ductile layer. The presented evolution model of the hourglass structures concentrates fault tips and related stress perturbation onto the top seal and is likely to be detrimental to top-seal integrity.

  11. Electronic structure of the interstitial lithium-associated electron trap in crystalline quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, T. M.; Weil, J. A.; Rao, P. S.

    1986-10-01

    A new, paramagnetic (S=1/2) defect, designated the [SiO4/Li]0 center, consisting of an interstitial lithium "atom," recently has been observed by Jani, Halliburton, and Halperin

    [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 1392 (1986)]
    in irradiated α-quartz. A model for this defect has been developed utilizing ab initio self-consistent-field, electronic-structure calculations. In this model, the interstitial lithium nucleus lies on a crystal twofold axis passing through two adjacent silicon ions, and has a nearly neutral charge but very low spin density. The properties calculated using this model are consistent with all the available experimental information for this defect.

  12. Effective light trapping by modulated quantum structures for Si nanowire/wall solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Daiji; Yata, Shigeo; Terakawa, Akira; Tanaka, Makoto; Konagai, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    The quantum size effect allows the use of silicon nanowires and nanowalls for the top cell of all-Si tandem solar cells by tuning the band gap. However, these Si nanostructures are far thinner than the wavelength of visible light in the direction of amplitude, so the incoming light cannot concentrate in the Si nanostructures, resulting in low absorption. Our calculations using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method show that the absorption of Si nanowires and nanowalls with a diameter of 10 nm depends on their arrangement. We have found an effective optical confinement structure for Si nanowalls that is compatible with the quantum size effect.

  13. Structure of the metallic films deposited on small spheres trapped in the rf magnetron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. V.; Pal, A. F.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.

    2016-11-01

    Metallic coatings were deposited onto glass spheres having diameters from several to one hundred micrometers by the magnetron sputtering. Two different experimental schemes were exploited. One of them had the traditional configuration where a magnetron sputter was placed at one hundred millimeters from particles. In this scheme, continuous mechanical agitation in a fluidized bed was used to achieve uniformity of coatings. In the second scheme the treated particles (substrates) levitated in a magnetron rf plasma over a sputtered rf electrode (target) at the distance d of few mm from it and at gas pressure p values of 30-100 mTorr. These parameters are essentially different from those in the traditional sputtering. Agitation due to the features of a particle confinement in dusty plasma was used here to obtain uniform coatings. Thickness and morphology of the obtained coatings were studied. As it is known, film growth rate and structure are determined by the substrate temperature, the densities of ion and neutral atom fluxes to the substrate surface, the radiation flux density, and the heat energy produced due to the surface condensation of atoms and recombination of electrons and ions. These parameters particularly depend on the product of p and d. In the case of magnetron rf dusty plasma, it is possible to achieve the pd value several times lower than the lowest value proper to the first traditional case. Completely different dependencies of the film growth rate and structure on the pd value in these sputtering processes were observed and qualitatively explained.

  14. Structural characterization of toxic oligomers that are kinetically trapped during α-synuclein fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Serene W.; Drakulic, Srdja; Deas, Emma; Ouberai, Myriam; Aprile, Francesco A.; Arranz, Rocío; Ness, Samuel; Roodveldt, Cintia; Guilliams, Tim; De-Genst, Erwin J.; Klenerman, David; Wood, Nicholas W.; Knowles, Tuomas P.J.; Alfonso, Carlos; Rivas, Germán; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Valpuesta, José María; Dobson, Christopher M.; Cremades, Nunilo

    2015-01-01

    We describe the isolation and detailed structural characterization of stable toxic oligomers of α-synuclein that have accumulated during the process of amyloid formation. Our approach has allowed us to identify distinct subgroups of oligomers and to probe their molecular architectures by using cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) image reconstruction techniques. Although the oligomers exist in a range of sizes, with different extents and nature of β-sheet content and exposed hydrophobicity, they all possess a hollow cylindrical architecture with similarities to certain types of amyloid fibril, suggesting that the accumulation of at least some forms of amyloid oligomers is likely to be a consequence of very slow rates of rearrangement of their β-sheet structures. Our findings reveal the inherent multiplicity of the process of protein misfolding and the key role the β-sheet geometry acquired in the early stages of the self-assembly process plays in dictating the kinetic stability and the pathological nature of individual oligomeric species. PMID:25855634

  15. Structural characterization of toxic oligomers that are kinetically trapped during α-synuclein fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Serene W; Drakulic, Srdja; Deas, Emma; Ouberai, Myriam; Aprile, Francesco A; Arranz, Rocío; Ness, Samuel; Roodveldt, Cintia; Guilliams, Tim; De-Genst, Erwin J; Klenerman, David; Wood, Nicholas W; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Alfonso, Carlos; Rivas, Germán; Abramov, Andrey Y; Valpuesta, José María; Dobson, Christopher M; Cremades, Nunilo

    2015-04-21

    We describe the isolation and detailed structural characterization of stable toxic oligomers of α-synuclein that have accumulated during the process of amyloid formation. Our approach has allowed us to identify distinct subgroups of oligomers and to probe their molecular architectures by using cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) image reconstruction techniques. Although the oligomers exist in a range of sizes, with different extents and nature of β-sheet content and exposed hydrophobicity, they all possess a hollow cylindrical architecture with similarities to certain types of amyloid fibril, suggesting that the accumulation of at least some forms of amyloid oligomers is likely to be a consequence of very slow rates of rearrangement of their β-sheet structures. Our findings reveal the inherent multiplicity of the process of protein misfolding and the key role the β-sheet geometry acquired in the early stages of the self-assembly process plays in dictating the kinetic stability and the pathological nature of individual oligomeric species.

  16. Trapped antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kemp, S. L.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif el Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ˜1 T (˜0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be `born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released—the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  17. Trapped antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kemp, S. L.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif el Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ˜1 T (˜0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be `born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released—the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  18. Structure and trapping of three-dimensional dust clouds in a capacitively coupled rf-discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, O.; Block, D.; Piel, A.

    2005-10-31

    In this survey the recently found 'Coulomb balls' are discussed, which show an unusual kind of crystalline order. These three-dimensional dust clouds consisting of hundreds or thousands of micrometer-sized dust particles have a spherical shape and exist in a wide range of plasma conditions. Coulomb balls are optically highly transparent and have macroscopic dimensions of several millimeters in diameter. The clouds allow for the observation of each single particle and thus the complete reconstruction of the crystal structure by means of video microscopy techniques. The particles are arranged in distinct nested shells in which they form patterns with mostly five and six neighbors. The confinement of Coulomb balls by dielectric walls involves electric forces, surface charges, ion drag forces, and thermophoretic levitation. The thermophoretic force field is measured with tracer particles and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The electric forces are derived from simulations with the two-dimensional SIGLO-2D code. It is shown the the sum of all confining forces results in a stable potential well that describes levitation and spherical confinement of the Coulomb ball.

  19. Safe trapping of cesium into pollucite structure by hot-pressing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omerašević, Mia; Matović, Ljiljana; Ružić, Jovana; Golubović, Željko; Jovanović, Uroš; Mentus, Slavko; Dondur, Vera

    2016-06-01

    A simple one-step method with direct thermal conversion at lower temperatures for preparing a stabile Cs-aluminsilicate phase, known as pollucite, is presented. Cs-exchanged form of Na, Ca-LTA type of zeolite (Cs-LTA) was pressureless sintered and hot pressed at certain temperatures in order to obtain pollucite. XRD and FTIR analysis were used to study structural changes of Cs-LTA before and after thermal treatments. Pressureless sintered sample recrystallized into pollucite phase after heat treatment at 1000 °C (3 h) (PLS1000) and hot pressed sample at 750 °C (3 h) using pressure of 35 MPa (HP750), indicating reduced temperature of 250°. SEM micrographs confirmed that HP750 has higher density than PLS1000 which leads to higher value of compressive strength. The HP750 showed better resistance to Cs leaching than the PLS1000. Base on these results one can conclude that hot pressing is the promising method for the permanent disposal of Cs radionuclides.

  20. The VP1 structural protein of enterovirus 71 interacts with human ornithine decarboxylase and gene trap ankyrin repeat.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Wee M; Chow, Vincent T K

    2007-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major etiological agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Several outbreaks in East Asia were associated with neurological complications and numerous deaths. EV71 possesses four structural proteins VP1-VP4 that are necessary in the formation of the pentameric icosahedral capsid. The viral capsid contributes to virulence, and VP1 is a prime target for EV71 vaccine development. Using yeast two-hybrid analysis, we demonstrated binding affinity between VP1 and three human proteins, i.e. ornithine decarboxylase (ODC1), gene trap ankyrin repeat (GTAR), and KIAA0697 expressed in brain tissue. These interactions were authenticated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, and by indirect immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of transfected and EV71-infected Vero cells. The significant interaction between VP1 and ODC1 may compromise the latter's activity, and interfere with polyamine biosynthesis, growth and proliferation of EV71-infected cells. The interaction between VP1 and GTAR is noteworthy, since ankyrin proteins are associated with certain neural cell adhesion molecules and with the CRASH neurological syndrome. Given that VP1 is synthesized in large amounts during productive infection, these viral-host protein interactions may provide insights into the role of VP1 in the pathogenesis of EV71 disease and its neurological complications such as acute flaccid paralysis and encephalitis.

  1. Black silicon solar thin-film microcells integrating top nanocone structures for broadband and omnidirectional light-trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhida; Yao, Yuan; Brueckner, Eric P.; Li, Lanfang; Jiang, Jing; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Logan Liu, Gang

    2014-08-01

    Recently developed classes of monocrystalline silicon solar microcells (μ-cell) can be assembled into modules with characteristics (i.e., mechanically flexible forms, compact concentrator designs, and high-voltage outputs) that would be impossible to achieve using conventional, wafer-based approaches. In this paper, we describe a highly dense, uniform and non-periodic nanocone forest structure of black silicon (bSi) created on optically-thin (30 μm) μ-cells for broadband and omnidirectional light-trapping with a lithography-free and high-throughput plasma texturizing process. With optimized plasma etching conditions and a silicon nitride passivation layer, black silicon μ-cells, when embedded in a polymer waveguiding layer, display dramatic increases of as much as 65.7% in short circuit current, as compared to a bare silicon device. The conversion efficiency increases from 8.1% to 11.5% with a small drop in open circuit voltage and fill factor.

  2. Crystal Structures of Nitroalkane Oxidase: Insights into the Reaction Mechanism from a Covalent Complex of the Flavoenzyme Trapped during Turnover‡

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Akanksha; Valley, Michael P.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.; Orville, Allen M.

    2006-01-01

    Nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) from Fusarium oxysporum catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones with the production of H2O2 and nitrite. The flavoenzyme is a new member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) family, but it does not react with acyl-CoA substrates. We present the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of NAO trapped during the turnover of nitroethane as a covalent N5–FAD adduct (ES*). The homotetrameric structure of ES* was solved by MAD phasing with 52 Se-Met sites in an orthorhombic space group. The electron density for the N5-(2-nitrobutyl)-1,5-dihydro-FAD covalent intermediate is clearly resolved. The structure of ES* was used to solve the crystal structure of oxidized NAO at 2.07 Å resolution. The c axis for the trigonal space group of oxidized NAO is 485 Å, and there are six subunits (1½ holoenzymes) in the asymmetric unit. Four of the active sites contain spermine (EI), a weak competitive inhibitor, and two do not contain spermine (Eox). The active-site structures of Eox, EI, and ES* reveal a hydrophobic channel that extends from the exterior of the protein and terminates at Asp402 and the N5 position on the re face of the FAD. Thus, Asp402 is in the correct position to serve as the active-site base, where it is proposed to abstract the α proton from neutral nitroalkane substrates. The structures for NAO and various members of the ACAD family overlay with root-mean-square deviations between 1.7 and 3.1 Å. The homologous region typically spans more than 325 residues and includes Glu376, which is the active-site base in the prototypical member of the ACAD family. However, NAO and the ACADs exhibit differences in hydrogen-bonding patterns between the respective active-site base, substrate molecules, and FAD. These likely differentiate NAO from the homologues and, consequently, are proposed to result in the unique reaction mechanism of NAO. PMID:16430210

  3. Crystal Structures of Nitroalkane Oxidase: Insights into the Reaction Mechanism of a Covalent Complex of the Flavoenzyme Trapped During Turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Nagpal,A.; Valley, M.; Fitzpatrick, P.; Orville, A.

    2006-01-01

    Nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) from Fusarium oxysporum catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones with the production of H2O2 and nitrite. The flavoenzyme is a new member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) family, but it does not react with acyl-CoA substrates. We present the 2.2 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of NAO trapped during the turnover of nitroethane as a covalent N5-FAD adduct (ES*). The homotetrameric structure of ES* was solved by MAD phasing with 52 Se-Met sites in an orthorhombic space group. The electron density for the N5-(2-nitrobutyl)-1,5-dihydro-FAD covalent intermediate is clearly resolved. The structure of ES* was used to solve the crystal structure of oxidized NAO at 2.07 Angstroms resolution. The c axis for the trigonal space group of oxidized NAO is 485 Angstroms, and there are six subunits (11/2 holoenzymes) in the asymmetric unit. Four of the active sites contain spermine (EI), a weak competitive inhibitor, and two do not contain spermine (E{sup ox}). The active-site structures of E{sup ox}, EI, and ES* reveal a hydrophobic channel that extends from the exterior of the protein and terminates at Asp402 and the N5 position on the re face of the FAD. Thus, Asp402 is in the correct position to serve as the active-site base, where it is proposed to abstract the {alpha} proton from neutral nitroalkane substrates. The structures for NAO and various members of the ACAD family overlay with root-mean-square deviations between 1.7 and 3.1 Angstroms. The homologous region typically spans more than 325 residues and includes Glu376, which is the active-site base in the prototypical member of the ACAD family. However, NAO and the ACADs exhibit differences in hydrogen-bonding patterns between the respective active-site base, substrate molecules, and FAD. These likely differentiate NAO from the homologues and, consequently, are proposed to result in the unique reaction mechanism of NAO.

  4. Octupole degree of freedom for the critical-point candidate nucleus Sm152 in a reflection-asymmetric relativistic mean-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Li, Z. P.; Zhang, S. Q.; Meng, J.

    2010-03-01

    The potential energy surfaces of even-even Sm146-156 are investigated in the constrained reflection-asymmetric relativistic mean-field approach with parameter set PK1. It is shown that the critical-point candidate nucleus Sm152 marks the shape/phase transition not only from U(5) to SU(3) symmetry, but also from the octupole-deformed ground state in Sm150 to the quadrupole-deformed ground state in Sm154. By including the octupole degree of freedom, an energy gap near the Fermi surface for single-particle levels in Sm152 with β2=0.14~0.26 is found and the important role of the octupole deformation driving pair ν2f7/2 and ν1i13/2 is demonstrated.

  5. 34. mu. s isomer at high spin in sup 212 Fr: Evidence for a many-particle octupole coupled state

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, A.P.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Schiffer, K.J.; Davidson, P.M.; Kibedi, T.; Fabricius, B.; Baxter, A.M.; Stuchbery, A.E. Australian National University, G.P.O. Box 4, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory )

    1990-07-01

    A very high spin isomeric state with {tau}{sub {ital m}}=34(3) {mu}s has been observed at an excitation energy of 8.5 MeV in {sup 212}Fr. The experimental evidence favors an {ital E}3 assignment, with a very large {ital E}3 transition strength, {ital B}({ital E}3)=100(12){times}10{sup 3} {ital e}{sup 2}fm{sup 6}, to one of the {gamma} rays de-exciting the isomer. The observed properties are in very good agreement with the characteristics of a 34{sup +} state predicted by the multiparticle octupole vibration model.

  6. Multi-functional stacked light-trapping structure for stabilizing and boosting solar-electricity efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Hsien; Shieh, Jia-Min; Pan, Fu-Ming; Shen, Chang-Hong; Huang, Jung Y.; Wu, Tsung-Ta; Kao, Ming-Hsuan; Hsiao, Tzu-Hsuan; Yu, Peichen; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Lee, Ching-Ting

    2013-08-01

    A sandwiched light-trapping electrode structure, which consists of a capping aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) layer, dispersed plasmonic Au-nanoparticles (Au-NPs), and a micro-structured transparent conductive substrate, is employed to stabilize and boost the conversion-efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. The conformal AZO ultrathin layer (5 nm) smoothened the Au-NP-dispersed electrode surface, thereby reducing defects across the AZO/a-Si:H interface and resulting in a high resistance to photo-degradation in the ultraviolet-blue photoresponse band. With the plasmonic light-trapping structure, the cell has a high conversion-efficiency of 10.1% and the photo-degradation is as small as 7%.

  7. Oxygen trapped by rare earth tetrahedral clusters in Nd4FeOS6: Crystal structure, electronic structure, and magnetic properties

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Qisheng; Taufour, Valentin; Zhang, Yuemei; ...

    2015-05-22

    Single crystals of Nd4FeOS6 were grown from an Fe-S eutectic solution. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a Nd4MnOSe6-type structure (P63mc, a = 9.2693(1) Å, c = 6.6650(1) Å, V = 495.94(1) Å3, Z = 2), featuring parallel chains of face-sharing [FeS6x1/2]4- trigonal antiprisms and interlinked [Nd4OS3]4+ cubane-like clusters. Oxygen atoms were found to be trapped by Nd4 clusters in the [Nd4OS3]4+ chains. Structural differences among Nd4MnOSe6-type Nd4FeOS6 and the related La3CuSiS7- and Pr8CoGa3-type structures have been described. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on Nd4FeOS6 suggested the dominance of antiferromagnetic interactions at low temperature, but no magnetic ordering down to 2 Kmore » was observed. Spin-polarized electronic structure calculations revealed magnetic frustration with dominant antiferromagnetic interactions.« less

  8. Effects of pitfall trap lid transparency and habitat structure on the catches of carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in tame pasture.

    PubMed

    Bell, Aaron J; Phillips, Iain D; Floate, Kevin D; Hoemsen, Brittney M; Phillips, Colin E

    2014-02-01

    Captures of insects in pitfall traps are affected by features of trap design that may confound the interpretation of data. One such feature is a lid suspended over the opening of the trap to exclude debris and rainwater. In this study, we tested whether use of these lids affected captures of carabid beetles by altering the light conditions at the opening to the trap. In one experiment, we examined the effects of lid transparency (opaque, semitransparent, or transparent) on catch rates. In a second experiment, we manipulated the heights (high, medium, or low) of vegetation adjacent to the traps to test for lid transparency and vegetation height interactions. We found that significantly more carabids were captured with use of transparent lids compared with other lid transparencies. Fewest Agonum cupreum Dejean, 1831, were captured with use of opaque lids. No other effects were detected. Given these results, we advocate the use of transparent lids, which provide the benefits of traditional opaque lids while minimizing the effects of lid use on light conditions at the opening to the trap.

  9. Parity splitting and E1/E2 branching in the alternating parity band of {sup 240}Pu from two-center octupole wave functions using supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Jolos, R. V.; Brentano, P. von

    2011-08-15

    An interpretation is suggested of the recently published experimental data on the alternating parity bands in {sup 240}Pu. The interpretation is based on the assumption that the main role in the description of the properties of the alternating parity bands plays the octupole mode which preserves the axial symmetry. The mathematical technique of the supersymmetric quantum mechanics is used for the realization of the model with the two-center octupole wave functions. A good description of the parity splitting and of the ratio of the dipole and quadrupole transitional moments is obtained for the first two bands.

  10. Broadband perfect light trapping in the thinnest monolayer graphene-MoS2 photovoltaic cell: the new application of spectrum-splitting structure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun-Ben; Yang, Wen; Wang, Tong-Biao; Deng, Xin-Hua; Liu, Jiang-Tao

    2016-01-01

    The light absorption of a monolayer graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic (GM-PV) cell in a wedge-shaped microcavity with a spectrum-splitting structure is investigated theoretically. The GM-PV cell, which is three times thinner than the traditional photovoltaic cell, exhibits up to 98% light absorptance in a wide wavelength range. This rate exceeds the fundamental limit of nanophotonic light trapping in solar cells. The effects of defect layer thickness, GM-PV cell position in the microcavity, incident angle, and lens aberration on the light absorptance of the GM-PV cell are explored. Despite these effects, the GM-PV cell can still achieve at least 90% light absorptance with the current technology. Our proposal provides different methods to design light-trapping structures and apply spectrum-splitting systems. PMID:26864749

  11. Nanofriction in cold ion traps.

    PubMed

    Benassi, A; Vanossi, A; Tosatti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sliding friction between crystal lattices and the physics of cold ion traps are so far non-overlapping fields. Two sliding lattices may either stick and show static friction or slip with dynamic friction; cold ions are known to form static chains, helices or clusters, depending on the trapping conditions. Here we show, based on simulations, that much could be learnt about friction by sliding, through, for example, an electric field, the trapped ion chains over a corrugated potential. Unlike infinite chains, in which the theoretically predicted Aubry transition to free sliding may take place, trapped chains are always pinned. Yet, a properly defined static friction still vanishes Aubry-like at a symmetric-asymmetric structural transition, found for decreasing corrugation in both straight and zig-zag trapped chains. Dynamic friction is also accessible in ringdown oscillations of the ion trap. Long theorized static and dynamic one-dimensional friction phenomena could thus become accessible in future cold ion tribology.

  12. Coupled optical-thermal-fluid and structural analyses of novel light-trapping tubular panels for concentrating solar power receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jesus D.; Christian, Joshua M.; Yellowhair, Julius E.; Ho, Clifford K.

    2015-09-01

    Traditional tubular receivers used in concentrating solar power are formed using tubes connected to manifolds to form panels; which in turn are arranged in cylindrical or rectangular shapes. Previous and current tubular receivers, such as the ones used in Solar One, Solar Two, and most recently the Ivanpah solar plants, have used a black paint coating to increase the solar absorptance of the receiver. However, these coatings degrade over time and must be reapplied, increasing the receiver maintenance cost. This paper presents the thermal efficiency evaluation of novel receiver tubular panels that have a higher effective solar absorptance due to a light-trapping effect created by arranging the tubes in each panel into unique geometric configurations. Similarly, the impact of the incidence angle on the effective solar absorptance and thermal efficiency is evaluated. The overarching goal of this work is to achieve effective solar absorptances of ~90% and thermal efficiencies above 85% without using an absorptance coating. Several panel geometries were initially proposed and were down-selected based on structural analyses considering the thermal and pressure loading requirements of molten salt and supercritical carbon-dioxide receivers. The effective solar absorptance of the chosen tube geometries and panel configurations were evaluated using the ray-tracing modeling capabilities of SolTrace. The thermal efficiency was then evaluated by coupling computational fluid dynamics with the ray-tracing results using ANSYS Fluent. Compared to the base case analysis (flat tubular panel), the novel tubular panels have shown an increase in effective solar absorptance and thermal efficiency by several percentage points.

  13. Direct observation of kinetic traps associated with structural transformations leading to multiple pathways of S-layer assembly.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seong-Ho; Chung, Sungwook; Sanii, Babak; Comolli, Luis R; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; De Yoreo, James J

    2012-08-07

    The concept of a folding funnel with kinetic traps describes folding of individual proteins. Using in situ Atomic Force Microscopy to investigate S-layer assembly on mica, we show this concept is equally valid during self-assembly of proteins into extended matrices. We find the S-layer-on-mica system possesses a kinetic trap associated with conformational differences between a long-lived transient state and the final stable state. Both ordered tetrameric states emerge from clusters of the monomer phase, however, they then track along two different pathways. One leads directly to the final low-energy state and the other to the kinetic trap. Over time, the trapped state transforms into the stable state. By analyzing the time and temperature dependencies of formation and transformation we find that the energy barriers to formation of the two states differ by only 0.7 kT, but once the high-energy state forms, the barrier to transformation to the low-energy state is 25 kT. Thus the transient state exhibits the characteristics of a kinetic trap in a folding funnel.

  14. Oxygen trapped by rare earth tetrahedral clusters in Nd4FeOS6: Crystal structure, electronic structure, and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qisheng; Taufour, Valentin; Zhang, Yuemei; Wood, Max; Drtina, Thomas; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Miller, Gordon J.

    2015-05-22

    Single crystals of Nd4FeOS6 were grown from an Fe-S eutectic solution. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a Nd4MnOSe6-type structure (P63mc, a = 9.2693(1) Å, c = 6.6650(1) Å, V = 495.94(1) Å3, Z = 2), featuring parallel chains of face-sharing [FeS6x1/2]4- trigonal antiprisms and interlinked [Nd4OS3]4+ cubane-like clusters. Oxygen atoms were found to be trapped by Nd4 clusters in the [Nd4OS3]4+ chains. Structural differences among Nd4MnOSe6-type Nd4FeOS6 and the related La3CuSiS7- and Pr8CoGa3-type structures have been described. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on Nd4FeOS6 suggested the dominance of antiferromagnetic interactions at low temperature, but no magnetic ordering down to 2 K was observed. Spin-polarized electronic structure calculations revealed magnetic frustration with dominant antiferromagnetic interactions.

  15. Discovery of deep and shallow trap states from step structures of rutile TiO{sub 2} vicinal surfaces by second harmonic and sum frequency generation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Miyauchi, Yoshihiro; Mizutani, Goro

    2011-04-21

    In this report, local electronic structures of steps and terraces on rutile TiO{sub 2} single crystal faces were studied by second harmonic and sum frequency generation (SHG/SFG) spectroscopy. We attained selective measurement of the local electronic states of the step bunches formed on the vicinal (17 18 1) and (15 13 0) surfaces using a recently developed step-selective probing technique. The electronic structures of the flat (110)-(1x1) (the terrace face of the vicinal surfaces) and (011)-(2x1) surfaces were also discussed. The SHG/SFG spectra showed that step structures are mainly responsible for the formation of trap states, since significant resonances from the trap states were observed only from the vicinal surfaces. We detected deep hole trap (DHT) states and shallow electron trap (SET) states selectively from the step bunches on the vicinal surfaces. Detailed analysis of the SHG/SFG spectra showed that the DHT and SET states are more likely to be induced at the top edges of the step bunches than on their hillsides. Unlike the SET states, the DHT states were observed only at the step bunches parallel to [1 1 1][equivalent to the step bunches formed on the (17 18 1) surface]. Photocatalytic activity for each TiO{sub 2} sample was also measured through methylene blue photodegradation reactions and was found to follow the sequence: (110) < (17 18 1) < (15 13 0) < (011), indicating that steps along [0 0 1] are more reactive than steps along [1 1 1]. This result implies that the presence of the DHT states observed from the step bunches parallel to [1 1 1] did not effectively contribute to the methylene blue photodegradation reactions.

  16. Nanocarpets for Trapping Microscopic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noca, Flavio; Chen, Fei; Hunt, Brian; Bronikowski, Michael; Hoenk, Michael; Kowalczyk, Robert; Choi, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Nanocarpets that is, carpets of carbon nanotubes are undergoing development as means of trapping microscopic particles for scientific analysis. Examples of such particles include inorganic particles, pollen, bacteria, and spores. Nanocarpets can be characterized as scaled-down versions of ordinary macroscopic floor carpets, which trap dust and other particulate matter, albeit not purposefully. Nanocarpets can also be characterized as mimicking both the structure and the particle-trapping behavior of ciliated lung epithelia, the carbon nanotubes being analogous to cilia. Carbon nanotubes can easily be chemically functionalized for selective trapping of specific particles of interest. One could, alternatively, use such other three-dimensionally-structured materials as aerogels and activated carbon for the purposeful trapping of microscopic particles. However, nanocarpets offer important advantages over these alternative materials: (1) Nanocarpets are amenable to nonintrusive probing by optical means; and (2) Nanocarpets offer greater surface-to-volume ratios.

  17. 1.55 A structure of the ectoine binding protein TeaA of the osmoregulated TRAP-transporter TeaABC from Halomonas elongata.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Sonja I; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C; Bienert, Ralf; Kunte, Hans-Jörg; Ziegler, Christine

    2008-09-09

    TeaABC from the moderate halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata belongs to the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters (TRAP-T), a family of secondary transporters functioning in conjunction with periplasmic substrate binding proteins. TeaABC facilitates the uptake of the compatible solutes ectoine and hydroxyectoine that are accumulated in the cytoplasm under hyperosmotic stress to protect the cell from dehydration. TeaABC is the only known TRAP-T activated by osmotic stress. Currently, our knowledge on the osmoregulated compatible solute transporter is limited to ABC transporters or conventional secondary transporters. Therefore, this study presents the first detailed analysis of the molecular mechanisms underlying substrate recognition of the substrate binding protein of an osmoregulated TRAP-T. In the present study we were able to demonstrate by isothermal titration calorimetry measurements that TeaA is a high-affinity ectoine binding protein ( K d = 0.19 microM) that also has a significant but somewhat lower affinity to hydroxyectoine ( K d = 3.8 microM). Furthermore, we present the structure of TeaA in complex with ectoine at a resolution of 1.55 A and hydroxyectoine at a resolution of 1.80 A. Analysis of the TeaA binding pocket and comparison of its structure to other compatible solute binding proteins from ABC transporters reveal common principles in compatible solute binding but also significant differences like the solvent-mediated specific binding of ectoine to TeaA.

  18. Solar trap

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, H.S.

    1988-02-09

    A solar trap for collecting solar energy at a concentrated level is described comprising: (a) a compound light funnel including a pair of light reflecting substantially planar members arranged into a trough having a substantially V-shaped cross section; (b) a two dimensional Fresnel lens cover covering the opening of the compound light funnel, the opening being the open diverging end of the substantially V-shaped cross section of the compound light funnel; (c) at least one conduit for carrying a heat transfer fluid disposed substantially adjacent and substantially parallel to the apex line of the compound light funnel.

  19. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  20. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  1. First observation of excited states in {sup 137}Te and the extent of octupole instability in the lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, W.; Korgul, A.; Rzaca-Urban, T.; Schulz, N.; Bentaleb, M.; Lubkiewicz, E.; Durell, J. L.; Leddy, M. J.; Jones, M. A.; Phillips, W. R.

    2000-04-01

    Excited states in {sup 137}Te, populated in spontaneous fission of {sup 248}Cm, were studied by means of prompt-{gamma} spectroscopy, using the EUROGAM2 multidetector array. This is the first observation of excited states in {sup 137}Te. The yrast excitations of {sup 137}Te are due to the three valence neutrons, occupying the {nu}f{sub 7/2} and {nu}h{sub 9/2} orbitals, similarly as observed in its heavier N=85 isotones. Systematic comparison of excited levels in the N=85 isotones shows inconsistencies in spin and parity assignments in {sup 139}Xe and {sup 141}Ba nuclei. The new data for {sup 137}Te do not confirm earlier suggestions that octupole correlations increase in the N=85 isotones, close to the Z=50 closed shell. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Camera Traps on Wildlife Crossing Structures as a Tool in Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) Management - Five-Years Monitoring of Wolf Abundance Trends in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Križan, Josip; Gužvica, Goran

    2016-01-01

    The conservation of gray wolf (Canis lupus) and its coexistence with humans presents a challenge and requires continuous monitoring and management efforts. One of the non-invasive methods that produces high-quality wolf monitoring datasets is camera trapping. We present a novel monitoring approach where camera traps are positioned on wildlife crossing structures that channel the animals, thereby increasing trapping success and increasing the cost-efficiency of the method. In this way we have followed abundance trends of five wolf packs whose home ranges are intersected by a motorway which spans throughout the wolf distribution range in Croatia. During the five-year monitoring of six green bridges we have recorded 28 250 camera-events, 132 with wolves. Four viaducts were monitored for two years, recording 4914 camera-events, 185 with wolves. We have detected a negative abundance trend of the monitored Croatian wolf packs since 2011, especially severe in the northern part of the study area. Further, we have pinpointed the legal cull as probable major negative influence on the wolf pack abundance trends (linear regression, r2 > 0.75, P < 0.05). Using the same approach we did not find evidence for a negative impact of wolves on the prey populations, both wild ungulates and livestock. We encourage strict protection of wolf in Croatia until there is more data proving population stability. In conclusion, quantitative methods, such as the one presented here, should be used as much as possible when assessing wolf abundance trends. PMID:27327498

  3. Camera Traps on Wildlife Crossing Structures as a Tool in Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) Management - Five-Years Monitoring of Wolf Abundance Trends in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Šver, Lidija; Bielen, Ana; Križan, Josip; Gužvica, Goran

    2016-01-01

    The conservation of gray wolf (Canis lupus) and its coexistence with humans presents a challenge and requires continuous monitoring and management efforts. One of the non-invasive methods that produces high-quality wolf monitoring datasets is camera trapping. We present a novel monitoring approach where camera traps are positioned on wildlife crossing structures that channel the animals, thereby increasing trapping success and increasing the cost-efficiency of the method. In this way we have followed abundance trends of five wolf packs whose home ranges are intersected by a motorway which spans throughout the wolf distribution range in Croatia. During the five-year monitoring of six green bridges we have recorded 28 250 camera-events, 132 with wolves. Four viaducts were monitored for two years, recording 4914 camera-events, 185 with wolves. We have detected a negative abundance trend of the monitored Croatian wolf packs since 2011, especially severe in the northern part of the study area. Further, we have pinpointed the legal cull as probable major negative influence on the wolf pack abundance trends (linear regression, r2 > 0.75, P < 0.05). Using the same approach we did not find evidence for a negative impact of wolves on the prey populations, both wild ungulates and livestock. We encourage strict protection of wolf in Croatia until there is more data proving population stability. In conclusion, quantitative methods, such as the one presented here, should be used as much as possible when assessing wolf abundance trends.

  4. Understanding the nanophotonic light-trapping structure of diatom frustule for enhanced solar energy conversion: a theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangfan; Wang, Chen; Baker, Evan; Wang, Jane; Sun, Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Recent designs in nanophotonic light-trapping technologies offer promising potential to develop high-efficiency thin-film solar cell at dramatically reduced cost. However, the lack of a cost effective scalable nanomanufacturing technique remains the main road-block. In nature, diatoms exhibit high solar energy harvesting efficiency due to their frustules (i.e., hard porous cell wall made of silica) possessing remarkable hierarchical nano-features optimized for the photosynthetic process through millions of years evolution. To explore this unique light trapping effect, different species of diatoms (Coscinodiscus sp. and Coscinodiscus wailesii) are cultured and characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) and Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method are employed to numerically study the nanophotonic light-trapping effect. The absorption efficiency is significantly enhanced over the spectrum region centered on 450nm and 700nm where the electric fields are found strongly confined within the active layer. The transmission and reflection spectra are also measured by optical spectroscopy and the experimental results are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  5. gamma-ray spectroscopic study of calcium-48,49 and scandium-50 focusing on low lying octupole vibration excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, David M.

    An inverse kinematic proton scattering experiment was performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) using the GRETINA-S800 detector system in conjunction with the Ursinus College liquid hydrogen target. gamma-ray yields from the experiment were determined using geant4 simulations, generating state population cross sections. These cross sections were used to extract the delta_3 deformation length for the low-lying octupole vibration excitations in Ca-48,49 using the coupled channels analysis code fresco. Particle-core coupling in Ca-49 was studied in comparison to Ca-48 through determination of the neutron and proton deformation lengths. The total inverse kinematic proton scattering deformation lengths were evaluated for the low-lying octupole vibration excitations in Ca-48,49 to be delta_3(Ca-48, 3. -_1) = 1.0(2)fm,delta_3(Ca-49, 9/2. +_1) = 1.2(1)fm, delta_3 (Ca-49, 9/2. +_1) = 1.5(2)fm, delta_3(Ca-49,5/2. +_1) = 1.1(1)fm. Proton and neutron deformation lengths for two of theseoctupole states were also determined to be delta_p(Ca-48, 3. -_1) = 0.9(1)fm,delta_p (Ca-49, 9/2. +_1) = 1.0(1)fm, delta_n(Ca-48, 3. -_1) = 1.1(3)fm, anddelta_n(Ca-49, 9/2. +_1) = 1.3(3)fm. Additionally, the ratios of the neutronto proton transition matrix elements were also determined for these two states to be M_n/M_p(Ca-48, 3. -_1) = 1.7(6) and M_n/M_p(Ca-49, 9/2. +_1) = 2.0(5).Statistically, the derived values for these two nuclei are nearly identical.

  6. Instability of Electrons Trapped by the Coronal Magnetic Field and Its Evidence in the Fine Structure (Zebra Pattern) of Solar Radio Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, E. Y.

    2013-06-01

    Solar radio emission is a significant source of information regarding coronal plasma parameters and the processes occurring in the solar atmosphere. High resolution frequency, space, and time observations together with the developed theory make it possible to retrieve physical conditions in the radiation source and recognize the radiation mechanisms responsible for various kinds of solar radio emission. In particular, the high brightness temperature of many bursts testifies to coherent radiation mechanisms, that is, to plasma instabilities in the corona. As an example, the fine structure of solar radio spectra looking like a set of quasi-harmonic stripes of enhanced and lowered radiation, which is observed against the type IV continuum at the post-flare phase of activity, is considered. It is shown that such emission arises from a trap-like source filled with a weakly anisotropic equilibrium plasma and a small addition of electrons which have a shortage of small velocities perpendicular to the magnetic field. For many recorded events with the mentioned fine spectral structure the instability processes responsible for the observed features are recognized. Namely, the background type IV continuum is due to the loss-cone instability of hot non-equilibrium electrons, and the enhanced striped radiation results from the double-plasma-resonance effect in the regions where the plasma frequency f p coincides with the harmonics of electron gyrofrequency f B ; f p= sf B . Estimations of the electron number density and magnetic field in the coronal magnetic traps, as well as the electron number density and velocities of hot electrons necessary to excite the radiation with the observed fine structure, are given. It is also shown that in some cases several ensembles of non-equilibrium electrons can coexist in magnetic traps during solar flares and that its radio signature sensitively depends on the parameters of the distribution functions of the various ensembles.

  7. Calculation of vibrational branching ratios and hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F and its suitability for laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Yin, Yanning; Wei, Bin; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    More recently, laser cooling of the diatomic radical magnesium monofluoride (24Mg19F ) is being experimentally preformed [Appl. Phys. Express 8, 092701 (2015), 10.7567/APEX.8.092701 and Opt. Express 22, 28645 (2014), 10.1364/OE.22.028645] and was also studied theoretically [Phys. Rev. A 91, 042511 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.042511]. However, some important problems still remain unsolved, so, in our paper, we perform further theoretical study for the feasibility of laser cooling and trapping the 24Mg19F molecule. At first, the highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors of the main transitions are verified by the closed-form approximation, Morse approximation, and Rydberg-Klein-Rees inversion methods, respectively. Afterwards, we investigate the lower X 2Σ1/2 + hyperfine manifolds using a quantum effective Hamiltonian approach and obtain the zero-field hyperfine spectrum with an accuracy of less than 30 kHz ˜5 μ K compared with the experimental results, and then find out that one cooling beam and one or two repumping beams with their first-order sidebands are enough to implement an efficient laser slowing and cooling of 24Mg19F . Meanwhile, we also calculate the accurate hyperfine structure magnetic g factors of the rotational state (X 2Σ1/2 +,N =1 ) and briefly discuss the influence of the external fields on the hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F as well as its possibility of preparing three-dimensional magneto-optical trapping. Finally we give an explanation for the difference between the Stark and Zeeman effects from the perspective of parity and time reversal symmetry. Our study shows that, besides appropriate excitation wavelengths, the short lifetime for the first excited state A 2Π1 /2 , and lighter mass, the 24Mg19F radical could be a good candidate molecule amenable to laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping.

  8. Simulation and analysis of the absorption enhancement in p-i-n InGaN/GaN solar cell using photonic crystal light trapping structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil Deep; Janyani, Vijay

    2016-10-01

    The structure of p-i-n InGaN/GaN based solar cell having a photonic crystal (PhC)-based light trapping structure (LTS) at the top assisted by the planar metallic (aluminum) back reflector (BR) is proposed. We propose two different designs for efficiency enhancement: in one we keep the PhC structure etching depth extending from the top antireflective coating (ARC) of indium tin oxide (ITO) up to the p-GaN layer (which is beneath the ITO and above the active layer), whereas in the other design, the PhC LTS etching depth has been extended up to the InxGa1-xN absorbing layer, starting from the top ITO layer. The theoretical optical simulation studies and optimization of the required parameters of the structure, which help to investigate and demonstrate the effectiveness of the LTS in the efficiency enhancement of the structure, are presented. The work also demonstrates the Lambertian light trapping limits for the practical indium concentrations in a InxGa1-xN active layer cell. The paper also presents the comparison between the proposed designs and compares their results with that of a planar reference cell. The studies are carried out for various indium concentrations. The results indicate considerable enhancement in the efficiency due to the PhC LTS, mainly because of better coupling, low reflectance, and diffraction capability of the proposed LTS, although it is still under the Lambertian limits. The performance evaluation of the proposed structure with respect to the angle of incident light has also been done, indicating improved performance. The parameters have been optimized and calculated by means of rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) method.

  9. Trapping ions in a segmented ring trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakov, B. P.; Sterk, J. D.; Benito, F.; Haltli, R.; Tigges, C. P.; Stick, D.; Blain, M. G.; Moehring, D. L.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate robust trapping in an ion trap which has a ring shaped RF node. Ions are back-side loaded through a small 10 μm diameter loading hole and we have demonstrated thousands of complete circuits around the trap. Each circuit passes through 44 trapping zones; the trap has 89 independent DC control electrodes. Measurements of the tangential secular frequency indicate a weak dependence on the RF and the loading hole. The ion trap is fabricated using four metal layers, allowing for the inner islanded electrodes to be electrically routed underneath the trap with negligible effects on the trapped ions. [4pt] This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. How varying pest and trap densities affect Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) capture in pheromone traps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is an important insect pest in food processing facilities. Pheromone trapping is frequently used to monitor red flour beetle populations in structures; however, the optimal trap density and the relationship between trap ...

  11. Computational analysis of thin film InGaAs/GaAs quantum well solar cells with back side light trapping structures.

    PubMed

    McPheeters, Claiborne O; Yu, Edward T

    2012-11-05

    Simulations of thin film (~2.5 µm thick) InGaAs/GaAs quantum well solar cells with various back side reflective and planar, symmetric scattering structures used for light trapping have been performed using rigorous coupled-wave analysis. Two-dimensional periodic metal/dielectric scattering structures were numerically optimized for Airmass 0 photocurrent generation for each device structure. The simulation results indicate that the absorption spectra of devices with both reflective and scattering structures are largely determined by the Fabry-Perot resonance characteristics of the thin film device structure. The scattering structures substantially increase absorption in the quantum wells at wavelengths longer than the GaAs absorption edge through a combination of coupling to modes of the thin film device structures and by reducing parasitic metal absorption compared to planar metal reflectors. For Airmass 0 illumination and 100% carrier collection, the estimated short-circuit current density of devices with In(0.3)Ga(0.7)As/GaAs quantum wells improves by up to 4.6 mA/cm(2) (15%) relative to a GaAs homojunction device, with the improvement resulting approximately equally from scattering of light into thin film modes and reduction of metal absorption compared to a planar reflective layer.

  12. Optimal design of light trapping in thin-film solar cells enhanced with graded SiNx and SiOxNy structure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongxiang; Chen, Fei; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Lianmeng

    2012-05-07

    In this paper, a graded SiNx and SiOxNy structure is proposed as antireflection coatings deposited on top of amorphous silicon (α-Si) thin-film solar cell. The structural parameters are optimized by differential evolution in order to enhance the optical absorption of solar cells to the greatest degree. The optimal design result demonstrates that the nonlinear profile of dielectric constant is superior to the linear profile, and discrete multilayer graded antireflection coatings can outperform near continuously graded antireflection coatings. What's more, the electric field intensity distributions clearly demonstrate the proposed graded SiNx and SiOxNy structure can remarkably increase the magnitude of electric field of a-Si:H layer and hence, enhance the light trapping of a-Si:H thin-film solar cells in the whole visible and near-infrared spectrum. Finally, we have compared the optical absorption enhancements of proposed graded SiNx and SiOxNy structure with nanoparticles structure, and demonstrated that it can result in higher enhancements compared to the dielectric SiC and TiO2 nanoparticles. We have shown that the optimal graded SiNx and SiOxNy structure optimized by differential evolution can reach 33.31% enhancement which has exceeded the ideal limit of 32% of nanoparticles structure including plasmonic Ag nanoparticles, dielectric SiC and TiO2 nanoparticles.

  13. Structure elucidation of degradation products of the antibiotic amoxicillin with ion trap MS(n) and accurate mass determination by ESI TOF.

    PubMed

    Nägele, Edgar; Moritz, Ralf

    2005-10-01

    Today, it is necessary to identify relevant compounds appearing in discovery and development of new drug substances in the pharmaceutical industry. For that purpose, the measurement of accurate molecular mass and empirical formula calculation is very important for structure elucidation in addition to other available analytical methods. In this work, the identification and confirmation of degradation products in a finished dosage form of the antibiotic drug amoxicillin obtained under stress conditions will be demonstrated. Structure elucidation is performed utilizing liquid chromatography (LC) ion trap MS/MS and MS3 together with accurate mass measurement of the molecular ions and of the collision induced dissociation (CID) fragments by liquid chromatography electro spray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-TOF).

  14. Analysis of the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions by optical spectroscopy in an electron-beam ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windberger, A.; Torretti, F.; Borschevsky, A.; Ryabtsev, A.; Dobrodey, S.; Bekker, H.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U.; Ubachs, W.; Hoekstra, R.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Versolato, O. O.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally re-evaluate the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions. These ions are essential in bright extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) plasma-light sources for next-generation nanolithography, but their complex electronic structure is an open challenge for both theory and experiment. We combine optical spectroscopy of magnetic dipole M 1 transitions, in a wavelength range covering 260 to 780 nm, with charge-state selective ionization in an electron beam ion trap. Our measurements confirm the predictive power of ab initio calculations based on Fock space coupled cluster theory. We validate our line identification using semiempirical cowan calculations with adjustable wave-function parameters. Available Ritz combinations further strengthen our analysis. Comparison with previous work suggests that line identifications in the EUV need to be revisited.

  15. The structure and processes of the Siberian Traps sub-volcanic complex and consequences for end-Permian environmental crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, H.; Polozov, A. G.; Planke, S.

    2013-12-01

    The emplacement of the Siberian Traps Large igneous province is regarded as the key processes that initiated the end-Permian environmental crisis. The details of this link are however still under investigation. Among the suggestions are lava degassing of mantle- and crustal-derived gases, explosive lava and phreatomagmatic eruptions, and gas release from contact metamorphism related to the sub-volcanic sill complex. Whereas the lava pile is relatively well studied and investigated, the sub-volcanic sills, dikes, and contact aureoles are poorly studied and documented. We present borehole and field data of sills and contact aureoles from across the Siberian Traps, from Norilsk in the north to Bratsk in the south. The data have been compiled during three field campaigns in 2004, 2006, and 2010. The sill geometries and thicknesses varies considerably from kilometer-scale intrusive complexes to individual thin sills of a few tens of meters. In contrast to several other LIPs, sills are also emplaced within the extrusive pile. Thick sills (30-80 meters) occur in high abundance in the upper part of the sedimentary succession, affecting the coal-rich Tungusska Series sediments. Moreover, very thick sills (100-300 meters) are also emplaced within the vast Cambrian salt formations. We show that depending on the specific location within the province and the emplacement depth, the potential for degassing of both greenhouse gases (CH4, CO2), aerosols (SO2), and ozone destructive gases (CH3Cl, CH3Br) was in the 103 to 104 Gt range.

  16. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  17. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  18. Acoustic trapping of active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatori, Sho C.; de Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F.

    2016-03-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently `explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies.

  19. Structural characterization of cyclosporin A, C and microbial bio-transformed cyclosporin A analog AM6 using HPLC-ESI-ion trap-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eun Young; Shrestha, Anil; Hoang, Nguyen Huu; Huong, Nguyen Lan; Yoon, Yeo Joon; Park, Je Won

    2014-06-01

    Cyclosporin A (CyA), a cyclic undecapeptide produced by a number of fungi, contains 11 unusual amino acids, and has been one of the most commonly prescribed immunosuppressive drugs. To date, there are over sixty different analogs reported as congeners and analogs resulting from precursor-directed biosynthesis, human CYP-mediated metabolites, or microbial bio-transformed analogs. However, there is still a need for more structurally diverse CyA analogs in order to discover new biological potentials and/or improve the physicochemical properties of the existing cyclosporins. As a result of the complexity of the resulting mass spectrometric (MS) data caused by its unusual amino acid composition and its cyclic nature, structural characterization of these cyclic peptides based on fragmentation patterns using multiple tandem MS analyses is challenging task. Here, we describe, an efficient HPLC-ESI-ion trap MS(n) (up to MS(8)) was developed for the identification of CyA and CyC, a (Thr(2))CyA congener in which L-aminobutyric acid (Abu) is replaced by L-threonine (Thr). In addition, we examined the fragmentation patterns of a CyA analog obtained from the cultivation of a recombinant Streptomyces venezuelae strain fed with CyA, assigning this analog as (γ-hydroxy-MeLeu(6))CyA (otherwise, known as an human CYP metabolite AM6). This is the first report on both the MS(n)-aided identification of CyC and the structural characterization of a CyA analog by employing HPLC-ESI-ion trap MS(n) analysis.

  20. On transition strengths of E1, E2, & E3 in the regions of mixed quadrupole-octupole collectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, John; Luo, Y. X.; Hamilton, Joseph; Ramayya, A. V.; Donangelo, Raul

    2010-11-01

    We review the main highlights of experiment and theory for the lowest three electric multipolarities, B(E1), B(E2), and B(E3), for nuclei where quadrupole and octupole collectivity may both occur. The principal regions of interest are around 6 to 12 protons and 6 to 12 neutrons beyond the doubly-closed shell nuclei ^132Sn and ^208Pb. We examine microscopic theoretical calculationsootnotetextW. Zhang et al., Phys. Rev. C 81, 034302 (2010) and references therein. in which deformations are driven by Nilsson orbitals near the Fermi energy. We also focus attention on recent experimentalootnotetextP.E. Garrett et al., Phys. Rev. Letts. 103, 062501 (2009) studies of ^152Sm, where the ground band and associated K=1^- band are mirrored by another 0^+ and 1^- band about 0.7 MeV higher in energy. We suggest that a monopole pairing force alone is insufficient to cause this mirroring, and monopole-plus-quadrupole pairing or a more realistic nucleon-nucleon force is needed.

  1. Trapping RNase A on MCM41 pores: effects on structure stability, product inhibition and overall enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Matlahov, Irina; Geiger, Yasmin; Goobes, Gil

    2014-05-21

    Catalytic activity of enzymes can be drastically modified by immobilization on surfaces of different materials. It is particularly effective when the dimensions of the biomolecules and adsorption sites on the material surfaces are commensurate. This can be utilized to hinder the biological activity of degradation enzymes and switch off undesired biological processes. Ribonucleases are particularly attractive targets for complete sequestration being efficient at disintegrating viable RNA molecules. Here we show that efficient quenching of ribonuclease A activity can be achieved by immobilization on the surface of MCM41 porous silica. Electron microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and adsorption isotherm measurements of ribonuclease A on the MCM41 surface are used to demonstrate that the enzyme adsorbs on the external surface of the porous silica through electrostatic interactions that overcome the unfavorable entropy change as the protein gets trapped on the surface, and that immobilization shifts up its denaturation temperature by 20-25 °C. Real-time kinetic measurements, using single injection titration calorimetry, demonstrate that enzymatic activity towards hydrolysis of cyclic nucleotides is lowered by nearly two orders of magnitude on MCM41 and that active inhibition by the formed product is much less effective on the surface than in solution.

  2. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Structural Feature and Solute Trapping of Rapidly Grown Ni3Sn Intermetallic Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Hai-Yan; Wang, Wei-Li; Wei, Bing-Bo

    2009-11-01

    The rapid dendritic growth of primary Ni3Sn phase in undercooled Ni-30.9%Sn-5%Ge alloy is investigated by using the glass fluxing technique. The dendritic growth velocity of Ni3Sn compound is measured as a function of undercooling, and a velocity of 2.47 m/s is achieved at the maximum undercooling of 251 K (0.17TL). The addition of the Ge element reduces its growth velocity as compared with the binary Ni75Sn25 alloy. During rapid solidification, the Ni3Sn compound behaves like a normal solid solution and it displays a morphological transition of “coarse dendrite-equiaxed grain-vermicular structure" with the increase of undercooling. Significant solute trapping of Ge atoms occurs in the whole undercooling range.

  3. Scalable Designs for Planar Ion Trap Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, R. E.

    2007-03-01

    Recent progress in quantum operations with trapped ion qubits has been spectacular for qubit counts up to approximately ten ions. Two qubit quantum gates, quantum error correction, simple quantum algorithms and entanglement of up to 8 qubits have been demonstrated by groups including those at NIST, University of Michigan, University of Innsbruck and Oxford. Interesting problems in quantum information processing including quantum simulations of condensed matter systems and quantum repeaters for long distance quantum communication systems require hundreds or thousands of qubits. Initial designs for an ion trap ``Quantum CCD'' using spatially multiplexed planar ion traps as well as initial experiments using planar ion traps are promising routes to scaling up the number of trapped ions to more interesting levels. We describe designs for planar ion traps fabricated using silicon VLSI techniques. This approach allows the control voltages required for the moving and positioning the ions in the array to be connected vertically through the silicon substrate to underlying CMOS electronics. We have developed techniques that allow the ion trap structures to be fabricated monolithically on top of the CMOS electronics. The planar traps have much weaker trapping depths than the more conventional multi-level traps. However, the trap depths are still adequate for trapping hot ions from many ion sources. The planar traps also involve more complex configurations for laser cooling and micromotion control. Initial solutions to these problems will be presented. Laser access to the ions can be provided by laser beams grazing the trap surface or by using vertical slots through the trap chip. We will also discuss limits imposed by power dissipation and ion transport through trap junctions (e.g. crosses and Ys). We have fabricated these VLSI based traps in a number of configurations. Initial fabrication and packaging challenges will be discussed. D. Kielpinski, C. Monroe, and D.J. Wineland

  4. The nature of the TRAP–Anti-TRAP complex

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Heddle, Jonathan G.; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Unzai, Satoru; Akashi, Satoko; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R. H.

    2009-01-01

    Tryptophan biosynthesis is subject to exquisite control in species of Bacillus and has become one of the best-studied model systems in gene regulation. The protein TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein) predominantly forms a ring-shaped 11-mer, which binds cognate RNA in the presence of tryptophan to suppress expression of the trp operon. TRAP is itself regulated by the protein Anti-TRAP, which binds to TRAP and prevents RNA binding. To date, the nature of this interaction has proved elusive. Here, we describe mass spectrometry and analytical centrifugation studies of the complex, and 2 crystal structures of the TRAP–Anti-TRAP complex. These crystal structures, both refined to 3.2-Å resolution, show that Anti-TRAP binds to TRAP as a trimer, sterically blocking RNA binding. Mass spectrometry shows that 11-mer TRAP may bind up to 5 AT trimers, and an artificial 12-mer TRAP may bind 6. Both forms of TRAP make the same interactions with Anti-TRAP. Crystallization of wild-type TRAP with Anti-TRAP selectively pulls the 12-mer TRAP form out of solution, so the crystal structure of wild-type TRAP–Anti-TRAP complex reflects a minor species from a mixed population. PMID:19164760

  5. Trapping polar molecules in an ac trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-12-15

    Polar molecules in high-field seeking states cannot be trapped in static traps as Maxwell's equations do not allow a maximum of the electric field in free space. It is possible to generate an electric field that has a saddle point by superposing an inhomogeneous electric field to an homogeneous electric field. In such a field, molecules are focused along one direction, while being defocused along the other. By reversing the direction of the inhomogeneous electric field the focusing and defocusing directions are reversed. When the fields are being switched back and forth at the appropriate rate, this leads to a net focusing force in all directions. We describe possible electrode geometries for creating the desired fields and discuss their merits. Trapping of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} ammonia molecules in a cylindrically symmetric ac trap is demonstrated. We present measurements of the spatial distribution of the trapped cloud as a function of the settings of the trap and compare these to both a simple model assuming a linear force and to full three-dimensional simulations of the experiment. With the optimal settings, molecules within a phase-space volume of 270 mm{sup 3} (m/s){sup 3} remain trapped. This corresponds to a trap depth of about 5 mK and a trap volume of about 20 mm{sup 3}.

  6. Effects of oxide traps, interface traps, and border traps'' on metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Winokur, P.S.; Reber, R.A. Jr.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Schwank, J.R.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Riewe, L.C. )

    1993-05-15

    We have identified several features of the 1/[ital f] noise and radiation response of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices that are difficult to explain with standard defect models. To address this issue, and in response to ambiguities in the literature, we have developed a revised nomenclature for defects in MOS devices that clearly distinguishes the language used to describe the physical location of defects from that used to describe their electrical response. In this nomenclature, oxide traps'' are simply defects in the SiO[sub 2] layer of the MOS structure, and interface traps'' are defects at the Si/SiO[sub 2] interface. Nothing is presumed about how either type of defect communicates with the underlying Si. Electrically, fixed states'' are defined as trap levels that do not communicate with the Si on the time scale of the measurements, but switching states'' can exchange charge with the Si. Fixed states presumably are oxide traps in most types of measurements, but switching states can either be interface traps or near-interfacial oxide traps that can communicate with the Si, i.e., border traps'' [D. M. Fleetwood, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. [bold NS]-[bold 39], 269 (1992)]. The effective density of border traps depends on the time scale and bias conditions of the measurements. We show the revised nomenclature can provide focus to discussions of the buildup and annealing of radiation-induced charge in non-radiation-hardened MOS transistors, and to changes in the 1/[ital f] noise of MOS devices through irradiation and elevated-temperature annealing.

  7. Crystal structure of CobK reveals strand-swapping between Rossmann-fold domains and molecular basis of the reduced precorrin product trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shuang; Sushko, Oleksandr; Deery, Evelyne; Warren, Martin J.; Pickersgill, Richard W.

    2015-11-01

    CobK catalyzes the essential reduction of the precorrin ring in the cobalamin biosynthetic pathway. The crystal structure of CobK reveals that the enzyme, despite not having the signature sequence, comprises two Rossmann fold domains which bind coenzyme and substrate respectively. The two parallel β-sheets have swapped their last β-strands giving a novel sheet topology which is an interesting variation on the Rossmann-fold. The trapped ternary complex with coenzyme and product reveals five conserved basic residues that bind the carboxylates of the tetrapyrrole tightly anchoring the product. A loop, disordered in both the apoenzyme and holoenzyme structures, closes around the product further tightening binding. The structure is consistent with a mechanism involving protonation of C18 and pro-R hydride transfer from NADPH to C19 of precorrin-6A and reveals the interactions responsible for the specificity of CobK. The almost complete burial of the reduced precorrin product suggests a remarkable form of metabolite channeling where the next enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway triggers product release.

  8. Structural, electrical, band alignment and charge trapping analysis of nitrogen-annealed Pt/HfO2/p-Si (100) MIS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arvind; Mondal, Sandip; Rao, K. S. R. Koteswara

    2016-12-01

    Low leakage current density and high relative permittivity (dielectric constant) are the key factor in order to replace the SiO2 from Si-based technology toward its further downscaling. HfO2 thin films received significant attention due to its excellent optoelectronic properties. In this work, ultra-thin (17 nm) HfO2 films on Si substrate are fabricated by RF sputtering. As deposited films are amorphous in nature and in order to get the reasonable high dielectric constant, the films are annealed (700 °C, 30 min) in nitrogen environment. A high refractive index (2.08) and small grain size ( 10) nm were extracted from ellipsometry and XRD, respectively. The AFM study revealed a small RMS surface roughness 9 Å. For electrical characterization, films are integrated in metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors structure. The oxide capacitance ( C ox), flat band capacitance ( C FB), flat band voltage ( V FB), and oxide-trapped charges ( Q ot) calculated from high-frequency (1 MHz) C- V curve are 490, 241 pF, 1.21 V and 1.8 × 1012 cm-2, respectively. The dielectric constant calculated from accumulation capacitance is 17. The films show a low leakage current density 6.8 × 10-9 A/cm2 at +1 V, and this is due to the reduction in oxygen vacancies concentration as we performed annealing in N2 environment. The band gap of the films is estimated from O 1 s loss spectra and found 5.7 eV. The electron affinity ( χ) and HfO2/Si barrier height (conduction band offset) extracted from UPS spectra are 1.88 and 2.17 eV, respectively. A trap state with 0.99 eV activation energy below the conduction band edge is found and assigned to the fourfold coordinated oxygen vacancy in m-HfO2.

  9. Trapping and Structural Elucidation of a Very Advanced Intermediate in the Lesion-Extrusion Pathway of hOGG1

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seongmin; Radom, Christopher T.; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2008-07-28

    Here we present the first structure of a very advanced intermediate in the lesion-extrusion pathway of a DNA glycosylase, human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1), and a substrate DNA containing a mutagenic lesion, 8-oxoguanine (oxoG). The structure was obtained by irradiation and flash-freezing of a disulfide-cross-linked (DXLed) complex of hOgg1 bound to DNA containing a novel photocaged derivative of oxoG. The X-ray structure reveals that, upon irradiation, the oxoG lesion has transited from the exosite to the active site pocket, but has not undergone cleavage by the enzyme. Furthermore, all but one of the specificity-determining interactions between the lesion and the enzyme are unformed in the flashed complex (FC), because active site functionality and elements of the DNA backbone are mispositioned. This structure thus provides a first glimpse into the structure of a very late-stage intermediate in the lesion-extrusion pathway -- the latest observed to date for any glycosylase -- in which the oxoG has undergone insertion into the enzyme active site following photodeprotection, but the enzyme and DNA have not yet completed the slower process of adjusting to the presence of the lesion in the active site.

  10. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analyses of Ni species trapped in graphene sheet of carbon nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Ushiro, Mayuko; Uno, Kanae; Fujikawa, Takashi; Sato, Yoshinori; Tohji, Kazuyuki; Watari, Fumio; Chun, W.-J.; Koike, Yuichiro; Asakura, Kiyotaka

    2006-04-01

    Metal impurities in the carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers play an important role in understanding their physical and chemical properties. We apply the Ni K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure analyses to the local electronic and geometric structures around embedded Ni impurities used as catalysts in a carbon nanofiber in combination with multiple scattering analyses. We find almost Ni catalysts as metal particles are removed by the purification treatment. Even after the purification, residual 100 ppm Ni species are still absorbed; most of them are in monomer structure with Ni-C bond length 1.83 A, and each of them is substituted for a carbon atom in a graphene sheet.

  11. High-Resolution Crystal Structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase with Trapped Intermediates Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism and Inhibition by Aldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-11

    Nicotinamidases are salvage enzymes that convert nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are essential for the recycling of nicotinamide into NAD{sup +} in most prokaryotes and most single-cell and multicellular eukaryotes, but not in mammals. The significance of these enzymes for nicotinamide salvage and for NAD{sup +} homeostasis has stimulated interest in nicotinamidases as possible antibiotic targets. Nicotinamidases are also regulators of intracellular nicotinamide concentrations, thereby regulating signaling of downstream NAD{sup +}-consuming enzymes, such as the NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylases (sirtuins). Here, we report several high-resolution crystal structures of the nicotinamidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic) in unliganded and ligand-bound forms. The structure of the C136S mutant in complex with nicotinamide provides details about substrate binding, while a trapped nicotinoyl thioester in a complex with SpNic reveals the structure of the proposed thioester reaction intermediate. Examination of the active site of SpNic reveals several important features, including a metal ion that coordinates the substrate and the catalytically relevant water molecule and an oxyanion hole that both orients the substrate and offsets the negative charge that builds up during catalysis. Structures of this enzyme with bound nicotinaldehyde inhibitors elucidate the mechanism of inhibition and provide further details about the catalytic mechanism. In addition, we provide a biochemical analysis of the identity and role of the metal ion that orients the ligand in the active site and activates the water molecule responsible for hydrolysis of the substrate. These data provide structural evidence of several proposed reaction intermediates and allow for a more complete understanding of the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme.

  12. Structural determinants for binding of sorting nexin 17 (SNX17) to the cytoplasmic adaptor protein Krev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1).

    PubMed

    Stiegler, Amy L; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Weizhi; Boggon, Titus J

    2014-09-05

    Sorting nexin 17 (SNX17) is a member of the family of cytoplasmic sorting nexin adaptor proteins that regulate endosomal trafficking of cell surface proteins. SNX17 localizes to early endosomes where it directly binds NPX(Y/F) motifs in the cytoplasmic tails of its target receptors to mediate their rates of endocytic internalization, recycling, and/or degradation. SNX17 has also been implicated in mediating cell signaling and can interact with cytoplasmic proteins. KRIT1 (Krev interaction trapped 1), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein associated with cerebral cavernous malformations, has previously been shown to interact with SNX17. Here, we demonstrate that SNX17 indeed binds directly to KRIT1 and map the binding to the second Asn-Pro-Xaa-Tyr/Phe (NPX(Y/F)) motif in KRIT1. We further characterize the interaction as being mediated by the FERM domain of SNX17. We present the co-crystal structure of SNX17-FERM with the KRIT1-NPXF2 peptide to 3.0 Å resolution and demonstrate that the interaction is highly similar in structure and binding affinity to that between SNX17 and P-selectin. We verify the molecular details of the interaction by site-directed mutagenesis and pulldown assay and thereby confirm that the major binding site for SNX17 is confined to the NPXF2 motif in KRIT1. Taken together, our results verify a direct interaction between SNX17 and KRIT1 and classify KRIT1 as a SNX17 binding partner.

  13. Linear ion-trap MSn with high resolution mass spectrometry reveals structural diversity of epidermal 1-O-acyl ceramide family in mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meei-Hua; Miner, Jeffery; Turk, John; Hsu, Fong-Fu

    2017-02-02

    1-O-acylceramide is a new class of epidermal ceramide found in humans and mice. Here, we report ESI linear ion-trap (LIT) multiple stage mass spectrometric (MSn) approach with high resolution towards structural characterization of this lipid family isolated from mice. Molecular species desorbed as the [M + H]+ ions was subjected to LIT MS2 to yield predominately the [M + H - H2O]+ ions, followed by MS3 to cleave the 1-O-acyl residue to yield the [M + H - H2O - (1-O-fatty acid)]+ ions. The structures of the N-acyl chain and long-chain base (LCB) of the molecule were determined by MS4 on ([M + H - H2O - (1-O-fatty acid)]+) ions that yielded multiple sets of specific ions. Using this approach, isomers varied in the 1-O-acyl (from 14:0- to 26:0-O-acyl) and N-acyl chains (from 20:0- to 26:0-N-acyl) with 18:1-sphingosine as the major LCB were found for the entire family. Minor isomers consisting of 16:1- 17:1-, 18:2-, and 19:1-sphingosine LCB, with odd fatty acyl chain, or with monounsaturated N- or O- fatty acyl substituents were also identified. An estimation of more than 700 1-O-acylceramide species, largely isobaric isomers are present, underscoring the complexity of this ceramide family.

  14. Structural Basis for Small G Protein Effector Interaction of Ras-related Protein 1 (Rap1) and Adaptor Protein Krev Interaction Trapped 1 (KRIT1)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Rong; Draheim, Kyle M.; Liu, Weizhi; Calderwood, David A.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2012-09-17

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) affect 0.1-0.5% of the population resulting in leaky vasculature and severe neurological defects. KRIT1 (Krev interaction trapped-1) mutations associate with {approx}40% of familial CCMs. KRIT1 is an effector of Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1) GTPase. Rap1 relocalizes KRIT1 from microtubules to cell membranes to impact integrin activation, potentially important for CCM pathology. We report the 1.95 {angstrom} co-crystal structure of KRIT1 FERM domain in complex with Rap1. Rap1-KRIT1 interaction encompasses an extended surface, including Rap1 Switch I and II and KRIT1 FERM F1 and F2 lobes. Rap1 binds KRIT1-F1 lobe using a GTPase-ubiquitin-like fold interaction but binds KRIT1-F2 lobe by a novel interaction. Point mutagenesis confirms the interaction. High similarity between KRIT1-F2/F3 and talin is revealed. Additionally, the mechanism for FERM domains acting as GTPase effectors is suggested. Finally, structure-based alignment of each lobe suggests classification of FERM domains as ERM-like and TMFK-like (talin-myosin-FAK-KRIT-like) and that FERM lobes resemble domain 'modules.'

  15. Sorption vacuum trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

  16. Ion trap simulation tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

    2009-02-01

    Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

  17. A light-trapping strategy for nanocrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells using three-dimensionally assembled nanoparticle structures.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kyungyeon; Jang, Eunseok; Jang, Segeun; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Jang, Min Seok; Choi, Hoseop; Cho, Jun-Sik; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-02-05

    We report three-dimensionally assembled nanoparticle structures inducing multiple plasmon resonances for broadband light harvesting in nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin-film solar cells. A three-dimensional multiscale (3DM) assembly of nanoparticles generated using a multi-pin spark discharge method has been accomplished over a large area under atmospheric conditions via ion-assisted aerosol lithography. The multiscale features of the sophisticated 3DM structures exhibit surface plasmon resonances at multiple frequencies, which increase light scattering and absorption efficiency over a wide spectral range from 350-1100 nm. The multiple plasmon resonances, together with the antireflection functionality arising from the conformally deposited top surface of the 3D solar cell, lead to a 22% and an 11% improvement in power conversion efficiency of the nc-Si:H thin-film solar cells compared to flat cells and cells employing nanoparticle clusters, respectively. Finite-difference time-domain simulations were also carried out to confirm that the improved device performance mainly originates from the multiple plasmon resonances generated from three-dimensionally assembled nanoparticle structures.

  18. Bloodmeal host congregation and landscape structure impact the estimation of female mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) abundance using dry ice-baited traps.

    PubMed

    Thiemann, Tara; Nelms, Brittany; Reisen, William K

    2011-05-01

    Vegetation patterns and the presence of large numbers of nesting herons and egrets significantly altered the number of host-seeking Culex tarsalis Coquillett (Diptera: Culicidae) collected at dry ice-baited traps. The numbers of females collected per trap night at traps along the ecotone of Eucalyptus stands with and without a heron colony were always greater or equal to numbers collected at traps within or under canopy. No Cx. tarsalis were collected within or under Eucaplytus canopy during the peak heron nesting season, even though these birds frequently were infected with West Nile virus and large number of engorged females could be collected at resting boxes. These data indicate a diversion of host-seeking females from traps to nesting birds reducing sampling efficiency.

  19. Bloodmeal Host Congregation and Landscape Structure Impact the Estimation of Female Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) Abundance Using Dry Ice-Baited Traps

    PubMed Central

    THIEMANN, TARA; NELMS, BRITTANY; REISEN, WILLIAM K.

    2011-01-01

    Vegetation patterns and the presence of large numbers of nesting herons and egrets significantly altered the number of host-seeking Culex tarsalis Coquillett (Diptera: Culicidae) collected at dry ice-baited traps. The numbers of females collected per trap night at traps along the ecotone of Eucalyptus stands with and without a heron colony were always greater or equal to numbers collected at traps within or under canopy. No Cx. tarsalis were collected within or under Eucaplytus canopy during the peak heron nesting season, even though these birds frequently were infected with West Nile virus and large number of engorged females could be collected at resting boxes. These data indicate a diversion of host-seeking females from traps to nesting birds reducing sampling efficiency. PMID:21661310

  20. Structural Elucidation of Diglycosyl Diacylglycerol and Monoglycosyl Diacylglycerol from Streptococcus pneumoniae by Multiple-Stage Linear Ion-Trap Mass Spectrometry with Electrospray Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Tatituri, Raju Venkata Veera; Brenner, Michael B.; Turk, John; Hsu, Fong-Fu

    2013-01-01

    The cell wall of the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) contains glucopyranosyl diacylglycerol (GlcDAG) and galactoglucopyranosyldiacylglycerol (GalGlcDAG). The specific GlcDAG consisting of vaccenic acid substituent at sn-2 was recently identified as another glycolipid antigen family recognized by invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). Here, we describe a linear ion-trap (LIT) multiple-stage (MSn) mass spectrometric approach towards structural analysis of GalGlcDAG and GlcDAG. Structural information derived from MSn (n = 2,3) on the [M + Li]+ adduct ions desorbed by electrospray ionization (ESI) affords identification of the fatty acid substituents, assignment of the fatty acyl groups on the glycerol backbone, as well as the location of double bond along the fatty acyl chain. The identification of the fatty acyl groups and determination of their regio-specificity were confirmed by MSn (n = 2,3) on the [M + NH4]+ ions. We establish the structures of GalGlcDAG and GlcDAG isolated from S. pneumoniae, in which the major species consists of a 16:1- or 18:1-fatty acid substituent mainly at sn-2, and the double bond of the fatty acid is located at ω-7 (n-7). More than one isomers were found for each mass in the family. This mass spectrometric approach provides a simple method to achieve structure identification of this important lipid family that would be very difficult to define using the traditional method. PMID:22282097

  1. Laser Trapping of Radioactive Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    2013-04-01

    Stuart Freedman conceived the idea of laser trapping radioactive atoms for the purpose of studying beta correlation effects. ``This is really the theorist's view of a radioactive source,'' as he fondly claimed. It is ideal because the atoms form a point source, compressed in both position and momentum space, with no material walls nearby. The Berkeley group succeeded in trapping ^21Na (half-life = 22 s) atoms [Lu et al., PRL 72, 3791 (1994)], and determined its beta-neutrino correlation coefficient a=0.5502(60) to be in agreement with the Standard Model [Vetter et al., PRC 77, 035502 (2008)]. Other groups have joined this effort with searches for scalar or tensor couplings in the weak interaction. Moreover, the technique has been extended to trap very short lived ^8He (0.1 s) to study its halo structure or the very long lived ^81Kr (230,000 yr) to map the movement of groundwater.

  2. Crystal structure of release factor RF3 trapped in the GTP state on a rotated conformation of the ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jie; Lancaster, Laura; Trakhanov, Sergei; Noller, Harry F.

    2012-03-26

    The class II release factor RF3 is a GTPase related to elongation factor EF-G, which catalyzes release of class I release factors RF1 and RF2 from the ribosome after termination of protein synthesis. The 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of the RF3 {center_dot} GDPNP {center_dot} ribosome complex provides a high-resolution description of interactions and structural rearrangements that occur when binding of this translational GTPase induces large-scale rotational movements in the ribosome. RF3 induces a 7{sup o} rotation of the body and 14{sup o} rotation of the head of the 30S ribosomal subunit, and itself undergoes inter- and intradomain conformational rearrangements. We suggest that ordering of critical elements of switch loop I and the P loop, which help to form the GTPase catalytic site, are caused by interactions between the G domain of RF3 and the sarcin-ricin loop of 23S rRNA. The rotational movements in the ribosome induced by RF3, and its distinctly different binding orientation to the sarcin-ricin loop of 23S rRNA, raise interesting implications for the mechanism of action of EF-G in translocation.

  3. Structural basis for the antipolymer activity of Hb ζ2βs2 trapped in a tense conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safo, Martin K.; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Schreiter, Eric R.; Eric Russell, J.

    2015-11-01

    The phenotypical severity of sickle cell disease (SCD) can be mitigated by modifying mutant hemoglobin S (Hb s, Hb α2β 2s) to contain embryonic ζ globin in place of adult α-globin subunits (Hb ζ2β2s). Crystallographical analyses of liganded Hb ζζ2β2s, though, demonstrate a tense (T-state) quaternary structure that paradoxically predicts its participation in--rather than its exclusion from--pathological deoxyHb S polymers. We resolved this structure-function conundrum by examining the effects of α → ζ exchange on the characteristics of specific amino acids that mediate sickle polymer assembly. Superposition analyses of the βs subunits of T-state deoxyHb α2β2s and T-state CO-liganded Hb ζ2β2s reveal significant displacements of both mutant βsVal6 and conserved β-chain contact residues, predicting weakening of corresponding polymer-stabilizing interactions. Similar comparisons of the α- and ζ-globin subunits implicate four amino acids that are either repositioned or undergo non-conservative substitution, abrogating critical polymer contacts. CO-Hb ζ2βs2 additionally exhibits a unique trimer-of-heterotetramers crystal packing that is sustained by novel intermolecular interactions involving the pathological βsVal6, contrasting sharply with the classical double-stranded packing of deoxyHb S. Finally, the unusually large buried solvent-accessible surface area for CO-Hb ζ2β2s suggests that it does not co-assemble with deoxyHb S in vivo. In sum, the antipolymer activities of Hb ζ203b2;2s appear to arise from both repositioning and replacement of specific α- and βs-chain residues, favoring an alternate T-state solution structure that is excluded from pathological deoxyHb S polymers. These data account for the antipolymer activity of Hb ζ2β2s, and recommend the utility of SCD therapeutics that capitalize on α-globin exchange strategies.

  4. Structure of the HIV-1 Full-Length Capsid Protein in a Conformationally Trapped Unassembled State Induced by Small-Molecule Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Shoucheng; Betts, Laurie; Yang, Ruifeng; Shi, Haibin; Concel, Jason; Ahn, Jinwoo; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Yeh, Joanne I.

    2012-11-26

    The capsid (CA) protein plays crucial roles in HIV infection and replication, essential to viral maturation. The absence of high-resolution structural data on unassembled CA hinders the development of antivirals effective in inhibiting assembly. Unlike enzymes that have targetable, functional substrate-binding sites, the CA does not have a known site that affects catalytic or other innate activity, which can be more readily targeted in drug development efforts. We report the crystal structure of the HIV-1 CA, revealing the domain organization in the context of the wild-type full-length (FL) unassembled CA. The FL CA adopts an antiparallel dimer configuration, exhibiting a domain organization sterically incompatible with capsid assembly. A small compound, generated in situ during crystallization, is bound tightly at a hinge site ('H site'), indicating that binding at this interdomain region stabilizes the ADP conformation. Electron microscopy studies on nascent crystals reveal both dimeric and hexameric lattices coexisting within a single condition, in agreement with the interconvertibility of oligomeric forms and supporting the feasibility of promoting assembly-incompetent dimeric states. Solution characterization in the presence of the H-site ligand shows predominantly unassembled dimeric CA, even under conditions that promote assembly. Our structure elucidation of the HIV-1 FL CA and characterization of a potential allosteric binding site provides three-dimensional views of an assembly-defective conformation, a state targeted in, and thus directly relevant to, inhibitor development. Based on our findings, we propose an unprecedented means of preventing CA assembly, by 'conformationally trapping' CA in assembly-incompetent conformational states induced by H-site binding.

  5. Trapping in TITANs Cooler Penning Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kootte, Brian; Lascar, Daniel; Paul, Stefan; Gwinner, Gerald; Dilling, Jens; Titan Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Penning trap mass spectrometry provides an excellent means of determining the masses of nuclei to high precision. Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) have been successfully used at TRIUMFs Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) to enhance the precision of mass measurements for short-lived species. The gain in precision can theoretically scale with the charge state of the ion, but recent measurements of beam properties have shown that the process of charge breeding ions to higher charge states increases the energy spread of the ion bunch sent to the Penning trap. This reduces the gain from using HCIs. In order to maximize the precision of mass measurements, we are currently performing offline commissioning of a Cooler PEnning Trap (CPET) with the purpose of sympathetically cooling HCI bunches to an energy of 1 eV/q using a plasma of electrons. This will require implementing a nested potential configuration to trap the ions and electrons in the same region so they can interact via coulomb scattering. Recent progress in testing the trapping of electrons and singly charged ions in CPET, leading towards the cooling of HCIs prior to mass measurements in TITANs will be discussed.

  6. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, Nicholas D. Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-07

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ions in a second BGA trap.

  7. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-01

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with 40Ca+ ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with 171Yb+ ions in a second BGA trap.

  8. Evaluating shading bias in malaise and intercept traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irvine, Kathryn M.; Woods, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    Foresters are increasingly focusing on landscape level management regimes. At the landscape level, managed acreage may differ substantially in structure and micro-climatic conditions. Trapping is a commonly used method to evaluate changes in insect communities across landscapes. Among those trapping techniques, Malaise and window-pane traps are conveniently deployed to collect large numbers of insects for relative estimates of density. However, the catch within traps may be affected by a wide range of environmental variables including trap location, height, and factors such as exposure to sunlight and temperature. Seven experiments were conducted from 1996 through 2000 to evaluate the effects of shading on trap catch of a variety of Malaise trap designs and one window-pane trap design. Overall, differences in shading effects on trap catch were detected across different traps and taxa and suggested that, in general, more insects are collected in traps that were in direct sunlight. The effect of shading varied from a reduction in trap catch of 10 % to an increase of 7%, the results depended on trap color. Diptera, Coleoptera, and Homoptera were most likely to exhibit this bias. In contrast, trap catch of the Hymenoptera was the most variable and appeared to be sensitive to factors that might interact with sun/shade conditions

  9. Multivariate Geostatistical Analysis of Uncertainty for the Hydrodynamic Model of a Geological Trap for Carbon Dioxide Storage. Case study: Multilayered Geological Structure Vest Valcele, ROMANIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scradeanu, D.; Pagnejer, M.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the works is to evaluate the uncertainty of the hydrodynamic model for a multilayered geological structure, a potential trap for carbon dioxide storage. The hydrodynamic model is based on a conceptual model of the multilayered hydrostructure with three components: 1) spatial model; 2) parametric model and 3) energy model. The necessary data to achieve the three components of the conceptual model are obtained from: 240 boreholes explored by geophysical logging and seismic investigation, for the first two components, and an experimental water injection test for the last one. The hydrodinamic model is a finite difference numerical model based on a 3D stratigraphic model with nine stratigraphic units (Badenian and Oligocene) and a 3D multiparameter model (porosity, permeability, hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient, leakage etc.). The uncertainty of the two 3D models was evaluated using multivariate geostatistical tools: a)cross-semivariogram for structural analysis, especially the study of anisotropy and b)cokriging to reduce estimation variances in a specific situation where is a cross-correlation between a variable and one or more variables that are undersampled. It has been identified important differences between univariate and bivariate anisotropy. The minimised uncertainty of the parametric model (by cokriging) was transferred to hydrodynamic model. The uncertainty distribution of the pressures generated by the water injection test has been additional filtered by the sensitivity of the numerical model. The obtained relative errors of the pressure distribution in the hydrodynamic model are 15-20%. The scientific research was performed in the frame of the European FP7 project "A multiple space and time scale approach for the quantification of deep saline formation for CO2 storage(MUSTANG)".

  10. Trap style influences wild pig behavior and trapping success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the efforts of many natural resource professionals, wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations are expanding in many areas of the world. Although many creative techniques for controlling pig populations are being explored, trapping has been and still is themost commonly usedmethod of population control formany public and private land managers. We conducted an observational study to examine the efficiency of 2 frequently used trap styles: a small, portable box-style trap and a larger, semi-permanent, corral-style trap.We used game cameras to examine patterns of trap entry by wild pigs around each style of trap, and we conducted a trapping session to compare trapping success between trap styles. Adult female and juvenile wild pigs entered both styles of trap more readily than did adult males, and adult males seemed particularly averse to entering box traps. Less than 10% of adult male visits to box traps resulted in entries, easily the least percentage of any class at any style of trap. Adult females entered corral traps approximately 2.2 times more often per visit than box traps and re-entered corral traps >2 times more frequently. Juveniles entered and reentered both box and corral traps at similar rates. Overall (all-class) entry-per-visit rates at corral traps (0.71) were nearly double that of box traps (0.37). Subsequent trapping data supported these preliminary entry data; the capture rate for corral traps was >4 times that of box traps. Our data suggest that corral traps are temporally and economically superior to box traps with respect to efficiency; that is, corral traps effectively trap more pigs per trap night at a lower cost per pig than do box traps. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  11. Ecological and evolutionary traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlaepfer, Martin A.; Runge, M.C.; Sherman, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Organisms often rely on environmental cues to make behavioral and life-history decisions. However, in environments that have been altered suddenly by humans, formerly reliable cues might no longer be associated with adaptive outcomes. In such cases, organisms can become 'trapped' by their evolutionary responses to the cues and experience reduced survival or reproduction. Ecological traps occur when organisms make poor habitat choices based on cues that correlated formerly with habitat quality. Ecological traps are part of a broader phenomenon, evolutionary traps, involving a dissociation between cues that organisms use to make any behavioral or life-history decision and outcomes normally associated with that decision. A trap can lead to extinction if a population falls below a critical size threshold before adaptation to the novel environment occurs. Conservation and management protocols must be designed in light of, rather than in spite of, the behavioral mechanisms and evolutionary history of populations and species to avoid 'trapping' them.

  12. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  13. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  14. Evaluating steam trap performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, N.Y.

    1985-08-08

    This paper presents a method for evaluating the performance level of steam traps by preparing an economic analysis of several types to determine the equivalent uniform annual cost. A series of tests on steam traps supplied by six manufacturers provided data for determining the relative efficiencies of each unit. The comparison was made using a program developed for the Texas Instruments T1-59 programmable calculator to evaluate overall steam trap economics.

  15. Truly trapped rainbow by utilizing nonreciprocal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kexin; He, Sailing

    2016-07-01

    The concept of a “trapped rainbow” has generated considerable interest for optical data storage and processing. It aims to trap different frequency components of the wave packet at different positions permanently. However, all the previously proposed structures cannot truly achieve this effect, due to the difficulties in suppressing the reflection caused by strong intermodal coupling and distinguishing different frequency components simultaneously. In this article, we found a physical mechanism to achieve a truly “trapped rainbow” storage of electromagnetic wave. We utilize nonreciprocal waveguides under a tapered magnetic field to achieve this and such a trapping effect is stable even under fabrication disorders. We also observe hot spots and relatively long duration time of the trapped wave around critical positions through frequency domain and time domain simulations. The physical mechanism we found has a variety of potential applications ranging from wave harvesting and storage to nonlinearity enhancement.

  16. Truly trapped rainbow by utilizing nonreciprocal waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kexin; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a “trapped rainbow” has generated considerable interest for optical data storage and processing. It aims to trap different frequency components of the wave packet at different positions permanently. However, all the previously proposed structures cannot truly achieve this effect, due to the difficulties in suppressing the reflection caused by strong intermodal coupling and distinguishing different frequency components simultaneously. In this article, we found a physical mechanism to achieve a truly “trapped rainbow” storage of electromagnetic wave. We utilize nonreciprocal waveguides under a tapered magnetic field to achieve this and such a trapping effect is stable even under fabrication disorders. We also observe hot spots and relatively long duration time of the trapped wave around critical positions through frequency domain and time domain simulations. The physical mechanism we found has a variety of potential applications ranging from wave harvesting and storage to nonlinearity enhancement. PMID:27453496

  17. Trapping atoms using nanoscale quantum vacuum forces.

    PubMed

    Chang, D E; Sinha, K; Taylor, J M; Kimble, H J

    2014-07-10

    Quantum vacuum forces dictate the interaction between individual atoms and dielectric surfaces at nanoscale distances. For example, their large strengths typically overwhelm externally applied forces, which makes it challenging to controllably interface cold atoms with nearby nanophotonic systems. Here we theoretically show that it is possible to tailor the vacuum forces themselves to provide strong trapping potentials. Our proposed trapping scheme takes advantage of the attractive ground-state potential and adiabatic dressing with an excited state whose potential is engineered to be resonantly enhanced and repulsive. This procedure yields a strong metastable trap, with the fraction of excited-state population scaling inversely with the quality factor of the resonance of the dielectric structure. We analyse realistic limitations to the trap lifetime and discuss possible applications that might emerge from the large trap depths and nanoscale confinement.

  18. Steam Trap Users’ Guide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    traps do not work well in a system where the condensate can back against the operating mechanism of the trap and open it when there is no condensate flow ...a flow through the trap. h. Float and thermostatic traps are widely used in low pressure heating 0 systems . If they are properly installed below the... system or trap problem. * Blowdown strainer. SOUND CHECK HOT TRAPS: • Listen to trap operate. * Check for continuous flow : - low pitch condensate flow

  19. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of anti-TRAP (AT) reveals residues involved in binding to TRAP.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanling; Gollnick, Paul

    2008-04-11

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulates expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp) genes in response to changes in intracellular levels of free l-tryptophan in many Gram-positive bacteria. When activated by binding tryptophan, TRAP binds to the mRNAs of several genes involved in tryptophan metabolism, and down-regulates transcription or translation of these genes. Anti-TRAP (AT) is an antagonist of TRAP that binds to tryptophan-activated TRAP and prevents it from binding to its RNA targets, and thereby up-regulates trp gene expression. The crystal structure shows that AT is a cone-shaped trimer (AT(3)) with the N-terminal residues of the three subunits assembled at the apex of the cone and that these trimers can further assemble into a dodecameric (AT(12)) structure. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis we found four residues, all located on the "top" region of AT(3), that are essential for binding to TRAP. Fluorescent labeling experiments further suggest that the top region of AT is in close juxtaposition to TRAP in the AT-TRAP complex. In vivo studies confirmed the importance of these residues on the top of AT in regulating TRAP mediated gene regulation.

  20. Characteristic coupling time between axial and transverse energy modes for anti-hydrogen in magnetostatic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Mike; Fajans, Joel

    2016-10-01

    For upcoming ALPHA collaboration laser spectroscopy and gravity experiments, the nature of the chaotic trajectories of individual antihydrogen atoms trapped in the octupole Ioffe magnetic trap is of importance. Of particular interest for experimental design is the coupling time between the axial and transverse modes of energy for the antihydrogen atoms. Using Monte Carlo simulations of semiclassical dynamics of antihydrogen trajectories, we quantify this characteristic coupling time between axial and transverse modes of energy. There appear to be two classes of trajectories: for orbits whose axial energy is higher than 10% of the total energy, the axial energy varies chaotically on the order of 1-10 seconds, whereas for orbits whose axial energy is around 10% of the total energy, the axial energy remains nearly constant on the order of 1000 seconds or longer. Furthermore, we search through parameter -space to find parameters of the magnetic trap that minimize and maximize this characteristic coupling time. This work was supported by the UC Berkeley Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship, the Berkeley Research Computing program, the Department of Energy contract DE-FG02-06ER54904, and the National Science Foundation Grant 1500538-PHY.

  1. Acoustic trapping of active matter

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Sho C.; De Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently ‘explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies. PMID:26961816

  2. Structure and properties of the glandular surface in the digestive zone of the pitcher in the carnivorous plant Nepenthes ventrata and its role in insect trapping and retention.

    PubMed

    Gorb, Elena; Kastner, Victoria; Peressadko, Andrei; Arzt, Eduard; Gaume, Laurence; Rowe, Nick; Gorb, Stanislav

    2004-08-01

    Carnivorous plants of the genus Nepenthes grow in nutrient-poor habitats and have evolved specialised trapping organs, known as pitchers. These are composed of different surface zones serving the functions of attraction, capture and digestion of insects, which represent a main source of nitrogen. To investigate the role of the glandular digestive zone in the trapping mechanism of the pitcher, structural, mechanical and physico-chemical studies were applied to N. ventrata and combined with insect behavioural experiments. It was found that the glandular surface is microscopically rough since it is regularly structured with multicellular glands situated in epidermal depressions. The presence of downward-directed 'hoods' over the upper part of glands and sloped depressions in the proximal direction of the pitcher causes a marked anisotropy of the surface. The glandular zone surface is composed of relatively stiff material (Young's modulus, 637.19+/-213.44 kPa). It is not homogeneous, in terms of adhesive properties, and contains numerous areas without adhesion as well as adhesive areas differing greatly in tenacity values (range, 1.39-28.24 kPa). The surface is readily wettable with water (contact angle, 31.9-36.0 degrees C) and has a high surface free energy (56.84-61.93 mN m(-1)) with a relatively high polar component (33.09-52.70 mN m(-1)). To examine the effect of the glandular secretion on attachment systems of insects having hairy and smooth adhesive pads, forces generated on different surfaces by Calliphora vicina flies and Pyrrhocoris apterus bugs, respectively, were measured. Flies attached equally well to both fresh and air-dried glandular surfaces whereas bugs generated a significantly lower force on the fresh glandular surface compared with the air-dried one. It is assumed that the contribution of the glandular surface to insect retention, due to its effect on insect attachment, differs depending on insect weight and the type of insect attachment system

  3. Structural Basis for the Disruption of the Cerebral Cavernous Malformations 2 (CCM2) Interaction with Krev Interaction Trapped 1 (KRIT1) by Disease-associated Mutations*

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Oriana S.; Liu, Weizhi; Zhang, Rong; Stiegler, Amy L.; Ghedia, Sondhya; Weber, James L.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-01-01

    Familial cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are predominantly neurovascular lesions and are associated with mutations within the KRIT1, CCM2, and PDCD10 genes. The protein products of KRIT1 and CCM2 (Krev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1) and cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2), respectively) directly interact with each other. Disease-associated mutations in KRIT1 and CCM2 mostly result in loss of their protein products, although rare missense point mutations can also occur. From gene sequencing of patients known or suspected to have one or more CCMs, we discover a series of missense point mutations in KRIT1 and CCM2 that result in missense mutations in the CCM2 and KRIT1 proteins. To place these mutations in the context of the molecular level interactions of CCM2 and KRIT1, we map the interaction of KRIT1 and CCM2 and find that the CCM2 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain displays a preference toward the third of the three KRIT1 NPX(Y/F) motifs. We determine the 2.75 Å co-crystal structure of the CCM2 PTB domain with a peptide corresponding to KRIT1NPX(Y/F)3, revealing a Dab-like PTB fold for CCM2 and its interaction with KRIT1NPX(Y/F)3. We find that several disease-associated missense mutations in CCM2 have the potential to interrupt the KRIT1-CCM2 interaction by destabilizing the CCM2 PTB domain and that a KRIT1 mutation also disrupts this interaction. We therefore provide new insights into the architecture of CCM2 and how the CCM complex is disrupted in CCM disease. PMID:25525273

  4. Structural basis for the disruption of the cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) interaction with Krev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1) by disease-associated mutations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Oriana S; Liu, Weizhi; Zhang, Rong; Stiegler, Amy L; Ghedia, Sondhya; Weber, James L; Boggon, Titus J

    2015-01-30

    Familial cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are predominantly neurovascular lesions and are associated with mutations within the KRIT1, CCM2, and PDCD10 genes. The protein products of KRIT1 and CCM2 (Krev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1) and cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2), respectively) directly interact with each other. Disease-associated mutations in KRIT1 and CCM2 mostly result in loss of their protein products, although rare missense point mutations can also occur. From gene sequencing of patients known or suspected to have one or more CCMs, we discover a series of missense point mutations in KRIT1 and CCM2 that result in missense mutations in the CCM2 and KRIT1 proteins. To place these mutations in the context of the molecular level interactions of CCM2 and KRIT1, we map the interaction of KRIT1 and CCM2 and find that the CCM2 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain displays a preference toward the third of the three KRIT1 NPX(Y/F) motifs. We determine the 2.75 Å co-crystal structure of the CCM2 PTB domain with a peptide corresponding to KRIT1(NPX(Y/F)3), revealing a Dab-like PTB fold for CCM2 and its interaction with KRIT1(NPX(Y/F)3). We find that several disease-associated missense mutations in CCM2 have the potential to interrupt the KRIT1-CCM2 interaction by destabilizing the CCM2 PTB domain and that a KRIT1 mutation also disrupts this interaction. We therefore provide new insights into the architecture of CCM2 and how the CCM complex is disrupted in CCM disease.

  5. Investigations of the ground-state hyperfine atomic structure and beta decay measurement prospects of 21Na with improved laser trapping techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Mary Anderson

    1999-05-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which a neutral atom laser trap loaded with radioactive 21Na was improved and then used for measurements. The sodium isotope (half-life=22 sec) is produced on line at the 88 in. cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The author developed an effective magnesium oxide target system which is crucial to deliver a substantive beam of 21Na to the experiment. Efficient manipulation of the 21Na beam with lasers allowed 30,000 atoms to be contained in a magneto-optical trap. Using the cold trapped atoms, the author measured to high precision the hyperfine splitting of the atomic ground state of 21Na. She measured the 3S1/2(F=1,m=0)-3S1/2(F=2,m=0) atomic level splitting of 21Na to be 1,906,471,870±200 Hz. Additionally, she achieved initial detection of beta decay from the trap and evaluated the prospects of precision beta decay correlation studies with trapped atoms.

  6. Nonlinear integrable ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2011-10-01

    Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

  7. Light trapping for flexible organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yoonseok; Berger, Jana; Will, Paul-Anton; Soldera, Marcos; Glatz, Bernhard; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Taretto, Kurt; Fery, Andreas; Lasagni, Andrés. Fabián.; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl

    2016-09-01

    Here we investigate light trapping substrates and electrodes for enhancing the performance of organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Their power conversion efficiency (PCE) can be improved by a factor of 1.16 using laser patterned PET substrates and by a factor of 1.13 using commercial, structured display films. Furthermore, we prepare light trapping electrodes using as flexible conductive polymer with embedded TiO2 nanoparticles, improving the PCE by a factor of 1.08 as compared to a neat polymer electrode. However, nano-imprinted conductive polymer electrodes does not provide light trapping effect due to the small size (50 nm) of the structures. Moreover flexible OPV devices, integrating the above light trapping elements, show non-degraded performance after bending tests.

  8. Quadrupole ion traps.

    PubMed

    March, Raymond E

    2009-01-01

    The extraordinary story of the three-dimensional radiofrequency quadrupole ion trap, accompanied by a seemingly unintelligible theoretical treatment, is told in some detail because of the quite considerable degree of commercial success that quadrupole technology has achieved. The quadrupole ion trap, often used in conjunction with a quadrupole mass filter, remained a laboratory curiosity until 1979 when, at the American Society for Mass Spectrometry Conference in Seattle, George Stafford, Jr., of Finnigan Corp., learned of the Masters' study of Allison Armitage of a combined quadrupole ion trap/quadrupole mass filter instrument for the observation of electron impact and chemical ionization mass spectra of simple compounds eluting from a gas chromatograph. Stafford developed subsequently the mass-selective axial instability method for obtaining mass spectra from the quadrupole ion trap alone and, in 1983, Finnigan Corp. announced the first commercial quadrupole ion trap instrument as a detector for a gas chromatograph. In 1987, confinement of ions generated externally to the ion trap was demonstrated and, soon after, the new technique of electrospray ionization was shown to be compatible with the ion trap.

  9. An active bubble trap and debubbler for microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Skelley, Alison M; Voldman, Joel

    2008-10-01

    We present a novel, fully integrated microfluidic bubble trap and debubbler. The 2-layer structure, based on a PDMS valve design, utilizes a featured membrane to stop bubble progression through the device. A pneumatic chamber directly above the trap is evacuated, and the bubble is pulled out through the gas-permeable PDMS membrane. Normal device operation, including continuous flow at atmospheric pressure, is maintained during the entire trapping and debubbling process. We present a range of trap sizes, from 2 to 10 mm diameter, and can trap and remove bubbles up to 25 microL in under 3 h.

  10. An ion trap built with photonic crystal fibre technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenfelser, F. Keitch, B.; Kienzler, D.; Home, J. P.; Bykov, D.; Uebel, P.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-03-15

    We demonstrate a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated using techniques transferred from the manufacture of photonic-crystal fibres. This provides a relatively straightforward route for realizing traps with an electrode structure on the 100 micron scale with high optical access. We demonstrate the basic functionality of the trap by cooling a single ion to the quantum ground state, allowing us to measure a heating rate from the ground state of 787 ± 24 quanta/s. Variation of the fabrication procedure used here may provide access to traps in this geometry with trap scales between 100 μm and 10 μm.

  11. The complex mixed Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin-full-wave approach and its application to the two dimensional mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z. X.

    2015-05-15

    The complex mixed Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB)-full-wave approach is applied to the 2D mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves in tokamak plasmas. The parallel mode structure is calculated with the full-wave approach, while the radial envelope is calculated with the complex WKB method. The tilting of the global mode structure along radius is demonstrated analytically. The effects of the phase and amplitude variation of the radial envelope on the parallel mode structure are included in terms of a complex radial wave vector in the parallel mode equation. It is shown that the radial equilibrium non-uniformity leads to the asymmetry of the parallel mode structure not only in configuration space but also in spectrum space. The mixed approach provides a practical way to analyze the asymmetric component of the global mode structure due to radial equilibrium non-uniformity.

  12. Traps in Al2O3 detected by tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarlatos, Y.; Barker, R. C.; Yelon, A.

    1976-01-01

    A structure, quite different from inelastic tunneling peaks, has been observed in electron-tunneling spectra of MOM junctions. A capacitance peak is associated with this structure, which is attributed to traps in the oxide at energies smaller than those previously reported. The C-V characteristics calculated using a single-energy trap model agree with experimental results; however, no satisfactory explanation has yet been found to account for the strong temperature dependence of the trap energy levels.

  13. Cosine light-trapping nanostructures for thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Bang; Li, Yi

    2015-08-15

    In this Letter, we present a cosine light-trapping texture for thin-film silicon solar cells. The surface texture was numerically demonstrated to exhibit comparable light-trapping performance to the inverted pyramid one, which is classic high-efficiency light-trapping structure. The cosine texture can be directly formed by interference lithography, while the inverted pyramid needs more complicated processing. The proposed structure has the potential to play a key role in thin-film solar cells.

  14. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  15. Versatile electrostatic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-06-15

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to create either a double-well or a donut-shaped trapping field. The profile of the {sup 15}ND{sub 3} packet in each of these four trapping potentials is measured, and the dependence of the well-separation and barrier height of the double-well and donut potential on the hexapole and dipole term are discussed.

  16. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  17. Innovation: the classic traps.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    Never a fad, but always in or out of fashion, innovation gets rediscovered as a growth enabler every half dozen years. Too often, though, grand declarations about innovation are followed by mediocre execution that produces anemic results, and innovation groups are quietly disbanded in cost-cutting drives. Each managerial generation embarks on the same enthusiastic quest for the next new thing. And each generation faces the same vexing challenges- most of which stem from the tensions between protecting existing revenue streams critical to current success and supporting new concepts that may be crucial to future success. In this article, Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter reflects on the four major waves of innovation enthusiasm she's observed over the past 25 years. She describes the classic mistakes companies make in innovation strategy, process, structure, and skills assessment, illustrating her points with a plethora of real-world examples--including AT&T Worldnet, Timberland, and Ocean Spray. A typical strategic blunder is when managers set their hurdles too high or limit the scope of their innovation efforts. Quaker Oats, for instance, was so busy in the 1990s making minor tweaks to its product formulas that it missed larger opportunities in distribution. A common process mistake is when managers strangle innovation efforts with the same rigid planning, budgeting, and reviewing approaches they use in their existing businesses--thereby discouraging people from adapting as circumstances warrant. Companies must be careful how they structure fledgling entities alongside existing ones, Kanter says, to avoid a clash of cultures and agendas--which Arrow Electronics experienced in its attempts to create an online venture. Finally, companies commonly undervalue and underinvest in the human side of innovation--for instance, promoting individuals out of innovation teams long before their efforts can pay off. Kanter offers practical advice for avoiding

  18. Atom trap loss, elastic collisions, and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, James

    2012-10-01

    The study of collisions and scattering has been one of the most productive approaches for modern physics, illuminating the fundamental structure of crystals, surfaces, atoms, and sub-atomic particles. In the field of cold atoms, this is no less true: studies of cold atom collisions were essential to the production of quantum degenerate matter, the formation of cold molecules, and so on. Over the past few years it has been my delight to investigate elastic collisions between cold atoms trapped in either a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or a magnetic trap with hot, background gas in the vacuum environment through the measurement of the loss of atoms from the trap. Motivated by the goal of creating cold atom-based technology, we are deciphering what the trapped atoms are communicating about their environment through the observed loss rate. These measurements have the advantages of being straightforward to implement and they provide information about the underlying, fundamental inter-atomic processes. In this talk I will present some of our recent work, including the observation of the trap depth dependence on loss rate for argon-rubidium collisions. The data follow the computed loss rate curve based on the long-range Van der Waals interaction between the two species. The implications of these findings are exciting: trap depths can be determined from the trap loss measurement under controlled background density conditions; observation of trap loss rate in comparison to models for elastic, inelastic, and chemical processes can lead to improved understanding and characterization of these fundamental interactions; finally the marriage of cold atoms with collision modeling offers the promise of creating a novel pressure sensor and pressure standard for the high and ultra-high vacuum regime.

  19. Optical trapping of nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Brooke C.; Crawford, Alice; Kishore, Rani B.; Helmerson, Kristian; Halas, Naomi J.; Levin, Carly

    2007-09-01

    We investigate near-resonant trapping of Rayleigh particles in optical tweezers. Although optical forces due to a near-resonant laser beam have been extensively studied for atoms, the situation for larger particles is that the laser wavelength is far from any absorption resonance. Theory predicts, however, that the trapping force exerted on a Rayleigh particle is enhanced, and may be three to fifty times larger for frequencies near resonance than for frequencies far off resonance. The ability to selectively trap only particles with a given absorption peak may have many practical applications. In order to investigate near-resonant trapping we are using nanoshells, particles with a dielectric core and metallic coating that can exhibit plasmon resonances. The resonances of the nanoshells can be tuned by adjusting the ratio of the radius of the dielectric core, r I, to the overall radius, r II, which includes the thickness of the metallic coating. Our nanoshells, fabricated at Rice University, consist of a silica core with a gold coating. Using back focal plane detection, we measure the trap stiffness of a single focus optical trap (optical tweezers), from a diode laser at 853 nm for nanoshells with several different r I/r II ratios.

  20. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  1. Metallic nano-particles for trapping light.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongan; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2013-02-07

    We study metallic nano-particles for light trapping by investigating the optical absorption efficiency of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film with and without metallic nano-particles on its top. The size and shape of these nano-particles are investigated as to their roles of light trapping: scattering light to the absorption medium and converting light to surface plasmons. The optical absorption enhancement in the red light region (e.g., 650nm) due to the light trapping of the metallic nano-particles is observed when a layer of metallic nano-particle array has certain structures. The investigation of the light with incident angles shows the importance of the coupling efficiency of light to surface plasmons in the metallic nano-particle light trapping. PACS: 73.20.Mf, 42.25.s, 88.40.hj.

  2. Controlling trapping potentials and stray electric fields in a microfabricated ion trap through design and compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doret, S. Charles; Amini, Jason M.; Wright, Kenneth; Volin, Curtis; Killian, Tyler; Ozakin, Arkadas; Denison, Douglas; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C.-S.; Slusher, Richart E.; Harter, Alexa W.

    2012-07-01

    Recent advances in quantum information processing with trapped ions have demonstrated the need for new ion trap architectures capable of holding and manipulating chains of many (>10) ions. Here we present the design and detailed characterization of a new linear trap, microfabricated with scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, that is well-suited to this challenge. Forty-four individually controlled dc electrodes provide the many degrees of freedom required to construct anharmonic potential wells, shuttle ions, merge and split ion chains, precisely tune secular mode frequencies, and adjust the orientation of trap axes. Microfabricated capacitors on dc electrodes suppress radio-frequency pickup and excess micromotion, while a top-level ground layer simplifies modeling of electric fields and protects trap structures underneath. A localized aperture in the substrate provides access to the trapping region from an oven below, permitting deterministic loading of particular isotopic/elemental sequences via species-selective photoionization. The shapes of the aperture and radio-frequency electrodes are optimized to minimize perturbation of the trapping pseudopotential. Laboratory experiments verify simulated potentials and characterize trapping lifetimes, stray electric fields, and ion heating rates, while measurement and cancellation of spatially-varying stray electric fields permits the formation of nearly-equally spaced ion chains.

  3. Reactive Transport Modeling of Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in Saline Aquifers: The Influence of Intra-Aquifer Shales and the Relative Effectiveness of Structural, Solubility, and Mineral Trapping During Prograde and Retrograde Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J W; Nitao, J J; Steefel, C I; Knauss, K G

    2001-04-24

    In this study, we address a series of fundamental questions regarding the processes and effectiveness of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline aquifers. We begin with the broadest: what is the ultimate fate of CO{sub 2} injected into these environments? Once injected, it is immediately subject to two sets of competing processes: migration processes and sequestration processes. In terms of migration, the CO{sub 2} moves by volumetric displacement of formation waters, with which it is largely immiscible; by gravity segregation, which causes the immiscible CO{sub 2} plume to rise owing to its relatively low density; and by viscous fingering, owing to its relatively low viscosity. In terms of sequestration, some fraction of the rising plume will dissolve into formation waters (solubility trapping); some fraction may react with formation minerals to precipitate carbonates (mineral trapping); and the remaining portion eventually reaches the cap rock, where it migrates up-dip, potentially accumulating in local topographic highs (structural trapping). Although this concept of competing migration/sequestration processes is intuitively obvious, identifying those sub-processes that dominate the competition is by no means straightforward. Hence, at present there are large uncertainties associated with the ultimate fate of injected CO{sub 2} (Figure 1). Principal among these: can a typical shale cap rock provide a secure seal? Because gravity segregation will always keep the immiscible CO{sub 2} plume moving towards the surface, caprock integrity is the single most important variable influencing isolation security. An extremely thick shale cap rock exists at Sleipner (several 100 m); here, however, we examine the performance of a 25-m-thick cap, which is more representative of the general case. Although the cap rock represents the final barrier to vertical CO{sub 2} migration, what is the effect of intra-aquifer permeability structure? Because this structure directs the

  4. Biases in Drosophila melanogaster protein trap screens

    PubMed Central

    Aleksic, Jelena; Lazic, Ranko; Müller, Ilka; Russell, Steven R; Adryan, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Background The ability to localise or follow endogenous proteins in real time in vivo is of tremendous utility for cell biology or systems biology studies. Protein trap screens utilise the random genomic insertion of a transposon-borne artificial reporter exon (e.g. encoding the green fluorescent protein, GFP) into an intron of an endogenous gene to generate a fluorescent fusion protein. Despite recent efforts aimed at achieving comprehensive coverage of the genes encoded in the Drosophila genome, the repertoire of genes that yield protein traps is still small. Results We analysed the collection of available protein trap lines in Drosophila melanogaster and identified potential biases that are likely to restrict genome coverage in protein trap screens. The protein trap screens investigated here primarily used P-element vectors and thus exhibit some of the same positional biases associated with this transposon that are evident from the comprehensive Drosophila Gene Disruption Project. We further found that protein trap target genes usually exhibit broad and persistent expression during embryonic development, which is likely to facilitate better detection. In addition, we investigated the likely influence of the GFP exon on host protein structure and found that protein trap insertions have a significant bias for exon-exon boundaries that encode disordered protein regions. 38.8% of GFP insertions land in disordered protein regions compared with only 23.4% in the case of non-trapping P-element insertions landing in coding sequence introns (p < 10-4). Interestingly, even in cases where protein domains are predicted, protein trap insertions frequently occur in regions encoding surface exposed areas that are likely to be functionally neutral. Considering the various biases observed, we predict that less than one third of intron-containing genes are likely to be amenable to trapping by the existing methods. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that the utility of P

  5. Switching Oxide Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.

    2003-01-01

    We consider radiation-induced charge trapping in SiO2 dielectric layers, primarily from the point of view of CMOS devices. However, SiO2 insulators are used in many other ways, and the same defects occur in other contexts. The key studies, which determined the nature of the oxide charge traps, were done primarily on gate oxides in CMOS devices, because that was the main radiation problem in CMOS at one time. There are two major reviews of radiation-induced oxide charge trapping already in the literature, which discuss the subject in far greater detail than is possible here. The first of these was by McLean et al. in 1989, and the second, ten years later, was intended as an update, because of additional, new work that had been reported. Basically, the picture that has emerged is that ionizing radiation creates electron-hole pairs in the oxide, and the electrons have much higher mobility than the holes. Therefore, the electrons are swept out of the oxide very rapidly by any field that is present, leaving behind any holes that escape the initial recombination process. These holes then undergo a polaron hopping transport toward the Si/SiO2 interface (under positive bias). Near the interface, some fraction of them fall into deep, relatively stable, long-lived hole traps. The nature and annealing behavior of these hole traps is the main focus of this paper.

  6. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  7. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    DOEpatents

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2006-02-21

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  8. Discovery of {sup 229}Rn and the Structure of the Heaviest Rn and Ra Isotopes from Penning-Trap Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Neidherr, D.; Boehm, Ch.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Naimi, S.; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Blaum, K.; George, S.; Kellerbauer, A.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Herlert, A.; Kowalska, M.; Noah, E.; Penescu, L.

    2009-03-20

    The masses of the neutron-rich radon isotopes {sup 223-229}Rn have been determined for the first time, using the ISOLTRAP setup at CERN ISOLDE. In addition, this experiment marks the first discovery of a new nuclide, {sup 229}Rn, by Penning-trap mass measurement. The new, high-accuracy data allow a fine examination of the mass surface, via the valence-nucleon interaction {delta}V{sub pn}. The results reveal intriguing behavior, possibly reflecting either a N=134 subshell closure or an octupolar deformation in this region.

  9. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

    1997-12-02

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

  10. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  11. The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, T.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP) aims to provide a common platform for rapidly deploying Astronomy Archives to the web. TRAP is currently under development for both the VAO Data Discovery Portal and the MAST Multi-Mission Portal (Figure 1). TRAP consists of 2 major software packages: the TRAP Client and the TRAP Server. The TRAP framework allows developers to deploy the Server, connect to data resources, then focus on building custom tools for the Client. TRAP is built upon proven industry technologies including the Ext/JS JavaScript Component Library, Mono.NET Web Services, and JSON message based APIs. The multi-layered architecture of TRAP decouples each layer: Client, Service and Data Access, enabling each to evolve independently over time. Although currently deployed to provide astronomy science data access, the TRAP architecture is flexible enough to thrive in any distributed data environment.

  12. Measurement of Trap Length for an Optical Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2009-01-01

    The trap length along the beam axis for an optical trap formed with an upright, oil-immersion microscope was measured. The goals for this effort were twofold. It was deemed useful to understand the depth to which an optical trap can reach for purposes of developing a tool to assist in the fabrication of miniature devices. Additionally, it was desired to know whether the measured trap length favored one or the other of two competing theories to model an optical trap. The approach was to trap a microsphere of known size and mass and raise it from its initial trap position. The microsphere was then dropped by blocking the laser beam for a pre-determined amount of time. Dropping the microsphere in a free-fall mode from various heights relative to the coverslip provides an estimate of how the trapping length changes with depth in water in a sample chamber on a microscope slide. While it was not possible to measure the trap length with sufficient precision to support any particular theory of optical trap formation, it was possible to find regions where the presence of physical boundaries influenced optical traps, and determine that the trap length, for the apparatus studied, is between 6 and 7 m. These results allow more precise control using optical micromanipulation to assemble miniature devices by providing information about the distance over which an optical trap is effective.

  13. Adverse Effects of Excess Residual PbI2 on Photovoltaic Performance, Charge Separation, and Trap-State Properties in Mesoporous Structured Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao-Yi; Hao, Ming-Yang; Han, Jun; Yu, Man; Qin, Yujun; Zhang, Pu; Guo, Zhi-Xin; Ai, Xi-Cheng; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2017-03-17

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have rapidly come to prominence in the photovoltaic field. In this context, CH3 NH3 PbI3 , as the most widely adopted active layer, has been attracting great attention. Generally, in a CH3 NH3 PbI3 layer, unreacted PbI2 inevitably coexists with the perovskite crystals, especially following a two-step fabrication process. There appears to be a consensus that an appropriate amount of unreacted PbI2 is beneficial to the overall photovoltaic performance of a device, the only disadvantageous aspect of excess residual PbI2 being viewed as its insulating nature. However, the further development of such perovskite-based devices requires a deeper understanding of the role of residual PbI2 . In this work, PbI2 -enriched and PbI2 -controlled perovskite films, as two extreme cases, have been prepared by modulating the crystallinity of a pre-deposited PbI2 film. The effects of excess residual PbI2 have been elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and optoelectronic studies. The initial charge separation, the trap-state density, and the trap-state distribution have all been found to be adversely affected in PbI2 -enriched devices, to the detriment of photovoltaic performance. This leads to a biphasic recombination process and accelerates the charge carrier recombination dynamics.

  14. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    SciTech Connect

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  15. Water-trapped Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO2 as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  16. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  17. Practical axial optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Mack, A. H.; Schlingman, D. J.; Regan, L.; Mochrie, S. G. J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new method for calibrating optical trapping measurements in which tension is applied in the direction of the laser beam to a molecule tethered between a surface and an optically trapped bead. Specifically, we present a generally-applicable procedure for converting from the measured scattering intensity and the measured stage displacement to applied tension and bead-coverslip separation, using measurements of the light intensity scattered from an untethered, trapped bead. Our calibration accounts for a number of effects, including aberrations and the interference of forward-reflected bead-scattered light with the trapping beam. To demonstrate the accuracy of our method, we show measurements of the DNA force-versus-extension relation using a range of laser intensities, and show that these measurements match the expected extensible wormlike-chain (WLC) behavior. Finally, we also demonstrate a force-clamp, in which the tension in a tether is held fixed while the extension varies as a result of molecular events. PMID:23126750

  18. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  19. Controlling the efficiency of trapping in treelike fractals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2013-07-14

    Efficiently controlling the trapping process, especially the trapping efficiency, is central in the study of trap problem in complex systems, since it is a fundamental mechanism for diverse other dynamic processes. Thus, it is of theoretical and practical significance to study the control technique for trapping problem. In this paper, we study the trapping problem in a family of proposed directed fractals with a deep trap at a central node. The directed fractals are a generalization of previous undirected fractals by introducing the directed edge weights dominated by a parameter. We characterize all the eigenvalues and their degeneracies for an associated matrix governing the trapping process. The eigenvalues are provided through an exact recursive relation deduced from the self-similar structure of the fractals. We also obtain the expressions for the smallest eigenvalue and the mean first-passage time (MFPT) as a measure of trapping efficiency, which is the expected time for the walker to first visit the trap. The MFPT is evaluated according to the proved fact that it is approximately equal to reciprocal of the smallest eigenvalue. We show that the MFPT is controlled by the weight parameter by modifying which the MFPT can scale superlinealy, linearly, or sublinearly with the system size. Thus, this work paves a way to delicately controlling the trapping process in the fractals.

  20. A Scalable Microfabricated Ion Trap for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunz, Peter; Haltli, Raymond; Hollowell, Andrew; Lobser, Daniel; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Rembetski, John; Resnick, Paul; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Stick, Daniel L.; Blain, Matthew G.

    2016-05-01

    Trapped Ion Quantum Information Processing (QIP) relies on complex microfabricated trap structures to enable scaling of the number of quantum bits. Building on previous demonstrations of surface-electrode ion traps, we have designed and characterized the Sandia high-optical-access (HOA-2) microfabricated ion trap. This trap features high optical access, high trap frequencies, low heating rates, and negligible charging of dielectric trap components. We have observed trap lifetimes of more than 100h, measured trap heating rates for ytterbium of less than 40quanta/s, and demonstrated shuttling of ions from a slotted to an above surface region and through a Y-junction. Furthermore, we summarize demonstrations of high-fidelity single and two-qubit gates realized in this trap. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  1. Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry characterization of the steroidal saponins of Dioscorea panthaica Prain et Burkill and its application for accelerating the isolation and structural elucidation of steroidal saponins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weihao; Zhao, Ye; Jing, Wenguang; Zhang, Jun; Xiao, Hui; Zha, Qin; Liu, An

    2015-03-01

    Dioscorea panthaica is a traditional Chinese medicinal herb used in the treatment of various physiological conditions, including cardiovascular disease, gastropathy and hypertension. Steroidal saponins (SS) are the main active ingredients of this herb and have effects on myocardial ischemia and cancer. The phytochemical evaluation of SS is both time-consuming and laborious, and the isolation and structural determination steps can be especially demanding. For this reason, the development of new methods to accelerate the processes involved in the identification, isolation and structural elucidation of SS is highly desirable. In this study, a new ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-IT/MS(n)) method has been developed for the identification of the SS in D. panthaica Prain et Burkill. Notably, the current method can distinguish between spirostanol and furostanol-type compounds based on the fragmentation patterns observed by electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-IT/MS(n)) analysis. UHPLC-IT/MS(n) was used to conduct a detailed investigation of the number, structural class and order of the sugar moieties in the sugar chains of the SS present in D. panthaica. The established fragmentation features were used to analyze the compounds found in the 65% ethanol fraction of the water extracts of D. panthaica. Twenty-three SS were identified, including 11 potential new compounds and six groups of isomers. Two of these newly identified SS were selected as representative examples, and their chemical structures were confirmed by (1)H and (13)C NMR analyses. This newly developed UHPLC-IT/MS(n) method therefore allowed for the efficient identification, isolation and structural determination of the SS in D. panthaica.

  2. Development of neutral atom traps based on a microfabricated waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Lee, Jongmin; Biedermann, Grant; Siddiqui, Aleem; Eichenfield, Matt; Dougla, Erica

    2016-05-01

    Implementation of trapping neutral atoms in the evanescent fields generated by a nano-structure, such as a nanofiber or a microfabricated nano-waveguide, will naturally enable strong atom-photon interactions, which serve the key mechanisms for different type of quantum controls. At Sandia National Labs, we are aiming to develop a platform based on this concept to eventually trap cesium atoms with a microfabricated waveguide. Although, neutral atom traps using optical nanofiber has been demonstrated, there are several key issues that need to be resolved to realize trapping atoms with microfabricated structure. The subjects include the material for making the waveguide, optical power handling capability, surface adsorption of alkali-metal atoms, surface roughness of the nano-structure, cold-atom source for loading the atoms into the evanescent-field traps, etc. We will discuss our studies on these related subjects and report our latest progress.

  3. Newly discovered landscape traps produce regime shifts in wet forests

    PubMed Central

    Lindenmayer, David B.; Hobbs, Richard J.; Likens, Gene E.; Krebs, Charles J.; Banks, Samuel C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the “landscape trap” concept, whereby entire landscapes are shifted into, and then maintained (trapped) in, a highly compromised structural and functional state as the result of multiple temporal and spatial feedbacks between human and natural disturbance regimes. The landscape trap concept builds on ideas like stable alternative states and other relevant concepts, but it substantively expands the conceptual thinking in a number of unique ways. In this paper, we (i) review the literature to develop the concept of landscape traps, including their general features; (ii) provide a case study as an example of a landscape trap from the mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans) forests of southeastern Australia; (iii) suggest how landscape traps can be detected before they are irrevocably established; and (iv) present evidence of the generality of landscape traps in different ecosystems worldwide. PMID:21876151

  4. Antihydrogen Trapped in the ALPHA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-25

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time.[i]  Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome.   The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained.[ii]  These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA[iii] experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating[iv].   The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures [v],[vi], [vii] where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried.   The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time. [i] 'Trapped antihydrogen' G.B. Andresen et al., Nature 468, 673 (2010) [ii]'A Magnetic Trap for Antihydrogen Confinement' W. Bertsche et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res. A566, 746 (2006) [iii] Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms M.Amoretti et al., Nature 419, 456 (2002). [iv]' Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Lett. B 685, 141 (2010) [v]' Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures',                                   G.B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 105, 013003 (2010) [vi]'Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping' G. B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 100, 203401 (2008) [vii]  'Autoresonant

  5. Antihydrogen Trapped in the ALPHA Experiment

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time.[i]  Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome.   The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained.[ii]  These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA[iii] experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating[iv].   The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures [v],[vi], [vii] where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried.   The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time. [i] 'Trapped antihydrogen' G.B. Andresen et al., Nature 468, 673 (2010) [ii]'A Magnetic Trap for Antihydrogen Confinement' W. Bertsche et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res. A566, 746 (2006) [iii] Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms M.Amoretti et al., Nature 419, 456 (2002). [iv]' Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Lett. B 685, 141 (2010) [v]' Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures',                                   G.B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 105, 013003 (2010) [vi]'Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping' G. B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 100, 203401 (2008) [vii]  'Autoresonant

  6. Calibration of optical traps by dual trapping of one bead.

    PubMed

    Dutov, Pavel; Schieber, Jay

    2013-11-15

    We introduce a method for optical trap calibration that is suitable for viscoelastic material. The method is designed for use on experimental setups with two optical tweezers and is based on pulling a trapped particle with one trap while holding it with the other. No piezo stage is needed, and only one optical trap must be movable with galvo mirrors, piezo mirrors, or acousto-optical deflectors. The method combines advantages of commonly known PSD-fitting and fast-sweeping methods, allowing calibration of a completely fixed trap in a fluid of unknown viscosity/viscoelasticity. A detailed method description, a theoretical derivation, and an experimental comparison to other methods are reported.

  7. Liquid trap seals thermocouple leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppe, E. P.

    1966-01-01

    Liquid trap seals thermocouple leads coming out of a brazing retort that operates with a controlled atmosphere so that air cannot enter the retort and hydrogen cannot escape. The trap is fastened to a duct welded to the retort. Thermocouple leads are led out through the duct and trap, with the fluid forming a gastight seal between the atmosphere and the retort.

  8. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  9. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  10. Testing the Model of Oscillating Magnetic Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szaforz, Ż.; Tomczak, M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to test the model of oscillating magnetic traps (the OMT model), proposed by Jakimiec and Tomczak ( Solar Phys. 261, 233, 2010). This model describes the process of excitation of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during solar flares. In the OMT model energetic electrons are accelerated within a triangular, cusp-like structure situated between the reconnection point and the top of a flare loop as seen in soft X-rays. We analyzed QPPs in hard X-ray light curves for 23 flares as observed by Yohkoh. Three independent methods were used. We also used hard X-ray images to localize magnetic traps and soft X-ray images to diagnose thermal plasmas inside the traps. We found that the majority of the observed pulsation periods correlates with the diameters of oscillating magnetic traps, as was predicted by the OMT model. We also found that the electron number density of plasma inside the magnetic traps in the time of pulsation disappearance is strongly connected with the pulsation period. We conclude that the observations are consistent with the predictions of the OMT model for the analyzed set of flares.

  11. Progress Towards a Practical Multicell Positron Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    The physics and technology of positron confinement is central to a range of applications at the forefront of antimatter science. Progress in this area has been driven by the development of a suite of novel non-neutral plasma techniques whereby up to 4 ×109 positrons have now been trapped and stored. However the next generation of experiments will require orders of magnitude more positrons. This talk describes techniques to increase storage capacity to >=1012 using a novel multi-cell trap architecture. Plasmas will be stored in separate Penning-Malmberg traps (``cells'') arranged in parallel off the magnetic axis to maximize use of the magnetic field volume while minimizing the required confinement voltages. Experiments with electrons in a test structure will be described to explore the basic physics and technology of the multicell concept and to set the design of a 21-cell trap for 1012 positrons. Over 50% of a trapped plasma has been injected into an off-axis cell, and hour-long confinement of 2 ×108 particles has been achieved using rotating electric fields. Experiments are under way to identify the limits of the injection process and demonstrate confinement >1010 particles in a single off-axis cell using kilovolt confinement potentials. In collaboration with N. C. Hurst, C. J. Baker, and C. M. Surko. This work is supported by U.S. DTRA and the U.S. DOE/NSF plasma partnership.

  12. Polarization dependent particle dynamics in simple traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yifat, Yuval; Sule, Nishant; Figliozzi, Patrick; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2016-09-01

    Optical trapping has proved to be a valuable research tool in a wide range of fields including physics, chemistry, biological and materials science. The ability to precisely localize individual colloidal particles in a three-dimensional location has been highly useful for understanding soft matter phenomena and inter-particle interactions. It also holds great promise for nanoscale fabrication and ultra-sensitive sensing by enabling precise positioning of specific material building blocks. In this presentation we discuss our research on the effect of the polarization state of the incident laser on the trapping of nanoscale particles. The polarization of the incident light has a pronounced effect on particle behavior even for the simple case of two plasmonic silver nano-particles in a Gaussian trap,. When the incident light is linearly polarized, the particles form an optically induced dimer that is stably oriented along the direction of polarization. However, nanoparticle dimers and trimmers exhibit structural instabilities and novel dynamics when trapped with focused beams of circularly polarized light. The observed dynamics suggest electrodynamic and hydrodynamic coupling. We explore the electrodynamic phenomena experimentally and theoretically and discuss further examples of polarization controlled trapping.

  13. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    an inspiring speech at the MIT Physics of Computation 1st Conference in 1981, Feynman proposed the development of a computer that would obey the...on ion trap based 36 quantum computing for physics and computer science students would include lecture notes, slides, lesson plans, a syllabus...reading lists, videos, demonstrations, and laboratories. 37 LIST OF REFERENCES [1] R. P. Feynman , “Simulating physics with computers,” Int. J

  14. Filter vapor trap

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold

    1976-04-13

    A sintered filter trap is adapted for insertion in a gas stream of sodium vapor to condense and deposit sodium thereon. The filter is heated and operated above the melting temperature of sodium, resulting in a more efficient means to remove sodium particulates from the effluent inert gas emanating from the surface of a liquid sodium pool. Preferably the filter leaves are precoated with a natrophobic coating such as tetracosane.

  15. A Pneumatic Actuated Microfluidic Beads-Trapping Device

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Guocheng; Cai, Ziliang; Wang, Jun; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-08-20

    The development of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic microbeads trapping device is reported in this paper. Besides fluid channels, the proposed device includes a pneumatic control chamber and a beads-trapping chamber with a filter array structure. The pneumatic flow control chamber and the beads-trapping chamber are vertically stacked and separated by a thin membrane. By adjusting the pressure in the pneumatic control chamber, the membrane can either be pushed against the filter array to set the device in trapping mode or be released to set the device in releasing mode. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics simulation was conducted to optimize the geometry design of the filter array structure; the device fabrication was also carried out. The prototype device was tested and the preliminary experimental results showed that it can be used as a beads-trapping unit for various biochemistry and analytical chemistry applications, especially for flow injection analysis systems.

  16. Magnetic trap for thulium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D D; Sokolov, A V; Chebakov, K A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevskii, N N; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2011-08-31

    For the first time ultra-cold thulium atoms were trapped in a magnetic quadrupole trap with a small field gradient (20 Gs cm{sup -1}). The atoms were loaded from a cloud containing 4x10{sup 5} atoms that were preliminarily cooled in a magneto-optical trap to the sub-Doppler temperature of 80 {mu}K. As many as 4x10{sup 4} atoms were trapped in the magnetic trap at the temperature of 40 {mu}K. By the character of trap population decay the lifetime of atoms was determined (0.5 s) and an upper estimate was obtained for the rate constant of inelastic binary collisions for spin-polarised thulium atoms in the ground state (g{sub in} < 10{sup -11}cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}). (magnetic traps)

  17. Multipole electrodynamic ion trap geometries for microparticle confinement under standard ambient temperature and pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalcea, Bogdan M.; Giurgiu, Liviu C.; Stan, Cristina; Vişan, Gina T.; Ganciu, Mihai; Filinov, Vladimir; Lapitsky, Dmitry; Deputatova, Lidiya; Syrovatka, Roman

    2016-03-01

    Trapping of microparticles and aerosols is of great interest for physics and chemistry. We report microparticle trapping in case of multipole linear Paul trap geometries, operating under standard ambient temperature and pressure conditions. An 8- and 12-electrode linear trap geometries have been designed and tested with an aim to achieve trapping for larger number of particles and to study microparticle dynamical stability in electrodynamic fields. We report emergence of planar and volume ordered structures of microparticles, depending on the a.c. trapping frequency and particle specific charge ratio. The electric potential within the trap is mapped using the electrolytic tank method. Particle dynamics is simulated using a stochastic Langevin equation. We emphasize extended regions of stable trapping with respect to quadrupole traps, as well as good agreement between experiment and numerical simulations.

  18. Shadowed off-axis production of Ge nanoparticles in Ar gas atmosphere by pulsed laser deposition: Morphological, structural and charge trapping properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Sánchez, J.; Capan, I.; Chahboun, A.; Pinto, S. R. C.; Vieira, E. M. F.; Rolo, A. G.; Gomes, M. J. M.

    2013-09-01

    In this work, a novel customized shadowed off-axis deposition set-up is used to perform an original study of Ge nanoparticles (NPs) formation in an inert Ar gas atmosphere by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature varying systematically the background Ar gas pressure (Pbase(Ar)), target-substrate distance (d) and laser repetition rate (f). The influence of these parameters on the final NPs size distributions is investigated and a fairly uniform droplets-free and non-agglomerated NPs distribution with average height = 2.8 ± 0.6 nm is obtained for optimized experimental conditions (Pbase(Ar) = 1 mbar; d = 3 cm; f = 10 Hz) with a fine control in the NPs density (from 3.2 × 109 cm-2 to 1.1 × 1011 cm-2). The crystalline quality of as-deposited NPs investigations demonstrate a strong dependence with the Ar gas pressure and a crystalline to amorphous phase volume fraction χc > 50% is found for Pbase(Ar) = 2 mbar. The NPs functionality for charge trapping applications has been successfully demonstrated by capacitance-voltage (C-V) electrical measurements.

  19. Measuring sunscreen protection against solar-simulated radiation-induced structural radical damage to skin using ESR/spin trapping: development of an ex vivo test method.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Rachel; Volkov, Arsen; Andrady, Carima; Sayer, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The in vitro star system used for sunscreen UVA-testing is not an absolute measure of skin protection being a ratio of the total integrated UVA/UVB absorption. The in vivo persistent-pigment-darkening method requires human volunteers. We investigated the use of the ESR-detectable DMPO protein radical-adduct in solar-simulator-irradiated skin substitutes for sunscreen testing. Sunscreens SPF rated 20+ with UVA protection, reduced this adduct by 40-65% when applied at 2 mg/cm(2). SPF 15 Organic UVA-UVB (BMDBM-OMC) and TiO(2)-UVB filters and a novel UVA-TiO(2) filter reduced it by 21, 31 and 70% respectively. Conventional broad-spectrum sunscreens do not fully protect against protein radical-damage in skin due to possible visible-light contributions to damage or UVA-filter degradation. Anisotropic spectra of DMPO-trapped oxygen-centred radicals, proposed intermediates of lipid-oxidation, were detected in irradiated sunscreen and DMPO. Sunscreen protection might be improved by the consideration of visible-light protection and the design of filters to minimise radical leakage and lipid-oxidation.

  20. Al2O3 influence on structural, elastic, thermal properties of Yb(3+) doped Ba-La-tellurite glass: evidence of reduction in self-radiation trapping at 1μm emission.

    PubMed

    Balaji, S; Biswas, K; Sontakke, A D; Gupta, G; Ghosh, D; Annapurna, K

    2014-12-10

    Ba-La-tellurite glasses doped with Yb(3+) ions have been prepared through melt quenching technique by modifying their composition with the inclusion of varied concentration of Al2O3 to elucidate its effects on glass structural, elastic, thermal properties and Yb(3+) ion NIR luminescence performance. The FTIR spectral analysis indicates Al2O3 addition is promoting the conversion of BOs from NBOs which have been generated during the process of depolymerisation of main glass forming TeO4 units. The elastic properties of the glass revealed an improved rigidity of the glass network on addition of Al2O3. In concurrence to this, differential thermal analysis showed an increase in glass transition temperature with improved thermal stability factor. Also, Yb(3+) fluorescence dynamics demonstrated that, Al2O3 inclusion helps in restraining the detrimental radiation trapping of ∼1μm emission.

  1. Cenozoic diapiric traps in eastern China

    SciTech Connect

    Xie-Pei, W.; Qi, F.; Jia-Hua, Z.

    1985-12-01

    Diapiric traps, including diapirs of salt and mud or igneous intrusives, have recently been found in many places in the Cenozoic petroliferous basins in eastern China, and most of them produce oil and gas. During the Eocene-early Oligocene, salt-lake basins evolved extensively. Plastic source materials for diapirism were deposited in the basins in great thickness. We have found that the diapiric traps of salt and mud in eastern China are unpierced or slightly pierced structures. The diapiric materials are a mixture of salt, gypsum, and mudstone, but mudstone is the main component of the plastic bodies. Based on an analysis of the structural features of the diapirs and the regional tectonic setting, we believe that the diapiric traps are caused by a combination of horizontal stress due to regional tectonic movement and vertical stress due to gravitational instability. Some diabase diapirs are arranged in a series of small anticlinal traps along the regional faults in the Subei basin of Jiangsu province. Oil and gas have been found in certain of these diapirs. 16 figures.

  2. Atom trap trace analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  3. A microfluidic device enabling high-efficiency single cell trapping

    PubMed Central

    Jin, D.; Deng, B.; Cai, W.; Tu, L.; Chen, J.; Wu, Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-01-01

    Single cell trapping increasingly serves as a key manipulation technique in single cell analysis for many cutting-edge cell studies. Due to their inherent advantages, microfluidic devices have been widely used to enable single cell immobilization. To further improve the single cell trapping efficiency, this paper reports on a passive hydrodynamic microfluidic device based on the “least flow resistance path” principle with geometry optimized in line with corresponding cell types. Different from serpentine structure, the core trapping structure of the micro-device consists of a series of concatenated T and inverse T junction pairs which function as bypassing channels and trapping constrictions. This new device enhances the single cell trapping efficiency from three aspects: (1) there is no need to deploy very long or complicated channels to adjust flow resistance, thus saving space for each trapping unit; (2) the trapping works in a “deterministic” manner, thus saving a great deal of cell samples; and (3) the compact configuration allows shorter flowing path of cells in multiple channels, thus increasing the speed and throughput of cell trapping. The mathematical model of the design was proposed and optimization of associated key geometric parameters was conducted based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. As a proof demonstration, two types of PDMS microfluidic devices were fabricated to trap HeLa and HEK-293T cells with relatively significant differences in cell sizes. Experimental results showed 100% cell trapping and 90% single cell trapping over 4 × 100 trap sites for these two cell types, respectively. The space saving is estimated to be 2-fold and the cell trapping speed enhancement to be 3-fold compared to previously reported devices. This device can be used for trapping various types of cells and expanded to trap cells in the order of tens of thousands on 1-cm2 scale area, as a promising tool to pattern large-scale single cells on

  4. Observation of Cold Collisions between Trapped Ions and Trapped Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Andrew T.; Cetina, Marko; Oručević, Fedja; Vuletić, Vladan

    2009-06-01

    We study cold collisions between trapped ions and trapped atoms in the semiclassical (Langevin) regime. Using Yb+ ions confined in a Paul trap and Yb atoms in a magneto-optical trap, we investigate charge-exchange collisions of several isotopes over three decades of collision energies down to 3μeV (kB×35mK). The minimum measured rate coefficient of 6×10-10cm3s-1 is in good agreement with that derived from a Langevin model for an atomic polarizability of 143 a.u.

  5. Cenozoic diapiric traps in eastern China

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, F.; Xie-Pei, W.; Jia-Hua, Z.

    1984-04-01

    Genetically, there are 2 types of Cenozoic diapiric traps in the oil fields in eastern China. One type is produced by cold diapirism owing to the rise of evaporites and soft mudstone. This type can be divided into 3 patterns. The first pattern is the faulted ridge with 1000 m (3300 ft) closure and flanks dipping up to 30/sup 0/. A complex graben system is developed on the top. The amplitude of the core of the anticline is about 3000 m (9800 ft). The Xiangzheng structure in the Shengli oil field and the Wang-cung structure in the Qian-jiang depression are examples. The second pattern is the gentle anticline or dome with 50-300 m (160-985 ft) closure and 3/sup 0/-10/sup 0/ dip on the flanks. The incompetent strata beneath it are about 1000 m (3300 ft) thick. The Tuocung-Shengli structure in the Shengli oil field is an example. The third pattern is a nose-like structure with less than 50 m (160 ft) closure. This pattern is usually located near the zero edge of incompetent strata. The Serniusi structure in the Dagang oil field is an example. Another type of Cenozoic diapiric trap results from hot diapirism associated with the intrusion of gabbro or diabase. Such traps are typically small, round domes. The dip of the flanking strata generally increases with depth as the diapir is approached. A graben system is developed on top of the diapir. The distribution of these traps is related usually to regional fault zones and coincides with the distribution of the magmatism. The Matouzung structure in the Jinhu depression is one of the examples.

  6. Cenozoic diapiric traps in eastern China

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, F.; Xie-Pei, W.; Jia-Hua, Z.

    1984-04-01

    Genetically, there are 2 types of Cenozoic diapiric traps in the oil fields in eastern China. One type is produced by cold diapirism owing to the rise of evaporites and soft mudstone. This type can be divided into 3 patterns. The first pattern is the faulted ridge with 1000 m (3300 ft) closure and flanks dipping up to 30/sup 0/. A complex graben system is developed on the top. The amplitude of the core of the anticline is about 3000 m (9800 ft). The Xiangzheng structure in the Shengli oil field and the Wang-atcung structure in the Qian-jiang depression are examples. The second pattern is the gentle anticline or dome with 50-300 m (160-985 ft) closure and 3/sup 0/-10/sup 0/ dip on the flanks. The incompetent strata beneath it are about 1000 m (3300 ft) thick. The Tuocung-Shengli structure in the Shengli oil field is an example. The third pattern is a nose-like structure with less than 50 m (160 ft) closure. This pattern is usually located near the zero edge of incompetent strata. The Serniusi structure in the Dagang oil field is an example. Another type of Cenozoic diapiric trap results from hot diapirism associated with the intrusion of gabbro or diabase. Such traps are typically small, round domes. The dip of the flanking strata generally increases with depth as the diapir is approached. A graben system is developed on top of the diapir. The distribution of these traps is related usually to regional fault zones and coincides with the distribution of the magmatism. The Matouzung structure in the Jinhu depression is one of the examples.

  7. Computer simulations of ions in radio-frequency traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.; Djomehri, J.; Harabetian, E.

    1990-01-01

    The motion of ions in a trapped-ion frequency standard affects the stability of the standard. In order to study the motion and structures of large ion clouds in a radio-frequency (RF) trap, a computer simulation of the system that incorporates the effect of thermal excitation of the ions was developed. Results are presented from the simulation for cloud sizes up to 512 ions, emphasizing cloud structures in the low-temperature regime.

  8. Finite element simulations of hydrodynamic trapping in microfluidic particle-trap array systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoxiao; Li, Zhenyu; Nehorai, Arye

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation is a powerful tool in the design and implementation of microfluidic systems, especially for systems that involve hydrodynamic behavior of objects such as functionalized microspheres, biological cells, or biopolymers in complex structures. In this work, we investigate hydrodynamic trapping of microspheres in a novel microfluidic particle-trap array device by finite element simulations. The accuracy of the time-dependent simulation of a microsphere's motion towards the traps is validated by our experimental results. Based on the simulation, we study the fluid velocity field, pressure field, and force and stress on the microsphere in the device. We further explore the trap array's geometric parameters and critical fluid velocity, which affect the microsphere's hydrodynamic trapping. The information is valuable for designing microfluidic devices and guiding experimental operation. Besides, we provide guidelines on the simulation set-up and release an openly available implementation of our simulation in one of the popular FEM softwares, COMSOL Multiphysics. Researchers may tailor the model to simulate similar microfluidic systems that may accommodate a variety of structured particles. Therefore, the simulation will be of particular interest to biomedical research involving cell or bead transport and migration, blood flow within microvessels, and drug delivery.

  9. Thermal Replication Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The hallmark of living matter is the replication of genetic molecules and their active storage against diffusion. We have argued in the past that thermal convection can host the million-fold accumulation even of single nucleotides and at the same time trigger exponential replication. Accumulation is driven by thermophoresis and convection in elongated chambers, replication by the inherent temperature cycling in convection. Optothermal pumping [2,3] allows to implement the thermal trap efficiently in a toroidal or linear geometry. Based on this method, we were in a position to combine accumulation and replication of DNA in the same chamber. As we are missing a solid chemistry of prebiotic replication, we used as a proxy reaction for to replication the polymerase chain reaction. Convective flow both drives the DNA replicating polymerase chain reaction (PCR) while concurrent thermophoresis accumulates the replicated 143 base pair DNA in bulk solution. The time constant for accumulation is 92 s while DNA is doubled every 50 s. The length of the amplified DNA is checked with thermophoresis. Finite element simulations confirm the findings. The experiments explore conditions in pores of hydrothermal rock which can serve as a model environment for the origin of life and has prospects towards the first autonomous evolution, hosting the Darwin process by molecular selection using the thermophoretic trap. On the other side, the implemented continuous evolution will be able to breed well specified DNA or RNA molecules in the future.

  10. Nano trap for polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümel, R.

    2012-07-01

    A new ac/dc monopole trap for neutral polar particles, introduced and explored by Blümel (2011 Phys. Rev. A 83 045402 and 2011 Eur. Phys. J. D 64 85-101), is significantly advanced in several directions. (1) Previously shown to work only for polar classical particles and polar macro-molecules, the trap is shown to work for polar diatomic molecules. (2) A homogeneous electric field, optionally switched on for improved stability in the angular direction, leads to stable trapping in higher order stability regions of the Mathieu equation. (3) Based on the Floquet formalism, analytical and numerical calculations are presented that show that the trap is quantum mechanically stable. (4) Definition and derivation of a quantum pseudo-potential allow a qualitative understanding of the quantum trapping mechanism. (5) It is shown that the proposed ac/dc trap may be realized experimentally using currently available scanning tunnelling microscopy technology.

  11. Ion traps in nuclear physics-Recent results and achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eronen, Tommi; Kankainen, Anu; Äystö, Juha

    2016-11-01

    Ion traps offer a way to determine nuclear binding energies through atomic mass measurements with a high accuracy and they are routinely used to provide isotopically or even isomerically pure beams of short-living ions for post-trap decay spectroscopy experiments. In this review, different ion-trapping techniques and progresses in recent nuclear physics experiments employing low-energy ion traps are discussed. The main focus in this review is on the benefit of recent high accuracy mass measurements to solve some key problems in physics related to nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics as well as neutrinos. Also, several cases of decay spectroscopy experiments utilizing trap-purified ion samples are summarized.

  12. Inelastic Collisions in Optically Trapped Ultracold Metastable Ytterbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Uetake, S.; Hashimoto, D.; Doyle, J. M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We report measurement of inelastic loss in dense and cold metastable ytterbium (Yb[P23]). Use of an optical far-off-resonance trap enables us to trap atoms in all magnetic sublevels, removing m-changing collisional trap loss from the system. Trapped samples of Yb[P23] are produced at a density of 2×1013cm-3 and temperature of 2μK. We observe rapid two-body trap loss of Yb[P23] and measure the inelastic collision rate constant 1.0(3)×10-11cm3s-1. The existence of the fine-structure changing collisions between atoms in the P23 state is strongly suggested.

  13. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  14. DNA Separation Using Photoelectrophoretic Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Braiman, Avital; Thundat, Thomas George; Rudakov, Fedor M

    2011-01-01

    In our recent publications we presented a design that allows formation of highly localized and optically controlled electrophoretic traps. 1,2 We demonstrated that electrophoretic traps can be utilized for biomolecule photoconcentration, optically directed transport, and separation by size. 1,2 In the current publication we suggest a hybrid design for biomolecule separation which implements electrophoretic traps in tandem with well-established electrophoretic techniques. We perform Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate that the resolution of well-established electrophoretic techniques can be greatly enhanced by introducing photoelectrophoretic traps.

  15. Geomagnetically trapped anomalous cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Selesnick, R.S.; Cummings, A.C.; Cummings, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    Since its launch in July 1992, the polar-orbiting satellite SAMPEX has been collecting data on geomagnetically trapped heavy ions, predominantly O, N, and Ne, at energies {ge}15 MeV/nucleon and in a narrow L shell range L = 2. Their location, elemental composition, energy spectra, pitch angle distribution, and time variations all support the theory that these particles originated as singly ionized interplanetary anomalous cosmic rays that were stripped of electrons in the Earth`s upper atmosphere and subsequently trapped. The O are observed primarily at pitch angles outside the atmospheric loss cones, consistent with a trapped population, and their distribution there is nearly isotropic. The abundances relative to O of the N, possible Ne, and especially C are lower than the corresponding interplanetary values, which may be indicative of the trapping efficiencies. The distributions of trapped N, O, and Ne in energy and L shell suggest that most of the ions observed at the SAMPEX altitude of {approximately}600 km are not fully stripped when initially trapped. A comparison of the trapped intensity with the much lower interplanetary intensity of anomalous cosmic rays provides model-dependent estimates of the product of the trapping probability and the average trapped particle lifetime against ionization losses in the residual atmosphere for particles that mirror near the SAMPEX altitude. 36 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Trapped-electron runaway effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Fisch, N. J.; Peysson, Y.

    2015-08-01

    In a tokamak, trapped electrons subject to a strong electric field cannot run away immediately, because their parallel velocity does not increase over a bounce period. However, they do pinch toward the tokamak center. As they pinch toward the center, the trapping cone becomes more narrow, so eventually they can be detrapped and run away. When they run away, trapped electrons will have a very different signature from circulating electrons subject to the Dreicer mechanism. The characteristics of what are called trapped-electron runaways are identified and quantified, including their distinguishable perpendicular velocity spectrum and radial extent.

  17. Traps and seals II. Stratigraphic/capillary traps

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.H.; Beaumont, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    This text is a reprint belonging to a series of reprint volumes which in turn are part of the Treatise of Petroleum Geology. This volume contains papers that describe different stratigraphically controlled trap types, the preservation of porosity, and the importance of capillarity in trapping hydrocarbons.

  18. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Area 1 trap limits. The Area 1 trap limit is 800 traps. Federally permitted lobster fishing vessels shall not fish with, deploy in, possess in, or haul back...

  19. Structure of 2C-Methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate Synthase from Shewanella oneidensis at 1.6 angstrom: Identification of Farnesyl pyrophosphate Trapped in a Hydrophobic Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Shuisong; Robinson, Howard; Marsing, Gregory C.; Bussiere, Dirksen E.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2004-11-01

    1. Introduction Enzymes in the non-mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid synthesis have gained recent attention because of their potential value as targets for antibiotic drug development. 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4 cyclophosphate (MECDP) synthase is the fifth enzyme in the seven enzyme non-mevalonate pathway for synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate. Four groups have published structures of MECDP synthase at resolutions varying from 1.6Å to 2.8Å, either in the presence or absence of substrate from Escherichia coli (Richard et al., 2002; Kemp et al., 2002; Steinbacher et al., 2002) or from Thermus thermophilus (Kishida et al., 2003). Among these structures, the protein always exists as a homotrimer either with a crystallographic or a non-crystallographic three-fold symmetry axis and an active site formed in a cleft between adjacent monomers. While the overall shape of the proteins is highly similar among these structures, each of the four reported structures contain different combinations of metal ions in the active site including a Zn2+ ion only (Steinbacher et al., 2002), a Mn2+ ion only (Richard et al., 2002), Zn2+ and Mn2+ ions (Kemp et al., 2002) or two Mg2+ ions (Kishida et al., 2003). Furthermore, two of the structures are reported to contain a hydrophobic channel along the three-fold symmetry axis that is capped by a cluster of three arginine side chains (one from each monomer) at one end of the cavity and a cluster of three glutamic acid side chains (one from each monomer) at the other side of the cavity. In a 1.8Å resolution structure, Kemp et al. (2002) reported a sulfate ion coordinated to the arginine cap and solvent trapped in a hydrophobic cavity. In a lower 2.8Å resolution structure, Richard et al. (2002) concluded that geranyl diphosphate, GPP, was most likely trapped by the arginine cap and hydrophobic cavity (Richard et al., 2002), however, the low resolution of the data together with the presence of the crystallographic symmetry axis prohibited a

  20. Solar energy trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus is described for trapping solar energy for heating a fluid that could be subsequently used in turbines and similar devices. The apparatus includes an elongated vertical light pipe having an open end through which the visible spectrum of electromagnetic radiation from the sun passes to strike a tubular absorber. The light pipe has a coated interior surface of a low absorptivity and a high reflectivity at the visible wavelengths and a high absorptivity/emissivity ratio at infrared wavelengths. The tubular absorber has a coating on the surface for absorbing visible wavelengths to heat the fluid passing through. Infrared wave lengths are radiated from the tubular absorber back into the light pipe for heating fluid passing through a tubular coil wound around it.

  1. The crystal structure of Erwinia amylovora levansucrase provides a snapshot of the products of sucrose hydrolysis trapped into the active site.

    PubMed

    Wuerges, Jochen; Caputi, Lorenzo; Cianci, Michele; Boivin, Stephane; Meijers, Rob; Benini, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Levansucrases are members of the glycoside hydrolase family and catalyse both the hydrolysis of the substrate sucrose and the transfer of fructosyl units to acceptor molecules. In the presence of sufficient sucrose, this may either lead to the production of fructooligosaccharides or fructose polymers. Aim of this study is to rationalise the differences in the polymerisation properties of bacterial levansucrases and in particular to identify structural features that determine different product spectrum in the levansucrase of the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora (Ea Lsc, EC 2.4.1.10) as compared to Gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis levansucrase. Ea is an enterobacterial pathogen responsible for the Fire Blight disease in rosaceous plants (e.g., apple and pear) with considerable interest for the agricultural industry. The crystal structure of Ea Lsc was solved at 2.77 Å resolution and compared to those of other fructosyltransferases from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We propose the structural features, determining the different reaction products, to reside in just a few loops at the rim of the active site funnel. Moreover we propose that loop 8 may have a role in product length determination in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus LsdA and Microbacterium saccharophilum FFase. The Ea Lsc structure shows for the first time the products of sucrose hydrolysis still bound in the active site.

  2. Toward efficient optical trapping of sub-10-nm particles with coaxial plasmonic apertures.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Amr A E; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2012-11-14

    Optical trapping using focused laser beams has emerged as a powerful tool in the biological and physical sciences. However, scaling this technique to nanosized objects remains challenging due to the diffraction limit of light and the high power levels required for nanoscale trapping. In this paper, we propose plasmonic coaxial apertures as low-power optical traps for nanosized specimens. The illumination of a coaxial aperture with a linearly polarized plane wave generates a dual optical trapping potential well. We theoretically show that this potential can stably trap dielectric particles smaller than 10 nm in diameter while keeping the trapping power level below 20 mW. By tapering the thickness of the coaxial dielectric channel, trapping can be extended to sub-2-nm particles. The proposed structures may enable optical trapping and manipulation of dielectric particles ranging from single proteins to small molecules with sizes previously inaccessible.

  3. Zinc-oxide charge trapping memory cell with ultra-thin chromium-oxide trapping layer

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atab, Nazek; Rizk, Ayman; Nayfeh, Ammar; Okyay, Ali K.

    2013-11-15

    A functional zinc-oxide based SONOS memory cell with ultra-thin chromium oxide trapping layer was fabricated. A 5 nm CrO{sub 2} layer is deposited between Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) steps. A threshold voltage (V{sub t}) shift of 2.6V was achieved with a 10V programming voltage. Also for a 2V V{sub t} shift, the memory with CrO{sub 2} layer has a low programming voltage of 7.2V. Moreover, the deep trapping levels in CrO{sub 2} layer allows for additional scaling of the tunnel oxide due to an increase in the retention time. In addition, the structure was simulated using Physics Based TCAD. The results of the simulation fit very well with the experimental results providing an understanding of the charge trapping and tunneling physics.

  4. Induction of trap formation in nematode-trapping fungi by bacteria-released ammonia.

    PubMed

    Su, H N; Xu, Y Y; Wang, X; Zhang, K Q; Li, G H

    2016-04-01

    A total of 11 bacterial strains were assayed for bacteria-induced trap formation in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora YMF1·01883 with two-compartmented Petri dish. These strains were identified on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of eight isolates were extracted using solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) and their structures were identified based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). At the same time, all isolates were used for quantitative measurement of ammonia by the indophenol blue method. The effects of pure commercial compounds on inducement of trap formation in A. oligospora were tested. Taken together, results demonstrated that the predominant bacterial volatile compound inducing trap formation was ammonia. Meanwhile, ammonia also played a role in other nematode-trapping fungi, including Arthrobotrys guizhouensis YMF1·00014, producing adhesive nets; Dactylellina phymatopaga YMF1·01474, producing adhesive knobs; Dactylellina cionopaga YMF1·01472, producing adhesive columns and Drechslerella brochopaga YMF1·01829, producing constricting rings.

  5. Evidence for hidden quadrupolar fluctuations behind the octupole order in Ce0.7La0.3B6 from resonant x-ray diffraction in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Takeshi; Michimura, Shinji; Inami, Toshiya; Otsubo, Toru; Tanida, Hiroshi; Iga, Fumitoshi; Sera, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    The multipole ordered phase in Ce0.7La0.3B6, emerging below 1.5 K and named phase IV, has been studied by resonant x-ray diffraction in magnetic fields. By utilizing diamond x-ray phase plates to rotate the incident linear polarization and a conventional crystal analyzer system, full linear polarization analysis has been performed to identify the order parameters. The analysis shows that the Γ5g(Oyz, Ozx, Oxy) quadrupoles are more induced by the field than the Γ3g (O20 and O22) quadrupoles on the Γ5u (Tx+y +zβ) antiferro-octupole order in phase IV. The problem is that this result is contradictory to a mean-field calculation, which inevitably gives the Γ3g quadrupole as the main induced moment. This result indicates that the Γ5g quadrupole order is close in energy. We consider that a large fluctuation of the Γ5g quadrupole is hidden behind the primary ordering of the Γ5u octupole and that the multipolar fluctuation significantly affects the ordering phenomenon.

  6. Mass trapping for Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass trapping has been found to be highly effective for control of pest fruit flies when populations are low and a highly effective lure is available for the target species. Successful population control through mass trapping is an indicator that attract-and-kill bait stations may be equally succes...

  7. Nontoxic Antifreeze for Insect Traps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Propylene glycol in water is a safe and effective alternative to ethylene glycol as a capture liquid in insect traps (pitfalls, flight intercepts, pan traps). Propylene glycol formulations are readily available because it is the primary (95%) ingredient in certain automotive antifreeze formulations...

  8. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  9. Optical Traps to Study Properties of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.; Rice, Sarah E.; Rock, Ronald S.; Purcell, Thomas J.; Warrick, Hans M.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro motility assays enabled the analysis of coupling between ATP hydrolysis and movement of myosin along actin filaments or kinesin along microtubules. Single-molecule assays using laser trapping have been used to obtain more detailed information about kinesins, myosins, and processive DNA enzymes. The combination of in vitro motility assays with laser-trap measurements has revealed detailed dynamic structural changes associated with the ATPase cycle. This article describes the use of optical traps to study processive and nonprocessive molecular motor proteins, focusing on the design of the instrument and the assays to characterize motility. PMID:22046048

  10. Trapped electron cloud bolometer relying on frequency shift.

    PubMed Central

    Dehmelt, H

    1994-01-01

    An improved electron cloud bolometer is analyzed. In this device the cloud temperature is read out not via thermal noise induced by the electrons in a coupled LC circuit but via shift in their axial oscillation frequency in the Penning trap confining them. This shift occurs because as the electron cloud expands with increasing temperature, the average restoring force in the slightly anharmonic trap does change perceptibly. The scheme will be useful in exploring the microwave mode structure of the trap cavity and in locating magnetic field values for which the cavity-induced shift in the measured electron g factor disappears. PMID:11607480

  11. Trapped electron cloud bolometer relying on frequency shift.

    PubMed

    Dehmelt, H

    1994-07-05

    An improved electron cloud bolometer is analyzed. In this device the cloud temperature is read out not via thermal noise induced by the electrons in a coupled LC circuit but via shift in their axial oscillation frequency in the Penning trap confining them. This shift occurs because as the electron cloud expands with increasing temperature, the average restoring force in the slightly anharmonic trap does change perceptibly. The scheme will be useful in exploring the microwave mode structure of the trap cavity and in locating magnetic field values for which the cavity-induced shift in the measured electron g factor disappears.

  12. Plasmonic enhancement of light trapping into organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van; Vu, Dinh Lam

    2015-12-01

    The present work is devoted to the review of the methods to improve light trapping into polymer solar cells. After a discussion on the important role of the improvement of the light-trapping technique in the fabrication of solar cells by applying the plasmonic enhancement effect, we review the results of the study on this topic, which were obtained mainly during recent years. The light-trapping nanostructures usually comprised the following basic elements: antireflection coating, randomly distributed or symmetric-periodic monolayers of metallic spherical nanoparticles (NPs), metallic NPs with different shapes, spherical NPs with core-shell structure, nanovoids, plasmonic metallic grating, grating organic active layer, grating indium tin oxide (ITO) layer, dielectric grating, photonic structure, and plasmonic cavity with subwavelength hole array. Each light-trapping nanostructure may use either one or two of the above-mentioned basic elements.

  13. Pulsed filling of a dark magnetooptical trap for rubidium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Chapovskii, Pavel L

    2006-03-31

    The parameters of a dark magnetooptical trap for rubidium atoms are measured. The rubidium atoms captured and cooled in the trap occupy a hyperfine level of the ground electronic state, which does not interact with cooling laser radiation. The pulsed filling of the trap is produced due to desorption of rubidium caused by irradiation by a short (1 ms) light pulse. The trap captures and cools 2.5x10{sup 8} rubidium atoms approximately for 0.2 s. The absorption spectra of a weak probe field by cold atoms are obtained, which demonstrate a good spectral resolution of the hyperfine structure in the excited state. This structure is completely hidden by the Doppler broadening in rubidium vapours at room temperature. (laser cooling)

  14. Bacteria can mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guo-Hong; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Tong; Zhao, Pei-Ji; Liang, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Ping; An, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Xi; Qin, Yue-Ke; Tian, Meng-Qing; Xu, You-Yao; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Yu, Ze-Fen; Huang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Qun; Niu, Xue-Mei; Yang, Jin-Kui; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2014-12-16

    In their natural habitat, bacteria are consumed by bacterivorous nematodes; however, they are not simply passive preys. Here we report a defensive mechanism used by certain bacteria to mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes. These bacteria release urea, which triggers a lifestyle switch in the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora from saprophytic to nematode-predatory form; this predacious form is characterized by formation of specialized cellular structures or 'traps'. The bacteria significantly promote the elimination of nematodes by A. oligospora. Disruption of genes involved in urea transport and metabolism in A. oligospora abolishes the urea-induced trap formation. Furthermore, the urea metabolite ammonia functions as a signal molecule in the fungus to initiate the lifestyle switch to form trap structures. Our findings highlight the importance of multiple predator-prey interactions in prey defense mechanisms.

  15. Structure of the HIV-1 Full-Length Capsid in a Conformationally-Trapped Unassembled State Induced by Small-Molecule Binding

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shoucheng; Betts, Laurie; Yang, Ruifeng; Shi, Haibin; Concel, Jason; Ahn, Jinwoo; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Yeh, Joanne I.

    2011-01-01

    The capsid protein (CA) plays crucial roles in HIV-infection and replication, essential to viral maturation. The absence of high-resolution structural data on unassembled CA hinders the development of antivirals effective in inhibiting assembly. Unlike enzymes that have targetable functional substrate binding sites, the CA does not have a known site that affects catalytic or other innate activity, which can be more readily targeted in drug development efforts. We report the crystal structure of the HIV-1 CA, revealing the domain organization in context of the wild-type full-length (FL) unassembled CA. The FL CA adopts an antiparallel dimer (APD) configuration, exhibiting a domain organization sterically incompatible with capsid assembly. A small compound, generated in-situ during crystallization, is bound tightly at a hinge-site (“H-site”), indicating that binding at this interdomain region stabilizes the ADP conformation. Electron microscopy studies on nascent crystals reveal both dimeric and hexameric lattices coexisting within a single condition, in agreement with the interconvertibility of oligomeric forms and supporting the feasibility of promoting assembly-incompetent dimeric states. Solution characterization in the presence of the H-site ligand shows predominantly unassembled dimeric CA, even under conditions that promote assembly. Our structure elucidation of the HIV-1 FL CA and characterization of a potential allosteric binding site provides 3D views of an assembly-defective conformation, a state targeted in and, thus, directly relevant to, inhibitor development. Based on our findings, we propose an unprecedented means of preventing CA assembly, by ‘conformationally-trapping’ CA in assembly-incompetent conformational states, induced by H-site binding. PMID:21146540

  16. The trapped human experiment.

    PubMed

    Huo, R; Agapiou, A; Bocos-Bintintan, V; Brown, L J; Burns, C; Creaser, C S; Devenport, N A; Gao-Lau, B; Guallar-Hoyas, C; Hildebrand, L; Malkar, A; Martin, H J; Moll, V H; Patel, P; Ratiu, A; Reynolds, J C; Sielemann, S; Slodzynski, R; Statheropoulos, M; Turner, M A; Vautz, W; Wright, V E; Thomas, C L P

    2011-12-01

    This experiment observed the evolution of metabolite plumes from a human trapped in a simulation of a collapsed building. Ten participants took it in turns over five days to lie in a simulation of a collapsed building and eight of them completed the 6 h protocol while their breath, sweat and skin metabolites were passed through a simulation of a collapsed glass-clad reinforced-concrete building. Safety, welfare and environmental parameters were monitored continuously, and active adsorbent sampling for thermal desorption GC-MS, on-line and embedded CO, CO(2) and O(2) monitoring, aspirating ion mobility spectrometry with integrated semiconductor gas sensors, direct injection GC-ion mobility spectrometry, active sampling thermal desorption GC-differential mobility spectrometry and a prototype remote early detection system for survivor location were used to monitor the evolution of the metabolite plumes that were generated. Oxygen levels within the void simulator were allowed to fall no lower than 19.1% (v). Concurrent levels of carbon dioxide built up to an average level of 1.6% (v) in the breathing zone of the participants. Temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide levels and the physiological measurements were consistent with a reproducible methodology that enabled the metabolite plumes to be sampled and characterized from the different parts of the experiment. Welfare and safety data were satisfactory with pulse rates, blood pressures and oxygenation, all within levels consistent with healthy adults. Up to 12 in-test welfare assessments per participant and a six-week follow-up Stanford Acute Stress Response Questionnaire indicated that the researchers and participants did not experience any adverse effects from their involvement in the study. Preliminary observations confirmed that CO(2), NH(3) and acetone were effective markers for trapped humans, although interactions with water absorbed in building debris needed further study. An unexpected observation from the NH(3

  17. Intrinsic and extrinsic pinning in NdFeAs(O,F): vortex trapping and lock-in by the layered structure

    PubMed Central

    Tarantini, C.; Iida, K.; Hänisch, J.; Kurth, F.; Jaroszynski, J.; Sumiya, N.; Chihara, M.; Hatano, T.; Ikuta, H.; Schmidt, S.; Seidel, P.; Holzapfel, B.; Larbalestier, D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Fe-based superconductors (FBS) present a large variety of compounds whose properties are affected to different extents by their crystal structures. Amongst them, the REFeAs(O,F) (RE1111, RE being a rare-earth element) is the family with the highest critical temperature Tc but also with a large anisotropy and Josephson vortices as demonstrated in the flux-flow regime in Sm1111 (Tc ∼ 55 K). Here we focus on the pinning properties of the lower-Tc Nd1111 in the flux-creep regime. We demonstrate that for H//c critical current density Jc at high temperatures is dominated by point-defect pinning centres, whereas at low temperatures surface pinning by planar defects parallel to the c-axis and vortex shearing prevail. When the field approaches the ab-planes, two different regimes are observed at low temperatures as a consequence of the transition between 3D Abrikosov and 2D Josephson vortices: one is determined by the formation of a vortex-staircase structure and one by lock-in of vortices parallel to the layers. This is the first study on FBS showing this behaviour in the full temperature, field, and angular range and demonstrating that, despite the lower Tc and anisotropy of Nd1111 with respect to Sm1111, this compound is substantially affected by intrinsic pinning generating a strong ab-peak in Jc. PMID:27782196

  18. Intrinsic and extrinsic pinning in NdFeAs(O,F): vortex trapping and lock-in by the layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarantini, C.; Iida, K.; Hänisch, J.; Kurth, F.; Jaroszynski, J.; Sumiya, N.; Chihara, M.; Hatano, T.; Ikuta, H.; Schmidt, S.; Seidel, P.; Holzapfel, B.; Larbalestier, D. C.

    2016-10-01

    Fe-based superconductors (FBS) present a large variety of compounds whose properties are affected to different extents by their crystal structures. Amongst them, the REFeAs(O,F) (RE1111, RE being a rare-earth element) is the family with the highest critical temperature Tc but also with a large anisotropy and Josephson vortices as demonstrated in the flux-flow regime in Sm1111 (Tc ∼ 55 K). Here we focus on the pinning properties of the lower-Tc Nd1111 in the flux-creep regime. We demonstrate that for H//c critical current density Jc at high temperatures is dominated by point-defect pinning centres, whereas at low temperatures surface pinning by planar defects parallel to the c-axis and vortex shearing prevail. When the field approaches the ab-planes, two different regimes are observed at low temperatures as a consequence of the transition between 3D Abrikosov and 2D Josephson vortices: one is determined by the formation of a vortex-staircase structure and one by lock-in of vortices parallel to the layers. This is the first study on FBS showing this behaviour in the full temperature, field, and angular range and demonstrating that, despite the lower Tc and anisotropy of Nd1111 with respect to Sm1111, this compound is substantially affected by intrinsic pinning generating a strong ab-peak in Jc.

  19. Ultrasonic imaging using trapped energy mode Fresnel lens transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, P.; Talley, S.; Kraft, R.; Tiersten, H. F.; Mcdonald, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Trapped-energy focusing transducers operating in the 2-5 MHz range have been fabricated by plating concentric rings of electrodes on a piezoelectric plate. The concentric ring structure acts as a Fresnel lens and can be used to obtain excellent lateral focusing of ultrasonic waves. The trapping is sufficiently strong to permit optimization of electrode spacings to suppress spurious virtual foci and ring sidelobes.

  20. Trapping phosphate anions inside the [Ag{sub 4}I]{sup 3+} framework: Structure, bonding, and properties of Ag{sub 4}I(PO{sub 4})

    SciTech Connect

    Oleneva, Olga S.; Kirsanova, Maria A.; Shestimerova, Tatiana A.; Abramchuk, Nikolay S.; Davliatshin, Dmitry I.; Bykov, Mikhail A.; Dikarev, Evgeny V.; Shevelkov, Andrei V.

    2008-01-15

    Orange-red Ag{sub 4}I(PO{sub 4}) crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2{sub 1}/m (No. 11), with the unit cell dimensions a=9.0874(6) A, b=6.8809(5) A, c=11.1260(7) A, {beta}=109.450(1){sup o}, and Z=4. The crystal structure is fully ordered; it comprises the silver-iodine three-dimensional positively charged framework hosting the tetrahedral PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} guest anions. The framework features high coordination numbers for iodine and manifold Ag-Ag bonds ranging from 3.01 to 3.46 A. The Ag-Ag interaction is bonding, it involves silver 4d and 5s orbitals lying, together with the orbitals of iodine, just below the Fermi level. Though the orbitals of silver and iodine define the conducting properties of the title compound, the interaction between the framework and the guest anions is also important and is responsive to the number of the silver atoms surrounding the PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} tetrahedra. Ag{sub 4}I(PO{sub 4}) melts incongruently at 591 K and produces a mixture of the silver phosphate and an amorphous phase upon cooling. Pure Ag{sub 4}I(PO{sub 4}) is a poor conductor with a room temperature conductivity of 3x10{sup -6} S m{sup -1}. The discrepancies between the properties observed here and those reported previously in the literature are discussed. - Graphical abstract: Regular [PO{sub 4}] tetrahedra fill large voids in the Ag-I framework to form a host-guest compound, Ag{sub 4}I(PO{sub 4}). It has a perfectly ordered crystal structure, atypical for this kind of compounds, rendering the study of the manifold Ag-Ag bonds and the host-guest interaction. However, this ordering leads to low ionic conductivity.

  1. Trap-mulching Argentine ants.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Jules; Sorenson, Clyde E; Waldvogel, Michael G

    2006-10-01

    Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), management is constrained, in large part, by polydomy where nestmates are distributed extensively across urban landscapes, particularly within mulch. Management with trap-mulching is a novel approach derived from trap-cropping where ants are repelled from a broad domain of nest sites to smaller defined areas, which are subsequently treated with insecticide. This concept was field-tested with mulch surrounding ornamental trees replaced with a narrow band of pine (Pinus spp.) needle mulch (trap) within a much larger patch of repellent aromatic cedar (Juniperus spp.) mulch. After ants reestablished around the trees, the pine needle mulch band was treated with 0.06% fipronil (Termidor). Poor results were obtained when the trap extended from the tree trunk to the edge of the mulched area. When the trap was applied as a circular band around the tree trunk reductions in the number of foraging ants were recorded through 14 d compared with an untreated mulch control, but not for longer periods. Reductions in the number of ant nests within mulch were no different between the trap mulch and any of the other treatments. We conclude that trap-mulching offers limited benefits, and that successful management of Argentine ants will require implementation of complementary or perhaps alternative strategies.

  2. A Strategy Combining Higher Energy C-Trap Dissociation with Neutral Loss- and Product Ion-Based MS(n) Acquisition for Global Profiling and Structure Annotation of Fatty Acids Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Bi, Qi-Rui; Hou, Jin-Jun; Yang, Min; Shen, Yao; Qi, Peng; Feng, Rui-Hong; Dai, Zhuo; Yan, Bing-Peng; Wang, Jian-Wei; Shi, Xiao-Jian; Wu, Wan-Ying; Guo, De-An

    2017-03-01

    Fatty acids conjugates (FACs) are ubiquitous but found in trace amounts in the natural world. They are composed of multiple unknown substructures and side chains. Thus, FACs are difficult to be analyzed by traditional mass spectrometric methods. In this study, an integrated strategy was developed to global profiling and targeted structure annotation of FACs in complex matrix by LTQ Orbitrap. Dicarboxylic acid conjugated bufotoxins (DACBs) in Venenum bufonis (VB) were used as model compounds. The new strategy (abbreviated as HPNA) combined higher-energy C-trap dissociation (HCD) with product ion- (PI), neutral loss- (NL) based MS(n) (n ≥ 3) acquisition in both positive-ion mode and negative-ion mode. Several advantages are presented. First, various side chains were found under HCD in negative-ion mode, which included both known and unknown side chains. Second, DACBs with multiple side chains were simultaneously detected in one run. Compared with traditional quadrupole-based mass method, it greatly increased analysis throughput. Third, the fragment ions of side chain and steroids substructure could be obtained by PI- and NL-based MS(n) acquisition, respectively, which greatly increased the accuracy of the structure annotation of DACBs. In all, 78 DACBs have been discovered, of which 68 were new compounds; 25 types of substructure formulas and seven dicarboxylic acid side chains were found, especially five new side chains, including two saturated dicarboxylic acids [(azelaic acid (C9) and sebacic acid (C10)] and three unsaturated dicarboxylic acids (u-C8, u-C9, and u-C10). All these results greatly enriched the structures of DACBs in VB. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. A Strategy Combining Higher Energy C-Trap Dissociation with Neutral Loss- and Product Ion-Based MSn Acquisition for Global Profiling and Structure Annotation of Fatty Acids Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Qi-rui; Hou, Jin-jun; Yang, Min; Shen, Yao; Qi, Peng; Feng, Rui-hong; Dai, Zhuo; Yan, Bing-peng; Wang, Jian-wei; Shi, Xiao-jian; Wu, Wan-ying; Guo, De-an

    2017-03-01

    Fatty acids conjugates (FACs) are ubiquitous but found in trace amounts in the natural world. They are composed of multiple unknown substructures and side chains. Thus, FACs are difficult to be analyzed by traditional mass spectrometric methods. In this study, an integrated strategy was developed to global profiling and targeted structure annotation of FACs in complex matrix by LTQ Orbitrap. Dicarboxylic acid conjugated bufotoxins (DACBs) in Venenum bufonis (VB) were used as model compounds. The new strategy (abbreviated as HPNA) combined higher-energy C-trap dissociation (HCD) with product ion- (PI), neutral loss- (NL) based MSn (n ≥ 3) acquisition in both positive-ion mode and negative-ion mode. Several advantages are presented. First, various side chains were found under HCD in negative-ion mode, which included both known and unknown side chains. Second, DACBs with multiple side chains were simultaneously detected in one run. Compared with traditional quadrupole-based mass method, it greatly increased analysis throughput. Third, the fragment ions of side chain and steroids substructure could be obtained by PI- and NL-based MSn acquisition, respectively, which greatly increased the accuracy of the structure annotation of DACBs. In all, 78 DACBs have been discovered, of which 68 were new compounds; 25 types of substructure formulas and seven dicarboxylic acid side chains were found, especially five new side chains, including two saturated dicarboxylic acids [(azelaic acid (C9) and sebacic acid (C10)] and three unsaturated dicarboxylic acids (u-C8, u-C9, and u-C10). All these results greatly enriched the structures of DACBs in VB.

  4. A Strategy Combining Higher Energy C-Trap Dissociation with Neutral Loss- and Product Ion-Based MSn Acquisition for Global Profiling and Structure Annotation of Fatty Acids Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Qi-rui; Hou, Jin-jun; Yang, Min; Shen, Yao; Qi, Peng; Feng, Rui-hong; Dai, Zhuo; Yan, Bing-peng; Wang, Jian-wei; Shi, Xiao-jian; Wu, Wan-ying; Guo, De-an

    2016-12-01

    Fatty acids conjugates (FACs) are ubiquitous but found in trace amounts in the natural world. They are composed of multiple unknown substructures and side chains. Thus, FACs are difficult to be analyzed by traditional mass spectrometric methods. In this study, an integrated strategy was developed to global profiling and targeted structure annotation of FACs in complex matrix by LTQ Orbitrap. Dicarboxylic acid conjugated bufotoxins (DACBs) in Venenum bufonis (VB) were used as model compounds. The new strategy (abbreviated as HPNA) combined higher-energy C-trap dissociation (HCD) with product ion- (PI), neutral loss- (NL) based MSn (n ≥ 3) acquisition in both positive-ion mode and negative-ion mode. Several advantages are presented. First, various side chains were found under HCD in negative-ion mode, which included both known and unknown side chains. Second, DACBs with multiple side chains were simultaneously detected in one run. Compared with traditional quadrupole-based mass method, it greatly increased analysis throughput. Third, the fragment ions of side chain and steroids substructure could be obtained by PI- and NL-based MSn acquisition, respectively, which greatly increased the accuracy of the structure annotation of DACBs. In all, 78 DACBs have been discovered, of which 68 were new compounds; 25 types of substructure formulas and seven dicarboxylic acid side chains were found, especially five new side chains, including two saturated dicarboxylic acids [(azelaic acid (C9) and sebacic acid (C10)] and three unsaturated dicarboxylic acids (u-C8, u-C9, and u-C10). All these results greatly enriched the structures of DACBs in VB.

  5. Landscape of kinetically trapped binary assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannige, Ranjan V.

    2015-12-01

    For two-component assemblies, an inherent structure diagram (ISD) is the relationship between set inter-subunit energies and the types of kinetic traps (inherent structures) one may obtain from those energies. It has recently been shown that two-component ISDs are apportioned into regions or plateaux within which inherent structures display uniform features (e.g., stoichometries and morphologies). Interestingly, structures from one of the plateaux were also found to be robust outcomes of one type of non-equilibrium growth, which indicates the usefulness of the two-component ISD in predicting outcomes of some types of far-from-equilibrium growth. However, little is known as to how the ISD is apportioned into distinct plateaux. Also, while each plateau displays classes of structures that are morphologically distinct, little is known about the source of these distinct morphologies. This article outlines an analytic treatment of the two-component ISD and shows that the manner in which any ISD is apportioned arises from a single unitless order parameter. Additionally, the analytical framework allows for the characterization of local properties of the trapped structures within each ISD plateau. This work may prove to be useful in the design of novel classes of robust nonequilibrium assemblies.

  6. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  7. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xu; Wu, Ying; Chen, Ze-Guo; Zheng, Li-Yang; Xu, Ye-Long; Nayar, Priyanka; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-11-01

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea.

  8. Neutrophil extracellular traps in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Cools-Lartigue, Jonathan; Spicer, Jonathan; Najmeh, Sara; Ferri, Lorenzo

    2014-11-01

    Neutrophils are being increasingly recognized as an important element in tumor progression. They have been shown to exert important effects at nearly every stage of tumor progression with a number of studies demonstrating that their presence is critical to tumor development. Novel aspects of neutrophil biology have recently been elucidated and its contribution to tumorigenesis is only beginning to be appreciated. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are neutrophil-derived structures composed of DNA decorated with antimicrobial peptides. They have been shown to trap and kill microorganisms, playing a critical role in host defense. However, their contribution to tumor development and metastasis has recently been demonstrated in a number of studies highlighting NETs as a potentially important therapeutic target. Here, studies implicating NETs as facilitators of tumor progression and metastasis are reviewed. In addition, potential mechanisms by which NETs may exert these effects are explored. Finally, the ability to target NETs therapeutically in human neoplastic disease is highlighted.

  9. Flexible, light trapping substrates for organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yoonseok; Berger, Jana; Tang, Zheng; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Lasagni, Andrés Fabián; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl

    2016-08-01

    Micro-structured organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices on polyethylene terephthalate substrates are produced using direct laser interference patterning (DLIP). The performance of organic solar cells on these substrates is improved by a factor of 1.16, and a power conversion efficiency of 7.70% is achieved. We show that a shorter spatial period of the pattern allows for a stronger light trapping effect in solar cell, as it leads to a longer light path. Moreover, since the patterned structures are located on the outside of the fully encapsulated OPV devices, there are no problems with the roughness induced shunts.

  10. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs. PMID:27698656

  11. Weak Interaction Measurements with Optically Trapped Radioactive Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, D.J.; Crane, S.G.; Guckert, R.; Zhao, X.; Brice, S.J.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hime, A.; Tupa, D.

    1999-07-16

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project is to apply the latest in magneto-optical and pure magnetic trapping technology to concentrate, cool, confine, and polarize radioactive atoms for precise electroweak interaction measurements. In particular, the authors have concentrated their efforts on the trapping of {sup 82}Rb for a parity-violating, beta-asymmetry measurement. Progress has been made in successfully trapping of up to 6 million {sup 82}Rb(t{sub 1/2}=75s) atoms in a magneto-optical trap coupled to a mass separator. This represents a two order of magnitude improvement in the number trapped radioactive atoms over all previous work. They have also measured the atomic hyperfine structure of {sup 82}Rb and demonstrated the MOT-to-MOT transfer and accumulation of atoms in a second trap. Finally, they have constructed and tested a time-orbiting-potential magnetic trap that will serve as a rotating beacon of spin-polarized nuclei and a beta-telescope detection system. Prototype experiments are now underway with the initial goal of making a 1% measurements of the beta-asymmetry parameter A which would match the world's best measurements.

  12. Quantum Information Experiments with Trapped Ions at NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    We present an overview of recent trapped-ion quantum information experiments at NIST. Advancing beyond few-qubit ``proof-of-principle'' experiments to the many-qubit systems needed for practical quantum simulation and information processing, without compromising on the performance demonstrated with small systems, remains a major challenge. One approach to scalable hardware development is surface-electrode traps. Micro-fabricated planar traps can have a number of useful features, including flexible electrode geometries, integrated microwave delivery, and spatio-temporal tuning of potentials for ion transport and spin-spin interactions. In this talk we report on a number of on-going investigations with surface traps. Experiments feature a multi-zone trap with closely spaced ions in a triangular arrangement (a first step towards 2D arrays of ions with tunable spin-spin interactions), a scheme for smooth transport through a junction in a 2D structure based on switchable RF potentials, and a micro-fabricated photo-detector integrated into a trap. We also give a progress report on our latest efforts to improve the fidelity of both optical and microwave 2-qubit gates. This work was supported by IARPA, ONR and the NIST Quantum Information Program. The 3-ion and switchable-RF-junction traps were developed in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratory.

  13. Managing resonant-trapped orbits in our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, James

    2016-11-01

    Galaxy modelling is greatly simplified by assuming the existence of a global system of angle-action coordinates. Unfortunately, global angle-action coordinates do not exist because some orbits become trapped by resonances, especially where the radial and vertical frequencies coincide. We show that in a realistic Galactic potential such trapping occurs only on thick-disc and halo orbits (speed relative to the guiding centre ≳ 80 km s- 1). We explain how the TORUS MAPPER code (TM) behaves in regions of phase space in which orbits are resonantly trapped, and we extend TM so that trapped orbits can be manipulated as easily as untrapped ones. The impact that the resonance has on the structure of velocity space depends on the weights assigned to trapped orbits. The impact is everywhere small if each trapped orbit is assigned the phase space density equal to the time average along the orbit of the DF for untrapped orbits. The impact could be significant with a different assignment of weights to trapped orbits.

  14. Molecular dynamics computations of brine-CO2 interfacial tensions and brine-CO2-quartz contact angles and their effects on structural and residual trapping mechanisms in carbon geo-sequestration.

    PubMed

    Iglauer, S; Mathew, M S; Bresme, F

    2012-11-15

    In the context of carbon geo-sequestration projects, brine-CO(2) interfacial tension γ and brine-CO(2)-rock surface water contact angles θ directly impact structural and residual trapping capacities. While γ is fairly well understood there is still large uncertainty associated with θ. We present here an investigation of γ and θ using a molecular approach based on molecular dynamics computer simulations. We consider a system consisting of CO(2)/water/NaCl and an α-quartz surface, covering a brine salinity range between 0 and 4 molal. The simulation models accurately reproduce the dependence of γ on pressure below the CO(2) saturation pressure at 300 K, and over predict γ by ~20% at higher pressures. In addition, in agreement with experimental observations, the simulations predict that γ increases slightly with temperature or salinity. We also demonstrate that for non-hydroxylated quartz surfaces, θ strongly increases with pressure at subcritical and supercritical conditions. An increase in temperature significantly reduces the contact angle, especially at low-intermediate pressures (1-10 MPa), this effect is mitigated at higher pressures, 20 MPa. We also found that θ only weakly depends on salinity for the systems investigated in this work.

  15. High-momentum tails as magnetic-structure probes for strongly correlated SU(κ ) fermionic mixtures in one-dimensional traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decamp, Jean; Jünemann, Johannes; Albert, Mathias; Rizzi, Matteo; Minguzzi, Anna; Vignolo, Patrizia

    2016-11-01

    A universal k-4 decay of the large-momentum tails of the momentum distribution, fixed by Tan's contact coefficients, constitutes a direct signature of strong correlations in a short-range interacting quantum gas. Here we consider a repulsive multicomponent Fermi gas under harmonic confinement, as in the experiment of G. Pagano et al. [Nat. Phys. 10, 198 (2014), 10.1038/nphys2878], realizing a gas with tunable SU(κ ) symmetry. We exploit an exact solution at infinite repulsion to show a direct correspondence between the value of the Tan's contact for each of the κ components of the gas and the Young tableaux for the SN permutation symmetry group identifying the magnetic structure of the ground state. This opens a route for the experimental determination of magnetic configurations in cold atomic gases, employing only standard (spin-resolved) time-of-flight techniques. Combining the exact result with matrix-product-state simulations, we obtain the Tan's contact at all values of repulsive interactions. We show that a local-density approximation (LDA) on the Bethe-ansatz equation of state for the homogeneous mixture is in excellent agreement with the results for the harmonically confined gas. At strong interactions, the LDA predicts a scaling behavior of the Tan's contact. This provides a useful analytical expression for the dependence on the number of fermions, number of components, and interaction strength. Moreover, using a virial approach, we study the Tan's contact behavior at high temperature and in the limit of infinite interactions, and we show that it increases with the temperature and the number of components. At zero temperature, we predict that the weight of the momentum distribution tails increases with interaction strength and the number of components if the population per component is kept constant. This latter property was experimentally observed in G. Pagano et al. [Nat. Phys. 10, 198 (2014), 10.1038/nphys2878].

  16. CO2 Capillary-Trapping Processes in Deep Saline Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum I.; Soltanian, Mohamadreza; Ritzi, Robert W., Jr.; Dominic, David F.

    2014-05-01

    The idea of reducing the Earth's greenhouse effect by sequestration of CO2 into the Earth's crust has been discussed and evaluated for more than two decades. Deep saline aquifers are the primary candidate formations for realization of this idea. Evaluation of reservoir capacity and the risk of CO2 leakage require a detailed modeling of the migration and distribution of CO2 in the subsurface structure. There is a finite risk that structural (or hydrodynamic) trapping by caprock may be compromised (e.g. by improperly abandoned wells, stratigraphic discontinuities, faults, etc.). Therefore, other trapping mechanisms (capillary trapping, dissolution, and mineralization) must be considered. Capillary trapping may be very important in providing a "secondary-seal", and is the focus of our investigation. The physical mechanism of CO2 trapping in porous media by capillary trapping incorporates three related processes, i.e. residual trapping, trapping due to hysteresis of the relative permeability, and trapping due to hysteresis of the capillary pressure. Additionally CO2 may be trapped in heterogeneous media due to difference in capillary pressure entry points for different materials. The amount of CO2 trapped by these processes is a complicated nonlinear function of the spatial distribution of permeability, permeability anisotropy, capillary pressure, relative permeability of brine and CO2, permeability hysteresis and residual gas saturation (as well as the rate, total amount and placement of injected CO2). Geological heterogeneities essentially affect the dynamics of a CO2 plume in subsurface environments. Recent studies have led to new conceptual and quantitative models for sedimentary architecture in fluvial deposits over a range of scales that are relevant to the performance of some deep saline reservoirs [1, 2]. We investigated how the dynamics of a CO2 plume, during and after injection, is influenced by the hierarchical and multi-scale stratal architecture in such

  17. Defect trapping in ABC block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corte, Laurent; Yamauchi, Kazuhiro; Court, Francois; Cloitre, Michel; Hashimoto, Takeji; Leibler, Ludwik

    2004-03-01

    Equilibrium morphologies in molten ABC triblock terpolymers are much more difficult to attain than in AB diblocks. In practice, it is important to know whether and how synthesis conditions influence the morphology and properties of copolymer materials. It is also relevant to understand the mechanisms of defect formation and annihilation. Indeed, a potential use of copolymers in new applications such as lithography highly depends on the ability to produce regular structures with no or few defects. We show that even the simplest lamellar structures exhibit high sensitivity to preparation conditions and that strongly trapped structural defects inherent to ABC triblock architecture cannot be removed by long annealing. Annealing can induce a transition from a lamellar structure in which A and C blocks are mixed to a lamellar structure where A, B and C are segregated. We propose reorganization mechanisms that are at the origin of some characteristic defects.

  18. The Sheet Trapped in a Plumber's Nightmare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bryan, Christopher; Bhattacharjee, Tapomoy; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Angelini, Thomas

    Block co-polymer systems offer exquisite control in the molecular-level design of self-assembled structures. The application of block copolymer phases has been generally limited to their use as bulk stabilizing agents in mass produced commodity chemicals and plastics. Recently, we have found the complex phase structures of self-assembled styrene ethylene/propylene diblock and styrene ethylene/butylene triblock co-polymers useful in 3D printing of other soft materials; the co-polymer structure yields around a writing nozzle as it moves through space while leaving material (polymers or colloids) trapped in the form of programmed structures. However, the relationship between the structural phase of the co-polymer self-assembly and its ability to support printed soft matter materials is not understood. In this study, we explore how different block co-polymer assemblies interact with and support soft matter materials once localized yielding has occurred.

  19. Vortex dynamics in anisotropic traps

    SciTech Connect

    McEndoo, S.; Busch, Th.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the dynamics of linear vortex lattices in anisotropic traps in two dimensions and show that the interplay between the rotation and the anisotropy leads to a rich but highly regular dynamics.

  20. Unconventional trapping of ultracold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, S. S.; Sarkisov, D.; Steyerl, A.; Brenner, Th.; Butterworth, J.; Geltenbort, P.; Hino, M.; Okumura, K.; Utsuro, M.

    1999-09-01

    In unconventional storage experiments we filled ultracold neutrons (UCN) into a Fomblin-grease coated trap and then immediately removed the UCN from the storage volume by an absorber, until their residual density in the trap was measured to be negligible. When subsequently the absorber was withdrawn a significant number of UCN of higher energies emerged from the trap. Their appearance cannot be attributed to heating or cooling of residual UCN. Further experiments were performed to investigate the origin of these UCN which we call `late UCN'. We noticed that application of a magnetic field gradient at the trap wall as well as a replacement of Fomblin grease on the surface by Fomblin oil gave rise to small but measurable alterations of storage behavior. These phenomena are consistent with the hypothesis of temporary adhesion of a few UCN to a rough wall.

  1. Charge trapping properties of the HfO2 layer with various thicknesses for charge trap flash memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Hee-Wook; Cho, Won-Ju

    2010-03-01

    MHOS (metal-HfO2-SiO2-Si) structure capacitors were fabricated to investigate the charge trapping properties of HfO2 layer with various thicknesses for the applications of charge trap flash (CTF) memory devices. Also, the centroid of charge trap in HfO2 layer was extracted by constant current stress method and compared with that of conventional Si3N4 layer. The gate leakage current of MHOS capacitor due to tunneling was significantly reduced by stacking the HfO2 trap layer on thin SiO2 tunnel layer. The MHOS capacitors showed a larger memory window than the MNOS (metal-Si3N4-SiO2-Si) capacitors at the same trap layer thickness, because the HfO2 layer has better charge trapping efficiency than the Si3N4 layer. It is found that ultrathin HfO2 trap layer with a thickness of 2 nm stored almost the same charges with Si3N4 layer with a thickness of 7 nm. Consequently, the application of ultrathin HfO2 to charge storage layer can considerably improve the performance and enhance the high density of CTF memory.

  2. Evaluation of BG-sentinel trap trapping efficacy for Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in a visually competitive environment.

    PubMed

    Ball, Tamara S; Ritchie, Scott R

    2010-07-01

    The BG-Sentinel (BGS) trap uses visual and olfactory cues as well as convection currents to attract Aedes aegypti (L.). The impact of the visual environment on trapping efficacy of the BGS trap for Ae. aegypti was investigated. Four- to 5-d nulliparous female and male Ae. aegypti were released into a semicontrolled room to evaluate the effect of the presence, reflectance, and distribution of surrounding harborage sites on BGS trapping efficacy. Low-reflective (dark) harborage sites near the BGS had a negative effect on both male and nulliparous female recapture rates; however, a more pronounced effect was observed in males. The distribution (clustered versus scattered) of dark harborage sites did not significantly affect recapture rates in either sex. In a subsequent experiment, the impact of oviposition sites on the recapture rate of gravid females was investigated. Although gravid females went to the oviposition sites and deposited eggs, the efficacy of the BGS in recapturing gravid females was not compromised. Ae. aegypti sampling in the field will mostly occur in the urban environment, whereby the BGS will be among oviposition sites and dark harborage areas in the form of household items and outdoor clutter. In addition to understanding sampling biases of the BGS, estimations of the adult population size and structure can be further adjusted based on an understanding of the impact of dark harborage sites on trap captures. Outcomes from this suite of experiments provide us with important considerations for trap deployment and interpretation of Ae. aegypti samples from the BGS trap.

  3. Science, conservation, and camera traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas; O'Connel, Allan F.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    Biologists commonly perceive camera traps as a new tool that enables them to enter the hitherto secret world of wild animals. Camera traps are being used in a wide range of studies dealing with animal ecology, behavior, and conservation. Our intention in this volume is not to simply present the various uses of camera traps, but to focus on their use in the conduct of science and conservation. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these two broad classes of endeavor and sketch the manner in which camera traps are likely to be able to contribute to them. Our main point here is that neither photographs of individual animals, nor detection history data, nor parameter estimates generated from detection histories are the ultimate objective of a camera trap study directed at either science or management. Instead, the ultimate objectives are best viewed as either gaining an understanding of how ecological systems work (science) or trying to make wise decisions that move systems from less desirable to more desirable states (conservation, management). Therefore, we briefly describe here basic approaches to science and management, emphasizing the role of field data and associated analyses in these processes. We provide examples of ways in which camera trap data can inform science and management.

  4. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  5. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yung, M-H; Casanova, J; Mezzacapo, A; McClean, J; Lamata, L; Aspuru-Guzik, A; Solano, E

    2014-01-07

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

  6. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, M.-H.; Casanova, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; McClean, J.; Lamata, L.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Solano, E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

  7. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  8. Collisionless microtearing modes in hot tokamaks: Effect of trapped electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, Aditya K.; Ganesh, R.; Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.

    2015-07-15

    Collisionless microtearing modes have recently been found linearly unstable in sharp temperature gradient regions of large aspect ratio tokamaks. The magnetic drift resonance of passing electrons has been found to be sufficient to destabilise these modes above a threshold plasma β. A global gyrokinetic study, including both passing electrons as well as trapped electrons, shows that the non-adiabatic contribution of the trapped electrons provides a resonant destabilization, especially at large toroidal mode numbers, for a given aspect ratio. The global 2D mode structures show important changes to the destabilising electrostatic potential. The β threshold for the onset of the instability is found to be generally downshifted by the inclusion of trapped electrons. A scan in the aspect ratio of the tokamak configuration, from medium to large but finite values, clearly indicates a significant destabilizing contribution from trapped electrons at small aspect ratio, with a diminishing role at larger aspect ratios.

  9. Imaging electronic trap states in perovskite thin films with combined fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; ...

    2016-04-22

    Charge carrier trapping degrades the performance of organometallic halide perovskite solar cells. To characterize the locations of electronic trap states in a heterogeneous photoactive layer, a spatially resolved approach is essential. Here, we report a comparative study on methylammonium lead tri-iodide perovskite thin films subject to different thermal annealing times using a combined photoluminescence (PL) and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) approach to spatially map trap states. This approach coregisters the initially populated electronic excited states with the regions that recombine radiatively. Although the TAM images are relatively homogeneous for both samples, the corresponding PL images are highly structured. Themore » remarkable variation in the PL intensities as compared to transient absorption signal amplitude suggests spatially dependent PL quantum efficiency, indicative of trapping events. Furthermore, detailed analysis enables identification of two trapping regimes: a densely packed trapping region and a sparse trapping area that appear as unique spatial features in scaled PL maps.« less

  10. Imaging electronic trap states in perovskite thin films with combined fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bin

    2016-04-22

    Charge carrier trapping degrades the performance of organometallic halide perovskite solar cells. To characterize the locations of electronic trap states in a heterogeneous photoactive layer, a spatially resolved approach is essential. Here, we report a comparative study on methylammonium lead tri-iodide perovskite thin films subject to different thermal annealing times using a combined photoluminescence (PL) and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) approach to spatially map trap states. This approach coregisters the initially populated electronic excited states with the regions that recombine radiatively. Although the TAM images are relatively homogeneous for both samples, the corresponding PL images are highly structured. The remarkable variation in the PL intensities as compared to transient absorption signal amplitude suggests spatially dependent PL quantum efficiency, indicative of trapping events. Furthermore, detailed analysis enables identification of two trapping regimes: a densely packed trapping region and a sparse trapping area that appear as unique spatial features in scaled PL maps.

  11. Ion Trap Array-Based Systems And Methods For Chemical Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Whitten, William B [Oak Ridge, TN; Ramsey, J Michael [Knoxville, TN

    2005-08-23

    An ion trap-based system for chemical analysis includes an ion trap array. The ion trap array includes a plurality of ion traps arranged in a 2-dimensional array for initially confining ions. Each of the ion traps comprise a central electrode having an aperture, a first and second insulator each having an aperture sandwiching the central electrode, and first and second end cap electrodes each having an aperture sandwiching the first and second insulator. A structure for simultaneously directing a plurality of different species of ions out from the ion traps is provided. A spectrometer including a detector receives and identifies the ions. The trap array can be used with spectrometers including time-of-flight mass spectrometers and ion mobility spectrometers.

  12. BerlinTrap: A new cryogenic 22-pole ion trap spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Alan; Nieto, Pablo; Müller, David; Sheldrick, Alexander; Gerlich, Dieter; Dopfer, Otto

    2017-02-01

    The design and first applications of a new tandem mass spectrometer (BerlinTrap) combining an electrospray ion source, a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a cryogenic 22-pole ion trap (4-300 K), and an orthogonal reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer are described. The trapped ions are cooled by helium buffer gas cooling. The formation and solvation shell structure of weakly-bound HenH3O+ complexes and the electronic photodissociation spectrum of the protonated amino acid tyrosine are used to calibrate the setup for cooling, tagging, and spectroscopic capabilities. A vibrational temperature below 20 K is inferred for protonated tyrosine. The electronic spectrum of isolated protonated lumichrome, the smallest protonated flavin, is recorded in the visible range and assigned to the most stable N5 isomer by comparison with quantum chemical calculations. These results demonstrate the suitability of the BerlinTrap apparatus for spectroscopy and reactivity studies of small and large (bio-)molecular ions and their clusters.

  13. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1993-04-27

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  14. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.; Glish, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  15. Microinstrument gradient-force optical trap.

    PubMed

    Collins, S D; Baskin, R J; Howitt, D G

    1999-10-01

    A micromachined fiber-optic trap is presented. The trap consists of four single-mode, 1064-nm optical intersection. The beam fibers mounted in a micromachined silicon and glass housing. Micromachining provides the necessary precision to align the four optical fibers so that the outputs have a common intersection forms a strong three-dimensional gradient-force trap with trapping forces comparable with that of optical tweezers. Characterization of the multibeam fiber trap is illustrated for capture of polystyrene microspheres, computer simulations of the trap stiffness, and experimental determination of the trapping forces.

  16. Effect of bait in live trapping Peromyscus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.

    1948-01-01

    SUMMARY: Evidence from live trapping tests indicated that Peromyscus leucopus did not leave their home ranges because of the attraction of trap bait in nearby areas. A trap line down the center of a heavily live-trapped area caught as many mice before the area trapping as afterward. Thus, there was reason to believe that the area trapping did not serve to pre-bait the mice. Two unbaited lines of live traps caught an equal number of Peromyscus. When one line was baited with rolled oats and peanut butter the efficiency of the traps was improved to the extent that the baited line captured more than twice as many mice as the unbaited line. It is concluded that for the species and habitat tested it is safe to make population calculations based on the assumption that the animals remain within their home ranges and do not tend to move into the trapped area because of the attraction of the trap bait.

  17. Live trapping of hawks and owls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, R.E.; Cope, J.B.; Robbins, C.S.

    1945-01-01

    1. Hawks of six species (80 individuals) and owls of five species (37 individuals) were trapped for banding from November 1, 1943, to. May 26,1944. 2. In general, pole traps proved better than hand-operated traps or automatic traps using live bait. 3. Verbail pole traps proved very efficient, and were much more humane than padded steel traps because they rarely injured a captured bird. 4: Unbaited Verbail traps took a variety of raptors, in rough proportion to their local abundance, although slightly more of beneficial species were caught than of harmful types. 5. Hawks and owls were retrapped more readily in Verbail traps than in other types tried. 6. The number of song birds caught in Verbail traps was negligible. 7. Crows and vultures were not taken in Verbail traps, but possibly could be caught with bait.

  18. Arraying single microbeads in microchannels using dielectrophoresis-assisted mechanical traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirapu-Azpiroz, Jaione; Temiz, Yuksel; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Manipulating and immobilizing single microbeads in flowing fluids is relevant for biological assays and chemical tests but typically requires expensive laboratory equipment and trapping mechanisms that are not reversible. In this paper, we present a highly efficient and reversible mechanism for trapping microbeads by combining dielectrophoresis (DEP) with mechanical traps. The integration of planar electrodes and mechanical traps in a microchannel enables versatile manipulation of microbeads via DEP for their docking in recessed structures of mechanical traps. By simulating the combined effects of the hydrodynamic drag and DEP forces on microbeads, we explore a configuration of periodic traps where the beads are guided by the electrodes and immobilized in recess areas of the traps. The design of the electrode layout and operating configuration are optimized for the efficient trapping of single microbeads. We demonstrated the predicted guiding and trapping effectiveness of the design as well as the reversibility of the system on 10 μm polystyrene beads. Experimental verification used an array of 96 traps in an area of 420 × 420 μm2, reaching a trapping efficiency of 63% when 7 Vpp is applied to the electrodes under 80 nl min-1 flow rate conditions, and 98% of bead release when the voltage is turned off.

  19. Capillary liquid chromatography-microcoil 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry for on-line structure elucidation of isoflavones in Radix astragali.

    PubMed

    Xiao, H B; Krucker, M; Putzbach, K; Albert, K

    2005-03-04

    Miniaturization and hyphenation of chromatographic separation techniques to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is being increasingly demanded in the field of biomedical, drug metabolite and natural product analysis. Herein, capillary liquid chromatography was coupled on-line to microcoil 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (capLC-NMR) equipped with a 1.5 microL solenoidal probe for structure elucidation of isoflavones in Radix astragali. The extract was screened by HPLC-UV-MS as the preliminary step and four major peaks were identified tentatively by ion trap mass spectrometry molecular weights and characteristic fragments. Then, stopped-flow capLC-UV-NMR was performed using 33 microg extract injected on-column. The four peaks were parked manually in the micro probe one by one and corresponding 1H NMR spectra were recorded with good resolutions under the applied capLC-NMR conditions (120 and 220 ng injected on-column for peaks 2 and 4, respectively). All aromatic regions of 1H NMR spectra correlated well to the characteristic signals of isoflavone aglycone protons. And the signal corresponding to the anomeric proton of the glucopyranoside of isoflavone glycoside was also obtained for peak 1. Therefore, these four peaks are determined as calycosin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1), ononin (2), calycosin (3) and formononetin (4) unambiguously. The capLC-NMR results indicate that this hyphenated technique could be used for the determination of a great variety of natural products from small sample amounts, e.g., only 5 g R. astragali in this study.

  20. Multiphoton polymerization using optical trap assisted nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitz, Karl-Heinz; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Flad, Florian; Schäffer, Eike; Quentin, Ulf; Alexeev, Ilya; Fardel, Romain; Arnold, Craig B.; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-06-01

    In this letter, we show the combination of multiphoton polymerization and optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) for the additive manufacturing of structures with nanometer resolution. User-defined patterns of polymer nanostructures are deposited on a glass substrate by a 3.5 μm polystyrene sphere focusing IR femtosecond laser pulses, showing minimum feature sizes of λ/10. Feature size depends on the applied laser fluence and the bead surface spacing. A finite element model describes the intensity enhancement in the microbead focus. The results presented suggest that OTAN in combination with multiphoton processing is a viable technique for additive nanomanufacturing with sub-diffraction-limited resolution.

  1. A chip of fiber optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Heming; Hu, Huizhu; Zhang, Lei; Ge, Xiaojia; Shen, Yu

    2016-10-01

    A chip of fiber optical trap paves the way to realize the miniaturization and portability of devices based on dual beam optical trap, without loss of stability. We have designed two types of chip of fiber optical trap according to our theoretical simulation. The first one integrates dual beam optical trap with microfluidic chip, called a chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap. It is generally used in chemical, biological, medical and other high-throughput experiments. The second one is a chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap. It is used to measure precisely the coefficient of viscosity or the Brownian movement of micro-object's in liquid. This paper focuses on the chip of fiber optical trap. We present two types of chips of fiber optical trap and detail their designs, fabrication and validation. The chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap is integrated with optical fiber and microfluidic chip made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). We have achieved the micro-sized alignment of optical paths and the trapping of micro-sized particles in the chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap. In addition, it is easy to fabrication and clean. The chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap was based on a cubic micro-cavity made by a rectangular capillary tube and sealed by PDMS. We have achieved micro-sized alignment accuracy, high trapping efficiency and better trapping stability in the chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap as well.

  2. Determining average path length and average trapping time on generalized dual dendrimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Guan, Jihong

    2015-03-01

    Dendrimer has wide number of important applications in various fields. In some cases during transport or diffusion process, it transforms into its dual structure named Husimi cactus. In this paper, we study the structure properties and trapping problem on a family of generalized dual dendrimer with arbitrary coordination numbers. We first calculate exactly the average path length (APL) of the networks. The APL increases logarithmically with the network size, indicating that the networks exhibit a small-world effect. Then we determine the average trapping time (ATT) of the trapping process in two cases, i.e., the trap placed on a central node and the trap is uniformly distributed in all the nodes of the network. In both case, we obtain explicit solutions of ATT and show how they vary with the networks size. Besides, we also discuss the influence of the coordination number on trapping efficiency.

  3. Trapping biases of Culex torrentium and Culex pipiens revealed by comparison of captures in CDC traps, ovitraps, and gravid traps.

    PubMed

    Hesson, Jenny C; Ignell, Rickard; Hill, Sharon R; Östman, Örjan; Lundström, Jan O

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate three trapping methods for their effectiveness at capturing Culex pipiens and Culex torrentium, both enzootic vectors of bird-associated viruses in Europe. The comparisons, performed in two regions in Sweden, were among CDC traps baited with carbon dioxide, gravid traps, and ovitraps baited with hay infusion. The proportions of the two Culex species in a catch differed between trap types, with CDC traps catching a lower proportion of Cx. torrentium than both gravid traps and ovitraps. Between gravid traps and ovitraps, there was no difference in the proportions of the two species. The results indicate that Cx. torrentium may go undetected or underestimated compared to Cx. pipiens when using carbon dioxide baited CDC traps. The new insight of trap bias presented here adds an important dimension to consider when investigating these vectors of bird-associated viruses in the field.

  4. Trap induction and trapping in eight nematode-trapping fungi (Orbiliaceae) as affected by juvenile stage of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongyan; Aminuzzaman, F M; Xu, Lingling; Lai, Yiling; Li, Feng; Liu, Xingzhong

    2010-06-01

    This study measured trap induction and trapping on agar disks as affected by juvenile stages (J1, J2, J3, and J4) of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and by species of nematode-trapping fungi. Eight species of nematode-trapping fungi belonging to the family Orbiliaceae and producing four kinds of traps were studied: adhesive network-forming Arthrobotrys oligospora, A. vermicola, and A. eudermata, constricting ring-forming Drechslerella brochopaga, and Dr. stenobrocha, adhesive column-forming Dactylellina cionopaga, and adhesive knob-forming Da. ellipsospora, and Da. drechsleri. The number of traps induced generally increased with increasing juvenile stages of C. elegans. The ability to capture the juveniles tended to be similar among isolates that produced the same kind of trap but differed among species that produced different kinds of traps. Trapping by Dr. stenobrocha and Da. cionopaga was correlated with trap number and with juvenile stage. A. oligospora and A. vermicola respectively captured more than 92 and 88% of the J1, J3, and J4 but captured a lower percentage of J2. The knob-producing isolates captured more younger than elder juveniles. Partial correlation analyses demonstrated that the trap induction of the most fungal species positively correlated with the juvenile size and motility, which was juvenile stage dependent. Overall, trap induction and trapping correlated with C. elegans juvenile stage (size and motility) in six species of trapping fungi.

  5. Search for Optical Binding with Shape Phase Holographic Optical Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roichman, Yohai; Polin, Marco; Cholis, Ilias; Grier, David

    2007-03-01

    Light scattered by an illuminated particle should repel that particle's neighbors through radiation pressure. Nearly two decades ago, Burns, Fournier and Golovchenko (BFG) proposed that the coherent superposition of scattered fields can lead to an attractive interparticle interaction, which they called optical binding. Their pioneering experimental observation has generated considerable interest, most of which has focused on developing the theory for the effect. Accurate measurements of the optical binding force in the BFG geometry have been lacking, however. The need to quantify optical binding forces is particularly acute for colloidal interaction measurements on linear optical traps. We present a new method to directly measure optical binding forces between colloidal spheres that exploits the ability of shape-phase holography to create linear optical traps with accurately specified intensity and phase profiles. Our ability to control the trap's phase profile makes possible precise discrimination between intensity- and field-dependent interactions, i.e. between radiation pressure and optical binding. The same novel technique that allows us to project holographic line traps also can be used to project two- and three-dimensionally structured ring traps, novel Bessel-beam traps, which we also will describe.

  6. Positron trapping at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dupasquier, A. ); Romero, R.; Somoza, A. )

    1993-10-01

    The standard positron trapping model has often been applied, as a simple approximation, to the interpretation of positron lifetime spectra in situations of diffusion-controlled trapping. This paper shows that this approximation is not sufficiently accurate, and presents a model based on the correct solution of the diffusion equation, in the version appropriate for studying positron trapping at grain boundaries. The model is used for the analysis of new experimental data on positron lifetime spectra in a fine-grained Al-Ca-Zn alloy. Previous results on similar systems are also discussed and reinterpreted. The analysis yields effective diffusion coefficients not far from the values known for the base metals of the alloys.

  7. Level structure and reflection asymmetric shape in sup 223 Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, R.K.; Liang, C.F.; Paris, P. )

    1990-07-20

    Mass separated sources of {sup 227}Pa (separated as PaF{sub 4}{sup +} ions) were used to study the level structure of {sup 223}Ac following alpha decay. The levels in {sup 223}Ac are interpreted as K = 5/2{sup {plus minus}} parity doublet bands which occur naturally in reflection asymmetric models and the multiphonon octupole model. The anomalous structure of the K = 3/2{sup {minus}} band is explained in terms of Coriolis coupling. The low lying parity doublet bands in {sup 223}Ac, {sup 225}Ac, and {sup 227}Ac are compared and contrasted.

  8. Dysprosium magneto-optical traps

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, Seo Ho; Lu Mingwu; Ray, Ushnish; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2010-10-15

    Magneto-optical traps (MOTs) of highly magnetic lanthanides open the door to explorations of novel phases of strongly correlated matter such as lattice supersolids and quantum liquid crystals. We recently reported the first MOTs of the five high-abundance isotopes of the most magnetic atom, dysprosium. Described here are details of the experimental technique employed for repumper-free Dy MOTs containing up to half a billion atoms. Extensive characterization of the MOTs' properties--population, temperature, loading, metastable decay dynamics, and trap dynamics--is provided.

  9. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Momčilo; Bechhoefer, John

    2017-03-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without `touching' them (e.g. by putting them in a small box or attaching them to a tether). Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: they can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop-absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid-we are free to specify and then manipulate in time an arbitrary potential U(x,t). Here, we review recent applications of feedback traps to studies on the fundamental connections between information and thermodynamics, a topic where feedback plays an even more fundamental role. We discuss how recursive maximum-likelihood techniques allow continuous calibration, to compensate for drifts in experiments that last for days. We consider ways to estimate work and heat, using them to measure fluctuating energies to a precision of ±0.03 kT over these long experiments. Finally, we compare work and heat measurements of the costs of information erasure, the Landauer limit of kT ln 2 per bit of information erased. We argue that, when you want to know the average heat transferred to a bath in a long protocol, you should measure instead the average work and then infer the heat using the first law of thermodynamics. This

  10. Salisbury hospital's steam trap success.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    With the Carbon Reduction Commitment now fully in force, and the NHS tasked with achieving tough carbon emission reduction targets in line with both UK and EU mandates, healthcare estates teams across the country are seeking cost-effective ways to reduce energy consumption. Against this backdrop, Salisbury District Hospital has implemented a concerted energy-saving programme, key elements of which include replacing existing bucket steam traps with higher performing, lower maintenance, and more effective GEM venturi steam traps from Thermal Energy International (TEI), installing a new gas CHP engine, and looking into fitting a TEI condensate economiser system.

  11. Fermionized Dipolar Bosons Trapped in a Harmonic Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kościk, Przemysław

    2017-03-01

    We explore entanglement properties of systems of identical dipolar bosons confined in a 1D harmonic trap by using explicitly correlated Jastrow-type wavefunctions. Results for the linear entropy in dependence on the dimensionless coupling and the number of particles are provided and discussed.

  12. Microwave regenerated particulate trap

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, A.C. Jr.; Yonushonis, T.M.; Haberkamp, W.C.; Mako, F.; Len, L.K,; Silberglitt, R.; Ahmed, I.

    1997-12-31

    It has been demonstrated that a fibrous particulate filter can extract particulate matter from the diesel exhaust. However, additional engineering efforts remains to achieve the design target of 90%. It has also be shown that with minor modifications magnetrons produced for home ovens can endure a simulated diesel operating environment. Much work remains to develop a robust product ready to complete extensive engine testing and evaluation. These efforts include: (1) additional environmental testing of magnetrons; (2) vibration testing of the filter in the housing; (3) evaluating alternative methods/designs to seal the center bore; and (4) determining the optimum coating thickness that provides sufficient structural integrity while maintaining rapid heating rates.

  13. Bacteria can mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guo-Hong; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Tong; Zhao, Pei-Ji; Liang, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Ping; An, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Xi; Qin, Yue-Ke; Tian, Meng-Qing; Xu, You-Yao; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Yu, Ze-Fen; Huang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Qun; Niu, Xue-Mei; Yang, Jin-Kui; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2014-01-01

    In their natural habitat, bacteria are consumed by bacterivorous nematodes; however, they are not simply passive preys. Here we report a defensive mechanism used by certain bacteria to mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes. These bacteria release urea, which triggers a lifestyle switch in the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora from saprophytic to nematode–predatory form; this predacious form is characterized by formation of specialized cellular structures or ‘traps’. The bacteria significantly promote the elimination of nematodes by A. oligospora. Disruption of genes involved in urea transport and metabolism in A. oligospora abolishes the urea-induced trap formation. Furthermore, the urea metabolite ammonia functions as a signal molecule in the fungus to initiate the lifestyle switch to form trap structures. Our findings highlight the importance of multiple predator–prey interactions in prey defense mechanisms. PMID:25514608

  14. Trapping efficiency of three types check dams experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hui-Kai; CHEN, Su-Chin; AN, Hsuan-Pei

    2015-04-01

    The check dams constructed to trap debris flow. This study divide check dams into three types as closed-type check dam, slit dam, and modular steel check dam. Closed-type check dam which can trap all kind of sediment or driftwood. Slit check dam is permeable dam, so it can prevent from depositing all of sediment or driftwood. A modular steel check dam improves the existing hard-to-change disadvantages of slit dam structure. The assembling of longitudinal and transverse beams can be constructed independently, and then it could be freely configured to form a flexibly adjustable modular steel check dam. This study used the laws of geometric similitude to design model of dam. To explore the trapping mechanisms and phenomenon in different dismantle transverse beams conditions and compared the trapping efficiency with different type of check dams. This study used different volume ratio with driftwood and sediment. In order to capture the trace of debris flow and calculate accuracy velocity of debris flow the study used several high-speed photography combining the method of 3D Remodeling from Motion Structure with Multi-View Stereo which constructed with multiple photos of overlapping coefficient at least 70% and established three-dimensional system of coordinate in laboratory experiment. As a result, the driftwood deposition rate of modular steel check dam increase 60% than slit dam and 40% than closed-type dam; the debris deposition rate increase 30% than slit dam. In addition, the increment of driftwood volume ratio led to the increment of trapping efficiency of three type of check dams. Meanwhile slit dam is the most effective type in trapping driftwood and sediment with more than 50% of increased rate, because of more driftwood flow through the slit dam jam together easily. Finally, transverse beams which installed the modular steel check dam can suppress the upward movement of driftwood, therefore driftwood can easily form the arched stacking efficiency with

  15. Assessment of vector/host contact: comparison of animal-baited traps and UV-light/suction trap for collecting Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), vectors of Orbiviruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence and massive spread of bluetongue in Western Europe during 2006-2008 had disastrous consequences for sheep and cattle production and confirmed the ability of Palaearctic Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to transmit the virus. Some aspects of Culicoides ecology, especially host-seeking and feeding behaviors, remain insufficiently described due to the difficulty of collecting them directly on a bait animal, the most reliable method to evaluate biting rates. Our aim was to compare typical animal-baited traps (drop trap and direct aspiration) to both a new sticky cover trap and a UV-light/suction trap (the most commonly used method to collect Culicoides). Methods/results Collections were made from 1.45 hours before sunset to 1.45 hours after sunset in June/July 2009 at an experimental sheep farm (INRA, Nouzilly, Western France), with 3 replicates of a 4 sites × 4 traps randomized Latin square using one sheep per site. Collected Culicoides individuals were sorted morphologically to species, sex and physiological stages for females. Sibling species were identified using a molecular assay. A total of 534 Culicoides belonging to 17 species was collected. Abundance was maximal in the drop trap (232 females and 4 males from 10 species) whereas the diversity was the highest in the UV-light/suction trap (136 females and 5 males from 15 species). Significant between-trap differences abundance and parity rates were observed. Conclusions Only the direct aspiration collected exclusively host-seeking females, despite a concern that human manipulation may influence estimation of the biting rate. The sticky cover trap assessed accurately the biting rate of abundant species even if it might act as an interception trap. The drop trap collected the highest abundance of Culicoides and may have caught individuals not attracted by sheep but by its structure. Finally, abundances obtained using the UV-light/suction trap did not estimate accurately Culicoides

  16. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Mangan, Michael A [Albuquerque, NM; Blain, Matthew G [Albuquerque, NM; Tigges, Chris P [Albuquerque, NM; Linker, Kevin L [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  17. Hydrodynamic trap for single particles and cells

    PubMed Central

    Tanyeri, Melikhan; Johnson-Chavarria, Eric M.; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    Trapping and manipulation of microscale and nanoscale particles is demonstrated using the sole action of hydrodynamic forces. We developed an automated particle trap based on a stagnation point flow generated in a microfluidic device. The hydrodynamic trap enables confinement and manipulation of single particles in low viscosity (1–10 cP) aqueous solution. Using this method, we trapped microscale and nanoscale particles (100 nm–15 μm) for long time scales (minutes to hours). We demonstrate particle confinement to within 1 μm of the trap center, corresponding to a trap stiffness of ∼10−5–10−4 pN∕nm. PMID:20585593

  18. Ion Trapping in the Accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, J.

    1985-02-18

    The beam space charge (- for {bar p}'s) will attract positive ions. In the absence of additional fields (clearing electrodes, e.g.) these ions will be trapped in the beam potential well. The depth of this potential well has been calculated for some geometries relevant for the accumulator.

  19. Mass Trapping for Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT In field tests conducted in south Florida to test grape juice as an alternative inexpensive bait for Anastrepha suspensa Loew, high numbers of Zaprionus indianus Gupta were captured in traps baited with aqueous grape juice. These experiments included comparisons of grape juice with standard...

  20. Asymmetric Penning trap coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Astorga, Alonso; Fernandez, David J.

    2010-07-12

    By using a matrix technique, which allows to identify directly the ladder operators, the coherent states of the asymmetric Penning trap are derived as eigenstates of the appropriate annihilation operators. They are compared with those obtained through the displacement operator method.

  1. VACUUM TRAP AND VALVE COMBINATION

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.; Levenson, L.

    1963-02-19

    This patent relates to a vacuum trap and valve combination suitable for use in large ultra-high vacuum systems. The vacuum trap is a chamber having an inlet and outlet opening which may be made to communicate with a chamber to be evacuated and a diffusion pump, respectively. A valve is designed to hermeticaliy seal with inlet opening and, when opened, block the line-of- sight'' between the inlet and outlet openings, while allowing a large flow path between the opened vaive and the side walls of the trap. The interior of the trap and the side of the valve facing the inlet opening are covered with an impurity absorbent, such as Zeolite or activated aluminum. Besides the advantage of combining two components of a vacuum system into one, the present invention removes the need for a baffle between the pump and the chamber to be evacuated. In one use of a specific embodiment of this invention, the transmission probability was 45 and the partial pressure of the pump fluid vapor in the vacuum chamber was at least 100 times lower than its vapor pressure. (AEC)

  2. Comparison of silicon photonic crystal resonator designs for optical trapping of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Serey, X; Mandal, S; Erickson, D

    2010-07-30

    The use of silicon photonic devices for optical manipulation has recently enabled the direct handling of objects like nucleic acids and nanoparticles that are much smaller than could previously be trapped using traditional laser tweezers. The ability to manipulate even smaller matter however requires the development of photonic structures with even stronger trapping potentials. In this work we investigate theoretically several photonic crystal resonator designs and characterize the achievable trapping stiffness and trapping potential depth (sometimes referred to as the trapping stability). Two effects are shown to increase these trapping parameters: field enhancement in the resonator and strong field containment. We find trapping stiffness as high as 22.3 pN nm(-1) for 100 nm polystyrene beads as well as potential depth of 51,000 k(B)T at T = 300 K, for one Watt of power input to the bus waveguide. Under the same conditions for 70 nm polystyrene beads, we find a stiffness of 69 pN nm(-1) and a potential depth of 177,000 k(B)T. Our calculations suggest that with input power of 10 mW we could trap particles as small as 7.7 nm diameter with a trapping depth of 500 k(B)T. We expect these traps to eventually enable the manipulation of small matter such as single proteins, carbon nanotubes and metallic nanoparticles.

  3. Charge Trapping Flash Memory With High-k Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, Dong Seog

    2011-12-01

    High capacity and affordable price of flash memory make portable electronic devices popular, which in turn stimulates the further scaling down effort of the flash memory cells. Indeed the flash memory cells have been scaling down aggressively and face several crucial challenges. As a result, the technology trend is shifting from the floating-gate cell to the charge-trap cell in order to overcome fatal interference problems between cells. There are critical problems in the charge-trap memory cell which will become main-stream in the near future. The first potential problem is related to the memory retention which is degraded by the charge leakage through thin tunnel dielectrics. The second is the reduction of charge-storage capacity in the scaled down SiN trapping layer. The third is the low operation-efficiency resulting from the methods used to solve the first two problems. Using high-k tunnel dielectrics can solve the first problem. The second problem can be overcome by adopting a high-k trapping dielectric. The dielectric constant of the blocking layer must be higher than those of the tunnel dielectric and the trapping dielectric in order to maintain operation efficiency. This dissertation study is focused on adopting high-k dielectrics in all three of the aforementioned layers for figure generations of flash memory technology. For the high-k tunnel dielectric, the MAD Si3N4 and the MAD Al2O3 are used to fabricate the MANNS structure and the MANAS structure. The MANNS structure has the advantage of reducing the erase voltage due to its low barrier height for holes. In addition, the retention characteristic of the MANAS structure is not sensitive to temperature. The reason is that the carrier transport in MAD Al2O3 is dominated by F-N tunneling, which is nearly independent of temperature. Adopting TiOx as the trapping dielectric forms the MATAS structure. Although the charge capacity of TiOx is not very high, the operating voltage can be reduced to less than 10V

  4. Funnel traps capture a higher proportion of juvenile Great Tits Parus major than automatic traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senar, J.C.; Domenech, J.; Conroy, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    We compared capture rates of Great Tits at funnel traps, where several birds can be captured at once so that some decoy effect may appear, to those obtained at automatic traps, where only one bird can be trapped at a time, at trapping stations in northeastern Spain. Juvenile birds were mainly captured at funnel traps (79% of juvenile captures), whereas adult plumaged birds were captured at both types of traps (51% of captures were at the funnel traps) (test between ages, P<0.001). Juvenile Great Tits had lower body condition as measured by ptilochronology (P<0.01). These birds are more easily trapped in funnel traps, which may be acting as decoy traps, and thus are vulnerable to the same kinds of biases (eg age or body condition) that have been previously documented for decoy traps.

  5. Observation of nuclear spin species conversion inside the 1593 cm -1 structure of H 2O trapped in argon matrices: Nitrogen impurities and the H 2O:N 2 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardanaud, Cédric; Vasserot, Anne-Marie; Michaut, Xavier; Abouaf-Marguin, L.

    2008-02-01

    We have investigated, at high resolution (0.03 cm -1), the 1593 cm -1 structure observed in the IR absorption spectrum of water trapped in solid argon doped with nitrogen. It exhibits a doublet at 1592.59 ± 0.05 and 1593.08 ± 0.05 cm -1 and a line centered at 1592.93 ± 0.05 cm -1. The central component, which increases irreversibly upon annealing and when the concentration is increased, is due to the proton acceptor submolecule of the H 2O dimer, as mentioned in the literature. The doublet is assigned to the H 2O:N 2 complex. After a fast cooling of the sample from 20 to 4 K, the low frequency line of the doublet decreases with time and the high frequency one increases, the total integrated absorption increasing slightly. The ratio of the integrated intensities between the low frequency component and the high frequency one reaches a constant limit of 0.5 ± 0.1 at infinite time. This time behavior, perfectly exponential with a time constant τ of about 680 min, is reproducible. As the nitrogen molecule cannot rotate in an argon substitutional site, and as the H 2O submolecule seems to preserve somewhat its identity, this is interpreted as nuclear spin species conversion between ortho and para states of the H 2O submolecule within the complex. The order of magnitude of the energy difference between the ortho and para lowest levels, about 5 cm -1, is too weak to imply any, even very hindered, rotational motion of H 2O, but it could be the energy range of a tunneling effect. When the temperature is increased, the two components coalesce at 25 K into a single symmetrical line pointing at 1593.3 cm -1 and the conversion time shortens dramatically. An Arrhenius plot leads to a weak activation energy of the conversion process (about 30 cm -1). A possible geometry of the complex in solid argon, different from the gas phase one, is proposed.

  6. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  7. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  8. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  9. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  10. Ion Trap Electric Field Characterization Using Slab Coupled Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadderdon, Spencer; Shumway, LeGrand; Powell, Andrew; Li, Ailin; Austin, Daniel E.; Hawkins, Aaron R.; Selfridge, Richard H.; Schultz, Stephen M.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a method for characterizing electric field profiles of radio frequency (rf) quadrupole ion trap structures using sensors based on slab coupled optical-fiber sensor (SCOS) technology. The all-dielectric and virtually optical fiber-sized SCOS fits within the compact environment required for ion traps and is able to distinguish electric field orientation and amplitude with minimal perturbation. Measurement of the fields offers insight into the functionality of traps, which may not be obtainable solely by performing simulations. The SCOS accurately mapped the well-known field profiles within a commercially available three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap (Paul trap). The results of this test allowed the SCOS to map the more complicated fields within the coaxial ion trap with a high degree of confidence as to the accuracy of the measurement. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Phonon Trapping in Pearl-Necklace-Shaped Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chunyang; Tai, Guoan; Zhou, Jianxin; Guo, Wanlin

    2015-12-22

    A pearl-necklace-shaped silicon nanowire, in contrast to a smooth nanowire, presents a much lower thermal conductivity due to the phonon trapping effect. By precisely controlling the pearl size and density, this reduction can be more than 70% for the structures designed in the study, which provides a unique approach for designing high-performance nanoscale thermoelectric devices.

  12. (Integrated Diffractive Mirrors (IDM) Ion Traps)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-04

    trap electrodes. Fluorescence from trapped ions is collected at high solid angle coverage for subsequent coupling into optical fiber (not shown). 2-6...integrated optics and fiber ribbon. The width of all optics was set by the ground electrode width of 80 μm. Since the trapping potential minimum was...signal. Thermal relaxation of the cables during the bake actually forced the trap carrier up and out of the socket on two occasions. We installed a

  13. Simplified Quantum Logic with Trapped Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-23

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A ATOMIC , MOLECULAR, AND OPTICAL PHYSICS THIRD SERIES, VOLUME 55, NUMBER 4 APRIL 1997Simplified quantum logic with trapped ions C...Received 17 December 1996! We describe a simplified scheme for quantum logic with a collection of laser-cooled trapped atomic ions. Building on the...in a system of laser-cooled trapped atomic ions. In the simplest form of the ion trap quantum computer, two internal electronic levels of each ion in

  14. High Optical Access Trap 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm

    2016-01-26

    The High Optical Access (HOA) trap was designed in collaboration with the Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer (MUSIQC) team, funded along with Sandia National Laboratories through IARPA's Multi Qubit Coherent Operations (MQCO) program. The design of version 1 of the HOA trap was completed in September 2012 and initial devices were completed and packaged in February 2013. The second version of the High Optical Access Trap (HOA-2) was completed in September 2014 and is available at IARPA's disposal.

  15. Stokes Trap: Multiplexed particle trapping and manipulation using fluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Anish; Schroeder, Charles

    We report the development of the Stokes Trap, which is a multiplexed microfluidic trap for control over an arbitrary number of small particles in a microfluidic device. Our work involves the design and implementation of ``smart'' flow-based devices by coupling feedback control with microfluidics, thereby enabling new routes for the fluidic-directed assembly of particles. Here, we discuss the development of a new method to achieve multiplexed microfluidic trapping of an arbitrary number of particles using the sole action of fluid flow. In particular, we use a Hele-Shaw microfluidic cell to generate hydrodynamic forces on particles in a viscous-dominated flow defined by the microdevice geometry and imposed peripheral flow rates. This platform allows for a high degree of flow control over individual particles and can be used for manufacturing novel particles for fundamental studies, using fluidic-directed assembly. From a broader perspective, our work provides a solid framework for guiding the design of next-generation, automated on-chip assays.

  16. Phase diagram for the trapping kinetics of partially coherent excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlstein, Robert M.

    1998-06-01

    The kinetics of exciton trapping within molecular assemblies similar to those of recently reported structural models of photosynthetic light-harvesting antennas have been described theoretically for any degree of exciton coherence. It is shown here that in the space of two of the kinetic parameters - the local exciton scattering rate constant and the nearest-neighbor separation distance of the exciton-generating transition dipoles - the trapping kinetics segregate into coherent and incoherent phases delineated by universal curves. Consequences of these findings are discussed, particularly as they may apply to purple photosynthetic bacteria.

  17. 50 CFR 697.27 - Trap transferability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Measures § 697.27 Trap transferability. (a) Federal lobster permit holders may elect to participate in a program that allows them to transfer trap allocation to other participating Federal lobster permit holders... Federal Trap Transfer Program: (i) An individual must possess a valid Federal lobster permit; and (ii)...

  18. 50 CFR 31.16 - Trapping program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Disposal § 31.16 Trapping program. Except as hereafter noted, persons trapping animals on wildlife refuge... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Trapping program. 31.16 Section 31.16 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED)...

  19. 50 CFR 31.16 - Trapping program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Disposal § 31.16 Trapping program. Except as hereafter noted, persons trapping animals on wildlife refuge... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Trapping program. 31.16 Section 31.16 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED)...

  20. An innovative mosquito trap for testing attractants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe a simple trap modification for testing or using attractants to collect flying mosquitoes. The trap also can test the effectiveness of spatial repellents. The proposed design may facilitate standardized testing of mosquito attractants and repellents. The trap uses a standard Centers f...

  1. Solar light trapping in slanted conical-pore photonic crystals: Beyond statistical ray trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyderman, Sergey; John, Sajeev; Deinega, Alexei

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that with only 1 μm, equivalent bulk thickness, of crystalline silicon, sculpted into the form of a slanted conical-pore photonic crystal and placed on a silver back-reflector, it is possible to attain a maximum achievable photocurrent density (MAPD) of 35.5 mA/cm2 from impinging sunlight. This corresponds to absorbing roughly 85% of all available sunlight in the wavelength range of 300-1100 nm and exceeds the limits suggested by previous "statistical ray trapping" arguments. Given the AM 1.5 solar spectrum and the intrinsic absorption characteristics of silicon, the optimum carrier generation occurs for a photonic crystal square lattice constant of 850 nm and slightly overlapping inverted cones with upper (base) radius of 500 nm. This provides a graded refractive index profile with good anti-reflection behavior. Light trapping is enhanced by tilting each inverted cone such that one side of each cone is tangent to the plane defining the side of the elementary cell. When the solar cell is packaged with silica (each pore filled with SiO2), the MAPD in the wavelength range of 400-1100 nm becomes 32.6 mA/cm2 still higher than the Lambertian 4n2 benchmark of 31.2 mA/cm2. In the near infrared regime from 800 to 1100 nm, our structure traps and absorbs light within slow group velocity modes, which propagate nearly parallel to the solar cell interface and exhibit localized high intensity vortex-like flow in the Poynting vector-field. In this near infrared range, our partial MAPD is 10.9 mA/cm2 compared to a partial MAPD of 7 mA/cm2 based on "4n2 statistical ray trapping." These results suggest silicon solar cell efficiencies exceeding 20% with just 1 μm of silicon.

  2. Functional characterization of a redundant Plasmodium TRAP family invasin, TRAP-like protein, by aldolase binding and a genetic complementation test.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Kirsten; Nie, Hui; Kumar, Sumit; Daly, Thomas M; Bergman, Lawrence W; Matuschewski, Kai

    2008-06-01

    Efficient and specific host cell entry is of exquisite importance for intracellular pathogens. Parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa are highly motile and actively enter host cells. These functions are mediated by type I transmembrane invasins of the TRAP family that link an extracellular recognition event to the parasite actin-myosin motor machinery. We systematically tested potential parasite invasins for binding to the actin bridging molecule aldolase and complementation of the vital cytoplasmic domain of the sporozoite invasin TRAP. We show that the ookinete invasin CTRP and a novel, structurally related protein, termed TRAP-like protein (TLP), are functional members of the TRAP family. Although TLP is expressed in invasive stages, targeted gene disruption revealed a nonvital role during life cycle progression. This is the first genetic analysis of TLP, encoding a redundant TRAP family invasin, in the malaria parasite.

  3. Trapping models for the Lower Silurian Medina Sandstone Group - A comparison of trapping styles and exploration methodology for both deep and shallow medina plays in the Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Zagorski, W.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The Lower Silurian Medina Sandstone Group has been a major oil and gas producer in the Appalachian basin since the late 1800s and remains a primary objective in parts of New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Although classified as a stratigraphic trap, production from the Medina is obtained from a wide variety of trapping conditions ranging from pure stratigraphic to structural stratigraphic in the shallower producing areas of the Medina to deep basin (i.e., Elmworth field, western Canada) trapping in the deeper producing regions of strategies must be employed for optimum prospect development and maximum economic success ratios. Several producing areas of the Medina are presented to compare and contrast these various trapping mechanisms together with suggested exploration models applicable to each trap type.

  4. Atom Trap, Krypton-81, and Saharan Water

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    2005-08-24

    Since radiocarbon dating was first demonstrated in 1949, the field of trace analyses of long-lived cosmogenic isotopes has seen steady growth in both analytical methods and applicable isotopes. The impact of such analyses has reached a wide range of scientific and technological areas. A new method, named Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA), was developed by our group and used to analyze {sup 81}Kr (t{sub 1/2} = 2.3 x 10{sup 5} years, isotopic abundance {approx} 1 x 10{sup -12}) in environmental samples. In this method, individual {sup 81}Kr atoms are selectively captured and detected with a laser-based atom trap. {sup 81}Kr is produced by cosmic rays in the upper atmosphere. It is the ideal tracer for dating ice and groundwater in the age range of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} years. As the first real-world application of ATTA, we have determined the mean residence time of the old groundwater in the Nubian Aquifer located underneath the Sahara Desert. Moreover, this method of capturing and probing atoms of rare isotopes is also applied to experiments that study exotic nuclear structure and test fundamental symmetries.

  5. Mesoscopic supersolid of dipoles in a trap

    SciTech Connect

    Golomedov, A. E.; Astrakharchik, G. E.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2011-09-15

    A mesoscopic system of dipolar bosons trapped by a harmonic potential is considered. The system has a number of physical realizations including dipole excitons, atoms with large dipolar moment, polar molecules, and Rydberg atoms in inhomogeneous electric field. We carry out a diffusion Monte Carlo simulation to define the quantum properties of a two-dimensional system of trapped dipoles at zero temperature. In dimensionless units the system is described by two control parameters, namely, the number of particles and the strength of the interparticle interaction. We have shown that when the interparticle interaction is strong enough a mesoscopic crystal is formed. As the strength of interactions is decreased a multistage melting takes place. Off-diagonal order in the system is tested using natural-orbitals analysis. We have found that the system might be Bose condensed even in the case of strong interparticle interactions. There is a set of parameters for which a spatially ordered structure is formed while simultaneously the fraction of Bose-condensed particles is nonzero. This might be considered as a realization of a mesoscopic supersolid.

  6. Neutral atom traps of rare isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Laser cooling and trapping techniques offer exquisite control of an atom's external and internal degrees of freedom. The species of interest can be selectively captured, cooled close to absolute zero temperatures, and observed with high signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the atom's electronic and magnetic state populations can be precisely manipulated and interrogated. Applied in nuclear physics, these techniques are ideal for precision measurements in the fields of fundamental interactions and symmetries, nuclear structure studies, and isotopic trace analysis. In particular, they offer unique opportunities in the quest for physics beyond the standard model. I will shortly review the basics of this approach and the state of the field and then cover in more details recent results from two such efforts: the search for a permanent electric dipole moment in 225Ra and the beta-neutrino angular correlation measurement with laser trapped 6He. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Using demographic data to better interpret pitfall trap catches

    PubMed Central

    Matalin, Andrey V.; Makarov, Kirill V.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The results of pitfall trapping are often interpreted as abundance in a particular habitat. At the same time, there are numerous cases of almost unrealistically high catches of ground beetles in seemingly unsuitable sites. The correlation of catches by pitfall trapping with the true distribution and abundance of Carabidae needs corroboration. During a full year survey in 2006/07 in the Lake Elton region (Volgograd Area, Russia), 175 species of ground beetles were trapped. Considering the differences in demographic structure of the local populations, and not their abundances, three groups of species were recognized: residents, migrants and sporadic. In residents, the demographic structure of local populations is complete, and their habitats can be considered “residential”. In migrants and sporadic species, the demographic structure of the local populations is incomplete, and their habitats can be considered “transit”. Residents interact both with their prey and with each other in a particular habitat. Sporadic species are hardly important to a carabid community because of their low abundances. The contribution of migrants to the structure of carabid communities is not apparent and requires additional research. Migrants and sporadic species represent a “labile” component in ground beetles communities, as opposed to a “stable” component, represented by residents. The variability of the labile component substantially limits our interpretation of species diversity in carabid communities. Thus, the criteria for determining the most abundant, or dominant species inevitably vary because the abundance of migrants in some cases can be one order of magnitude higher than that of residents. The results of pitfall trapping adequately reflect the state of carabid communities only in zonal habitats, while azonal and disturbed habitats are merely transit ones for many species of ground beetles. A study of the demographic structure of local populations and

  8. Phenomenological study of binding in optically trapped photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maystre, D.; Vincent, P.

    2007-08-01

    We describe a phenomenological theory of the phenomenon of binding observed both experimentally and numerically when particles are trapped by an interference system in order to make a structure close to a photonic crystal. This theory leads to a very simple conclusion, which links the binding phenomenon to the bottom of the lowest bandgap of the trapped crystal in a given direction. The phenomenological theory allows one to calculate the period of the trapped crystal by using numerical tools on dispersion diagrams of photonic crystals. It emerges that the agreement of our theory with our rigorous numerical results given in a previous paper [J. Opt A8, 1059 (2006)] is better than 2% on the crystal period. Furthermore, it is shown that in two-dimensional problems and s polarization, all the optical forces derive from a scalar potential.

  9. Towards a 3-D Magneto-Optical Trap for Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collopy, Alejandra; Hummon, Matthew; Yeo, Mark; Stuhl, Benjamin; Hemmerling, Boerge; Drayna, Garrett; Chae, Eunmi; Ravi, Aakash; Lu, Hsin-I.; Doyle, John; Ye, Jun

    2013-05-01

    As the magneto-optical trap revolutionized atomic physics, we anticipate the molecular counterpart to open doors to unexplored molecular physics, including ultra-cold chemistry. While molecules possess more complex structure than atoms, quasi-cycling cooling transitions are still attainable in a variety of species, including the polar molecule YO. In order to remix dark states, we RF modulate the polarization of the light in our trap. In order to maintain a restoring force, we modulate the orientation of our magnetic fields in phase with the light using LC resonant in-vacuum magnetic coils. We demonstrate magneto-optical trapping in two dimensions for YO, and present progress towards a three dimensional implementation of a MOT loaded from a two-stage buffer gas cell source. We acknowledge support from the AFOSR (MURI), DOE, NIST and the NSF.

  10. Solar Cell light trapping beyond the ray optic limit.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Dennis M; Munday, Jeremy N; Atwater, Harry A

    2012-01-11

    In 1982, Yablonovitch proposed a thermodynamic limit on light trapping within homogeneous semiconductor slabs, which implied a minimum thickness needed to fully absorb the solar spectrum. However, this limit is valid for geometrical optics but not for a new generation of subwavelength solar absorbers such as ultrathin or inhomogeneously structured cells, wire-based cells, photonic crystal-based cells, and plasmonic cells. Here we show that the key to exceeding the conventional ray optic or so-called ergodic light trapping limit is in designing an elevated local density of optical states (LDOS) for the absorber. Moreover, for any semiconductor we show that it is always possible to exceed the ray optic light trapping limit and use these principles to design a number of new solar absorbers with the key feature of having an elevated LDOS within the absorbing region of the device, opening new avenues for solar cell design and cost reduction.

  11. Trapping of coherence and entanglement in photonic band-gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ling-Juan; Zhang, Ying-Jie; Xing, Gui-Chao; Xia, Yun-Jie; Gong, Shang-Qing

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the coherence trapping of a two-level atom transversally interacting with a reservoir with a photonic band-gap structure function. We then focus on the multipartite entanglement dynamics via genuinely multipartite concurrence among N independent atoms each locally coupled with its own reservoir. By considering the Lorentzian width and the system size, we find that for the resonant and near-resonant conditions, the increase of Lorentzian width and the decrease of system size can lead to the occurrence of coherence trapping and entanglement trapping. By choosing the multipartite GHZ state as atomic initial state, we show that the multipartite entanglement may exhibit entanglement sudden death depending on the initial condition and the system size. In addition, we also analyze how the crossover behaviors of two dynamical regimes are influenced by the Lorentzian width and the weight ratio, in terms of the non-Markovianity.

  12. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Witten, William B.; Kornienko, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  13. Trapping of radiation in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.E.; Alford, W.J.

    1995-06-01

    The authors analyze the problem of radiation trapping (imprisonment) by the method of Holstein. The process is described by an integrodifferential equation which shows that the effective radiative decay rate of the system depends on the size and the shape of the active medium. Holstein obtains a global decay rate for a particular geometry by assuming that the radiating excited species evolves into a steady state spatial mode. The authors derive a new approximation for the trapped decay which has a space dependent decay rate and is easy to implement in a detailed computer simulation of a plasma confined within an arbitrary geometry. They analyze the line shapes that are relevant to a near-atmospheric-pressure mixture of He and Xe. This line-shape analysis can be utilized in either the Holstein formulae or the space-dependent decay approximation.

  14. Rotation sensing with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, W. C.; Hamilton, P.

    2017-03-01

    We present a protocol for rotation measurement via matter-wave Sagnac interferometry using trapped ions. The ion trap based interferometer encloses a large area in a compact apparatus through repeated round-trips in a Sagnac geometry. We show how a uniform magnetic field can be used to close the interferometer over a large dynamic range in rotation speed and measurement bandwidth without contrast loss. Since this technique does not require the ions to be confined in the Lamb–Dicke regime, Doppler laser cooling should be sufficient to reach a sensitivity of { S }=1.4× {10}-6 {{rad}} {{{s}}}-1 {{{H}}{{z}}}-1/2. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Wes Campbell was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  15. Trap-limited photovoltage in ultrathin metal oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Th.; Duzhko, V.; Koch, F.; Kytin, V.; Rappich, J.

    2002-04-01

    Photovoltage signals were observed at ultrathin metal oxide (TiO2,Cu2O, ZnO)/ metal structures by transient and spectral photovoltage (PV) techniques. The sign, the spectral behavior and the time-dependent relaxation of the PV are determined by the nature of the traps in the metal oxide layers. At lower temperatures, the relaxation of the PV signal in TiO2 layers is controlled by recombination due to the overlap of the wave functions of the spatially separated electrons and holes. At higher temperatures, thermal emission accelerates the recombination process. The Bohr radius of trapped holes, the tail of the exponential approximation of electronic states distribution above the valence band, the density of states at the valence band edge were obtained for TiO2 layers by using the proposed model of trap limited PV. The concept of trap limited PV gives a general tool for the investigation of excess carrier separation in ultrathin metal oxide or semiconductor layers with trap states.

  16. Plasmon assisted optical trapping: fundamentals and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Makropoulou, Mersini; Tsigaridas, Georgios N.; Gousetis, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    The field of optical trapping has dramatically grown due to implementation in various arenas including physics, biology, medicine and nanotechnology. Certainly, optical tweezers are an invaluable tool to manipulate a variation of particles, such as small dielectric spheres, cells, bacteria, chromosomes and even genes, by highly focused laser beams through microscope. As the main disadvantage of the conventional optical trapping systems is the diffraction limit of the incident light, plasmon assisted nanotrapping is reported as a suitable technique for trapping sub-wavelength metallic or dielectric particles. In this work, firstly, we report briefly on the basic theory of plasmon excitation, focusing on the interaction of nanoscale metallic structures with laser light. Secondly, experimental and numerical simulation results are also presented, demonstrating enhancement of the trapping efficiency of glass or SiO2 substrates, coated with Au and Ag nanostructures, with or without nanoparticles. The optical forces were calculated by measuring the particle's escape velocity calibration method. Finally, representative applications of plasmon assisted optical trapping are reviewed, from cancer therapeutics to fundamental biology and cell nanosurgery.

  17. Trapping waves in Earth's plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, Eric O.

    2014-12-01

    Earth's magnetic field traps donut-shaped bands of radiation in a belt around the planet that react to solar eruptions by growing and shrinking. The Van Allen belts consist of two rings filled with particles from the solar wind and cosmic rays. Within the outer ring of the Van Allen belt sits the plasmasphere, which is the innermost part of the planet's magnetic field and home to low-energy charged particles.

  18. Lift enhancement by trapped vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of lift enhancement by trapped vortex are provided. Efforts are continuously being made to find simple ways to convert wings of aircraft from an efficient cruise configuration to one that develops the high lift needed during landing and takeoff. The high-lift configurations studied here consist of conventional airfoils with a trapped vortex over the upper surface. The vortex is trapped by one or two vertical fences that serve as barriers to the oncoming stream and as reflection planes for the vortex and the sink that form a separation bubble on top of the airfoil. Since the full three-dimensional unsteady flow problem over the wing of an aircraft is so complicated that it is hard to get an understanding of the principles that govern the vortex trapping process, the analysis is restricted here to the flow field illustrated in the first slide. It is assumed that the flow field between the two end plates approximates a streamwise strip of the flow over a wing. The flow between the endplates and about the airfoil consists of a spanwise vortex located between the suction orifices in the endplates. The spanwise fence or spoiler located near the nose of the airfoil serves to form a separated flow region and a shear layer. The vorticity in the shear layer is concentrated into the vortex by withdrawal of fluid at the suction orifices. As the strength of the vortex increases with time, it eventually dominates the flow in the separated region so that a shear or vertical layer is no longer shed from the tip of the fence. At that point, the vortex strength is fixed and its location is such that all of the velocity contributions at its center sum to zero thereby making it an equilibrium point for the vortex. The results of a theoretical analysis of such an idealized flow field are described.

  19. Trapper readies trap for lizard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    State-licensed animal trapper James Dean sets the open door of an animal trap on KSC. He hopes to catch a large monitor lizard spotted recently near S.R. 3, a route into the Center, by several area residents. The lizard is not a native of the area, and possibly a released pet. Dean is working with the cooperation of KSC and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  20. A cell sorting and trapping microfluidic device with an interdigital channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jing; Qiao, Yi; Xu, Minghua; Li, Junji; Liang, Fupeng; Duan, Mengqin; Ju, An; Lu, Zuhong

    2016-12-01

    The growing interest in cell sorting and trapping is driving the demand for high performance technologies. Using labeling techniques or external forces, cells can be identified by a series of methods. However, all of these methods require complicated systems with expensive devices. Based on inherent differences in cellular morphology, cells can be sorted by specific structures in microfluidic devices. The weir filter is a basic and efficient cell sorting and trapping structure. However, in some existing weir devices, because of cell deformability and high flow velocity in gaps, trapped cells may become stuck or even pass through the gaps. Here, we designed and fabricated a microfluidic device with interdigital channels for cell sorting and trapping. The chip consisted of a sheet of silicone elastomer polydimethylsiloxane and a sheet of glass. A square-wave-like weir was designed in the middle of the channel, comprising the interdigital channels. The square-wave pattern extended the weir length by three times with the channel width remaining constant. Compared with a straight weir, this structure exhibited a notably higher trapping capacity. Interdigital channels provided more space to slow down the rate of the pressure decrease, which prevented the cells from becoming stuck in the gaps. Sorting a mixture K562 and blood cells to trap cells demonstrated the efficiency of the chip with the interdigital channel to sort and trap large and less deformable cells. With stable and efficient cell sorting and trapping abilities, the chip with an interdigital channel may be widely applied in scientific research fields.

  1. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potenital and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  2. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potential and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  3. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-05-15

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  4. Efficacy of commercial traps and food odor attractants for mass trapping of Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Lasa, Rodrigo; Velázquez, Olinda E; Ortega, Rafael; Acosta, Emilio

    2014-02-01

    One of the most important factors for the success of a mass trapping strategy to control a fruit fly involves the selection of an effective trap-lure combination. Because different species of fruit flies respond differently to the physical characteristics of a trap and to bait volatiles, the evaluation of commercial traps and lures that have proved useful against other tephtrids is necessary to determine their efficacy for mass trapping of Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae). Under caged conditions, a commercial hemispherical trap with lateral holes (Maxitrap Plus) proved more attractive to A. ludens (both sexes) than five other commercial traps that were all baited with hydrolyzed protein. Among these traps, bottom invaginated traps and traps with invaginated lateral holes constructed with transparent cylinders had the best physical retention properties. When evaluated under field conditions, the lure was critical for the efficacy of the trap, and one of the traps that performed poorly in attraction and retention cage tests (MS2) resulted as one of the most effective traps when baited with CeraTrap lure. Considering the use of different trap models under field conditions, CeraTrap liquid bait was more effective in A. ludens capture than Biolure dry synthetic bait, but both lures were not replaced during the entire course of the experiment. The percentage of captured females was also slightly higher using CeraTrap lure (67.2%) than using Biolure baits (54.5-58.8%). In field tests, 75-81% of females were mated and no significant differences were observed among trap-lure combinations. Trap selectivity against nontarget adult lacewings also differed among trap-lure combinations.

  5. Control of the conformations of ion Coulomb crystals in a Penning trap

    PubMed Central

    Mavadia, Sandeep; Goodwin, Joseph F.; Stutter, Graham; Bharadia, Shailen; Crick, Daniel R.; Segal, Daniel M.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-cooled atomic ions form ordered structures in radiofrequency ion traps and in Penning traps. Here we demonstrate in a Penning trap the creation and manipulation of a wide variety of ion Coulomb crystals formed from small numbers of ions. The configuration can be changed from a linear string, through intermediate geometries, to a planar structure. The transition from a linear string to a zigzag geometry is observed for the first time in a Penning trap. The conformations of the crystals are set by the applied trap potential and the laser parameters, and agree with simulations. These simulations indicate that the rotation frequency of a small crystal is mainly determined by the laser parameters, independent of the number of ions and the axial confinement strength. This system has potential applications for quantum simulation, quantum information processing and tests of fundamental physics models from quantum field theory to cosmology. PMID:24096901

  6. Penning traps with unitary architecture for storage of highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Joseph N; Brewer, Samuel M; Guise, Nicholas D

    2012-02-01

    Penning traps are made extremely compact by embedding rare-earth permanent magnets in the electrode structure. Axially-oriented NdFeB magnets are used in unitary architectures that couple the electric and magnetic components into an integrated structure. We have constructed a two-magnet Penning trap with radial access to enable the use of laser or atomic beams, as well as the collection of light. An experimental apparatus equipped with ion optics is installed at the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility, constrained to fit within 1 meter at the end of a horizontal beamline for transporting highly charged ions. Highly charged ions of neon and argon, extracted with initial energies up to 4000 eV per unit charge, are captured and stored to study the confinement properties of a one-magnet trap and a two-magnet trap. Design considerations and some test results are discussed.

  7. Evaporite geometries and diagenetic traps, lower San Andres, Northwest shelf, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, D.R. )

    1992-04-01

    An east-west-trending belt of lower San Andres oil fields extends 80 mi across southeastern New Mexico from the Pecos River near Roswell to the Texas-New Mexico border. These fields are along a porosity pinch-out zone where porous carbonates grade laterally into bedded anhydrite and halite. The lower San Andres traps are associated with pre-Tertiary structural or stratigraphic traps. Oil and water production relationships from these fields are not consistent with present-day structure. These fields have been commonly interpreted to be hydrodynamic traps created by the eastern flow of fresh surface water that enters the lower San Andres outcrops west of Pecos River. There is no evidence, however, that surface water has moved through the lower San Andres in this area. This conclusion is supported by the fact that formation-water resistivities are uniform throughout the producing trend, no significant dissolution of carbonates or evaporites has occurred, and there has been no increase in biogradation of oils adjacent to the lower San Andres outcrops. These fields actually are diagenetic traps created by porosity occlusion in the water column beneath the oil accumulations. Hydrocarbons originally were trapped in pre-Tertiary structural and structural-stratigraphic traps. Bedded evaporites were effective barriers to vertical and lateral hydrocarbon migration. Eastward tilting of the Northwest shelf during the Tertiary opened these traps, but the oil remained in these structurally unfavorable positions because of the diagenetic sealing. The gas-solution drive in these reservoirs is a result of this sealing. The sequence of events leading to diagenetic entrapment include (1) Triassic and Jurassic migration of hydrocarbons into broad, low-relief post-San Andres structural and structural-stratigraphic traps; (2) rapid occlusion of porosity in the water column beneath oil reservoirs, and (3) Tertiary tilt-out traps.

  8. Electrostatic trapping of metastable NH molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, Steven; Metsaelae, Markus; Zieger, Peter C.; Scharfenberg, Ludwig; Gilijamse, Joop J.; Meijer, Gerard; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de

    2007-12-15

    We report on the Stark deceleration and electrostatic trapping of {sup 14}NH (a{sup 1}{delta}) radicals. In the trap, the molecules are excited on the spin-forbidden A{sup 3}{pi}<-a{sup 1}{delta} transition and detected via their subsequent fluorescence to the X{sup 3}{sigma}{sup -} ground state. The 1/e trapping time is 1.4{+-}0.1 s, from which a lower limit of 2.7 s for the radiative lifetime of the a{sup 1}{delta}, v=0, J=2 state is deduced. The spectral profile of the molecules in the trapping field is measured to probe their spatial distribution. Electrostatic trapping of metastable NH followed by optical pumping of the trapped molecules to the electronic ground state is an important step toward accumulation of these radicals in a magnetic trap.

  9. Evaluation of trapping-web designs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukacs, P.M.; Anderson, D.R.; Burnham, K.P.

    2005-01-01

    The trapping web is a method for estimating the density and abundance of animal populations. A Monte Carlo simulation study is performed to explore performance of the trapping web for estimating animal density under a variety of web designs and animal behaviours. The trapping performs well when animals have home ranges, even if the home ranges are large relative to trap spacing. Webs should contain at least 90 traps. Trapping should continue for 5-7 occasions. Movement rates have little impact on density estimates when animals are confined to home ranges. Estimation is poor when animals do not have home ranges and movement rates are rapid. The trapping web is useful for estimating the density of animals that are hard to detect and occur at potentially low densities. ?? CSIRO 2005.

  10. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, K. K.; Ram, R. J.; Eltony, A. M.; Chuang, I. L.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M. Chiaverini, J.

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware utilizing a commercial CMOS process opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  11. Cryptic zooplankton ``swimmers'' in upper ocean sediment traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Anthony F.; Silver, Mary W.; Gowing, Marcia M.; Knauer, George A.

    1990-08-01

    Sediment traps are the major oceanographic tool for collecting passively sinking particulate material (the "particle flux") in the ocean. Sediment traps in the upper ocean also collect actively sinking zooplankton that are usually manually removed prior to analysis. Microscospic analysis of sediment trap samples collected over a 19-month period in the eastern North Pacific reveals that zooplankton "swimmers" are a larger problem than previously recognized. Zooplankton that are cryptic (i.e. difficult to see or distinguish from the detrital material) and difficult to remove (principally gelatinous zooplankton) may have contributed up to 20 mg C m -2 day -1 to the "particulate flux", with the highest values in the upper 150 m. This swimmer problem is in addition to the previously recognized presence of crustaceans and other large metazoans in traps. Additionally, the detritus-laden, mucous-feeding structures (houses)of larvaceans probably enter the traps with the larvaceans and would be impossible to remove. We estimate that the contribution of the cryptic swimmers and larvacean houses could be as much as 96% of the measured carbon flux. The contribution is greatest in the euphotic zone and drops sharply below 200 m. Subtracting out this potential artifact at the VERTEX station results in vertical profiles of organic carbon flux that differ dramatically from the standard flux profile for carbon in the upper ocean: specifically, the implied "regeneration" rate is greatly reduced. Screened traps (300 μm screens below the baffles) contained numerous metazoans smaller than the screen mesh size. These traps also contained lower levels of other types of sinking particles, and it is unclear to what extent the screens reduced the relative contribution of swimmers to the trap-collected carbon. Although the expanded swimmer problem presented here is now documented at just the VERTEX site, we expect it exists elsewhere. The extent of this swimmer problem requires resolution

  12. Numerical analysis of an optical nanoscale particles trapping device based on a slotted nanobeam cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Senlin; Yong, Zhengdong; Shi, Yaocheng; He, Sailing

    2016-10-01

    A slotted nanobeam cavity (SNC) is utilized to trap a polystyrene (PS) particle with a radius of only 2 nm. The carefully designed SNC shows an ultrahigh Q factor of 4.5 × 107 while maintaining a small mode volume of 0.067(λ/nwater)3. Strongly enhanced optical trapping force is numerically demonstrated when the 2 nm PS particle is introduced into the central, slotted part of the SNC. In the vertical direction, the numerical calculation results show that a trapping stiffness of 0.4 pN/(nm · mW) around the equilibrium position and a trapping potential barrier of ~2000 kBT/mW can be reached. To our best knowledge, the trapping capability (trapping stiffness and trapping potential barrier) of the proposed structure significantly outperforms the theoretical results of those in previously reported work. In addition, the SNC system does not suffer from the metal induced heat issue that restricts the performance of state-of-the-art optical trapping systems involving plasmonic enhancement. Based on the proposed cavity, applications such as lab-on-a-chip platforms for nanoscale particle trapping and analysis can be expected in future.

  13. Numerical analysis of an optical nanoscale particles trapping device based on a slotted nanobeam cavity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Senlin; Yong, Zhengdong; Shi, Yaocheng; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A slotted nanobeam cavity (SNC) is utilized to trap a polystyrene (PS) particle with a radius of only 2 nm. The carefully designed SNC shows an ultrahigh Q factor of 4.5 × 107 while maintaining a small mode volume of 0.067(λ/nwater)3. Strongly enhanced optical trapping force is numerically demonstrated when the 2 nm PS particle is introduced into the central, slotted part of the SNC. In the vertical direction, the numerical calculation results show that a trapping stiffness of 0.4 pN/(nm · mW) around the equilibrium position and a trapping potential barrier of ~2000 kBT/mW can be reached. To our best knowledge, the trapping capability (trapping stiffness and trapping potential barrier) of the proposed structure significantly outperforms the theoretical results of those in previously reported work. In addition, the SNC system does not suffer from the metal induced heat issue that restricts the performance of state-of-the-art optical trapping systems involving plasmonic enhancement. Based on the proposed cavity, applications such as lab-on-a-chip platforms for nanoscale particle trapping and analysis can be expected in future. PMID:27786248

  14. Subwavelength optical dipole trap for neutral atoms using a microcapillary tube tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Gang; Zhang, Tiancai

    2017-02-01

    We propose a scheme for a state-insensitive optical dipole trap for single cesium atoms using a silica microcapillary tube tip. The end of microcapillary tube tip is flat. Simulations show that the trapping light beam output from microcapillary tube tip interferes and can form a subwavelength-trap with a full width at half-maximum of 0.67 μm. The trap is small enough to trap single atoms. The trap depth is more than 1 mK when the optical power of the trapping light guided by the microcapillary tube tip is only a few milliwatts. The effects of two imperfections, roughness of end surface and cutting angle, are estimated. The trapping depth for single atom trapping can be more than 1 mK when the average rms amplitude and average correlation length of tip surface roughness is smaller than 0.15 μm and the cutting angle is smaller than 16 degrees. Tip sizes on the order of microns are small enough to be combined within micro/nano structures for hybrid systems.

  15. Differences in regional air trapping in current smokers with normal spirometry.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Reza; Tornling, Göran; Forsslund, Helena; Mikko, Mikael; Wheelock, Åsa M; Nyrén, Sven; Sköld, C Magnus

    2017-01-01

    We investigated regional air trapping on computed tomography in current smokers with normal spirometry. It was hypothesised that presence of regional air trapping may indicate a specific manifestation of smoking-related changes.40 current smokers, 40 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 40 healthy never- smokers underwent computed tomography scans. Regional air trapping was assessed on end-expiratory scans and emphysema, micronodules and bronchial wall thickening on inspiratory scans. The ratio of expiratory and inspiratory mean lung attenuation (E/I) was calculated as a measure of static (fixed) air trapping.Regional air trapping was present in 63% of current smokers, in 45% of never smokers and in 8% of COPD patients (p<0.001). Current smokers with and without regional air trapping had E/I ratio of 0.81 and 0.91, respectively (p<0.001). Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was significantly higher and emphysema less frequent in current smokers with regional air trapping.Current smokers with regional air trapping had higher FEV1 and less emphysema on computed tomography. In contrast, current smokers without regional air trapping resembled COPD. Our results highlight heterogeneity among smokers with normal spirometry and may contribute to early detection of smoking related structural changes in the lungs.

  16. Temperature and trapping characterization of an acoustic trap with miniaturized integrated transducers--towards in-trap temperature regulation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Linda; Evander, Mikael; Lilliehorn, Tobias; Almqvist, Monica; Nilsson, Johan; Laurell, Thomas; Johansson, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    An acoustic trap with miniaturized integrated transducers (MITs) for applications in non-contact trapping of cells or particles in a microfluidic channel was characterized by measuring the temperature increase and trapping strength. The fluid temperature was measured by the fluorescent response of Rhodamine B in the microchannel. The trapping strength was measured by the area of a trapped particle cluster counter-balanced by the hydrodynamic force. One of the main objectives was to obtain quantitative values of the temperature in the fluidic channel to ensure safe handling of cells and proteins. Another objective was to evaluate the trapping-to-temperature efficiency for the trap as a function of drive frequency. Thirdly, trapping-to-temperature efficiency data enables identifying frequencies and voltage values to use for in-trap temperature regulation. It is envisioned that operation with only in-trap temperature regulation enables the realization of small, simple and fast temperature-controlled trap systems. The significance of potential gradients at the trap edges due to the finite size of the miniaturized transducers for the operation was emphasized and expressed analytically. The influence of the acoustic near field was evaluated in FEM-simulation and compared with a more ideal 1D standing wave. The working principle of the trap was examined by comparing measurements of impedance, temperature increase and trapping strength with impedance transfer calculations of fluid-reflector resonances and frequencies of high reflectance at the fluid-reflector boundary. The temperature increase was found to be moderate, 7°C for a high trapping strength, at a fluid flow of 0.5mms(-1) for the optimal driving frequency. A fast temperature response with a fall time of 8s and a rise time of 11s was observed. The results emphasize the importance of selecting the proper drive frequency for long term handling of cells, as opposed to the more pragmatic way of selecting the

  17. Polarization-dependent atomic dipole traps behind a circular aperture for neutral-atom quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen-Christandl, Katharina; Copsey, Bert D.

    2011-02-01

    The neutral-atom quantum computing community has successfully implemented almost all necessary steps for constructing a neutral-atom quantum computer. We present computational results of a study aimed at solving the remaining problem of creating a quantum memory with individually addressable sites for quantum computing. The basis of this quantum memory is the diffraction pattern formed by laser light incident on a circular aperture. Very close to the aperture, the diffraction pattern has localized bright and dark spots that can serve as red-detuned or blue-detuned atomic dipole traps. These traps are suitable for quantum computing even for moderate laser powers. In particular, for moderate laser intensities (~100 W/cm2) and comparatively small detunings (~1000-10 000 linewidths), trap depths of ~1 mK and trap frequencies of several to tens of kilohertz are achieved. Our results indicate that these dipole traps can be moved by tilting the incident laser beams without significantly changing the trap properties. We also explored the polarization dependence of these dipole traps. We developed a code that calculates the trapping potential energy for any magnetic substate of any hyperfine ground state of any alkali-metal atom for any laser detuning much smaller than the fine-structure splitting for any given electric field distribution. We describe details of our calculations and include a summary of different notations and conventions for the reduced matrix element and how to convert it to SI units. We applied this code to these traps and found a method for bringing two traps together and apart controllably without expelling the atoms from the trap and without significant tunneling probability between the traps. This approach can be scaled up to a two-dimensional array of many pinholes, forming a quantum memory with single-site addressability, in which pairs of atoms can be brought together and apart for two-qubit gates for quantum computing.

  18. Polarization-dependent atomic dipole traps behind a circular aperture for neutral-atom quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen-Christandl, Katharina; Copsey, Bert D.

    2011-02-15

    The neutral-atom quantum computing community has successfully implemented almost all necessary steps for constructing a neutral-atom quantum computer. We present computational results of a study aimed at solving the remaining problem of creating a quantum memory with individually addressable sites for quantum computing. The basis of this quantum memory is the diffraction pattern formed by laser light incident on a circular aperture. Very close to the aperture, the diffraction pattern has localized bright and dark spots that can serve as red-detuned or blue-detuned atomic dipole traps. These traps are suitable for quantum computing even for moderate laser powers. In particular, for moderate laser intensities ({approx}100 W/cm{sup 2}) and comparatively small detunings ({approx}1000-10 000 linewidths), trap depths of {approx}1 mK and trap frequencies of several to tens of kilohertz are achieved. Our results indicate that these dipole traps can be moved by tilting the incident laser beams without significantly changing the trap properties. We also explored the polarization dependence of these dipole traps. We developed a code that calculates the trapping potential energy for any magnetic substate of any hyperfine ground state of any alkali-metal atom for any laser detuning much smaller than the fine-structure splitting for any given electric field distribution. We describe details of our calculations and include a summary of different notations and conventions for the reduced matrix element and how to convert it to SI units. We applied this code to these traps and found a method for bringing two traps together and apart controllably without expelling the atoms from the trap and without significant tunneling probability between the traps. This approach can be scaled up to a two-dimensional array of many pinholes, forming a quantum memory with single-site addressability, in which pairs of atoms can be brought together and apart for two-qubit gates for quantum computing.

  19. Modeling and Optimizing RF Multipole Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanghaenel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Radio frequency (rf) ion traps are very well suited for spectroscopy experiments thanks to the long time storage of the species of interest in a well defined volume. The electrical potential of the ion trap is determined by the geometry of its electrodes and the applied voltages. In order to understand the behavior of trapped ions in realistic multipole traps it is necessary to characterize these trapping potentials. Commercial programs like SIMION or COMSOL, employing the finite difference and/or finite element method, are often used to model the electrical fields of the trap in order to design traps for various purposes, e.g. introducing light from a laser into the trap volume. For a controlled trapping of ions, e.g. for low temperature trapping, the time dependent electrical fields need to be known to high accuracy especially at the minimum of the effective (mechanical) potential. The commercial programs are not optimized for these applications and suffer from a number of limitations. Therefore, in our approach the boundary element method (BEM) has been employed in home-built programs to generate numerical solutions of real trap geometries, e.g. from CAD drawings. In addition the resulting fields are described by appropriate multipole expansions. As a consequence, the quality of a trap can be characterized by a small set of multipole parameters which are used to optimize the trap design. In this presentation a few example calculations will be discussed. In particular the accuracy of the method and the benefits of describing the trapping potentials via multipole expansions will be illustrated. As one important application heating effects of cold ions arising from non-ideal multipole fields can now be understood as a consequence of imperfect field configurations.

  20. Trapped rubber processing for advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marra, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Trapped rubber processing is a molding technique for composites in which precast silicone rubber is placed within a closed cavity where it thermally expands against the composite's surface supported by the vessel walls. The method has been applied by the Douglas Aircraft Company, under contract to NASA-Langley, to the design and fabrication of 10 DC-10 graphite/epoxy upper aft rudder assemblies. A three-bay development tool form mold die has been designed and manufactured, and tooling parameters have been established. Fabrication procedures include graphite layup, assembly of details in the tool, and a cure cycle. The technique has made it possible for the cocured fabrication of complex primary box structures otherwise impracticable via standard composite material processes.