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Sample records for ocular motor nerves

  1. Prevalence of ocular motor cranial nerve palsy and associations following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, F

    2011-01-01

    Aim Occurrence of ocular motor cranial nerve palsies (OMCNP), following stroke, has not been reported in relation to the type of OMCNP seen and in relation to brain area affected by stroke. The aim of this study was to identify all patients referred with suspected visual impairment to establish the presence and type of OMCNP. Methods Prospective, observation study with standardised referral and assessment forms across 20 sites. Visual assessment included visual acuity measurement, visual field assessment, ocular alignment, and movement and visual inattention assessment. Multicentre ethics approval and informed patient consent was obtained. Results In total, 915 patients were recruited with mean age of 69.18 years (SD 14.19). Altogether, 498 patients (54%) were diagnosed with ocular motility abnormalities. Of these, 89 patients (18%) had OMCNP. Unilateral third nerve palsy was present in 23 patients (26%), fourth nerve palsy in 14 patients (16%), and sixth nerve palsy in 52 patients (58%). Out of these, 44 patients had isolated OMCNP and 45 had OMCNP combined with other ocular motility abnormalities. Location of stroke was reported mainly in cerebellum, brain stem, thalamus, and internal and external capsules. Treatment was provided for each case including prisms, occlusion, typoscope, scanning exercises, and refraction. Conclusions OMCNP account for 18% of eye movement abnormalities in this stroke sub-population. Sixth CNP was most common, followed by third and fourth CNP. Half were isolated and half combined with other eye movement abnormality. Most were treated with prisms or occlusion. The reported brain area affected by stroke was typically the cerebellum, brain stem, and diencephalic structures. PMID:21475314

  2. Severity of infantile nystagmus syndrome-like ocular motor phenotype is linked to the extent of the underlying optic nerve projection defect in zebrafish belladonna mutant.

    PubMed

    Huber-Reggi, Sabina P; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Grimm, Lea; Straumann, Dominik; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Huang, Melody Ying-Yu

    2012-12-12

    Infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS), formerly known as congenital nystagmus, is an ocular motor disorder in humans characterized by spontaneous eye oscillations (SOs) and, in several cases, reversed optokinetic response (OKR). Its etiology and pathomechanism is largely unknown, but misrouting of the optic nerve has been observed in some patients. Likewise, optic nerve misrouting, a reversed OKR and SOs with INS-like waveforms are observed in zebrafish belladonna (bel) mutants. We aimed to investigate whether and how misrouting of the optic nerve correlates with the ocular motor behaviors in bel larvae. OKR and SOs were quantified and subsequently the optic nerve fibers were stained with fluorescent lipophilic dyes. Eye velocity during OKR was reduced in larvae with few misprojecting optic nerve fibers and reversed in larvae with a substantial fraction of misprojecting fibers. All larvae with reversed OKR also displayed SOs. A stronger reversed OKR correlated with more frequent SOs. Since we did not find a correlation between additional retinal defects and ocular motor behavior, we suggest that axon misrouting is in fact origin of INS in the zebrafish animal model. Depending on the ratio between misprojecting ipsilateral and correctly projecting contralateral fibers, the negative feedback loop normally regulating OKR can turn into a positive loop, resulting in an increase in retinal slip. Our data not only give new insights into the etiology of INS but may also be of interest for studies on how the brain deals with and adapts to conflicting inputs. PMID:23238723

  3. Unusual ocular motor findings in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    de Seze, J; Vukusic, S; Viallet-Marcel, M; Tilikete, C; Zéphir, H; Delalande, S; Stojkovic, T; Defoort-Dhellemmes, S; Confavreux, C; Vermersch, P

    2006-04-15

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), nystagmus or internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) are the usual ocular motor dysfunctions. However, in patients with focal brainstem lesions, other rare manifestations may be observed, such as an isolated ocular motor nerve palsy or complex ocular motor disturbances. We report five MS patients with unusual ocular motor disturbances (bilateral third nerve palsy [n = 2], opsoclonus, Horner's syndrome and one-and-a-half syndrome). We discuss possible correlations between clinical disturbances and MRI abnormalities. Patients were seen in two MS centres. They had a confirmed diagnosis of MS and underwent a brain MRI and a complete neuro-ophthalmological work-up. In one case (opsoclonus), ocular motor manifestations were the first manifestation of MS. In the other four cases they occurred 3 months (Horner syndrome), 6 years and 12 years (bilateral third nerve palsy) and 2 years (one-and-a-half syndrome) after the disease onset, respectively. Four out of five patients were still in a relapsing-remitting form of MS. In the opsoclonus case, there was no evidence of a brainstem lesion. A gadolinium-enhanced lesion (2 cases) or a new T2-weighted lesion located in the brainstem correlated with the clinical presentation. All patients completely or partially recovered after corticosteroid infusions. Our study shows some rare or previously undescribed complex ocular motor symptoms in MS. PMID:16466746

  4. Albinism: particular attention to the ocular motor system.

    PubMed

    Hertle, Richard W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize an understanding of the ocular motor system in patients with albinism. Other than the association of vertical eccentric gaze null positions and asymmetric, (a) periodic alternating nystagmus in a large percentage of patients, the ocular motor system in human albinism does not contain unique pathology, rather has "typical" types of infantile ocular oscillations and binocular disorders. Both the ocular motor and afferent visual system are affected to varying degrees in patients with albinism, thus, combined treatment of both systems will maximize visual function. PMID:24014991

  5. Detection of optic nerve damage in ocular hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J E; Bron, A J; Reeves, B C; Emmerson, P G

    1985-01-01

    Thirty patients with ocular hypertension were tested for contrast sensitivity loss. Seventeen were not on treatment, and thirteen were receiving some form of pressure reducing therapy. The contrast sensitivity results of 63% of ocular hypertensive eyes were abnormal (greater than 2 SDs from the age matched norm). Thus it appears that contrast sensitivity can detect early visual loss in patients who have normal visual fields and it is suggested that this test might be used as a criterion for therapy in ocular hypertension. There was no significant difference in the intraocular pressures between patients who gave abnormal contrast sensitivity results and those who did not in the untreated group (p greater than 0.05), suggesting that intraocular pressure level is a poor predictor of optic nerve fibre damage in patients with ocular hypertension. PMID:4084481

  6. Mechanics of mouse ocular motor plant quantified by optogenetic techniques.

    PubMed

    Stahl, John S; Thumser, Zachary C; May, Paul J; Andrade, Francisco H; Anderson, Sean R; Dean, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Rigorous descriptions of ocular motor mechanics are often needed for models of ocular motor circuits. The mouse has become an important tool for ocular motor studies, yet most mechanical data come from larger species. Recordings of mouse abducens neurons indicate the mouse mechanics share basic viscoelastic properties with larger species but have considerably longer time constants. Time constants can also be extracted from the rate at which the eye re-centers when released from an eccentric position. The displacement can be accomplished by electrically stimulating ocular motor nuclei, but electrical stimulation may also activate nearby ocular motor circuitry. We achieved specific activation of abducens motoneurons through photostimulation in transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin in cholinergic neurons. Histology confirmed strong channelrhodopsin expression in the abducens nucleus with relatively little expression in nearby ocular motor structures. Stimulation was delivered as 20- to 1,000-ms pulses and 40-Hz trains. Relaxations were modeled best by a two-element viscoelastic system. Time constants were sensitive to stimulus duration. Analysis of isometric relaxation of isolated mouse extraocular muscles suggest the dependence is attributable to noninstantaneous decay of active forces in non-twitch fibers following stimulus offset. Time constants were several times longer than those obtained in primates, confirming that the mouse ocular motor mechanics are relatively sluggish. Finally, we explored the effects of 0.1- to 20-Hz sinusoidal photostimuli and demonstrated their potential usefulness in characterizing ocular motor mechanics, although this application will require further data on the temporal relationship between photostimulation and neuronal firing in extraocular motoneurons.

  7. Ocular Motor Function in Patients with Bilateral Vestibular Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Ghazizadeh Hashemi, Seyyed Amir Hossein; Jafarzadeh, Sadegh; Haddadi Aval, Majid; Hosseinabadi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with bilateral weakness (BW) have many difficulties in gaze stability that interfere with their normal function. The aim of this study was to evaluate ocular motor functions in patients with BW to better understand the problem of gaze instability in these patients. Materials and Methods: Patients were referred from the Otolaryngology Department for Vestibular Assessment to our clinic between November 2014 and March 2015. We assessed ocular motor function (gaze, saccade, and smooth pursuit) in patients over the age of 18 years with BW, as verified by a caloric test. Results: Seventy-eight patients completed all the tests. The mean age of patients was 51.9 (±15.9) years, and 47 (60%) were female. Abnormal results were found in five (6.4%), 32 (41%), and seven (9%) patients with respect to gaze, smooth pursuit, and saccade, respectively. There were positive but relatively weak relationships between age and ocular motor results. Conclusion: Patients with BW suffer from dizziness and unsteadiness. These patients have abnormal function in ocular motor (especially smooth pursuit) tests. The ocular motor dysfunction is responsible for gaze instability in static positions such as standing. PMID:27429945

  8. Ocular motor signatures of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Joanne; Clough, Meaghan; Beh, Shin; Millist, Lynette; Sears, Derek; Frohman, Ashley N; Lizak, Nathaniel; Lim, Jayne; Kolbe, Scott; Rennaker, Robert L; Frohman, Teresa C; White, Owen B; Frohman, Elliot M

    2015-11-01

    The anatomical and functional overlap between ocular motor command circuitry and the higher-order networks that form the scaffolding for cognition makes for a compelling hypothesis that measures of ocular motility could provide a means to sensitively interrogate cognitive dysfunction in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Such an approach may ultimately provide objective and reproducible measures of cognitive dysfunction that offer an innovative capability to refine diagnosis, improve prognostication, and more accurately codify disease burden. A further dividend may be the validation and application of biomarkers that can be used in studies aimed at identifying and monitoring preventative, protective and even restorative properties of novel neurotherapeutics in MS. This Review discusses the utility of ocular motor measures in patients with MS to characterize disruption to wide-ranging networks that support cognitive function.

  9. Lyin' eyes: ocular-motor measures of reading reveal deception.

    PubMed

    Cook, Anne E; Hacker, Douglas J; Webb, Andrea K; Osher, Dahvyn; Kristjansson, Sean D; Woltz, Dan J; Kircher, John C

    2012-09-01

    Our goal was to evaluate an alternative to current methods for detecting deception in security screening contexts. We evaluated a new cognitive-based test of deception that measured participants' ocular-motor responses (pupil responses and reading behaviors) while they read and responded to statements on a computerized questionnaire. In Experiment 1, participants from a university community were randomly assigned to either a "guilty" group that committed one of two mock crimes or an "innocent" group that only learned about the crime. Participants then reported for testing, where they completed the computer-administered questionnaire that addressed their possible involvement in the crimes. Experiment 2 also manipulated participants' incentive to pass the test and difficulty of statements on the test. In both experiments, guilty participants had increased pupil responses to statements answered deceptively; however, they spent less time fixating on, reading, and rereading those statements than statements answered truthfully. These ocular-motor measures were optimally weighted in a discrimination function that correctly classified 85% of participants as either guilty or innocent. Findings from Experiment 2 indicated that group discrimination was improved with greater incentives to pass the test and the use of statements with simple syntax. The present findings suggest that two cognitive processes are involved in deception-vigilance and strategy-and that these processes are reflected in different ocular-motor measures. The ocular-motor test reported here represents a new approach to detecting deception that may fill an important need in security screening contexts.

  10. Lyin’ Eyes: Ocular-motor Measures of Reading Reveal Deception

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Anne E.; Hacker, Douglas J.; Webb, Andrea K.; Osher, Dahvyn; Kristjansson, Sean; Woltz, Dan J.; Kircher, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate an alternative to current methods for detecting deception in security screening contexts. We evaluated a new cognitive-based test of deception that measured participants’ ocular-motor responses (pupil responses and reading behaviors) while they read and responded to statements on a computerized questionnaire. In Experiment 1, participants from a university community were randomly assigned to either a “guilty” group that committed one of two mock crimes or an “innocent” group that only learned about the crime. Participants then reported for testing, where they completed the computer-administered questionnaire that addressed their possible involvement in the crimes. Experiment 2 also manipulated participants’ incentive to pass the test and difficulty of statements on the test. In both experiments, guilty participants had increased pupil responses to statements answered deceptively; however, they spent less time fixating on, reading, and re-reading those statements than statements answered truthfully. These ocular-motor measures were optimally weighted in a discrimination function that correctly classified 85% of participants as either guilty or innocent. Findings from Experiment 2 indicated that group discrimination was improved with greater incentives to pass the test and the use of statements with simple syntax. The present findings suggest that two cognitive processes are involved in deception -- vigilance and strategy -- and that these processes are reflected in different ocular-motor measures. The ocular-motor test reported here represents a new approach to detecting deception that may fill an important need in security screening contexts. PMID:22545928

  11. Does the addition of a nerve wrap to a motor nerve repair affect motor outcomes?

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Yup; Parisi, Thomas J; Friedrich, Patricia F; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of wrapping bioabsorbable nerve conduit around primary suture repair on motor nerve regeneration in a rat model. Forty rats were randomly divided into two experimental groups according to the type of repair of the rat sciatic nerve: group I had primary suture repair; group II had primary suture repair and bioabsorbable collagen nerve conduit (NeuraGen® 1.5 mm, Integra LifeSciences Corp., Plainsboro, NJ) wrapped around the repair. At 12 weeks, no significant differences in the percentage of recovery between the two groups were observed with respect to compound muscle action potentials, isometric muscle force, and muscle weight (P = 0.816, P = 0.698, P = 0.861, respectively). Histomorphometric analysis as compared to the non-operative sites was also not significantly different between the two groups in terms of number of myelinated axons, myelinated fiber area, and nerve fiber density (P = 0.368, P = 0.968, P = 0.071, respectively). Perineural scar tissue formation was greater in primary suture repair group (0.36 ± 0.15) than in primary repair plus conduit wrapping group (0.17 ± 0.08). This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Wrapping bioabsorbable nerve conduit around primary nerve repair can decrease perineural scar tissue formation. Although the scar-decreasing effect of bioabsorbable nerve wrap does not translate into better motor nerve recovery in this study, it might have an effect on the functional outcome in humans where scar formation is much more evident than in rats.

  12. Medical treatment of nystagmus and ocular motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Carlow, T J

    1986-01-01

    An increased compendium of drugs useful in ocular motor system dysfunction has expanded our capacity to treat selected ocular motility disorders. Adjunctive therapeutic modes (e.g., Fresnel prisms and orthoptic exercises) can also be beneficial. PAN and see-saw nystagmus can be treated with baclofen. Downbeat nystagmus may respond to clonazepam therapy, and prisms may help if the nystagmus can be modified with convergence. Congenital nystagmus may respond minimally to drugs (e.g., baclofen), but prisms or surgical procedures, or both, are still the primary treatment modalities. Innovar may be helpful in patients with severe, incapacitating vestibular disorders, and scopolamine alone or in combination with promethazine may be beneficial in patients with milder ambulatory acute peripheral vestibular disorders. Benign positional vertigo is best treated initially with positional exercises before drug therapy is instituted. Opsoclonus and ocular flutter have been treated successfully with corticosteroids, propranolol, and clonazepam, while microflutter, an extremely rare disorder, can resolve with baclofen. Although therapy with carbamazepine, 5-hydroxtryptophan, and scopolamine has been useful in selected patients with ocular palatal myoclonus, most do not respond to drug treatment. It is not usually necessary to treat voluntary nystagmus, but Fresnel prism lenses should be remembered in refractory patients. Potentially reversible and pseudointernuclear ophthalmoplegias also were discussed. Orthoptic exercises can be beneficial in posttraumatic internuclear ophthalmoplegia. Selected supranuclear palsies can be improved completely with the proper drug regimen. Lastly, superior oblique myokymia can be treated successfully with carbamazepine, with tight surveillance for possible adverse side effects. Descriptive phenomenology and pathophysiological localization must be correlated with brain stem neurochemistry and neuropharmacology to medically treat additional ocular

  13. Repair of ocular-oral synkinesis of postfacial paralysis using cross-facial nerve grafting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Chuan; Wang, Wei; Li, Wei

    2010-08-01

    We present the surgical techniques and results of cross-facial nerve grafting that have been developed in the repair of ocular-oral synkinesis after facial paralysis. Eleven patients with ocular-oral synkinesis after facial paralysis underwent the cross-facial nerve grafting with facial nerve transposition at a tertiary academic hospital between 2003 and 2009. The patient selection for the study was based on the degree of disfigurement and facial function parameter rating using the Toronto Facial Grading System. The procedures used were surgeries done in two stages. All cases were followed up for 2 months to 6 years after the second surgery. The degree of improvement was evaluated at 6 to 7 months after the procedures. Six of the patients were followed up for more than 2 years after the stage-two surgery and demonstrated significant reduction in the ocular-oral synkinetic movements. The Toronto Facial Grading System scores from the postoperative follow-ups increased an average of 16 points (28%), and the patients had achieved symmetrical facial movement. We concluded that cross-facial nerve grafting with facial nerve branch transposition is effective and can be considered as an option for the repair of ocular-oral synkinesis after facial paralysis in select patients.

  14. Motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) and lead content in sciatic nerve of lead-exposed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Maehara, N.; Uchino, E.; Terayama, K.; Ohno, H.; Yamamura, K.

    1986-07-01

    There have been many pathological and electrophysiological studies of peripheral nerves in inorganic lead intoxication. Peripheral nerve conduction velocity (NCV) has been used as an objective measure of the effects of lead on the peripheral nerve function and has been examined with blood lead content. There have been few reports on the changes in NCV related to lead content in the peripheral nerve tissue under lead poisoning. In the present study, the authors have examined motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) of the tail by a non-invasive method and lead content of the peripheral nerve in lead-exposed rats. Furthermore, they have attempted to assess the relationship between these two parameters.

  15. Intraoperative monitoring of motor cranial nerves in skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Maurer, J; Pelster, H; Amedee, R G; Mann, W J

    1995-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerves is performed to minimize postoperative cranial nerve dysfunction. We performed electrophysiologic monitoring of motor cranial nerves with a NIM 2 unit from Xomed Treace and a patient multiplexer developed in our clinic. This multiplexer allows simultaneous monitoring of four cranial nerves and is additionally equipped with a bipolar stimulation mode. This intraoperative monitoring was used during 102 skull base operations. Of these, 44 operations were acoustic neuroma removals by translabyrinthine approach and 36 by a middle fossa approach. Various operations, including removal of tumors of the jugular foramen and the infratemporal fossa, were performed in the remaining 22 patients. The facial nerve, being the most frequently monitored nerve, was evaluated both preoperatively and intraoperatively. Electrophysiologic data were evaluated with respect to their predictive value for postoperative facial nerve function. The relative percent decrease in amplitude of the electromyogram after resection compared to that observed before resection seems to be of some predictive value for the postoperative facial nerve function. A 50 to 60% decrease or more is associated with an increase in the House classification. Intraoperative monitoring is a useful tool in skull base surgery, allowing for safer and faster identification of motor nerves in pathologic-anatomic conditions. It allows the surgeon a degree of comfort by providing immediate information regarding the status of the nerve. It may also improve postoperative nerve function and shorten operating time. Additionally, neuromonitoring provides some information about expected postoperative facial nerve function.

  16. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness profiles associated with ocular laterality and dominance.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin A; Kim, Jung-Sub; Park, Hae-Young Lopilly; Park, Hana; Park, Chan Kee

    2014-01-13

    Although human anatomy is arranged symmetrically based on a central vertical axis, the majority of persons will use one side of their body more readily than the other. Interestingly, these lateral body dominances including ocular dominance are all rightward. The asymmetry in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness between the right and left eyes in healthy subjects has been reported in several studies, and the reason for this structural difference between right and left eyes is unclear. In the manuscript, we hypothesized that the characteristics of ocular dominance are reflected in the RNFL profile and may be related to inter-ocular structural differences between right and left eyes. In this study, ocular dominance occurred mostly in right eyes (right vs. left: 78.77% vs. 21.22%; P<0.001). According to ocular dominance and laterality, different relationships between the inferior and superior RNFLs were observed. The right eyes had a thicker RNFL, except in the superior quadrant, than the left eyes. Regardless of laterality, inferior RNFL was thicker than superior RNFL in the dominant eyes. To our knowledge, this paper is the first report demonstrating the RNFL characteristics associated with ocular dominance.

  17. Rapid motor learning in the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Wu; Weldon, Patrick; Tang, Bingfeng; King, W. M.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Motor learning was induced in the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (TVOR) when monkeys were repeatedly subjected to a brief (0.5 sec) head translation while they tried to maintain binocular fixation on a visual target for juice rewards. If the target was world-fixed, the initial eye speed of the TVOR gradually increased; if the target was head-fixed, the initial eye speed of the TVOR gradually decreased. The rate of learning acquisition was very rapid, with a time constant of approximately 100 trials, which was equivalent to <1 min of accumulated stimulation. These learned changes were consolidated over >or=1 d without any reinforcement, indicating induction of long-term synaptic plasticity. Although the learning generalized to targets with different viewing distances and to head translations with different accelerations, it was highly specific for the particular combination of head motion and evoked eye movement associated with the training. For example, it was specific to the modality of the stimulus (translation vs rotation) and the direction of the evoked eye movement in the training. Furthermore, when one eye was aligned with the heading direction so that it remained motionless during training, learning was not expressed in this eye, but only in the other nonaligned eye. These specificities show that the learning sites are neither in the sensory nor the motor limb of the reflex but in the sensory-motor transformation stage of the reflex. The dependence of the learning on both head motion and evoked eye movement suggests that Hebbian learning may be one of the underlying cellular mechanisms.

  18. [Motor nerve hyperexcitability in ALS: its pathophysiology and treatment].

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Kazumoto; Misawa, Sonoko; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Wide-spread fasciculations are prominent clinical features in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), specifically seen in ALS among disorders with neurogenic muscle atrophy. Fasciculations frequently arise from the motor nerve terminals, and the hyperexcitability of motor axons appears to constitute the pathophysiology of the disease. Neurophysiologic investigations of the upper and lower motor neurons/axons have shown increased excitability. The altered excitability is supposed to relate to motor neuron death. Based on these findings, a clinical trial of mexiletine (non-selective sodium channel blocker) is ongoing. PMID:25672715

  19. Changes in ocular aquaporin expression following optic nerve crush

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Hidehiro; Fukuhara, Masayuki; Kurimoto, Takuji; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Patil, Rajkumar V.; Sharif, Najam A.; Yorio, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Changes in the expression of water channels (aquaporins; AQP) have been reported in several diseases. However, such changes and mechanisms remain to be evaluated for retinal injury after optic nerve crush (ONC). This study was designed to analyze changes in the expression of AQP4 (water selective channel) and AQP9 (water and lactate channel) following ONC in the rat. Methods Rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were retrogradely labeled by applying FluoroGold onto the left superior colliculus 1 week before ONC. Retinal injuries were induced by ONC unilaterally. Real-time PCR was used to measure changes in AQP4, AQP9, thy-1, Kir4.1 (K+ channel), and β-actin messages. Changes in AQP4, AQP9, Kir4.1, B cell lymphoma-x (bcl-xl), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression were measured in total retinal extracts using western blotting. Results The number of RGCs labeled retrogradely from the superior colliculus was 2,090±85 cells/mm2 in rats without any treatment, which decreased to 1,091±78 (47% loss) and 497±87 cells/mm2 (76% loss) on days 7 and 14, respectively. AQP4, Kir4.1, and thy-1 protein levels decreased at days 2, 7, and 14, which paralleled a similar reduction in mRNA levels, with the exception of Kir4.1 mRNA at day 2 showing an apparent upregulation. In contrast, AQP9 mRNA and protein levels showed opposite changes to those observed for the latter targets. Whereas AQP9 mRNA increased at days 2 and 14, protein levels decreased at both time points. AQP9 mRNA decreased at day 7, while protein levels increased. GFAP (a marker of astrogliosis) remained upregulated at days 2, 7, and 14, while bcl-xl (anti-apoptotic) decreased. Conclusions The reduced expression of AQP4 and Kir4.1 suggests dysfunctional ion coupling in retina following ONC and likely impaired retinal function. The sustained increase in GFAP indicates astrogliosis, while the decreased bcl-xl protein level suggests a commitment to cellular death, as clearly shown by the reduction in

  20. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities in Yucatan minipigs.

    PubMed

    Hort-Legrand, C; Noah, L; Mériguet, E; Mésangeau, D

    2006-01-01

    Motor and/or sensory conduction velocities are used to assess peripheral nervous system disorders. Although the miniature pig represents a model of choice for long-term pharmacological experimentation, no study has so far been reported on this model in relation to the measurement of nerve conduction velocities. We developed the present technique and applied it to 34 3-18-month-old Yucatan minipigs. Motor and sensory conduction velocities were measured using the anterior tibial nerve and the internal plantar nerve, a branch of the posterior tibial nerve, respectively. The nerve conduction velocity data of motor (MNCV) and sensory (SNCV) nerves, together with the amplitude of the sensory nerve signal, were logarithmically dependent on the age of the tested animals (r(2)=0.92, 0.81 and 0.76, respectively). The mean values of MNCV and SNCV were 70.9 +/- 1.1 and 67.9 +/- 0.2 m/s, respectively, at the age of 16 months for these miniature pigs. In order to validate this model, we compared it with other known models when the velocities reached a plateau at the end of the study. These values were found to be higher than those in humans or rats, but are comparable to those of the baboon, one of the best large animal models for human pathologies. Because the physiology and metabolism of the minipig resemble those of humans, and due to its long lifetime, this animal represents a good model for studying the development of neuropathology.

  1. Ocular Motor Indicators of Executive Dysfunction in Fragile X and Turner Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasker, Adrian G.; Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Zee, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Fragile X and Turner syndromes are two X-chromosome-related disorders associated with executive function and visual spatial deficits. In the present study, we used ocular motor paradigms to examine evidence that disruption to different neurological pathways underlies these deficits. We tested 17 females with fragile X, 19 females with Turner…

  2. Reversal of Motor Learning in the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in the Absence of Visual Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Marlene R.; Meissner, Geoffrey W.; Schafer, Robert J.; Raymond, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    Motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and eyeblink conditioning use similar neural circuitry, and they may use similar cellular plasticity mechanisms. Classically conditioned eyeblink responses undergo extinction after prolonged exposure to the conditioned stimulus in the absence of the unconditioned stimulus. We investigated the…

  3. Central ocular motor abnormalities in Duane's retraction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gourdeau, A; Miller, N; Zee, D; Morris, J

    1981-10-01

    Duane's retraction syndrome (DRS) is a congenital eye movement disorder characterized by marked limitation or absence of abduction, variable limitation of adduction, and narrowing of the palpebral fissure with retraction of the globe on attempted adduction. We have recently recorded and quantitated ocular motility in five patients with unilateral DRS. In all patients, abduction of the affected eye was greatly limited, whereas adduction was limited, whereas adduction was limited to a lesser degree. Abnormalities in saccadic velocities were found in both the affected eye and the sound eye. Results of testing of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, optokinetic nystagmus, and optokinetic afternystagmus showed notable asymmetry. Our results suggest that DRS is produced by a primary brainstem abnormality involving premotor structures.

  4. Adaptability of the Immature Ocular Motor Control System: Unilateral IGF-1 Medial Rectus Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Christy L.; Fleuriet, Jérome; Walton, Mark M.; Mustari, Michael J.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Unilateral treatment with sustained release IGF-1 to one medial rectus muscle in infant monkeys was performed to test the hypothesis that strabismus would develop as a result of changes in extraocular muscles during the critical period of development of binocularity. Methods. Sustained release IGF-1 pellets were implanted unilaterally on one medial rectus muscle in normal infant monkeys during the first 2 weeks of life. Eye position was monitored using standard photographic methods. After 3 months of treatment, myofiber and neuromuscular size, myosin composition, and innervation density were quantified in all rectus muscles and compared to those in age-matched controls. Results. Sustained unilateral IGF-1 treatments resulted in strabismus for all treated subjects; 3 of the 4 subjects had a clinically significant strabismus of more than 10°. Both the treated medial rectus and the untreated ipsilateral antagonist lateral rectus muscles had significantly larger myofibers. No adaptation in myofiber size occurred in the contralateral functionally yoked lateral rectus or in myosin composition, neuromuscular junction size, or nerve density. Conclusions. Sustained unilateral IGF-1 treatment to extraocular muscles during the sensitive period of development of orthotropic eye alignment and binocularity was sufficient to disturb ocular motor development, resulting in strabismus in infant monkeys. This could be due to altering fusion of gaze during the early sensitive period. Serial measurements of eye alignment suggested the IGF-1-treated infants received insufficient coordinated binocular experience, preventing the establishment of normal eye alignment. Our results uniquely suggest that abnormal signaling by the extraocular muscles may be a cause of strabismus. PMID:26030103

  5. Ocular, Neurologic and Systemic Findings of the Cases with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Eyyup; Tulin Berk, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To describe the associated ocular, neurologic, and systemic findings in a population of children with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) and to evaluate the relationship between ocular signs and neurologic findings. Method: A retrospective chart review of 53 patients with the diagnosis of ONH seen between December 1998 and September 2012 was performed. All neurodevelopmental anomalies, neuroradiologic findings, endocrinologic and systemic findings were recorded. Poor vision was defined as the visual acuity poorer than logMAR 1.0 or inadequate central steady maintained fixation. Results: Thirty (56.6%) of the 53 children with ONH were boys. Mean age at presentation was 56.2±46.8 months (range; 3 months to 18 years). Poor vision defined for the purpose of this study was found in 47.2% of 53 patients. Thirty-three (62.3%) children had nystagmus. Thirty-four (64.2%) children had strabismus. Thirteen (38.2%) of those with strabismus had esotropia, 20 (58.8%) had exotropia. The total number of the children with neurodevelopmental deficit was 22 (41.5%) in our study. Conclusion: The vision of young children with ONH should be monitored at least annually, and any refractive errors should be treated. Neuroimaging of the brain and endocrinologic evaluation is necessary in all cases with ONH. PMID:27014380

  6. [Motor nerves of the face. Surgical and radiologic anatomy of facial paralysis and their surgical repair].

    PubMed

    Vacher, C; Cyna-Gorse, F

    2015-10-01

    Motor innervation of the face depends on the facial nerve for the mobility of the face, on the mandibular nerve, third branch of the trigeminal nerve, which gives the motor innervation of the masticator muscles, and the hypoglossal nerve for the tongue. In case of facial paralysis, the most common palliative surgical techniques are the lengthening temporalis myoplasty (the temporal is innervated by the mandibular nerve) and the hypoglossal-facial anastomosis. The aim of this work is to describe the surgical anatomy of these three nerves and the radiologic anatomy of the facial nerve inside the temporal bone. Then the facial nerve penetrates inside the parotid gland giving a plexus. Four branches of the facial nerve leave the parotid gland: they are called temporal, zygomatic, buccal and marginal which give innervation to the cutaneous muscles of the face. Mandibular nerve gives three branches to the temporal muscles: the anterior, intermediate and posterior deep temporal nerves which penetrate inside the deep aspect of the temporal muscle in front of the infratemporal line. The hypoglossal nerve is only the motor nerve to the tongue. The ansa cervicalis, which is coming from the superficial cervical plexus and joins the hypoglossal nerve in the submandibular area is giving the motor innervation to subhyoid muscles and to the geniohyoid muscle.

  7. Role of the flocculus of the cerebellum in motor learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Highstein, S M

    1998-09-01

    Structure-function studies at the systems level are an effective method for understanding the relationship of the central nervous system to behavior. Motor learning or adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex is a clear example wherein this approach has been productive. During a vestibulo-ocular reflex the brain converts a head velocity signal, transduced through the vestibular semicircular canals, into an eye movement command delivered to the extraocular muscles. If the viewed target remains on the fovea of the retina, the reflex is compensatory, and its gain, eye velocity/head velocity, is one. When the image of the viewed object slips across the retina, visual acuity decreases, and the gain of the reflex, which is no longer one, is plastically adapted or adjusted until retinal stability is restored. The anatomic substrate for this plasticity thus involves brain structures in which visual-vestibular interaction can potentially occur, as well as vestibular and visual sensory and oculomotor motor structures. Further, it has been known for many years that removal of the flocculus of the cerebellum permanently precludes further vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation, demonstrating the involvement of the cerebellum in this behavior. Maekawa and Simpson (J Neurophysiol 1973;36: 649-66) discovered that one visual input to the flocculus involved the accessory optic system and the inferior olive. Ensuing work has demonstrated that the visual signals used to adapt the vestibulo-ocular reflex are transmitted by this accessory optic system to the flocculus and subsequently to brain stem structures involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex plasticity. Presently the inclusive list of anatomic sites involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex circuitry and its adaptive plasticity is small. Our laboratory continues to believe that this behavior should be caused by interactions within this small class of neurons. By studying each class of identified neuron and its interactions with others within

  8. Role of the flocculus of the cerebellum in motor learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highstein, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    Structure-function studies at the systems level are an effective method for understanding the relationship of the central nervous system to behavior. Motor learning or adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex is a clear example wherein this approach has been productive. During a vestibulo-ocular reflex the brain converts a head velocity signal, transduced through the vestibular semicircular canals, into an eye movement command delivered to the extraocular muscles. If the viewed target remains on the fovea of the retina, the reflex is compensatory, and its gain, eye velocity/head velocity, is one. When the image of the viewed object slips across the retina, visual acuity decreases, and the gain of the reflex, which is no longer one, is plastically adapted or adjusted until retinal stability is restored. The anatomic substrate for this plasticity thus involves brain structures in which visual-vestibular interaction can potentially occur, as well as vestibular and visual sensory and oculomotor motor structures. Further, it has been known for many years that removal of the flocculus of the cerebellum permanently precludes further vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation, demonstrating the involvement of the cerebellum in this behavior. Maekawa and Simpson (J Neurophysiol 1973;36: 649-66) discovered that one visual input to the flocculus involved the accessory optic system and the inferior olive. Ensuing work has demonstrated that the visual signals used to adapt the vestibulo-ocular reflex are transmitted by this accessory optic system to the flocculus and subsequently to brain stem structures involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex plasticity. Presently the inclusive list of anatomic sites involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex circuitry and its adaptive plasticity is small. Our laboratory continues to believe that this behavior should be caused by interactions within this small class of neurons. By studying each class of identified neuron and its interactions with others within

  9. Collateral development and spinal motor reorganization after nerve injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Youlai; Zhang, Peixun; Han, Na; Kou, Yuhui; Yin, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery is often unsatisfactory after severe extended nerve defects or proximal nerve trunks injuries repaired by traditional repair methods, as the long regeneration distance for the regenerated axons to reinnervate their original target end-organs. The proximal nerve stump can regenerate with many collaterals that reinnervate the distal stump after peripheral nerve injury, it may be possible to use nearby fewer nerve fibers to repair more nerve fibers at the distal end to shorten the regenerating distance. In this study, the proximal peroneal nerve was used to repair both the distal peroneal and tibial nerve. The number and location of motor neurons in spinal cord as well as functional and morphological recovery were assessed at 2 months, 4 months and 8 months after nerve repair, respectively. Projections from the intact peroneal and tibial nerves were also studied in normal animals. The changes of motor neurons were assessed using the retrograde neurotracers FG and DiI to backlabel motor neurons that regenerate axons into two different pathways. To evaluate the functional recovery, the muscle forces and sciatic function index were examined. The muscles and myelinated axons were assessed using electrophysiology and histology. The results showed that all labeled motor neurons after nerve repair were always confined within the normal peroneal nerve pool and nearly all the distribution of motor neurons labeled via distal different nerves was disorganized as compared to normal group. However, there was a significant decline in the number of double labeled motor neurons and an obvious improvement with respect to the functional and morphological recovery between 2 and 8 months. In addition, the tibial/peroneal motor neuron number ratio at different times was 2.11±0.05, 2.13±0.08, 2.09±0.12, respectively, and was close to normal group (2.21±0.09). Quantitative analysis showed no significant morphological differences between myelinated nerve fibers

  10. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  11. [Intraoperative monitoring of motor cranial nerves in operations of the neck and cranial base].

    PubMed

    Maurer, J; Pelster, H; Mann, W

    1994-11-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerves is performed to minimize postoperative cranial nerve dysfunction. We performed electrophysiological monitoring of motor cranial nerves with a NIM 2 unit from Xomed Treace and a patient multiplexer developed in our clinic. This multiplexer allows simultaneous monitoring of 4 cranial nerves and is additionally equipped with a bipolar stimulation mode. This intraoperative monitoring was employed during 102 skull base operations. Of these 102 operations, 44 were acoustic neuroma removals by translabyrinthine approach and 36 by a middle fossa approach. Various operations including removal of tumours of the jugular foramen and the infratemporal fossa were performed in the remaining 22 patients. The facial nerve, being the most frequently monitored nerve, was evaluated both pre- and intraoperatively. Electrophysiologic data were evaluated with respect to their predictive value for postoperative facial nerve function. The relative per cent decrease in amplitude of the EMG after resection compared to that observed before resection seems to be of some predictive value for postoperative facial nerve function. A 50-60% decrease or more is associated with an increase in the House classification. Intraoperative monitoring is a useful tool in skull base surgery allowing for safer and faster identification of motor nerves in pathologic anatomic conditions. It allows the surgeon a degree of comfort by providing immediate information regarding the status of the nerve. It may also improve post-operative nerve function and shorten operating time. Additionally, neuromonitoring provides some information about expected postoperative facial nerve function.

  12. Identification of Changes in Gene expression of rats after Sensory and Motor Nerves Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lu, Shi-Bi; Xu, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is a sequence of events in the distal stump of axotomized nerves. Despite large numbers of researches concentrating on WD, the biological mechanism still remains unclear. Hence we constructed a rat model with both motor and sensory nerves injury and then conducted a RNA-seq analysis. Here the rats were divided into the 4 following groups: normal motor nerves (NMN), injured motor nerves (IMN), normal sensory nerves (NSN) and injured sensory nerves (ISN). The transcriptomes of rats were sequenced by the Illumina HiSeq. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of 4 combinations including NMN vs. IMN, NSN vs. ISN, NMN vs. NSN and IMN vs. ISN were identified respectively. For the above 4 combinations, we identified 1666, 1514, 95 and 17 DEGs. We found that NMN vs. IMN shared the most common genes with NSN vs. ISN indicating common mechanisms between motor nerves injury and sensory nerves injury. At last, we performed an enrichment analysis and observed that the DEGs of NMN vs IMN and NSN vs. ISN were significantly associated with binding and activity, immune response, biosynthesis, metabolism and development. We hope our study may shed light on the molecular mechanisms of nerves degeneration and regeneration during WD.

  13. Identification of Changes in Gene expression of rats after Sensory and Motor Nerves Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lu, Shi-Bi; Xu, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is a sequence of events in the distal stump of axotomized nerves. Despite large numbers of researches concentrating on WD, the biological mechanism still remains unclear. Hence we constructed a rat model with both motor and sensory nerves injury and then conducted a RNA-seq analysis. Here the rats were divided into the 4 following groups: normal motor nerves (NMN), injured motor nerves (IMN), normal sensory nerves (NSN) and injured sensory nerves (ISN). The transcriptomes of rats were sequenced by the Illumina HiSeq. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of 4 combinations including NMN vs. IMN, NSN vs. ISN, NMN vs. NSN and IMN vs. ISN were identified respectively. For the above 4 combinations, we identified 1666, 1514, 95 and 17 DEGs. We found that NMN vs. IMN shared the most common genes with NSN vs. ISN indicating common mechanisms between motor nerves injury and sensory nerves injury. At last, we performed an enrichment analysis and observed that the DEGs of NMN vs IMN and NSN vs. ISN were significantly associated with binding and activity, immune response, biosynthesis, metabolism and development. We hope our study may shed light on the molecular mechanisms of nerves degeneration and regeneration during WD. PMID:27253193

  14. Peripheral nerve conduction and central motor conduction after magnetic stimulation of the brain in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Cruz Martínez, A

    1992-06-01

    Central motor conduction time was calculated after magnetic stimulation of the brain in 15 patients with myotonic dystrophy and in 38 healthy voluntaries of the same age. Conventional electromyography and motor and sensory conduction velocities were also performed. Central motor conduction time from vertex to C8 was within the normal range in all patients whereas motor conduction velocity of the peripheral nerve and amplitude of the nerve evoked potentials were slightly reduced in 3 and 2 cases respectively, supporting peripheral nerve involvement in some subjects. Our results suggest that the reported central nervous system involvement in myotonic dystrophy, including the nonspecific white matter lesions showed by magnetic resonance imaging, would not affect the conduction of the corticospinal tracts. Magnetic stimulation on the motor cortex is a painless method to study the central nervous system and apports a satisfactory approximation to central motor pathways conduction.

  15. Facial nerve dysfunction in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I and III.

    PubMed

    Glocker, F X; Rösler, K M; Linden, D; Heinen, F; Hess, C W; Lücking, C H

    1999-09-01

    Facial nerve function was studied in 19 patients with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I (HMSN I) and 2 patients with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSN III, Déjérine-Sottas), and compared to that in 24 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). The facial nerve was stimulated electrically at the stylomastoid fossa, and magnetically in its proximal intracanalicular segment. Additionally, the face-associated motor cortex was stimulated magnetically. The facial nerve motor neurography was abnormal in 17 of 19 HMSN I patients and in both HMSN III patients, revealing moderate to marked conduction slowing in both the extracranial and intracranial nerve segments, along with variable reductions of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes. The facial nerve conduction slowing paralleled that of limb nerves, but was not associated with clinical dysfunction of facial muscles, because none of the HMSN I patients had facial palsy. Conduction slowing was most severe in the HMSN III patients, but only slight facial weakness was present. In GBS, conduction slowing was less marked, but facial weakness exceeded that in HMSN patients in all cases. We conclude that involvement of the facial nerve is common in HMSN I and HMSN III. It affects the intra- and extracranial part of the facial nerve and is mostly subclinical. PMID:10454715

  16. Transient isolated ocular motor abnormality related to perilesional edema of an acute medullary microbleed: A case report and review of the literatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Jin; Lee, Jee-Young; Lim, Jae-Sung; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Lee, Yong-Seok

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of transient isolated gaze-evoked nystagmus with ocular lateropulsion in a patient with an acute medullary microbleed which was detected by brain magnetic resonance imaging. Considering the correlation between the neural structures involved by the lesion and the ocular motor symptoms of this patient, we suggest that the perilesional edema of the acute medullary microbleed is responsible for this transient ocular motor abnormality.

  17. The effects of general anaesthesia on nerve-motor response characteristics (rheobase and chronaxie) to peripheral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B C

    2014-04-01

    Using a simple surface nerve stimulation system, I examined the effects of general anaesthesia on rheobase (the minimum current required to stimulate nerve activity) and chronaxie (the minimum time for a stimulus twice the rheobase to elicit nerve activity). Nerve stimulation was used to elicit a motor response from the ulnar nerve at varying pulse widths before and after induction of general anaesthesia. Mean (SD) rheobase before and after general anaesthesia was 0.91 (0.37) mA (95% CI 0.77-1.04 mA) and 1.11 (0.53) mA (95% CI 0.92-1.30 mA), respectively. Mean (SD) chronaxie measured before and after general anaesthesia was 0.32 (0.17) ms (95% CI 0.26-0.38 ms) and 0.29 (0.13) ms (95% CI 0.24-0.33 ms), respectively. Under anaesthesia, rheobase values increased by an average of 20% (p = 0.05), but chronaxie values did not change significantly (p = 0.39). These results suggest that threshold currents used for motor response from nerve stimulation under general anaesthesia might be higher than those used in awake patients.

  18. Effects of lead acetate on guinea pig - cochear microphonics, action potential, and motor nerve conduction velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, K.; Maehara, N.; Terayama, K.; Ueno, N.; Kohyama, A.; Sawada, Y.; Kishi, R.

    1987-04-01

    Segmental demyelination and axonal degeneration of motor nerves induced by lead exposure is well known in man, and animals. The effect of lead acetate exposure to man may involve the cranial nerves, since vertigo and sensory neuronal deafness have been reported among lead workers. However, there are few reports concerning the dose-effects of lead acetate both to the peripheral nerve and the cranial VII nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration. The authors investigated the effects of lead acetate to the cochlea and the VIII nerve using CM (cochlear microphonics) and AP (action potential) of the guinea pigs. The effects of lead acetate to the sciatic nerve were measured by MCV of the sciatic nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration.

  19. Single motor unit activity in human extraocular muscles during the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Weber, Konrad P; Rosengren, Sally M; Michels, Rike; Sturm, Veit; Straumann, Dominik; Landau, Klara

    2012-07-01

    Motor unit activity in human eye muscles during the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is not well understood, since the associated head and eye movements normally preclude single unit recordings. Therefore we recorded single motor unit activity following bursts of skull vibration and sound, two vestibular otolith stimuli that elicit only small head and eye movements. Inferior oblique (IO) and inferior rectus (IR) muscle activity was measured in healthy humans with concentric needle electrodes. Vibration elicited highly synchronous, short-latency bursts of motor unit activity in the IO (latency: 10.5 ms) and IR (14.5 ms) muscles. The activation patterns of the two muscles were similar, but reciprocal, with delayed activation of the IR muscle. Sound produced short-latency excitation of the IO muscle (13.3 ms) in the eye contralateral to the stimulus. Simultaneous needle and surface recordings identified the IO as the muscle of origin of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) thus validating the physiological basis of this recently developed clinical test of otolith function. Single extraocular motor unit recordings provide a window into neural activity in humans that can normally only be examined using animal models and help identify the pathways of the translational VOR from otoliths to individual eye muscles.

  20. Spike removal through multiscale wavelet and entropy analysis of ocular motor noise: a case study in patients with cerebellar disease.

    PubMed

    Veneri, Giacomo; Federighi, Pamela; Rosini, Francesca; Federico, Antonio; Rufa, Alessandra

    2011-03-30

    Wavelet decomposition of ocular motor signals was investigated with a view to its use for noise analysis and filtering. Ocular motor noise may be physiological, depending on brain activities, or experimental, depending on the eye recording machine, head movements and blinks. Experimental noise, such as spikes, must be removed, preserving noise due to neuro-physiological activities. The proposed method uses wavelet multiscale decomposition to remove spikes and optimizes the procedure by means of the covariance of the eye signals. To measure the noise on eye motor control, we used the wavelet entropy. The method was tested on patients with cerebellar disorders and healthy subjects. A significant difference in wavelet entropy was observed, indicating this quantity as a valuable measure of physiological motor noise.

  1. Supplementary motor area deactivation impacts the recovery of hand function from severe peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye-Chen; Liu, Han-Qiu; Hua, Xu-Yun; Shen, Yun-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Although some patients have successful peripheral nerve regeneration, a poor recovery of hand function often occurs after peripheral nerve injury. It is believed that the capability of brain plasticity is crucial for the recovery of hand function. The supplementary motor area may play a key role in brain remodeling after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, we explored the activation mode of the supplementary motor area during a motor imagery task. We investigated the plasticity of the central nervous system after brachial plexus injury, using the motor imagery task. Results from functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that after brachial plexus injury, the motor imagery task for the affected limbs of the patients triggered no obvious activation of bilateral supplementary motor areas. This result indicates that it is difficult to excite the supplementary motor areas of brachial plexus injury patients during a motor imagery task, thereby impacting brain remodeling. Deactivation of the supplementary motor area is likely to be a serious problem for brachial plexus injury patients in terms of preparing, initiating and executing certain movements, which may be partly responsible for the unsatisfactory clinical recovery of hand function. PMID:27212933

  2. Ocular motor characteristics of different subtypes of spinocerebellar ataxia: distinguishing features.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, Ji Soo; Youn, Jinyoung; Seo, Dae-Won; Jeong, Yuri; Kang, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeong Ho; Cho, Jin Whan

    2013-08-01

    Because of frequent involvement of the cerebellum and brainstem, ocular motor abnormalities are key features of spinocerebellar ataxias and may aid in differential diagnosis. Our objective for this study was to distinguish the subtypes by ophthalmologic features after head-shaking and positional maneuvers, which are not yet recognized as differential diagnostic tools in most common forms of spinocerebellar ataxias. Of the 302 patients with a diagnosis of cerebellar ataxia in 3 Korean University Hospitals from June 2011 to June 2012, 48 patients with spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, or 8 or with undetermined spinocerebellar ataxias were enrolled. All patients underwent a video-oculographic recording of fixation abnormalities, gaze-evoked nystagmus, positional and head-shaking nystagmus, and dysmetric saccades. Logistic regression analysis controlling for disease duration revealed that spontaneous and positional downbeat nystagmus and perverted head-shaking nystagmus were strong predictors for spinocerebellar ataxia 6, whereas saccadic intrusions and oscillations were identified as positive indicators of spinocerebellar ataxia 3. In contrast, the presence of gaze-evoked nystagmus and dysmetric saccades was a negative predictor of spinocerebellar ataxia 2. Positional maneuvers and horizontal head shaking occasionally induced or augmented saccadic intrusions/oscillations in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 2, and 3 and undetermined spinocerebellar ataxia. The results indicated that perverted head-shaking nystagmus may be the most sensitive parameter for SCA6, whereas saccadic intrusions/oscillations are the most sensitive for spinocerebellar ataxia 3. In contrast, a paucity of gaze-evoked nystagmus and dysmetric saccades is more indicative of spinocerebellar ataxia 2. Head-shaking and positional maneuvers aid in defining ocular motor characteristics in spinocerebellar ataxias. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  3. Identification of the sensory and motor fascicles in the peripheral nerve: A historical review and recent progress.

    PubMed

    Xianyu, Meng; Zhenggang, Bi; Laijin, Lu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to critically review the clinical approach to distinguish the sensory and motor nerve fascicles of the peripheral nerve system and to explore potential novel techniques to meet the clinical needs. The principles and shortcomings of the currently used methods for identification of sensory and motor nerve fascicles, including nerve morphology, electrical stimulation, spectroscopy, enzymohistochemistry staining (acetylcholinesterase [AchE], carbonic anhydrase [CA] and choline acetyltransferase [ChAC] histochemistry staining methods), and immunochemical staining were systematically reviewed. The progress in diffusion tensor imaging, proteomic approaches, and quantum dots (QDs) assessment in clinical applications to identify sensory or motor fascicles has been discussed. Traditional methods such as physical and enzymohistochemical methods are not suitable for the precise differentiation of sensory and motor nerve fascicles. Immunohistochemical staining using AchE, CA, and ChAC is promising in differentiation of sensory and motor nerve fascicles. Diffusion tensor imaging can reflect morphological details of nerve fibers. Proteomics can reveal the dynamics of specific proteins discriminating sensory and motor fascicles. QDs, with their size-dependent optical properties, make them the ideal protein markers for identification of the sensory or motor nerves. Diffusion tensor imaging, proteomics and QDs-imaging will facilitate the clinical identification of motor and sensory nerve fascicles, help in improving surgical success rates and assist in postoperative functional recovery. PMID:27625224

  4. Repetitive nerve stimulation transiently opens the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in motor nerve terminals of symptomatic mutant SOD1 mice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khanh T; Barrett, John N; García-Chacón, Luis; David, Gavriel; Barrett, Ellen F

    2011-06-01

    Mitochondria in motor nerve terminals temporarily sequester large Ca(2+) loads during repetitive stimulation. In wild-type mice this Ca(2+) uptake produces a small (<5 mV), transient depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψ(m), motor nerve stimulated at 100 Hz for 5s). We demonstrate that this stimulation-induced Ψ(m) depolarization attains much higher amplitudes in motor terminals of symptomatic mice expressing the G93A or G85R mutation of human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), models of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). These large Ψ(m) depolarizations decayed slowly and incremented with successive stimulus trains. Additional Ψ(m) depolarizations occurred that were not synchronized with stimulation. These large Ψ(m) depolarizations were reduced (a) by cyclosporin A (CsA, 1-2 μM), which inhibits opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), or (b) by replacing bath Ca(2+) with Sr(2+), which enters motor terminals and mitochondria but does not support mPTP opening. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the large Ψ(m) depolarizations evoked by repetitive stimulation in motor terminals of symptomatic fALS mice result from mitochondrial dysfunction that increases the likelihood of transient mPTP opening during Ca(2+) influx. Such mPTP openings, a sign of mitochondrial stress, would disrupt motor terminal handling of Ca(2+) loads and might thereby contribute to motor terminal degeneration in fALS mice. Ψ(m) depolarizations resembling those in symptomatic fALS mice could be elicited in wild-type mice following a 0.5-1h exposure to diamide (200 μM), which produces an oxidative stress, but these depolarizations were not reduced by CsA. PMID:21310237

  5. Variations in the motor nerve supply of the thenar and hypothenar muscles of the hand.

    PubMed Central

    Ajmani, M L

    1996-01-01

    The distribution pattern of the muscular branch of median and ulnar nerves and motor innervation of the thenar and hypothenar muscles were studied in 68 palmar regions taken from 34 adult cadavers of both sexes aged 40 to 70 y. The structure of the flexor pollicis brevis was examined in all 68 hands. In 13 of the 68 hands an anastomosis was seen between the ulnar and median nerves. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8771405

  6. Wallerian Degeneration and Recovery of Motor Nerves after Multiple Focused Cold Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Michael; Stevenson, Fang F

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A device has been developed to apply freezing temperatures to temporarily impede nerve conduction, resulting in inhibition of voluntary skeletal muscle contraction. This device was designed as an alternative to the neurotoxins usually used to treat movement disorders. Methods: We evaluated the effects of single and 3 repeat treatments with a cryoprobe device (−55°C) on a sciatic nerve rat model. Long-term effects of repeated treatment were evaluated through assessments of physiological function and histological analysis. Results: There was consistent weakening of physiological function after each treatment, with recovery of normal function by 8 weeks posttreatment. Histological findings showed axonal degeneration with no disruption to the epineurial or perineurial structures. Progressive axonal regeneration was followed by normal recovery by 24 weeks post-treatment. Conclusions: Low-temperature treatment of motor nerves did not result in permanent or long-term changes to nerve function or structure. Muscle Nerve 51: 268–275, 2015 PMID:24895229

  7. Foreign body in ocular coats causing a pseudo optic nerve head shadow.

    PubMed

    Takkar, Brijesh; Kumar, Vinod; Agrawal, Renu; Ravani, Raghav; Azad, Shorya

    2015-01-01

    Small intraocular foreign body in the outer coats of the eye may be wrongly interpreted as optic nerve head on ultrasound imaging. Such errors can be avoided by performing multiple sonography scans in different axes.

  8. Interest of Electrostimulation of Peripheral Motor Nerves during Percutaneous Thermal Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia Garnon, Julien Ramamurthy, Nitin Buy, Xavier Gangi, Afshin

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: We present our experience of utilizing peripheral nerve electrostimulation as a complementary monitoring technique during percutaneous thermal ablation procedures; and we highlight its utility and feasibility in the prevention of iatrogenic neurologic thermal injury. Methods: Peripheral motor nerve electrostimulation was performed in 12 patients undergoing percutaneous image-guided thermal ablations of spinal/pelvic lesions in close proximity to the spinal cord and nerve roots. Electrostimulation was used in addition to existing insulation (active warming/cooling with hydrodissection, passive insulation with CO{sub 2} insufflation) and temperature monitoring (thermocouples) techniques. Impending neurologic deficit was defined as a visual reduction of muscle response or need for a stronger electric current to evoke muscle contraction, compared with baseline. Results: Significant reduction of the muscle response to electrostimulation was observed in three patients during the ablation, necessitating temporary interruption, followed by injection of warm/cool saline. This resulted in complete recovery of the muscle response in two cases, while for the third patient the response did not improve and the procedure was terminated. No patient experienced postoperative motor deficit. Conclusion: Peripheral motor nerve electrostimulation is a simple, easily accessible technique allowing early detection of impending neurologic injury during percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation. It complements existing monitoring techniques and provides a functional assessment along the whole length of the nerve.

  9. Bioinformatic and statistical analysis of the optic nerve head in a primate model of ocular hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kompass, Kenneth S; Agapova, Olga A; Li, Wenjun; Kaufman, Paul L; Rasmussen, Carol A; Hernandez, M Rosario

    2008-01-01

    Background The nonhuman primate model of glaucomatous optic neuropathy most faithfully reproduces the human disease. We used high-density oligonucleotide arrays to investigate whole genome transcriptional changes occurring at the optic nerve head during primate experimental glaucoma. Results Laser scarification of the trabecular meshwork of cynomolgus macaques produced elevated intraocular pressure that was monitored over time and led to varying degrees of damage in different samples. The macaques were examined clinically before enucleation and the myelinated optic nerves were processed post-mortem to determine the degree of neuronal loss. Global gene expression was examined in dissected optic nerve heads with Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays. We validated a subset of differentially expressed genes using qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immuno-enriched astrocytes from healthy and glaucomatous human donors. These genes have previously defined roles in axonal outgrowth, immune response, cell motility, neuroprotection, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Conclusion Our findings show that glaucoma is associated with increased expression of genes that mediate axonal outgrowth, immune response, cell motility, neuroprotection, and ECM remodeling. These studies also reveal that, as glaucoma progresses, retinal ganglion cell axons may make a regenerative attempt to restore lost nerve cell contact. PMID:18822132

  10. Stimulus electrodiagnosis and motor and functional evaluations during ulnar nerve recovery

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Luciane F. R. M.; Oliveira, Nuno M. L.; Pelet, Danyelle C. S.; Cunha, Agnes F. S.; Grecco, Marco A. S.; Souza, Luciane A. P. S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Distal ulnar nerve injury leads to impairment of hand function due to motor and sensorial changes. Stimulus electrodiagnosis (SE) is a method of assessing and monitoring the development of this type of injury. OBJECTIVE: To identify the most sensitive electrodiagnostic parameters to evaluate ulnar nerve recovery and to correlate these parameters (Rheobase, Chronaxie, and Accommodation) with motor function evaluations. METHOD: A prospective cohort study of ten patients submitted to ulnar neurorrhaphy and evaluated using electrodiagnosis and motor assessment at two moments of neural recovery. A functional evaluation using the DASH questionnaire (Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) was conducted at the end to establish the functional status of the upper limb. RESULTS: There was significant reduction only in the Chronaxie values in relation to time of injury and side (with and without lesion), as well as significant correlation of Chronaxie with the motor domain score. CONCLUSION: Chronaxie was the most sensitive SE parameter for detecting differences in neuromuscular responses during the ulnar nerve recovery process and it was the only parameter correlated with the motor assessment. PMID:26786072

  11. Th17 Cell Response in SOD1G93A Mice following Motor Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Allen; Yang, Tao; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A.; Gutierrez, Rafael; Stubbs, Evan B.; McGuire, Susan O.; Sanders, Virginia M.; Jones, Kathryn J.; Foecking, Eileen M.; Xin, Junping

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of ALS has been reported for veterans, varsity athletes, and professional football players. The mechanism underlying the increased risk in these populations has not been identified; however, it has been proposed that motor nerve injury may trigger immune responses which, in turn, can accelerate the progression of ALS. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal immune reactions and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, but the specific immune cells involved have not been clearly defined. To understand how nerve injury and immune responses may contribute to ALS development, we investigated responses of CD4+ T cell after facial motor nerve axotomy (FNA) at a presymptomatic stage in a transgenic mouse model of ALS (B6SJL SOD1G93A). SOD1G93A mice, compared with WT mice, displayed an increase in the basal activation state of CD4+ T cells and higher frequency of Th17 cells, which were further enhanced by FNA. In conclusion, SOD1G93A mice exhibit abnormal CD4+ T cell activation with increased levels of Th17 cells prior to the onset of neurological symptoms. Motor nerve injury exacerbates Th17 cell responses and may contribute to the development of ALS, especially in those who carry genetic susceptibility to this disease. PMID:27194826

  12. Th17 Cell Response in SOD1G93A Mice following Motor Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ni, Allen; Yang, Tao; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A; Gutierrez, Rafael; Stubbs, Evan B; McGuire, Susan O; Sanders, Virginia M; Jones, Kathryn J; Foecking, Eileen M; Xin, Junping

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of ALS has been reported for veterans, varsity athletes, and professional football players. The mechanism underlying the increased risk in these populations has not been identified; however, it has been proposed that motor nerve injury may trigger immune responses which, in turn, can accelerate the progression of ALS. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal immune reactions and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, but the specific immune cells involved have not been clearly defined. To understand how nerve injury and immune responses may contribute to ALS development, we investigated responses of CD4(+) T cell after facial motor nerve axotomy (FNA) at a presymptomatic stage in a transgenic mouse model of ALS (B6SJL SOD1(G93A)). SOD1(G93A) mice, compared with WT mice, displayed an increase in the basal activation state of CD4(+) T cells and higher frequency of Th17 cells, which were further enhanced by FNA. In conclusion, SOD1(G93A) mice exhibit abnormal CD4(+) T cell activation with increased levels of Th17 cells prior to the onset of neurological symptoms. Motor nerve injury exacerbates Th17 cell responses and may contribute to the development of ALS, especially in those who carry genetic susceptibility to this disease.

  13. Accuracy of Motor Axon Regeneration Across Autograft, Single Lumen, and Multichannel Poly(lactic-co-glycolic Acid) (PLGA) Nerve Tubes

    PubMed Central

    de Ruiter, Godard C.; Spinner, Robert J.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Moore, Michael J.; Sorenson, Eric J.; Currier, Bradford L.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Accuracy of motor axon regeneration becomes an important issue in the development of a nerve tube for motor nerve repair. Dispersion of regeneration across the nerve tube may lead to misdirection and polyinnervation. In this study, we present a series of methods to investigate the accuracy of regeneration, which we used to compare regeneration across autografts and single lumen poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nerve tubes. We also present the concept of the multichannel nerve tube that may limit dispersion by separately guiding groups of regenerating axons. Methods Simultaneous tracing of the tibial and peroneal nerves with fast blue (FB) and diamidino yellow (DY), 8 weeks after repair of a 1-cm nerve gap in the rat sciatic nerve, was performed to determine the percentage of double-projecting motoneurons. Sequential tracing of the peroneal nerve with DY 1 week before and FB 8 weeks after repair was performed to determine the percentage of correctly directed peroneal motoneurons. Results In the cases in which there was successful regeneration across single lumen nerve tubes, more motoneurons had double projections to both the tibial and peroneal nerve branches after single lumen nerve tube repair (21.4%) than after autograft repair (5.9%). After multichannel nerve tube repair, this percentage was slightly reduced (16.9%), although not significantly. The direction of regeneration was nonspecific after all types of repair. Conclusion Retrograde tracing techniques provide new insights into the process of regeneration across nerve tubes. The methods and data presented in this study can be used as a basis in the development of a nerve tube for motor nerve repair. PMID:18728579

  14. Long-Standing Motor and Sensory Recovery following Acute Fibrin Sealant Based Neonatal Sciatic Nerve Repair.

    PubMed

    Perussi Biscola, Natalia; Politti Cartarozzi, Luciana; Ferreira Junior, Rui Seabra; Barraviera, Benedito; Leite Rodrigues de Oliveira, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Brachial plexus lesion results in loss of motor and sensory function, being more harmful in the neonate. Therefore, this study evaluated neuroprotection and regeneration after neonatal peripheral nerve coaptation with fibrin sealant. Thus, P2 neonatal Lewis rats were divided into three groups: AX: sciatic nerve axotomy (SNA) without treatment; AX+FS: SNA followed by end-to-end coaptation with fibrin sealant derived from snake venom; AX+CFS: SNA followed by end-to-end coaptation with commercial fibrin sealant. Results were analyzed 4, 8, and 12 weeks after lesion. Astrogliosis, microglial reaction, and synapse preservation were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and ultrastructural changes at ventral spinal cord were also investigated. Sensory-motor recovery was behaviorally studied. Coaptation preserved synaptic covering on lesioned motoneurons and led to neuronal survival. Reactive gliosis and microglial reaction decreased in the same groups (AX+FS, AX+CFS) at 4 weeks. Regarding axonal regeneration, coaptation allowed recovery of greater number of myelinated fibers, with improved morphometric parameters. Preservation of inhibitory synaptic terminals was accompanied by significant improvement in the motor as well as in the nociceptive recovery. Overall, the present data suggest that acute repair of neonatal peripheral nerves with fibrin sealant results in neuroprotection and regeneration of motor and sensory axons. PMID:27446617

  15. Upslope treadmill exercise enhances motor axon regeneration but not functional recovery following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Cannoy, Jill; Crowley, Sam; Jarratt, Allen; Werts, Kelly LeFevere; Osborne, Krista; Park, Sohee; English, Arthur W

    2016-09-01

    Following peripheral nerve injury, moderate daily exercise conducted on a level treadmill results in enhanced axon regeneration and modest improvements in functional recovery. If the exercise is conducted on an upwardly inclined treadmill, even more motor axons regenerate successfully and reinnervate muscle targets. Whether this increased motor axon regeneration also results in greater improvement in functional recovery from sciatic nerve injury was studied. Axon regeneration and muscle reinnervation were studied in Lewis rats over an 11 wk postinjury period using stimulus evoked electromyographic (EMG) responses in the soleus muscle of awake animals. Motor axon regeneration and muscle reinnervation were enhanced in slope-trained rats. Direct muscle (M) responses reappeared faster in slope-trained animals than in other groups and ultimately were larger than untreated animals. The amplitude of monosynaptic H reflexes recorded from slope-trained rats remained significantly smaller than all other groups of animals for the duration of the study. The restoration of the amplitude and pattern of locomotor EMG activity in soleus and tibialis anterior and of hindblimb kinematics was studied during treadmill walking on different slopes. Slope-trained rats did not recover the ability to modulate the intensity of locomotor EMG activity with slope. Patterned EMG activity in flexor and extensor muscles was not noted in slope-trained rats. Neither hindblimb length nor limb orientation during level, upslope, or downslope walking was restored in slope-trained rats. Slope training enhanced motor axon regeneration but did not improve functional recovery following sciatic nerve transection and repair. PMID:27466130

  16. Long-Standing Motor and Sensory Recovery following Acute Fibrin Sealant Based Neonatal Sciatic Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Junior, Rui Seabra

    2016-01-01

    Brachial plexus lesion results in loss of motor and sensory function, being more harmful in the neonate. Therefore, this study evaluated neuroprotection and regeneration after neonatal peripheral nerve coaptation with fibrin sealant. Thus, P2 neonatal Lewis rats were divided into three groups: AX: sciatic nerve axotomy (SNA) without treatment; AX+FS: SNA followed by end-to-end coaptation with fibrin sealant derived from snake venom; AX+CFS: SNA followed by end-to-end coaptation with commercial fibrin sealant. Results were analyzed 4, 8, and 12 weeks after lesion. Astrogliosis, microglial reaction, and synapse preservation were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and ultrastructural changes at ventral spinal cord were also investigated. Sensory-motor recovery was behaviorally studied. Coaptation preserved synaptic covering on lesioned motoneurons and led to neuronal survival. Reactive gliosis and microglial reaction decreased in the same groups (AX+FS, AX+CFS) at 4 weeks. Regarding axonal regeneration, coaptation allowed recovery of greater number of myelinated fibers, with improved morphometric parameters. Preservation of inhibitory synaptic terminals was accompanied by significant improvement in the motor as well as in the nociceptive recovery. Overall, the present data suggest that acute repair of neonatal peripheral nerves with fibrin sealant results in neuroprotection and regeneration of motor and sensory axons. PMID:27446617

  17. [Integrated Center for Research and Treatment of Vertigo, Balance and Ocular Motor Disorders].

    PubMed

    Brandt, T; Zwergal, A; Jahn, K; Strupp, M

    2009-08-01

    The German BMBF (German Ministry of Education and Research) has decided to establish an Integrated Center for Research and Treatment of Vertigo, Balance and Ocular Motor Disorders (IFB(LMU)) in Munich in 2010. After funding over a 10-year period, the long-term continuation of the IFB(LMU) by the medical faculty and the hospital is envisioned. Vertigo is one of the most common complaints in medicine. Despite its high prevalence patients with vertigo generally receive either inappropriate or inadequate treatment. This deplorable situation is internationally well known and its causes are multiple: insufficient interdisciplinary cooperation, no standardized diagnostics and therapy, the failure to translate findings of basic science into clinical applications and the scarcity of clinical multicenter studies. The IFB(LMU) will constitute a suitable tool with which these structural, clinical, and scientific deficits can be overcome. It will also make possible the establishment of an international interdisciplinary referral center. Munich has become the site of a unique concentration of leading experts on vertigo, balance and ocular motor disorders, both in the clinical and basic sciences. Academic structures have paved the way for the creation of an interdisciplinary horizontal network that also allows structured, vertical academic career paths via the Bachelor's and Master's degree programs in neuroscience, a Graduate School of Systemic Neurosciences, and the Munich Center for Neuroscience "Brain and Mind". The IFB(LMU) has the following objectives with regard to structure and content: to create an independent patient-oriented clinical research center under the auspices of the Medical Faculty but with autonomic administration and budget; to overcome existing clinical and academic barriers separating the traditional specializations, to establish a standardized interdisciplinary longitudinal and transversal network at one site for the management of patients. This should

  18. Institutional profile: integrated center for research and treatment of vertigo, balance and ocular motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Thomas; Zwergal, Andreas; Jahn, Klaus; Strupp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 the German BMBF (German Ministry of Education and Research) established an Integrated Center for Research and Treatment (IFB(LMU)) of Vertigo, Balance and Ocular Motor Disorders in Munich. After the 10-year period of funding by the BMBF, it is envisioned that the (IFB(LMU)) will continue over the long term with the joint support of the University Hospital, the Medical Faculty, and the Bavarian State. Vertigo is one of the most common complaints in medicine. Despite its high prevalence, patients with vertigo generally receive either inappropriate or inadequate treatment. This deplorable situation is internationally well known and its causes are multiple: insufficient interdisciplinary cooperation, no standardized diagnostics and therapy, the failure to translate findings of basic science into clinical applications, and the scarcity of clinical multicenter studies. The (IFB(LMU)) will constitute a suitable tool with which these structural, clinical, and scientific deficits can be overcome. It will also make possible the establishment of an international interdisciplinary referral center. Munich has become the site of a unique concentration of leading experts on vertigo, balance and ocular motor disorders, both in the clinical and basic sciences. Academic structures have paved the way for the creation of an interdisciplinary horizontal network that also allows structured, vertical academic career paths via the Bachelor's and Master's degree programs in Neuroscience, a Graduate School of Systemic Neurosciences, and the Munich Center for Neurosciences - Brain and Mind. The (IFB(LMU)) has the following objectives as regards structure and content: to create an independent patient-oriented clinical research center under the auspices of the Medical Faculty but with autonomous administration and budget; to overcome existing clinical and academic barriers separating the traditional specializations; to establish a standardized interdisciplinary longitudinal and

  19. Optic Nerve Sheath as a Novel Mechanical Load on the Globe in Ocular Duction

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The optic nerve (ON) sheath's role in limiting duction has been previously unappreciated. This study employed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to demonstrate this constraint on adduction. Methods High-resolution, surface coil axial MRI was obtained in 11 normal adults, 14 subjects with esotropia (ET) having normal axial length (AL) < 25.8 mm, 13 myopic subjects with ET and mean AL 29.3 ± 3.3 (SD) mm, and 7 subjects with exotropia (XT). Gaze angles and ON lengths were measured for scans employing eccentric lateral fixation in which an ON became completely straightened. Results In all groups, ON straightening occurred only in the adducting, not abducting, eye. Adduction at ON straightening was 26.0 ± 8.8° in normal subjects, not significantly different from XT at 22.2 ± 11.8°. However, there was significant increase in comparable adduction in ET to 36.3 ± 9.3°, and in myopic ET to 33.6 ± 10.7° (P < 0.04). Optic nerve length at straightening was 27.6 ± 2.7 mm in normals, not significantly different from 28.2 ± 2.8 mm in ET and 27.8 ± 2.7 mm in XT. In myopic ET, ON length at straightening was significantly reduced to 24.0 ± 2.9 mm (P < 0.002) and was associated with globe retraction in adduction, suggesting ON tethering. Conclusions Large adduction may exhaust length redundancy in the normally sinuous ON and sheath, so that additional adduction must stretch the sheath and retract or deform the globe. These mechanical effects are most significant in ET with axial myopia, but may also exert traction on the posterior sclera absent strabismus or myopia. Tethering by the ON sheath in adduction is an important, novel mechanical load on the globe. PMID:27082297

  20. Intra-operative electrooculographic monitoring to prevent post-operative extraocular motor nerve dysfunction during skull base surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sheshadri, Veena; Bharadwaj, Suparna; Chandramouli, BA

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intra-operative identification and preservation of extraocular motor nerves is one of the main goals of surgeries for skull base tumours and this is done by monitoring the extraocular movement (EOM). Intra-operative electromyographic monitoring has been reported, but it is a complex and skilful process. Electrooculography (EOG) is a simple and reliable technique for monitoring EOMs. We aimed to assess the utility of EOG monitoring in preventing extraocular motor nerve dysfunction during skull base surgeries. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, intra-operative EOG recordings were obtained using disposable needle electrodes placed on the periorbital skin and the polarity of the waves noted for interpretation. Triggered as well as continuous EOG responses were recorded after monopolar electrode stimulation of cranial nerve (CN) during tumour removal which helped the surgeon with careful dissection and avoiding potential nerve injuries. Results: Of the 11 cases monitored, oculomotor and abducent nerves were identified in all cases, but the trochlear nerve could not be definitively identified. Six patients had no pre- or post-operative extraocular motor nerve dysfunction. The other five patients had pre-existing deficits before surgery, which recovered completely in two, significantly in one, and did not improve in two patients at 3–6 months follow-up. Conclusions: EOG was found to be a simple and reliable method of monitoring extraocular motor nerves (CNs III and VI) intraoperatively. PMID:27601738

  1. Intra-operative electrooculographic monitoring to prevent post-operative extraocular motor nerve dysfunction during skull base surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sheshadri, Veena; Bharadwaj, Suparna; Chandramouli, BA

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intra-operative identification and preservation of extraocular motor nerves is one of the main goals of surgeries for skull base tumours and this is done by monitoring the extraocular movement (EOM). Intra-operative electromyographic monitoring has been reported, but it is a complex and skilful process. Electrooculography (EOG) is a simple and reliable technique for monitoring EOMs. We aimed to assess the utility of EOG monitoring in preventing extraocular motor nerve dysfunction during skull base surgeries. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, intra-operative EOG recordings were obtained using disposable needle electrodes placed on the periorbital skin and the polarity of the waves noted for interpretation. Triggered as well as continuous EOG responses were recorded after monopolar electrode stimulation of cranial nerve (CN) during tumour removal which helped the surgeon with careful dissection and avoiding potential nerve injuries. Results: Of the 11 cases monitored, oculomotor and abducent nerves were identified in all cases, but the trochlear nerve could not be definitively identified. Six patients had no pre- or post-operative extraocular motor nerve dysfunction. The other five patients had pre-existing deficits before surgery, which recovered completely in two, significantly in one, and did not improve in two patients at 3–6 months follow-up. Conclusions: EOG was found to be a simple and reliable method of monitoring extraocular motor nerves (CNs III and VI) intraoperatively.

  2. Heightened motor and sensory (mirror-touch) referral induced by nerve block or topical anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura K; Gosavi, Radhika; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2013-08-01

    Mirror neurons allow us to covertly simulate the sensation and movement of others. If mirror neurons are sensory and motor neurons, why do we not actually feel this simulation- like "mirror-touch synesthetes"? Might afferent sensation normally inhibit mirror representations from reaching consciousness? We and others have reported heightened sensory referral to phantom limbs and temporarily anesthetized arms. These patients, however, had experienced illness or injury of the deafferented limb. In the current study we observe heightened sensory and motor referral to the face after unilateral nerve block for routine dental procedures. We also obtain double-blind, quantitative evidence of heightened sensory referral in healthy participants completing a mirror-touch confusion task after topical anesthetic cream is applied. We suggest that sensory and motor feedback exist in dynamic equilibrium with mirror representations; as feedback is reduced, the brain draws more upon visual information to determine- perhaps in a Bayesian manner- what to feel.

  3. Cathepsin B-dependent motor neuron death after nerve injury in the adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li; Wu, Zhou; Baba, Masashi; Peters, Christoph; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Cathepsin B (CB), a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in neuron and glia. {yields} CB increased in hypogrossal nucleus neurons after nerve injury in adult mice. {yields} CB-deficiency significantly increased the mean survival ratio of injured neurons. {yields} Thus, CB plays a critical role in axotomy-induced neuronal death in adult mice. -- Abstract: There are significant differences in the rate of neuronal death after peripheral nerve injury between species. The rate of neuronal death of motor neurons after nerve injury in the adult rats is very low, whereas that in adult mice is relatively high. However, the understanding of the mechanism underlying axotomy-induced motor neuron death in adult mice is limited. Cathepsin B (CB), a typical cysteine lysosomal protease, has been implicated in three major morphologically distinct pathways of cell death; apoptosis, necrosis and autophagic cell death. The possible involvement of CB in the neuronal death of hypogrossal nucleus (HGN) neurons after nerve injury in adult mice was thus examined. Quantitative analyses showed the mean survival ratio of HGN neurons in CB-deficient (CB-/-) adult mice after nerve injury was significantly greater than that in the wild-type mice. At the same time, proliferation of microglia in the injured side of the HGN of CB-/- adult mice was markedly reduced compared with that in the wild-type mice. On the injured side of the HGN in the wild-type adult mice, both pro- and mature forms of CB markedly increased in accordance with the increase in the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II), a marker protein of autophagy. Furthermore, the increase in CB preceded an increase in the expression of Noxa, a major executor for axotomy-induced motor neuron death in the adult mouse. Conversely, expression of neither Noxa or LC3-II was observed in the HGN of adult CB-/- mice after nerve injury. These observations strongly suggest that CB plays a critical role in axotomy

  4. Corneal Dendritic Cell Density Is Associated with Subbasal Nerve Plexus Features, Ocular Surface Disease Index, and Serum Vitamin D in Evaporative Dry Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Rohit; Sethu, Swaminathan; Deshmukh, Rashmi; Deshpande, Kalyani; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Agrawal, Aarti; Shroff, Rushad

    2016-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) has evolved into a major public health concern with ocular discomfort and pain being responsible for significant morbidity associated with DED. However, the etiopathological factors contributing to ocular pain associated with DED are not well understood. The current IVCM based study investigated the association between corneal dendritic cell density (DCD), corneal subbasal nerve plexus (SBNP) features, and serum vitamin D and symptoms of evaporative dry eye (EDE). The study included age and sex matched 52 EDE patients and 43 heathy controls. A significant increase in the OSDI scores (discomfort subscale) was observed between EDE (median, 20.8) and control (median, 4.2) cohorts (P < 0.001). Similarly, an increase in DCD was observed between EDE (median, 48.1 cells/mm2) patients and controls (median, 5.6 cells/mm2) (P < 0.001). A significant decrease in SBNP features (corneal nerve fiber length, fiber density, fiber width, total branch density, nerve branch density, and fiber area) was observed in EDE patients with OSDI score >23 (P < 0.05). A positive correlation was observed between DCD and OSDI discomfort subscale (r = 0.348; P < 0.0003) and SBNP features. An inverse correlation was observed between vitamin D and OSDI scores (r = −0.332; P = 0.0095) and DCD with dendritic processes (r = −0.322; P = 0.0122). The findings implicate DCD, SBNP features, and vitamin D with EDE symptoms. PMID:26904676

  5. Gallic acid and exercise training improve motor function, nerve conduction velocity but not pain sense reflex after experimental sciatic nerve crush in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Hajimoradi, Maryam; Fazilati, Mohammad; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem; Sarkaki, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of oral administration of gallic acid (GA) for 21 days alone and in combination with exercise on nerve conduction velocity and sensory and motor functions in rats with sciatic nerve crush. Materials and Methods: Seventy adult male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were divided randomly into 7 groups with 10 in each: 1) Control (Cont), 2) Crushed + Vehicle (Cr +Veh), 3-5) Crushed + gallic acid (Cr+GA) (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/2 mL, orally), 6) Crushed + exercise (Cr+Exe), and 7) Crushed + exercise + effective dose of gallic acid (Cr+Exe +GA200) for 21 days. In order to establish an animal model of sciatic nerve crush, equivalent to 7 kg of force pressed on 2-3 mm of sciatic nerve for 30 s, three times with 30 s intervals. Pain sense reflex in hot plate, motor coordination in rotarod, and sciatic nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) in all groups were tested. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test and p<0.05 has assigned as the significant difference. Results: Pain threshold was increased significantly in untreated crushed rats while motor function and SNCV were decreased in all groups with nerve crush (p<0.05, p<0.01, p<0.001 vs. control). Pain reflex latency was not changed in treated groups. Motor coordination and SNCV were improved in groups Cr+GA200 and Cr+Exe + GA200 (p<0.05, p<0.01 vs. Cr+Veh). Conclusion: GA, dose-dependently, may have therapeutic potential to improve the peripheral nerve degeneration, which is most likely related, at least in part, to its antioxidant and therapeutic properties. PMID:26445710

  6. Crosstalk between p38, Hsp25 and Akt in spinal motor neurons after sciatic nerve injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Ul Haq, I.; Hill, C.; Park, E.; Smith, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, X.; Goldberg, D. J.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    The p38 stress-activated protein kinase pathway is involved in regulation of phosphorylation of Hsp25, which in turn regulates actin filament dynamic in non-neuronal cells. We report that p38, Hsp25 and Akt signaling pathways were specifically activated in spinal motor neurons after sciatic nerve axotomy. The activation of the p38 kinase was required for induction of Hsp25 expression. Furthermore, Hsp25 formed a complex with Akt, a member of PI-3 kinase pathway that prevents neuronal cell death. Together, our observations implicate Hsp25 as a central player in a complex system of signaling that may both promote regeneration of nerve fibers and prevent neuronal cell death in the injured spinal cord.

  7. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs); sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Makkar, R K; Kochar, D K

    1994-01-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials, sensory and motor nerve conduction velocity were studied in 25 patients of chronic renal failure and the results were compared with 15 healthy persons. The values more than +/- 3 S.D. were considered abnormal. SNCV was reduced in 11/25 patients; average reduction being 18 m/s (highly significant, p < 0.001); MNCV was reduced in 11/25 patients, average reduction being 20 m/s (highly significant, p < 0.001). Both SNCV and MNCV in same person were reduced in 6/25 patients. In SSEP N9, N13 and N20 were delayed in almost all the patients (highly significant, p < 0.001). Amplitude of N20 and N13 were reduced in 1 and 4 patients respectively but amplitude of N9 was normal. Out of different IPLS, Ebw-N9 was delayed in 5/25 patients (p < 0.9, insignificant); N9-N13 was delayed in 8/25 patients (p < 0.001, highly significant); N13-N20 was delayed in 1/25 patients (p < 0.01, significant). The evidence of these neurophysiological abnormalities collectively suggest the presence of central-peripheral axonopathy in this disease. PMID:7956880

  8. Randomized Controlled Trial of Surface Peroneal Nerve Stimulation for Motor Relearning in Lower Limb Hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Paul N.; Gunzler, Douglas D.; Buurke, Jaap H.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Chae, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the motor relearning effect of a surface peroneal nerve stimulator (PNS) versus usual care on lower limb motor impairment, activity limitation, and quality of life among chronic stroke survivors. Design Single-blinded randomized controlled trial Setting Teaching hospital of academic medical center Participants 110 chronic stroke survivors (> 12-wks post-stroke) with unilateral hemiparesis and dorsiflexion strength of ≤ 4/5 on the Medical Research Council scale Interventions Subjects were stratified by motor impairment level and then randomized to ambulation training with either a surface PNS device or usual care (ankle foot orthosis or no device) intervention. Subjects were treated for 12-wks and followed for 6-months post-treatment. Main Outcome Measures Lower limb portion of the Fugl-Meyer (FM) Assessment (motor impairment), the Modified Emory Functional Ambulation Profile (mEFAP) performed without a device (functional ambulation), and the Stroke Specific Quality of Life (SSQOL) scale. Results There was no significant treatment group main effect or treatment group by time interaction effect on FM, mEFAP, or SSQOL raw scores (p>0.05). The time effect was significant for the three raw scores (p<0.05). However, when comparing average change scores from baseline (T1) to end of treatment, (T2, 12-wks), and at 12-wks (T3) and 24-wks (T4) after end of treatment, significant differences were noted only for the mEFAP and SSQOL scores. The change in the average scores for both mEFAP and SSQOL occurred between T1 and T2, followed by relative stability thereafter. Conclusions There was no evidence of a motor relearning effect on lower limb motor impairment in either the PNS or usual care groups. However, both PNS and usual care groups demonstrated significant improvements in functional mobility and quality of life during the treatment period, which were maintained at 6-months follow-up. PMID:23399456

  9. Modulation of presynaptic Ca(2+) currents in frog motor nerve terminals by high pressure.

    PubMed

    Aviner, Ben; Gradwohl, Gideon; Moore, Homer J; Grossman, Yoram

    2013-09-01

    Presynaptic Ca(2+) -dependent mechanisms have already been implicated in depression of evoked synaptic transmission by high pressure (HP). Therefore, pressure effects on terminal Ca(2+) currents were studied in Rana pipiens peripheral motor nerves. The terminal currents, evoked by nerve or direct stimulation, were recorded under the nerve perineurial sheath with a loose macropatch clamp technique. The combined use of Na(+) and K(+) channel blockers, [Ca(2+) ]o changes, voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (VDCC) blocker treatments and HP perturbations revealed two components of presynaptic Ca(2+) currents: an early fast Ca(2+) current (ICaF ), possibly carried by N-type (CaV 2.2) Ca(2+) channels, and a late slow Ca(2+) current (ICaS ), possibly mediated by L-type (CaV 1) Ca(2+) channels. HP reduced the amplitude and decreased the maximum (saturation level) of the Ca(2+) currents, ICaF being more sensitive to pressure, and may have slightly shifted the voltage dependence. HP also moderately diminished the Na(+) action current, which contributed to the depression of VDCC currents. Computer-based modeling was used to verify the interpretation of the currents and investigate the influence of HP on the presynaptic currents. The direct HP reduction of the VDCC currents and the indirect effect of the action potential decrease are probably the major cause of pressure depression of synaptic release. PMID:23738821

  10. Two protein trafficking processes at motor nerve endings unveiled by botulinum neurotoxin E.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gary; Wang, Jiafu; Chion, C K N Kwo; Aoki, K Roger; Dolly, J Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The unique ability of a family of botulinum neurotoxins to block neuroexocytosis specifically-by selective interaction with peripheral cholinergic nerve endings, endocytotic uptake, translocation to the cytosol, and enzymic cleavage of essential proteins-underlies their increasing therapeutic applications. Although clinical use of type A is most widespread due to its prolonged inactivation of the synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa, botulinum neurotoxin E cleaves this same target but at a different bond and exhibits faster onset of neuromuscular paralysis. Herein, insights were gained into the different dynamics of action of types A and E toxins, which could help in designing variants with new pharmacological profiles. Natural and recombinant type E dichain forms showed similar proteolytic and neuromuscular paralytic activities. The neuroparalysis induced by type E toxin was accelerated between 21 and 35 degrees C and attenuated by bafilomycin A1. Temperature elevation also revealed an unanticipated bipartite dose response indicative of two distinct internalization processes, one being independent of temperature and the other dependent. Although elevating the temperature also hastened intoxication by type A, a second uptake mechanism was not evident. Increasing the frequency of nerve stimulation raised the uptake of type E via both processes, but the enhanced trafficking through the temperature-dependent pathway was only seen at 35 degrees C. These novel observations reveal that two membrane retrieval mechanisms are operative at motor nerve terminals which type E toxin exploits to gain entry via an acidification-dependent step, whereas A uses only one.

  11. Identifying motor and sensory myelinated axons in rabbit peripheral nerves by histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Sanger, James R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Yousif, N. John; Bain, James L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) histochemical staining of rabbit spinal nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia demonstrated that among the reactive myeliated axons, with minor exceptions, sensory axons were CA positive and CE negative whereas motor axons were CA negative and CE positive. The high specificity was achieved by adjusting reaction conditions to stain subpopulations of myelinated axons selectively while leaving 50 percent or so unstained. Fixation with glutaraldehyde appeared necessary for achieving selectivity. Following sciatic nerve transection, the reciprocal staining pattern persisted in damaged axons and their regenerating processes which formed neuromas within the proximal nerve stump. Within the neuromas, CA-stained sensory processes were elaborated earlier and in greater numbers than CE-stained regenerating motor processes. The present results indicate that histochemical axon typing can be exploited to reveal heterogeneous responses of motor and sensory axons to injury.

  12. Embryological origin for autism: developmental anomalies of the cranial nerve motor nuclei.

    PubMed

    Rodier, P M; Ingram, J L; Tisdale, B; Nelson, S; Romano, J

    1996-06-24

    The underlying brain injury that leads to autism has been difficult to identify. The diagnostic criteria of the disease are not readily associated with any brain region or system, nor are they mimicked by vascular accidents, tumors, or degenerative neurological diseases occurring in adults. Fortuitously, a recent report of autism induced by thalidomide exposure provides evidence that the disease originates by an injury at the time of closure of the neural tube. The human data suggest that the initiating lesion includes the motor cranial nerve nuclei. To test this hypothesis, we first examined motor nuclei in the brainstem of a human autistic case. The autopsy brain exhibited near-complete absence of the facial nucleus and superior olive along with shortening of the brainstem between the trapezoid body and the inferior olive. A similar deficit has been reported in Hoxa-1 gene knockout mice in which pattern formation of the hindbrain is disrupted during neurulation. Alternatively, exposure to antimitotic agents just after neural tube closure could produce the observed pattern of deficits. Thus, the lesions observed in the autopsy case appear to match those predicted by the thalidomide cases in both time of origin and central nervous system (CNS) location. To produce similar brain lesions experimentally, we exposed rat embryos to valproic acid, a second teratogen newly linked to autism. Dams received 350 mg/kg of valproic acid (VPA) on day 11.5 (the day of neural tube closure), day 12, or day 12.5 gestation. Each treatment significantly reduced the number of motor neurons counted in matched sections of the earliest-forming motor nuclei (V, XII), and progressively later exposures affected the VIth and IIIrd cranial nerve nuclei. All treatments spared the facial nucleus, which forms still later. Counts from the mesencephalic nucleus of trigeminal, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, and the locus ceruleus were not affected by exposure to VPA, even though these nuclei

  13. Zonisamide Enhances Neurite Elongation of Primary Motor Neurons and Facilitates Peripheral Nerve Regeneration In Vitro and in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Hideki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Ishii, Hisao; Noto, Kimitoshi; Ohta, Kyotaro; Masuda, Akio; Imagama, Shiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2015-01-01

    No clinically applicable drug is currently available to enhance neurite elongation after nerve injury. To identify a clinically applicable drug, we screened pre-approved drugs for neurite elongation in the motor neuron-like NSC34 cells. We found that zonisamide, an anti-epileptic and anti-Parkinson’s disease drug, promoted neurite elongation in cultured primary motor neurons and NSC34 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The neurite-scratch assay revealed that zonisamide enhanced neurite regeneration. Zonisamide was also protective against oxidative stress-induced cell death of primary motor neurons. Zonisamide induced mRNA expression of nerve growth factors (BDNF, NGF, and neurotrophin-4/5), and their receptors (tropomyosin receptor kinase A and B). In a mouse model of sciatic nerve autograft, intragastric administration of zonisamide for 1 week increased the size of axons distal to the transected site 3.9-fold. Zonisamide also improved the sciatic function index, a marker for motor function of hindlimbs after sciatic nerve autograft, from 6 weeks after surgery. At 8 weeks after surgery, zonisamide was protective against denervation-induced muscle degeneration in tibialis anterior, and increased gene expression of Chrne, Colq, and Rapsn, which are specifically expressed at the neuromuscular junction. We propose that zonisamide is a potential therapeutic agent for peripheral nerve injuries as well as for neuropathies due to other etiologies. PMID:26571146

  14. A Preclinical Study of Laryngeal Motor-Evoked Potentials as a Marker Vagus Nerve Activation.

    PubMed

    Grimonprez, Annelies; Raedt, Robrecht; De Taeye, Leen; Larsen, Lars Emil; Delbeke, Jean; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl

    2015-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a treatment for refractory epilepsy and depression. Previous studies using invasive recording electrodes showed that VNS induces laryngeal motor-evoked potentials (LMEPs) through the co-activation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and subsequent contractions of the laryngeal muscles. The present study investigates the feasibility of recording LMEPs in chronically VNS-implanted rats, using a minimally-invasive technique, to assess effective current delivery to the nerve and to determine optimal VNS output currents for vagal fiber activation. Three weeks after VNS electrode implantation, signals were recorded using an electromyography (EMG) electrode in the proximity of the laryngeal muscles and a reference electrode on the skull. The VNS output current was gradually ramped up from 0.1 to 1.0 mA in 0.1 mA steps. In 13/27 rats, typical LMEPs were recorded at low VNS output currents (median 0.3 mA, IQR 0.2-0.3 mA). In 11/27 rats, significantly higher output currents were required to evoke electrophysiological responses (median 0.7 mA, IQR 0.5-0.7 mA, p < 0.001). The latencies of these responses deviated significantly from LMEPs (p < 0.05). In 3/27 rats, no electrophysiological responses to simulation were recorded. Minimally invasive LMEP recordings are feasible to assess effective current delivery to the vagus nerve. Furthermore, our results suggest that low output currents are sufficient to activate vagal fibers.

  15. Interaction of /sup 125/I-labeled botulinum neurotoxins with nerve terminals. II. Autoradiographic evidence for its uptake into motor nerves by acceptor-mediated endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.D.; Dolly, J.O.

    1986-01-01

    Using pharmacological and autoradiographic techniques it has been shown that botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is translocated across the motor nerve terminal membrane to reach a postulated intraterminal target. In the present study, the nature of this uptake process was investigated using electron microscopic autoradiography. It was found that internalization is acceptor-mediated and that binding to specific cell surface acceptors involves the heavier chain of the toxin. In addition, uptake was shown to be energy and temperature-dependent and to be accelerated by nerve stimulation, a treatment which also shortens the time course of the toxin-induced neuroparalysis. These results, together with the observation that silver grains were often associated with endocytic structures within the nerve terminal, suggested that acceptor-mediated endocytosis is responsible for toxin uptake. Possible recycling of BoNT acceptors (an important aspect of acceptor-mediated endocytosis of toxins) at motor nerve terminals was indicated by comparing the extent of labeling in the presence and absence of metabolic inhibitors. On the basis of these collective results, it is concluded that BoNT is internalized by acceptor-mediated endocytosis and, hence, the data support the proposal that this toxin inhibits release of acetylcholine by interaction with an intracellular target.

  16. Which motor nerve conduction study is best in ulnar neuropathy at the elbow?

    PubMed

    Shakir, Ali; Micklesen, Paula J; Robinson, Lawrence R

    2004-04-01

    There is debate regarding how best to utilize ulnar motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) to identify ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE). We used receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves to compare absolute across-elbow MNCV with MNCV difference between elbow and forearm segments (VDIF) when recording from abductor digiti minimi (ADM) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles. Also, we determined how their utility was impacted by low amplitudes of compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs). We studied 85 subjects with UNE and 77 subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome but without clinical evidence of UNE. The UNE group was divided into three subgroups based on CMAP amplitude. At 95% specificity, MNCV sensitivities were 80% at ADM and 77% at FDI, and VDIF sensitivities were 51% at ADM and 38% at FDI. The ROC curves showed MNCV to be superior to VDIF across all amplitude subgroups; however, confidence intervals overlapped when amplitude was high.

  17. [Investigation of maximal motor nerve conductivity and distal latency before and after galvanic cell bath (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Trnavsky, G

    1982-04-30

    Measurements about maximal motor nerve conductivity of ulnaris and medianus were carried out before and after constant galvanisation from neck to hand. Significant results of conductivity, distal latency and amplitude of summation potential could not be registered neither by plus nor by minus pole at the hand.

  18. Ocular Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Ocular Hypertension Sections What Is Ocular Hypertension? Ocular Hypertension Causes ... Hypertension Diagnosis Ocular Hypertension Treatment What Is Ocular Hypertension? Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: J Kevin ...

  19. Motor nerve terminals on abdominal muscles in larval flesh flies, Sarcophaga bullata: comparisons with Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Feeney, C J; Karunanithi, S; Pearce, J; Govind, C K; Atwood, H L

    1998-12-14

    Motor nerve terminals on abdominal body-wall muscles 6A and 7A in larval flesh flies were investigated to establish their general structural features with confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and freeze-fracture procedures. As in Drosophila and other dipterans, two motor axons supply these muscles, and two morphologically different terminals were discerned with confocal microscopy: thin terminals with relatively small varicosities (Type Is), and thicker terminals with larger varicosities (Type Ib). In serial electron micrographs, Type Ib terminals were distinguished from Type Is terminals by their larger cross-sectional area, more extensive subsynaptic reticulum, more mitochondrial profiles, and more clear synaptic vesicles. Type Ib terminals possessed larger synapses and more synaptic contact area per unit terminal length. Although presynaptic dense bars of active zones were similar in mean length for the two terminal types, there were almost twice as many dense bars per synapse for Type Ib terminals. Freeze-fractures through the presynaptic membrane showed particle-free areas indicative of synapses on the P-face, within which were localized aggregations of large intramembranous particles indicative of active zones. These particles were similar in number to those found at active zones of several other arthropod neuromuscular junctions. In general, synaptic structural parameters strongly paralleled those of the anatomically homologous muscles in Drosophila melanogaster. In live preparations, simultaneous focal recording from identified varicosities and intracellular recording indicated that the two terminals produced excitatory junction potentials of similar amplitude in a physiological solution similar to that used for Drosophila.

  20. Transient ocular motor paresis associated with acute internal carotid artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Wilson, W B; Leavengood, J M; Ringel, S P; Bott, A D

    1989-03-01

    While sudden monocular blindness and occlusion of the central retinal artery associated with acute thrombosis of the internal carotid artery are well reported, concurrent unilateral ophthalmoparesis is not. We studied 3 adult men who did not have other major signs of vascular disease but who exhibited the complete syndrome. The initial paresis of the oculomotor, trochlear, and abducens nerves varied in each individual and slowly cleared over days to weeks in all, but vision did not return in any. Each had mild-to-moderate signs of hemispheric dysfunction. In each, the thrombus extended from the origin of the internal carotid to its intracranial bifurcation into the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. It also occluded the proximal one-half to two-thirds of the ophthalmic artery. None had evidence of vasculitis or compromise of the posterior circulation. PMID:2729917

  1. Posterior interosseous and ulnar nerve motor palsies after a minimally displaced radial neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Stepanovich, Matthew T; Hogan, Christopher J

    2012-08-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a serious potential complication following an upper extremity fracture. A rare case of acute posterior interosseous nerve and ulnar nerve palsy following a minimally displaced radial neck fracture is reported. With nonsurgical management, both nerves demonstrated excellent functional recovery. Although rare, nerve palsies can occur during a variety of upper extremity clinical situations, including minimally displaced fractures, and the importance of a detailed neurologic examination cannot be overstated.

  2. Ocular motor responses to abrupt interaural head translation in normal humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramat, Stefano; Zee, David S.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We characterized the interaural translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) in 6 normal humans to brief (approximately 200 ms), high-acceleration (0.4-1.4g) stimuli, while they fixed targets at 15 or 30 cm. The latency was 19 +/- 5 ms at 15-cm and 20 +/- 12 ms at 30-cm viewing. The gain was quantified using the ratio of actual to ideal behavior. The median position gain (at time of peak head velocity) was 0.38 and 0.37, and the median velocity gain, 0.52 and 0.62, at 15- and 30-cm viewing, respectively. These results suggest the tVOR scales proportionally at these viewing distances. Likewise, at both viewing distances, peak eye velocity scaled linearly with peak head velocity and gain was independent of peak head acceleration. A saccade commonly occurred in the compensatory direction, with a greater latency (165 vs. 145 ms) and lesser amplitude (1.8 vs. 3.2 deg) at 30- than 15-cm viewing. Even with saccades, the overall gain at the end of head movement was still considerably undercompensatory (medians 0.68 and 0.77 at 15- and 30-cm viewing). Monocular viewing was also assessed at 15-cm viewing. In 4 of 6 subjects, gains were the same as during binocular viewing and scaled closely with vergence angle. In sum the low tVOR gain and scaling of the response with viewing distance and head velocity extend previous results to higher acceleration stimuli. tVOR latency (approximately 20 ms) was lower than previously reported. Saccades are an integral part of the tVOR, and also scale with viewing distance.

  3. Nerve Fiber Layer Infarcts in Thiamine Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sia, Paul I; Sia, David I T; Crompton, John L; Casson, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    Thiamine deficiency classically manifests as the triad of Wernicke encephalopathy: acute confusional state, ataxic gait, and ocular motor dysfunction. However, most patients do no present with this classic triad. Optic neuropathy in thiamine deficiency is a rare manifestation and is usually associated with fundus appearances of optic disc swelling or optic disc pallor. We present 2 unique cases of thiamine deficiency where the fundus demonstrated peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickening without florid disc swelling or pallor.

  4. Development of Vestibular Stochastic Resonance as a Sensorimotor Countermeasure: Improving Otolith Ocular and Motor Task Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; DeDios,Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob; Wood, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. The goal of our present study is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular SR that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and improve motor task responses to mitigate associated risks.

  5. Peripheral facial nerve lesions induce changes in the firing properties of primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Múnera, A; Cuestas, D M; Troncoso, J

    2012-10-25

    Facial nerve lesions elicit long-lasting changes in vibrissal primary motor cortex (M1) muscular representation in rodents. Reorganization of cortical representation has been attributed to potentiation of preexisting horizontal connections coming from neighboring muscle representation. However, changes in layer 5 pyramidal neuron activity induced by facial nerve lesion have not yet been explored. To do so, the effect of irreversible facial nerve injury on electrophysiological properties of layer 5 pyramidal neurons was characterized. Twenty-four adult male Wistar rats were randomly subjected to two experimental treatments: either surgical transection of mandibular and buccal branches of the facial nerve (n=18) or sham surgery (n=6). Unitary and population activity of vibrissal M1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons recorded in vivo under general anesthesia was compared between sham-operated and facial nerve-injured animals. Injured animals were allowed either one (n=6), three (n=6), or five (n=6) weeks recovery before recording in order to characterize the evolution of changes in electrophysiological activity. As compared to control, facial nerve-injured animals displayed the following sustained and significant changes in spontaneous activity: increased basal firing frequency, decreased spike-associated local field oscillation amplitude, and decreased spontaneous theta burst firing frequency. Significant changes in evoked-activity with whisker pad stimulation included: increased short latency population spike amplitude, decreased long latency population oscillations amplitude and frequency, and decreased peak frequency during evoked single-unit burst firing. Taken together, such changes demonstrate that peripheral facial nerve lesions induce robust and sustained changes of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in vibrissal motor cortex. PMID:22877641

  6. Quantal potential fields around individual active zones of amphibian motor-nerve terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M R; Farnell, L; Gibson, W G; Macleod, G T; Dickens, P

    2000-01-01

    The release of a quantum from a nerve terminal is accompanied by the flow of extracellular current, which creates a field around the site of transmitter action. We provide a solution for the extent of this field for the case of a quantum released from a site on an amphibian motor-nerve terminal branch onto the receptor patch of a muscle fiber and compare this with measurements of the field using three extracellular electrodes. Numerical solution of the equations for the quantal potential field in cylindrical coordinates show that the density of the field at the peak of the quantal current gives rise to a peak extracellular potential, which declines approximately as the inverse of the distance from the source at distances greater than about 4 microm from the source along the length of the fiber. The peak extracellular potential declines to 20% of its initial value in a distance of about 6 microm, both along the length of the fiber and in the circumferential direction around the fiber. Simultaneous recordings of quantal potential fields, made with three electrodes placed in a line at right angles to an FM1-43 visualized branch, gave determinations of the field strengths in accord with the numerical solutions. In addition, the three electrodes were placed so as to straddle the visualized release sites of a branch. The positions of these sites were correctly predicted on the basis of the theory and independently ascertained by FM1-43 staining of the sites. It is concluded that quantal potential fields at the neuromuscular junction that can be measured with available recording techniques are restricted to regions within about 10 microm of the release site. PMID:10692301

  7. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p < 0.05) or more severe impairment (p < 0.05), both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p < 0.05), while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p < 0.05) and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p < 0.05). Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p < 0.05 for CIDP; p < 0.05 for MMN). Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP. PMID:27313890

  8. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data.

    PubMed

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p < 0.05) or more severe impairment (p < 0.05), both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p < 0.05), while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p < 0.05) and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p < 0.05). Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p < 0.05 for CIDP; p < 0.05 for MMN). Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP.

  9. Hexamethonium- and methyllycaconitine-induced changes in acetylcholine release from rat motor nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Tian, >Lijun; Prior, Chris; Dempster, John; Marshall, Ian G

    1997-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonists hexamethonium and methyllycaconitine (MLA) have been used to study the putative prejunctional nicotinic ACh receptors (AChRs) mediating a negative-feedback control of ACh release from motor nerve terminals in voltage-clamped rat phrenic nerve/hemidiaphragm preparations. Hexamethonium (200 μM), but not MLA (0.4–2.0 μM), decreased the time constant of decay of both endplate currents (e.p.cs) and miniature endplate currents (m.e.p.cs), indicating endplate ion channel block with hexamethonium. However, driving function analysis and reconvolution of e.p.cs and m.e.p.cs indicated that this ion channel block did not compromise the analysis of e.p.c. quantal content. At low frequencies of stimulation (0.5–2 Hz), hexamethonium (200 μM) and MLA (2.0 μM) increased e.p.c. quantal content by 30–40%. At high frequencies (50–150 Hz) neither compound affected e.p.c. quantal content. All effects on quantal content were paralleled by changes in the size of the pool of quanta available for release. The low frequency augmentation of e.p.c. quantal content by hexamethonium was absent when extracellular [Ca2+] was lowered from 2.0 to 0.5 mM. At the concentrations studied, MLA and hexamethonium produced a small (10–20%) decrease in the peak amplitude of m.e.p.cs. Neither apamin (100 nM) nor charybdotoxin (80 nM) had effects on spontaneous or nerve evoked current amplitudes at any frequency of stimulation. Thus the ability of nicotinic antagonists to augment e.p.c. quantal content is not due to inhibition of Ca2+-activated K+-channels. We suggest that hexamethonium and MLA increase evoked ACh release by blocking prejunctional nicotinic AChRs. These receptors exert a negative feedback control over evoked ACh release and are probably of the α-bungarotoxin-insensitive neuronal type. PMID:9401765

  10. A Small Motor Cortex Lesion Abolished Ocular Dominance Plasticity in the Adult Mouse Primary Visual Cortex and Impaired Experience-Dependent Visual Improvements.

    PubMed

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Greifzu, Franziska; Löwel, Siegrid

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that a small lesion in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) prevented both cortical plasticity and sensory learning in the adult mouse visual system: While 3-month-old control mice continued to show ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in their primary visual cortex (V1) after monocular deprivation (MD), age-matched mice with a small photothrombotically induced (PT) stroke lesion in S1, positioned at least 1 mm anterior to the anterior border of V1, no longer expressed OD-plasticity. In addition, in the S1-lesioned mice, neither the experience-dependent increase of the spatial frequency threshold ("visual acuity") nor of the contrast threshold ("contrast sensitivity") of the optomotor reflex through the open eye was present. To assess whether these plasticity impairments can also occur if a lesion is placed more distant from V1, we tested the effect of a PT-lesion in the secondary motor cortex (M2). We observed that mice with a small M2-lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers no longer expressed an OD-shift towards the open eye after 7 days of MD in V1 of the lesioned hemisphere. Consistent with previous findings about the consequences of an S1-lesion, OD-plasticity in V1 of the nonlesioned hemisphere of the M2-lesioned mice was still present. In addition, the experience-dependent improvements of both visual acuity and contrast sensitivity of the open eye were severely reduced. In contrast, sham-lesioned mice displayed both an OD-shift and improvements of visual capabilities of their open eye. To summarize, our data indicate that even a very small lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers and more than 3mm anterior to the anterior border of V1 compromised V1-plasticity and impaired learning-induced visual improvements in adult mice. Thus both plasticity phenomena cannot only depend on modality-specific and local nerve cell networks but are clearly influenced by long-range interactions even from distant brain regions.

  11. A Small Motor Cortex Lesion Abolished Ocular Dominance Plasticity in the Adult Mouse Primary Visual Cortex and Impaired Experience-Dependent Visual Improvements.

    PubMed

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Greifzu, Franziska; Löwel, Siegrid

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that a small lesion in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) prevented both cortical plasticity and sensory learning in the adult mouse visual system: While 3-month-old control mice continued to show ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in their primary visual cortex (V1) after monocular deprivation (MD), age-matched mice with a small photothrombotically induced (PT) stroke lesion in S1, positioned at least 1 mm anterior to the anterior border of V1, no longer expressed OD-plasticity. In addition, in the S1-lesioned mice, neither the experience-dependent increase of the spatial frequency threshold ("visual acuity") nor of the contrast threshold ("contrast sensitivity") of the optomotor reflex through the open eye was present. To assess whether these plasticity impairments can also occur if a lesion is placed more distant from V1, we tested the effect of a PT-lesion in the secondary motor cortex (M2). We observed that mice with a small M2-lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers no longer expressed an OD-shift towards the open eye after 7 days of MD in V1 of the lesioned hemisphere. Consistent with previous findings about the consequences of an S1-lesion, OD-plasticity in V1 of the nonlesioned hemisphere of the M2-lesioned mice was still present. In addition, the experience-dependent improvements of both visual acuity and contrast sensitivity of the open eye were severely reduced. In contrast, sham-lesioned mice displayed both an OD-shift and improvements of visual capabilities of their open eye. To summarize, our data indicate that even a very small lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers and more than 3mm anterior to the anterior border of V1 compromised V1-plasticity and impaired learning-induced visual improvements in adult mice. Thus both plasticity phenomena cannot only depend on modality-specific and local nerve cell networks but are clearly influenced by long-range interactions even from distant brain regions

  12. Restoration of sensory and motor function in earthworm escape reflex pathways following ventral nerve cord transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vining, E P; Drewes, C D

    1985-07-01

    Twelve segments of earthworm ventral nerve cord (VNC) were excised from either segments 10-22 (i.e., within the MGF sensory field) or segments 75-87 (i.e., within the LGF sensory field) in donor worms and heterotopically, or homotopically, transplanted into recipient animals. Morphological evidence indicated that by four days after transplantation, peripheral connections were formed between the transplanted VNC and the body wall of the recipient, many of these connections involving novel pathways projecting ventrally from the transplant. Restoration of giant fiber touch sensitivity in the transplant occurred from 4-14 days after transplantation. Regardless of the site of transplantation, the restored sensitivity (i.e., MGF versus LGF sensory field) always reflected the origin of the donor VNC. Restoration of MGF-mediated motor activity in the transplant occurred approximately 17-22 days after transplantation. In the case of heterotopic transplants (i.e., anterior VNC into posterior segments), the restored MGF-mediated muscle potentials were facilitating, indicating at least some tendency for persistence of this feature after transplantation. Behavioral observations suggested that reconnections involving other reflex pathways (e.g., those controlling setal movements and peristaltic locomotion) were made within the transplant region and that properties of the restored reflexes reflected those of the donor VNC. The rapid restoration of sensory and motor connections, despite heterotopic placement, indicates a significant capacity for peripheral regeneration by the transplanted VNC. On the other hand, the maintenance of various properties of reflex function, despite heterotopic transplantation, suggests a limited capacity for rearrangement of established central connections in the transplanted VNC. PMID:4031850

  13. ACUTE LESION OF THE MOTOR BRANCH OF THE ULNAR NERVE IN THE WRIST AFTER TUG-OF-WAR TRAINING

    PubMed Central

    Seguti, Vladimir Ferreira; Bonavides, Aloísio Fernandes; Flores, Leandro Pretto; Ferreira, Lisiane Seguti

    2015-01-01

    Papers correlating clinical and electrophysiological findings relating to ulnar nerve lesions in the wrist are uncommon in the literature, if compared with elbow injuries. We present the case of a patient with atrophy of the intrinsic musculature of the hand, secondary to injury only of the motor branch of the ulnar nerve, which is located in Guyon's canal close to the hamate hook. We review the anatomical, clinical and neurophysiological aspects of distal ulnar nerve injuries and we emphasize the importance of multidisciplinary approaches. Specifically in relation to the mechanism of injury of this patient (tug-of-war), we did not find any similar cases in the literature. We issue an alert regarding the risks during military physical training. PMID:27047837

  14. The role of spinal GABAergic circuits in the control of phrenic nerve motor output

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, Michael G. Z.; Rogers, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    While supraspinal mechanisms underlying respiratory pattern formation are well characterized, the contribution of spinal circuitry to the same remains poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that intraspinal GABAergic circuits are involved in shaping phrenic motor output. To this end, we performed bilateral phrenic nerve recordings in anesthetized adult rats and observed neurogram changes in response to knocking down expression of both isoforms (65 and 67 kDa) of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65/67) using microinjections of anti-GAD65/67 short-interference RNA (siRNA) in the phrenic nucleus. The number of GAD65/67-positive cells was drastically reduced on the side of siRNA microinjections, especially in the lateral aspects of Rexed's laminae VII and IX in the ventral horn of cervical segment C4, but not contralateral to microinjections. We hypothesize that intraspinal GABAergic control of phrenic output is primarily phasic, but also plays an important role in tonic regulation of phrenic discharge. Also, we identified respiration-modulated GABAergic interneurons (both inspiratory and expiratory) located slightly dorsal to the phrenic nucleus. Our data provide the first direct evidence for the existence of intraspinal GABAergic circuits contributing to the formation of phrenic output. The physiological role of local intraspinal inhibition, independent of descending direct bulbospinal control, is discussed. PMID:25833937

  15. Live imaging of bulk endocytosis in frog motor nerve terminals using FM dyes

    PubMed Central

    Gaffield, Michael A.; Romberg, Christin F.

    2011-01-01

    We observed endocytosis in real time in stimulated frog motor nerve terminals by imaging the growth of large membrane infoldings labeled with a low concentration of FM dye. The spatial and temporal information made available by these experiments allowed us to image several new aspects of this synaptic vesicle recycling pathway. Membrane infoldings appeared near synaptic vesicle clusters and grew rapidly during long-duration, high-frequency stimulation. In some cases, we observed large, elongated infoldings growing laterally into the terminal. We used these observations to calculate infolding growth rates. A decrease in stimulation frequency caused a decrease in growth rates, but the overall length of these structures was unaffected by frequency changes. Attempts to wash the dye from these infoldings after stimulation were unsuccessful, demonstrating that the fluorescent structures had been endocytosed. We also used this technique to trigger and image infoldings during repeated, short trains. We found that membrane uptake occurred repeatedly at individual endocytosis sites, but only during a portion of the total number of trains delivered to the terminal. Finally, we showed that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but not actin, was involved in this endocytosis pathway. The ability to monitor many individual bulk endocytosis sites in real time should allow for new types of endocytosis measurements and could reveal novel and unexpected mechanisms for coordinating membrane recovery during synaptic activity. PMID:21543750

  16. Reproducibility of normal facial motor nerve conduction studies and their relevance in the electrophysiological assessment of peripheral facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Di Bella, P; Logullo, F; Lagalla, G; Sirolla, C; Provinciali, L

    1997-09-01

    To determine the intra-examiner intertrial reproducibility of normal facial motor nerve conduction studies (FNCS) and their relevance in electrophysiological assessments of peripheral facial paralysis, 52 patients with acute unilateral Bell's palsy were examined on two separate occasions 1 months apart. Three electroneurographic methods were assessed. On the unaffected side of the face, FNCS are reliable when performed by a single examiner over time. Nevertheless, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) baseline-to-peak and peak-to-peak amplitude showed a rather high intertrial variability. Reproducibility of the assessed surface electrode recording procedures was similar. Regarding the affected side, in patients with mild axonotmesis of the facial nerve variations of electroneurographic parameters 1 months apart fell within the range of normal intertrial variability. In patients with severe or moderate axonotmesis, the distal latency and the M wave amplitude variations showed significant intertrial variations. Reproducibility of FNCS appears to be similar to that found in limb motor nerves. Normal variability curtails the sensitivity of FNCS in detecting mild facial nerve axonotmesis, although this technique remains useful in severe cases.

  17. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the median nerve facilitates low motor cortex excitability in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Chung; Chuang, Yu-Fen; Yang, Hsiao-Chu; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Huang, Ying-Zu; Chang, Ya-Ju

    2015-02-01

    The neuromodulation of motor excitability has been shown to improve functional movement in people with central nervous system damage. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of peripheral neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in motor excitability and its effects in people with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). This single-blind case-control study was conducted on young control (n=9), age-matched control (n=9), and SCA participants (n=9; 7 SCAIII and 2 sporadic). All participants received an accumulated 30 min of NMES (25 Hz, 800 ms on/800 ms off) of the median nerve. The central motor excitability, measured by motor evoked potential (MEP) and silent period, and the peripheral motor excitability, measured by the H-reflex and M-wave, were recorded in flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle before, during, and after the NMES was applied. The results showed that NMES significantly enhanced the MEP in all 3 groups. The silent period, H-reflex and maximum M-wave were not changed by NMES. We conclude that NMES enhances low motor excitability in patients with SCA and that the mechanism of the neuromodulation was supra-segmental. These findings are potentially relevant to the utilization of NMES for preparation of motor excitability. The protocol was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02103075).

  18. Effect of Treating Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats With Sorbinil, Myo-Inositol or Aminoguanidine on Endoneurial Blood Flow, Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity and Vascular Function of Epineurial Arterioles of the Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Coppey, Lawrence J.; Gellett, Jill S.; Davidson, Eric P.; Dunlap, Joyce A.

    2002-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that diabetes causes impairment in vascular function of epineurial vessels, which precedes the slowing of motor nerve conduction velocity. Treatment of diabetic rats with aldose reductase inhibitors, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol supplementation have been shown to improve motor nerve conduction velocity and/or decreased endoneurial blood flow. However, the effect these treatments have on vascular reactivity of epineurial vessels of the sciatic nerve is unknown. In these studies we examined the effect of treating streptozotocininduced rats with sorbinil, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol on motor nerve conduction velocity, endoneurial blood flow and endothelium dependent vascular relaxation of arterioles that provide circulation to the region of the sciatic nerve. Treating diabetic rats with sorbinil, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol improved the reduction of endoneurial blood flow and motor nerve conduction velocity. However, only sorbinil treatment significantly improved the diabetes-induced impairment of acetylcholinemediated vasodilation of epineurial vessels of the sciatic nerve. All three treatments were efficacious in preventing the appropriate metabolic derangements associated with either activation of the polyol pathway or increased nonenzymatic glycation. In addition, sorbinil was shown to prevent the diabetes-induced decrease in lens glutathione level. However, other markers of oxidative stress were not vividly improved by these treatments. These studies suggest that sorbinil treatment may be more effective in preventing neural dysfunction in diabetes than either aminoguanidine or myoinositol. PMID:11900277

  19. Refining the Sensory and Motor Ratunculus of the Rat Upper Extremity Using fMRI and Direct Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Younghoon R.; Pawela, Christopher P.; Li, Rupeng; Kao, Dennis; Schulte, Marie L.; Runquist, Matthew L.; Yan, Ji-Geng; Matloub, Hani S.; Jaradeh, Safwan S.; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Hyde, James S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well understood that the different regions of the body have cortical representations in proportion to the degree of innervation. Our current understanding of the rat upper extremity has been enhanced using functional MRI (fMRI), but these studies are often limited to the rat forepaw. The purpose of this study is to describe a new technique that allows us to refine the sensory and motor representations in the cerebral cortex by surgically implanting electrodes on the major nerves of the rat upper extremity and providing direct electrical nerve stimulation while acquiring fMRI images. This technique was used to stimulate the ulnar, median, radial, and musculocutaneous nerves in the rat upper extremity using four different stimulation sequences that varied in frequency (5 Hz vs. 10 Hz) and current (0.5 mA vs. 1.0 mA). A distinct pattern of cortical activation was found for each nerve. The higher stimulation current resulted in a dramatic increase in the level of cortical activation. The higher stimulation frequency resulted in both increases and attenuation of cortical activation in different regions of the brain, depending on which nerve was stimulated. PMID:17969116

  20. Central regulation of motor cortex neuronal responses to forelimb nerve inputs during precision walking in the cat.

    PubMed

    Marple-Horvat, D E; Armstrong, D M

    1999-08-15

    1. The responses of neurones in forelimb motor cortex to impulse volleys evoked by single pulse electrical stimulation (at 1.5 or 2 times the threshold for most excitable nerve fibres) of the superficial radial (SR) and ulnar (UL) nerves of the contralateral forelimb were studied in awake cats both resting quietly and walking on a horizontal ladder. Nerve volley amplitude was monitored by recording the compound action potential elicited by the stimulus. 2. In the resting animal 34/82 (41%) cells yielded statistically significant responses to SR stimulation, and 20/72 (28%) responded to UL stimulation. Some responses were confined to or began with an increase in firing probability ('excitatory' responses) and others with a decrease in firing ('inhibitory' responses), typically including a brief interruption of the spike train (zero rate). Cells responding to both nerves usually yielded responses similar in type. Most (78%) response onset latencies were less than 30 ms. Responses involved the addition or subtraction of from 3.4 to 0.1 impulses stimulus-1 (most <1 impulse stimulus-1). The distribution of response sizes was continuous down to the smallest values, i.e. there was no 'gap' which would represent a clear separation into 'responsive' and 'unresponsive' categories. Responses were commonest in the lateral part of the pericruciate cortex, and commoner among pyramidal tract neurones (PTNs) than non-PTNs. 3. During ladder walking most cells generated a rhythmic step-related discharge; in assessing the size of responses to nerve stimulation (20 studied, from 13 cells) this activity was first subtracted. Response onset latencies (90% <30 ms) and durations showed little or no change. Although most cells were overall more active than during rest both 'excitatory' and 'inhibitory' responses in both PTNs and non-PTNs were often markedly reduced in large parts of the step cycle; over some (usually brief) parts responses approached or exceeded their size during rest, i

  1. Reaching the limit of the oculomotor plant: 3D kinematics after abducens nerve stimulation during the torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Klier, Eliana M; Meng, Hui; Angelaki, Dora E

    2012-09-19

    Accumulating evidence shows that the oculomotor plant is capable of implementing aspects of three-dimensional kinematics such as Listing's law and the half-angle rule. But these studies have only examined the eye under static conditions or with movements that normally obey these rules (e.g., saccades and pursuit). Here we test the capability of the oculomotor plant to rearrange itself as necessary for non-half-angle behavior. Three monkeys (Macaca mulatta) fixated five vertically displaced targets along the midsagittal plane while sitting on a motion platform that rotated sinusoidally about the naso-occipital axis. This activated the torsional, rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex, which exhibits a zero-angle or negative-angle rule (depending on the visual stimulus). On random sinusoidal cycles, we stimulated the abducens nerve and observed the resultant eye movements. If the plant has rearranged itself to implement this non-half-angle behavior, then stimulation should reveal this behavior. On the other hand, if the plant is only capable of half-angle behavior, then stimulation should reveal a half-angle rule. We find the latter to be true and therefore additional neural signals are likely necessary to implement non-half-angle behavior.

  2. Hyperemic responses of the optic nerve head blood flow to chromatic equiluminant flicker are reduced by ocular hypertension and early glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsini, Benedetto; Riva, Charles E.; Salgarello, Tommaso; Logean, Eric; Colotto, Alberto; Giudiceandrea, Andrea

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated in ocular hypertension (OHT) and early glaucoma (EOAG) patients the optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow response (RF) to chromatic equiluminant flicker. This stimulus generates neural activity dominated by the parvo-cellular system. Eleven EOAG, 20 OHT patients, and 8 age-matched control subjects were examined. The blood flow (F) at the neuroretinal rim was continuously monitored by laser Doppler flowmetry before, during, and after a 60-s exposure to a 4 Hz, red-green equiluminant flicker stimulus (30 deg field). RF was expressed as percentage F-change during the last 20 s of flicker relative to baseline F. Responses were collected at a number of temporal sites. The highest RF value was used for subsequent analysis. As compared to controls, both OHT and EOAG patients showed a decrease (p<0.01) in mean RF. We conclude that RF elicited by chromatic equiluminant flicker is abnormally reduced in OHT and EOAG patients indicating an impairment of the parvo-cellular-mediated vasoactivity. This decrease of vascular response may occur independently of neural activity loss early in the disease process.

  3. Reaching the Limit of the Oculomotor Plant: 3D Kinematics after Abducens Nerve Stimulation during the Torsional Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that the oculomotor plant is capable of implementing aspects of three-dimensional kinematics such as Listing's law and the half-angle rule. But these studies have only examined the eye under static conditions or with movements that normally obey these rules (e.g., saccades and pursuit). Here we test the capability of the oculomotor plant to rearrange itself as necessary for non-half-angle behavior. Three monkeys (Macaca mulatta) fixated five vertically displaced targets along the midsagittal plane while sitting on a motion platform that rotated sinusoidally about the naso-occipital axis. This activated the torsional, rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex, which exhibits a zero-angle or negative-angle rule (depending on the visual stimulus). On random sinusoidal cycles, we stimulated the abducens nerve and observed the resultant eye movements. If the plant has rearranged itself to implement this non-half-angle behavior, then stimulation should reveal this behavior. On the other hand, if the plant is only capable of half-angle behavior, then stimulation should reveal a half-angle rule. We find the latter to be true and therefore additional neural signals are likely necessary to implement non-half-angle behavior. PMID:22993439

  4. Neural correlates of motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex: dynamic regulation of multimodal integration in the macaque vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Soroush G; Minor, Lloyd B; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2010-07-28

    Motor learning is required for the reacquisition of skills that have been compromised as a result of brain lesion or disease, as well as for the acquisition of new skills. Behaviors with well characterized anatomy and physiology are required to yield significant insight into changes that occur in the brain during motor learning. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is well suited to establish connections between neurons, neural circuits, and motor performance during learning. Here, we examined the linkage between neuronal and behavioral VOR responses in alert behaving monkeys (Macaca mulatta) during the impressive recovery that occurs after unilateral vestibular loss. We show, for the first time, that motor learning is characterized by the dynamic reweighting of inputs from different modalities (i.e., vestibular vs extravestibular) at the level of the single neurons that constitute the first central stage of vestibular processing. Specifically, two types of information, which did not influence neuronal responses before the lesion, had an important role during compensation. First, unmasked neck proprioceptive inputs played a critical role in the early stages of this process demonstrated by faster and more substantial recovery of vestibular responses in proprioceptive sensitive neurons. Second, neuronal and VOR responses were significantly enhanced during active relative to passive head motion later in the compensation process (>3 weeks). Together, our findings provide evidence linking the dynamic regulation of multimodal integration at the level of single neurons and behavioral recovery, suggesting a role for homeostatic mechanisms in VOR motor learning.

  5. Central motor conduction time by magnetic stimulation of the cortex and peripheral nerve conduction follow-up studies in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martínez, A; Palau, F

    1997-12-01

    A follow-up clinical study, peripheral motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities and central motor conduction by magnetic stimulation of the cortex were performed in 13 patients with classical Friedreich's ataxia (FA) phenotype, for a period of 9-12 years. Clinical worsening was unrelated to peripheral nerve abnormalities. The amplitude of the nerve action potentials and delayed conduction velocity remained unchanged for several years. Central motor conduction times were abnormal in all patients. Clinical conditions worsened significantly between successive examinations with significant increments in threshold and significant decrement of the amplitude of motor evoked potentials. The results are consistent with progressive pyramidal and cerebellar pathways involvement as the cause of clinical worsening in FA.

  6. Noninvasive and painless magnetic stimulation of nerves improved brain motor function and mobility in a cerebral palsy case.

    PubMed

    Flamand, Véronique H; Schneider, Cyril

    2014-10-01

    Motor deficits in cerebral palsy disturb functional independence. This study tested whether noninvasive and painless repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation could improve motor function in a 7-year-old boy with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy. Stimulation was applied over different nerves of the lower limbs for 5 sessions. We measured the concurrent aftereffects of this intervention on ankle motor control, gait (walking velocity, stride length, cadence, cycle duration), and function of brain motor pathways. We observed a decrease of ankle plantar flexors resistance to stretch, an increase of active dorsiflexion range of movement, and improvements of corticospinal control of ankle dorsiflexors. Joint mobility changes were still present 15 days after the end of stimulation, when all gait parameters were also improved. Resistance to stretch was still lower than prestimulation values 45 days after the end of stimulation. This case illustrates the sustained effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation on brain plasticity, motor function, and gait. It suggests a potential impact for physical rehabilitation in cerebral palsy.

  7. Localization and expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in postmortem sciatic nerve from patients with motor neuron disease and diabetic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.A.; Gross, L.; Wittrock, D.A.; Windebank, A.J.

    1996-08-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is thought to play an important role in the maintenance of the mature motor system. The factor is found most abundantly in myelinating Schwann cells in the adult sciatic nerve. Lack of neuronal growth factors has been proposed as one possible etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Growth factor replacement therapies are currently being evaluated as a treatment for motor neuron disease. In this report we determined whether the expression of CNTF in sciatic nerve differed in patients with motor neuron disease compared to controls or patients with another form of axonopathy. We identified 8 patients (7 with ALS and 1 with SMA) with motor neuron disease and 6 patients with diabetic motor neuropathy who had autopsy material available. Immunoperoxidase staining showed reduced CNTF expression in nerves of patients with motor neuron disease but not in patients with diabetic motor neuropathy. Decreased CNTF appears be associated with primary motor neuron disease rather than a generalized process of axon loss. This result supports suggestions that CNTF deficiency may be an important factor in the development of motor neuron disease. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Optic nerve sheath diameter threshold by ocular ultrasonography for detection of increased intracranial pressure in Korean adult patients with brain lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Si Un; Jeon, Jin Pyeong; Lee, Hannah; Han, Jung Ho; Seo, Mingu; Byoun, Hyoung Soo; Cho, Won-Sang; Ryu, Ho Geol; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Heung Cheol; Jang, Kyung-Sool

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) seen on ocular US has been associated with increased intracranial pressure (IICP). However, most studies have analyzed normal range of ONSD and its optimal cut-off point for IICP in Caucasian populations. Considering ONSD differences according to ethnicity, previous results may not accurately reflect the association between IICP and ONSD in Koreans. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate normal range of ONSD and its optimal threshold for detecting IICP in Korean patients. This prospective multicenter study was performed for patients with suspected IICP. ONSD was measured 3 mm behind the globe using a 13-MHz US probe. IICP was defined as significant brain edema, midline shift, compression of ventricle or basal cistern, effacement of sulci, insufficient gray/white differentiation, and transfalcine herniation by radiologic tests. The results of the ONSD are described as the median (25th–75th percentile). The differences of ONSD according to disease entity were analyzed. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was generated to determine the optimal cut-off point for identifying IICP. A total of 134 patients were enrolled. The patients were divided into 3 groups as follows: patients with IICP, n = 81 (60.5%); patients without IICP, n = 27 (20.1%); and control group, n = 26 (19.4%). ONSD in patients with IICP (5.9 mm [5.8–6.2]) is significantly higher than those without IICP (5.2 mm [4.8–5.4]) (P < 0.01) and normal control group (4.9 mm [4.6–5.2]) (P < 0.001). Between patients without IICP and normal control group, the difference of ONSD did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.31). ONSD >5.5 mm yielded a sensitivity of 98.77% (95% CI: 93.3%–100%) and a specificity of 85.19% (95% CI: 66.3%–95.8%). In conclusion, the optimal cut-off point of ONSD for identifying IICP was 5.5 mm. ONSD seen on ocular US can be a feasible method for detection and serial monitoring of ICP in

  9. Genetically encoded pH-indicators reveal activity-dependent cytosolic acidification of Drosophila motor nerve termini in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rossano, Adam J; Chouhan, Amit K; Macleod, Gregory T

    2013-04-01

    All biochemical processes, including those underlying synaptic function and plasticity, are pH sensitive. Cytosolic pH (pH(cyto)) shifts are known to accompany nerve activity in situ, but technological limitations have prevented characterization of such shifts in vivo. Genetically encoded pH-indicators (GEpHIs) allow for tissue-specific in vivo measurement of pH. We expressed three different GEpHIs in the cytosol of Drosophila larval motor neurons and observed substantial presynaptic acidification in nerve termini during nerve stimulation in situ. SuperEcliptic pHluorin was the most useful GEpHI for studying pH(cyto) shifts in this model system. We determined the resting pH of the nerve terminal cytosol to be 7.30 ± 0.02, and observed a decrease of 0.16 ± 0.01 pH units when the axon was stimulated at 40 Hz for 4 s. Realkalinization occurred upon cessation of stimulation with a time course of 20.54 ± 1.05 s (τ). The chemical pH-indicator 2,7-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein corroborated these changes in pH(cyto). Bicarbonate-derived buffering did not contribute to buffering of acid loads from short (≤ 4 s) trains of action potentials but did buffer slow (~60 s) acid loads. The magnitude of cytosolic acid transients correlated with cytosolic Ca(2+) increase upon stimulation, and partial inhibition of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase, a Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger, attenuated pH(cyto) shifts. Repeated stimulus trains mimicking motor patterns generated greater cytosolic acidification (~0.30 pH units). Imaging through the cuticle of intact larvae revealed spontaneous pH(cyto) shifts in presynaptic termini in vivo, similar to those seen in situ during fictive locomotion, indicating that presynaptic pH(cyto) shifts cannot be dismissed as artifacts of ex vivo preparations.

  10. Region-related modular nerve-dependent motor activity in anorectum--cholinergic and nitrergic contribution to rat model.

    PubMed

    Stavreva, Galya; Radomirov, Radomir

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances of enteric nerve-mediated anorectal evacuation mechanisms have medical and social impact. The study aimed at further eliciting the contribution of cholinergic and nitrergic neurotransmission systems to modular nerve networks in different regions of Wistar rat anorectum. Electrical field stimulation (EFS, 0.8 ms, 40 V, 2, 5 or 10 Hz, 20 s), computerized mechanographic on-line setup and drugs were used to evaluate the motor responses of isolated rings from circular muscle of rectum (proximal, middle, and distal part), internal anal sphincter, and anal canal. Twitch-like frequency-dependent contractions, more pronounced in rectal preparations, characterized the modular motor responses of rectal circular muscle rings and anal canal. Depending on the frequency of stimulation, the motor activity of internal anal sphincter varied from deep long-lasting relaxation to initial short-lasting relaxation, followed by a contraction. Electrically-evoked responses of anorectal preparations were tetrodotoxin (0.1 microM)-sensitive. In the presence of atropine (0.3 microM) the contractions of rectal rings decreased, relaxation of internal anal sphincter increased and inhibition of the contractions of the anal canal occurred, followed by relaxation. During atropine treatment, NG-nitro-L-arginine (0.5 microM) increased the contractile responses and suppressed internal anal sphincter relaxations. L-arginine (0.5 microM) decreased the contractions and extended the relaxations of internal anal sphincter and anal canal. Our results suggest that cholinergic and nitrergic systems are not equally involved in modular nerve networks of various regions of anorectum. Cholinergic transmission is more expressed in distal rectum, underlying its contractile potency, while nitric oxide-dependent transmission(s) control the relaxation ability of the internal anal sphincter and anal canal.

  11. Longitudinal changes of nerve conduction velocity, distal motor latency, compound motor action potential duration, and skin temperature during prolonged exposure to cold in a climate chamber.

    PubMed

    Maetzler, Walter; Klenk, Jochen; Becker, Clemens; Zscheile, Julia; Gabor, Kai-Steffen; Lindemann, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Changes of nerve conduction velocity (NCV), distal motor latency (DML), compound motor action potential (CMAP) duration, and skin temperature with regard to cold have been investigated by use of ice packs or cold water baths, but not after cooling of environmental temperature which has higher ecological validity. The aim of this study was to investigate these parameters during cooled room temperature. NCV, DML, and CMAP duration of the common fibular nerve, and skin temperature were measured in 20 healthy young females during exposure to 15°C room temperature, coming from 25°C room. We found that NCV decreased and DML increased linearly during 45 min observation time, in contrast to CMAP duration and skin temperature which changes followed an exponential curve. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study investigating changes of these parameters during exposure to environmental cold. The results may pilot some new hypotheses and studies on physiological and pathological changes of the peripheral nervous system and skin to environmental cold, e.g., in elderly with peripheral neuropathies. PMID:22510085

  12. Anti-neurofilament antibodies in neuropathy with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance produce experimental motor nerve conduction block.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Evan B; Lawlor, Mike W; Richards, Michael P; Siddiqui, Kiran; Fisher, Morris A; Bhoopalam, Nirmala; Siegel, George J

    2003-02-01

    Elevated levels of serum antibodies to neurofilament proteins have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases, including autoimmune disorders such as neuropathy with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). The pathological significance of anti-neurofilament antibodies in sera of affected patients, however, remains unclear. In this study, we report our findings of polyclonal antibodies in sera from 4 of 16 IgG MGUS neuropathy patients that react strongly on immunoblot with a high molecular weight neurofilament protein (NFH). The effect of anti-NFH polyclonal antibody on peripheral nerve function was tested in vivo by intraneural injection. Sera containing anti-NFH antibody, but not sera from age-matched control subjects, injected into the endoneurium of rat sciatic nerve significantly attenuated proximal-evoked motor nerve compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes in a complement-dependent manner. In contrast, ankle-evoked CMAP amplitudes were unaffected by intraneural injection of sera containing anti-NFH antibody. Anti-NFH serum-injected nerves showed changes in both axon caliber (shrinkage) and myelin ultrastructure (vesiculation and ovoid formation), suggestive of intramyelinic edema. Preincubation of sera containing anti-NFH antibody with purified NFH protein abolished immunoreactivity to NFH protein and neutralized the serum-mediated toxicity. The data suggest that anti-NFH polyclonal antibodies occurring in sera of some patients with IgG MGUS neuropathy may elicit peripheral nerve conduction block independent of the patients' IgG paraprotein. Anti-neural polyclonal antibodies in sera of IgG MGUS neuropathy patients may have a greater pathological significance than previously anticipated.

  13. Identification of gangliosides recognized by IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies in bovine spinal motor neurons and motor nerves.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Hiide; Ariga, Toshio; Suzuki, Akemi; Yu, Robert K; Miyatake, Tadashi

    2008-08-28

    The presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG)-type antibodies to the ganglioside, N-acetylgalactosaminyl GD1a (GalNAc-GD1a), is closely associated with the pure motor type of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). In the present study, we isolated disialogangliosides from the motor neurons and motor nerves of bovine spinal cords by DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography. The disialoganglioside fraction contained GD1a, GD2, GD1b, and three gangliosides, designated X1, X2 and X3. Serum from a patient with axonal GBS with IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody yielded positive immunostaining with X1, X2, and X3. When isolated by preparative thin-layer chromatography (TLC), X1 migrated at the same position as GalNAc-GD1a from Tay-Sachs brain, suggesting that X1 is GalNAc-GD1a containing N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc). TLC of isolated X2 revealed that it migrated between GD1a and GD2. On the other hand, X3 had a migratory rate on TLC between and GD1b and GT1b. Since both X2 and X3 were recognized by IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody, the results suggest that X2 is a GalNAc-GD1a species containing a mixture containing a NeuAc-and an N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuGc) species, and X3 is a GalNAc-GD1a species with two NeuGc. This evidence indicating the specific localization of GalNAc-GD1a and its isomers in spinal motor neurons should be useful in elucidating the pathogenic role of IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody in pure motor-type GBS.

  14. Specificity of reinnervation and motor recovery after interposition of an artificial barrier between transected and repaired nerves in adjacency--an experimental study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lutz, B S; Ma, S F; Chuang, D C; Lidman, D; Wei, F C

    2001-01-01

    Non-specific re-innervation of target organs caused by misdirected axonal growth at the repair site is regarded as one reason for a poor functional outcome after peripheral nerve transsection and repair. This study investigates the rate of aberrant re-innervation and its influence on motor recovery in the rat sciatic nerve using artificial sheets as barrier between tibial and peroneal nerves. The sciatic nerve was transsected and repaired as follows: epineural sutures (A x 6), fascicular repair of tibial and peroneal nerves respectively (B x 8), and the same as in group B, but separating both nerves using an Integra-sheet with silicone (C x 8), or Integra without silicone (D x 8). As control, solely the tibial nerve was transsected and repaired (E x 5). Final investigations after 4 months revealed that in group C, 50% of the Integra-silicone sheets were dislocated. No dislocation was found in group D. Muscle contraction force of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly higher in group E as compared to all other groups. However although not significant, group D showed a consistently higher muscle contraction force than groups A, B, and C. Histology in groups A, B, and C with dislocated sheets demonstrated multiple axons growing from the tibial to the peroneal nerve and vice versa. In groups D and E, no such axonal growth was visible. These findings were confirmed by a significantly higher rate of specific reinnervation of the soleus muscle using sequential retrograde double labelling technique. Results of this study suggest that an artificial sheet such as Integra bears the potential of preventing aberrant re-innervation between repaired adjacent nerves resulting in improved motor recovery. Clinically, this technique may be of importance for brachial plexus, sciatic nerve, and facial nerve repair.

  15. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve enhances cognitive and motor recovery following moderate fluid percussion injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Smith, Douglas C; Modglin, Arlene A; Roosevelt, Rodney W; Neese, Steven L; Jensen, Robert A; Browning, Ronald A; Clough, Richard W

    2005-12-01

    Intermittent, chronically delivered electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve (VNS) is an FDA-approved procedure for the treatment of refractory complex/partial epilepsy in humans. Stimulation of the vagus has also been shown to enhance memory storage processes in laboratory rats and human subjects. Recent evidence suggests that some of these effects of VNS may be due to the activation of neurons in the nucleus locus coeruleus resulting in the release of norepinephrine (NE) throughout the neuraxis. Because antagonism of NE systems has been shown to delay recovery of function following brain damage, it is possible that enhanced release of NE in the CNS may facilitate recovery of function. To evaluate this hypothesis the lateral fluid percussion injury (LFP) model of traumatic brain injury was used and a variety of motor and cognitive behavioral tests were employed to assess recovery in pre-trained stimulated, control, and sham-injured laboratory rats. Two hours following moderate LFP, vagus nerve stimulation (30.0-sec trains of 0.5 mA, 20.0 Hz, biphasic pulses) was initiated. Stimulation continued in each animal's home cage at 30-min intervals for a period of 14 days, with the exception of brief periods when the animals were disconnected for behavioral assessments. Motor behaviors were evaluated every other day following LFP and tests included beam walk, locomotor placing, and skilled forelimb reaching. In each measure an enhanced rate of recovery and /or level of final performance was observed in the VNS-LFP animals compared to nonstimulated LFP controls. Behavior in the Morris water maze was assessed on days 11-14 following injury. Stimulated LFP animals showed significantly shorter latencies to find the hidden platform than did controls. Despite these behavioral effects, neurohistological examination did not reveal significant differences in lesion extent, density of fluorojade positive neurons, reactive astrocytes or numbers of spared neurons in the CA3 subarea

  16. Preferred sites of exocytosis and endocytosis colocalize during high but not lower frequency stimulation in mouse motor nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Gaffield, Michael A.; Tabares, Lucia; Betz, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The spatial relationship of exocytosis and endocytosis in motor nerve terminals has been explored, with varied results, mostly in fixed preparations and without direct information on the utilization of each exocytic site. We sought to determine these spatial properties in real time using synaptopHluorin (spH) and FM 4-64. Earlier we showed that nerve stimulation elicits the appearance of spH fluorescence hot spots, which mark preferred sites of exocytosis. Here we show that nerve stimulation in the presence of the styryl dye FM 4-64 evokes hot spots of FM 4-64 fluorescence. Their size, density, and rate of appearance are similar to the spH hot spots, but their rate of disappearance after stimulation was much slower (t½ ∼9 min versus ∼10 s for spH hot spots), consistent with FM 4-64 spots identifying bulk endocytosis and subsequent slow intracellular dispersion of nascent vesicles. Simultaneous imaging of both fluorophores revealed a strong colocalization of spH and FM 4-64 spots, but only during high (100 Hz) stimulation. At 40 Hz stimulation, exo- and endocytic spots did not colocalize. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that hot spots of endocytosis, possibly in the form of bulk uptake, occur at or very near highly active exocytic sites during high frequency stimulation. PMID:19955383

  17. Polychlorinated biphenyl poisoning: correlation of sensory and motor nerve conduction, neurologic symptoms, and blood levels of polychlorinated biphenyls, quaterphenyls, and dibenzofurans

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.C.; Tang, S.Y.; Miyata, H.; Kashimoto, T.; Chang, Y.C.; Chang, K.J.; Tung, T.C.

    1985-08-01

    In 1979 in Taiwan, more than 2000 people were poisoned with rice cooking oil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). One hundred ten patients were studied within one year of the exposure. The blood PCB levels were 39.3 +/- 16.6 ppb. The blood levels of the PCB derivatives, polychlorinated quaterphenyls (PCQ) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), were 8.6 +/- 4.8 and 0.076 +/- 0.038 ppb, respectively. Both the sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities (NCV) of the patients were significantly lower than the control. Abnormal slowing of sensory NCV was found in 43.6% and abnormal slowing of motor NCV was seen in 21.8%. Patients who had higher PCQ blood levels has significantly slower median nerve sensory NCV than those with lower PCQ levels. Patients with higher PCB blood levels had significantly slower peroneal nerve motor NCV than those with lower PCB levels.

  18. Central regulation of motor cortex neuronal responses to forelimb nerve inputs during precision walking in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Marple-Horvat, D E; Armstrong, D M

    1999-01-01

    The responses of neurones in forelimb motor cortex to impulse volleys evoked by single pulse electrical stimulation (at 1.5 or 2 times the threshold for most excitable nerve fibres) of the superficial radial (SR) and ulnar (UL) nerves of the contralateral forelimb were studied in awake cats both resting quietly and walking on a horizontal ladder. Nerve volley amplitude was monitored by recording the compound action potential elicited by the stimulus. In the resting animal 34/82 (41 %) cells yielded statistically significant responses to SR stimulation, and 20/72 (28 %) responded to UL stimulation. Some responses were confined to or began with an increase in firing probability (‘excitatory’ responses) and others with a decrease in firing (‘inhibitory’ responses), typically including a brief interruption of the spike train (zero rate). Cells responding to both nerves usually yielded responses similar in type. Most (78 %) response onset latencies were less than 30 ms. Responses involved the addition or subtraction of from 3.4 to 0.1 impulses stimulus−1 (most < 1 impulse stimulus−1). The distribution of response sizes was continuous down to the smallest values, i.e. there was no ‘gap’ which would represent a clear separation into ‘responsive’ and ‘unresponsive’ categories. Responses were commonest in the lateral part of the pericruciate cortex, and commoner among pyramidal tract neurones (PTNs) than non-PTNs. During ladder walking most cells generated a rhythmic step-related discharge; in assessing the size of responses to nerve stimulation (20 studied, from 13 cells) this activity was first subtracted. Response onset latencies (90 % < 30 ms) and durations showed little or no change. Although most cells were overall more active than during rest both ‘excitatory’ and ‘inhibitory’ responses in both PTNs and non-PTNs were often markedly reduced in large parts of the step cycle; over some (usually brief) parts responses approached or

  19. A functional model and simulation of spinal motor pools and intrafascicular recordings of motoneuron activity in peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghani, Mohamed N.; Abbas, James J.; Horch, Kenneth W.; Jung, Ranu

    2014-01-01

    Decoding motor intent from recorded neural signals is essential for the development of effective neural-controlled prostheses. To facilitate the development of online decoding algorithms we have developed a software platform to simulate neural motor signals recorded with peripheral nerve electrodes, such as longitudinal intrafascicular electrodes (LIFEs). The simulator uses stored motor intent signals to drive a pool of simulated motoneurons with various spike shapes, recruitment characteristics, and firing frequencies. Each electrode records a weighted sum of a subset of simulated motoneuron activity patterns. As designed, the simulator facilitates development of a suite of test scenarios that would not be possible with actual data sets because, unlike with actual recordings, in the simulator the individual contributions to the simulated composite recordings are known and can be methodically varied across a set of simulation runs. In this manner, the simulation tool is suitable for iterative development of real-time decoding algorithms prior to definitive evaluation in amputee subjects with implanted electrodes. The simulation tool was used to produce data sets that demonstrate its ability to capture some features of neural recordings that pose challenges for decoding algorithms. PMID:25452711

  20. Genetically encoded pH-indicators reveal activity-dependent cytosolic acidification of Drosophila motor nerve termini in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rossano, Adam J; Chouhan, Amit K; Macleod, Gregory T

    2013-01-01

    All biochemical processes, including those underlying synaptic function and plasticity, are pH sensitive. Cytosolic pH (pHcyto) shifts are known to accompany nerve activity in situ, but technological limitations have prevented characterization of such shifts in vivo. Genetically encoded pH-indicators (GEpHIs) allow for tissue-specific in vivo measurement of pH. We expressed three different GEpHIs in the cytosol of Drosophila larval motor neurons and observed substantial presynaptic acidification in nerve termini during nerve stimulation in situ. SuperEcliptic pHluorin was the most useful GEpHI for studying pHcyto shifts in this model system. We determined the resting pH of the nerve terminal cytosol to be 7.30 ± 0.02, and observed a decrease of 0.16 ± 0.01 pH units when the axon was stimulated at 40 Hz for 4 s. Realkalinization occurred upon cessation of stimulation with a time course of 20.54 ± 1.05 s (τ). The chemical pH-indicator 2′,7′-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein corroborated these changes in pHcyto. Bicarbonate-derived buffering did not contribute to buffering of acid loads from short (≤4 s) trains of action potentials but did buffer slow (∼60 s) acid loads. The magnitude of cytosolic acid transients correlated with cytosolic Ca2+ increase upon stimulation, and partial inhibition of the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase, a Ca2+/H+ exchanger, attenuated pHcyto shifts. Repeated stimulus trains mimicking motor patterns generated greater cytosolic acidification (∼0.30 pH units). Imaging through the cuticle of intact larvae revealed spontaneous pHcyto shifts in presynaptic termini in vivo, similar to those seen in situ during fictive locomotion, indicating that presynaptic pHcyto shifts cannot be dismissed as artifacts of ex vivo preparations. PMID:23401611

  1. Management of intrinsic spasticity in the hand with phenol injection or neurectomy of the motor branch of the ulnar nerve.

    PubMed

    Keenan, M A; Todderud, E P; Henderson, R; Botte, M

    1987-09-01

    Thirty-nine adults with acquired spastic disorders who had 21 phenol injections and 21 neurectomies of the motor branch of the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal for control of intrinsic spasticity in the hand were reviewed. Follow-up averaged 25.8 months for the patients with phenol blocks and 24.3 months for those who had a neurectomy. Intrinsic spasticity was relieved in all hands postoperatively. After the phenol block, which is a temporizing procedure, 13 hands had return of spasticity in 6 months. Eight hands had little or no return of spasticity and required no further treatment. Neurectomy was performed in predominantly nonfunctional hands with severe hygiene problems and with no potential for further neurologic recovery. Hand function was improved in six hands after phenol block and in one hand after neurectomy. Hygiene was improved in all hands after phenol block and in all except one hand after neurectomy. Two wound infections and one wound dehiscence occurred.

  2. Intraoperative monitoring during decompression of the spinal cord and spinal nerves using transcranial motor-evoked potentials: The law of twenty percent.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Hirao, Jun; Oka, Hidehiro; Akimoto, Jiro; Takanashi, Junko; Yamada, Junichi

    2015-09-01

    Motor-evoked potential (MEP) monitoring was performed during 196 consecutive spinal (79 cervical and 117 lumbar) surgeries for the decompression of compressive spinal and spinal nerve diseases. MEP monitoring in spinal surgery has been considered sensitive to predict postoperative neurological recovery. In this series, transcranial stimulation consisted of trains of five pulses at a constant voltage (200-600 V). For the normalization of MEP, we recorded compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) after peripheral nerve stimulation, usually on the median nerve at the wrist 2 seconds before or after each transcranial stimulation of the motor area, for all operations. The sensitivity and specificity of MEP monitoring was 100% and 97.4%, respectively, or 96.9% with or without CMAP compensation (if the threshold of postoperative motor palsy was defined as 20% relative amplitude rate [RAR]). The mean RAR after CMAP normalization, of the most affected muscle in the patient group with excellent postoperative results (recovery rate of a Japan Orthopedic Association score of more than 50%) was significantly higher than that in the other groups (p=0.0224). All patients with an amplitude increase rate (AIR) with CMAP normalization of more than 20% achieved neurological recovery postoperatively. Our results suggest that if the RAR is more than 20%, postoperative motor palsy can be avoided in spinal surgery. If the AIR with normalization by CMAP after peripheral nerve stimulation is more than 20%, neurological recovery can be expected in spinal surgery. PMID:26142049

  3. Interaction of /sup 125/I-labeled botulinum neurotoxins with nerve terminals. I. Ultrastructural autoradiographic localization and quantitation of distinct membrane acceptors for types A and B on motor nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.D.; Dolly, J.O.

    1986-01-01

    The labeling patterns produced by radioiodinated botulinum neurotoxin (/sup 125/I-BoNT) types A and B at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction were investigated using electron microscopic autoradiography. The data obtained allow the following conclusions to be made. (a) /sup 125/I-BoNT type A, applied in vivo or in vitro to mouse diaphragm or frog cutaneous pectoris muscle, interacts saturably with the motor nerve terminal only; silver grains occur on the plasma membrane, within the synaptic bouton, and in the axoplasm of the nerve trunk, suggesting internalization and retrograde intra-axonal transport of toxin or fragments thereof. (b) /sup 125/I-BoNT type B, applied in vitro to the murine neuromuscular junction, interacts likewise with the motor nerve terminal except that a lower proportion of internalized radioactivity is seen. This result is reconcilable with the similar, but not identical, pharmacological action of these toxin types. (c) The saturability of labeling in each case suggested the involvement of acceptors; on preventing the internalization step with metabolic inhibitors, their precise location became apparent. They were found on all unmyelinated areas of the nerve terminal membrane, including the preterminal axon and the synaptic bouton. (d) It is not proposed that these membrane acceptors target BoNT to the nerve terminal and mediate its delivery to an intracellular site, thus contributing to the toxin's selective inhibitory action on neurotransmitter release.

  4. The bidirectionality of motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex is a function of cerebellar mGluR1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Titley, Heather K; Heskin-Sweezie, Raquel; Broussard, Dianne M

    2010-12-01

    Bidirectional changes in synaptic transmission have the potential to optimize the control of movement. However, it can be difficult to establish a causal relationship between the bidirectionality of synaptic plasticity and bidirectional changes in the speed of actual movements. We asked whether metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) receptors, which participate in cerebellar long-term depression (LTD), are necessary for bidirectional motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Cerebellar LTD and long-term potentiation (LTP) are thought to cause increases and decreases, respectively, in the gain of the VOR; the direction of learning depends on the behavioral protocol. We injected either the mGluR1 agonist (S)-DHPG or the antagonist YM 298198 bilaterally into the flocculus of alert cats, and then induced motor learning. In the presence of YM 298198, the VOR gain decreased in gain-up, as well as in gain-down protocols. (S)-DHPG augmented gain-up learning. Gain-down learning was not significantly affected by either drug. These results supported the hypothesis that gain-up learning relies on cerebellar LTD, but gain-down learning relies on a different mechanism. In the absence of mGluR1 activity, cerebellar LTD may be replaced with LTP, permitting learning in only one direction.

  5. Early-onset multisystem degeneration with central motor, autonomic and optic nerve disturbances: unusual Riley-Day syndrome or new clinical entity?

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, A; Witte, O W; Kunesch, E; Freund, H J; Benecke, R

    1998-02-01

    We report a 21-year-old woman presenting with a slowly progressive tetraparesis, optic nerve atrophy on both sides, and autonomic disturbances since early childhood. The patient has been carefully followed up for 5 years with clinical and ancillary investigations. The results and the time course strongly suggest an underlying degenerative syndrome affecting parts of three major systems: autonomic, motor and visual. Some symptoms resemble familial dysautonomia (FD, Riley-Day syndrome), however, hallmarks of FD, such as absence of fungiform papillae of the tongue, abnormal reaction on intradermal histamine injection, absent tendon reflexes, are missing, and central motor disturbances have not been described in FD. We consider this syndrome a slowly progressive multisystemic degeneration with two unusual hitherto unreported features: the combination of affected systems (autonomic and motor systems, optic nerves), and the early onset.

  6. Long-lasting modulation of human motor cortex following prolonged transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of forearm muscles: evidence of reciprocal inhibition and facilitation.

    PubMed

    Tinazzi, Michele; Zarattini, Stefano; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Romito, Silvia; Farina, Simona; Moretto, Giuseppe; Smania, Nicola; Fiaschi, Antonio; Abbruzzese, Giovanni

    2005-03-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that motor cortex excitability can be modulated by manipulation of afferent inputs, like peripheral electrical stimulation. Most studies in humans mainly dealt with the effects of prolonged low-frequency peripheral nerve stimulation on motor cortical excitability, despite its being known from animal studies that high-frequency stimulation can also result in changes of the cortical excitability. To investigate the possible effects of high-frequency peripheral stimulation on motor cortical excitability we recorded motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the left motor cortex from the right flexor carpi radialis (FCR), extensor carpi radialis (ECR), and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) in normal subjects, before and after transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of 30 min duration applied over the FCR. The amplitude of MEPs from the FRC was significantly reduced from 10 to 35 min after TENS while the amplitude of MEPs from ECR was increased. No effects were observed in the FDI muscle. Indices of peripheral nerve (M-wave) and spinal cord excitability (H waves) did not change throughout the experiment. Electrical stimulation of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve has no significant effect on motor cortex excitability. These findings suggest that TENS of forearm muscles can induce transient reciprocal inhibitory and facilitatory changes in corticomotoneuronal excitability of forearm flexor and extensor muscles lasting several minutes. These changes probably may occur at cortical site and seem to be mainly dependent on stimulation of muscle afferents. These findings might eventually lead to practical applications in rehabilitation, especially in those syndromes in which the excitatory and inhibitory balance between agonist and antagonist is severely impaired, such as spasticity and dystonia.

  7. Ocular neuromyotonia after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lessell, S.; Lessell, I.M.; Rizzo, J.F. III

    1986-12-15

    Ocular neuromyotonia is a paroxysmal monocular deviation that results from spasm of eye muscles secondary to spontaneous discharges from third, fourth, or sixth nerve axons. We observed this rare disorder in four patients who had been treated with radiation for tumors in the region of the sella turcica and cavernous sinus. Based on these cases and four others identified in the literature it would appear that radiation predisposes to a cranial neuropathy in which ocular neuromyotonia may be the major manifestation. Radiation appears to be the most common cause of ocular neuromyotonia.

  8. Ocular disease and driving.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joanne M; Black, Alex A

    2016-09-01

    As the driving population ages, the number of drivers with visual impairment resulting from ocular disease will increase given the age-related prevalence of ocular disease. The increase in visual impairment in the driving population has a number of implications for driving outcomes. This review summarises current research regarding the impact of common ocular diseases on driving ability and safety, with particular focus on cataract, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, hemianopia and diabetic retinopathy. The evidence considered includes self-reported driving outcomes, driving performance (on-road and simulator-based) and various motor vehicle crash indices. Collectively, this review demonstrates that driving ability and safety are negatively affected by ocular disease; however, further research is needed in this area. Older drivers with ocular disease need to be aware of the negative consequences of their ocular condition and in the case where treatment options are available, encouraged to seek these earlier for optimum driving safety and quality of life benefits. PMID:27156178

  9. Relation of Na+, K(+)-ATPase to delayed motor nerve conduction velocity: effect of aldose reductase inhibitor, ADN-138, on Na+, K(+)-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Y; Okada, K

    1990-06-01

    The role of sorbitol, myo-inositol, and Na+, K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats was studied. Reduction of MNCV and Na+, K(+)-ATPase in caudal nerves appeared after 3 weeks of diabetes, and at this time treatment with aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI), ADN-138 and 1% myo-inositol supplement was begun. One percent myo-inositol supplement for 3 weeks resulted in a significant increase in myo-inositol levels in diabetic nerves, but left MNCV and sorbitol levels unchanged. In contrast, treatment with ADN-138 for 3 weeks reduced sorbitol levels in diabetic nerves and resulted in significant increases in MNCV and Na+, K(+)-ATPase in the nerves. Since ADN-138 did not restore myo-inositol levels, the increase in Na+, K(+)-ATPase levels by ADN-138 treatment was independent of myo-inositol levels. Also, nerve Na+ levels in ADN-138-treated rats were reduced and the ratio of K+ to Na+ was raised, while 1% myo-inositol supplement did not affect them. These results suggest that treatment with ADN-138 elevates MNCV through a series of processes: ARI----reduction of sorbitol level----increase in Na+, K(+)-ATPase activity----correction of K+, Na+ imbalance----increase in MNCV.

  10. The role of calcium in depolarization-secretion coupling at the motor nerve terminal.

    PubMed

    Cooke, J D; Okamoto, K; Quastel, D M

    1973-01-01

    1. The relation between m.e.p.p. frequency (F) and [Ca] was studied at the mouse neuromuscular junction, at varied concentrations of K(+) and at nerve terminals depolarized by focal depolarization.2. Under all conditions the relation between log F and log [Ca] was sigmoid, with a maximum slope that increased with depolarization or raised [K(+)]. In addition, depolarization or raised K(+) caused a progressive shift of the sigmoid curve upward and to the left (to reduced log [Ca]) and increased the range over which log F could be altered by [Ca].3. Reduction of osmotic pressure changed the relation between log F and log [Ca] in the same way as increase of depolarization, while increase of osmotic pressure did the opposite.4. Raised [Mg] acted in two ways: (a) to shift the curve of log F vs. log [Ca] to the right and (b) to reduce maximum Delta log F/Delta log [Ca] without altering the range of log F sensitive to [Ca].5. The relation between log quantal content of e.p.p.s and log [Ca] was similar to that between log m.e.p.p. frequency and log [Ca].6. Individual nerve terminals varied in both Ca-dependent and Ca-independent fractions of log F; a large Ca-independent portion appears to be associated with a low Ca-dependent portion and vice versa. With large prolonged depolarization the Ca-independent portion was increased, apparently at the expense of the Ca-dependent portion.7. The results of all experiments were summarized in terms of parameters found by fitting the observed log release -log [Ca] curves to two theoretical equations, each derived on the basis of a model: (a) all-or-nothing activation of release probability by Ca-complex(es) and (b) graded activation of release probability by Ca complex(es).8. On the basis of the all-or-nothing model, from which follows alinear relation between F and amounts of Ca complex(es), the number of Ca(2+) atoms that ;cooperate' to mediate release appeared to increase progressively with presynaptic depolarization, to a value of

  11. A Ca2+-induced Ca2+ Release Mechanism Involved in Asynchronous Exocytosis at Frog Motor Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Narita, K.; Akita, T.; Osanai, M.; Shirasaki, T.; Kijima, H.; Kuba, K.

    1998-01-01

    The extent to which Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) affects transmitter release is unknown. Continuous nerve stimulation (20–50 Hz) caused slow transient increases in miniature end-plate potential (MEPP) frequency (MEPP-hump) and intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in presynaptic terminals (Ca2+-hump) in frog skeletal muscles over a period of minutes in a low Ca2+, high Mg2+ solution. Mn2+ quenched Indo-1 and Fura-2 fluorescence, thus indicating that stimulation was accompanied by opening of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. MEPP-hump depended on extracellular Ca2+ (0.05–0.2 mM) and stimulation frequency. Both the Ca2+- and MEPP-humps were blocked by 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate hydrochloride (TMB-8), ryanodine, and thapsigargin, but enhanced by CN−. Thus, Ca2+-hump is generated by the activation of CICR via ryanodine receptors by Ca2+ entry, producing MEPP-hump. A short interruption of tetanus (<1 min) during MEPP-hump quickly reduced MEPP frequency to a level attained under the effect of TMB-8 or thapsigargin, while resuming tetanus swiftly raised MEPP frequency to the previous or higher level. Thus, the steady/equilibrium condition balancing CICR and Ca2+ clearance occurs in nerve terminals with slow changes toward a greater activation of CICR (priming) during the rising phase of MEPP-hump and toward a smaller activation during the decay phase. A short pause applied after the end of MEPP- or Ca2+-hump affected little MEPP frequency or [Ca2+]i, but caused a quick increase (faster than MEPP- or Ca2+-hump) after the pause, whose magnitude increased with an increase in pause duration (<1 min), suggesting that Ca2+ entry-dependent inactivation, but not depriming process, explains the decay of the humps. The depriming process was seen by giving a much longer pause (>1 min). Thus, ryanodine receptors in frog motor nerve terminals are endowed with Ca2+ entry-dependent slow priming and fast inactivation mechanisms, as well as Ca2+ entry

  12. Action of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome IgG at mouse motor nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Prior, C; Lang, B; Wray, D; Newsom-Davis, J

    1985-06-01

    We have studied the electrophysiological effects of IgG obtained from four patients with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) (two with small cell carcinoma), using the mouse passive transfer model. Mice received LEMS or control IgG or plasma, 10 to 60 mg daily. Microelectrode intracellular recordings were made from diaphragm muscle. LEMS IgG and plasma decreased end-plate potential quantal content similarly, confirming IgG as the active factor. LEMS IgG was equally effective in C5-deficient mice, indicating that late complement components are not required. The time course of decline and recovery of quantal content closely followed that of the human IgG in the mouse serum, with time to half-maximal effect of about 1.5 days in each case. Binding/dissociation of IgG or down/up regulation of the antigenic determinants, possibly Ca2+ channels, has a half-life of between 2 and 36 hours. The results confirm our concept that IgG antibody to nerve terminal determinants underlies the disorder of transmitter release in LEMS.

  13. Role of the Internal Superior Laryngeal Nerve in the Motor Responses of Vocal Cords and the Related Voice Acoustic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Seifpanahi, Sadegh; Izadi, Farzad; Jamshidi, Ali-Ashraf; Torabinezhad, Farhad; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Mohammadi, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    Background: Repeated efforts by researchers to impose voice changes by laryngeal surface electrical stimulation (SES) have come to no avail. This present pre-experimental study employed a novel method for SES application so as to evoke the motor potential of the internal superior laryngeal nerve (ISLN) and create voice changes. Methods: Thirty-two normal individuals (22 females and 10 males) participated in this study. The subjects were selected from the students of Iran University of Medical Sciences in 2014. Two monopolar active electrodes were placed on the thyrohyoid space at the location of the ISLN entrance to the larynx and 1 dispersive electrode was positioned on the back of the neck. A current with special programmed parameters was applied to stimulate the ISLN via the active electrodes and simultaneously the resultant acoustic changes were evaluated. All the means of the acoustic parameters during SES and rest periods were compared using the paired t-test. Results: The findings indicated significant changes (P=0.00) in most of the acoustic parameters during SES presentation compared to them at rest. The mean of fundamental frequency standard deviation (SD F0) at rest was 1.54 (SD=0.55) versus 4.15 (SD=3.00) for the SES period. The other investigated parameters comprised fundamental frequency (F0), minimum F0, jitter, shimmer, harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR), mean intensity, and minimum intensity. Conclusion: These findings demonstrated significant changes in most of the important acoustic features, suggesting that the stimulation of the ISLN via SES could induce motor changes in the vocal folds. The clinical applicability of the method utilized in the current study in patients with vocal fold paralysis requires further research. PMID:27582586

  14. Motor learning in common marmosets: vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation and its sensitivity to inhibitors of Purkinje cell long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Mari; Nagao, Soich

    2014-06-01

    Adaptation of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (HVOR) provides an experimental model for cerebellum-dependent motor learning. We developed an eye movement measuring system and a paradigm for induction of HVOR adaptation for the common marmoset. The HVOR gain in dark measured by 10° (peak-to-peak amplitude) and 0.11-0.5Hz turntable oscillation was around unity. The gain-up and gain-down HVOR adaptation was induced by 1h of sustained out-of-phase and in-phase 10°-0.33Hz combined turntable-screen oscillation in the light, respectively. To examine the role of long-term depression (LTD) of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses, we intraperitonially applied T-588 or nimesulide, which block the induction of LTD in vitro or in vivo preparations, 1h before the test of HVOR adaptation. T-588 (3 and 5mg/kg body weight) did not affect nonadapted HVOR gains, and impaired both gain-up and gain-down HVOR adaptation. Nimesulide (3 and 6mg/kg) did not affect nonadapted HVOR gains, and impaired gain-up HVOR adaptation dose-dependently; however, it very little affected gain-down HVOR adaptation. These findings are consistent with the results of our study of nimesulide on the adaptation of horizontal optokinetic response in mice (Le et al., 2010), and support the view that LTD underlies HVOR adaptation.

  15. Central command: control of cardiac sympathetic and vagal efferent nerve activity and the arterial baroreflex during spontaneous motor behaviour in animals.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Kanji

    2012-01-01

    Feedforward control by higher brain centres (termed central command) plays a role in the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system during exercise. Over the past 20 years, workers in our laboratory have used the precollicular-premammillary decerebrate animal model to identify the neural circuitry involved in the CNS control of cardiac autonomic outflow and arterial baroreflex function. Contrary to the traditional idea that vagal withdrawal at the onset of exercise causes the increase in heart rate, central command did not decrease cardiac vagal efferent nerve activity but did allow cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve activity to produce cardiac acceleration. In addition, central command-evoked inhibition of the aortic baroreceptor-heart rate reflex blunted the baroreflex-mediated bradycardia elicited by aortic nerve stimulation, further increasing the heart rate at the onset of exercise. Spontaneous motor activity and associated cardiovascular responses disappeared in animals decerebrated at the midcollicular level. These findings indicate that the brain region including the caudal diencephalon and extending to the rostral mesencephalon may play a role in generating central command. Bicuculline microinjected into the midbrain ventral tegmental area of decerebrate rats produced a long-lasting repetitive activation of renal sympathetic nerve activity that was synchronized with the motor nerve discharge. When lidocaine was microinjected into the ventral tegmental area, the spontaneous motor activity and associated cardiovascular responses ceased. From these findings, we conclude that cerebral cortical outputs trigger activation of neural circuits within the caudal brain, including the ventral tegmental area, which causes central command to augment cardiac sympathetic outflow at the onset of exercise in decerebrate animal models. PMID:21984731

  16. Targeted delivery into motor nerve terminals of inhibitors for SNARE-cleaving proteases via liposomes coupled to an atoxic botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Edupuganti, Om P; Ovsepian, Saak V; Wang, Jiafu; Zurawski, Tomas H; Schmidt, James J; Smith, Leonard; Lawrence, Gary W; Dolly, J Oliver

    2012-07-01

    A targeted drug carrier (TDC) is described for transferring functional proteins or peptides into motor nerve terminals, a pivotal locus for therapeutics to treat neuromuscular disorders. It exploits the pronounced selectivity of botulinum neurotoxin type B (BoNT/B) for interacting with acceptors on these cholinergic nerve endings and becoming internalized. The gene encoding an innocuous BoNT/B protease-inactive mutant (BoTIM) was fused to that for core streptavidin, expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified protein was conjugated to surface-biotinylated liposomes. Such decorated liposomes, loaded with fluorescein as traceable cargo, acquired pronounced specificity for motor nerve terminals in isolated mouse hemidiaphragms and facilitated the intraneuronal transfer of the fluor, as revealed by confocal microscopy. Delivery of the protease light chain of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) via this TDC accelerated the onset of neuromuscular paralysis, indicative of improved translocation of this enzyme into the presynaptic cytosol with subsequent proteolytic inactivation of synaptosomal-associated protein of molecular mass 25 kDa (SNAP-25), an exocytotic soluble N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) essential for neurotransmitter release. BoTIM-coupled liposomes, loaded with peptide inhibitors of proteases, yielded considerable attenuation of the neuroparalytic effects of BoNT/A or BoNT/F as a result of their cytosolic transfer, the first in situ demonstration of the ability of designer antiproteases to suppress the symptoms of botulism ex vivo. Delivery of the BoNT/A inhibitor by liposomes targeted with the full-length BoTIM proved more effective than that mediated by its C-terminal neuroacceptor-binding domain. This demonstrated versatility of TDC for nonviral cargo transfer into cholinergic nerve endings has unveiled its potential for direct delivery of functional targets into motor nerve endings.

  17. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... called upper motor neurons ) are transmitted to nerve cells in the brain stem and spinal cord (called lower motor neurons ) and from them to particular muscles. Upper motor neurons direct the lower motor neurons ...

  18. “Late” Macroendosomes and Acidic Endosomes in Vertebrate Motor Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Richard S.; Teng, Haibing; Wilkinson, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Activity at the vertebrate nerve—muscle synapse creates large macroendosomes (MEs) via bulk membrane infolding. Visualized with the endocytic probe FM1-43, most (94%) of the ~25 MEs/terminal created by brief (30-Hz, 18-second) stimulation dissipate rapidly (~1 minute) into vesicles. Others, however, remain for hours. Here we study these “ late” MEs by using 4D live imaging over a period of ~1 hour after stimulation. We find that some (51/398 or 13%) disappear spontaneously via exocytosis, releasing their contents into the extracellular milieu. Others (at least 15/1,960 or 1%) fuse or closely associate with a second class of endosomes that take up acidophilic dyes (acidic endosomes [AEs]). AEs are plentiful (~47/terminal) and exist independent of stimulation. Unlike MEs, which exhibit Brownian motion, AEs exhibit directed motion (average, 83 nm/sec) on microtubules within and among terminal boutons. AEs populate the axon as well, where movement is predominantly retrograde. They share biochemical and immunohistochemical markers (e.g., lysosomal-associated membrane protein [LAMP-1]) with lysosomes. Fusion/association of MEs with AEs suggests a sorting/degradation pathway in nerve terminals wherein the role of AEs is similar to that of lysosomes. Based on our data, we propose that MEs serve as sorting endosomes. Thus their contents, which include plasma membrane proteins, vesicle proteins, and extracellular levels of Ca2+, can be targeted either toward the reformation and budding of synaptic vesicles, toward secretion via exocytosis, or toward a degradation process that utilizes AEs either for lysis within the terminal or for transport toward the cell body. PMID:22740045

  19. The spatial pattern of exocytosis and post-exocytic mobility of synaptopHluorin in mouse motor nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Gaffield, Michael A; Tabares, Lucia; Betz, William J

    2009-01-01

    We monitored the spatial distribution of exo- and endocytosis at 37°C in mouse motor nerve terminals expressing synaptopHluorin (spH), confirming and extending earlier work at room temperature, which had revealed fluorescent ‘hot spots’ appearing in repeatable locations during tetanic stimulation. We also tested whether hot spots appeared during mild stimulation. Averaged responses from single shocks showed a clear fluorescence jump, but revealed no sign of hot spots; instead, fluorescence rose uniformly across the terminal. Only after 5–25 stimuli given at high frequency did hot spots appear, suggesting a novel initiation mechanism. Experiments showed that about half of the surface spH molecules were mobile, and that spH movement occurred out of hot spots, demonstrating their origin as exocytic sources, not endocytic sinks. Taken together, our results suggest that synaptic vesicles exocytose equally throughout the terminal with mild stimulation, but preferentially exocytose at specific, repeatable locations during tetanic stimulation. PMID:19153160

  20. Ageing-induced changes in the redox status of peripheral motor nerves imply an effect on redox signalling rather than oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, Brian; Scullion, Siobhan M.; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Pollock, Natalie; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    Ageing is associated with loss of skeletal muscle fibres, atrophy of the remaining fibres and weakness. These changes in muscle are accompanied by disruption of motor neurons and neuromuscular junctions although the direct relationship between the nerve and muscle degeneration is not understood. Oxidative changes have been implicated in the mechanisms leading to age-related loss of muscle mass and in degeneration of the central nervous system, but little is known about age-related changes in oxidation in specific peripheral nerves that supply muscles that are affected by ageing. We have therefore examined the sciatic nerve of old mice at an age when loss of tibialis anterior muscle mass and function is apparent. Sciatic nerve from old mice did not show a gross increase in oxidative damage, but electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies indicated an increase in the activity of superoxide and/or peroxynitrite in the nerves of old mice at rest that was further exacerbated by electrical stimulation of the nerve to activate muscle contractions. Proteomic analyses indicated that specific redox-sensitive proteins are increased in content in the nerves of old mice that may reflect an adaptation to regulate the increased superoxide/peroxynitrite and maintain redox homoeostasis. Analysis of redox active cysteines showed some increase in reversible oxidation in specific proteins in nerves of old mice, but this was not universally seen across all redox-active cysteines. Detailed analysis of the redox-active cysteine in one protein in the nerve of old mice that is key to redox signalling (Peroxiredoxin 6, Cys 47) showed a minor increase in reversible oxidation that would be compatible with a change in its redox signalling function. In conclusion, the data presented indicate that sciatic nerve from old mice does not show a gross increase in oxidative damage similar to that seen in the TA and other muscles that it innervates. Our results indicate an adaptation to increased

  1. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  2. [Third cranial nerve palsy in sphenoid sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Dores, Luís Almeida; Simão, Marco Alveirinho; Marques, Marta Canas; Dias, Éscar

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid sinus disease is particular not only for its clinical presentation, as well as their complications. Although rare, these may present as cranial nerve deficits, so it is important to have a high index of suspicion and be familiar with its diagnosis and management. Symptoms are often nonspecific, but the most common are headache, changes in visual acuity and diplopia due to dysfunction of one or more ocular motor nerves. The authors report a case of a 59 years-old male, who was referred to the ENT emergency department with frontal headaches for one week which had progressively worsened and were associated, since the last 12 hours, with diplopia caused by left third cranial nerve palsy. Neurologic examination was normal aside from the left third cranial nerve palsy. Anterior and posterior rhinoscopy excluded the presence of nasal masses and purulent rhinorrhea. The CT scan revealed a soft tissue component and erosion of the roof of the left sphenoid sinus. Patient was admitted for intravenous antibiotics and steroids treatment without any benefit after 48 hours. He was submitted to endoscopic sinus surgery with resolution of the symptoms 10 days after surgery. The authors present this case for its rarity focusing on the importance of differential diagnosis in patients with headaches and cranial nerves palsies.

  3. Phorbol esters and adenosine affect the readily releasable neurotransmitter pool by different mechanisms at amphibian motor nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Searl, T J; Silinsky, E M

    2003-12-01

    Phorbol esters and adenosine have been proposed to interact at common sites downstream of calcium entry at amphibian motor nerve endings. We thus studied the actions and interactions of phorbol esters and adenosine using electrophysiological recording techniques in conjunction with both binomial statistical analysis and high-frequency stimulation at the amphibian neuromuscular junction. To begin this study, we confirmed previous observations that synchronous evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release (reflected as endplate potentials, EPPs) is well described by a simple binomial distribution. We then used binomial analysis to study the effects of the phorbol ester phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu, 100 nM) and adenosine (50 microM) on the binomial parameters n (the number of calcium charged ACh quanta available for release) and p (the average probability of release), where the mean level of evoked ACh release (m) = np. We found that PDBu increased m by increasing the parameter n whilst adenosine reduced m by reducing n; neither agent affected the parameter p. PDBu had no effect on either the potency or efficacy of the inhibition produced by adenosine. Subtle differences between these two agents were revealed by the patterns of EPPs evoked by high-frequency trains of stimuli. Phorbol esters increased ACh release during the early phase of stimulation but not during the subsequent plateau phase. The inhibitory effect of adenosine was maximal at the beginning of the train and was still present with reduced efficacy during the plateau phase. When taken together with previous findings, these present results suggest that phorbol esters increase the immediately available store of synaptic vesicles by increasing the number of primed vesicles whilst adenosine acts at a later stage of the secretory process to decrease the number of calcium-charged primed vesicles.

  4. Motor palsies of cranial nerves (excluding VII) after vaccination: reports to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Woo, Emily Jane; Winiecki, Scott K; Ou, Alan C

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed cranial nerve palsies, other than VII, that have been reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We examined patterns for differences in vaccine types, seriousness, age, and clinical characteristics. We identified 68 reports of cranial nerve palsies, most commonly involving the oculomotor (III), trochlear (IV), and abducens (VI) nerves. Isolated cranial nerve palsies, as well as palsies occurring as part of a broader clinical entity, were reported. Forty reports (59%) were classified as serious, suggesting that a cranial nerve palsy may sometimes be the harbinger of a broader and more ominous clinical entity, such as a stroke or encephalomyelitis. There was no conspicuous clustering of live vs. inactivated vaccines. The patient age range spanned the spectrum from infants to the elderly. Independent data may help to clarify whether, when, and to what extent the rates of cranial nerve palsies following particular vaccines may exceed background levels.

  5. Ocular Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Pasadhika, Sirichai; Rosenbaum, James T

    2015-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is one of the leading causes of inflammatory eye disease. Ocular sarcoidosis can involve any part of the eye and its adnexal tissues and may cause uveitis, episcleritis/scleritis, eyelid abnormalities, conjunctival granuloma, optic neuropathy, lacrimal gland enlargement, and orbital inflammation. Glaucoma and cataract can be complications from inflammation itself or adverse effects from therapy. Ophthalmic manifestations can be isolated or associated with other organ involvement. Patients with ocular sarcoidosis can present with a wide range of clinical presentations and severity. Multidisciplinary approaches are required to achieve the best treatment outcomes for both ocular and systemic manifestations.

  6. Dynamics of motor nerve terminal remodeling unveiled using SNARE-cleaving botulinum toxins: the extent and duration are dictated by the sites of SNAP-25 truncation.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Frédéric A; Lisk, Godfrey; Sesardic, Dorothea; Dolly, J Oliver

    2003-04-01

    Nerve sprouts emerge from motor nerve terminals following blockade of exo-endocytosis for more than 3 days by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), and form functional synapses, albeit temporary. Upon restoration of synaptic activity to the parent terminal 7 and 90 days after exposure to BoNT/F or A respectively, a concomitant retraction of the outgrowths was observed. BoNT/E caused short-term neuroparalysis, and dramatically accelerated the recovery of BoNT/A-paralyzed muscle by further truncation of SNAP-25 and its replenishment with functional full-length SNARE. The removal of 9 C-terminal residues from SNAP-25 by BoNT/A leads to persistence of the inhibitory product due to the formation of a nonproductive SNARE complex(es) at release sites, whereas deletion of a further 17 amino acids permits replenishment and a speedy recovery.

  7. The Effect of the Silicone Ring Tourniquet and Standard Pneumatic Tourniquet on the Motor Nerve Conduction, Pain and Grip Strength in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Georgios I.; Kiziridis, Georgios; Aggelopoulou, Cristina; Galiatsatos, Dimitrios; Anastassopoulos, George; Ververidis, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pneumatic tourniquet (PT) is routinely used in upper and lower limb operations by most orthopaedic surgeons. The silicone ring tourniquet (SRT) was introduced in clinical practice over the last decade. Clinical as well as comparative studies have been published in volunteers concerning its safety and efficacy. The aim of this study was to investigate the postoperative effect of the silicone ring tourniquet (SRT), primarily on the motor nerve conduction, and secondarily on the pain and grip strength, in comparison to the effect of the pneumatic tourniquet (PT) in healthy volunteers. Methods: Both tourniquets were applied in the forearm of the dominant arm in 20 healthy volunteers and were kept on for 10 minutes. Pain was measured using the visual analogue scale and grip strength was measured with a hand dynamometer. We evaluated the following parameters of median nerve conduction: motor conduction velocity (MCV), latency (LAT) and amplitude (AMP). Results: Pain score at the time of tourniquet application was higher in SRT group but the alteration in pain scores in PT group was higher, with statistical significance (P<0.05). The grip strength was reduced by the application of both tourniquets; however there was a significantly higher reduction in the SRT group (P<0.05). The conduction impairment of the median nerve was worse in the PT group than in the SRT one, according to the changes in MCV (P<0.05). Conclusion: Median nerve conduction was affected more after PT application as compared to the SRT. Nevertheless, the reduction of grip strength was higher after the SRT application. PMID:26894213

  8. Ocular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, S E; Wagner, R S

    1986-01-01

    Torticollis can arise from nonocular (usually musculoskeletal) and ocular conditions. Abnormal head position for ocular reasons is usually assumed in order to maintain binocularity and/or to optimize visual acuity. A variety of conditions may be responsible. The sensory organ of position sense, the labyrinth, lies within the inner ear and it relates to eye movement in both a dynamic and static fashion. The Bielschowsky head tilt test is based on the functioning of the otolithic apparatus and is the primary test in evaluating abnormal head position. Treatment is usually surgical, with extent and location dependent upon on the underlying cause. While corrective surgery has usually been done on an elective basis for cosmetic purposes, there is evidence that uncorrected torticollis can cause musculoskeletal problems. This review describes the physiological bases for ocular torticollis and the diagnosis and treatment of its various underlying causes.

  9. Air bags and ocular injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, J D; Jaeger, E A; Jeffers, J B

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: This investigation retrospectively examined ocular injuries associated with air bag deployment to gain a better appreciation of potential risk factors in motor vehicle accidents. National statistics regarding the efficacy of air bags were reviewed. METHODS: Review of the literature from 1991 to 1998 identified 44 articles describing 97 patients with air-bag-induced ocular injuries. Variables extracted from each case were age, sex, height, position in the car, eye wear, vehicle impact speed, visual acuity, and specific ocular injuries. RESULTS: Corneal abrasions occurred in 49% of occupants, hyphemas in 43%, vitreous or retinal hemorrhages in 25%, and retinal tears or detachments in 15%. The globe was ruptured in 10 patients. Patients involved in higher-speed accidents (over 30 mph) sustained a greater percentage of vitreous or retinal hemorrhages and traumatic cataracts, while those at slower speeds were more prone to retinal tears or detachments. In a subset of 14 patients with serious ocular injuries, the impact speed of 11 patients was recorded at 30 mph or less. Slower speed may be a risk factor for some ocular injuries. Occupant height was not a significant factor. National statistics confirm that air bags reduce fatalities in motor vehicle accidents. However, children sitting in the front seat without a seat belt and infants in passenger-side rear-facing car seats are at risk for fatal injury. CONCLUSION: Air bags combined with seat belts are an effective means of reducing injury and death in adults during motor vehicle accidents. However, this study has documented a wide variety of ocular injuries associated with air bag deployment. It is hoped that researchers can develop modifications that continue to save lives while minimizing additional harm. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 2C FIGURE 2D FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:10703118

  10. Normative Values for Intertrial Variability of Motor Responses to Nerve Root and Transcranial Stimulation: A Condition for Follow-Up Studies in Individual Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Malucchi, Simona; Capobianco, Marco; Sperli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Objective Intertrial variability (ITV) of motor responses to peripheral (CMAP) and transcranial (MEP) stimulation prevents their use in follow-up studies. Our purpose was to develop strategies to reduce and measure CMAP and MEP ITV to guide long-term monitoring of conduction slowing and conduction failure of peripheral and central motor pathway in the individual patient. Methods Maximal compound muscle action potentials to High Voltage Electrical Stimulation (HVES) of lumbo-sacral nerve roots (r-CMAP) and activated, averaged motor evoked potentials (MEPs) to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) using double cone coil were recorded from 10 proximal and distal muscle districts of lower limbs. The procedure was repeated twice, 1–2 days apart, in 30 subjects, including healthy volunteers and clinically stable multiple sclerosis patients, using constant stimulating and recording sites and adopting a standardized procedure of voluntary activation. ITV for latency and area indexes and for the ratio between MEP and r-CMAP areas (a-Ratio) was expressed as Relative Intertrial Variation (RIV, 5th-95th percentile). As an inverse correlation between the size of area and ITV was found, raw ITV values were normalized as a function of area to make them comparable with one another. Results All RIV values for latencies were significantly below the optimum threshold of ± 10%, with the exception of r-CMAP latencies recorded from Vastus Lateralis muscle. RIVs for a-Ratio, the most important index of central conduction failure, ranged from a maximum of -25.3% to +32.2% (Vastus Medialis) to a minimum of -15.0% to + 17.4% (Flexor Hallucis Brevis). Conclusions The described procedure represents an effort to lower as much as possible variability of motor responses in serial recording; the reported ITV normative values are the necessary premise to detect significant changes of motor conduction slowing and failure in the individual patient in follow-up studies. PMID:27182973

  11. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Gasull, Xavier; Diebold, Yolanda; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101) have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases) can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation. PMID:25132732

  12. The role of the vagus nerve in the migrating motor complex and ghrelin- and motilin-induced gastric contraction in suncus.

    PubMed

    Miyano, Yuki; Sakata, Ichiro; Kuroda, Kayuri; Aizawa, Sayaka; Tanaka, Toru; Jogahara, Takamichi; Kurotani, Reiko; Sakai, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    The upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract undergoes a temporally coordinated cyclic motor pattern known as the migrating motor complex (MMC) in both dogs and humans during the fasted state. Feeding results in replacement of the MMC by a pattern of noncyclic, intermittent contractile activity termed as postprandial contractions. Although the MMC is known to be stimulated by motilin, recent studies have shown that ghrelin, which is from the same peptide family as motilin, is also involved in the regulation of the MMC. In the present study, we investigated the role of the vagus nerve on gastric motility using conscious suncus-a motilin- and ghrelin-producing small animal. During the fasted state, cyclic MMC comprising phases I, II, and III was observed in both sham-operated and vagotomized suncus; however, the duration and motility index (MI) of phase II was significantly decreased in vagotomized animals. Motilin infusion (50 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) for 10 min) during phase I had induced phase III-like contractions in both sham-operated and vagotomized animals. Ghrelin infusion (0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, or 10 µg·kg(-1)·min(-1) for 10 min) enhanced the amplitude of phase II MMC in sham-operated animals, but not in vagotomized animals. After feeding, phase I was replaced by postprandial contractions, and motilin infusion (50 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) for 10 min) did not induce phase III-like contractions in sham-operated suncus. However, in vagotomized suncus, feeding did not evoke postprandial contractions, but exogenous motilin injection strongly induced phase III-like contractions, as noted during the phase I period. Thus, the results indicate that ghrelin stimulates phase II of the MMC via the vagus nerve in suncus. Furthermore, the vagus nerve is essential for initiating postprandial contractions, and inhibition of the phase III-like contractions induced by motilin is highly dependent on the vagus nerve. PMID:23724093

  13. [Ocular burns].

    PubMed

    Merle, H; Gérard, M; Schrage, N

    2008-09-01

    Ocular or thermal burns account for 7.7%-18% of ocular trauma. The majority of victims are young. The burns occur in the setting of accidents at work or in the home, or during a physical attack. Chemical burns by strong acids or bases are responsible for the most serious injuries. Associated with the destruction of limbal stem cells, they present as recurrent epithelial ulcerations, chronic stromal ulcers, deep stromal revascularization, conjunctival overlap, or even corneal perforation. The initial clinical exam is sometimes difficult to perform in the presence of burning symptoms. Nevertheless, it enables the physician to classify the injury, establish a prognosis, and most importantly, guide the therapeutic management. The Roper-Hall modification of the Hughes classification system is the most widely utilized, broken down into stages based on the size of the stromal opacity and the extent of possible limbal ischemia. This classification is now favorably supplemented by those proposed by Dua and Wagoner, which are based on the extent of the limbal stem cell deficiency. The prognosis of the more serious forms of ocular burns has markedly improved over the last decade because of a better understanding of the physiology of the corneal epithelium. Surgical techniques aimed at restoring the destroyed limbal stem cells have altered the prognosis of severe corneal burns. In order to decrease the incidence of burns, prevention, particularly in industry, is essential. PMID:18971859

  14. The role of cyclic AMP and its protein kinase in mediating acetylcholine release and the action of adenosine at frog motor nerve endings.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, J. K.; Silinsky, E. M.; Solsona, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    1. The importance of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and its protein kinase (protein kinase A, PKA) in promoting acetylcholine (ACh) release was studied at frog motor nerve endings. The effects of cyclic AMP-dependent protein phosphorylation on the action of adenosine receptor agonists were also investigated. 2. Cyclic AMP was delivered to a local region of the cytoplasm just beneath the plasma membrane of motor nerve endings using phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) as a vehicle. Cyclic AMP in liposomes produced a parallel reduction in the mean level of evoked ACh release (m) and spontaneous ACh release (miniature endplate potential frequency; m.e.p.p.f) in most experiments. These inhibitory effects of cyclic AMP on quantal ACh release resemble the action of adenosine. 3. The effects of global increases in cytoplasmic cyclic AMP concentrations using lipophilic cyclic AMP analogues were generally different from those observed with cyclic AMP. 8-(4-Chlorophenylthio) cyclic AMP (CPT cyclic AMP) produced approximately two fold increases in m and m.e.p.p.f. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db cyclic AMP) also increased m and m.e.p.p.f, with the effect on m being smaller and more variable. 4. All three cyclic AMP analogues reduced the effects of adenosine receptor agonists on spontaneous and evoked ACh release. 5. The roles of protein phosphorylation in mediating ACh release and the inhibitory effects of adenosine were studied with the protein kinase inhibitor H7. H7 (30-100 microM) produced no consistent effect on evoked or spontaneous ACh release. At these concentrations, however, H7 exerted an unfortunate inhibitory action on the nicotinic ACh receptor/ion channel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2175231

  15. Bothropstoxin-I reduces evoked acetylcholine release from rat motor nerve terminals: radiochemical and real-time video-microscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Noronha-Matos, José B; Timóteo, Maria A; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Marques, Patrícia; Soares, Andreimar M; Carvalho, Cicilia; Cavalcante, Walter L G; Gallacci, Márcia

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the biological activity profile of the snake venom components is fundamental for improving the treatment of snakebite envenomings and may also contribute for the development of new potential therapeutic agents. In this work, we tested the effects of BthTX-I, a Lys49 PLA(2) homologue from the Bothrops jararacussu snake venom. While this toxin induces conspicuous myonecrosis by a catalytically independent mechanism, a series of in vitro studies support the hypothesis that BthTX-I might also exert a neuromuscular blocking activity due to its ability to alter the integrity of muscle cell membranes. To gain insight into the mechanisms of this inhibitory neuromuscular effect, for the first time, the influence of BthTX-I on nerve-evoked ACh release was directly quantified by radiochemical and real-time video-microscopy methods. Our results show that the neuromuscular blockade produced by in vitro exposure to BthTX-I (1 μM) results from the summation of both pre- and postsynaptic effects. Modifications affecting the presynaptic apparatus were revealed by the significant reduction of nerve-evoked [(3)H]-ACh release; real-time measurements of transmitter exocytosis using the FM4-64 fluorescent dye fully supported radiochemical data. The postsynaptic effect of BthTX-I was characterized by typical histological alterations in the architecture of skeletal muscle fibers, increase in the outflow of the intracellular lactate dehydrogenase enzyme and progressive depolarization of the muscle resting membrane potential. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the neuromuscular blockade produced by BthTX-I results from transient depolarization of skeletal muscle fibers, consequent to its general membrane-destabilizing effect, and subsequent decrease of evoked ACh release from motor nerve terminals. PMID:23142504

  16. Motor neuron disease with pyramidal tract dysfunction involves the cortical generators of the early somatosensory evoked potential to tibial nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zanette, G; Tinazzi, M; Polo, A; Rizzuto, N

    1996-10-01

    We evaluated somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) to tibial nerve stimulation in 39 patients with sporadic motor neuron disease using multiple scalp derivations (earlobe reference). SEPs were altered in 22 of 29 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, whereas they were unaffected in 10 progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) patients. The main changes involved the amplitude and the field distribution of the early P40 and N37 cortical potentials with different modalities varying from a selective loss of the P40 potential (33% of tested sides) to absence of all early cortical SEPs (22% of tested sides). The later components following N50 were generally spared. The commonly used Cz-Fz montage was inadequate for detecting these alterations. Central afferent conduction was slightly affected. The selective loss of cortical SEPs and their close correlation with clinicoelectrophysiologic evidence of central motor system involvement strongly support a cortical origin of the SEP alterations in ALS. We suggest that neuronal loss in the somatosensory cortex may selectively affect the generator sites of the cortical SEPs to lower limb stimulation. PMID:8857722

  17. A role for complexes of survival of motor neurons (SMN) protein with gemins and profilin in neurite-like cytoplasmic extensions of cultured nerve cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Aarti; Lambrechts, Anja; Le thi Hao; Le, Thanh T.; Sewry, Caroline A.; Ampe, Christophe; Burghes, Arthur H.M.; Morris, Glenn E. . E-mail: glenn.morris@rjah.nhs.uk

    2005-09-10

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced levels of SMN (survival of motor neurons protein) and consequent loss of motor neurons. SMN is involved in snRNP transport and nuclear RNA splicing, but axonal transport of SMN has also been shown to occur in motor neurons. SMN also binds to the small actin-binding protein, profilin. We now show that SMN and profilin II co-localise in the cytoplasm of differentiating rat PC12 cells and in neurite-like extensions, especially at their growth cones. Many components of known SMN complexes were also found in these extensions, including gemin2 (SIP-1), gemin6, gemin7 and unrip (unr-interacting protein). Coilin p80 and Sm core protein immunoreactivity, however, were seen only in the nucleus. SMN is known to associate with {beta}-actin mRNA and specific hnRNPs in axons and in neurite extensions of cultured nerve cells, and SMN also stimulates neurite outgrowth in cultures. Our results are therefore consistent with SMN complexes, rather than SMN alone, being involved in the transport of actin mRNPs along the axon as in the transport of snRNPs into the nucleus by similar SMN complexes. Antisense knockdown of profilin I and II isoforms inhibited neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells and caused accumulation of SMN and its associated proteins in cytoplasmic aggregates. BIAcore studies demonstrated a high affinity interaction of SMN with profilin IIa, the isoform present in developing neurons. Pathogenic missense mutations in SMN, or deletion of exons 5 and 7, prevented this interaction. The interaction is functional in that SMN can modulate actin polymerisation in vitro by reducing the inhibitory effect of profilin IIa. This suggests that reduced SMN in SMA might cause axonal pathfinding defects by disturbing the normal regulation of microfilament growth by profilins.

  18. Ocular dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light interferometry (SRWLI) was used to measure the wavelength dependence of refractive index (i.e., dispersion) for various ocular components. The accuracy of the technique was assessed by measurement of fused silica and water, the refractive indices of which have been measured at several different wavelengths. The dispersion of bovine and rabbit aqueous and vitreous humor was measured from 400 to 1100 nm. Also, the dispersion was measured from 400 to 700 nm for aqueous and vitreous humor extracted from goat and rhesus monkey eyes. For the humors, the dispersion did not deviate significantly from water. In an additional experiment, the dispersion of aqueous and vitreous humor that had aged up to a month was compared to freshly harvested material. No difference was found between the fresh and aged media. An unsuccessful attempt was also made to use the technique for dispersion measurement of bovine cornea and lens. Future refinement may allow measurement of the dispersion of cornea and lens across the entire visible and near-infrared wavelength band. The principles of white- light interferometry including image analysis, measurement accuracy, and limitations of the technique, are discussed. In addition, alternate techniques and previous measurements of ocular dispersion are reviewed.

  19. Ocular manifestations of Hansen's disease.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, G C; Vance, G; Otton, S; Kumar, S V; Stanley, J N; Rao, G N

    1994-01-01

    A detailed ophthalmic evaluation including slitlamp biomicroscopy, measurement of corneal sensitivity using Cochet and Bonnet aesthesiometer, Schirmer's test and Goldmann applanation tonometry was carried out in 89 patients of Hansen's disease attending the leprosy clinic with or without ocular symptoms and willing to undergo eye evaluation. Thirty-one patients had lepromatous leprosy (8 with erythema nodosum leprosum), 56 patients had borderline disease (13 with reversal reactions) and 2 had tuberculoid disease. In addition to the well documented changes of lagophthalmos (6.7%), uveitis (7.3%) and cataracts (19%), we noted prominent corneal nerves in 133 eyes (74.7%), beaded corneal nerves in 19 eyes (10.7%), corneal scarring in 10 eyes (5.6%), corneal hypoaesthesia in 51 eyes (28%) and dry eye in 18 eyes (13%). Beaded corneal nerves and/or stomal infiltrates occurred mainly in the lepromatous group (75%). Ocular hypotony (IOP less than 12 mm Hg) was not seen more frequently in Hansen's as compared to age and sex matched controls with refractive errors or cataracts (33.7%, vs. 37.8%, p = 0.33). Our study highlights the primary corneal involvement with corneal neuropathy as the predominant feature of Hansen's disease.

  20. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  1. Hypertonic enhancement of transmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals: Ca2+ independence and role of integrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, A. H.; Chen, B. M.; Grinnell, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    Hyperosmotic solutions cause markedly enhanced spontaneous quantal release of neurotransmitter from many nerve terminals. The mechanism of this enhancement is unknown. We have investigated this phenomenon at the frog neuromuscular junction with the aim of determining the degree to which it resembles the modulation of release by stretch, which has been shown to be mediated by mechanical tension on integrins.The hypertonicity enhancement, like the stretch effect, does not require Ca2+ influx or release from internal stores, although internal release may contribute to the effect. The hypertonicity effect is sharply reduced (but not eliminated) by peptides containing the RGD sequence, which compete with native ligands for integrin bonds.There is co-variance in the magnitude of the stretch and osmotic effects; that is, individual terminals exhibiting a large stretch effect also show strong enhancement by hypertonicity, and vice versa. The stretch and osmotic enhancements also can partially occlude each other.There remain some clear-cut differences between osmotic and stretch forms of modulation: the larger range of enhancement by hypertonic solutions, the relative lack of effect of osmolarity on evoked release, and the reported higher temperature sensitivity of osmotic enhancement. Nevertheless, our data strongly implicate integrins in a significant fraction of the osmotic enhancement, possibly acting via the same mechanism as stretch modulation.

  2. Central respiratory effects on motor nerve activities after organophosphate exposure in a working heart brainstem preparation of the rat.

    PubMed

    Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Seeger, Thomas; Dutschmann, Mathias; Worek, Franz; Mörschel, Michael

    2011-09-25

    The impact of organophosphorus compound (OP) intoxication on the activity of central respiratory circuitry, causing acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition and accumulation of acetylcholine in the respiratory brainstem circuits, is not understood. We investigated the central effect of the OP Crotylsarin (CRS) on respiratory network activity using the working heart brainstem preparation, which specifically allows for the analysis of central drug effects without changes in brainstem oxygenation possibly caused by drug effects on peripheral cardio-respiratory activity. Respiratory network activity was determined from phrenic and hypoglossal or vagal nerve activities (PNA, HNA, VNA). To investigate combined central and peripheral CRS effects hypo-perfusion was used mimicking additional peripheral cardiovascular collapse. Systemic CRS application induced a brief central apnea and complete AChE-inhibition in the brainstem. Subsequently, respiration was characterised by highly significant reduced PNA minute activity, while HNA showed expiratory related extra bursting indicative for activation of un-specified oro-pharyngeal behaviour. During hypo-perfusion CRS induced significantly prolonged apnoea. In all experiments respiratory activity fully recovered after 1h. We conclude that CRS mediated AChE inhibition causes only transient central breathing disturbance. Apparently intrinsic brainstem mechanisms can compensate for cholinergic over activation. Nevertheless, combination of hypo-perfusion and CRS exposure evoke the characteristic breathing arrests associated with OP poisoning.

  3. The origin of ocular microtremor in man.

    PubMed

    Spauschus, A; Marsden, J; Halliday, D M; Rosenberg, J R; Brown, P

    1999-06-01

    A novel technique for the study of human eye movements was used to investigate the frequency components of ocular drift and microtremor in both eyes simultaneously. The tangential components of horizontal eye accelerations were recorded in seven healthy subjects using light-weight accelerometers mounted on scleral contact lenses during smooth pursuit movements, vestibulo-ocular reflexes and eccentric gaze with and without fixation. Spectral peaks were observed at low (up to 25 Hz) and high (60-90 Hz) frequencies. A multivariate analysis based on partial coherence analysis was used to correct for head movement. After correction, the signals were found to be coherent between the eyes over both low- and high-frequency ranges, irrespective of task, convergence or fixation. It is concluded that the frequency content of ocular drift and microtremor reflects the patterning of low-level drives to the extra-ocular muscle motor units. PMID:10422719

  4. TRPV1-dependent regulation of synaptic activity in the mouse dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Imran J.; Derbenev, Andrei V.

    2013-01-01

    The dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) is a key integrative point of the parasympathetic neuronal network localized in the dorsal vagal complex. Activity of neurons in the DMV is closely regulated by synaptic inputs, and regulation of excitatory and inhibitory synapsis by transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has been demonstrated. Activation of TRPV1 by heat, protons, endovanilloids, endocannabinoids, and inflammatory mediators is well established. In our study we hypothesized that TRPV1 contributes to the synaptic transmission of DMV neurons at physiological range of temperature without additional stimuli. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings we evaluated the effect of a rapid increase of temperature on excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission and the contribution of TRPV1 to this response. Rapid increase of temperature from 25 to 37°C increased the frequency of miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSC) by 351.7%. The frequency of miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSC) also increased by 184.7%. 5′-iodoresiniferatoxin (5′-iRFT), a selective TRPV1 antagonist, prevented the increase of mEPSC and mIPSC frequency. In summary, our data demonstrate that at physiological range of temperature TRPV1 contributes to presynaptic neurotransmission of DMV neurons. PMID:24379754

  5. Ocular manifestations of frontonasal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Roarty, J D; Pron, G E; Siegel-Bartelt, J; Posnick, J C; Buncic, J R

    1994-01-01

    The ophthalmologic findings associated with frontonasal dysplasia have not been defined previously in a large series of untreated children. We reviewed the ophthalmic manifestations of a series of patients with frontonasal dysplasia who were seen as part of their craniofacial evaluation. All had undergone a complete ophthalmologic examination before any manipulation of either the orbits or the soft tissues of the orbital contents. From 1986 to 1991, 23 patients with frontonasal dysplasia were seen; ophthalmologic abnormalities were found in 20 (87 percent). Abnormalities included significant refractive errors, strabismus, nystagmus, and eyelid ptosis. Three patients had amblyopia, a treatable cause of visual loss, from strabismus or anisometropia. Ten eyes in seven patients (30 percent) had severe structural anomalies, such as optic nerve hypoplasia, optic nerve colobomas, microphthalmia, cataract, corneal dermoid, or inflammatory retinopathy, that resulted in an acuity of 20/100 or worse. The high incidence of ocular abnormalities indicates that early assessment by an ophthalmologist should be part of the initial evaluation of patients with frontonasal dysplasia to detect treatable visual or ocular problems. PMID:8278482

  6. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  7. Kinetics, Ca2+ dependence, and biophysical properties of integrin-mediated mechanical modulation of transmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. M.; Grinnell, A. D.

    1997-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals is strongly modulated by change in muscle length. Over the physiological range, there is an approximately 10% increase in spontaneous and evoked release per 1% muscle stretch. Because many muscle fibers do not receive suprathreshold synaptic inputs at rest length, this stretch-induced enhancement of release constitutes a strong peripheral amplifier of the spinal stretch reflex. The stretch modulation of release is inhibited by peptides that block integrin binding of natural ligands. The modulation varies linearly with length, with a delay of no more than approximately 1-2 msec and is maintained constant at the new length. Moreover, the stretch modulation persists in a zero Ca2+ Ringer and, hence, is not dependent on Ca2+ influx through stretch activated channels. Eliminating transmembrane Ca2+ gradients and buffering intraterminal Ca2+ to approximately normal resting levels does not eliminate the modulation, suggesting that it is not the result of release of Ca2+ from internal stores. Finally, changes in temperature have no detectable effect on the kinetics of stretch-induced changes in endplate potential (EPP) amplitude or miniature EPP (mEPP) frequency. We conclude, therefore, that stretch does not act via second messenger pathways or a chemical modification of molecules involved in the release pathway. Instead, there is direct mechanical modulation of release. We postulate that tension on integrins in the presynaptic membrane is transduced mechanically into changes in the position or conformation of one or more molecules involved in neurotransmitter release, altering sensitivity to Ca2+ or the equilibrium for a critical reaction leading to vesicle fusion.

  8. Ice test in diagnosis of ocular myasthenia.

    PubMed

    Quddus, M A; Rahman, H Z; Ali, Z M; Khan, O S; Aftabuddin, M

    2013-10-01

    This observational, non-control, non equivalent pretest and post test descriptive study was carried out at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh from June 2009 to December 2009 to compare the efficacy of ice test and repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) in diagnosis of ocular myasthenia gravis. Ten patients with fluctuating ptosis (4 male and 6 female) who were suspected of having ocular myasthenia were included in the study. Male and female ratio in the study was 2:3. The mean age of the patients was 28.1 years. Positive response to pyridostigmine was taken as confirmation of ocular myasthenia. A piece of ice (2cm × 1cm) was placed over the upper eyelid for 2 minutes and the vertical eye lid fissure height was noted before and after the application of ice. Repetitive nerve stimulation was performed in the same subjects subsequently. Results of two tests were compared. Eight patients shows good (>2mm) elevation of eyelid with ice and three patients had abnormal RNS. In conclusion, ice test appears as more sensitive clinical test to detect ocular myasthenia than RNS test.

  9. High-Resolution Ultrasonography of the Superficial Peroneal Motor and Sural Sensory Nerves May Be a Non-invasive Approach to the Diagnosis of Vasculitic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Schäfer, Kristina A.; Mackenrodt, Daniel; Sommer, Claudia; Müllges, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) is an emerging new tool in the investigation of peripheral nerves. We set out to assess the utility of HRUS performed at lower extremity nerves in peripheral neuropathies. Nerves of 26 patients with polyneuropathies of different etiologies and 26 controls were investigated using HRUS. Patients underwent clinical, laboratory, electrophysiological assessment, and a diagnostic sural nerve biopsy as part of the routine work-up. HRUS was performed at the sural, tibial, and the common, superficial, and deep peroneal nerves. The superficial peroneal nerve longitudinal diameter (LD) distinguished best between the groups: patients with immune-mediated neuropathies (n = 13, including six with histology-proven vasculitic neuropathy) had larger LD compared to patients with non-immune-mediated neuropathies (p < 0.05) and to controls (p < 0.001). Among all subgroups, patients with vasculitic neuropathy showed the largest superficial peroneal nerve LD (p < 0.001) and had a larger sural nerve cross-sectional area when compared with disease controls (p < 0.001). Enlargement of the superficial peroneal and sural nerves as detected by HRUS may be a useful additional finding in the differential diagnosis of vasculitic and other immune-mediated neuropathies. PMID:27064457

  10. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX–XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected by lesions in the basal ganglia. Vagus nerve funtion (craniel nerve X) can be compromised in schizophrenia, bulimia, obesity, and major depression. A cervical lesion to the nerve roots of the spinal accessory nerve (craniel nerve XI) can cause a cervical dystonia, which sometimes is misdiagnosed as a dyskinesia related to neuroleptic use. Finally, unilateral hypoglossal (craniel nerve XII) nerve palsy is one of the most common mononeuropathies caused by brain metastases. Supranuclear lesions of cranial nerve XII are involved in pseudobulbar palsy and ALS, and lower motor neuron lesions of cranial nerve XII can also be present in bulbar palsy and in ALS patients who also have lower motor neuron involvement. This article reviews these and other syndromes related to cranial nerves IX through XII that might be seen by psychiatry. PMID:20532157

  11. Ocular toxicity from systemically administered xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Gokulgandhi, Mitan R; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The eye is considered as the most privileged organ because of the blood–ocular barrier that acts as a barrier to systemically administered xenobiotics. However, there has been a significant increase in the number of reports on systemic drug-induced ocular complications. If such complications are left untreated, then it may cause permanent damage to vision. Hence, knowledge of most recent updates on ever-increasing reports of such toxicities has become imperative to develop better therapy while minimizing toxicities. Areas covered The article is mainly divided into anterior and posterior segment manifestations caused by systemically administered drugs. The anterior segment is further elaborated on corneal complications where as the posterior segment is focused on optic nerve, retinal and vitreous complications. Furthermore, this article includes recent updates on acute and chronic ocular predicaments, in addition to discussing various associated symptoms caused by drugs. Expert opinion Direct correlation of ocular toxicities due to systemic drug therapy is evident from current literature. Therefore, it is necessary to have detailed documentation of these complications to improve understanding and predict toxicities. We made an attempt to ensure that the reader is aware of the characteristic ocular complications, the potential for irreversible drug toxicity and indications for cessation. PMID:22803583

  12. Ocular comparative anatomy of the family Rodentia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ramos Fernandez, Julia; Dubielzig, Richard R

    2013-07-01

    There is little information regarding ocular anatomy and histology in many of the rodent species. Histological analyses for morphologic features were performed in 31 globes from 18 rodent species submitted to and archived at the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin. The following measurements were taken: thickness of the cornea, corneal epithelium, corneal stroma, Descemet's membrane, and retina. H&E sections were evaluated for the following anatomical features: presence of pigmented epithelial cells in the peripheral cornea, presence and location of Schlemm's canal, presence of iridal sphincter and dilator and ciliary body muscles, presence of pars plicata and plana, presence of retinal vessels, presence of lamina cribrosa, and presence of tapetum lucidum. The springhaas was the only rodent in our collection that presented a well-developed tapetum lucidum fibrosum. The presence of retinal vessels was variable: vessels were observed in all of the members of the mouse-related clade, except the springhaas and the beaver, in all of the squirrel-related clade members, and in none of the Ctenohystrica. In the flying squirrels, blood vessels extended to the outer limiting membrane in the photoreceptor layer. Beavers, chinchillas, capybara, and guinea pigs lacked vessels within the retina; however, they had vessels within the optic nerve head. Ground squirrels have an optic nerve head, which is linear in the horizontal plane and an asymmetric retina. The tree-dwelling squirrels have a rounded but still elongated optic nerve, and the flying squirrel has a round optic nerve head like all the other rodents.

  13. Presumed ocular bartonellosis

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoff, F; Ossewaarde, J; de Loos, W S; Rothova, A

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The spectrum of diseases caused by Bartonella henselae continues to expand and ocular involvement during this infection is being diagnosed with increasing frequency.
METHODS—The clinical features and visual prognosis for 13 patients with intraocular inflammatory disease and laboratory evidence of bartonellosis were investigated. There were nine patients with neuroretinitis and four with panuveitis with positive antibody titres against B henselae determined by an enzyme immunoassay (IgG exceding 1:900 and/or IgM exceeding 1:250).
RESULTS—Positive IgG levels were found for eight patients and positive IgM levels for five. Despite animal exposure of 10 patients, only two (IgG positive) cases had systemic symptoms consistent with the diagnosis of cat scratch disease. Pathological fluorescein leakage of the optic disc was observed in all affected eyes. At 6 months' follow up, 3/18 (17%) affected eyes had a visual acuity of less than 20/100, owing to optic disc atrophy and cystoid macular oedema. 12 patients (17 eyes) were treated with antibiotics; visual acuity improved two or more Snellen lines for 9/17 (53%) eyes.
CONCLUSIONS—The possibility of B henselae infection should be considered in patients with neuroretinitis and panuveitis (especially in cases with associated optic nerve involvement) even in the absence of systemic symptoms typical for cat scratch disease.

 Keywords: bartonellosis; Bartonella henselae; intraocular inflammatory disease; cat scratch disease PMID:10365031

  14. [Electrical nerve stimulation for plexus and nerve blocks].

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, J; Klotz, E; Bogusch, G; Volk, T

    2007-11-01

    Despite the increasing use of ultrasound, electrical nerve stimulation is commonly used as the standard for both plexus and peripheral nerve blocks. Several recent randomized trials have contributed to a better understanding of physiological and clinical correlations. Traditionally used currents and impulse widths are better defined in relation to the distance between needle tip and nerves. Commercially available devices enable transcutaneous nerve stimulation and provide new opportunities for the detection of puncture sites and for training. The electrically ideal position of the needle usually is defined by motor responses which can not be interpreted without profound anatomical knowledge. For instance, interscalene blocks can be successful even after motor responses of deltoid or pectoral muscles. Infraclavicular blocks should be aimed at stimulation of the posterior fascicle (extension). In contrast to multiple single nerve blocks, axillary single-shot blocks more commonly result in incomplete anaesthesia. Blockade of the femoral nerve can be performed without any nerve stimulation if the fascia iliaca block is used. Independently of the various approaches to the sciatic nerve, inversion and plantar flexion are the best options for single-shot blocks. Further clinical trials are needed to define the advantages of stimulating catheters in continuous nerve blocks.

  15. Plasticity within non-cerebellar pathways rapidly shapes motor performance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Diana E; Della Santina, Charles C; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2016-01-01

    Although cerebellar mechanisms are vital to maintain accuracy during complex movements and to calibrate simple reflexes, recent in vitro studies have called into question the widely held view that synaptic changes within cerebellar pathways exclusively guide alterations in motor performance. Here we investigate the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) circuitry by applying temporally precise activation of vestibular afferents in awake-behaving monkeys to link plasticity at different neural sites with changes in motor performance. Behaviourally relevant activation patterns produce rapid attenuation of direct pathway VOR neurons, but not their nerve input. Changes in the strength of this pathway are sufficient to induce a lasting decrease in the evoked VOR. In addition, indirect brainstem pathways display complementary nearly instantaneous changes, contributing to compensating for the reduced sensitivity of primary VOR neurons. Taken together, our data provide evidence that multiple sites of plasticity within VOR pathways can rapidly shape motor performance in vivo. PMID:27157829

  16. Plasticity within non-cerebellar pathways rapidly shapes motor performance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Diana E.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Cullen, Kathleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Although cerebellar mechanisms are vital to maintain accuracy during complex movements and to calibrate simple reflexes, recent in vitro studies have called into question the widely held view that synaptic changes within cerebellar pathways exclusively guide alterations in motor performance. Here we investigate the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) circuitry by applying temporally precise activation of vestibular afferents in awake-behaving monkeys to link plasticity at different neural sites with changes in motor performance. Behaviourally relevant activation patterns produce rapid attenuation of direct pathway VOR neurons, but not their nerve input. Changes in the strength of this pathway are sufficient to induce a lasting decrease in the evoked VOR. In addition, indirect brainstem pathways display complementary nearly instantaneous changes, contributing to compensating for the reduced sensitivity of primary VOR neurons. Taken together, our data provide evidence that multiple sites of plasticity within VOR pathways can rapidly shape motor performance in vivo. PMID:27157829

  17. Effect of Artificial Nerve Conduit Vascularization on Peripheral Nerve in a Necrotic Bed

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Yuki; Murayama, Akira; Takeshita, Katsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several types of artificial nerve conduit have been used for bridging peripheral nerve gaps as an alternative to autologous nerves. However, their efficacy in repairing nerve injuries accompanied by surrounding tissue damage remains unclear. We fabricated a novel nerve conduit vascularized by superficial inferior epigastric (SIE) vessels and evaluated whether it could promote axonal regeneration in a necrotic bed. Methods: A 15-mm nerve conduit was implanted beneath the SIE vessels in the groin of a rat to supply it with blood vessels 2 weeks before nerve reconstruction. We removed a 13-mm segment of the sciatic nerve and then pressed a heated iron against the dorsal thigh muscle to produce a burn. The defects were immediately repaired with an autograft (n = 10), nerve conduit graft (n = 8), or vascularized nerve conduit graft (n = 8). Recovery of motor function was examined for 18 weeks after surgery. The regenerated nerves were electrophysiologically and histologically evaluated. Results: The vascularity of the nerve conduit implanted beneath the SIE vessels was confirmed histologically 2 weeks after implantation. Between 14 and 18 weeks after surgery, motor function of the vascularized conduit group was significantly better than that of the nonvascularized conduit group. Electrophysiological and histological evaluations revealed that although the improvement did not reach the level of reinnervation achieved by an autograft, the vascularized nerve conduit improved axonal regeneration more than did the conduit alone. Conclusion: Vascularization of artificial nerve conduits accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration, but further research is required to improve the quality of nerve regeneration. PMID:27257595

  18. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  19. Vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.; Randle, R. J.; Stewart, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Stimulation of the vestibular system by angular acceleration produces widespread sensory and motor effects. The present paper studies a motor effect which has not been reported in the literature, i.e., the influence of rotary acceleration of the body on ocular accommodation. The accommodation of 10 young men was recorded before and after a high-level deceleration to zero velocity following 30 sec of rotating. Accommodation was recorded continuously on an infrared optometer for 110 sec under two conditions: while the subjects observed a target set at the far point, and while they viewed the same target through a 0.3-mm pinhole. Stimulation by high-level rotary deceleration produced positive accommodation or a pseudomyopia under both conditions, but the positive accommodation was substantially greater and lasted much longer during fixation through the pinhole. It is hypothesized that this increase in accommodation is a result of a vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex.

  20. Custom ocular prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Cain, J R

    1982-12-01

    The rehabilitation of a patient who has suffered the psychologic trauma of an ocular loss requires a prosthesis that will provide the optimum cosmetic and functional result. Refinement in the details of custom ocular construction has produced a superior restoration delivered more readily.

  1. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Update Date 6/1/2015 ...

  2. Ocular manifestations in children with developmental delay preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Wu, H J; Tsai, R K

    2000-08-01

    To investigate systemic diseases and ocular problems among children with developmental delay, forty-one children (28 boys and 13 girls with a mean age of 3.53 +/- 2.25 y/o) were enrolled in this study. In addition to ocular examinations, we used centrality, steadiness, fixation and flash visual evoked potentials (VEPs) tests on all of the children. We found that 23 children (56.10%) had ocular problems with optic atrophy and strabismus being the two most common ocular abnormalities. The two major clinical manifestations of developmentally delayed children were mental and motor retardation. The primary test of centrality, steadiness and fixation and visual evoked potentials could be useful tools in evaluating the visual pathway and ocular motility. Preliminary results showed that more than half of the children with developmental delay had certain ocular abnormalities. The high incidence of ocular abnormalities deserves careful attention when these children are brought to seek medical help. Further study of ocular problems among developmentally delayed children and a search for more reliable examination method should be encouraged. PMID:11221546

  3. Optic nerve astrocytoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Rozov, Orr; Piñeyro, Pablo E; Zimmerman, Kurt L; Herring, Ian P; Matusow, Rachel; Rossmeisl, John H; Jortner, Bernard S; Dreyfus, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial astrocytomas are relatively uncommon in dogs and optic nerve astrocytomas even more so. This neoplasm should be considered as differential in canine patients with vision loss, retinal detachment, ocular mass, and histopathologic findings of infiltrative fusiform to polygonal glial cells possibly associated with glomeruloid vascular proliferation. PMID:27648262

  4. Ocular changes induced by drugs commonly used in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Turno-Kręcicka, Anna; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta; Patryn, Eliza; Czajor, Karolina; Nita, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The use of many drugs in dermatologic diseases may cause ocular side effects. Some may regress after discontinuation of the therapy, but others persist or progress even after the cessation of treatment. This review presents four groups of commonly prescribed drugs-antimalarial medicines, glucocorticoids, retinoids, and psoralens + ultraviolet A (UVA) therapy-and discusses their possible ocular side effects. The most significant complication of antimalarial drugs is retinopathy with the risk of permanent visual impairment. There are different recommendations for screening for this drug-related retinopathy. The most important ocular manifestations of steroid management are irreversible optic nerve damage in "steroid responders" (steroid glaucoma) and cataract. Some other side effects may disappear after discontinuation of the therapy. Retinoid-induced ocular side effects include ocular surface disease as well as retinal dysfunction. It is recommended to modify the therapy when night blindness occurs or after the decrease of color vision. Protective eyewear is sufficient to avoid ocular surface problems during psoralen + UVA therapy. The knowledge of screening schemes and closer cooperation between physicians may decrease the risk of serious or irreversible ocular side effects. PMID:26903180

  5. Numerical Modeling of Ocular Dysfunction in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Vera, J.; Myers, J. G.; Raykin, J.; Feola, A. J.; Gleason, R.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Upon introduction to microgravity, the near-loss of hydrostatic pressure causes a marked cephalic (headward) shift of fluid in an astronaut's body. The fluid shift, along with other factors of spaceflight, induces a cascade of interdependent physiological responses which occur at varying time scales. Long-duration missions carry an increased risk for the development of the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath, kinking of the optic nerve and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. In the cases of VIIP found to date, the initial onset of symptoms occurred after several weeks to several months of spaceflight, by which time the gross bodily fluid distribution is well established. We are developing a suite of numerical models to simulate the effects of fluid shift on the cardiovascular, central nervous and ocular systems. These models calculate the modified mean volumes, flow rates and pressures that are characteristic of the altered quasi-homeostatic state in microgravity, including intracranial and intraocular pressures. The results of the lumped models provide initial and boundary data to a 3D finite element biomechanics simulation of the globe, optic nerve head and retrobulbar subarachnoid space. The integrated set of models will be used to investigate the evolution of the biomechanical stress state in the ocular tissues due to long-term exposure to microgravity.

  6. Visual Behaviors and Adaptations Associated with Cortical and Ocular Impairment in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jan, J. E.; Groenveld, M.

    1993-01-01

    This article shows the usefulness of understanding visual behaviors in the diagnosis of various types of visual impairments that are due to ocular and cortical disorders. Behaviors discussed include nystagmus, ocular motor dyspraxia, head position, close viewing, field loss adaptations, mannerisms, photophobia, and abnormal color perception. (JDD)

  7. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B. S.; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  8. Differential Reanimation of the Upper and Lower Face Using 2 Interpositional Nerve Grafts in Total Facial Nerve Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Radical parotidectomy often results in complex facial nerve defects involving the main nerve trunk and multiple distal nerve branches. Although cable nerve grafting often leads to good nerve regeneration, severe synkinesis due to aberrant axonal regrowth is inevitable. In such situations, the use of 2 motor sources to differentially reanimate the upper and lower face could minimize synkinesis. Here we describe a method of total facial nerve reconstruction in which the upper and lower face are differentially reconstructed with the hypoglossal nerve and facial nerve, respectively, using 2 interpositional nerve grafts. Reconstruction of the lower face with the facial nerve restored voluntary and coordinated animation, and reconstruction of the upper face with the hypoglossal nerve restored frontalis muscle tone and eye closure. These results suggest that our method could serve as an alternative to conventional techniques that use only the facial or hypoglossal nerve. PMID:26579350

  9. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  10. Microscopes and ocular infections.

    PubMed

    Olcerst, R B

    1987-05-01

    Environmental microbial assays of industrial microscope eyepieces were conducted following reports of multiple intershift ocular infections. Pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus was identified among the microorganisms cultured. This paper suggests that direct contact with industrial microscope eyepieces provides a potentially significant route of transmission of both bacterial and viral ocular infections. An industrial hygiene ocular health questionnaire was distributed to a first and second shift manufacturing operation to assess the incidence of ocular infections. These data were compared to the questionnaire responses of 122 control manufacturing workers who did not use microscopes. Based on self-reporting by employees, those who used microscopes were found to have statistically significant incidence of sites and conjunctivitis that was 8.3 times that of the control group. Sterilization of eyepieces by ethylene oxide, formaldehyde and isopropyl alcohol were considered, but ultimately rejected. These biocides were found respectively to damage ocular lens coatings, contribute to volatile organic emissions, or be ineffective against spore-forming bacteria. This article presents a detailed evaluation of a commercially available ultraviolet sanitization unit (manufactured by the King Bactostat Corp., 7115 Armistad Street, El Paso, TX 79912). This ultraviolet disinfection process proved to be rapid and emission free; it also yielded eyepieces free of residual chemical biocides that have the potential for ocular irritation. Field tests involving 60 eyepieces demonstrated effective disinfection by a Chi-Square statistical comparison, at values greater than 95% confidence level, as compared to unirradiated eyepieces.

  11. Effect of Ranirestat on Sensory and Motor Nerve Function in Japanese Patients with Diabetic Polyneuropathy: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Jo; Kohara, Nobuo; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a 26-week oral-administration study of ranirestat (an aldose reductase inhibitor) at a once-daily dose of 20 mg to evaluate its efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). The primary endpoint was summed change in sensory nerve conduction velocity (NCV) for the bilateral sural and proximal median sensory nerves. The sensory NCV was significantly (P = 0.006) improved by ranirestat. On clinical symptoms evaluated with the use of modified Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score (mTCNS), obvious efficacy was not found in total score. However, improvement in the sensory test domain of the mTCNS was significant (P = 0.037) in a subgroup of patients diagnosed with neuropathy according to the TCNS severity classification. No clinically significant effects on safety parameters including hepatic and renal functions were observed. Our results indicate that ranirestat is effective on DPN (Japic CTI-121994). PMID:26881251

  12. Ocular comparative anatomy of the family Rodentia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ramos Fernandez, Julia; Dubielzig, Richard R

    2013-07-01

    There is little information regarding ocular anatomy and histology in many of the rodent species. Histological analyses for morphologic features were performed in 31 globes from 18 rodent species submitted to and archived at the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin. The following measurements were taken: thickness of the cornea, corneal epithelium, corneal stroma, Descemet's membrane, and retina. H&E sections were evaluated for the following anatomical features: presence of pigmented epithelial cells in the peripheral cornea, presence and location of Schlemm's canal, presence of iridal sphincter and dilator and ciliary body muscles, presence of pars plicata and plana, presence of retinal vessels, presence of lamina cribrosa, and presence of tapetum lucidum. The springhaas was the only rodent in our collection that presented a well-developed tapetum lucidum fibrosum. The presence of retinal vessels was variable: vessels were observed in all of the members of the mouse-related clade, except the springhaas and the beaver, in all of the squirrel-related clade members, and in none of the Ctenohystrica. In the flying squirrels, blood vessels extended to the outer limiting membrane in the photoreceptor layer. Beavers, chinchillas, capybara, and guinea pigs lacked vessels within the retina; however, they had vessels within the optic nerve head. Ground squirrels have an optic nerve head, which is linear in the horizontal plane and an asymmetric retina. The tree-dwelling squirrels have a rounded but still elongated optic nerve, and the flying squirrel has a round optic nerve head like all the other rodents. PMID:23734597

  13. Ocular Fixation Abnormality in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirama, Aya; Kanai, Chieko; Kato, Nobumasa; Kashino, Makio

    2016-01-01

    We examined the factors that influence ocular fixation control in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) including sensory information, individuals' motor characteristics, and inhibitory control. The ASD group showed difficulty in maintaining fixation especially when there was no fixation target. The fixational eye movement characteristics of…

  14. [Experimental model of ocular ischemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, T N; Chudin, A V

    2014-01-01

    The review presents the most common methods of modeling of retinal ischemia in vitro (chemical ischemia with iodoacetic acid, incubation of the retinal pigment epithelium cells with oligomycin, deprivation of oxygen and glucose) and in vivo (a model with increased intraocular pressure, cerebral artery occlusion, chronic ligation of the carotid arteries, photocoagulation of the retinal vessels, occlusion of the central retinal artery, endothelin-1 administration). Modeling ischemic injury in rats is the most frequently used method in studies, because the blood supply of their eyes is similar to blood flow in the human eyes. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. Application of methods depends on the purpose of the experimental study. Currently model of ocular ischemic disease can be obtained easily by injecting vasoconstrictive drug endothelin-1. It is the most widely used method of high intraocular pressure induced ocular ischemic damage similar to glaucoma, occlusion of central retinal artery or ophthalmic artery in human. The development of experimental models of ocular ischemic diseases and detailed investigation of mechanisms of impairment of microcirculation are useful for improve the efficiency of diagnostic and treatment of ischemic diseases of retina and optic nerve. PMID:25971134

  15. TNF-α enhances the currents of voltage gated sodium channels in uninjured dorsal root ganglion neurons following motor nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Pang, Rui-Ping; Shen, Kai-Feng; Zimmermann, Manfred; Xin, Wen-Jun; Li, Yong-Yong; Liu, Xian-Guo

    2011-02-01

    The ectopic discharges observed in uninjured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following various lesions of spinal nerves have been attributed to functional alterations of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Such mechanisms may be important for the development of neuropathic pain. However, the pathophysiology underlying the functional modulation of VGSCs following nerve injury is largely unknown. Here, we studied this issue with use of a selective lumbar 5 ventral root transection (L5-VRT) model, in which dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons remain intact. We found that the L5-VRT increased the current densities of TTX-sensitive Na channels as well as currents in Nav1.8, but not Nav1.9 channels in uninjured DRG neurons. The thresholds of action potentials decreased and firing rates increased in DRG neurons following L5-VRT. As we found that levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) increased in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in DRG tissue after L5-VRT, we tested whether the increased TNF-α might result in the changes in sodium channels. Indeed, recombinant rat TNF (rrTNF) enhanced the current densities of TTX-S and Nav1.8 in cultured DRG neurons dose-dependently. Furthermore, genetic deletion of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR-1) in mice attenuated the mechanical allodynia and prevented the increase in sodium currents in DRG neurons induced by L5-VRT. These data suggest that the increase in sodium currents in uninjured DRG neurons following nerve injury might be mediated by over-production of TNF-α. PMID:21145890

  16. Retinal and optic nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Eyal; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2003-11-01

    A variety of disease processes can affect the retina and/or the optic nerve, including vascular or ischemic disease, inflammatory or infectious disease, and degenerative disease. These disease processes may selectively damage certain parts of the retina or optic nerve, and the specific areas that are damaged may have implications for the design of potential therapeutic visual prosthetic devices. Outer retinal diseases include age-related macular degeneration, pathologic myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Although the retinal photoreceptors may be lost, the inner retina is relatively well-preserved in these diseases and may be a target for retinal prosthetic devices. Inner retinal diseases include retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal venous occlusive disease, and retinopathy of prematurity. Other retinal diseases such as ocular infections (retinitis, endophthalmitis) may affect all retinal layers. Because the inner retinal cells, including the retinal ganglion cells, may be destroyed in these diseases (inner retinal or whole retinal), prosthetic devices that stimulate the inner retina may not be effective. Common optic nerve diseases include glaucoma, optic neuritis, and ischemic optic neuropathy. Because the ganglion cell nerve fibers themselves are damaged, visual prosthetics for these diseases will need to target more distal portions of the visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. Clearly, a sound understanding of retinal and optic nerve disease pathophysiology is critical for designing and choosing the optimal visual prosthetic device.

  17. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  18. Pediatric genetic ocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Behnaz; Ramasubramanian, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric genetic ocular tumors include malignancies like retinoblastoma and phakomatosis like neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is important to screen for ocular tumors both for visual prognosis and also for systemic implications. The phakomatosis comprise of multitude of benign tumors that are aysmptomatic but their detection can aid in the diagnosis of the syndrome. Retinoblastoma is the most common malignant intraocular tumor in childhood and with current treatment modalities, the survival is more than 95%. It is transmitted as an autosomal dominant fashion and hence the offsprings of all patients with the germline retinoblastoma need to be screened from birth. This review discusses the various pediatric genetic ocular tumors discussing the clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Pediatric genetic ocular tumors.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Behnaz; Ramasubramanian, Aparna

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric genetic ocular tumors include malignancies like retinoblastoma and phakomatosis like neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is important to screen for ocular tumors both for visual prognosis and also for systemic implications. The phakomatosis comprise of multitude of benign tumors that are aysmptomatic but their detection can aid in the diagnosis of the syndrome. Retinoblastoma is the most common malignant intraocular tumor in childhood and with current treatment modalities, the survival is more than 95%. It is transmitted as an autosomal dominant fashion and hence the offsprings of all patients with the germline retinoblastoma need to be screened from birth. This review discusses the various pediatric genetic ocular tumors discussing the clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27625882

  20. Glycobiology of ocular angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Markowska, Anna I; Cao, Zhiyi; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2014-12-01

    Ocular neovascularization can affect almost all the tissues of the eye: the cornea, the iris, the retina, and the choroid. Pathological neovascularization is the underlying cause of vision loss in common ocular conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and age-related macular neovascularization. Glycosylation is the most common covalent posttranslational modification of proteins in mammalian cells. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that glycosylation influences the process of angiogenesis and impacts activation, proliferation, and migration of endothelial cells as well as the interaction of angiogenic endothelial cells with other cell types necessary to form blood vessels. Recent studies have provided evidence that members of the galectin class of β-galactoside-binding proteins modulate angiogenesis by novel carbohydrate-based recognition systems involving interactions between glycans of angiogenic cell surface receptors and galectins. This review discusses the significance of glycosylation and the role of galectins in the pathogenesis of ocular neovascularization. PMID:25108228

  1. Bedside ocular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Roque, Pedro J; Hatch, Nicholas; Barr, Laurel; Wu, Teresa S

    2014-04-01

    Many ocular emergencies are difficult to diagnose in the emergency setting with conventional physical examination tools. Additionally, persistent efforts to re-examine the eye may be deleterious to a patient's overall condition. Ultrasound is an important tool because it affords physicians a rapid, portable, accurate, and dynamic tool for evaluation of a variety of ocular and orbital diseases. The importance of understanding orbital anatomy, with attention to the firm attachment points of the various layers of the eye, cannot be understated. This article describes the relevant eye anatomy, delves into the ultrasound technique, and illustrates a variety of orbital pathologies detectable by bedside ultrasound.

  2. Ocular rosacea: a dermatologic perspective.

    PubMed

    Webster, Guy; Schaller, Martin

    2013-12-01

    As many as 50% of patients given the diagnosis of cutaneous rosacea also have ocular rosacea. Conservative figures indicate that approximately 10 million patients are affected by ocular rosacea in the United States alone. Despite this prevalence, ocular symptoms of rosacea are often improperly diagnosed, particularly when they occur in the absence of skin involvement.

  3. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-yuan; Wang, Zhong-chao; Wang, Pin; Lan, Yu-yan; Tu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypoglossal nerve crush injury and gave intraperitoneal injections of exogenous nerve growth factor to rats for 14 days. p38MAPK activity in the damaged neurons was increased following hypoglossal nerve crush injury; exogenous nerve growth factor inhibited this increase in acitivity and increased the survival rate of motor neurons within the hypoglossal nucleus. Under transmission electron microscopy, we found that the injection of nerve growth factor contributed to the restoration of the morphology of hypoglossal nerve after crush injury. Our experimental findings indicate that exogenous nerve growth factor can protect damaged neurons and promote hypoglossal nerve regeneration following hypoglossal nerve crush injury. PMID:26889186

  4. Gene-environment interactions in ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Sacca, S C; Bolognesi, C; Battistella, A; Bagnis, A; Izzotti, A

    2009-07-10

    Degenerative ocular diseases are widespread in the population and represent a major cause of reversible and irreversible blindness. Scientific evidences have been accumulating supporting the role of genotoxic damage and gene environment interactions in the pathogenesis of these diseases mainly including glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and cataract. Glaucoma, in its degenerative form, is characterized by the degeneration of the trabecular meshwork, the tissue of the anterior chamber of the eye devoted to aqueous-humour outflow. Such a degenerative process results in intra-ocular pressure increase and progressive damage of optic nerve head. Oxidative stress and DNA damage play an important role in inducing the degeneration of these well differentiated target tissues in which DNA damage results in a progressive cell loss. Macular degeneration is a common age-related disease affecting the central regions of the retina inducing progressive accumulation of oxidized lipoproteins and neovascularization. Environmental genotoxic risk factors include diet, light, and cigarette smoke paralleled by individual susceptibility as determined by adverse genetic assets. Cataract is a progressive opacity of the crystalline lens resulting from molecular damages induced by various risk factors including UV-containing light. This disease has been related to a failure in antioxidant defences. Experimental study provides evidence that cataract patients possess higher basal level of DNA damage, as evaluated by Comet test, in lymphocytes than controls. This finding is paralleled by the higher susceptibility to oxidative stress observed in the same patients. These novel experimental data further support the role of DNA damage as a main factor contributing to cataract onset. In conclusion, the examined degenerative ocular diseases recognise environmental risk factors often displaying genotoxic attitudes. Whenever these factors target individuals who are susceptible due their

  5. Neuropathic ocular pain: an important yet underevaluated feature of dry eye

    PubMed Central

    Galor, A; Levitt, R C; Felix, E R; Martin, E R; Sarantopoulos, C D

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye has gained recognition as a public health problem given its prevalence, morbidity, and cost implications. Dry eye can have a variety of symptoms including blurred vision, irritation, and ocular pain. Within dry eye-associated ocular pain, some patients report transient pain whereas others complain of chronic pain. In this review, we will summarize the evidence that chronicity is more likely to occur in patients with dysfunction in their ocular sensory apparatus (ie, neuropathic ocular pain). Clinical evidence of dysfunction includes the presence of spontaneous dysesthesias, allodynia, hyperalgesia, and corneal nerve morphologic and functional abnormalities. Both peripheral and central sensitizations likely play a role in generating the noted clinical characteristics. We will further discuss how evaluating for neuropathic ocular pain may affect the treatment of dry eye-associated chronic pain. PMID:25376119

  6. Nerve conduction

    MedlinePlus

    ... fascicles) that contain hundreds of individual nerve fibers (neurons). Neurons consist of dendrites, axon, and cell body. The ... tree-like structures that receive signals from other neurons and from special sensory cells that sense the ...

  7. Peripheral facial nerve axotomy in mice causes sprouting of motor axons into perineuronal central white matter: time course and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Makwana, Milan; Werner, Alexander; Acosta-Saltos, Alejandro; Gonitel, Roman; Pararajasingam, Abirami; Pararajasingham, Abirami; Ruff, Crystal; Rumajogee, Prakasham; Cuthill, Dan; Galiano, Mathias; Bohatschek, Marion; Wallace, Adam S; Anderson, Patrick N; Mayer, Ulrike; Behrens, Axel; Raivich, Gennadij

    2010-03-01

    Generation of new axonal sprouts plays an important role in neural repair. In the current study, we examined the appearance, composition and effects of gene deletions on intrabrainstem sprouts following peripheral facial nerve axotomy. Axotomy was followed by the appearance of galanin(+) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)(+) sprouts peaking at day 14, matching both large, neuropeptide(+) subpopulations of axotomized facial motoneurons, but with CGRP(+) sprouts considerably rarer. Strong immunoreactivity for vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and retrogradely transported MiniRuby following its application on freshly cut proximal facial nerve stump confirmed their axotomized motoneuron origin; the sprouts expressed CD44 and alpha7beta1 integrin adhesion molecules and grew apparently unhindered along neighboring central white matter tracts. Quantification of the galanin(+) sprouts revealed a stronger response following cut compared with crush (day 7-14) as well as enhanced sprouting after recut (day 8 + 6 vs. 14; 14 + 8 vs. 22), arguing against delayed appearance of sprouting being the result of the initial phase of reinnervation. Sprouting was strongly diminished in brain Jun-deficient mice but enhanced in alpha7 null animals that showed apparently compensatory up-regulation in beta1, suggesting important regulatory roles for transcription factors and the sprout-associated adhesion molecules. Analysis of inflammatory stimuli revealed a 50% reduction 12-48 hours following systemic endotoxin associated with neural inflammation and a tendency toward more sprouts in TNFR1/2 null mutants (P = 10%) with a reduced inflammatory response, indicating detrimental effects of excessive inflammation. Moreover, the study points to the usefulness of the facial axotomy model in exploring physiological and molecular stimuli regulating central sprouting. PMID:20034058

  8. Ocular Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An ocular screening system designed for safe, convenient screening of large groups was developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, leading to the formation of Medical Sciences Corporation. The system identifies visual defects accurately and inexpensively, and includes a photorefractor telephoto lens and an electronic flash. Medical Sciences Corporation is using the device to test at schools, industrial plants, etc.

  9. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome results in a loss of visual function and occurs in astronauts following long-duration spaceflight. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to the ocular changes involved in VIIP is of critical importance for space medicine research. Although the exact mechanisms of VIIP are not yet known, it is hypothesized that microgravity-induced increases in intracranial pressures (ICP) drive the remodeling of the optic nerve sheath, leading to compression of the optic nerve which in turn may reduce visual acuity. Some astronauts present with a kink in the optic nerve after return to earth, suggesting that tissue remodeling in response to ICP increases may be taking place. The goal of this work is to characterize the mechanical properties of the optic nerve sheath (dura mater) to better understand its biomechanical response to increased ICP.

  10. Lacritin and other autophagy associated proteins in ocular surface health.

    PubMed

    Karnati, Roy; Talla, Venu; Peterson, Katherine; Laurie, Gordon W

    2016-03-01

    Advantage may be taken of macroautophagy ('autophagy') to promote ocular health. Autophagy continually captures aged or damaged cellular material for lysosomal degradation and recyling. When autophagic flux is chronically elevated, or alternatively deficient, health suffers. Chronic elevation of flux and stress are the consequence of inflammatory cytokines or of dry eye tears but not normal tears invitro. Exogenous tear protein lacritin transiently accelerates flux to restore homeostasis invitro and corneal health invivo, and yet the monomeric active form of lacritin appears to be selectively deficient in dry eye. Tissue transglutaminase-dependent cross-linking of monomer decreases monomer quantity and monomer affinity for coreceptor syndecan-1 thereby abrogating activity. Tissue transglutaminase is elevated in dry eye. Mutation of arylsulfatase A, arylsulfatase B, ceroid-lipofuscinosis neuronal 3, mucolipin, or Niemann-Pick disease type C1 respectively underlie several diseases of apparently insufficient autophagic flux that affect the eye, including: metachromatic leukodystrophy, mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, juvenile-onset Batten disease, mucolipidosis IV, and Niemann-Pick type C associated with myelin sheath destruction of corneal sensory and ciliary nerves and of the optic nerve; corneal clouding, ocular hypertension, glaucoma and optic nerve atrophy; accumulation of 'ceroid-lipofuscin' in surface conjunctival cells, and in ganglion and neuronal cells; decreased visual acuity and retinal dystrophy; and neurodegeneration. For some, enzyme or gene replacement, or substrate reduction, therapy is proving to be successful. Here we discuss examples of restoring ocular surface homeostasis through alteration of autophagy, with particular attention to lacritin.

  11. Lacritin and other autophagy associated proteins in ocular surface health.

    PubMed

    Karnati, Roy; Talla, Venu; Peterson, Katherine; Laurie, Gordon W

    2016-03-01

    Advantage may be taken of macroautophagy ('autophagy') to promote ocular health. Autophagy continually captures aged or damaged cellular material for lysosomal degradation and recyling. When autophagic flux is chronically elevated, or alternatively deficient, health suffers. Chronic elevation of flux and stress are the consequence of inflammatory cytokines or of dry eye tears but not normal tears invitro. Exogenous tear protein lacritin transiently accelerates flux to restore homeostasis invitro and corneal health invivo, and yet the monomeric active form of lacritin appears to be selectively deficient in dry eye. Tissue transglutaminase-dependent cross-linking of monomer decreases monomer quantity and monomer affinity for coreceptor syndecan-1 thereby abrogating activity. Tissue transglutaminase is elevated in dry eye. Mutation of arylsulfatase A, arylsulfatase B, ceroid-lipofuscinosis neuronal 3, mucolipin, or Niemann-Pick disease type C1 respectively underlie several diseases of apparently insufficient autophagic flux that affect the eye, including: metachromatic leukodystrophy, mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, juvenile-onset Batten disease, mucolipidosis IV, and Niemann-Pick type C associated with myelin sheath destruction of corneal sensory and ciliary nerves and of the optic nerve; corneal clouding, ocular hypertension, glaucoma and optic nerve atrophy; accumulation of 'ceroid-lipofuscin' in surface conjunctival cells, and in ganglion and neuronal cells; decreased visual acuity and retinal dystrophy; and neurodegeneration. For some, enzyme or gene replacement, or substrate reduction, therapy is proving to be successful. Here we discuss examples of restoring ocular surface homeostasis through alteration of autophagy, with particular attention to lacritin. PMID:26318608

  12. Cross-Face Nerve Grafting with Infraorbital Nerve Pathway Protection: Anatomic and Histomorphometric Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Catapano, Joseph; Demsey, Daniel R.B.; Ho, Emily S.; Zuker, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Smiling is an important aspect of emotional expression and social interaction, leaving facial palsy patients with impaired social functioning and decreased overall quality of life. Although there are several techniques available for facial reanimation, staged facial reanimation using donor nerve branches from the contralateral, functioning facial nerve connected to a cross-face nerve graft (CFNG) is the only technique that can reliably reproduce an emotionally spontaneous smile. Although CFNGs provide spontaneity, they typically produce less smile excursion than when the subsequent free functioning muscle flap is innervated with the motor nerve to the masseter muscle. This may be explained in part by the larger number of donor motor axons when using the masseter nerve, as studies have shown that only 20% to 50% of facial nerve donor axons successfully cross the nerve graft to innervate their targets. As demonstrated in our animal studies, increasing the number of donor axons that grow into and traverse the CFNG to innervate the free muscle transfer increases muscle movement, and this phenomenon may provide patients with the benefit of improved smile excursion. We have previously shown in animal studies that sensory nerves, when coapted to a nerve graft, improve axonal growth through the nerve graft and improve muscle excursion. Here, we describe the feasibility of and our experience in translating these results clinically by coapting the distal portion of the CFNG to branches of the infraorbital nerve. PMID:27757349

  13. Ocular hemodynamic effects of nitrovasodilators in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Schmidl, D; Polska, E; Kiss, B; Sacu, S; Garhofer, G; Schmetterer, L

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in the regulation of ocular blood flow and may be an interesting therapeutic target in ocular ischemic disease. In the present study, we hypothesized that NO-releasing drugs may increase blood flow to the head of the optic nerve and also in the choroid. The study employed a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind, four-way crossover design. On separate study days, 12 healthy subjects received infusions of nitroglycerin, isosorbide dinitrate, sodium nitroprusside, or placebo. All three study drugs reduced the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) (P < 0.001). None of the administered drugs increased the ocular hemodynamic variables. By contrast, vascular resistance decreased dose dependently during administration of the study drugs (P < 0.001). These results indicate that systemic administration of NO-donor drugs is associated with a decrease in vascular resistance in the ocular vasculature. However, because these drugs also reduce blood pressure, they do not improve perfusion to the posterior eye pole.

  14. Ocular surface and external filtration surgery: mutual relationships.

    PubMed

    Baudouin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence from clinical and experimental studies that the long-term use of topical drugs may induce ocular surface changes, causing ocular discomfort, dry eye, conjunctival inflammation, subconjunctival fibrosis, corneal surface impairment, and, as a consequence of chronic ocular surface changes, the potential risk of failure for further glaucoma surgery. Subclinical inflammation has also been widely described in patients receiving antiglaucoma treatments for long periods of time, with inflammatory cell infiltration and fibroblast activation in the conjunctiva and subconjunctival space. The preservative, especially benzalkonium chloride, which has consistently demonstrated its toxic effects in laboratory, experimental, and clinical studies, could induce or enhance such inflammatory changes. As a quaternary ammonium, this compound causes tear film instability, loss of goblet cells, conjunctival squamous metaplasia and apoptosis, disruption of the corneal epithelium barrier, corneal nerve impairment, chronic inflammation and potential damage to deeper ocular tissues. Drug-induced adverse effects are therefore far from being restricted to only allergic reactions, but they are often very difficult to identify because they mostly occur in a delayed or poorly specific manner, and result from complex and multifactorial interactions between the drugs and the ocular surface. Postoperatively, the ocular surface also plays an important role, as the conjunctiva interacts with aqueous humor and subconjunctival fibrosis may block aqueous outflow and cause surgical failure. As preoperative inflammation underlies postoperative fibrosis and therefore surgical outcome, a better knowledge of ocular surface changes with appropriate evaluation and management should thus become a new paradigm in glaucoma care over the long term.

  15. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor cortical excitability and sensory nerve conduction velocity in subacute-stage incomplete spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyun Gyu; Ji, Sang-Goo; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted on 20 subjects with diagnosed paraplegia due to spinal cord injury. These 20 subjects were allocated to an experimental group of 10 subjects that underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or to a control group of 10 subjects that underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. The SCI patients in the experimental group underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy, whereas the spinal cord injury patients in the control group underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for six-weeks. Latency, amplitude, and sensory nerve conduction velocity were assessed before and after the six week therapy period. [Results] A significant intergroup difference was observed for posttreatment velocity gains, but no significant intergroup difference was observed for amplitude or latency. [Conclusion] repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. PMID:27512251

  16. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor cortical excitability and sensory nerve conduction velocity in subacute-stage incomplete spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun Gyu; Ji, Sang-Goo; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted on 20 subjects with diagnosed paraplegia due to spinal cord injury. These 20 subjects were allocated to an experimental group of 10 subjects that underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or to a control group of 10 subjects that underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. The SCI patients in the experimental group underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy, whereas the spinal cord injury patients in the control group underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for six-weeks. Latency, amplitude, and sensory nerve conduction velocity were assessed before and after the six week therapy period. [Results] A significant intergroup difference was observed for posttreatment velocity gains, but no significant intergroup difference was observed for amplitude or latency. [Conclusion] repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. PMID:27512251

  17. Dorsal displacement of the ulnar nerve after a displaced distal radius fracture: case report.

    PubMed

    Sohal, Jennifer Kaur R; Chia, Benjamin; Catalano, Louis W

    2009-03-01

    We report on a patient in whom ulnar nerve palsy developed after a closed distal radius fracture due to displacement of the ulnar nerve dorsal to the ulnar styloid. After delayed exploration and decompression of the ulnar nerve, the patient had recovery of both motor and sensory function of the ulnar nerve.

  18. Learning in a Simple Motor System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Dianne M.; Kassardjian, Charles D.

    2004-01-01

    Motor learning is a very basic, essential form of learning that appears to share common mechanisms across different motor systems. We evaluate and compare a few conceptual models for learning in a relatively simple neural system, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of vertebrates. We also compare the different animal models that have been used to…

  19. Ocular delivery of macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Chun; Chiang, Bryce; Wu, Xianggen; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are making increasing impact on medicine, including treatment of indications in the eye. Macromolecular drugs are typically given by physician-administered invasive delivery methods, because non--invasive ocular delivery methods, such as eye drops, and systemic delivery, have low bioavailability and/or poor ocular targeting. There is a need to improve delivery of biopharmaceuticals to enable less-invasive delivery routes, less-frequent dosing through controlled-release drug delivery and improved drug targeting within the eye to increase efficacy and reduce side effects. This review discusses the barriers to drug delivery via various ophthalmic routes of administration in the context of macromolecule delivery and discusses efforts to develop controlled-release systems for delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the eye. The growing number of macromolecular therapies in the eye needs improved drug delivery methods that increase drug efficacy, safety and patient compliance. PMID:24998941

  20. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves, plexus, or root lesions). Furthermore pathological processes may result in either demyelination, axonal degeneration or both. In order to reach an exact diagnosis of any neuropathy electrophysiological studies are crucial to obtain information about these variables. Conventional electrophysiological methods including nerve conduction studies and electromyography used in the study of patients suspected of having a neuropathy and the significance of the findings are discussed in detail and more novel and experimental methods are mentioned. Diagnostic considerations are based on a flow chart classifying neuropathies into eight categories based on mode of onset, distribution, and electrophysiological findings, and the electrophysiological characteristics in each type of neuropathy are discussed. PMID:23931776

  1. Restoring motor control and sensory feedback in people with upper extremity amputations using arrays of 96 microelectrodes implanted in the median and ulnar nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. S.; Wark, H. A. C.; Hutchinson, D. T.; Warren, D. J.; O'Neill, K.; Scheinblum, T.; Clark, G. A.; Normann, R. A.; Greger, B.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. An important goal of neuroprosthetic research is to establish bidirectional communication between the user and new prosthetic limbs that are capable of controlling >20 different movements. One strategy for achieving this goal is to interface the prosthetic limb directly with efferent and afferent fibres in the peripheral nervous system using an array of intrafascicular microelectrodes. This approach would provide access to a large number of independent neural pathways for controlling high degree-of-freedom prosthetic limbs, as well as evoking multiple-complex sensory percepts. Approach. Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs, 96 recording/stimulating electrodes) were implanted for 30 days into the median (Subject 1-M, 31 years post-amputation) or ulnar (Subject 2-U, 1.5 years post-amputation) nerves of two amputees. Neural activity was recorded during intended movements of the subject’s phantom fingers and a linear Kalman filter was used to decode the neural data. Microelectrode stimulation of varying amplitudes and frequencies was delivered via single or multiple electrodes to investigate the number, size and quality of sensory percepts that could be evoked. Device performance over time was assessed by measuring: electrode impedances, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), stimulation thresholds, number and stability of evoked percepts. Main results. The subjects were able to proportionally, control individual fingers of a virtual robotic hand, with 13 different movements decoded offline (r = 0.48) and two movements decoded online. Electrical stimulation across one USEA evoked >80 sensory percepts. Varying the stimulation parameters modulated percept quality. Devices remained intrafascicularly implanted for the duration of the study with no significant changes in the SNRs or percept thresholds. Significance. This study demonstrated that an array of 96 microelectrodes can be implanted into the human peripheral nervous system for up to 1 month durations. Such an

  2. An ocular motility conundrum

    PubMed Central

    McElnea, Elizabeth Margaret; Stephenson, Kirk; Lanigan, Bernie; Flitcroft, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Two siblings, an 11-year-old boy and a 7-year-old girl presented with bilateral symmetrical ptosis and limited eye movements. Having already been reviewed on a number of occasions by a variety of specialists in multiple hospital settings a diagnosis of their ocular motility disorder had remained elusive. We describe their cases, outline the differential diagnosis and review the investigations performed which were influential in finally making a diagnosis. PMID:25349186

  3. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes.

  4. Changes in nerve function and nerve fibre structure induced by acute, graded compression.

    PubMed Central

    Rydevik, B; Nordborg, C

    1980-01-01

    Rabbit tibial nerves were subjected to direct, acute graded compression by means of an inflatable compression chamber. The acute and long term effects of 50, 200 and 400 mmHg applied for two hours on nerve function and nerve fibre structure were investigated. A pressure of 50 mmHg applied for two hours induced only minimal or no acute deterioration of maximal conduction velocity and nerve fibre structure. Conduction velocity was gradually reduced during compression at 200-400 mmHg pressure for two hours and in those cases the recovery of nerve conduction after pressure release was incomplete. Ultrastructural analysis revealed pronounced, early nerve fibre damage in these nerves. Three weeks after compression, nerves compressed at 50 mmHg for two hours had normal afferent and motor conduction velocity, although there were morphological signs of slight nerve fibre damage. Nerves compressed at 200 mmHg for two hours exhibited reduction of conduction velocity only at the level of compression, in contrast to the nerves compressed at 400 mmHg for two hours in which conduction velocity was reduced both at the level of compression and distal to the compressed segment. Morphologically, the nerves compressed at 200-400 mmHg for two hours showed varying degrees of demyelination and axonal degeneration three weeks after compression. Images PMID:7217952

  5. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  6. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  7. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Peripheral Nerve Internal Fascicular Groups

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yingchun; Wang, Liping; Dong, Jianghui; Zhang, Yi; Luo, Peng; Qi, Jian; Liu, Xiaolin; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerves are important pathways for receiving afferent sensory impulses and sending out efferent motor instructions, as carried out by sensory nerve fibers and motor nerve fibers. It has remained a great challenge to functionally reconnect nerve internal fiber bundles (or fascicles) in nerve repair. One possible solution may be to establish a 3D nerve fascicle visualization system. This study described the key technology of 3D peripheral nerve fascicle reconstruction. Firstly, fixed nerve segments were embedded with position lines, cryostat-sectioned continuously, stained and imaged histologically. Position line cross-sections were identified using a trained support vector machine method, and the coordinates of their central pixels were obtained. Then, nerve section images were registered using the bilinear method, and edges of fascicles were extracted using an improved gradient vector flow snake method. Subsequently, fascicle types were identified automatically using the multi-directional gradient and second-order gradient method. Finally, a 3D virtual model of internal fascicles was obtained after section images were processed. This technique was successfully applied for 3D reconstruction for the median nerve of the hand-wrist and cubital fossa regions and the gastrocnemius nerve. This nerve internal fascicle 3D reconstruction technology would be helpful for aiding peripheral nerve repair and virtual surgery. PMID:26596642

  8. The Neural Basis for Learning of Simple Motor Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisberger, Stephen G.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) which is used to investigate the neural basis for motor learning in monkeys. Suggests organizing principles that may apply in forms of motor learning as a result of similarities among VOR and other motor systems. (Author/RT)

  9. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment].

    PubMed

    Fansa, H; Schneider, W

    2003-03-01

    Isolated compression of the suprascapular nerve is a rare entity, that is seldom considered in differential diagnosis of shoulder pain. Usually atrophy of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles is present, resulting in weakened abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. Mostly the patients do not note the paresis, but complain about a dull and burning pain over the dorsal shoulder region. In a proximal lesion (at level of the superior transverse scapular ligament) electromyography reveals changes in both muscles, while in a distal lesion (spinoglenoidal notch) only the infraspinatus shows a pathology. From 1996 to 2001 we diagnosed an isolated suprascapular entrapment in nine patients. Seven patients were operated: The ligament was removed and the nerve was neurolysed. The average age was 36 years. All patients showed pathological findings in electrophysiological and clinical examination. Five patients had an atrophy of both scapula muscles, two showed only infraspinatus muscle atrophy (one with a ganglion in the distal course of the nerve). Six patients were followed up. All showed an improvement. Pain disappeared and all patients were able to return to work and sport activities. Electrophysiological examination one year after operation revealed normal nerve conduction velocity. The number of motor units, however, showed a reduction by half compared to the healthy side. Lesions without history of trauma are usually caused by repetitive motion or posture. Weight lifting, volley ball and tennis promote the entrapment. Rarely a lesion (either idiopathic or due to external compression) is described for patients who underwent surgery. Patients with a ganglion or a defined cause of compression should be operated, patients who present without a distinct reason for compression should firstly be treated conservatively. Physiotherapy, antiphlogistic medication and avoiding of the pain triggering motion can improve the symptoms. However, if muscle atrophy is evident

  10. A Case of Severe Airbag Related Ocular Alkali Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wong, William; Affeldt, John C

    2012-01-01

    While airbags have saved many lives and are clearly beneficial overall, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) powder produced by the inflation reaction can cause significant alkali ocular injury if not irrigated promptly. Here we report a case of severe airbag related ocular alkali injury as a way to bring attention to the need for prompt ocular irrigation following motor vehicle accidents (MVA) with airbag deployment. A 47-year-old man was involved in a MVA with airbag deployment in a rural setting. Attention was paid to several other life-threatening traumatic injuries, however, ocular irrigation was not performed until some 6–7 hours after the MVA. Over the course of 6 months, airbag related alkali injury caused severe limbal ischemia, conjunctivalization of the cornea, corneal epithelial defects, cicatricial scarring, haze, and corneal/limbal vascularization despite amniotic membrane graft. Awareness of the importance of ocular irrigation following airbag deployment must be raised both in the ophthalmology and emergency medicine communities. PMID:22900239

  11. Non-ocular dermal photoreception in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Chono, Koji; Fujito, Yutaka; Ito, Etsuro

    2002-09-27

    Based on the results of previous behavioral experiments, researchers believe that sensitivity to light stimuli is not restricted to the eyes in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. To determine the presence of a non-ocular dermal photoreception system and to examine the synaptic connections between this peripheral system and the central nervous system, we electrophysiologically examined the activities of the pedal nerves in L. stagnalis by light stimulation. The results demonstrated that light stimulation evokes non-ocular dermal photosensitive responses in the foot, that these responses exert inhibitory, afferent influences through the inferior pedal nerves to the pedal ganglia, and that these responses were independent of the ocular photoreception system in L. stagnalis.

  12. [Genetic ocular diseases].

    PubMed

    Hamel, Christian P

    2015-04-01

    Genetic ocular diseases are inherited Mendelian conditions (prevalence 1/1000) in which any tissue of the eye could be involved (cornea, lens, iridocomeal angle, vitrous, retina, choroid, sclera). More than 200 genes are responsible for inherited retinal dystrophies and even more genes remain to be identified. These genes belong to many metabolisms essential to the photoreceptor function. Gene therapy and retinal prosthesis are the two most promising therapeutic strategies currently in clinical trials which are expected to provide visual improvement in short term.

  13. Ocular Syphilis: a Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Woolston, Sophie L; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Marrazzo, Jeanne

    2016-11-01

    While ocular syphilis is not a new phenomenon, recent increased rates of new diagnoses, especially in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons and men who have sex with men, have sparked a new interest in an old disease. This article will review the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of ocular syphilis, and provide guidance on management. PMID:27686678

  14. Loss of α-calcitonin gene-related peptide (αCGRP) reduces the efficacy of the Vestibulo-ocular Reflex (VOR).

    PubMed

    Luebke, Anne E; Holt, Joseph C; Jordan, Paivi M; Wong, Yi Shan; Caldwell, Jillian S; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2014-07-30

    The neuroactive peptide calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) is known to act at efferent synapses and their targets in hair cell organs, including the cochlea and lateral line. CGRP is also expressed in vestibular efferent neurons as well as a number of central vestibular neurons. Although CGRP-null (-/-) mice demonstrate a significant reduction in cochlear nerve sound-evoked activity compared with wild-type mice, it is unknown whether and how the loss of CGRP influence vestibular system function. Vestibular function was assessed by quantifying the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in alert mice. The loss of CGRP in (-/-) mice was associated with a reduction of the VOR gain of ≈50% without a concomitant change in phase. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that, although CGRP staining was absent in the vestibular end-organs of null (-/-) mice, cholinergic staining appeared normal, suggesting that the overall gross development of vestibular efferent innervation was unaltered. We further confirmed that the observed deficit in vestibular function of null (-/-) mice was not the result of nontargeted effects at the level of the extraocular motor neurons and/or their innervation of extraocular muscles. Analysis of the relationship between vestibular quick phase amplitude and peak velocity revealed that extraocular motor function was unchanged, and immunohistochemistry revealed no abnormalities in motor endplates. Together, our findings show that the neurotransmitter CGRP plays a key role in ensuring VOR efficacy.

  15. Loss of α-Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (αCGRP) Reduces the Efficacy of the Vestibulo-ocular Reflex (VOR)

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Joseph C.; Jordan, Paivi M.; Wong, Yi Shan; Caldwell, Jillian S.; Cullen, Kathleen E.

    2014-01-01

    The neuroactive peptide calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) is known to act at efferent synapses and their targets in hair cell organs, including the cochlea and lateral line. CGRP is also expressed in vestibular efferent neurons as well as a number of central vestibular neurons. Although CGRP-null (−/−) mice demonstrate a significant reduction in cochlear nerve sound-evoked activity compared with wild-type mice, it is unknown whether and how the loss of CGRP influence vestibular system function. Vestibular function was assessed by quantifying the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in alert mice. The loss of CGRP in (−/−) mice was associated with a reduction of the VOR gain of ≈50% without a concomitant change in phase. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that, although CGRP staining was absent in the vestibular end-organs of null (−/−) mice, cholinergic staining appeared normal, suggesting that the overall gross development of vestibular efferent innervation was unaltered. We further confirmed that the observed deficit in vestibular function of null (−/−) mice was not the result of nontargeted effects at the level of the extraocular motor neurons and/or their innervation of extraocular muscles. Analysis of the relationship between vestibular quick phase amplitude and peak velocity revealed that extraocular motor function was unchanged, and immunohistochemistry revealed no abnormalities in motor endplates. Together, our findings show that the neurotransmitter CGRP plays a key role in ensuring VOR efficacy. PMID:25080603

  16. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Barbato, Andrea; Pascarella, Antonia; Giannotti, Rossella; Genzano, Martina; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI), metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP), maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models. PMID:25493637

  17. Laterality of brain and ocular lesions in Aicardi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Michelle T.; Winn, Bryan J.; Porco, Travis; Strominger, Zoe; Barkovich, A. James; Hoyt, Creig S.; Wakahiro, Mari; Sherr, Elliott H.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports a large case series of children with Aicardi syndrome. A new severity scoring system is established to assess sidedness of ocular and brain lesions. Thirty-five children were recruited from Aicardi syndrome family conferences. All children received dilated ophthalmologic exams, and brain MRI’s were reviewed. Ocular and brain MRI Aicardi lesion severity scores were devised. A linear mixed model was used to compare each side for the ocular and brain MRI severity scores of Aicardi associated disease. Twenty-six children met inclusion criteria for the study. All subjects were female, ages 3 months to 19 years. Rates per child of optic nerve coloboma, severe lacunae, and microphthalmos in one or both eyes (among those with complete fundus exams available) were 10/24 (42%), 8/22 (36%), and 7/26 (27%), respectively. Ocular and brain MRI asymmetry was found in 18% (4/22) and 58% (15/26) of subjects, respectively, with more right sided brain lesions than left (V=52, P=0.028). A significant correlation between sidedness of brain disease and microphthalmos was seen (T = 2.54, P = 0.02). This study substantiates the range and severity of Aicardi syndrome associated ophthalmologic and brain MRI lesions from prior smaller case series. PMID:21824560

  18. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Barbato, Andrea; Pascarella, Antonia; Giannotti, Rossella; Genzano, Martina; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI), metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP), maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models.

  19. Ocular tuberculosis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Shakarchi, Faiz I

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization currently estimates that nearly two billion people, or one-third of the world’s population, are infected by tuberculosis, and that roughly 10% of the infected people are symptomatic. Tuberculosis affects the lungs in 80% of patients, while in the remaining 20% the disease may affect other organs, including the eye. Uveitis can be seen concurrently with tuberculosis, but a direct association is difficult to prove. Ocular tuberculosis is usually not associated with clinical evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis, as up to 60% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients may not have pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of tuberculous uveitis is often problematic and in nearly all reported cases, the diagnosis was only presumptive. Tuberculous uveitis is a great mimicker of various uveitis entities and it can be considered in the differential diagnosis of any type of intraocular inflammation. It is still unknown if ocular manifestations result from a direct mycobacterium infection or hypersensitivity reaction and this is reflected on the management of tuberculous uveitis. Prevalence of tuberculosis as an etiology of uveitis may reach up to 10% in endemic areas. Tuberculous uveitis is a vision-threatening disease that inevitably leads to blindness if not properly diagnosed and treated. The aim of this review is to illustrate the various clinical features and management of presumed tuberculous uveitis. The current review focuses on the diagnostic criteria, significance of tuberculin skin test, and use of systemic corticosteroids in the management of tuberculous uveitis as recommended in recent publications. PMID:26648690

  20. Ocular injury in hurling

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, T; Fennessy, K; Horgan, N; Walsh, B; O'Connell, E; Cleary, P; Beatty, S; MacEwan, C

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the clinical characteristics of ocular injuries sustained in hurling in the south of Ireland and to investigate reasons for non-use of protective headgear and eye wear. Results: Hurling related eye injuries occurred most commonly in young men. Fifty two patients (17%) required hospital admission, with hyphaema accounting for 71% of admissions. Ten injuries required intraocular surgical intervention: retinal detachment repair (5); macular hole surgery (1); repair of partial thickness corneal laceration (1); repair of globe perforation (1); enucleation (1); trabeculectomy for post-traumatic glaucoma (1). Fourteen eyes (4.5%) had a final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of <6/12 and six (2%) had BCVA <3/60. In the survey, 63 players (48.5%) reported wearing no protective facemask while playing hurling. Impairment of vision was the most common reason cited for non-use. Conclusions: Hurling related injury is a significant, and preventable, cause of ocular morbidity in young men in Ireland. The routine use of appropriate protective headgear and faceguards would result in a dramatic reduction in the incidence and severity of these injuries, and should be mandatory. PMID:16046328

  1. Ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Parenky, Ashwin; Mitra, Ashim K

    2010-09-01

    Ocular drug delivery has been a major challenge to pharmacologists and drug delivery scientists due to its unique anatomy and physiology. Static barriers (different layers of cornea, sclera, and retina including blood aqueous and blood-retinal barriers), dynamic barriers (choroidal and conjunctival blood flow, lymphatic clearance, and tear dilution), and efflux pumps in conjunction pose a significant challenge for delivery of a drug alone or in a dosage form, especially to the posterior segment. Identification of influx transporters on various ocular tissues and designing a transporter-targeted delivery of a parent drug has gathered momentum in recent years. Parallelly, colloidal dosage forms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, liposomes, and microemulsions have been widely explored to overcome various static and dynamic barriers. Novel drug delivery strategies such as bioadhesive gels and fibrin sealant-based approaches were developed to sustain drug levels at the target site. Designing noninvasive sustained drug delivery systems and exploring the feasibility of topical application to deliver drugs to the posterior segment may drastically improve drug delivery in the years to come. Current developments in the field of ophthalmic drug delivery promise a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges posed by various anterior and posterior segment diseases. PMID:20437123

  2. Ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Parenky, Ashwin; Mitra, Ashim K

    2010-09-01

    Ocular drug delivery has been a major challenge to pharmacologists and drug delivery scientists due to its unique anatomy and physiology. Static barriers (different layers of cornea, sclera, and retina including blood aqueous and blood-retinal barriers), dynamic barriers (choroidal and conjunctival blood flow, lymphatic clearance, and tear dilution), and efflux pumps in conjunction pose a significant challenge for delivery of a drug alone or in a dosage form, especially to the posterior segment. Identification of influx transporters on various ocular tissues and designing a transporter-targeted delivery of a parent drug has gathered momentum in recent years. Parallelly, colloidal dosage forms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, liposomes, and microemulsions have been widely explored to overcome various static and dynamic barriers. Novel drug delivery strategies such as bioadhesive gels and fibrin sealant-based approaches were developed to sustain drug levels at the target site. Designing noninvasive sustained drug delivery systems and exploring the feasibility of topical application to deliver drugs to the posterior segment may drastically improve drug delivery in the years to come. Current developments in the field of ophthalmic drug delivery promise a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges posed by various anterior and posterior segment diseases.

  3. Rehabilitation of Supinator Nerve to Posterior Interosseous Nerve Transfer in Individuals With Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Jodie; Cooper, Catherine; Flood, Stephen; Weymouth, Michael; van Zyl, Natasha

    2016-06-01

    Despite being a routine part of the early surgical management of brachial plexus injury, nerve transfers have only recently been used as a reconstructive option for those with tetraplegia. Subsequently, there is limited published literature on the rehabilitation theories and techniques for optimizing outcomes in this population. This article seeks to address this void by presenting our centers' working model for rehabilitation after nerve transfers for individuals with tetraplegia. The model is illustrated with the example of the rehabilitation process after a supinator nerve to posterior interosseous nerve transfer. This nerve transfer reconstructs wrist, finger, and thumb extension. The topics covered in the model include the following: patient selection and presurgical planning/intervention, managing the postoperative healing phase of an individual who is wheelchair dependent, maximizing motor reeducation, increasing muscle strength, and ensuring use in functional tasks. This article provides a platform for further development and collaboration to improve the outcomes of patients who undergo nerve transfers after tetraplegia. PMID:27233591

  4. Interfascicular reconstruction of the peroneal nerve after knee ligament injury.

    PubMed

    McMahon, M S; Craig, S M

    1994-06-01

    Peroneal palsy is the most common lower extremity nerve injury. Although most studies emphasize particularly poor prognosis after traction injuries to the peroneal nerve, interfascicular nerve grafting has emerged as a promising technique. We describe the case of a 20-year-old man who sustained a traction injury to the peroneal nerve (0/5 foot dorsiflexion and eversion) concomitant with tears of the anterior cruciate and lateral collateral ligaments. Interfascicular sural nerve grafting (10-14 cm in length) was performed 7 months after injury and 6 months after ligament reconstruction. The patient recovered motor strength (4+/5) in both anterior and lateral compartments by 2 years' postsurgery. The results obtained indicate that interfascicular nerve grafting is a valuable technique for reconstruction of the disrupted peroneal nerve; it provides sufficient benefit to justify the time, expense, and effort involved. An aggressive approach is thus recommended in patients with peroneal nerve disruption in the setting of multiple knee ligament injuries.

  5. Management of Pain in Complex Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gabrielle; Curtin, Catherine M

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic nerve injuries can be devastating and life-changing events, leading to functional morbidity and psychological stress and social constraints. Even in the event of a successful surgical repair with recovered motor function, pain can result in continued disability and poor quality of life. Pain after nerve injury can also prevent recovery and return to preinjury life. It is difficult to predict which patients will develop persistent pain; once incurred, pain can be even challenging to manage. This review seeks to define the types of pain following peripheral nerve injuries, investigate the pathophysiology and causative factors, and evaluate potential treatment options. PMID:27094896

  6. Paresis of cranial nerves III, IV, and VI: clinical manifestation and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Carlow, T J

    1989-01-01

    Successful identification of the cranial nerve and ocular muscle responsible for a subjective complaint of diplopia requires an evaluation of the type and character of the double vision and not infrequently the use of a red glass or Maddox rod, especially in incomplete and subtle cases. An isolated third nerve lesion is most commonly seen with a supraclinoid aneurysm (pupil dilated and fixed), vascular disease (pupil spared), and trauma. Mild frontal head trauma and vascular disease are the most common etiologies associated with an isolated fourth nerve paresis. Tumor, vascular disease and trauma should be prime considerations when a patient presents with an isolated sixth nerve paresis. A child's diagnostic possibilities will differ from the adult: third nerve (congenital), fourth nerve (congenital), and sixth nerve (brainstem glioma, postviral or inflammatory). Finally, myasthenia gravis can readily mask or mimic an isolated or mixed cranial nerve palsy. A Tensilon test is always indicated in unexplained diplopia with ophthalmoplegia and normal pupils.

  7. A bioengineered peripheral nerve construct using aligned peptide amphiphile nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Yalom, Anisa; Berns, Eric J.; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; McClendon, Mark T.; Segovia, Luis A.; Spigelman, Igor; Stupp, Samuel I.; Jarrahy, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries can result in lifelong disability. Primary coaptation is the treatment of choice when the gap between transected nerve ends is short. Long nerve gaps seen in more complex injuries often require autologous nerve grafts or nerve conduits implemented into the repair. Nerve grafts, however, cause morbidity and functional loss at donor sites, which are limited in number. Nerve conduits, in turn, lack an internal scaffold to support and guide axonal regeneration, resulting in decreased efficacy over longer nerve gap lengths. By comparison, peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are molecules that can self-assemble into nanofibers, which can be aligned to mimic the native architecture of peripheral nerve. As such, they represent a potential substrate for use in a bioengineered nerve graft substitute. To examine this, we cultured Schwann cells with bioactive PAs (RGDS-PA, IKVAV-PA) to determine their ability to attach to and proliferate within the biomaterial. Next, we devised a PA construct for use in a peripheral nerve critical sized defect model. Rat sciatic nerve defects were created and reconstructed with autologous nerve, PLGA conduits filled with various forms of aligned PAs, or left unrepaired. Motor and sensory recovery were determined and compared among groups. Our results demonstrate that Schwann cells are able to adhere to and proliferate in aligned PA gels, with greater efficacy in bioactive PAs compared to the backbone-PA alone. In vivo testing revealed recovery of motor and sensory function in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs comparable to animals treated with autologous nerve grafts. Functional recovery in conduit/PA and autologous graft groups was significantly faster than in animals treated with empty PLGA conduits. Histological examinations also demonstrated increased axonal and Schwann cell regeneration within the reconstructed nerve gap in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs. These results indicate that PA nanofibers may

  8. Spontaneous temporal changes and variability of peripheral nerve conduction analyzed using a random effects model.

    PubMed

    Krøigård, Thomas; Gaist, David; Otto, Marit; Højlund, Dorthe; Selmar, Peter E; Sindrup, Søren H

    2014-08-01

    The reproducibility of variables commonly included in studies of peripheral nerve conduction in healthy individuals has not previously been analyzed using a random effects regression model. We examined the temporal changes and variability of standard nerve conduction measures in the leg. Peroneal nerve distal motor latency, motor conduction velocity, and compound motor action potential amplitude; sural nerve sensory action potential amplitude and sensory conduction velocity; and tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency were examined in 51 healthy subjects, aged 40 to 67 years. They were reexamined after 2 and 26 weeks. There was no change in the variables except for a minor decrease in sural nerve sensory action potential amplitude and a minor increase in tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency. Reproducibility was best for peroneal nerve distal motor latency and motor conduction velocity, sural nerve sensory conduction velocity, and tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency. Between-subject variability was greater than within-subject variability. Sample sizes ranging from 21 to 128 would be required to show changes twice the magnitude of the spontaneous changes observed in this study. Nerve conduction studies have a high reproducibility, and variables are mainly unaltered during 6 months. This study provides a solid basis for the planning of future clinical trials assessing changes in nerve conduction.

  9. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  10. Ocular Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Used to detect eye problems in children through analysis of retinal reflexes, the system incorporates image processing techniques. VISISCREEN's photorefractor is basically a 35 millimeter camera with a telephoto lens and an electronic flash. By making a color photograph, the system can test the human eye for refractive error and obstruction in the cornea or lens. Ocular alignment problems are detected by imaging both eyes simultaneously. Electronic flash sends light into the eyes and the light is reflected from the retina back to the camera lens. Photorefractor analyzes the retinal reflexes generated by the subject's response to the flash and produces an image of the subject's eyes in which the pupils are variously colored. The nature of a defect, where such exists, is identifiable by atrained observer's visual examination.

  11. Ocular leech infestation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yueh-Chang; Chiu, Cheng-Jen

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes a female toddler with manifestations of ocular leech infestation. A 2-year-old girl was brought to our outpatient clinic with a complaint of irritable crying after being taken to a stream in Hualien 1 day previous, where she played in the water. The parents noticed that she rubbed her right eye a lot. Upon examination, the girl had good fix and follow in either eye. Slit-lamp examination showed conjunctival injection with a moving dark black–brown foreign body partly attached in the lower conjunctiva. After applying topical anesthetics, the leech, measuring 1 cm in length, was extracted under a microscope. The patient began using topical antibiotic and corticosteroid agents. By 1 week after extraction, the patient had no obvious symptoms or signs, except for a limited subconjunctival hemorrhage, and no corneal/scleral involvement was observed. PMID:25784786

  12. Photorefractor ocular screening system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, John R. (Inventor); Kerr, Joseph H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting human eye defects, particularly detection of refractive error is presented. Eye reflex is recorded on color film when the eyes are exposed to a flash of light. The photographs are compared with predetermined standards to detect eye defects. The base structure of the ocular screening system is a folding interconnect structure, comprising hinged sections. Attached to one end of the structure is a head positioning station which comprises vertical support, a head positioning bracket having one end attached to the top of the support, and two head positioning lamps to verify precise head positioning. At the opposite end of the interconnect structure is a camera station with camera, electronic flash unit, and blinking fixation lamp, for photographing the eyes of persons being evaluated.

  13. Surveillance of Ocular Parameters and Visual Function in Bed Rest Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent visual changes in astronauts have raised concern about ocular health during long duration spaceflight. Seven cases have been documented in astronauts who spent 6 months aboard the International Space Station. These astronauts were male ranging in age from 45 to 55 years old. All astronauts exhibited pre- to post flight refractive changes. Decreased intraocular pressure (IOP) post flight was observed in 3 cases. Fundoscopic exams revealed post flight findings of choroidal folds in 4 cases, optic disc edema in 5 cases and the presence of cotton wool spots in 3 cases. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) confirmed findings of choroidal folds and disc edema, and also documented retinal nerve fiber layer thickening (5 cases). Findings from MRI examinations showed posterior globe flattening (5 cases), optic nerve sheath distention (6 cases) and torturous optic nerves (2 cases). Of the 7 cases, intracranial pressure was measured on 4 astronauts. These 4 showed elevated ICP post-flight that remained elevated for as long as 19 months in one case. While the etiology remains unknown, hypotheses speculate that venous insufficiency or hypertension in the brain caused by cephalad fluid shifts during spaceflight are possible mechanisms for ocular changes seen in astronauts. Head-down tilt bed rest is a spaceflight analog that induces cephalad fluid shifts. This study is designed to provide ocular monitoring of bed rest subjects and determine whether clinically relevant changes are found. Ocular Changes

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis and ocular involvement.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Chittaranjan; Banik, Sujoy; Islam, Md Nazarul; Biswas, Mukul Chandra; Biswas, Gautam; Biswas, Sobhan

    2003-09-01

    To study the occurrence and incidence of different ocular manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis a random cross-sectional study was carried out among 54 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. The patients were examined thoroughly to detect any ocular disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Complete ocular examination with special emphasis on anterior segment evaluation and tearfilm study was done. Two-thirds of the patients examined had some kind of visual problem at presentation. Three patients (5.55%) had marked dry eye with another 20 (37.03%) having borderline tear deficiency. Two cases ( 3.70% ) of episcleritis were also seen. No cases of scleritis or retinopathy were found. The most common ocular association with rheumatoid arthritis was secondary Sjogren's syndrome. Other conditions include episcleritis and marginal keratitis.

  15. Ocular Tropism of Respiratory Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Paul A.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism. PMID:23471620

  16. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  17. Evaluating optic nerve damage: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Paul J; Mikelberg, Frederick S

    2009-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy involving loss of retinal ganglion cells and their axons at the level of the optic nerve head. This change manifests as thinning and excavation of the neural tissues and nerve fiber layer. Therefore, it has long been known that the structural appearance of the optic nerve head is paramount to both glaucoma diagnosis and to the detection of progression [1-4]. Quantitative imaging methods such as Heidelberg Retinal Tomography (HRT) and Ocular Coherence Tomography (OCT) show great promise for the diagnosis and management of glaucoma and as these technologies continue to improve, they will become more important in the care of glaucoma. However, these tests cannot replace good clinical examination and indeed they depend upon clinical correlation for correct interpretation. Thus, careful and systematic clinical examination of the optic nerve remains a cornerstone of glaucoma management. In this paper, we outline a few pearls for the examination of the optic nerve and some of the pitfalls to be avoided in optic disc examination. PMID:19834565

  18. Ocular Manifestations of Oblique Facial Clefts

    PubMed Central

    Ortube, Maria Carolina; Dipple, Katrina; Setoguchi, Yoshio; Kawamoto, Henry K.; Demer, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the Tessier classification, craniofacial clefts are numbered from 0 to 14 and extend along constant axes through the eyebrows, eyelids, maxilla, nostrils, and the lips. We studied a patient with bilateral cleft 10 associated with ocular abnormalities. Method Clinical report with orbital and cranial computed tomography. Results After pregnancy complicated by oligohydramnios, digoxin, and lisinopril exposure, a boy was born with facial and ocular dysmorphism. Examination at age 26 months showed bilateral epibulbar dermoids, covering half the corneal surface, and unilateral morning glory anomaly of the optic nerve. Ductions of the right eye were normal, but the left eye had severely impaired ductions in all directions, left hypotropia, and esotropia. Under anesthesia, the left eye could not be rotated freely in any direction. Bilateral Tessier cleft number 10 was implicated by the presence of colobomata of the middle third of the upper eyelids and eyebrows. As the cleft continued into the hairline, there was marked anterior scalp alopecia. Computed x-ray tomography showed a left middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst and calcification of the reflected tendon of the superior oblique muscle, trochlea, and underlying sclera, with downward and lateral globe displacement. Discussion Tessier 10 clefts are very rare and usually associated with encephalocele. Bilateral 10 clefts have not been reported previously. In this case, there was coexisting unilateral morning glory anomaly and arachnoid cyst of the left middle cranial fossa but no encephalocele. Conclusions Bilateral Tessier facial cleft 10 may be associated with alopecia, morning glory anomaly, epibulbar dermoids, arachnoid cyst, and restrictive strabismus. PMID:20856062

  19. Novel ocular antihypertensive compounds in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, June; Runyan, Stephen A; Robinson, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Glaucoma is a multifactorial disease characterized by progressive optic nerve injury and visual field defects. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the most widely recognized risk factor for the onset and progression of open-angle glaucoma, and IOP-lowering medications comprise the primary treatment strategy. IOP elevation in glaucoma is associated with diminished or obstructed aqueous humor outflow. Pharmacotherapy reduces IOP by suppressing aqueous inflow and/or increasing aqueous outflow. Purpose: This review focuses on novel non-FDA approved ocular antihypertensive compounds being investigated for IOP reduction in ocular hypertensive and glaucoma patients in active clinical trials within approximately the past 2 years. Methods: The mode of IOP reduction, pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of these new agents were assessed. Relevant drug efficacy and safety trials were identified from searches of various scientific literature databases and clinical trial registries. Compounds with no specified drug class, insufficient background information, reformulations, and fixed-combinations of marketed drugs were not considered. Results: The investigational agents identified comprise those that act on the same targets of established drug classes approved by the FDA (ie, prostaglandin analogs and β-adrenergic blockers) as well as agents belonging to novel drug classes with unique mechanisms of action. Novel targets and compounds evaluated in clinical trials include an actin polymerization inhibitor (ie, latrunculin), Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitors, adenosine receptor analogs, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a serotonin receptor antagonist. Conclusion: The clinical value of novel compounds for the treatment of glaucoma will depend ultimately on demonstrating favorable efficacy and benefit-to-risk ratios relative to currently approved prostaglandin analogs and β-blockers and/or having complementary

  20. A Novel Internal Fixator Device for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ting-Hsien; Wilson, Robin E.; Love, James M.; Fisher, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Recovery from peripheral nerve damage, especially for a transected nerve, is rarely complete, resulting in impaired motor function, sensory loss, and chronic pain with inappropriate autonomic responses that seriously impair quality of life. In consequence, strategies for enhancing peripheral nerve repair are of high clinical importance. Tension is a key determinant of neuronal growth and function. In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that moderate levels of imposed tension (strain) can encourage axonal outgrowth; however, few strategies of peripheral nerve repair emphasize the mechanical environment of the injured nerve. Toward the development of more effective nerve regeneration strategies, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and implementation of a novel, modular nerve-lengthening device, which allows the imposition of moderate tensile loads in parallel with existing scaffold-based tissue engineering strategies for nerve repair. This concept would enable nerve regeneration in two superposed regimes of nerve extension—traditional extension through axonal outgrowth into a scaffold and extension in intact regions of the proximal nerve, such as that occurring during growth or limb-lengthening. Self-sizing silicone nerve cuffs were fabricated to grip nerve stumps without slippage, and nerves were deformed by actuating a telescoping internal fixator. Poly(lactic co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) constructs mounted on the telescoping rods were apposed to the nerve stumps to guide axonal outgrowth. Neuronal cells were exposed to PLGA using direct contact and extract methods, and they exhibited no signs of cytotoxic effects in terms of cell morphology and viability. We confirmed the feasibility of implanting and actuating our device within a sciatic nerve gap and observed axonal outgrowth following device implantation. The successful fabrication and implementation of our device provides a novel method for examining mechanical influences on nerve regeneration. PMID

  1. Ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist.

    PubMed

    Earp, Brandon E; Floyd, W Emerson; Louie, Dexter; Koris, Mark; Protomastro, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Presentation of ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist varies based on differential anatomy and the site or sites of compression. Therefore, an understanding of the anatomy of the Guyon canal is essential for diagnosis in patients presenting with motor and/or sensory deficits in the hand. The etiologies of ulnar nerve compression include soft-tissue tumors; repetitive or acute trauma; the presence of anomalous muscles and fibrous bands; arthritic, synovial, endocrine, and metabolic conditions; and iatrogenic injury. In addition to a thorough history and physical examination, which includes motor, sensory, and vascular assessments, imaging and electrodiagnostic studies facilitate the diagnosis of ulnar nerve lesions at the wrist. Nonsurgical management is appropriate for a distal compression lesion caused by repetitive activity, but surgical decompression is indicated if symptoms persist or worsen over 2 to 4 months. PMID:25344595

  2. Optimizing skeletal muscle reinnervation with nerve transfer.

    PubMed

    Lien, Samuel C; Cederna, Paul S; Kuzon, William M

    2008-11-01

    Denervation as a consequence of nerve injury causes profound structural and functional changes within skeletal muscle and can lead to a marked impairment in function of the affected limb. Prompt reinnervation of a muscle with a sufficient number of motion-specific motor axons generally results in good structural and functional recovery, whereas long-term denervation or insufficient or improper axonal recruitment uniformly results in poor functional recovery. Only nerve transfer has been highly efficacious in changing the clinical outcomes of patients with skeletal muscle denervation, especially in the case of proximal limb nerve injuries. Rapid reinnervation with an abundant number of motor axons remains the only clinically effective means to restore function to denervated skeletal muscles. PMID:18928892

  3. Treatment of peroneal nerve injuries with simultaneous tendon transfer and nerve exploration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Common peroneal nerve palsy leading to foot drop is difficult to manage and has historically been treated with extended bracing with expectant waiting for return of nerve function. Peroneal nerve exploration has traditionally been avoided except in cases of known traumatic or iatrogenic injury, with tendon transfers being performed in a delayed fashion after exhausting conservative treatment. We present a new strategy for management of foot drop with nerve exploration and concomitant tendon transfer. Method We retrospectively reviewed a series of 12 patients with peroneal nerve palsies that were treated with tendon transfer from 2005 to 2011. Of these patients, seven were treated with simultaneous peroneal nerve exploration and repair at the time of tendon transfer. Results Patients with both nerve repair and tendon transfer had superior functional results with active dorsiflexion in all patients, compared to dorsiflexion in 40% of patients treated with tendon transfers alone. Additionally, 57% of patients treated with nerve repair and tendon transfer were able to achieve enough function to return to running, compared to 20% in patients with tendon transfer alone. No patient had full return of native motor function resulting in excessive dorsiflexion strength. Conclusion The results of our limited case series for this rare condition indicate that simultaneous nerve repair and tendon transfer showed no detrimental results and may provide improved function over tendon transfer alone. PMID:25099247

  4. Rabies: ocular pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Haltia, M; Tarkkanen, A; Kivelä, T

    1989-01-01

    Ocular pathology in the first European case of human bat-borne rabies is described. The patient was a 30-year-old bat scientist who seven weeks after bat bite developed neurological symptoms and died 23 days later. Rabies virus antigens were detected in brain smears. After extensive virological studies the virus turned out to be a rabies-related virus, closely resembling the Duvenhage virus isolated from bats in South Africa in 1980. By light microscopy focal chronic inflammatory infiltration of the ciliary body and of the choroid was found. PAS-positive exudate was seen in the subretinal and in the outer plexiform layers of the retina, and retinal veins showed endothelial damage and perivascular inflammation. Many of the retinal ganglion cells were destroyed. The presence of rabies-related viral antigen in the retinal ganglion cells was shown by positive cytoplasmic immunofluorescence, though electron microscopy failed to identify definite viral structures in the retina. By immunohistochemistry glial fibrillary acidic protein was observed in the Müller's cells, which are normally negative for this antigen but express it as a reactive change when the retina is damaged. Synaptophysin, a constituent of presynaptic vesicles of normal retinal neurons, was not detected in the retina. Images PMID:2920157

  5. Isolated optic nerve infiltration in systemic lymphoma--a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Usha R; Shah, Akash D; Arora, Vipul; Solanki, Urvashi

    2010-01-01

    Ocular involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma occurs either as primary ocular, central nervous system lymphoma or isolated intraocular lymphoma. Recurrence of systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the form of CNS lymphoma has been reported. However, recurrence as an isolated optic nerve lesion without involving CNS has never been reported in the pediatric age group. We report a case of systemic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in a 2-year-old female, which primarily occurred as suprapubic mass and later recurred in the form of isolated optic nerve infiltration, after remission of the primary disease. Early detection and prompt treatment resulted in complete reversal of the disease. PMID:20523257

  6. Neuroma-in-continuity of the median nerve managed by nerve expansion and direct suture with vein conduit.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, J; Raimbeau, G; Rabarin, F; Fouque, P A; Saint-Cast, Y; Césari, B; Bigorre, N

    2014-06-01

    Autologous nerve grafting is the current standard for bridging large gaps in major sensory and motor nerves. It allows both function and pain improvement with predictable results. Clinical observations of nerve elongation caused by tumours have prompted experimental animal studies of induced gradual elongation of the nerve stump proximal to the gap. This technique allows direct suturing of the two nerve ends to bridge the gap. Here, we describe a case of neuroma-in-continuity of the median nerve managed by resection and direct suture after nerve elongation with a tissue expander. We are not aware of similar reported cases. Secondary repair 3 years after the initial injury improved the pain and hypersensitivity and restored a modest degree of protective sensory function (grade S1).

  7. Secondary optic nerve tumors.

    PubMed

    Christmas, N J; Mead, M D; Richardson, E P; Albert, D M

    1991-01-01

    Secondary tumors of the optic nerve are more common than primary optic nerve tumors. The involvement of the optic nerve may arise from direct invasion from intraocular malignancies, from hematopoietic malignancy, from meningeal carcinomatosis, or from distant primary tumors. Orbital tumors rarely invade the optic nerve, and brain tumors involve it only in their late stages.

  8. Prospective Observational Study of Ocular Health in ISS Crews - The Ocular Health Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, C.; Barr, Y.; Platts, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Sargsyan, A.; Alexander, D.; Riascos, R.; Gibson, C.; Patel, N.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is currently NASA's number one human space flight risk. The syndrome, which is related to microgravity exposure, manifests with changes in visual acuity (hyperopic shifts, scotomas), changes in eye structure (optic disc edema, choroidal folds, cotton wool spots, globe flattening, and dilated optic nerve sheaths), and in some cases with documented increased intracranial pressure (ICP) postflight. While the eye appears to be the main affected end organ of this syndrome, the ocular effects are thought to be related to underlying changes in the vascular system and the central nervous system. The leading hypotheses for the development of VIIP involve microgravity-induced head-ward fluid shifts along with a loss of gravity-assisted drainage of venous blood from the brain, leading to cephalic congestion, decreased CSF resorption and increased ICP. Since 70% of ISS crewmembers have manifested clinical signs or symptoms of the VIIP syndrome, it is assumed that the majority have some degree of ICP elevation in-flight compared to the ground. Prolonged elevations of ICP can cause long-term reduced visual acuity and loss of peripheral visual fields, and have been reported to cause mild cognitive impairment in the analog terrestrial population of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH). These potentially irreversible health consequences underscore the importance of identifying the factors that lead to this syndrome and mitigating them. METHODS: The Ocular Health study expands on the required in-flight medical testing required of long-duration crewmembers assigned to an International Space Station (ISS) mission, to include 13 sessions over a three-year period. Pre- and postflight evaluations include functional eye exams (visual testing), structural eye exams (fundoscopy, ocular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, optical biometry and biomicroscopy), intraocular pressure (IOP, tonometry

  9. Cnidarian Nerve Nets and Neuromuscular Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Satterlie, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Cnidarians are considered "nerve net animals" even though their nervous systems include various forms of condensation and centralization. Yet, their broad, two-dimensional muscle sheets are innervated by diffuse nerve nets. Do the motor nerve nets represent a primitive organization of multicellular nervous systems, do they represent a consequence of radial symmetry, or do they offer an efficient way to innervate a broad, two-dimensional muscle sheet, in which excitation of the muscle sheet can come from multiple sites of initiation? Regarding the primitive nature of cnidarian nervous systems, distinct neuronal systems exhibit some adaptations that are well known in higher animals, such as the use of oversized neurons with increased speed of conduction, and condensation of neurites into nerve-like tracts. A comparison of neural control of two-dimensional muscle sheets in a mollusc and jellyfish suggests that a possible primitive feature of cnidarian neurons may be a lack of regional specialization into conducting and transmitting regions.

  10. Ocular versus extraocular control of posture and equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Guerraz, M; Bronstein, A M

    2008-12-01

    Vision has been shown for almost a century to be heavily involved in postural control. However, the mechanism by which it operates is still an open debate. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the evidence supporting the view that there are two modes of visual detection of body sway: ocular and extraocular. The former is based on the characteristics of the visual flow (retinal slip), the second one is based on either the copy of the motor command (efference copy) or the extraocular muscle afferents (re-afferences) consecutive to eye movements. Results from the literature indicate that these two modes of visual detection of body sway are effective and can operate congruently. For sufficiently large body sway with respect to eye-target distance, the ocular and the extraocular perception systems could provide two sources of visual information about body displacements. However, the afferent system might remain the only one used for small lateral body sway. PMID:19026959

  11. Nonvisual eye position control in a patient with ocular lateropulsion.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, K; Sawa, M; Matsuda, S; Uno, A; Takeda, M

    1988-01-01

    For elucidating the nonvisual eye position control system, we studied the accuracy of saccades toward the remembered position (memory-guided saccades) in a patient with ocular lateropulsion having tonic bias of the eye position. Although the saccadic dysmetria caused by ocular lateropulsion was recorded during memory-guided saccades in the same manner as visually guided saccades, the eyes reached precisely the intended position by corrective saccades. The mean latency of corrective saccades was significantly longer than that of corrective saccades observed for visually guided saccades. This long latency of corrective saccades supports the assumption that feedback information of the eye position is a signal generated by orbital afferents rather than a copy of the motor command.

  12. Upbeat-torsional nystagmus and contralateral fourth nerve palsy due to unilateral dorsal ponto-mesencephalic lesion

    PubMed Central

    Thurtell, Matthew J.; Tomsak, Robert L.; Leigh, R. John

    2010-01-01

    The central projections of the anterior semicircular canals are thought to be conveyed from the vestibular nuclei to the ocular motor nuclei in the midbrain by three distinct brainstem pathways: the medial longitudinal fasciculus, crossing ventral tegmental tract, and brachium conjunctivum. There is controversy as to whether upbeat nystagmus could result from lesions involving each of these pathways. We report a 52-year-old man who presented with a contralesional fourth nerve palsy and primary position upbeat-torsional nystagmus due to a small unilateral dorsal ponto-mesencephalic lymphomatous deposit. We postulate that the upbeat-torsional nystagmus was caused by involvement of the brachium conjunctivum, which lies adjacent to the fourth nerve fascicles at the dorsal ponto-mesencephalic junction, but we cannot exclude involvement of the crossing ventral tegmental tract. Our observations suggest that, in humans, excitatory upward-torsional eye movement signals from the anterior semicircular canals could be partly conveyed to the midbrain by the brachium conjunctivum. PMID:19645952

  13. Topical rebamipide improves the ocular surface in mild lagophthalmos

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Mariko; Itakura, Hirotaka; Kashima, Tomoyuki; Akiyama, Hideo; Kishi, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    Administration of topical rebamipide improves the ocular surface in dry eye. We consecutively studied seven eyes in seven cases (three males and four females) with mild lagophthalmos (three cases after eyelid surgery, two cases of incomplete facial nerve palsy, and two cases of senile ectropion) during the treatment of corneal disorders with rebamipide eye drops four times daily for 2 weeks. The fluorescein corneal staining (FCS) score, tear film break-up time (TBUT), Schirmer’s test, and decimal visual acuity were examined. Ocular symptoms were examined and scored by questioning each patient before and after administration of the drug. In all seven eyes, inferior corneal erosion decreased or disappeared within 2 weeks after administration of topical rebamipide. The FCS score was significantly improved (P < 0.05). The TBUT was significantly extended from 2.9 ± 0.5 seconds to 5.2 ± 0.4 seconds (P < 0.05). The scores of ocular symptoms, such as eye pain, dryness, blurred vision, and foreign body sensations, were significantly improved (P < 0.05).Topical rebamipide was effective for corneal disorders in mild lagophthalmos. This drug may provide a novel approach to treat lagophthalmos. PMID:23836962

  14. Ocular involvement in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: a review.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Deirdre; Giles, Seamus

    2014-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), the most severe manifestation of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is considered the leading non-hereditary cause of mental retardation and neurological deficit in the Western world. There lie a huge associated human cost to both FASD victims and their families and a considerable financial burden. This problem is being tackled on many fronts including community awareness programs, biomarker development for fetal alcohol exposure, research into preventative treatments and the development of more robust diagnostic systems for the early detection of FASD. Although ethanol can affect many of the major systems of the body, the eye is a primary target. Ocular aberrations including optic nerve hypoplasia, tortuosity of retinal vessels, coloboma and microphthalmia are frequently observed in children diagnosed with FAS. In this regard, ocular involvement in FAS has gained importance, particularly in relation to early diagnosis and identification of FAS. Furthermore, our considerable knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying eye development has provided a powerful tool for the investigation of the teratogenic actions of ethanol. In this review, we initially provide an overview of FASD in terms of historical background, epidemiology and current status. Next, we explore the role of ocular involvement in FASD and the use of eye measurements in the diagnosis of FAS. Lastly, we review how current knowledge of early eye development can be used to gain new insights into the molecular mechanisms of ethanol teratogenicity with particular reference to the sonic hedgehog pathway.

  15. Ocular involvement in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: a review.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Deirdre; Giles, Seamus

    2014-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), the most severe manifestation of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is considered the leading non-hereditary cause of mental retardation and neurological deficit in the Western world. There lie a huge associated human cost to both FASD victims and their families and a considerable financial burden. This problem is being tackled on many fronts including community awareness programs, biomarker development for fetal alcohol exposure, research into preventative treatments and the development of more robust diagnostic systems for the early detection of FASD. Although ethanol can affect many of the major systems of the body, the eye is a primary target. Ocular aberrations including optic nerve hypoplasia, tortuosity of retinal vessels, coloboma and microphthalmia are frequently observed in children diagnosed with FAS. In this regard, ocular involvement in FAS has gained importance, particularly in relation to early diagnosis and identification of FAS. Furthermore, our considerable knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying eye development has provided a powerful tool for the investigation of the teratogenic actions of ethanol. In this review, we initially provide an overview of FASD in terms of historical background, epidemiology and current status. Next, we explore the role of ocular involvement in FASD and the use of eye measurements in the diagnosis of FAS. Lastly, we review how current knowledge of early eye development can be used to gain new insights into the molecular mechanisms of ethanol teratogenicity with particular reference to the sonic hedgehog pathway. PMID:24502600

  16. Ocular injuries caused by fireworks.

    PubMed

    Levitz, L M; Miller, J K; Uwe, M; Drüsedau, H

    1999-10-01

    What are the consequences of suddenly legalizing fireworks sales in a largely rural society? Would the spectrum of ocular injuries caused by fireworks differ from those found in the Western world? This is the first study on ocular injuries caused by fireworks conducted in the Republic of South Africa. We analyzed the presenting features and prospectively followed up all patients who presented to the casualties served by our ophthalmic department over the New Year celebrations of 1996-1997. The sale of fireworks to the public had been deregulated the previous year. Ocular injuries caused by fireworks had not been reported before 1995. We found that ocular injuries caused by fireworks occurred mainly in young male patients. The injuries were usually unilateral and responded to treatment. This mirrors worldwide studies that show that it is children who are frequently harmed by fireworks injury. Two of our patients were blinded by their injuries. Our findings echo those found in Western countries where fireworks have not been restricted by law. We suggest that young boys, regardless of race, nationality, literacy, or social circumstances, are at risk for ocular injuries caused by fireworks. Countries planning to unban fireworks should aim their education program at this target group.

  17. Visual performance and the ocular surface in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Cockerham, Glenn C; Lemke, Sonne; Glynn-Milley, Catherine; Zumhagen, Lars; Cockerham, Kimberly P

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of neurotrauma is reviewed and an original study investigating the prevalence of dry eye disease in a sample of veterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is presented. Fifty-three veterans with TBI were evaluated by history of injury, past ocular history, and medication use. Ocular Disease Surface Index (OSDI), ocular examination, cranial nerve evaluation, tear osmolarity, tear film break-up time (TFBUT), ocular surface staining and tear production testing were performed. A matched comparison group underwent similar testing. TBI causes were blast (44) or non-blast (9). TBI subjects scored significantly worse on the OSDI (P<.001), and ocular surface staining by Oxford scale (P<.001) than non-TBI subjects. Scores for tear film breakup (P=.6), basal tear production less than 3 mm (P=.13), and tear osmolarity greater than 314 mOsm/L (P=.15) were all higher in TBI subjects; significantly more TBI subjects had at least one abnormal dry eye measure than comparisons (P<.001). The OSDI related to presence of dry eye symptoms (P<.01). These effects were present in both blast and non-blast TBI. Seventy percent of TBI subjects were taking at least one medication in the following classes: antidepressant, atypical antipsychotic, anticonvulsant, or h1-antihistamine. There was no association between any medication class and the OSDI or dry eye measures. Reduced corneal sensation in 21 TBI subjects was not associated with OSDI, tear production, or TFBUT, but did correlate with reduced tear osmolarity (P=.05). History of refractive surgery, previous contact lens wear, facial nerve weakness, or meibomian gland dysfunction was not associated with DED. In summary, we found a higher prevalence of DED in subjects with TBI, both subjectively and objectively. This effect is unrelated to medication use, and it may persist for months to years. We recommend that patients with TBI from any cause be evaluated for DED using a battery of standard testing methods described in

  18. Median Nerve Conduction in Healthy Nigerians: Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Owolabi, LF; Adebisi, SS; Danborno, BS; Buraimoh, AA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Because of lack of local normative data, electrodiagnostic laboratories in Nigeria apply standard values generated in the USA and Europe to diagnose different median nerve abnormalities. Aim: To develop normative values for motor and sensory median nerve conduction studies (NCSs) in Nigerian population. Subjects and Methods: In a cross-sectional study design, a total of 200 healthy volunteers were selected after clinical evaluation to exclude systemic or neuromuscular disorders. NCS of the median nerves was conducted on all the healthy volunteers according to a standardized protocol. The data included in the final analysis were amplitude, latency, and nerve conduction velocity. Ethical approval was obtained for the study. Results: The reference range for median nerve (motor) velocity, distal latency, and amplitude were 49.48–66.92, 1.95–4.52, and 4.3–11.3, respectively. The reference range for median nerve F-wave latency was 44.8–70.5. The reference range for median nerve (sensory) velocity, distal latency, and amplitude were 44.8–70.5, 1.98–4.52, and 16.6–58.4, respectively. Conclusion: Reference values for the nerve conduction parameters of the median (motor and sensory) in the study population were similar to those obtained in the literature. PMID:27213090

  19. The ocular surface: from physiology to the ocular allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Galicia-Carreón, Jorge; Santacruz, Concepción; Hong, Enrique; Jiménez-Martínez, María C

    2013-01-01

    Allergic conjunctivitis (AC) is an inflammation of the conjunctiva secondary to an immune response to exogenous antigens, usually called allergens. In fact, AC is a syndrome that involves the entire ocular surface, including conjunctiva, lids, cornea, and tear film. The signs and symptoms of AC have a meaningful effect on comfort and patient health, and could be influenced by environment, genetics and immune regulation mechanisms, all of which work together in a complex immunological homeostasis. Dysregulation in such immune responses could turn into a variety of ocular allergic diseases (OAD). This review describes some of the current understanding of cellular and molecular pathways involved in different OAD.

  20. Donor Activation Focused Rehabilitation Approach: Maximizing Outcomes After Nerve Transfers.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Lorna Canavan; Moore, Amy M

    2016-05-01

    As nerve transfers become the mainstay in treatment of brachial plexus and isolated nerve injuries, the preoperative and postoperative therapy performed to restore motor function requires continued dedication and appreciation. Through the understanding of the general principles of muscle activation and patient education, the therapist has a unique impact on the return of function in patients with nerve injuries. As surgeons continue to develop novel nerve transfers, the perioperative training, education, and implementation of the donor activation focused rehabilitation approach model is critical to ensure successful outcomes. PMID:27094897

  1. Imaging of the optic nerve and retinal nerve fiber layer: an essential part of glaucoma diagnosis and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kotowski, Jacek; Wollstein, Gadi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Schuman, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    Because glaucomatous damage is irreversible early detection of structural changes in the optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer is imperative for timely diagnosis of glaucoma and monitoring of its progression. Significant improvements in ocular imaging have been made in recent years. Imaging techniques such as optical coherence tomography, scanning laser polarimetry and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy rely on different properties of light to provide objective structural assessment of the optic nerve head, retinal nerve fiber layer and macula. In this review, we discuss the capabilities of these imaging modalities pertinent for diagnosis of glaucoma and detection of progressive glaucomatous damage and provide a review of the current knowledge on the clinical performance of these technologies. PMID:24388709

  2. Ocular Immune Privilege and Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Allografts are afforded a level of protection from rejection within immune-privileged tissues. Immune-privileged tissues involve mechanisms that suppress inflammation and promote immune tolerance. There are anatomical features, soluble factors, membrane-associated proteins, and alternative antigen-presenting cells (APC) that contribute to allograft survival in the immune-privileged tissue. This review presents the current understanding of how the mechanism of ocular immune privilege promotes tolerogenic activity by APC, and T cells in response to the placement of foreign antigen within the ocular microenvironment. Discussed will be the unique anatomical, cellular, and molecular mechanisms that lessen the chance for graft destroying immune responses within the eye. As more is understood about the molecular mechanisms of ocular immune privilege greater is the potential for using these molecular mechanisms in therapies to prevent allograft rejection.

  3. Sports-related ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Larrison, W I; Hersh, P S; Kunzweiler, T; Shingleton, B J

    1990-10-01

    A prospective evaluation of all patients presenting with a sports-related ocular injury during a 1-year (4-season) period was conducted. Of the 202 patients evaluated, 28 (13.8%) required hospitalization and 11 (5.6%) required intraocular surgery. Twenty-six patients (12.8%) sustained permanent ocular sequelae including seven (3.5%) who suffered visual loss. Basketball accounted for 28.7%, baseball/softball 19.8%, and racquetball 11.4% of all injuries. At the time of injury, 5.1% of patients had worn protective eye wear, whereas on follow-up only 31% had used eye protection. These results indicate that sports trauma remains a significant cause of ocular morbidity.

  4. Medial rectus muscle anchoring in complete oculomotor nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Hyung; Chang, Jee Ho

    2015-10-01

    The management of exotropia resulting from complete oculomotor nerve palsy is challenging. Conventional therapeutic interventions, including supramaximal resection and recession, superior oblique tendon resection and transposition, and several ocular anchoring procedures have yielded less-than-adequate results. Here we describe a novel surgical technique of anchoring the medial rectus muscle to the medial orbital wall in combination with lateral rectus disinsertion and reattachment to the lateral orbital wall. PMID:26486032

  5. Nerve Transfers in Birth Related Brachial Plexus Injuries: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed

    Davidge, Kristen M; Clarke, Howard M; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the assessment and management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The potential role of distal nerve transfers in the treatment of infants with Erb's palsy is discussed. Current evidence for motor outcomes after traditional reconstruction via interpositional nerve grafting and extraplexal nerve transfers is reviewed and compared with the recent literature on intraplexal distal nerve transfers in obstetrical brachial plexus injury. PMID:27094890

  6. Mononeuropathy of a distal branch of the femoral nerve in a body building champion

    PubMed Central

    Padua, L; D'Aloya, E; LoMonaco, M; Padua, R; Gregori, B; Tonali, P

    1997-01-01

    A unique case of a body building champion with localised atrophy of the distal portion of the vastus lateralis muscle is reported; neurophysiological evaluation suggests a selective lesion of a distal branch of the vastus lateralis nerve (a motor branch of the femoral nerve). A necroscopic study in four cases was performed to better clarify the site and mechanism of nerve lesion. The data suggest that stretching and compression of the nerve has probably occurred during strenous exercise.

 PMID:9408112

  7. The management of ocular herpesvirus infections.

    PubMed

    Ostler, H B

    1976-01-01

    The many treatment methods in current use for every known complaint only seem to aggravate the difficulty of treating ocular herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, which are generally self-limited in the immunocompetent host. The cornea is already a somewhat immune-deficient tissue since its lack of blood vessels separates it partially from the host, and treatment with glucocorticoids, which are immunosuppressive, increases the risk of damaging complications such as scarring, prolonged morbidity, bacterial or fungal superinfection, and the occasional corenal perforation. Accepted methods of treatment of specific lesions, are discussed, as are some methods that are not yet accepted, but which seem promising. Herpes zoster may result in scarring and significant loss of vision even without the use of glucocorticoids, the disease often manifesting itself in the already compromised host. The major complication is postherpetic neuralgia. None of the available treatment methods has been fully satisfactory, and every effort should be made to prevent eye lesions in patients with early infection of the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve. Stimulation of cellular immunity by various means appears to offer some new promise for control of the disease. Management of varicella, cytomegalovirus, and infectious mononucleosis are also discussed.

  8. Evaporation from the ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Mathers, William

    2004-03-01

    Evaporation from the ocular surface is dramatically reduced by the lipid layer which covers it. With this layer intact, evaporation represents a small loss of water for which the lacrimal gland easily compensates. When tear production is compromised evaporation becomes important, especially since evaporation in almost all ocular surface disease states and any surface perturbation, including contact lens wear, increases evaporation significantly. How the barrier function of the lipid layer accomplishes this reduction in evaporation is not understood and is probably quite complex as is the structure of the lipid layer. Improving this barrier function remains an important and elusive goal.

  9. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects.

  10. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects. PMID:27357302

  11. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Collins, K; Storey, M; Peterson, K; Nutter, P

    1988-01-01

    In brief: Nerve injuries in athletes may be serious and may delay or prevent an athlete's return to his or her sport. Over a two-year period, the authors evaluated the condition of 65 patients who had entrapments of a nerve or nerve root, documented with electromyography. They describe four case histories: Two patients had radial nerve entrapments, one caused by baseball pitching and the other by kayaking; one football player had combined suprascapular neuropathy and upper trunk brachial plexopathy; and one patient had carpal tunnel syndrome of a median nerve secondary to rowing. Sports-related peripheral nerve lesions of the lower extremity were not seen during the study period. Based on a literature review, the nerve injuries discussed represent the spectrum of nerve entrapments likely to be seen in US clinics. The authors conclude that peripheral nerve lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sports injuries, particularly at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist.

  12. Morphology and Functional Anatomy of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve with Extralaryngeal Terminal Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), such as an extralaryngeal terminal bifurcation (ETB), threaten the safety of thyroid surgery. Besides the morphology of the nerve branches, intraoperative evaluation of their functional anatomy may be useful to preserve motor activity. We exposed 67 RLNs in 36 patients. The main trunk, bifurcation point, and terminal branches of bifid nerves were macroscopically determined and exposed during thyroid surgery. The functional anatomy of the nerve branches was evaluated by intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM). Forty-six RLNs with an ETB were intraoperatively exposed. The bifurcation point was located along the prearterial, arterial, and postarterial segments in 11%, 39%, and 50% of bifid RLNs, respectively. Motor activity was determined in all anterior branches. The functional anatomy of terminal branches detected motor activity in 4 (8.7%) posterior branches of 46 bifid RLNs. The motor activity in posterior branches created a wave amplitude at 25–69% of that in the corresponding anterior branches. The functional anatomy of bifid RLNs demonstrated that anterior branches always contained motor fibres while posterior branches seldom contained motor fibres. The motor activity of the posterior branch was weaker than that of the anterior branch. IONM may help to differentiate between motor and sensory functions of nerve branches. The morphology and functional anatomy of all nerve branches must be preserved to ensure a safer surgery. PMID:27493803

  13. Sciatic nerve repair using adhesive bonding and a modified conduit

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangdang; Cai, Hongfei; Hao, Yongyu; Sun, Geng; Song, Yaoyao; Chen, Wen

    2014-01-01

    When repairing nerves with adhesives, most researchers place glue directly on the nerve stumps, but this method does not fix the nerve ends well and allows glue to easily invade the nerve ends. In this study, we established a rat model of completely transected sciatic nerve injury and repaired it using a modified 1 cm-length conduit with inner diameter of 1.5 mm. Each end of the cylindrical conduit contains a short linear channel, while the enclosed central tube protects the nerve ends well. Nerves were repaired with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate and suture, which complement the function of the modified conduit. The results demonstrated that for the same conduit, the average operation time using the adhesive method was much shorter than with the suture method. No significant differences were found between the two groups in sciatic function index, motor evoked potential latency, motor evoked potential amplitude, muscular recovery rate, number of medullated nerve fibers, axon diameter, or medullary sheath thickness. Thus, the adhesive method for repairing nerves using a modified conduit is feasible and effective, and reduces the operation time while providing an equivalent repair effect. PMID:25206861

  14. [Functional anatomy of the trigeminal nerve].

    PubMed

    Leston, J M

    2009-04-01

    The cranial nerve (CN) V is a mixed nerve that consists primarily of sensory neurons. It exits the brain on the lateral surface of the pons, entering the trigeminal ganglion within a few millimeters. Three major branches emerge from the trigeminal ganglion. The first division (V1, the ophthalmic nerve) exits the cranium through the superior orbital fissure, entering the orbit to innervate the globe and skin in the area above the eye and forehead. The second division (V2, the maxillary nerve) exits through a round hole, the foramen rotundum, into a space posterior to the orbit, the pterygopalatine fossa. It then re-enters a canal running inferior to the orbit, the infraorbital canal, and exits through a small hole, the infraorbital foramen, to innervate the skin below the eye and above the mouth. The third division (V3, the mandibular nerve) exits the cranium through an oval hole, the foramen ovale. The third division also has an additional motor component, which may run in a separate fascial compartment. Most fibers travel directly to their target tissues. Sensory axons innervate skin on the lateral side of the head, the tongue, and the mucosal wall of the oral cavity. Motor fibers innervate the muscles that are attached to the mandible. Some sensory axons enter in the mandible to innervate the teeth and emerge from the mental foramen to innervate the skin of the lower jaw.

  15. Communications Between the Trigeminal Nerve and the Facial Nerve in the Face: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Yang, Su Cheol; Song, Ju Sung

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the article is to elucidate the communications between the trigeminal nerve and facial nerve in the face. In a PubMed search, 328 studies were found using the terms 'trigeminal nerve, facial nerve, and communication.' The abstracts were read and 39 full-text articles were reviewed. Among them, 11 articles were analyzed. In the studies using dissection, the maxillary branch (V2) had the highest frequency (95.0% ± 8.0%) of communication with the facial nerve, followed by the mandibular branch (V3) (76.7% ± 38.5%). The ophthalmic branch (V1) had the lowest frequency of communication (33.8% ± 19.5%). In a Sihler stain, all of the maxillary branches and mandibular branches had communications with the facial nerve and 85.7% (12/14 hemifaces) of the ophthalmic branches had communications. The frequency of communications between the trigeminal nerve and facial nerve were significantly higher (P = 0.00, t-test) in the studies using a Sihler stain (94.7% ± 1.1%) than the studies using dissection (76.9 ± 35.8). The reason for the significantly higher frequency of trigeminal-facial communication in the studies using a Sihler stain is because of the limitation of the Sihler stain itself. This technique cannot differentiate the motor nerves from sensory nerves at the periphery, and a crossover can be misinterpreted as communication near to nerve terminal.

  16. [Multiple ocular coloboma (MOC) with persistent pupillary membrane in the snow leopard (Panthera uncia)].

    PubMed

    Schäffer, E; Wiesner, H; von Hegel, G

    1988-01-01

    In a litter of three snow leopards, bilateral colobomata of the upper temporal eyelids, bilateral persistent pupillary membranes and a unilateral coloboma of the optic nerve entrance are described as "Multiple Ocular Colobomata" (MOC). The causal pathogenesis of each of the colobomata is discussed comparatively. The colobomata of the eyelids, essential feature of the MOC syndrome in snow leopards, are most probably not of hereditary, but rather of intrauterine infectious viral origin.

  17. [Multiple ocular coloboma (MOC) with persistent pupillary membrane in the snow leopard (Panthera uncia)].

    PubMed

    Schäffer, E; Wiesner, H; von Hegel, G

    1988-01-01

    In a litter of three snow leopards, bilateral colobomata of the upper temporal eyelids, bilateral persistent pupillary membranes and a unilateral coloboma of the optic nerve entrance are described as "Multiple Ocular Colobomata" (MOC). The causal pathogenesis of each of the colobomata is discussed comparatively. The colobomata of the eyelids, essential feature of the MOC syndrome in snow leopards, are most probably not of hereditary, but rather of intrauterine infectious viral origin. PMID:3368914

  18. Comparison of quadriceps inactivation between nerve and muscle stimulation.

    PubMed

    Place, Nicolas; Casartelli, Nicola; Glatthorn, Julia F; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2010-12-01

    We evaluated the use of direct muscle stimulation for quantifying quadriceps inactivation at different contraction levels as opposed to conventional twitch interpolation using nerve stimulation. Fourteen healthy volunteers were tested. Paired stimuli were delivered to the femoral nerve or to the quadriceps muscle belly during voluntary contractions ranging from 20% to 100% of maximum, and the amplitude of the superimposed doublet was quantified to investigate inactivation. Superimposed doublet for muscle and nerve stimulation, respectively between the range of 60% to 100% of maximum (e.g., at 100%, muscle stimulation was 14 ± 5 Nm and nerve stimulation was 15 ± 6 Nm). Despite higher current doses, muscle stimulation was associated with less discomfort than nerve stimulation (P < 0.05). Collectively, our data suggest that direct muscle stimulation could be used to assess quadriceps inactivation at maximal and quasi-maximal contraction levels as a valid alternative to motor nerve stimulation.

  19. Ocular manifestations of feline viral diseases.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Feline viral diseases are common and cats can be presented with a variety of clinical manifestations. Ocular disease associated with viral pathogens is not unusual, particularly with viruses causing upper respiratory tract disease in cats, such as feline herpesvirus type 1 and feline calicivirus. These agents mainly cause ocular surface disease. Other viruses, such as feline immunodeficiency virus and feline coronavirus, can cause uveitis, while feline leukemia virus can induce ocular lymphosarcoma. This review covers the most common viral pathogens of cats that cause ocular manifestations, the specific features of the ocular diseases caused by these viruses and therapeutic recommendations.

  20. Ocular hypotensive effects of medifoxamine.

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, S; Turner, P

    1992-01-01

    Medifoxamine is a novel monoamine re-uptake inhibiting antidepressive drug which preferentially inhibits dopamine reuptake. In human volunteer studies it has been found to reduce significantly intraocular pressure after single oral doses of 300-1000 mg, and to produce a small but statistically significant miosis. Its maximal ocular hypotensive action was less than that of oral timolol 20 mg. PMID:1389953

  1. Ocular Toxoplasmosis: Lessons from Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    • A new attention to post-natally acquired infections. Previously, most attention was focused on infection during pregnancy, and the risk of congenital disease, with the feeling that infection in older individuals was benign, without a substantial risk of disease morbidity, such as ocular involvemen...

  2. Therapeutical Management for Ocular Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    López-Valverde, Gloria; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Larrosa-Povés, José Manuel; Polo-Llorens, Vicente; Pablo-Júlvez, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe a case of ocular rosacea with a very complex evolution. Rosacea is a chronic dermatological disease that may affect the ocular structures up to 6-72% of all cases. This form is often misdiagnosed, which may lead to long inflammatory processes with important visual consequences for affected patients. Therefore, an early diagnosis and an adequate treatment are important. Methods We report the case of a 43-year-old patient who had several relapses of what seemed an episode of acute bacterial conjunctivitis. Two weeks later, he developed a corneal ulcer with a torpid evolution including abundant intrastromal infiltrators and calcium deposits. He was diagnosed with ocular rosacea and treated with systemic doxycycline and topical protopic. Results A coating with amniotic membrane was placed in order to heal the ulcer, but a deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty to restore the patient's vision because of the corneal transparency loss was necessary. Conclusions Ocular rosacea includes multiple ophthalmic manifestations ranging from inflammation of the eyelid margin and blepharitis to serious corneal affectations. A delayed diagnosis can result in chronic inflammatory conditions including keratinization and loss of corneal transparency, which lead to important visual sequelae for affected patients. PMID:27462249

  3. Adjuvant neurotrophic factors in peripheral nerve repair with chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-reduced acellular nerve allografts

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Richard B.; Sexton, Kevin W.; Rodriguez-Feo, Charles L.; Nookala, Ratnam; Pollins, Alonda C.; Cardwell, Nancy L.; Tisdale, Keonna Y.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Shack, R. Bruce; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acellular nerve allografts are now standard tools in peripheral nerve repair due to decreased donor site morbidity and operative time savings. Preparation of nerve allografts involves several steps of decellularization and modification of extracellular matrix to remove chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth through a poorly understood mechanism involving RhoA and ECM-integrin interactions. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) is an enzyme that degrades CSPG molecules and has been shown to promote neurite outgrowth following injury of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Variable results following chondroitinase ABC treatment make it difficult to predict the effects of this drug in human nerve allografts, especially in the presence of native extracellular signaling molecules. Several studies have shown cross-talk between neurotrophic factor and CSPG signaling pathways, but their interaction remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the adjuvant effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on neurite outgrowth post-injury in CSPG-reduced substrates and acellular nerve allografts. Materials and Methods E12 chicken DRG explants were cultured in medium containing ChABC, ChABC + NGF, ChABC + GDNF or control media. Explants were imaged at 3 d and neurite outgrowths measured. The rat sciatic nerve injury model involved a 1-cm sciatic nerve gap that was microsurgically repaired with ChABC pre-treated acellular nerve allografts. Prior to implantation, nerve allografts were incubated in NGF, GDNF or sterile water. Nerve histology was evaluated at 5d and 8wk post-injury. Results The addition of GDNF in vitro produced significant increase in sensory neurite length at 3 d compared to ChABC alone (P < 0.01), while NGF was not significantly different from control. In vivo adjuvant NGF produced increases in total myelinated axon count (P < 0.005) and motor axon

  4. Aberrant radial-ulnar nerve communication in the upper arm presenting as an unusual radial nerve palsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Daniel J; Buzas, David; Siegel, Geoffrey; Afsari, Alan

    2015-05-01

    An unusual communication between the radial and ulnar nerves was observed during repair of a fracture of the humerus in an adult patient who presented with unusual physical exam findings. The patient had loss of radial and ulnar nerve motor function, as well as decreased sensation in both nerve distributions. Radial nerve injury following fracture of the humerus is a common condition, and anatomic variations are therefore of importance to clinicians. Communications between branches of the brachial plexus are also not uncommon findings; however there is very little mention of communication between the radial and ulnar nerves in the literature. An appreciation of unusual nerve anatomy is important in explaining unusual finding in patients. PMID:25481257

  5. Short-interval intracortical inhibition is modulated by high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takenobu; Sakuma, Kenji; Nomura, Takashi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2007-06-01

    Cortical excitability can be modulated by manipulation of afferent input. We investigated the influence of peripheral mixed nerve stimulation on the excitability of the motor cortex. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs), short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) in the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB), extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles were evaluated using paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) before and after high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation (150 Hz, 30 min) over the right median nerve at the wrist. The MEP amplitude and SICI of the APB muscle decreased transiently 0-10 min after the intervention, whereas the ICF did not change. High-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation reduced the excitability of the motor cortex. The decrement in the SICI, which reflects the function of GABA(A)ergic inhibitory interneurons, might compensate for the reduced motor cortical excitability after high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation.

  6. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... toe-out movements Tests of nerve activity include: Electromyography (EMG, a test of electrical activity in muscles) Nerve ... Peroneal neuropathy. In: Preston DC, Shapiro BE, eds. Electromyography and Neuromuscular Disorders . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  7. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... to measure the speed of the nerve signals. Electromyography (recording from needles placed into the muscles) is ... Often, the nerve conduction test is followed by electromyography (EMG). In this test, needles are placed into ...

  8. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  9. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  10. Neuromuscular junction integrity after chronic nerve compression injury.

    PubMed

    Mozaffar, Tahseen; Strandberg, Erika; Abe, Kazuko; Hilgenberg, Lutz G; Smith, Martin A; Gupta, Ranjan

    2009-01-01

    Chronic nerve compression injuries (CNC) are progressive demyelinating disorders characterized by a gradual decline of the nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in the affected nerve region. CNC injury induces a robust Schwann cell response with axonal sprouting, but without morphologic evidence of axonal injury. We hypothesize that early CNC injury occurs without damage to neuromuscular junction of motor axons. A well-established animal model was used to assess for damage to motor axons. As sprouting is considered a hallmark of regeneration during and after axonal degeneration and sprouting was confirmed visually at 2 weeks in CNC animals, we assessed for axonal degeneration in motor nerves after CNC by evaluating the integrity of the neuromuscular junction. NCV exhibited a gradual progressive decline consistent with the human condition. Compound motor action potential amplitudes decreased slightly immediately and plateaued, indicating that there was not sustained and increasing axonal loss. Sprouting was confirmed using immunofluorescence and by an increase in number of unmyelinated axons and Remak bundles. Blind analysis of the neuromuscular junction showed no difference between control and CNC images, indicating that there was no evidence for end-unit axonal loss in the soleus muscle. Because the progressive decline in NCV was not paired with a similar progressive decline in amplitude, it is likely that axonal loss is not responsible for slowing of action potentials. Blind analysis of the neuromuscular junction provides further evidence that the axonal sprouting seen early after CNC injury is not a consequence of axonal degeneration in the motor nerves. PMID:18655131

  11. Ocular manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, D A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of ocular complications and the clinical outcomes of these complications in patients with various stages of HIV infection. METHODS: Retrospective review of all HIV-infected patients seen in an AIDS ophthalmology clinic from November 1983 through December 31, 1992. RESULTS: Eleven-hundred sixty-three patients were seen for ophthalmologic evaluation. Of these, 781 had the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), 226 had symptomatic HIV infection (AIDs-related complex [ARC]), and 156 had asymptomatic HIV infection. Non-infectious HIV retinopathy was the most common ocular complication, affecting 50% of the patients with AIDS, 34% of the patients with ARC, and 3% of the patients with asymptomatic HIV infection. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis was the most common opportunistic ocular infection, affecting 37% of the patients with AIDS. Other opportunistic ocular infections, including ocular toxoplasmosis, varicella zoster virus retinitis, and Pneumocystis choroidopathy were all much less common, each occurring in < or = 1% of the patients with AIDS. Treatment of CMV retinitis with either foscarnet or ganciclovir was successful in initially controlling the retinitis. However, relapse represented a significant problem and required frequent re-inductions. As a consequence of the retinal damage associated with relapse, loss of visual acuity occurred. The median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse for all eyes with CMV retinitis was 13.4 months, and the median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse in the better eye was 21.1 months. At last follow-up, 75% of the patients had a final visual acuity of 20/40 or better in at least one eye. Retinal detachments were a frequent ophthalmologic complication of CMV retinitis with a cumulative probability of a retinal detachment in at least one eye of 57% at 12 months after the diagnosis of CMV retinitis. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus developed in 3% of the overall series and was seen in

  12. Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction after Injury: A Review of Clinical and Experimental Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Grinsell, D.; Keating, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other tissues in the body, peripheral nerve regeneration is slow and usually incomplete. Less than half of patients who undergo nerve repair after injury regain good to excellent motor or sensory function and current surgical techniques are similar to those described by Sunderland more than 60 years ago. Our increasing knowledge about nerve physiology and regeneration far outweighs our surgical abilities to reconstruct damaged nerves and successfully regenerate motor and sensory function. It is technically possible to reconstruct nerves at the fascicular level but not at the level of individual axons. Recent surgical options including nerve transfers demonstrate promise in improving outcomes for proximal nerve injuries and experimental molecular and bioengineering strategies are being developed to overcome biological roadblocks limiting patient recovery. PMID:25276813

  13. Comparison of nerve, vessel, and cartilage grafts in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Firat, Cemal; Geyik, Ylmaz; Aytekin, Ahmet Hamdi; Gül, Mehmet; Kamşl, Suat; Yiğitcan, Birgül; Ozcan, Cemal

    2014-07-01

    Peripheral nerve injury primarily occurs due to trauma as well as factors such as tumors, inflammatory diseases, congenital deformities, infections, and surgical interventions. The surgical procedure to be performed as treatment depends on the etiology, type of injury, and the anatomic region. The goal of treatment is to minimize loss of function due to motor and sensory nerve loss at the distal part of the injury. Regardless of the cause of the injury, the abnormal nerve regeneration due to incomplete nerve regeneration, optimal treatment of peripheral nerve injuries should provide adequate coaptation of proximal and distal sides without tension, preserving the neurotrophic factors within the repair line. The gold standard for the treatment of nerve defects is the autograft; however, due to denervation of the donor site, scarring, and neuroma formation, many studies have aimed to develop simpler methods, better functional results, and less morbidity. In this study, a defect 1 cm in length was created on the sciatic nerve of rats. The rats were treated with the following procedures: group 1, autograft; group 2, allogeneic aorta graft; group 3, diced cartilage graft in allogeneic aorta graft; and group 4, tubularized cartilage graft in allogeneic aorta graft. Group 5 was the control group. The effects of cartilage tissue in nerve regeneration were evaluated by functional and histomorphological methods.Group 1, for which the repair was performed with an autograft, was evaluated to be the most similar to the control group. There was not a statistically significant difference in myelination and Schwann cell rates between group 2, in which an allogeneic aorta graft was used, and group 3, in which diced cartilage in an allogeneic aorta graft was used. In group 4, myelination and Schwann cell formation were observed; however, they were scattered and irregular, likely due to increased fibrosis.In all of the groups, nerve regeneration at various rates was observed both

  14. Ocular surface foreign bodies: novel findings mimicking ocular malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Maudgil, A; Wagner, B E; Rundle, P; Rennie, I G; Mudhar, H S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Malignant melanoma of the eye is an uncommon condition that is important to recognise. We describe three cases in which ocular foreign bodies have masqueraded as ocular malignant melanoma. Methods Interventional case reports. Results Case 1 describes diathermy-induced carbon particle implantation, during plaque therapy for the treatment of uveal melanoma, mimicking recurrence with extra-scleral invasion. Case 2 shows a foreign body called ‘mullite' mimicking conjunctival melanoma. Case 3 demonstrates a conjunctival foreign body called ‘illite' that mimicked a limbal melanocytic lesion, clinically thought to be either melanocytoma or melanoma. Conclusion This report highlights the importance of careful history taking, examination, and appropriate biopsy in cases of suspected malignant melanoma, to prevent unnecessary and potentially radical treatment. PMID:25104745

  15. Lower limb surgeries under combined femoral and sciatic nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Lipsy; Attri, Joginder Pal; Verma, Pawan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral nerve blocks are gaining popularity for many infraumblical surgeries with the development of new techniques such as ultrasound and peripheral nerve stimulator. It provides stable hemodynamic, better, and prolonged postoperative analgesia. This study was carried out to see the effectiveness of combined femoral and sciatic nerve block with ropivacaine alone and by adding fentanyl. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 100 patients scheduled for lower limb surgeries and were randomly divided into two groups of 50 each. In Group A, patients received 20 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine for femoral nerve block and same dose for sciatic nerve block and in Group B, 25 μg fentanyl was added each for femoral nerve and sciatic nerve block along with ropivacaine. All hemodynamic parameters, onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks were noted. The patient characteristics were analyzed using the “Chi-square tests” and the intergroup comparison of the parametric data was carried out using the unpaired t-test using software IBM SPSS 17.0. Results: Combined femoral and sciatic nerve block provide longer duration of postoperative analgesia of about 12–13 h. All the above-mentioned parameters were statistically non-significant. Conclusion: Hence in this study, onset and duration of sensory and motor block was comparable in both groups. However postoperative analgesia was prolonged as compared to neuraxial blockade without any hemodynamic instability. PMID:27746528

  16. Assessment of war and accidental nerve injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Barisić, N; Perović, D; Mitrović, Z; Jurenić, D; Zagar, M

    1999-07-01

    Eleven children with war-related peripheral nerve injury and 16 children with accident-related nerve injury between the ages of 3 and 15 years were assessed clinically and electromyoneurographically for 1-15 months. Lesions of 32 peripheral nerves were registered in children with war injuries. Children with accidentally acquired injuries had lesions of 27 peripheral nerves. A complete loss of voluntary motor unit potentials and signs of total axonal damage were recorded in the upper arms of seven of 11 children with war injuries and in five of 16 children with accidental injuries. There was a diminished number of motor unit potentials and a reduction in compound muscle action potential amplitudes, indicating partial nerve lesions, in 11 of 16 children with accidental injuries (mostly after humeral fracture) and in three of 11 children with brachial plexus war injuries. Reinnervation signs first occurred after 5-9 months (mean = 6.2 months) in war-injured children receiving conservative treatment and after 2-7 months (mean = 3.4 months) in children with accidentally acquired injuries. War-related peripheral nerve injuries in children are more frequently associated with complete denervation followed by slower or delayed nerve regeneration. In children with accidentally acquired nerve injuries the course is significantly better.

  17. Electrical stimulation and motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several investigators have successfully regenerated axons in animal spinal cords without locomotor recovery. One explanation is that the animals were not trained to use the regenerated connections. Intensive locomotor training improves walking recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in people, and >90% of people with incomplete SCI recover walking with training. Although the optimal timing, duration, intensity, and type of locomotor training are still controversial, many investigators have reported beneficial effects of training on locomotor function. The mechanisms by which training improves recovery are not clear, but an attractive theory is available. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed a famous rule that has been paraphrased as "neurons that fire together, wire together." This rule provided a theoretical basis for a widely accepted theory that homosynaptic and heterosynaptic activity facilitate synaptic formation and consolidation. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord has a locomotor center, called the central pattern generator (CPG), which can be activated nonspecifically with electrical stimulation or neurotransmitters to produce walking. The CPG is an obvious target to reconnect after SCI. Stimulating motor cortex, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves can modulate lumbar spinal cord excitability. Motor cortex stimulation causes long-term changes in spinal reflexes and synapses, increases sprouting of the corticospinal tract, and restores skilled forelimb function in rats. Long used to treat chronic pain, motor cortex stimuli modify lumbar spinal network excitability and improve lower extremity motor scores in humans. Similarly, epidural spinal cord stimulation has long been used to treat pain and spasticity. Subthreshold epidural stimulation reduces the threshold for locomotor activity. In 2011, Harkema et al. reported lumbosacral epidural stimulation restores motor control in chronic motor complete patients. Peripheral nerve or functional electrical

  18. Ocular Fixation Abnormality in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Shirama, Aya; Kanai, Chieko; Kato, Nobumasa; Kashino, Makio

    2016-05-01

    We examined the factors that influence ocular fixation control in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) including sensory information, individuals' motor characteristics, and inhibitory control. The ASD group showed difficulty in maintaining fixation especially when there was no fixation target. The fixational eye movement characteristics of individuals were consistent regardless of the presence or absence of a fixation target in the controls, but not in the ASD group. Additionally, fixation stability did not correlate with an ability to suppress reflexive saccades measured by an antisaccade task. These findings suggest that ASD adults have deficits in converting alternative sensory information, such as retinal signals in the peripheral visual field or extraretinal signals, to motor commands when the foveal information is unavailable. PMID:26739354

  19. Selective activation of the human tibial and common peroneal nerves with a flat interface nerve electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefer, M. A.; Freeberg, M.; Pinault, G. J. C.; Anderson, J.; Hoyen, H.; Tyler, D. J.; Triolo, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation has been shown effective in restoring basic lower extremity motor function in individuals with paralysis. We tested the hypothesis that a flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) placed around the human tibial or common peroneal nerve above the knee can selectively activate each of the most important muscles these nerves innervate for use in a neuroprosthesis to control ankle motion. Approach. During intraoperative trials involving three subjects, an eight-contact FINE was placed around the tibial and/or common peroneal nerve, proximal to the popliteal fossa. The FINE's ability to selectively recruit muscles innervated by these nerves was assessed. Data were used to estimate the potential to restore active plantarflexion or dorsiflexion while balancing inversion and eversion using a biomechanical simulation. Main results. With minimal spillover to non-targets, at least three of the four targets in the tibial nerve, including two of the three muscles constituting the triceps surae, were independently and selectively recruited in all subjects. As acceptable levels of spillover increased, recruitment of the target muscles increased. Selective activation of muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve was more challenging. Significance. Estimated joint moments suggest that plantarflexion sufficient for propulsion during stance phase of gait and dorsiflexion sufficient to prevent foot drop during swing can be achieved, accompanied by a small but tolerable inversion or eversion moment.

  20. Distal nerve entrapment following nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, T; Otto, A; Wechselberger, G; Pommer, B; Papp, C

    1998-04-01

    Failure of nerve repair or poor functional outcome after reconstruction can be influenced by various causes. Besides improper microsurgical technique, fascicular malalignment and unphysiologic tension, we found in our clinical series that a subclinical nerve compression distal to the repair site can seriously impair regeneration. We concluded that the injured nerve, whether from trauma or microsurgical intervention, could be more susceptible to distal entrapment in the regenerative stage because of its disturbed microcirculation, swelling and the increase of regenerating axons followed by increased nerve volume. In two cases we found the regenerating nerve entrapped at pre-existing anatomical sites of narrowing resulting in impaired functional recovery. In both cases the surgical therapy was decompression of the distal entrapped nerve and this was followed by continued regeneration. Thorough clinical and electrophysiologic follow-up is necessary to detect such adverse compression effects and to distinguish between the various causes of failed regeneration. Under certain circumstances primary preventive decompression may be beneficial if performed at the time of nerve coaptation.

  1. Non-traumatic Occulomotor Nerve Palsy: A Rare Case Report and Discussion on Etiopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Prajesh; Bansal, Vishal; Arun Kumar, K V; Mowar, Apoorva; Khare, Gagan; Singh, Sukumar

    2015-03-01

    The ghost of the past has emerged as the horror of today. The fear of weakness/loss of eyesight following extraction is a common thinking amongst the orthodox people of Indian subcontinent. Occulomotor nerve paralysis following dental extraction is a rare complication. Although these ophthalmic complications in routine practice are rare, some time they do occur and pose difficulty to explain. Occulomotor nerve palsy is amongst the rare reported cases of ocular complication. Here we report a case of spontaneous recovery of occulomotor nerve palsy in an elderly diabetic patient and brief discussion on its etiopathogenesis. PMID:25838716

  2. The Lesser Palatine Nerve Innervates the Levator Veli Palatini Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Yoshitaka; Kawai, Katsuya; Yamada, Shigehito; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary: When the lesser palatine nerve (LPN) is supposed to be a branch of the trigeminal nerve and innervate sensation of the soft palate, whether the LPN contains motor fibers is unclear. In this study, we monitored the electromyogram of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle on stimulating the LPN during palatoplasty in 3 patients. The electromyogram of the muscles showed the myogenic potential induced by electrostimulation of the LPN. Taken together with the finding from our previous anatomical study that the motor fibers come from the facial nerve, this result supports the double innervation theory of the LVP, which posits that both the pharyngeal plexus and the facial nerve innervate it. Identifying and preserving the LPN during palatoplasty might improve postoperative speech results. PMID:27757354

  3. Late sciatic nerve axonotmesis following acetabular reconstruction plate.

    PubMed

    Moreta, J; Foruria, X; Labayru, F

    2016-01-01

    Sciatic nerve injuries associated with acetabular fractures can be post-traumatic, perioperative or postoperative. Late postoperative injury is very uncommon and can be due to heterotopic ossifications, muscular scarring, or implant migration. A case is presented of a patient with a previous transverse acetabular fracture treated with a reconstruction plate for the posterior column. After 17 years, she presented with progressive pain and motor deficit in the sciatic territory. Radiological and neurophysiological assessments were performed and the patient underwent surgical decompression of the sciatic nerve. A transection of the nerve was observed that was due to extended compression of one of the screws. At 4 years postoperatively, her pain had substantially diminished and the paresthesias in her leg had resolved. However, her motor symptoms did not improve. This case report could be relevant due to this uncommon delayed sciatic nerve injury due to prolonged hardware impingement.

  4. Ocular effects of radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Elder, J A

    2003-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) energy has been reported to cause a variety of ocular effects, primarily cataracts but also effects on the retina, cornea, and other ocular systems. Cataracts have been observed in experimental animals when one eye was exposed to a localized, very high RF field and the other eye was the unexposed control. The results show that 2450 MHz exposures for >or=30 min at power densities causing extremely high dose rates (>or=150 W/kg) and temperatures (>or=41 degrees C) in or near the lens caused cataracts in the rabbit eye. However, cataracts were not observed in the monkey eye exposed to similar exposure conditions, reflecting the different patterns of energy absorption (SAR, specific absorption rate) distribution, due to their different facial structure. Since the monkey head is similar in structure to the human head, the nonhuman primate study showed that the incident power density levels causing cataracts in rabbits and other laboratory animals cannot be directly extrapolated to primates, including human beings. It is reasonable to assume that an SAR that would induce temperatures >or=41 degrees C in or near the lens in the human eye would produce cataracts by the same mechanism (heating) that caused cataracts in the rabbit lens; however, such an exposure would greatly exceed the currently allowable limits for human exposure and would be expected to cause unacceptable effects in other parts of the eye and face. Other ocular effects including corneal lesions, retinal effects, and changes in vascular permeability, have been observed after localized exposure of the eye of laboratory animals to both continuous wave (CW) and pulsed wave (PW) exposures, but the inconsistencies in these results, the failure to independently confirm corneal lesions after CW exposure, the failure to independently confirm retinal effects after PW exposure, and the absence of functional changes in vision are reasons why these ocular effects are not useful in defining an

  5. [Ocular toxocariasis--case report].

    PubMed

    Moraru, Andreea; Panfil, Madălina; Totolici, Geanina; Brănişteanu, Daniel; Costin, Dănut; Schmitzer, Speranţa

    2014-01-01

    Ocular Toxocariasis is a parasitosis caused by Toxocara catis/canis larvae localized in the eye. The most frequent clinical manifestations are the central retinal granuloma, peripheral retinal granuloma and chronic endophthalmitis. Secondary complications due to the presence of parasite in the posterior segment of the eye may have significant consequences on visual function. We present the case of a 23 years old patient, admitted for progressive decrease of the right eye BCVA during the last 6 months. After performing clinical examination and serological tests we established the diagnosis of ocular Toxocariasis. The patient presented a particular form of the disease consisting in the presence of both a central retinal granuloma and a peripheral one. We performed 23G pars plana vitrectomy and membrane peeling. VA improved as soon as the first month after surgery.

  6. Ocular toxoplasmosis in AIDS patients.

    PubMed Central

    Gagliuso, D J; Teich, S A; Friedman, A H; Orellana, J

    1990-01-01

    We describe 16 cases of ocular and, in some patients, associated CNS toxoplasmosis in AIDS patients. T gondii is commonly associated with infection in the immunocompromised host. The lesions are most often seen in the CNS and eyes; involvement in the brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, and lymph nodes may be observed. CNS involvement by toxoplasmosis may be an initial manifestation of AIDS and may be associated with discrete or diffuse lesions. CT scan and MR imaging may demonstrate a multitude of lesions often displaying the characteristic ring-shaped enhancement after contrast injection. Ocular involvement by toxoplasmosis, though less common than CNS involvement, is characterized by several features. These may be manifested as single or multifocal retinal lesions in one or both eyes or massive areas of retinal necrosis. Invariably these lesions are unassociated with a pre-existing retinochoroidal scar suggesting that the lesions are a manifestation of acquired rather than congenital disease. Presence of IgM antibodies may support this observation although antibody levels in AIDS patients may not reflect the magnitude of disease. Vitreous reaction is often minimal. Anterior uveitis has been reported in one case. Treatment of the ocular infection with pyrimethamine, clindamycin and sulfadiazine is effective in over 75% of patients. Once resolution of the ocular infection is observed, maintenance therapy is continued as relapses occur in the absence of treatment. Corticosteroid treatment is unnecessary and its use has been associated with the development of CMV retinitis. Other retinal infections in AIDS patients which should be considered in the differential diagnosis include CMV, herpetic-associated ARN and syphilis. Concomitant CMV and toxoplasmosis in the same eye have been seen. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 A FIGURE 8 B FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 9 C PMID

  7. Transplant related ocular surface disorders: Advanced techniques for ocular surface rehabilitation after ocular complications secondary to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Erin D; Mahomed, Faheem; Hans, Amneet K; Dalal, Jignesh D

    2016-05-01

    HSCT has been linked to the development of an assortment of ocular surface complications with the potential to lead to permanent visual impairment if left untreated or if not treated early in the course of disease. Strategies for therapy include maintenance of lubrication and tear preservation, prevention of evaporation, decreasing inflammation, and providing epithelial support. The ultimate aim of treatment is to prevent permanent ocular sequelae through prompt ophthalmology consultation and the use of advanced techniques for ocular surface rehabilitation. We describe several rehabilitation options of ocular surface complications occurring secondarily during the post-HSCT course.

  8. Effect of a new aldose reductase inhibitor, 8'-chloro-2',3'-dihydrospiro [pyrrolidine-3,6'(5'H)-pyrrolo[1,2,3-de] [1,4]benzoxazine]-2,5,5'- trione (ADN-138), on delayed motor nerve conduction velocity in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Y; Fujimori, S; Okada, K

    1988-02-01

    The effects of a chemically new type of aldose reductase inhibitor, ADN-138, on delayed motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and sciatic nerve sorbitol, fructose and myo-inositol levels were studied in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. MNCV in rats was significantly delayed after 3 weeks of diabetes and ADN-138 treatment was started at this point. Treatment of diabetics with ADN-138 at 5 and 20 but not 1 mg/kg/d for 3 weeks resulted in a significant increase in MNCV and reduced sorbitol levels to or below those of nondiabetic controls. However, fructose, though decreased in a dose-dependent manner, was not normalized. The reference drug, Sorbinil, showed similar effects on them. After the 3 weeks of ADN-138(20 mg/kg/d) treatment, diabetics were left on ADN-138 or continued further to be treated with it for 3 weeks. The withdrawal of ADN-138 prevented a further increase in MNCV and restored sorbitol and fructose to nontreated diabetic levels, and myo-inositol levels declined. In contrast, the ADN-138-continued group kept improving its MNCV and normalized sorbitol and myo-inositol. These results suggest that polyol accumulation is responsible for delayed MNCV and that the action of ADN-138 on MNCV reflected reversibility of metabolic function in diabetics.

  9. Ocular motor assessment in concussion: Current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Rachel E; Balcer, Laura J; Galetta, Steven L; Rucker, Janet C

    2016-02-15

    Mild head injury such as concussions and subconcussive repetitive impact may lead to subtle changes in brain function and it is imperative to find sensitive and reliable tests to detect such changes. Tests involving the visual system, in particular eye movements, can incorporate higher cortical functioning and involve diffuse pathways in the brain, including many areas susceptible to head impact. With concussions, the clinical neuro-ophthalmic exam is important for detecting abnormalities in vergence, saccades, pursuit, and visual fixation. On the sidelines, the King-Devick test has been used as a visual performance measure that incorporates eye movements and increases the sensitivity in detecting possible concussions in conjunction with standard sideline tests of cognition, symptom checklists, and balance. Much promise lies in the eye movement laboratory to quantitate changes in saccades and pursuit with concussions using video-oculography. A combination of eye movement tasks coupled with neuroimaging techniques and other objective biomarkers may lead to a better understanding of the anatomical and physiological consequences of concussion and to better understand the natural history of this condition. PMID:26810521

  10. Facial asymmetry in ocular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Khorrami Nejad, Masoud; Askarizadeh, Farshad; Pour, Fatemeh Farahbakhsh; Ranjbar Pazooki, Mahsa; Moeinitabar, Mohamad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Torticollis can arise from nonocular (usually musculoskeletal) and ocular conditions. Some facial asymmetries are correlated with a history of early onset ocular torticollis supported by the presence of torticollis on reviewing childhood photographs. When present in an adult, this type of facial asymmetry with an origin of ocular torticollis should help to confirm the chronicity of the defect and prevent unnecessary neurologic evaluation in patients with an uncertain history. Assessment of facial asymmetry consists of a patient history, physical examination, and medical imaging. Medical imaging and facial morphometry are helpful for objective diagnosis and measurement of the facial asymmetry, as well as for treatment planning. The facial asymmetry in congenital superior oblique palsy is typically manifested by midfacial hemihypoplasia on the side opposite the palsied muscle, with deviation of the nose and mouth toward the hypoplastic side. Correcting torticollis through strabismus surgery before a critical developmental age may prevent the development of irreversible facial asymmetry. Mild facial asymmetry associated with congenital torticollis has been reported to resolve with continued growth after early surgery, but if asymmetry is severe or is not treated in the appropriate time, it might remain even with continued growth after surgery.

  11. Recent Overview of Ocular Patents

    PubMed Central

    Gaudana, Ripal J.; Gokulgandhi, Mitan R.; Boddu, Sai H.S.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Ocular drug therapy has always been considered as a major challenge in the field of drug delivery. The presence of blood ocular barriers and efflux pumps has imposed a great concern as well. Various vision threatening disorders require a long term therapy of drug molecules, especially for the diseases that affect the posterior segment. Pharmaceutical companies and other research institutes have adopted a multidisciplinary approach to meet the current challenges which is evidenced by the trends seen in the published and filed U.S. patents. Various strategies have been employed to achieve long term sustained and targeted delivery for both the anterior and the posterior segments of the ocular diseases. These strategies include formulating drugs into implant, micro or nanoparticulate systems and hydrogel-based systems. Transporter targeted approach has also allowed scientists to deliver drugs to both the segments of the eye. Recent developments such as delivery of drugs utilizing ultrasound, iontophoresis and microneedle based devices have been promising. Gene-based therapeutics has opened a new avenue for vision threatening disorders. In all, the current developments in the entire field have been very exciting for finding out new strategies to treat vision threatening disorders. PMID:22493994

  12. Hemimasticatory spasm treated with microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve.

    PubMed

    Chon, Kyu-Hyon; Lee, Jong-Myong; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young

    2012-09-01

    Hemimasticatory spasm is a very rare disorder of the trigeminal nerve characterized by paroxysmal involuntary contraction of the jaw-closing muscles. The mechanisms leading to hemimasticatory spasm are still unclear. Recently, injection of botulinum toxin has become the treatment of choice due to its excellent results. We report a case of a successful treatment of hemimasticatory spasm via microvascular decompression of the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve.

  13. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  14. [Diagnosis and treatment of ocular hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sun, Y Y; Chen, W W; Wang, N L

    2016-07-01

    Ocular hypertension is popular among people, with a prevalence of 3% to 10% in those older than 40 years old. Without proper intervention, over 10% of the patients with ocular hypertension would develop glaucoma in the following 5 to 10 years. Glaucoma has become one of the leading causes of blindness all over the world, which makes it essential for us to pay enough attention to the prevention and treatment of ocular hypertension. However, it is not cost-effective to treat all the patients with ocular hypertension. Certain side effects may also be caused with long-term medical treatment. Therefore, it is of great importance for ophthalmologists to identify the right time and use appropriate therapeutic methods. To introduce the knowledge of ocular hypertension, the definition, epidemiology, diagnosis, risk factors and treatment of ocular hypertension are reviewed in this article. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 542-546). PMID:27531115

  15. Impact of Microbiome on Ocular Health.

    PubMed

    Kugadas, Abirami; Gadjeva, Mihaela

    2016-07-01

    The ocular surface is continuously exposed to the environment and, therefore, it is surprising that it harbors only few commensals with low degree of diversity. This unique aspect of the ocular surface physiology prompts the question whether there are core ocular commensal communities and how they affect ocular immunity. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of what is known about the ocular surface commensals in health and disease and what we would like to learn in the near future. In addition, we discuss how microbiota at sites other than the eye may influence ocular immune responses. The information discussed in the review has been gathered using PubMed searches for literature published from January 1982 to December 2015.

  16. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy of the Ocular Surface: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Villani, Edoardo; Baudouin, Christophe; Efron, Nathan; Hamrah, Pedram; Kojima, Takashi; Patel, Sanjay V.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Zhivov, Andrey; Dogru, Murat

    2014-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) is an emerging technology that provides minimally invasive, high resolution, steady-state assessment of the ocular surface at the cellular level. Several challenges still remain but, at present, IVCM may be considered a promising technique for clinical diagnosis and management. This mini-review summarizes some key findings in IVCM of the ocular surface, focusing on recent and promising attempts to move “from bench to bedside”. IVCM allows prompt diagnosis, disease course follow-up, and management of potentially blinding atypical forms of infectious processes, such as acanthamoeba and fungal keratitis. This technology has improved our knowledge of corneal alterations and some of the processes that affect the visual outcome after lamellar keratoplasty and excimer keratorefractive surgery. In dry eye disease, IVCM has provided new information on the whole-ocular surface morphofunctional unit. It has also improved understanding of pathophysiologic mechanisms and helped in the assessment of prognosis and treatment. IVCM is particularly useful in the study of corneal nerves, enabling description of the morphology, density, and disease- or surgically induced alterations of nerves, particularly the subbasal nerve plexus. In glaucoma, IVCM constitutes an important aid to evaluate filtering blebs, to better understand the conjunctival wound healing process, and to assess corneal changes induced by topical antiglaucoma medications and their preservatives. IVCM has significantly enhanced our understanding of the ocular response to contact lens wear. It has provided new perspectives at a cellular level on a wide range of contact lens complications, revealing findings that were not previously possible to image in the living human eye. The final section of this mini-review provides a focus on advances in confocal microscopy imaging. These include 2D wide-field mapping, 3D reconstruction of the cornea and automated image analysis. PMID

  17. Recent advances in research on nitrergic nerve-mediated vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Okamura, Tomio

    2015-06-01

    Cerebral vascular resistance and blood flow were widely considered to be regulated solely by tonic innervation of vasoconstrictor adrenergic nerves. However, pieces of evidence suggesting that parasympathetic nitrergic nerve activation elicits vasodilatation in dog and monkey cerebral arteries were found in 1990. Nitric oxide (NO) as a neurotransmitter liberated from parasympathetic postganglionic neurons decreases cerebral vascular tone and resistance and increases cerebral blood flow, which overcome vasoconstrictor responses to norepinephrine liberated from adrenergic nerves. Functional roles of nitrergic vasodilator nerves are found also in peripheral vasculature, including pulmonary, renal, mesenteric, hepatic, ocular, uterine, nasal, skeletal muscle, and cutaneous arteries and veins; however, adrenergic nerve-induced vasoconstriction is evidently greater than nitrergic vasodilatation in these vasculatures. In coronary arteries, neurogenic NO-mediated vasodilatation is not clearly noted; however, vasodilatation is induced by norepinephrine released from adrenergic nerves that activates β1-adrenoceptors. Impaired actions of NO liberated from the endothelium and nitrergic neurons are suggested to participate in cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to brain dysfunction, like that in Alzheimer's disease. Nitrergic neural dysfunction participates in impaired circulation in peripheral organs and tissues and also in systemic blood pressure increase. NO and vasodilator peptides, as sensory neuromediators, are involved in neurogenic vasodilatation in the skin. Functioning of nitrergic vasodilator nerves is evidenced not only in a variety of mammals, including humans and monkeys, but also in non-mammals. The present review article includes recent advances in research on the functional importance of nitrergic nerves concerning the control of cerebral blood flow, as well as other regions, and vascular resistance. Although information is still insufficient, the nitrergic nerve

  18. [Principles of treatment in ocular burns regarding the ocular surface and limbal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Potop, V; Dumitrache, Marieta

    2005-01-01

    The term ocular surface emphasizes the functional interdependence of the nonkeratinizing epithelium of cornea and conjunctiva. The limbal stem cells are responsible for replacement of corneal epithelium following ocular surface injuries. Over the past decades important advances in the management of chemical injury have occurred based on the application of theories on ocular surface and limbal stem cells. PMID:16245740

  19. [Glaucoma medications, preservatives and the ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Aptel, F; Labbé, A; Baudouin, C; Bron, A; Lachkar, Y; Sellem, E; Renard, J-P; Nordmann, J-P; Rouland, J-F; Denis, P

    2014-10-14

    Several clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that ocular surface disease is common in glaucoma patients receiving chronic glaucoma drops, and that the preservatives in these drops play a major role in the occurrence of ocular surface disease. These ocular surface changes may induce both symptoms reported by the patients and anterior segment clinical signs, and should be systematically assessed by history and exam in all glaucoma patients. In these patients with ocular surface disease, reducing the amount of preservatives administered to the eye should be strived for, rather than adding additional eye drops to alleviate or mask the side effects of the glaucoma drops. PMID:25440185

  20. Facial Nerve Trauma: Evaluation and Considerations in Management

    PubMed Central

    Gordin, Eli; Lee, Thomas S.; Ducic, Yadranko; Arnaoutakis, Demetri

    2014-01-01

    The management of facial paralysis continues to evolve. Understanding the facial nerve anatomy and the different methods of evaluating the degree of facial nerve injury are crucial for successful management. When the facial nerve is transected, direct coaptation leads to the best outcome, followed by interpositional nerve grafting. In cases where motor end plates are still intact but a primary repair or graft is not feasible, a nerve transfer should be employed. When complete muscle atrophy has occurred, regional muscle transfer or free flap reconstruction is an option. When dynamic reanimation cannot be undertaken, static procedures offer some benefit. Adjunctive tools such as botulinum toxin injection and biofeedback can be helpful. Several new treatment modalities lie on the horizon which hold potential to alter the current treatment algorithm. PMID:25709748

  1. Pseudoradial Nerve Palsy Caused by Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Hassan; Daruwalla, Vistasp; Meisel, Jeremy; Kodsi, Samir E.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoperipheral palsy has been used to characterize isolated monoparesis secondary to stroke. Isolated hand nerve palsy is a rare presentation for acute cerebral stroke. Our patient presented with clinical features of typical peripheral radial nerve palsy and a normal computed tomography scan of the head, which, without a detailed history and neurological examination, could have been easily misdiagnosed as a peripheral nerve lesion deferring further investigation for a stroke. We stress the importance of including cerebral infarction as a critical differential diagnosis in patients presenting with sensory-motor deficit in an isolated peripheral nerve pattern. A good history and physical exam can differentiate stroke from peripheral neuropathy as the cause of radial nerve palsy. PMID:27493976

  2. Pseudoradial Nerve Palsy Caused by Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Hassan; Daruwalla, Vistasp; Meisel, Jeremy; Kodsi, Samir E

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoperipheral palsy has been used to characterize isolated monoparesis secondary to stroke. Isolated hand nerve palsy is a rare presentation for acute cerebral stroke. Our patient presented with clinical features of typical peripheral radial nerve palsy and a normal computed tomography scan of the head, which, without a detailed history and neurological examination, could have been easily misdiagnosed as a peripheral nerve lesion deferring further investigation for a stroke. We stress the importance of including cerebral infarction as a critical differential diagnosis in patients presenting with sensory-motor deficit in an isolated peripheral nerve pattern. A good history and physical exam can differentiate stroke from peripheral neuropathy as the cause of radial nerve palsy. PMID:27493976

  3. Heterozygous mutations of OTX2 cause severe ocular malformations.

    PubMed

    Ragge, Nicola K; Brown, Alison G; Poloschek, Charlotte M; Lorenz, Birgit; Henderson, R Alex; Clarke, Michael P; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Fielder, Alistair; Gerrelli, Dianne; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Ruddle, Piers; Hurst, Jane; Collin, J Richard O; Salt, Alison; Cooper, Simon T; Thompson, Pamela J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Williamson, Kathleen A; Fitzpatrick, David R; van Heyningen, Veronica; Hanson, Isabel M

    2005-06-01

    Major malformations of the human eye, including microphthalmia and anophthalmia, are examples of phenotypes that recur in families yet often show no clear Mendelian inheritance pattern. Defining loci by mapping is therefore rarely feasible. Using a candidate-gene approach, we have identified heterozygous coding-region changes in the homeobox gene OTX2 in eight families with ocular malformations. The expression pattern of OTX2 in human embryos is consistent with the eye phenotypes observed in the patients, which range from bilateral anophthalmia to retinal defects resembling Leber congenital amaurosis and pigmentary retinopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed defects of the optic nerve, optic chiasm, and, in some cases, brain. In two families, the mutations appear to have occurred de novo in severely affected offspring, and, in two other families, the mutations have been inherited from a gonosomal mosaic parent. Data from these four families support a simple model in which OTX2 heterozygous loss-of-function mutations cause ocular malformations. Four additional families display complex inheritance patterns, suggesting that OTX2 mutations alone may not lead to consistent phenotypes. The high incidence of mosaicism and the reduced penetrance have implications for genetic counseling.

  4. A flexible device for ocular iontophoretic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yushi; Chen, Yao; Yu, Xiaoxue; Qi, Yangjia; Chen, Yufeng; Liu, Yuxi; Hu, Yuntao; Li, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a flexible ocular iontophoretic device, which can be fabricated by batch processing, is reported. In vivo experiments were conducted on rabbit eyes, and the results demonstrated this device could realize ocular iontophoresis effectively, simply, and conveniently. Compared to conventional eye cups, it can be placed under the eyelid and can deliver ions through a small area on the eyeball, reducing tissue damage caused by the drug during ion penetration. Owing to the flexibility of the device, the device can be easily seated under the eyelid stably during iontophoresis. Manganese ions as a tracer for detection of optic nerve damage were delivered into rabbit eyes by this iontophoretic device. Under 1 mA for 600 s, the average Mn(2+) concentration in the eye ball after iontophoresis was 102 ng/ml, while the one in the control group was 23 ng/ml. Using 2 mA for 600 s, the average concentration was 271 ng/ml, while it was 38 ng/ml in the control group. Thermal injury during iontophoresis was not observed under an applied current of no more than 2 mA for no longer than 10 min, with the local temperature less than 38 °C, measured by an infrared thermal imager. PMID:26958098

  5. [The role of ultrasonography exam in orbital-ocular tumors].

    PubMed

    Ciocâlteu, Alina Mihaela; Ardeleanu, S; Checheriţă, I A

    2011-01-01

    Ophthalmology is one of the specialties that have particularly benefited from the contribution of ultrasonography exam as a method of investigation. Ultrasonography is very much essential for diagnostic to complement other clinical and laboratory investigations, providing images in real time. The basic principle of diagnostic ultrasound is to study and to interpret the changes they undergo when crossing ultrasonic waves diverse biological properties different sound, and such injuries can be traced in the dynamics or can be documented on photographic paper and thus can diagnose correct certain eye diseases. The indications for performing ultrasound consist in: measurement of distances and volumes, examine difficult or inaccessible case of opaque media; ophthalmoscopic view of a mass lesion, examine the orbit or optic nerve. The advantages of ultrasound for orbital-ocular tumors are represented by the fact that ultrasound is a noninvasive method, safe, well tolerated, less expensive that the advantage of determining the position and distance from structures ocular tumor. High frequency ultrasound provides excellent resolution of 0-1 to 0.01 mm, and serial scans allow tracking progress and measuring lesion diameters tumor while allowing monitoring and evaluation of stereotactic radiation treatments applied to small tumors. In conclusion ultrasound allows not only early diagnosis of eye tumors, but accurate assessment of the proposed therapy and of the evolution of detected mass lesions or tumors.

  6. The Furcal Nerve Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked) is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets) and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/professionals involved in spine care. PMID:25317309

  7. Mandibular nerve entrapment in the infratemporal fossa.

    PubMed

    Piagkou, Maria N; Demesticha, T; Piagkos, G; Androutsos, G; Skandalakis, P

    2011-05-01

    The posterior trunk of the mandibular nerve (V(3)) comprises of three main branches. Various anatomic structures may entrap and potentially compress the mandibular nerve branches. A usual position of mandibular nerve (MN) compression is the infratemporal fossa (ITF) which is one of the most difficult regions of the skull base to access surgically. The anatomical positions of compression are: the incomplete or complete ossified pterygospinous (LPs) or pterygoalar (LPa) ligament, the large lamina of the lateral plate of the pterygoid process and the medial fibres of the lower belly of the lateral pterygoid (LPt). A contraction of the LPt, due to the connection between nerve and anatomic structures (soft and hard tissues), might lead to MN compression. Any variations of the course of the MN branches can be of practical significance to surgeons and neurologists who are dealing with this region, because of possibly significant complications. The entrapment of the MN motor branches can lead to paresis or weakness in the innervated muscle. Compression of the sensory branches can provoke neuralgia or paraesthesia. Lingual nerve (LN) compression causes numbness, hypoesthesia or even anaesthesia of the mucous of the tongue, anaesthesia and loss of taste in the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, anaesthesia of the lingual gums, as well as pain related to speech articulation disorders. Dentists should be very suspicious of possible signs of neurovascular compression in the region of the ITF.

  8. Low-Level Laser-Accelerated Peripheral Nerve Regeneration within a Reinforced Nerve Conduit across a Large Gap of the Transected Sciatic Nerve in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Yang, Yi-Chin; Huang, Tsung-Bin; Chan, Shiuh-Chuan; Liu, Bai-Shuan

    2013-01-01

    This study proposed a novel combination of neural regeneration techniques for the repair of damaged peripheral nerves. A biodegradable nerve conduit containing genipin-cross-linked gelatin was annexed using beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramic particles (genipin-gelatin-TCP, GGT) to bridge the transection of a 15 mm sciatic nerve in rats. Two trigger points were irradiated transcutaneously using 660 nm of gallium-aluminum arsenide phosphide (GaAlAsP) via laser diodes for 2 min daily over 10 consecutive days. Walking track analysis showed a significant improvement in sciatic functional index (SFI) (P < 0.01) and pronounced improvement in the toe spreading ability of rats undergoing laser stimulation. Electrophysiological measurements (peak amplitude and area) illustrated by compound muscle action potential (CMAP) curves demonstrated that laser stimulation significantly improved nerve function and reduced muscular atrophy. Histomorphometric assessments revealed that laser stimulation accelerated nerve regeneration over a larger area of neural tissue, resulting in axons of greater diameter and myelin sheaths of greater thickness than that observed in rats treated with nerve conduits alone. Motor function, electrophysiological reactions, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessments all demonstrate that the proposed therapy accelerated the repair of transected peripheral nerves bridged using a GGT nerve conduit. PMID:23737818

  9. Low-Level Laser-Accelerated Peripheral Nerve Regeneration within a Reinforced Nerve Conduit across a Large Gap of the Transected Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Yang, Yi-Chin; Huang, Tsung-Bin; Chan, Shiuh-Chuan; Liu, Bai-Shuan

    2013-01-01

    This study proposed a novel combination of neural regeneration techniques for the repair of damaged peripheral nerves. A biodegradable nerve conduit containing genipin-cross-linked gelatin was annexed using beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramic particles (genipin-gelatin-TCP, GGT) to bridge the transection of a 15 mm sciatic nerve in rats. Two trigger points were irradiated transcutaneously using 660 nm of gallium-aluminum arsenide phosphide (GaAlAsP) via laser diodes for 2 min daily over 10 consecutive days. Walking track analysis showed a significant improvement in sciatic functional index (SFI) (P < 0.01) and pronounced improvement in the toe spreading ability of rats undergoing laser stimulation. Electrophysiological measurements (peak amplitude and area) illustrated by compound muscle action potential (CMAP) curves demonstrated that laser stimulation significantly improved nerve function and reduced muscular atrophy. Histomorphometric assessments revealed that laser stimulation accelerated nerve regeneration over a larger area of neural tissue, resulting in axons of greater diameter and myelin sheaths of greater thickness than that observed in rats treated with nerve conduits alone. Motor function, electrophysiological reactions, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessments all demonstrate that the proposed therapy accelerated the repair of transected peripheral nerves bridged using a GGT nerve conduit. PMID:23737818

  10. In-vivo human corneal nerve imaging using Fourier-domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Eom, Tae Joong; Hwang, Ho Sik

    2015-03-01

    We have imaged human corneal nerve bundles by using real-time Fourier-domain OCT (FD-OCT). Corneal nerves contribute to the maintenance of healthy ocular surface owing to their trophic influences on the corneal epithelium. The FD-OCT system was based on a swept laser of a 50 kHz sweeping rate and 1.31 μm center wavelength. At the area including sclera, limbus, and cornea, we could successfully get the in-vivo tomograms of the corneal nerve bundles. The scan range was 5 x 5mm. In this study, the A-scan images in each B-scan were realigned to have a flat air-surface boundary in the final B-scan image. With this effort, we could align corneal nerve bundle in a same depth and get the 3D image showing the branched and threadlike corneal nerve bundles.

  11. Nonophthalmic symptoms secondary to ocular torticollis from severe blepharoptosis: an underappreciated but treatable condition.

    PubMed

    Bohnsack, Brenda L; Bhatt, Rina; Kahana, Alon

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe reversible systemic symptoms associated with ocular torticollis due to blepharoptosis. A retrospective chart review identified patients with symptomatic ocular torticollis due to bilateral congenital or acquired blepharoptosis who underwent surgical correction (levator resection or frontalis sling). Preoperative and postoperative assessment of systemic symptoms in adults and developmental milestones are reported. The authors present 4 cases, 1 adult and 3 young children, all with severe bilateral upper eyelid ptosis. In the adult patient, it caused debilitating back pain that required orthopedic evaluation but was completely relieved with ptosis repair surgery. In the toddlers, subjective developmental motor delay was rapidly reversed following ptosis repair surgery. The authors suggest that primary care physicians, and spine and neuromuscular specialists, consider the possibility of ocular torticollis due to eyelid ptosis in the evaluation of patients with unexplained back and/or neck pain or with gross motor developmental delay. The authors propose that symptomatic ocular torticollis is an indication for ptosis repair.

  12. Nonophthalmic symptoms secondary to ocular torticollis from severe blepharoptosis: an underappreciated but treatable condition.

    PubMed

    Bohnsack, Brenda L; Bhatt, Rina; Kahana, Alon

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe reversible systemic symptoms associated with ocular torticollis due to blepharoptosis. A retrospective chart review identified patients with symptomatic ocular torticollis due to bilateral congenital or acquired blepharoptosis who underwent surgical correction (levator resection or frontalis sling). Preoperative and postoperative assessment of systemic symptoms in adults and developmental milestones are reported. The authors present 4 cases, 1 adult and 3 young children, all with severe bilateral upper eyelid ptosis. In the adult patient, it caused debilitating back pain that required orthopedic evaluation but was completely relieved with ptosis repair surgery. In the toddlers, subjective developmental motor delay was rapidly reversed following ptosis repair surgery. The authors suggest that primary care physicians, and spine and neuromuscular specialists, consider the possibility of ocular torticollis due to eyelid ptosis in the evaluation of patients with unexplained back and/or neck pain or with gross motor developmental delay. The authors propose that symptomatic ocular torticollis is an indication for ptosis repair. PMID:21562438

  13. Ocular drug delivery systems: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Agrahari, Vibhuti; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    The major challenge faced by today’s pharmacologist and formulation scientist is ocular drug delivery. Topical eye drop is the most convenient and patient compliant route of drug administration, especially for the treatment of anterior segment diseases. Delivery of drugs to the targeted ocular tissues is restricted by various precorneal, dynamic and static ocular barriers. Also, therapeutic drug levels are not maintained for longer duration in target tissues. In the past two decades, ocular drug delivery research acceleratedly advanced towards developing a novel, safe and patient compliant formulation and drug delivery devices/techniques, which may surpass these barriers and maintain drug levels in tissues. Anterior segment drug delivery advances are witnessed by modulation of conventional topical solutions with permeation and viscosity enhancers. Also, it includes development of conventional topical formulations such as suspensions, emulsions and ointments. Various nanoformulations have also been introduced for anterior segment ocular drug delivery. On the other hand, for posterior ocular delivery, research has been immensely focused towards development of drug releasing devices and nanoformulations for treating chronic vitreoretinal diseases. These novel devices and/or formulations may help to surpass ocular barriers and associated side effects with conventional topical drops. Also, these novel devices and/or formulations are easy to formulate, no/negligibly irritating, possess high precorneal residence time, sustain the drug release, and enhance ocular bioavailability of therapeutics. An update of current research advancement in ocular drug delivery necessitates and helps drug delivery scientists to modulate their think process and develop novel and safe drug delivery strategies. Current review intends to summarize the existing conventional formulations for ocular delivery and their advancements followed by current nanotechnology based formulation developments

  14. Influence of Nerve Supply on Hand Electromyography Coherence during a Three-Digit Task

    PubMed Central

    Pasluosta, Cristian F.; Domalain, Mathieu M.; Fang, Yin; Yue, Guang H.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Intermuscular coupling has been investigated to understand neural inputs to coordinate muscles in a motor performance. However, little is known on the role of nerve innervation on intermuscular coupling. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the anatomy of nerve distribution affected intermuscular coupling in the hand during static grip. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from intrinsic and extrinsic muscles while subjects performed a static grip. Coherence was computed for muscle pairs innervated by either the same or different nerves. The results did not support the hypothesis that muscles sharing the same nerve exhibit greater coupling than muscles innervated by different nerves. In general, extrinsic muscle pairs displayed higher coherence than intrinsic pairs. The results suggest that intermuscular coupling in a voluntary motor task is likely modulated in a functional manner and that different nerves might transport common neural inputs to functionally coupled muscles. PMID:23410655

  15. The Study of Diagnostic Efficacy of Nerve Conduction Study Parameters in Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Sachin; Kashikar, Aditi; Shende, Vinod; Waghmare, Satish

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cervical Radiculopathy (CR) is a neurologic condition characterised by dysfunction of a cervical spinal nerve, the roots of the nerve, or both. Diagnostic criteria for CR are not well defined, and no universally accepted criteria for its diagnosis have been established. Clinical examination, radiological imaging and electrophysiologic evaluation are the different modalities to diagnose CR. The incidence of Cervical Spondylosis and related conditions is increasing in the present scenario and the use of radiologic examination is time consuming and uneconomical for the common Indian setup. Thus, there is a definite need to establish a cost effective, reliable, and accurate means for establishing the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy. Electrodiagnostic tests are the closest to fulfill these criteria. Aim: To evaluate diagnostic utility of various motor and sensory nerve conduction study parameters in cervical radiculopathy. Setting and Design: It was a cross-sectional study conducted on 100 subjects of age > 40 years. Material and Methods: The consecutive patients clinically diagnosed to have cervical radiculopathy, referred from department of Orthopaedics were prospectively recruited for the motor and sensory nerve conduction study using RMS EMG EP Mark-II. Parameters studied were Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP), Distal Motor Latency (DML) and Conduction Velocity (CV) for motor nerves and Sensory Nerve Action Potential (SNAP) and CV for sensory nerves. Statistical Analysis: Study observations and results were analysed to find the Specificity, Sensitivity, Positive Predictive Value and Negative Predictive Value using SPSS 16.0. Results: Among various motor nerve conduction parameters CMAP was found to be more sensitive with high positive predicative value. CV was found to have greater specificity and DML had least negative predictive value. Sensory nerve conduction parameters were found to have less sensitivity but higher specificity as compared

  16. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  17. Anomalous phosphenes in ocular protontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, E.; Maréchal, F.; Dendale, R.; Mabit, C.; Calugaru, V.; Desjardin, L.; Narici, L.

    2010-04-01

    We have undertaken a clinical ground study of proton-induced light flashes (phosphenes). Patients treated at the Institut Curie - Centre de Protonthérapie in Orsay, France, received radiation therapy to cure ocular and skull-base cancers. Sixty percent of the patients treated for choroidal melanomas using 73 MeV protons report anomalous phosphenes. Delivering a radiation dose on the retina only is not sufficient to trigger the light flash. The present study may be the first indication of phosphenes triggered by protons of few tens of MeV.

  18. The effect of selective, chronic stimulation on motor unit size in developing rat muscle.

    PubMed

    Ridge, R M; Betz, W J

    1984-10-01

    One of the two peripheral nerves which innervate rat lumbrical muscle was stimulated chronically in vivo during the postnatal period of synapse elimination to determine whether the differential stimulation would affect the outcome of the elimination process. Rats were anesthetized for about 4 hr a day for 5 to 6 consecutive days, during which time the sural nerve (or, in other animals, the lateral plantar nerve) was electrically stimulated. Each animal received about 10(6) stimuli. After the last stimulation period, the sizes of motor units in both nerves were estimated from motor unit tension recorded in vitro. We found that, on average, sural motor units were larger than others in animals which had received sural nerve stimulation and smaller than others in animals which had received lateral planter nerve stimulation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that more active nerve terminals possess a relative advantage in competing for occupancy of the endplate. PMID:6491726

  19. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a

  20. Meibomian glands and ocular surface inflammation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomo; Teramukai, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this review was to systematically analyze publications related to the role of meibomian gland disease in ocular surface inflammation, with special reference to meibomitis as an inflammatory form of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). Meibomian gland inflammation is often present with the ocular surface inflammation in conditions such as blepharokeratoconjunctivitis, ocular rosacea, and phlyctenular keratitis, but its contribution is often overlooked, especially in younger subjects. This can result in misdiagnosis, mistreatment, and, sometimes, severe visual impairment. We identified a related disease entity, seen predominantly in young patients, of ocular surface inflammation associated with meibomitis, which we termed meibomitis-related keratoconjunctivitis. Its specific clinical features are similar to those observed in the above-mentioned diseases, and the inflammatory form of MGD was found to be closely involved in the ocular surface inflammation seen in those four diseases, based on our statistical evaluation. The diagnosis and management of meibomitis, an inflammatory form of MGD, is vital for the successful treatment of the induced ocular surface inflammation. We propose that the ocular surface and the adnexal meibomian glands should be considered as one unit, i.e., the "meibomian gland and ocular surface" (MOS), when encountered in the clinical setting.

  1. An update on ocular adnexal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2016-05-01

    Ocular adnexal lymphoma (OAL) is a relatively common lesion in the practice of ophthalmic oncology. Although OALs are usually primary tumors, secondary involvement of the ocular adnexae by systemic lymphoma is also possible. The clinical and radiological features of OAL are non-specific. Thorough morphological evaluation, aided by immunostaining, cytogenetic studies and molecular testing, are necessary for accurate diagnosis. PMID:26972223

  2. Latitude and incidence of ocular melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guo-Pei; Hu, Dan-Ning; McCormick, Steven A

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the associations between latitude and the incidence of two different types of ocular melanoma, external ocular melanoma (exposed to sunlight) and internal melanoma (not exposed to sunlight), separately. Using 1992-2002 data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of National Cancer Institute, we identified 2142 ocular melanoma cases in non-Hispanic whites, and then regressed the incidences of various types of ocular melanomas with latitude. Our analysis indicated that the higher the latitude (away from the equator, the less sun exposure), the lower the risk of external ocular melanoma (eyelid and conjunctival melanomas) among non-Hispanic whites (P for trend = 0.018). The incidence increased 2.48 fold from 47-48 degrees to 20-22 degrees. This trend is very similar to that of skin melanoma. The incidence of internal ocular melanoma (uveal melanoma) increased significantly with increasing latitudes (the less sun exposure, P for trend < 0.0001), it increased 4.91 fold from 20-22 degrees to 47-48 degrees. The latitudinal patterns of ocular melanomas may reflect the dual effects of sunlight exposure, i.e. a mutagenic effect of direct solar radiation on external ocular melanomas and a protective effect for internal uveal melanoma, which is similar to the sun radiation protective effects for various internal malignant tumors that are not exposed to the sunlight.

  3. Meibomian glands and ocular surface inflammation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomo; Teramukai, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this review was to systematically analyze publications related to the role of meibomian gland disease in ocular surface inflammation, with special reference to meibomitis as an inflammatory form of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). Meibomian gland inflammation is often present with the ocular surface inflammation in conditions such as blepharokeratoconjunctivitis, ocular rosacea, and phlyctenular keratitis, but its contribution is often overlooked, especially in younger subjects. This can result in misdiagnosis, mistreatment, and, sometimes, severe visual impairment. We identified a related disease entity, seen predominantly in young patients, of ocular surface inflammation associated with meibomitis, which we termed meibomitis-related keratoconjunctivitis. Its specific clinical features are similar to those observed in the above-mentioned diseases, and the inflammatory form of MGD was found to be closely involved in the ocular surface inflammation seen in those four diseases, based on our statistical evaluation. The diagnosis and management of meibomitis, an inflammatory form of MGD, is vital for the successful treatment of the induced ocular surface inflammation. We propose that the ocular surface and the adnexal meibomian glands should be considered as one unit, i.e., the "meibomian gland and ocular surface" (MOS), when encountered in the clinical setting. PMID:25881997

  4. Ocular diseases: immunological and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jing; Huang, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Fei; Guo, Yu-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Many factors, such as environmental, microbial and endogenous stress, antigen localization, can trigger the immunological events that affect the ending of the diverse spectrum of ocular disorders. Significant advances in understanding of immunological and molecular mechanisms have been researched to improve the diagnosis and therapy for patients with ocular inflammatory diseases. Some kinds of ocular diseases are inadequately responsive to current medications; therefore, immunotherapy may be a potential choice as an alternative or adjunctive treatment, even in the prophylactic setting. This article first provides an overview of the immunological and molecular mechanisms concerning several typical and common ocular diseases; second, the functions of immunological roles in some of systemic autoimmunity will be discussed; third, we will provide a summary of the mechanisms that dictate immune cell trafficking to ocular local microenvironment in response to inflammation. PMID:27275439

  5. Adult Ocular Toxocariasis Mimicking Ciliary Body Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Abiad, Bachir; Boulos, Fouad I.; Alameddine, Ramzi; Maalouf, Fadi C.; Bu Ghannam, Alaa; Hamam, Rola N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To discuss an unusual presentation of ocular toxocariasis. Methods. Case report. Results. A 40-year-old woman presented with decreased vision in the left eye with a long history of recurrent red eye from uveitis. Eosinophilia and positive ELISA titers for Toxocara canis favored the diagnosis of ocular toxocariasis. Over 3 months, an anterior scleral mass had a rapid growth raising the possibility of medulloepithelioma, which rarely can mimic uveitic syndromes. Surgical plan changed from local excision to enucleation. Histopathology demonstrated a large homogeneous mass of chronic inflammatory cells with inflammation of the overlying thinned out sclera, medial rectus insertion, and limbal cornea. The triad of peripheral granuloma, eosinophilia, and positive blood serology established the diagnosis of ocular toxocariasis. Conclusions. Ocular toxocariasis can mimic ocular malignancy such as medulloepithelioma in adults and rarely presents as an anterior scleral mass. PMID:25371681

  6. Influence of refractive correction on ocular dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Nanami; Kawamorita, Takushi; Uozato, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the effects of refractive correction and refractive defocus on the assessment of sensory ocular dominance. In 25 healthy subjects (4 males and 21 females) aged between 20 and 31 years, a quantitative measurement of sensory ocular dominance was performed with refractive correction and the addition of a positive lens on the dominant eye. Sensory ocular dominance was measured with a chart using binocular rivalry targets. The reversal point changed after the addition of a +1.00 D lens on the dominant eye in all subjects. However, sighting ocular dominance and stereopsis did not change after the addition of a positive lens on the dominant eye ( P > 0:05, Wilcoxon test). These results suggest that refractive correction affects sensory ocular dominance, indicating the possible development of a new type of occlusion for amblyopia in the future.

  7. Allograft pretreatment for the repair of sciatic nerve defects: green tea polyphenols versus radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sheng-hu; Zhen, Ping; Li, Shen-song; Liang, Xiao-yan; Gao, Ming-xuan; Tian, Qi; Li, Xu-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment of nerve allografts by exposure to irradiation or green tea polyphenols can eliminate neuroimmunogenicity, inhibit early immunological rejection, encourage nerve regeneration and functional recovery, improve tissue preservation, and minimize postoperative infection. In the present study, we investigate which intervention achieves better results. We produced a 1.0 cm sciatic nerve defect in rats, and divided the rats into four treatment groups: autograft, fresh nerve allograft, green tea polyphenol-pretreated (1 mg/mL, 4°C) nerve allograft, and irradiation-pretreated nerve allograft (26.39 Gy/min for 12 hours; total 19 kGy). The animals were observed, and sciatic nerve electrophysiology, histology, and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at 6 and 12 weeks after grafting. The circumference and structure of the transplanted nerve in rats that received autografts or green tea polyphenol-pretreated nerve allografts were similar to those of the host sciatic nerve. Compared with the groups that received fresh or irradiation-pretreated nerve allografts, motor nerve conduction velocity in the autograft and fresh nerve allograft groups was greater, more neurites grew into the allografts, Schwann cell proliferation was evident, and a large number of new blood vessels was observed; in addition, massive myelinated nerve fibers formed, and abundant microfilaments and microtubules were present in the axoplasm. Our findings indicate that nerve allografts pretreated by green tea polyphenols are equivalent to transplanting autologous nerves in the repair of sciatic nerve defects, and promote nerve regeneration. Pretreatment using green tea polyphenols is better than pretreatment with irradiation. PMID:25788934

  8. The ocular manifestations of syphilis in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected host.

    PubMed

    McLeish, W M; Pulido, J S; Holland, S; Culbertson, W W; Winward, K

    1990-02-01

    Nine patients with active ocular or optic nerve involvement by syphilis who also had concurrent human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection are described. The ocular manifestations of syphilis led to the discovery of HIV-1 seropositivity in four of nine cases. Fifteen eyes were affected. Ocular manifestations were: iridocyclitis in three eyes, vitreitis in one eye, retinitis or neuroretinitis in five eyes, papillitis in two eyes, optic perineuritis in two eyes, and retrobulbar optic neuritis in two eyes. Three patients diagnosed with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) had the worst initial visual acuities. Six of nine patients had evidence of concomitant central nervous syndrome (CNS) involvement with syphilis. Benzathine penicillin was administered intramuscularly to three patients. All three had relapses. Seven of nine patients treated intravenously with high-dose penicillin had dramatic responses to therapy with improvement in vision and serologies and no evidence of relapse. Regimens accepted for the treatment of neurosyphilis appear to be adequate for the treatment of ocular syphilis in HIV-1-infected patients though further long-term follow-up will be required. PMID:2326008

  9. Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning.

    PubMed

    Louis, P J

    2001-09-01

    Nerve repositioning is a viable alternative for patients with an atrophic edentulous posterior mandible. Patients, however, should be informed of the potential risks of neurosensory disturbance. Documentation of the patient's baseline neurosensory function should be performed with a two-point discrimination test or directional brush stroke test preoperatively and postoperatively. Recovery of nerve function should be expected in 3 to 6 months. The potential for mandibular fracture when combining nerve repositioning with implant placement also should be discussed with the patient. This can be avoided by minimizing the amount of buccal cortical plate removal during localization of the nerve and maintaining the integrity of the inferior cortex of the mandible. Additionally, avoid overseating the implant, thus avoiding stress along the inferior border of the mandible. The procedure does allow for the placement of longer implants, which should improve implant longevity. Patients undergoing this procedure have expressed overall satisfaction with the results. Nerve repositioning also can be used to preserve the inferior alveolar nerve during resection of benign tumors or cysts of the mandible. This procedure allows the surgeon to maintain nerve function in situations in which the nerve would otherwise have to be resected. PMID:11665379

  10. Cryotherapy and nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Drez, D; Faust, D C; Evans, J P

    1981-01-01

    Ice application is one of the most extensively used treatments for athletic injuries. Frostbite is a recognized danger. Five cases of nerve palsy resulting from ice application are reported here. These palsies were temporary. They usually resolve spontaneously without any significant sequelae. This complication can be avoided by not using ice for more than 30 minutes and by guarding superficial nerves in the area.

  11. Imaging the cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Parry, Andrew T; Volk, Holger A

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of the normal course of the cranial nerves (CN) is essential when interpreting images of patients with cranial neuropathies. CN foramina are depicted best using computed X-ray tomography, but the nerves are depicted best using magnetic resonance imaging. The function and anatomy of the CN in the dog are reviewed and selected examples of lesions affecting the CN are illustrated.

  12. [Sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma].

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Benjamin; Poussange, Nicolas; Le Collen, Philippe; Fabre, Thierry; Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Intraneural perineurioma is a benign tumor developed from the perineurium and responsible for localized nerve hypertrophy. This uncommon tumor is characterized by a proliferation of perineural cells with a "pseudo-onion bulb" pattern. We report a sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma in a 39-year-old patient. PMID:26586011

  13. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... canals). The optic nerve is the “nerve of vision” and extends from the brain, through your skull, and into your eye. A ... limited to, the following: loss of vision, double vision, inadequate ... leakage of brain fluid (CSF), meningitis, nasal bleeding, infection of the ...

  14. Ulnar nerve tuberculoma.

    PubMed

    Ramesh Chandra, V V; Prasad, Bodapati Chandramowliswara; Varaprasad, Gangumolu

    2013-01-01

    The authors report a very rare case of tuberculoma involving the ulnar nerve. The patient, a 7-year-old girl, presented with swelling over the medial aspect of her right forearm just below the elbow joint, with features of ulnar nerve palsy, including paresthesias along the little and ring fingers and claw hand deformity. There was a history of trauma and contact with a contagious case of tuberculosis. There were no other signs of tuberculosis. At surgical exploration the ulnar nerve was found to be thickened, and on opening the sheath there was evidence of caseous material enclosed in a fibrous capsule compressing and displacing the nerve fibers. The lesion, along with the capsule, was subtotally removed using curettage, and a part of the capsule that was densely adherent to the nerve fibers was left in the patient. Histopathological examination of the specimen was consistent with tuberculoma. The patient received adequate antitubercular treatment and showed significant improvement.

  15. Peripheral nerve stimulation: definition.

    PubMed

    Abejón, David; Pérez-Cajaraville, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been a tremendous evolution in the field of neurostimulation, both from the technological point of view and from development of the new and different indications. In some areas, such as peripheral nerve stimulation, there has been a boom in recent years due to the variations in the surgical technique and the improved results documented by in multiple published papers. All this makes imperative the need to classify and define the different types of stimulation that are used today. The confusion arises when attempting to describe peripheral nerve stimulation and subcutaneous stimulation. Peripheral nerve stimulation, in its pure definition, involves implanting a lead on a nerve, with the aim to produce paresthesia along the entire trajectory of the stimulated nerve.

  16. Pleiotrophin is a neurotrophic factor for spinal motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Mi, Ruifa; Chen, Weiran; Höke, Ahmet

    2007-03-13

    Regeneration in the peripheral nervous system is poor after chronic denervation. Denervated Schwann cells act as a "transient target" by secreting growth factors to promote regeneration of axons but lose this ability with chronic denervation. We discovered that the mRNA for pleiotrophin (PTN) was highly up-regulated in acutely denervated distal sciatic nerves, but high levels of PTN mRNA were not maintained in chronically denervated nerves. PTN protected spinal motor neurons against chronic excitotoxic injury and caused increased outgrowth of motor axons out of the spinal cord explants and formation of "miniventral rootlets." In neonatal mice, PTN protected the facial motor neurons against cell death induced by deprivation from target-derived growth factors. Similarly, PTN significantly enhanced regeneration of myelinated axons across a graft in the transected sciatic nerve of adult rats. Our findings suggest a neurotrophic role for PTN that may lead to previously unrecognized treatment options for motor neuron disease and motor axonal regeneration.

  17. [Aplasia and hypoplasia of the optic nerve. Comparison of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Pisaturo, C; Dolci, A; Pessagno, A; Padua, G L; Dassio, D A; De Negri, M

    1996-10-01

    Hypoplasia and aplasia of the optic nerve are congenital anomalies characterized respectively by a marked volume reduction (very small papilla, often identifiable only as a rosy-yellowish area from which the retinal vessels emerge) and by the absence of the optic disk (absence of the nerve and mainly of its vessels) and of the visual functions. These anomalies are often associated with malformations of the central nervous system and of the ocular structures. The defects originate in the embryonal period due to the arrested development of the mesodermal component towards the head of the optic nerve. The aim of this study is to try to interpret the different clinical manifestations of the disease by observing two cases (a female and a male) with a clinical picture of aplasia and hypoplasia of the optic nerve respectively. Both cases presented the following clinical characteristics: developmental defects of the optic nerve, severe microcephaly, positive IgG antibodies against CMV. The association of the optic nerve defect with microcephaly is due to the embryogenic origin of the optic vescicle by prosencephalon. The resulting clinical picture is probably the outcome of an interfering process that the authors have presumed in CMV intrauterine infection, after having excluded the most frequent teratogenic agents (maternal diabetes, tabagism, intake of alcohol ad drugs). Moreover, the different degree of ocular involvement and the different time of onset of the intrauterine pathogenic insult in the two cases could account for the different clinical pictures. PMID:9053727

  18. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  19. Reinnervation of the Tibialis Anterior Following Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury: A Confocal Microscopic Study in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Magill, Christina K.; Tong, Alice; Kawamura, David; Hayashi, Ayato; Hunter, Daniel A.; Parsadanian, Alexander; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Myckatyn, Terence M.

    2007-01-01

    Transgenic mice whose axons and Schwann cells express fluorescent chromophores enable new imaging techniques and augment concepts in developmental neurobiology. The utility of these tools in the study of traumatic nerve injury depends on employing nerve models that are amenable to microsurgical manipulation and gauging functional recovery. Motor recovery from sciatic nerve crush injury is studied here by evaluating motor endplates of the tibialis anterior muscle, which is innervated by the deep peroneal branch of the sciatic nerve. Following sciatic nerve crush, the deep surface of the tibialis anterior muscle is examined using whole mount confocal microscopy, and reinnervation is characterized by imaging fluorescent axons or Schwann cells (SCs). One week following sciatic crush injury, 100% of motor endplates are denervated with partial reinnervation at two weeks, hyperinnervation at three and four weeks, and restoration of a 1:1 axon to motor endplate relationship six weeks after injury. Walking track analysis reveals progressive recovery of sciatic nerve function by six weeks. SCs reveal reduced S100 expression within two weeks of denervation, correlating with regression to a more immature phenotype. Reinnervation of SCs restores S100 expression and a fully differentiated phenotype. Following denervation, there is altered morphology of circumscribed terminal Schwann cells demonstrating extensive process formation between adjacent motor endplates. The thin, uniformly innervated tibialis anterior muscle is well suited for studying motor reinnervation following sciatic nerve injury. Confocal microscopy may be performed coincident with other techniques of assessing nerve regeneration and functional recovery. PMID:17628540

  20. Deficiency in monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) in mice delays regeneration of peripheral nerves following sciatic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Brett M; Tsingalia, Akivaga; Vidensky, Svetlana; Lee, Youngjin; Jin, Lin; Farah, Mohamed H; Lengacher, Sylvain; Magistretti, Pierre J; Pellerin, Luc; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration following injury occurs spontaneously, but many of the processes require metabolic energy. The mechanism of energy supply to axons has not previously been determined. In the central nervous system, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), expressed in oligodendroglia, is critical for supplying lactate or other energy metabolites to axons. In the current study, MCT1 is shown to localize within the peripheral nervous system to perineurial cells, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and Schwann cells by MCT1 immunofluorescence in wild-type mice and tdTomato fluorescence in MCT1 BAC reporter mice. To investigate whether MCT1 is necessary for peripheral nerve regeneration, sciatic nerves of MCT1 heterozygous null mice are crushed and peripheral nerve regeneration was quantified electrophysiologically and anatomically. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) recovery is delayed from a median of 21 days in wild-type mice to greater than 38 days in MCT1 heterozygote null mice. In fact, half of the MCT1 heterozygote null mice have no recovery of CMAP at 42 days, while all of the wild-type mice recovered. In addition, muscle fibers remain 40% more atrophic and neuromuscular junctions 40% more denervated at 42 days post-crush in the MCT1 heterozygote null mice than wild-type mice. The delay in nerve regeneration is not only in motor axons, as the number of regenerated axons in the sural sensory nerve of MCT1 heterozygote null mice at 4 weeks and tibial mixed sensory and motor nerve at 3 weeks is also significantly reduced compared to wild-type mice. This delay in regeneration may be partly due to failed Schwann cell function, as there is reduced early phagocytosis of myelin debris and remyelination of axon segments. These data for the first time demonstrate that MCT1 is critical for regeneration of both sensory and motor axons in mice following sciatic nerve crush. PMID:25447940

  1. The lower cranial nerves: IX, X, XI, XII.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, J-L; Toulgoat, F; Benoudiba, F

    2013-10-01

    The lower cranial nerves innervate the pharynx and larynx by the glossopharyngeal (CN IX) and vagus (CN X) (mixed) nerves, and provide motor innervation of the muscles of the neck by the accessory nerve (CN XI) and the tongue by the hypoglossal nerve (CN XII). The symptomatology provoked by an anomaly is often discrete and rarely in the forefront. As with all cranial nerves, the context and clinical examinations, in case of suspicion of impairment of the lower cranial nerves, are determinant in guiding the imaging. In fact, the impairment may be located in the brain stem, in the peribulbar cisterns, in the foramens or even in the deep spaces of the face. The clinical localization of the probable seat of the lesion helps in choosing the adapted protocol in MRI and eventually completes it with a CT-scan. In the bulb, the intra-axial pathology is dominated by brain ischemia (in particular, with Wallenberg syndrome) and multiple sclerosis. Cisternal pathology is tumoral with two tumors, schwannoma and meningioma. The occurrence is much lower than in the cochleovestibular nerves as well as the leptomeningeal nerves (infectious, inflammatory or tumoral). Finally, foramen pathology is tumoral with, outside of the usual schwannomas and meningiomas, paragangliomas. For radiologists, fairly hesitant to explore these lower cranial pairs, it is necessary to be familiar with (or relearn) the anatomy, master the exploratory technique and be aware of the diagnostic possibilities.

  2. [Development of Researches on Acupuncture Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Injury].

    PubMed

    Tao, Xing; Ma, Tie-ming

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical disease. Acupuncture therapy has been demonstrated to be effective in improving nerve injury in clinical practice, but its underlying mechanisms in prompting tissue repair basically remain unknown. In the present paper, the authors reviewed some descriptions of traditional Chinese medicine on peripheral nerve injury and treatment, and recent development of researches on acupuncture treatment of it in both clinical practice and animal studies. Clinical trials demonstrated that acupuncture treatment can relieve nerve injury induced pain, ameliorate both sensory and motor functions. Experimental studies showed that acupuncture stimulation may promote nerve repair by reducing desquamation of medullary sheath of nerve fibers, inhibiting apoptosis of nerve cells, and up-regulating expression of myelin basic protein, Slit-1 protein and gene, etc. In addition, acupuncture intervention may also improve the microenvironment of neural regeneration including increase of the proliferation and differentiation of Schwann cells and release of various types of neurotrophic factors. However, its mechanisms underlying accelerating rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injury need being researched further. PMID:27141630

  3. Optic nerve diameters and perimetric thresholds in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Salgarello, T.; Tamburrelli, C.; Falsini, B.; Giudiceandrea, A.; Colotto, A.

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND--Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a central nervous disorder characterised by abnormally increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure leading to optic nerve compression. An indirect estimate of increased CSF pressure can be obtained by the ultrasonographic determination of optic nerve sheaths diameters. Computerised static perimetry is regarded as the method of choice for monitoring the course of the optic neuropathy in IIH. The aims were to compare the echographic optic nerve diameters (ONDs) and the perimetric thresholds of patients with IIH with those of age-matched controls, and to examine the correlation between these two variables in individual patients with papilloedema. METHODS--Standardised A-scan echography of the mid orbital optic nerve transverse diameters and automated threshold perimetry (Humphrey 30-2) were performed in 20 patients with IIH with variable degree of papilloedema (according to the Frisén scheme) and no concomitant ocular diseases. Echographic and perimetric results were compared with those obtained from 20 age-matched controls. RESULTS--When compared with controls, patients with IIH showed a significant increase in mean ONDs and significantly reduced mean perimetric sensitivities. In individual patients with papilloedema, the transverse ONDs correlated negatively with Humphrey mean deviation values and positively with pattern standard deviation values. CONCLUSION--These results indicate that OND changes in IIH are associated with perimetric threshold losses, and suggest that IIH functional deficits may be related to the degree of distension of optic nerve sheaths as a result of an increased CSF pressure. PMID:8759260

  4. Microgravity-Driven Optic Nerve/Sheath Biomechanics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Current thinking suggests that the ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to cephalad fluid shifts resulting in altered fluid pressures [1]. In particular, we hypothesize that increased intracranial pressure (ICP) drives connective tissue remodeling of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS). We describe here finite element (FE) modeling designed to understand how altered pressures, particularly altered ICP, affect the tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS) in VIIP. METHODS: Additional description of the modeling methodology is provided in the companion IWS abstract by Feola et al. In brief, a geometric model of the posterior eye and optic nerve, including the ONS, was created and the effects of fluid pressures on tissue deformations were simulated. We considered three ICP scenarios: an elevated ICP assumed to occur in chronic microgravity, and ICP in the upright and supine positions on earth. Within each scenario we used Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to consider a range of ICPs, ONH tissue mechanical properties, intraocular pressures (IOPs) and mean arterial pressures (MAPs). The outcome measures were biomechanical strains in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve and retina; here we focus on peak values of these strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induce tissue remodeling. In 3D, the strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as first, second and third principal strains. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: For baseline material properties, increasing ICP from 0 to 20 mmHg significantly changed strains within the posterior eye and ONS (Fig. 1), indicating that elevated ICP affects ocular tissue biomechanics. Notably, strains in the lamina cribrosa and retina became less extreme as ICP increased; however, within the optic nerve, the occurrence of such extreme strains greatly increased as

  5. Purinergic nerves and receptors.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, G

    1980-01-01

    The presence of a non-cholinergic, non-adrenergic component in the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is now well established. Evidence that ATP is the transmitter released from some of these nerves (called "purinergic') includes: (a) synthesis and storage of ATP in nerves: (b) release of ATP from the nerves when they are stimulated; (c) exogenously applied ATP mimicking the action of nerve-released transmitter; (d) the presence of ectoenzymes which inactivate ATP; (e) drugs which produce similar blocking or potentiating effects on the response to exogenously applied ATP and nerve stimulation. A basis for distinguishing two types of purinergic receptors has been proposed according to four criteria: relative potencies of agonists, competitive antagonists, changes in levels of cAMP and induction of prostaglandin synthesis. Thus P1 purinoceptors are most sensitive to adenosine, are competitively blocked by methylxanthines and their occupation leads to changes in cAMP accumulation; while P2 purinoceptors are most sensitive to ATP, are blocked (although not competitively) by quinidine, 2-substituted imidazolines, 2,2'-pyridylisatogen and apamin, and their occupation leads to production of prostaglandin. P2 purinoceptors mediate responses of smooth muscle to ATP released from purinergic nerves, while P1 purinoceptors mediate the presynaptic actions of adenosine on adrenergic, cholinergic and purinergic nerve terminals. PMID:6108568

  6. Biological and Electrophysiologic Effects of Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) on Regenerating Peripheral Nerve Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Baghmanli, Ziya; Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Wei, Benjamin; Shim, Bong S.; Martin, David C.; Cederna, Paul S.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Uninjured peripheral nerves in upper-limb amputees represent attractive sites for connectivity with neuroprostheses because their predictable internal topography allows for precise sorting of motor and sensory signals. The inclusion of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) reduces impedance and improves charge transfer at the biotic-abiotic interface. This study evaluates the in vivo performance of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)–coated interpositional decellularized nerve grafts across a critical nerve conduction gap, and examines the long-term effects of two different poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) formulations on regenerating peripheral nerve fibers. Methods In 48 rats, a 15-mm gap in the common peroneal nerve was repaired using a nerve graft of equivalent length, including (1) decellularized nerve chemically polymerized with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (dry); (2) decellularized nerve electrochemically polymerized with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (wet); (3) intact nerve; (4) autogenous nerve graft; (5) decellularized nerve alone; and (6) unrepaired nerve gap controls. All groups underwent electrophysiologic characterization at 3 months, and nerves were harvested for histomorphometric analysis. Results Conduction velocity was significantly faster in the dry poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) group compared with the sham, decellularized nerve, and wet poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) groups. Maximum specific force for the dry poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) group was more similar to sham than were decellularized nerve controls. Evident neural regeneration was demonstrated in both dry and wet poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) groups by the presence of normal regenerating axons on histologic cross-section. Conclusions Both poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) formulations were compatible with peripheral nerve regeneration at 3 months. This study supports poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) as a promising adjunct for peripheral nerve interfaces for

  7. Ocular contrapulsion in multiple sclerosis: clinical features and pathophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Frohman, E; Frohman, T; Fleckenstein, J; Racke, M; Hawker, K; Kramer, P

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to describe in multiple sclerosis, a cerebellar eye movement syndrome that resulted from an acute episode of inflammatory demyelination. Contrapulsion is an ocular motor disturbance characterised by a triad of (1) hypermetric saccadic eye movements in a direction opposite from a precisely localised lesion within a specific white matter pathway, the uncinate fasciculus, at the level of the superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP); (2) hypometric saccades towards the side of the lesion; (3) oblique saccades directed away from the side of the lesion on attempted vertical saccades.
 Infrared oculography was used to demonstrate the characteristic features of contrapulsion in two patients with multiple sclerosis.
 Brain MRI showed lesions within the region of the uncinate fasciculus and superior cerebellar peduncle in both patients. Eye movement recordings showed saccadic hypermetria away from the side of the lesion and saccadic hypometria towards the side of the lesion. The hypometria decomposed into a series of stepwise movements as the eye approached the target. Oblique saccades directed away from the side of the lesion were seen on attempted vertical saccades.
In conclusion, ocular contrapulsion can be seen in patients with multiple sclerosis and results from a lesion in the region of the SCP, involving the uncinate fasciculus.

 PMID:11309470

  8. Nerve and muscle involvement in mitochondrial disorders: an electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Michelangelo; Piazza, Selina; Volpi, Leda; Orsucci, Daniele; Calsolaro, Valeria; Caldarazzo Ienco, Elena; Carlesi, Cecilia; Rocchi, Anna; Petrozzi, Lucia; Calabrese, Rosanna; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2012-04-01

    Involvement of the peripheral nervous system in mitochondrial disorders (MD) has been previously reported. However, the exact prevalence of peripheral neuropathy and/or myopathy in MD is still unclear. In order to evaluate the prevalence of neuropathy and myopathy in MD, we performed sensory and motor nerve conduction studies (NCS) and concentric needle electromyography (EMG) in 44 unselected MD patients. NCS were abnormal in 36.4% of cases, and were consistent with a sensori-motor axonal multineuropathy (multifocal neuropathy), mainly affecting the lower limbs. EMG evidence of myopathy was present in 54.5% of patients, again mainly affecting the lower limbs. Nerve and muscle involvement was frequently subclinical. Peripheral nerve and muscle involvement is common in MD patients. Our study supports the variability of the clinical expression of MD. Further studies are needed to better understand the molecular basis underlying the phenotypic variability among MD patients. PMID:21751099

  9. Occupational exposure to pesticides and nerve conduction studies among Korean farmers.

    PubMed

    Park, Su Kyeong; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Young Joo; Lee, Gyu Taek; Lee, Won Jin

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether occupational exposure to pesticides was associated with decreased nerve conduction studies among farmers. On 2 separate occasions, the authors performed a cross-sectional study of a group of 31 male farmers who periodically applied pesticides. The study included questionnaire interviews and nerve conduction studies on the median, ulnar, posterior tibial, peroneal, and sural nerves. Although all mean values remained within laboratory normal limits, significant differences between the first and second tests were found in sensory conduction velocities on the median and sural nerves, and motor conduction velocities on the posterior tibial nerve. Lifetime days of pesticide application was negatively associated with nerve conduction velocities at most nerves after adjusting for potential confounders. These findings may reflect a link between occupational pesticide exposure and peripheral neurophysiologic abnormality that deserves further evaluation.

  10. Wide resection of traction induced radial nerve injury with cable grafting leads to full recovery.

    PubMed

    Henry, Mark

    2006-12-01

    The specific clinical setting of high-energy open humerus fractures combined with radial nerve transection has typically led to poor final outcomes with respect to recovery of nerve function. Attention has focused on the issue of an expanded zone of nerve injury induced by longitudinal traction. The fundamental principle of nerve grafting is to bypass the zone of injury. If direct repair or short nerve grafts are placed within the zone of injury, limited recovery should be expected, and this is exactly what has been documented. Wide resection of the zone of traction induced injury, particularly from the distal injured nerve trunk and replacement with long cable grafts has the potential for improved outcomes. Complete nerve recovery to 5/5 manual motor power testing and bilaterally equivalent grip strength is reported in two initial cases treated according to the wide resection plan.

  11. Intraparotid facial nerve neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M J; Babyak, J W; Kartush, J M

    1987-02-01

    Neurogenic neoplasms of the intraparotid facial nerve are uncommon and are usually diagnosed intraoperatively by tissue biopsy. Fifty-six cases of primary neurogenic neoplasms involving the facial nerve have been reported. The majority of these have been schwannomas. A case of a solitary neurofibroma involving the main trunk of the facial nerve is presented. Schwannomas and neurofibromas have distinct histological features which must be considered prior to the management of these tumors. The management of neurogenic tumors associated with normal facial function is a particularly difficult problem. A new approach for the diagnosis and management of neurogenic neoplasms is described utilizing electroneurography. PMID:3807626

  12. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    PubMed

    Romao, Elen A; Bolella, Valdes R; Nardin, Maria Estela P; Habib-Simao, Maria Lucia; Furtado, João Marcelo; Moyses-Neto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated. PMID:27253748

  13. Molecular mechanisms of keratinizing ocular surface disease.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Nancy A

    2010-04-01

    A devastating consequence of autoimmune-mediated, aqueous tear deficiency is pathological keratinization of the ocular surface. It is setoff by an aberrant immune response that promotes a program of altered mucosal epithelial cell differentiation. The management of keratinizing ocular surface disease is challenging. Topical therapies are largely inadequate for acute exacerbations, and progressive disease often requires systemic immunosuppression. A combination of translational and basic science research is necessary to understand the link between aberrant immunity and pathological keratinization. I review recent research and future directions aimed to develop targeted therapies that control or prevent ocular surface keratinization.

  14. Immunomodulation on the ocular surface: a review

    PubMed Central

    Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.; Ambroziak, Maciej; Witkiewicz, Jan; Skopiński, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The increasing understanding of immune mechanisms changed our perception of the ocular surface, which is now considered a compartment of the common mucosal immune system. It offered the possibility to alter the physiological immune response on the ocular surface and effectively combat inflammation, which impairs stability of the tear film and causes tear hyperosmolarity, causing symptoms of dry eye disease. The paper provides an overview of ocular surface anatomy and physiology, explains the underlying mechanisms of dry eye disease and discusses novel and promising treatment modalities, such as cyclosporine A, biological therapies using autologous serum and various growth factors as well as experimental treatment methods which are currently being investigated. PMID:27536206

  15. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    PubMed

    Romao, Elen A; Bolella, Valdes R; Nardin, Maria Estela P; Habib-Simao, Maria Lucia; Furtado, João Marcelo; Moyses-Neto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated.

  16. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

    PubMed Central

    ROMAO, Elen A.; BOLELLA, Valdes R.; NARDIN, Maria Estela P.; HABIB-SIMAO, Maria Lucia; FURTADO, João Marcelo; MOYSES-NETO, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated. PMID:27253748

  17. Gender Disparities in Ocular Inflammatory Disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Hatice Nida; Davis, Janet; Ucar, Didar; Fox, Austin; Chan, Chi Chao; Goldstein, Debra A.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular inflammatory disorders disproportionately affect women, and the majority of affected women are of childbearing age. The role of sex or reproductive hormones has been proposed in many other inflammatory or autoimmune disorders, and findings from non-ocular autoimmune diseases suggest a complex interaction between sex hormones, genetic factors and the immune system. However, despite the age and sex bias, factors that influence this disparity are complicated and unclear. This review aims to evaluate the gender disparities in prevalence, incidence and severity of the most common infectious and non-infectious ocular inflammatory disorders. PMID:24987987

  18. Ocular manifestations of drug and alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Peragallo, Jason; Biousse, Valérie; Newman, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To review commonly encountered adverse ocular effects of illicit drug use. Recent findings Drug and alcohol abuse can produce a variety of ocular and neuro-ophthalmic side effects. Novel, so-called “designer,” drugs of abuse can lead to unusual ocular disorders. Legal substances, when used in manners for which they have not been prescribed, can also have devastating ophthalmic consequences. Summary In this review we will systematically evaluate each part of the visual pathways and discuss how individual drugs may affect them. PMID:24100364

  19. Racket sports. An ocular hazard.

    PubMed

    Vinger, P F; Tolpin, D W

    1978-06-16

    Eighty-two injuries secondary to the racket sports were studied during a 15-month period. Ordinary glasses provided considerable protection in the play of tennis and badminton, but not in the play of squash and racquet ball. Plastic safety lenses (USA Standard Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye ,nd Face Protection, approved Sept 18, 1968 by the USA Standards Institute [ANSI Z87.1-1968]) mounted in a sturdy frame (industrial or athletic) or an eye protector are necessary for squash and racquet ball. Contact lenses provide no ocular protection. Males suffered more serious injuries than females, but injuries were not related to the age or experience of the players. Eye protection is recommended for the racket sports.

  20. Ocular immune privilege: a review.

    PubMed

    Koevary

    2000-12-01

    The definition of the term 'immune privilege' has evolved over the last century. Current usage refers to a state within a particular organ or tissue in which elements of normal immunity are absent. The fact that this deficiency is thought to be generally beneficial has compelled others to go a step further and venture that immune privilege acts to minimize expression of immunopathology. The purpose of this article is to review which parts of the eye hold immune privileged status, what mechanisms contribute to it, and what clinical benefits may have driven the development of these unique immune environments. The article ends with an examination of recent studies which have sought to use components of ocular immune privilege to prevent systemic autoimmune disease.

  1. [Ocular prosthesis following plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Morozova, O D; Druianova, Iu S

    1989-01-01

    The shape of the eye prostheses depends on the plastic surgery type. Standard prostheses with thin but not sharp edges are used to recreate the conjunctival cavity, prostheses with a deep retraction or flat ones are employed for a delayed introduction into the stump, prostheses with a 'swelling' at the upper edge are of use in surgery to correct the upper eyelid falling in, prostheses with a flattened lower edge and a 'shelf' at the upper edge are used to fortify the lower eyelid. Individual prostheses are recommended after plastic surgery. The prostheses should not prevent free closing and blinking of the eyelids, retaining the identical opening of the eyes. An inadequately chosen prosthesis brings to nothing the tremendous work made by the surgeon. Ocular prosthetics may be regarded as the final stage stabilizing the results of plastic surgery.

  2. Optic nerve involvement in childhood onset systemic lupus erythematosus: Three cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Suri, D; Abujam, B; Gupta, A; Rawat, A; Saikia, B; Walker Minz, R; Gupta, V; Bansal, R; Kaushik, S; Singh, S

    2016-01-01

    The ocular system can be affected in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in one third of patients. However, optic nerve involvement is relatively uncommon, but is more so in pediatric SLE patients, where it can occur in 1% of cases. We report three children with SLE who presented with optic nerve involvement. Two children had optic neuritis, with optic neuritis being the first manifestation in one child. The third child had ischaemic optic neuropathy secondary to antiphospholipid syndrome. A careful work up for SLE should be performed in every child with optic nerve disease. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment results in a better prognosis.

  3. Digital Photogrammetry Of The Optic Nerve Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, A. Ralph

    1980-07-01

    A digital photogrammetric method capable of providing quantitative measurements from stereophotographs of the optic nerve head has been utilized in our laboratory to study the optic cup in patients with ocular hypertension and chronic glaucoma. Studies on the reproducibi-lity of the digital photogrammetric technique of optic nerve head photographs taken with various cameras has revealed that (1) reproducibility was significantly better when simultaneous stereo-photographs were analyzed and (2) the Donaldson stereofundus camera provided the best reproducibility of the majority of geometric measurements in optic cups of various sizes. In addition, it has been determined that the shallower cups encountered larger percentage errors. Improvements in parameter reproducibility have been obtained when finer sampling intervals have been used during film digitization. An additional study comparing reproducibility of cup parameters as determined by the digital photogrammetric procedure with those values obtained from analog photogrammetry and manual analysis revealed generally superior reproducibility of the digital photogrammetric analyses in the eyes studies. Preliminary observations utilizing the digital photogrammetric procedure in a modified Zeiss model eye indicated that minor shifts in camera posi-tion did not alter the reproducibility of the technique.

  4. Imaging of ocular melanoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanya, Rashmi; Selvarajan, Santosh Kumar; Cox, Mougnyan; Joshi, Ganesh; Deshmukh, Sandeep; Mitchell, Donald G; O'Kane, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Ocular melanoma is the most common adult primary intraocular tumour. Although <1% of patients have metastatic disease at the time of initial diagnosis, most will develop metastasis at varying lengths of time. Metastasis surveillance is therefore critical in the follow-up of patients with ocular melanoma. Liver is the most common site of metastasis and prognosis is based on the treatment of liver metastasis. Hence, imaging of liver metastasis is vital. MRI is the most specific modality for imaging liver metastasis and is at least as sensitive as CT. Extrahepatic metastasis such as retroperitoneal nodules and bone metastases are also better evaluated on MRI. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are extremely helpful for detecting liver lesions. In particular, newer hepatobiliary contrast agents which offer an additional hepatobiliary phase of excretion help in the detection of even tiny liver metastases. Diffusion-weighted imaging is helpful when an i.v. contrast cannot be administered. Treated lesions are also better evaluated with MRI. CT is useful for evaluating lung nodules, large liver metastasis or in patients in whom MRI is medically contraindicated. The disadvantage lies in its inability to detect small liver metastasis and the radiation dose involved. The lesions treated with iodized oil as part of chemoembolization procedures can be followed on CT. Ultrasound can be used only for detecting hepatic metastases. However, it is heavily operator dependent, technically challenging and time consuming especially in patients who are large. Extrahepatic metastasis cannot be seen on ultrasound. Its utility is primarily for the biopsy of liver lesions. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT can detect lung nodules and large liver lesions but is insensitive to small liver lesions. Moreover, the high radiation dose is a major disadvantage. PMID:27168029

  5. Thermal safety of ultrasound-enhanced ocular drug delivery: A modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Nabili, Marjan; Geist, Craig E-mail: zderic@gwu.edu; Zderic, Vesna E-mail: zderic@gwu.edu

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Delivery of sufficient amounts of therapeutic drugs into the eye for treatment of various ocular diseases is often a challenging task. Ultrasound was shown to be effective in enhancing ocular drug delivery in the authors’ previous in vitro and in vivo studies. Methods: The study reported here was designed to investigate the safety of ultrasound application and its potential thermal effects in the eye using PZFlex modeling software. The safety limit in this study was set as a temperature increase of no more than 1.5 °C based on regulatory recommendations and previous experimental safety studies. Acoustic and thermal specifications of different human eye tissues were obtained from the published literature. The tissues of particular interest in this modeling safety study were cornea, lens, and the location of optic nerve in the posterior eye. Ultrasound application was modeled at frequencies of 400 kHz–1 MHz, intensities of 0.3–1 W/cm{sup 2}, and exposure duration of 5 min, which were the parameters used in the authors’ previous drug delivery experiments. The baseline eye temperature was 37 °C. Results: The authors’ results showed that the maximal tissue temperatures after 5 min of ultrasound application were 38, 39, 39.5, and 40 °C in the cornea, 39.5, 40, 42, and 43 °C in the center of the lens, and 37.5, 38.5, and 39 °C in the back of the eye (at the optic nerve location) at frequencies of 400, 600, 800 kHz, and 1 MHz, respectively. Conclusions: The ocular temperatures reached at higher frequencies were considered unsafe based on current recommendations. At a frequency of 400 kHz and intensity of 0.8 W/cm{sup 2} (parameters shown in the authors’ previous in vivo studies to be optimal for ocular drug delivery), the temperature increase was small enough to be considered safe inside different ocular tissues. However, the impact of orbital bone and tissue perfusion should be included in future modeling efforts to determine the safety

  6. High Ulnar Nerve Injuries: Nerve Transfers to Restore Function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jennifer Megan M

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are challenging problems. Nerve transfers are one of many options available to surgeons caring for these patients, although they do not replace tendon transfers, nerve graft, or primary repair in all patients. Distal nerve transfers for the treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries allow for a shorter reinnervation period and improved ulnar intrinsic recovery, which are critical to function of the hand. PMID:27094893

  7. Differential fiber-specific block of nerve conduction in mammalian peripheral nerves using kilohertz electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Yogi A.

    2015-01-01

    Kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) has been shown to induce repeatable and reversible nerve conduction block in animal models. In this study, we characterized the ability of KES stimuli to selectively block specific components of stimulated nerve activity using in vivo preparations of the rat sciatic and vagus nerves. KES stimuli in the frequency range of 5–70 kHz and amplitudes of 0.1–3.0 mA were applied. Compound action potentials were evoked using either electrical or sensory stimulation, and block of components was assessed through direct nerve recordings and muscle force measurements. Distinct observable components of the compound action potential had unique conduction block thresholds as a function of frequency of KES. The fast component, which includes motor activity, had a monotonically increasing block threshold as a function of the KES frequency. The slow component, which includes sensory activity, showed a nonmonotonic block threshold relationship with increasing KES frequency. The distinct trends with frequency of the two components enabled selective block of one component with an appropriate choice of frequency and amplitude. These trends in threshold of the two components were similar when studying electrical stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve, electrical stimulation and responses of the vagus nerve, and sensorimotor stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve. This differential blocking effect of KES on specific fibers can extend the applications of KES conduction block to selective block and stimulation of neural signals for neuromodulation as well as selective control of neural circuits underlying sensorimotor function. PMID:25878155

  8. Microsurgical treatment of peripheral nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Dolene, V

    1977-01-01

    In the period from 1972 to 1976, 536 patients with injuries of the peripheral nerves were treated at the Neurosurgical University Clinic Lyublyana. The treatment was performed according to the principles of microsurgery. Preoperative and postoperative supervision included EMG, electroneurography and nerve conduction speed. Subdivision: N. facialis 6, plexus brachialis 78, n. radialis 58, n. medianus 189, n. ulnaris 212, n. ischiadicus 17, n. femoralis 3, n. tibialis 12, n. fibularis 37. On the plexus brachialis 50 funiculolyses and 28 raphies were carried out. Immobilisation for 10 days. The length of the transplants showed no negative influence. After-observation was necessary for three and more years, especially in case of plexus injuries. Complete restoration was only found in children. Sensitivity in 80% more than Seddon III, 17% III and 3% less than III. Motor function in 60% IV, 20% III, 12% II and 8% less than II.

  9. Ocular prosthetics: use of a tissue conditioner material to modify a stock ocular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ow, R K; Amrith, S

    1997-08-01

    The custom-made ocular prosthesis contributes to enhanced tissue health of the anophthalmic socket. For this purpose, an acrylic resin ocular prosthesis may be modified, by using an appropriate dental impression material and being adapted closely to the anophthalmic socket. The modeling impression material is subsequently replaced by acrylic resin. This article describes the application of a viscoelastic tissue conditioner material, as an impression medium for prosthetic modification of an ocular prosthesis. The tissue conditioner material exhibits favorable tissue compatibility, adhesion to acrylic resin, and detailed surface registration. These advantages facilitate the clinical procedure and evaluation of modifications made to the ocular prosthesis.

  10. Facial Nerve Neuroma Management

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Peter C.; Osguthorpe, J. David

    1998-01-01

    Three facial nerve neuromas were identified in the academic year 1994-1995. Each case illustrates different management dilemmas. One patient with a grade III facial nerve palsy had a small geniculate ganglion neuroma with the dilemma of decompression versus resection clear nerve section margins. The second patient underwent facial neuroma resection with cable graft reconstruction, but the permanent sections were positive. The last patient had a massive neuroma in which grafting versus other facial reconstructive options were considered. These three cases illustrate some of the major controversies in facial nerve neuroma management. We discuss our decision-making plan and report our results. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171043

  11. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  12. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  13. Sacral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matzel, K E; Stadelmaier, U; Besendörfer, M

    2004-01-01

    The current concept of recruiting residual function of an inadequate pelvic organ by electrostimulation involves stimulation of the sacral spinal nerves at the level of the sacral canal. The rationale for applying SNS to fecal incontinence was based on clinical observations of its effect on bowel habits and anorectal continence function in urologic patients (increased anorectal angulation and anal canal closure pressure) and on anatomic considerations: dissection demonstrated a dual peripheral nerve supply of the striated pelvic floor muscles that govern these functions. Because the sacral spinal nerve site is the most distal common location of this dual nerve supply, stimulating here can elicit both functions. Since the first application of SNS in fecal incontinence in 1994, this technique has been improved, the patient selection process modified, and the spectrum of indications expanded. At present SNS has been applied in more than 1300 patients with fecal incontinence limited.

  14. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  15. Damaged axillary nerve (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Conditions associated with axillary nerve dysfunction include fracture of the humerus (upper arm bone), pressure from casts or splints, and improper use of crutches. Other causes include systemic disorders that cause neuritis (inflammation of ...

  16. Iatrogenic accessory nerve injury.

    PubMed Central

    London, J.; London, N. J.; Kay, S. P.

    1996-01-01

    Accessory nerve injury produces considerable disability. The nerve is most frequently damaged as a complication of radical neck dissection, cervical lymph node biopsy and other surgical procedures. The problem is frequently compounded by a failure to recognise the error immediately after surgery when surgical repair has the greatest chance of success. We present cases which outline the risk of accessory nerve injury, the spectrum of clinical presentations and the problems produced by a failure to recognise the deficit. Regional anatomy, consequences of nerve damage and management options are discussed. Diagnostic biopsy of neck nodes should not be undertaken as a primary investigation and, when indicated, surgery in this region should be performed by suitably trained staff under well-defined conditions. Awareness of iatrogenic injury and its consequences would avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment. Images Figure 2 PMID:8678450

  17. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Craig EJ, Clinchot DM. Femoral neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ...

  18. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  19. Ocular surface changes in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Ru, Yu-Sha; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Yang, Ji-Zhong; Li, Chun-Hui; Wang, Hong-Xing; Li, Xiao-Rong; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    AIM To detect and analyze the changes on ocular surface and tear function in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), an advanced stage of diabetic retinopathy (DR), using conventional ophthalmic tests and the high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy. METHODS Fifty-eight patients with type II diabetes were selected. Based on the diagnostic criteria and stage classification of DR, the patients were divided into the non-DR (NDR) group and the PDR group. Thirty-six patients with cataract but no other ocular and systemic disease were included as non-diabetic controls. All the patients were subjected to the conventional clinical tests of corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I Test, and corneal fluorescein staining. The non-invasive tear film break-up time (NIBUT) and tear interferometry were conducted by a Tearscope Plus. The morphology of corneal epithelia and nerve fibers was examined using the high-resolution confocal microscopy. RESULTS The NDR group exhibited significantly declined corneal sensitivity and Schirmer I test value, as compared to the non-diabetic controls (P< 0.001). The PDR group showed significantly reduced corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test value, and NIBUT in comparison to the non-diabetic controls (P < 0.001). Corneal fluorescein staining revealed the progressively injured corneal epithelia in the PDR patients. Moreover, significant decrease in the corneal epithelial density and morphological abnormalities in the corneal epithelia and nerve fibers were also observed in the PDR patients. CONCLUSION Ocular surface changes, including blunted corneal sensitivity, reduced tear secretion, tear film dysfunction, progressive loss of corneal epithelia and degeneration of nerve fibers, are common in type II diabetic patients, particularly in the diabetic patients with PDR. The corneal sensitivity, fluorescein staining scores, and the density of corneal epithelial cells and nerve fibers in the diabetic patients correlate

  20. Lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy.

  1. Nonmydriatic ocular fundus photography among headache patients in an emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Thulasi, Praneetha; Fraser, Clare L.; Biousse, Valérie; Wright, David W.; Newman, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Determine the frequency of and the predictive factors for abnormal ocular fundus findings among emergency department (ED) headache patients. Methods: Cross-sectional study of prospectively enrolled adult patients presenting to our ED with a chief complaint of headache. Ocular fundus photographs were obtained using a nonmydriatic fundus camera that does not require pupillary dilation. Demographic and neuroimaging information was collected. Photographs were reviewed independently by 2 neuroophthalmologists for findings relevant to acute care. The results were analyzed using univariate statistics and logistic regression modeling. Results: We included 497 patients (median age: 40 years, 73% women), among whom 42 (8.5%, 95% confidence interval: 6%–11%) had ocular fundus abnormalities. Of these 42 patients, 12 had disc edema, 9 had optic nerve pallor, 6 had grade III/IV hypertensive retinopathy, and 15 had isolated retinal hemorrhages. Body mass index ≥35 kg/m2 (odds ratio [OR]: 2.3, p = 0.02), younger age (OR: 0.7 per 10-year increase, p = 0.02), and higher mean arterial blood pressure (OR: 1.3 per 10-mm Hg increase, p = 0.003) were predictive of abnormal retinal photography. Patients with an abnormal fundus had a higher percentage of hospital admission (21% vs 10%, p = 0.04). Among the 34 patients with abnormal ocular fundi who had brain imaging, 14 (41%) had normal imaging. Conclusions: Ocular fundus abnormalities were found in 8.5% of patients with headache presenting to our ED. Predictors of abnormal funduscopic findings included higher body mass index, younger age, and higher blood pressure. Our study confirms the importance of funduscopic examination in patients with headache, particularly in the ED, and reaffirms the utility of nonmydriatic fundus photography in this setting. PMID:23284060

  2. Motor Starters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    The power factor controller (PFC) was invented by a NASA engineer. It matches voltage with a motor's actual need by sensing shifts in the relationship between voltage and current flow. With the device, power can be trimmed as much as 65%. Intellinet adopted this technology and designed "soft start" and "load-responsive" control modes to start engines gradually and recycle voltage without reducing motor speed. Other features are lower motor heat and faster fault identification.

  3. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  4. [Ocular hypertension after surgery for retinal detachment].

    PubMed

    Muşat, O; Cristescu, R; Coman, Corina; Asandi, R

    2012-01-01

    This papers presents a case of a patient with retinal detachement, 3 days ago operated (posterior vitrectomy internal tamponament with silicon oil 1000) who develop increased ocular pressure following silicon oil output in the anterior chamber.

  5. Ocular Complications of Diabetes and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-Potter, Victoria J.; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Lee, Darren J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease defined by elevated blood glucose (BG). DM is a global epidemic and the prevalence is anticipated to continue to increase. The ocular complications of DM negatively impact the quality of life and carry an extremely high economic burden. While systemic control of BG can slow the ocular complications they cannot stop them, especially if clinical symptoms are already present. With the advances in biodegradable polymers, implantable ocular devices can slowly release medication to stop, and in some cases reverse, diabetic complications in the eye. In this review we discuss the ocular complications associated with DM, the treatments available with a focus on localized treatments, and what promising treatments are on the horizon. PMID:27119078

  6. Ocular torsion quantification with video images.

    PubMed

    Bos, J E; de Graaf, B

    1994-04-01

    The present paper describes a technique to quantify eye rotations about the visual axis (ocular torsion). Two digitized polar transformed images of the iris are displayed on a video monitor in order to facilitate a visual comparison and manual interaction. Emphasis is placed on error analysis and the method's simplicity when applied to static ocular torsion measurement. The implementation, applying averaging over ocular torsion determined in partitioned iris images, yields a theoretical resolution of 5' of arc. In a control experiment with an artificial eye, the accuracy showed to be better than 14' of arc. In practice, the measuring device was validated with the data from the literature by means of an experiment about ocular torsion in humans during tilt and hypergravity conditions (up to 3 g).

  7. Ocular Complications of Diabetes and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Lee, Darren J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease defined by elevated blood glucose (BG). DM is a global epidemic and the prevalence is anticipated to continue to increase. The ocular complications of DM negatively impact the quality of life and carry an extremely high economic burden. While systemic control of BG can slow the ocular complications they cannot stop them, especially if clinical symptoms are already present. With the advances in biodegradable polymers, implantable ocular devices can slowly release medication to stop, and in some cases reverse, diabetic complications in the eye. In this review we discuss the ocular complications associated with DM, the treatments available with a focus on localized treatments, and what promising treatments are on the horizon. PMID:27119078

  8. Ocular Emergencies: Screening Tool and Alert Protocol.

    PubMed

    Coronica, Rolly; Murty, Cailin

    2015-01-01

    Ocular emergencies such as central retinal artery occlusion, open globe injuries, eye chemical burns, retrobulbar hemorrhage, retinal detachment, and acute angle-closure glaucoma can result in vision loss. Diagnosis is based on astute screening, which can be guided by the OAP screening tool used by ophthalmic nurses engaged in triaging patients presenting with symptoms indicative of emergent vision or eye changes. The OAP provides direction to ophthalmic team members for treatment and management of ocular emergencies.

  9. A history of facial and ocular prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Reisberg, D J; Habakuk, S W

    1990-01-01

    This article traces the history of facial and ocular prosthetics. Creative individuals who have made significant contributions are highlighted and the evolution of techniques and materials is presented. In view of the significance placed upon facial beauty in today's society, it becomes incumbent upon us to recognize the ingenuity and skill of those in the past to gain appreciation for the present state of the art and to provide incentive for improving facial and ocular prosthetic restorations in the future.

  10. Distribution and Structure of Synapses on Medial Vestibular Nuclear Neurons Targeted by Cerebellar Flocculus Purkinje Cells and Vestibular Nerve in Mice: Light and Electron Microscopy Studies

    PubMed Central

    Matsuno, Hitomi; Kudoh, Moeko; Watakabe, Akiya; Yamamori, Tetsuo; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Nagao, Soichi

    2016-01-01

    Adaptations of vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic response eye movements have been studied as an experimental model of cerebellum-dependent motor learning. Several previous physiological and pharmacological studies have consistently suggested that the cerebellar flocculus (FL) Purkinje cells (P-cells) and the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons targeted by FL (FL-targeted MVN neurons) may respectively maintain the memory traces of short- and long-term adaptation. To study the basic structures of the FL-MVN synapses by light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM), we injected green florescence protein (GFP)-expressing lentivirus into FL to anterogradely label the FL P-cell axons in C57BL/6J mice. The FL P-cell axonal boutons were distributed in the magnocellular MVN and in the border region of parvocellular MVN and prepositus hypoglossi (PrH). In the magnocellular MVN, the FL-P cell axons mainly terminated on somata and proximal dendrites. On the other hand, in the parvocellular MVN/PrH, the FL P-cell axonal synaptic boutons mainly terminated on the relatively small-diameter (< 1 μm) distal dendrites of MVN neurons, forming symmetrical synapses. The majority of such parvocellular MVN/PrH neurons were determined to be glutamatergic by immunocytochemistry and in-situ hybridization of GFP expressing transgenic mice. To further examine the spatial relationship between the synapses of FL P-cells and those of vestibular nerve on the neurons of the parvocellular MVN/PrH, we added injections of biotinylated dextran amine into the semicircular canal and anterogradely labeled vestibular nerve axons in some mice. The MVN dendrites receiving the FL P-cell axonal synaptic boutons often closely apposed vestibular nerve synaptic boutons in both LM and EM studies. Such a partial overlap of synaptic boutons of FL P-cell axons with those of vestibular nerve axons in the distal dendrites of MVN neurons suggests that inhibitory synapses of FL P-cells may influence the function

  11. Dissection of intercostal nerves by means of assisted video thoracoscopy: experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In total brachial plexus preganglionic lesions (C5-C6-C7-C8 and T1) different extraplexual neurotizations are indicated for partial motor function restitution. Mostly for the flexion of the elbow. Neurotization with intercostal nerves (ICN) to musculocutaneous nerve has been known and accepted during many years with different results 2 - 5. The customary technique as described by various authors is carried out by means of a large submammary incision to harvest three or four intercostal nerves (Figure 1). Then are connected by direct suture or grafts to the musculocutaneous nerve or its motor branches 6 - 7. In this article the authors described the possibility of dissection intercostal nerves by means of assisted video thoracoscopy. (VATS-videdo assisted thoracic surgery). PMID:23406448

  12. [Structural anatomy of cranial nerves (V, VII, VIII, IX, X)].

    PubMed

    Guclu, B; Meyronet, D; Simon, E; Streichenberger, N; Sindou, M; Mertens, P

    2009-04-01

    This study reports a review of the literature on the structural anatomy of the Vth, VIIth, VIIIth, IXth, and Xth cranial nerves, known to harbor dysfunction syndromes in humans. Because these dysfunctions are hypothesized to be caused by neurovascular conflicts at the root entry/exit zone and the transitional zone between central and peripheral myelinization, this investigation focused on the study and description of this junction. All the cranial nerves, except the optic and olfactory nerves, which are considered to be more a direct expansion of the central nervous system, have a transitional zone between central myelin (coming from oligodendrocytes) and peripheral myelin (produced by Schwann cells). The human studies reported in the literature argue in favor of a dome-shaped transitional zone directed to the periphery. It seems that this junctional region is situated more peripherally in sensory nerves than in motor nerves. The transitional zone is situated very peripherally for the cochlear and vestibular nerves, and on the contrary very close to its exit from the brain stem for the facial nerve.

  13. Bilateral Abducent Nerve Palsy After Neck Trauma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Shafiee, Sajad; Sazegar, Mohammad; Nosrati, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The abducent nucleus is located in the upper part of the rhomboid fossa beneath the fourth ventricle in the caudal portion of the pons. The abducent nerve courses from its nucleus, to innervate the lateral rectus muscle. This nerve has the longest subarachnoid course of all the cranial nerves, it is the cranial nerve most vulnerable to trauma. It has been reported that 1% to 2.7% of all head injuries are followed by unilateral abducent palsy, but bilateral abducent nerve palsy is extremely rare. Case Presentation A 65-year-old woman presented to the emergency department following a motor vehicle accident. A neurological assessment showed the patient’s Glascow coma scale (GCS) to be 15. She complained of double vision, and we found lateral gaze palsy in both eyes. A hangman fracture type IIA (C2 fracture with posterior ligamentous C1 - C2 distraction) was found on the cervical CT scan. A three-month follow-up of the patient showed complete recovery of the abducent nerve. Conclusions Conservative treatment is usually recommended for traumatic bilateral abducent nerve palsy. Our patient recovered from this condition after three months without any remaining neurological deficit, a very rare outcome in a rare case. PMID:27218062

  14. Choroidal rupture and optic nerve injury with equipment designated as 'child-safe'.

    PubMed

    Petrarca, Robert; Saldana, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Blunt ocular trauma from a child's plastic foam-covered toy baseball bat caused traumatic optic neuropathy and choroidal rupture in a 9-year-old child. The examination revealed a visual acuity of 6/60, a relative afferent pupillary defect, optic nerve swelling, commotio retinae and retinal haemorrhages. There was no orbital fracture or intraorbital haematoma on CT scanning. Optical coherence tomography showed macular oedema and disruption of the retinal pigment epithelium and Bruch's membrane. The child was admitted for intravenous methylprednisolone and discharged on topical steroid treatment. At 1 month follow-up, visual acuity had improved to 6/12. Optic nerve swelling had resolved and the fundus had two crescent-shaped choroidal rupture scars. Choroidal rupture and optic neuropathy can be secondary to indirect trauma, and even when the mechanism of injury is with a piece of equipment designated as suitable for children, serious ocular injury can occur. PMID:22927278

  15. Choroidal rupture and optic nerve injury with equipment designated as 'child-safe'.

    PubMed

    Petrarca, Robert; Saldana, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Blunt ocular trauma from a child's plastic foam-covered toy baseball bat caused traumatic optic neuropathy and choroidal rupture in a 9-year-old child. The examination revealed a visual acuity of 6/60, a relative afferent pupillary defect, optic nerve swelling, commotio retinae and retinal haemorrhages. There was no orbital fracture or intraorbital haematoma on CT scanning. Optical coherence tomography showed macular oedema and disruption of the retinal pigment epithelium and Bruch's membrane. The child was admitted for intravenous methylprednisolone and discharged on topical steroid treatment. At 1 month follow-up, visual acuity had improved to 6/12. Optic nerve swelling had resolved and the fundus had two crescent-shaped choroidal rupture scars. Choroidal rupture and optic neuropathy can be secondary to indirect trauma, and even when the mechanism of injury is with a piece of equipment designated as suitable for children, serious ocular injury can occur.

  16. [Ocular involvement in familial amyloid polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Rousseau, A; Kaswin, G; Adams, D; Cauquil, C; Théaudin, M; Mincheva, Z; M'garrech, M; Labetoulle, M; Barreau, E

    2013-11-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) or transthyretin (TTR) amyloid polyneuropathy is a progressive sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathy of adult onset, which is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In addition to neurologic symptoms, FAP may be associated with weight loss, cardiac and renal failure and ocular complications. FAP is a devastating disease, causing death within 10years after the first symptoms. The TTR Val30Met mutation is the most common of more than 100 amyloidogenic mutations identified worldwide. Liver transplantation (LT) is currently the only treatment for preventing synthesis of the amyloidogenic variants of TTR. LT can halt progression of the neuropathy in up to 70% of cases and doubles the overall median survival of young Val30Met patients. Oral administration of tafamidis, which prevents deposition of mutated TTR, is now available to delay neurologic complications in early stages of the disease. Ocular manifestations of FAP are frequent and mainly include keratoconjunctivitis sicca, secondary glaucoma, vitreous deposits and pupillary abnormalities. Retinal and choroidal vascular abnormalities are more rare. Since ocular TTR is synthesized, at least in part, in the retinal pigment epithelium, LT does not influence the course of ocular involvement. The effects of tafamidis on the latter are still unknown. Because LT and symptomatic treatments greatly improve life expectancy of patients with FAP, ocular involvement is becoming a more frequent challenge to address. This review summarizes the pathophysiology, clinical findings and possible treatments of ocular manifestations of FAP. PMID:24144522

  17. The spinal accessory nerve plexus, the trapezius muscle, and shoulder stabilization after radical neck cancer surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H; Burns, S; Kaiser, C W

    1988-01-01

    A clinical and anatomic study of the spinal accessory, the eleventh cranial nerve, and trapezius muscle function of patients who had radical neck cancer surgery was conducted. This study was done not only to document the indispensibility of the trapezius muscle to shoulder-girdle stability, but also to clarify the role of the eleventh cranial nerve in the variable motor and sensory changes occurring after the loss of this muscle. Seventeen male patients, 49-69 years of age, (average of 60 years of age) undergoing a total of 23 radical neck dissections were examined for upper extremity function, particularly in regard to the trapezius muscle, and for subjective signs of pain. The eleventh nerve, usually regarded as the sole motor innervation to the trapezius, was cut in 17 instances because of tumor involvement. Dissection of four fresh and 30 preserved adult cadavers helped to reconcile the motor and sensory differences in patients who had undergone loss of the eleventh nerve. The dissections and clinical observations corroborate that the trapezius is a key part of a "muscle continuum" that stabilizes the shoulder. Variations in origins and insertions of the trapezius may influence its function in different individuals. As regards the spinal accessory nerve, it is concluded that varying motor and sensory connections form a plexus with the eleventh nerve, accounting, in part, for the variations in motor innervation and function of the trapezius, as well as for a variable spectrum of sensory changes when the eleventh nerve is cut. For this reason, it is suggested that the term "spinal accessory nerve plexus" be used to refer to the eleventh nerve when it is considered in the context of radical neck cancer surgery. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3056289

  18. Directional sensitivity of anterior, posterior, and horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular neurons in the cat.

    PubMed

    Brettler, S C; Baker, J F

    2001-10-01

    extraocular muscle excitation axis vectors. Only single examples of second-order vestibulo-ocular neuron vectors were approximately aligned with the pitch and roll coordinate axes. We conclude that second-order vestibulo-ocular neurons do not exclusively represent either the semicircular canal sensory coordinate frame or the extraocular muscle excitation motor coordinate frame, and instead are mostly distributed on a continuum between the input and output coordinate frames, with anterior canal neurons having the widest distribution of directionality.

  19. Peripheral Nerve Repair in Rats Using Composite Hydrogel-Filled Aligned Nanofiber Conduits with Incorporated Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jenny; Limburg, Sonja; Joshi, Sunil K.; Landman, Rebeccah; Park, Michelle; Zhang, Qia; Kim, Hubert T.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of peripheral nerve defects with current synthetic, tubular nerve conduits generally shows inferior recovery when compared with using nerve autografts, the current gold standard. We tested the ability of composite collagen and hyaluronan hydrogels, with and without the nerve growth factor (NGF), to stimulate neurite extension on a promising aligned, nanofiber poly-L-lactide-co-caprolactone (PLCL) scaffold. In vitro, the hydrogels significantly increased neurite extension from dorsal root ganglia explants. Consistent with these results, the addition of hydrogels as luminal fillers within aligned, nanofiber tubular PLCL conduits led to improved sensory function compared to autograft repair in a critical-size defect in the sciatic nerve in a rat model. Sensory recovery was assessed 3 and 12 weeks after repair using a withdrawal assay from thermal stimulation. The addition of hydrogel did not enhance recovery of motor function in the rat model. The NGF led to dose-dependent improvements in neurite out-growth in vitro, but did not have a significant effect in vivo. In summary, composite collagen/hyaluronan hydrogels enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth in vitro and sensory recovery in vivo. The use of such hydrogels as luminal fillers for tubular nerve conduits may therefore be useful in assisting restoration of protective sensation following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23659607

  20. Diabetic neuropathy increases stimulation threshold during popliteal sciatic nerve block†

    PubMed Central

    Heschl, S.; Hallmann, B.; Zilke, T.; Gemes, G.; Schoerghuber, M.; Auer-Grumbach, M.; Quehenberger, F.; Lirk, P.; Hogan, Q.; Rigaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve stimulation is commonly used for nerve localization in regional anaesthesia, but recommended stimulation currents of 0.3–0.5 mA do not reliably produce motor activity in the absence of intraneural needle placement. As this may be particularly true in patients with diabetic neuropathy, we examined the stimulation threshold in patients with and without diabetes. Methods Preoperative evaluation included a neurological exam and electroneurography. During ultrasound-guided popliteal sciatic nerve block, we measured the current required to produce motor activity for the tibial and common peroneal nerve in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Proximity to the nerve was evaluated post-hoc using ultrasound imaging. Results Average stimulation currents did not differ between diabetic (n=55) and non-diabetic patients (n=52). Although the planned number of patients was not reached, the power goal for the mean stimulation current was met. Subjects with diminished pressure perception showed increased thresholds for the common peroneal nerve (median 1.30 vs. 0.57 mA in subjects with normal perception, P=0.042), as did subjects with decreased pain sensation (1.60 vs. 0.50 mA in subjects with normal sensation, P=0.038). Slowed ulnar nerve conduction velocity predicted elevated mean stimulation current (r=−0.35, P=0.002). Finally, 15 diabetic patients required more than 0.5 mA to evoke a motor response, despite intraneural needle placement (n=4), or required currents ≥2 mA despite needle-nerve contact, vs three such patients (1 intraneural, 2 with ≥2 mA) among non-diabetic patients (P=0.003). Conclusions These findings suggest that stimulation thresholds of 0.3–0.5 mA may not reliably determine close needle-nerve contact during popliteal sciatic nerve block, particularly in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Clinical trial registration NCT01488474 PMID:26994231

  1. Macular pigment optical density: repeatability, intereye correlation, and effect of ocular dominance

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Pinakin Gunvant; Alvarez, Silverio D; Lee, Jessica Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate short-term repeatability, intereye correlation, and effect of ocular dominance on macular pigment optical density (MPOD) measurements obtained using the QuantifEye Heterochromatic Flicker Photometer. Patients and methods A total of 72 study participants were enrolled in this prospective, cross-sectional study. Participants underwent a comprehensive ocular evaluation, including visual acuity, evaluation of ocular dominance, slit lamp examination, intraocular pressure measurement, and optic nerve head and macula analysis using optical coherence tomography and fundus photography. All study participants after initial training underwent MPOD measurement twice in both eyes in a randomized sequence. The repeatability was tested using Altman and Bland plots for first measurements with the second measurements for right eye and left eye and additionally by grouping eyes as a function of ocular dominance. The Pearson correlation coefficient was performed to assess the intereye correlation of MPOD values. Results The mean age of study participants was 35.5 years (range 22–68 years). The mean MPOD measurements for OD (right eye) and OS (left eye) were 0.47 and 0.48, respectively, which followed a normal distribution (Shapiro–Wilk test, P=0.6 and 0.2). The 95% limits of agreement of Altman and Bland plots for the first and second measurements were −0.12 to +0.11 and −0.13 to +0.12 for OD and OS, respectively. The correlation coefficient of mean MPOD measurements of OD and OS was r statistic =0.94 (Pearson correlation coefficient P<0.0001; r2 0.89). The 95% limits of agreement of Altman and Bland plots when evaluated by laterality of eye or by ocular dominance were narrow, with limits of agreement ranging from −0.13 to +0.12. Conclusion The MPOD measurements obtained using the QuantifEye show good short-term repeatability. There is excellent intereye correlation, indicating that the MPOD values of one eye data can predict the fellow eye value with 89

  2. Macular pigment optical density: repeatability, intereye correlation, and effect of ocular dominance

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Pinakin Gunvant; Alvarez, Silverio D; Lee, Jessica Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate short-term repeatability, intereye correlation, and effect of ocular dominance on macular pigment optical density (MPOD) measurements obtained using the QuantifEye Heterochromatic Flicker Photometer. Patients and methods A total of 72 study participants were enrolled in this prospective, cross-sectional study. Participants underwent a comprehensive ocular evaluation, including visual acuity, evaluation of ocular dominance, slit lamp examination, intraocular pressure measurement, and optic nerve head and macula analysis using optical coherence tomography and fundus photography. All study participants after initial training underwent MPOD measurement twice in both eyes in a randomized sequence. The repeatability was tested using Altman and Bland plots for first measurements with the second measurements for right eye and left eye and additionally by grouping eyes as a function of ocular dominance. The Pearson correlation coefficient was performed to assess the intereye correlation of MPOD values. Results The mean age of study participants was 35.5 years (range 22–68 years). The mean MPOD measurements for OD (right eye) and OS (left eye) were 0.47 and 0.48, respectively, which followed a normal distribution (Shapiro–Wilk test, P=0.6 and 0.2). The 95% limits of agreement of Altman and Bland plots for the first and second measurements were −0.12 to +0.11 and −0.13 to +0.12 for OD and OS, respectively. The correlation coefficient of mean MPOD measurements of OD and OS was r statistic =0.94 (Pearson correlation coefficient P<0.0001; r2 0.89). The 95% limits of agreement of Altman and Bland plots when evaluated by laterality of eye or by ocular dominance were narrow, with limits of agreement ranging from −0.13 to +0.12. Conclusion The MPOD measurements obtained using the QuantifEye show good short-term repeatability. There is excellent intereye correlation, indicating that the MPOD values of one eye data can predict the fellow eye value with 89

  3. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  4. Communications Between the Facial Nerve and the Vestibulocochlear Nerve, the Glossopharyngeal Nerve, and the Cervical Plexus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Song, Ju Sung; Yang, Su Cheol

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this review is to elucidate the communications between the facial nerves or facial nerve and neighboring nerves: the vestibulocochlear nerve, the glossopharyngeal nerve, and the cervical plexus.In a PubMed search, 832 articles were searched using the terms "facial nerve and communication." Sixty-two abstracts were read and 16 full-text articles were reviewed. Among them, 8 articles were analyzed.The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve was the highest (82.3%) and the frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the glossopharyngeal nerve was the lowest (20%). The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the cervical plexus was 65.2 ± 43.5%. The frequency of communication between the cervical branch and the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was 24.7 ± 1.7%.Surgeons should be aware of the nerve communications, which are important during clinical examinations and surgical procedures of the facial nerves such as those communications involved in facial reconstructive surgery, neck dissection, and various nerve transfer procedures.

  5. Ocular Outcomes Comparison Between 14- and 70-day Head-down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, R.L.; Taibbi, G.; Zanello, S.B.; Yarbough, P.O.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.J.; Vizzen, G.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ophthalmological changes, including optic disc edema with optic nerve sheath distension, posterior globe flattening with hyperopic shift, choroidal folds and cotton wool spots have been detected in some astronauts involved in long-duration spaceflights. (sup 1) It is hypothesized that elevated intracranial pressure resulting from microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts may be responsible for most of these findings. Head-down tilt bed rest (HTDBR) is a ground-based microgravity analog which also produces cephalad fluid shifts. It is conceivable that prolonged HDTBR exposure may induce ocular changes similar to those experienced in microgravity. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to compare structural and functional ocular outcomes between 14- and 70-day HDTBR in healthy human subjects. It is hypothesized that 70-d HDTBR induced ocular changes of greater magnitude as compared to 14-d HDTBR. METHODS: Two HDTBR studies were conducted at the NASA Flight Analogs Research Unit, located at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX. Identical NASA standard screening procedures and BR conditions (e.g., strict sleep-wake cycle, standardized diet, continuous video monitoring) were implemented in both studies. Participants spent 14 and/or 70 consecutive days in a 6deg HDT position and did not engage in exercise. Subjects received weekly ocular examinations before, during, and after HDTBR. Ocular testing included: distance and near best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), cycloplegic refraction, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, color vision, red dot test, modified Amsler grid test, confrontational visual field, color fundus photography and Spectral-domain OCT scans of the macula and the optic disc. Pre/post HDTBR differences between the two studies will be evaluated for BCVA, spherical equivalent, IOP, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and macular OCT parameters. RESULTS: 16 (12 males and 4 females) and 6 (5 males and 1

  6. Lower motor neuron dysfunction in ALS.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Mamede; Swash, Michael

    2016-07-01

    In the motor system there is a complex interplay between cortical structures and spinal cord lower motor neurons (LMN). In this system both inhibitory and excitatory neurons have relevant roles. LMN loss is a marker of motor neuron disease/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (MND/ALS). Conventional needle electromyography (EMG) does not allow LMN loss to be quantified. Measurement of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude or area, and the neurophysiological index, provide a surrogate estimate of the number of functional motor units. Increased motor neuronal excitability is a neurophysiological marker of ALS in the context of a suspected clinical and electrophysiological diagnosis. In the LMN system, fasciculation potentials (FPs) are the earliest changes observed in affected muscles, a feature of LMN hyperexcitability. Reinnervation is best investigated by needle EMG although other methods can be explored. Moreover needle EMG give information about the temporal profile of the reinnervation process, important ancillary data. Quantitative motor unit potential analysis is a valuable method of evaluating reinnervation. The importance of FPs has been recognized in the Awaji criteria for the electrodiagnosis of ALS, criteria that are a sensitive adjunct to the revised El Escorial criteria. Finally, functionality of LMN's, and perhaps excitability studies in motor nerves, aids understanding of the disease process, allowing measurement of potential treatment effects in clinical trials. Other investigational techniques, such as electrical impedance myography, muscle and nerve ultrasound, and spinal cord imaging methods may prove useful in future. PMID:27117334

  7. Ocular Biometric Changes after Trabeculectomy.

    PubMed

    Alvani, Azam; Pakravan, Mohammad; Esfandiari, Hamed; Safi, Sare; Yaseri, Mehdi; Pakravan, Parastou

    2016-01-01

    This review article aimed to evaluate ocular biometric changes after trabeculectomy. The PubMed database was searched using the keywords "axial length" (AL), "anterior chamber depth" (ACD), "corneal astigmatism," "corneal topography" and "trabeculectomy." The extracted studies were categorized based on the evaluated parameters and the biometry method (contact and non-contact). Comparable studies with respect to their sample size were combined for statistical analysis. Twenty-five studies including 690 individuals which met the inclusion criteria were selected. After trabeculectomy, a significant and persistent AL reduction, with a range of 0.1-0.19 and 0.1-0.9 mm measured with contact and non-contact methods, respectively, was observed. With respect to topographic changes, 0.38-1.4 diopters (D) with-the-rule (WTR) astigmatism was induced postoperatively. All studies revealed ACD reduction immediately after surgery, which gradually deepened and approximated its preoperative levels on day 14. ACD reduction was not significant after that period in the majority of cases. In conclusion, changes in ACD is of small amount and of short period, thus it can be ignored; however, reported changes in AL and keratometry are of sufficient magnitude and can affect the refractive prediction of combined cataract surgery and trabeculectomy. PMID:27621788

  8. Ocular Biometric Changes after Trabeculectomy.

    PubMed

    Alvani, Azam; Pakravan, Mohammad; Esfandiari, Hamed; Safi, Sare; Yaseri, Mehdi; Pakravan, Parastou

    2016-01-01

    This review article aimed to evaluate ocular biometric changes after trabeculectomy. The PubMed database was searched using the keywords "axial length" (AL), "anterior chamber depth" (ACD), "corneal astigmatism," "corneal topography" and "trabeculectomy." The extracted studies were categorized based on the evaluated parameters and the biometry method (contact and non-contact). Comparable studies with respect to their sample size were combined for statistical analysis. Twenty-five studies including 690 individuals which met the inclusion criteria were selected. After trabeculectomy, a significant and persistent AL reduction, with a range of 0.1-0.19 and 0.1-0.9 mm measured with contact and non-contact methods, respectively, was observed. With respect to topographic changes, 0.38-1.4 diopters (D) with-the-rule (WTR) astigmatism was induced postoperatively. All studies revealed ACD reduction immediately after surgery, which gradually deepened and approximated its preoperative levels on day 14. ACD reduction was not significant after that period in the majority of cases. In conclusion, changes in ACD is of small amount and of short period, thus it can be ignored; however, reported changes in AL and keratometry are of sufficient magnitude and can affect the refractive prediction of combined cataract surgery and trabeculectomy.

  9. Ocular Biometric Changes after Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    Alvani, Azam; Pakravan, Mohammad; Esfandiari, Hamed; Safi, Sare; Yaseri, Mehdi; Pakravan, Parastou

    2016-01-01

    This review article aimed to evaluate ocular biometric changes after trabeculectomy. The PubMed database was searched using the keywords “axial length” (AL), “anterior chamber depth” (ACD), “corneal astigmatism,” “corneal topography” and “trabeculectomy.” The extracted studies were categorized based on the evaluated parameters and the biometry method (contact and non-contact). Comparable studies with respect to their sample size were combined for statistical analysis. Twenty-five studies including 690 individuals which met the inclusion criteria were selected. After trabeculectomy, a significant and persistent AL reduction, with a range of 0.1-0.19 and 0.1-0.9 mm measured with contact and non-contact methods, respectively, was observed. With respect to topographic changes, 0.38-1.4 diopters (D) with-the-rule (WTR) astigmatism was induced postoperatively. All studies revealed ACD reduction immediately after surgery, which gradually deepened and approximated its preoperative levels on day 14. ACD reduction was not significant after that period in the majority of cases. In conclusion, changes in ACD is of small amount and of short period, thus it can be ignored; however, reported changes in AL and keratometry are of sufficient magnitude and can affect the refractive prediction of combined cataract surgery and trabeculectomy. PMID:27621788

  10. Cockpit Ocular Recording System (CORS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenheber, Edward; Stokes, James; Lagrossa, Charles; Arnold, William; Dick, A. O.

    1990-01-01

    The overall goal was the development of a Cockpit Ocular Recording System (CORS). Four tasks were used: (1) the development of the system; (2) the experimentation and improvement of the system; (3) demonstrations of the working system; and (4) system documentation. Overall, the prototype represents a workable and flexibly designed CORS system. For the most part, the hardware use for the prototype system is off-the-shelf. All of the following software was developed specifically: (1) setup software that the user specifies the cockpit configuration and identifies possible areas in which the pilot will look; (2) sensing software which integrates the 60 Hz data from the oculometer and heat orientation sensing unit; (3) processing software which applies a spatiotemporal filter to the lookpoint data to determine fixation/dwell positions; (4) data recording output routines; and (5) playback software which allows the user to retrieve and analyze the data. Several experiments were performed to verify the system accuracy and quantify system deficiencies. These tests resulted in recommendations for any future system that might be constructed.

  11. Ocular Biometric Changes after Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    Alvani, Azam; Pakravan, Mohammad; Esfandiari, Hamed; Safi, Sare; Yaseri, Mehdi; Pakravan, Parastou

    2016-01-01

    This review article aimed to evaluate ocular biometric changes after trabeculectomy. The PubMed database was searched using the keywords “axial length” (AL), “anterior chamber depth” (ACD), “corneal astigmatism,” “corneal topography” and “trabeculectomy.” The extracted studies were categorized based on the evaluated parameters and the biometry method (contact and non-contact). Comparable studies with respect to their sample size were combined for statistical analysis. Twenty-five studies including 690 individuals which met the inclusion criteria were selected. After trabeculectomy, a significant and persistent AL reduction, with a range of 0.1-0.19 and 0.1-0.9 mm measured with contact and non-contact methods, respectively, was observed. With respect to topographic changes, 0.38-1.4 diopters (D) with-the-rule (WTR) astigmatism was induced postoperatively. All studies revealed ACD reduction immediately after surgery, which gradually deepened and approximated its preoperative levels on day 14. ACD reduction was not significant after that period in the majority of cases. In conclusion, changes in ACD is of small amount and of short period, thus it can be ignored; however, reported changes in AL and keratometry are of sufficient magnitude and can affect the refractive prediction of combined cataract surgery and trabeculectomy.

  12. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  13. Combined KHFAC + DC nerve block without onset or reduced nerve conductivity after block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Manfred; Vrabec, Tina; Wainright, Jesse; Bhadra, Niloy; Bhadra, Narendra; Kilgore, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC) waveforms have been shown to provide peripheral nerve conductivity block in many acute and chronic animal models. KHFAC nerve block could be used to address multiple disorders caused by neural over-activity, including blocking pain and spasticity. However, one drawback of KHFAC block is a transient activation of nerve fibers during the initiation of the nerve block, called the onset response. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using charge balanced direct current (CBDC) waveforms to temporarily block motor nerve conductivity distally to the KHFAC electrodes to mitigate the block onset-response. Approach. A total of eight animals were used in this study. A set of four animals were used to assess feasibility and reproducibility of a combined KHFAC + CBDC block. A following randomized study, conducted on a second set of four animals, compared the onset response resulting from KHFAC alone and combined KHFAC + CBDC waveforms. To quantify the onset, peak forces and the force-time integral were measured during KHFAC block initiation. Nerve conductivity was monitored throughout the study by comparing muscle twitch forces evoked by supra-maximal stimulation proximal and distal to the block electrodes. Each animal of the randomized study received at least 300 s (range: 318-1563 s) of cumulative dc to investigate the impact of combined KHFAC + CBDC on nerve viability. Main results. The peak onset force was reduced significantly from 20.73 N (range: 18.6-26.5 N) with KHFAC alone to 0.45 N (range: 0.2-0.7 N) with the combined CBDC and KHFAC block waveform (p < 0.001). The area under the force curve was reduced from 6.8 Ns (range: 3.5-21.9 Ns) to 0.54 Ns (range: 0.18-0.86 Ns) (p < 0.01). No change in nerve conductivity was observed after application of the combined KHFAC + CBDC block relative to KHFAC waveforms. Significance. The distal application of CBDC can significantly reduce or even

  14. A Human Hair Keratin Hydrogel Scaffold Enhances Median Nerve Regeneration in Nonhuman Primates: An Electrophysiological and Histological Study

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Lauren A.; Plate, Johannes F.; Mannava, Sandeep; Barnwell, Jonathan C.; Koman, L. Andrew; Li, Zhongyu; Smith, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    A human hair keratin biomaterial hydrogel scaffold was evaluated as a nerve conduit luminal filler following median nerve transection injury in 10 Macaca fascicularis nonhuman primates (NHP). A 1 cm nerve gap was grafted with a NeuraGen® collagen conduit filled with either saline or keratin hydrogel and nerve regeneration was evaluated by electrophysiology for a period of 12 months. The keratin hydrogel-grafted nerves showed significant improvement in return of compound motor action potential (CMAP) latency and recovery of baseline nerve conduction velocity (NCV) compared with the saline-treated nerves. Histological evaluation was performed on retrieved median nerves and abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscles at 12 months. Nerve histomorphometry showed a significantly larger nerve area in the keratin group compared with the saline group and the keratin APB muscles had a significantly higher myofiber density than the saline group. This is the first published study to show that an acellular biomaterial hydrogel conduit filler can be used to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration and motor recovery in an NHP model. PMID:24083825

  15. What is a typical optic nerve head?

    PubMed

    Voorhees, A P; Grimm, J L; Bilonick, R A; Kagemann, L; Ishikawa, H; Schuman, J S; Wollstein, G; Sigal, I A

    2016-08-01

    Whereas it is known that elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) increases the risk of glaucoma, it is not known why optic nerve heads (ONHs) vary so much in sensitivity to IOP and how this sensitivity depends on the characteristics of the ONH such as tissue mechanical properties and geometry. It is often assumed that ONHs with uncommon or atypical sensitivity to IOP, high sensitivity in normal tension glaucoma or high robustness in ocular hypertension, also have atypical ONH characteristics. Here we address two specific questions quantitatively: Do atypical ONH characteristics necessarily lead to atypical biomechanical responses to elevated IOP? And, do typical biomechanical responses necessarily come from ONHs with typical characteristics. We generated 100,000 ONH numerical models with randomly selected values for the characteristics, all falling within literature ranges of normal ONHs. The models were solved to predict their biomechanical response to an increase in IOP. We classified ONH characteristics and biomechanical responses into typical or atypical using a percentile-based threshold, and calculated the fraction of ONHs for which the answers to the two questions were true and/or false. We then studied the effects of varying the percentile threshold. We found that when we classified the extreme 5% of individual ONH characteristics or responses as atypical, only 28% of ONHs with an atypical characteristic had an atypical response. Further, almost 29% of typical responses came from ONHs with at least one atypical characteristic. Thus, the answer to both questions is no. This answer held irrespective of the threshold for classifying typical or atypical. Our results challenge the assumption that ONHs with atypical sensitivity to IOP must have atypical characteristics. This finding suggests that the traditional approach of identifying risk factors by comparing characteristics between patient groups (e.g. ocular hypertensive vs. primary open angle glaucoma) may not

  16. Stepper motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekramer, Cornelis

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the more commonly used permanent magnet stepper motors for spaceflight. It will discuss the mechanical and electrical aspects of the devices, their torque behavior, those parameters which need to be controlled and measured, and test methods to be employed. It will also discuss torque margins, compare these to the existing margin requirements, and determine the applicability of these requirements. Finally it will attempt to generate a set of requirements which will be used in any stepper motor procurement and will fully characterize the stepper motor behavior in a consistent and repeatable fashion.

  17. Peripheral nerve: from the microscopic functional unit of the axon to the biomechanically loaded macroscopic structure.

    PubMed

    Topp, Kimberly S; Boyd, Benjamin S

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral nerves are composed of motor and sensory axons, associated ensheathing Schwann cells, and organized layers of connective tissues that are in continuity with the tissues of the central nervous system. Nerve fiber anatomy facilitates conduction of electrical impulses to convey information over a distance, and the length of these polarized cells necessitates regulated axonal transport of organelles and structural proteins for normal cell function. Nerve connective tissues serve a protective function as the limb is subjected to the stresses of myriad limb positions and postures. Thus, the tissues are uniquely arranged to control the local nerve fiber environment and modulate physical stresses. In this brief review, we describe the microscopic anatomy and physiology of peripheral nerve and the biomechanical properties that enable nerve to withstand the physical stresses of everyday life. PMID:22133662

  18. The accessory deep peroneal nerve and anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Sinanović, Osman; Zukić, Sanela; Šakić, Alma; Muftić, Mirsad

    2013-10-01

    The accessory deep peroneal (ADPN) nerve has been regarded as an anomalous nerve derived from the superficial peroneal nerve or its branch and supplies motor innervations for extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) and sensory innervations for the lateral part of the ankle and foot regions. The EDB is usually innervated exclusively by the deep peroneal nerve, a major branch of the the common peroneal nerve, however, in as many as 28% of patients (with same male/female frequency), one or both of the EDB muscles are (partially or exclusively) innervated by the ADPN nerve. This anomaly appears to be inherited in autosomal dominant fashion with incomplete gene penetrance. ADPN existence is of great clinical and surgical importance, and the aim of this study is to describe a very rare case of coexistence ADPN and anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome. PMID:24399869

  19. Ocular manifestations of Sturge-Weber syndrome: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Flavio; Bruscolini, Alice; La Cava, Maurizio; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome has been included in the group of phakomatoses that is characterized by hamartomas involving the brain, skin, and eyes. The characteristic facial port-wine stain, involving the first branch of the trigeminal nerve and the embryonic vasculature distribution in this area, leads to several ocular complications of the anterior segment and can involve the eyelids and conjunctiva. The posterior segment of the eyes is also affected with diffuse choroidal hemangiomas. However, the most frequent ocular comorbidity is glaucoma with a prevalence rate ranging from 30%-70%. Glaucoma is related to anterior chamber malformations, high episcleral venous pressure (EVP), and changes in ocular hemodynamics. Glaucoma can be diagnosed at birth, but the disease can also develop during childhood and in adults. The management of glaucoma in Sturge-Weber syndrome patients is particularly challenging because of early onset, frequently associated severe visual field impairment at the time of diagnosis, and unresponsiveness to standard treatment. Several surgical approaches have been proposed, but long-term prognosis for both intraocular pressure control and visual function remains unsatisfactory in these patients. Choroidal hemangiomas may also lead to visual impairment thorough exudative retinal detachment and macular edema. Treatment of exudative hemangioma complications is aimed at destructing the tumor or decreasing tumor leakage. PMID:27257371

  20. Comparison of Structural and Functional Ocular Outcomes Between 14- and 70 Day Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, R. L.; Taibbi, G.; Zanello, S. B.; Yarbough, P. O.; Ploutz-Snyder, R. J.; Vizzeri, G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare structural and functional ocular outcomes in healthy human subjects undergoing 14- and/or 70-day head-down-tilt bed rest (HDTBR). We hypothesized the amount of HDTBR-induced ocular changes be affected by the HDTBR duration. Methods: The studies were conducted at the NASA Flight Analogs Research Unit, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX. Participants were selected using NASA standard screening procedures. Standardized NASA screening procedures and bed rest conditions (e.g., strict sleep-wake cycle, standardized diet, continuous video monitoring) were implemented in both studies. Participants maintained a 6deg HDTBR position for 14 and/or 70 consecutive days and did not engage in exercise. Weekly ophthalmological examinations were conducted in the sitting (pre/post-bed rest only) and HDT positions. Ocular outcomes of interest included: near best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA); spherical equivalent, as determined by cycloplegic autorefraction; Goldmann applanation tonometry and iCare (Icare Finland Oy, Espoo, Finland) intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement; color vision; red dot test; modified Amsler grid test; confrontational visual field; stereoscopic color fundus photography; Spectralis OCT (Heidelberg Engineering, GmbH, Heidelberg, Germany) retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT), peripapillary and macular retinal thicknesses. Mixed-effects linear models were used to compare pre- and post-HDTBR observations between 14- and 70-day HDTBR for our continuously scaled outcomes.

  1. Ocular scanning instrumentation: confirmation of biomarkers for anticholinesterase and cyanide exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Lance R.; Henry, Kurt A.; Odom, James V.; Kolanko, Christopher J.

    2003-09-01

    The sensitivity of the eye"s reaction to a wide variety of chemicals/toxins and its role as a gauge for internal homeostasis (e.g., cardiovascular and neurophysiological imbalances) has been extensively researched via many scientific disciplines. New techniques and equipment are both harnessing and utilizing this information to define a modern approach to the field of non-invasive early detection of a vast range of physical abnormalities, injuries, and illnesses. Early detection provides an invaluable tool in the subsequent success of treating such conditions. The application of these techniques to the detection of exposure to chemical threat agents such as organophosphate nerve agents and cyanide provides an important advancement in the ability to limit the deleterious effects of these agents. The Ocular Scanning Instrumentation (OSI) technology involves the use of an automated device for the continuous or programmed monitoring of optically apparent characteristic(s) and attributes of the eye that may serve as an early-warning system for possible complications based upon generalized information obtained from ocular biomarkers. Described herein is the analysis of primary ocular biomarkers for organophosphate (miosis) and cyanide (venous blood coloration) exposure.

  2. Ocular manifestations of Sturge–Weber syndrome: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Mantelli, Flavio; Bruscolini, Alice; La Cava, Maurizio; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Sturge–Weber syndrome has been included in the group of phakomatoses that is characterized by hamartomas involving the brain, skin, and eyes. The characteristic facial port-wine stain, involving the first branch of the trigeminal nerve and the embryonic vasculature distribution in this area, leads to several ocular complications of the anterior segment and can involve the eyelids and conjunctiva. The posterior segment of the eyes is also affected with diffuse choroidal hemangiomas. However, the most frequent ocular comorbidity is glaucoma with a prevalence rate ranging from 30%–70%. Glaucoma is related to anterior chamber malformations, high episcleral venous pressure (EVP), and changes in ocular hemodynamics. Glaucoma can be diagnosed at birth, but the disease can also develop during childhood and in adults. The management of glaucoma in Sturge–Weber syndrome patients is particularly challenging because of early onset, frequently associated severe visual field impairment at the time of diagnosis, and unresponsiveness to standard treatment. Several surgical approaches have been proposed, but long-term prognosis for both intraocular pressure control and visual function remains unsatisfactory in these patients. Choroidal hemangiomas may also lead to visual impairment thorough exudative retinal detachment and macular edema. Treatment of exudative hemangioma complications is aimed at destructing the tumor or decreasing tumor leakage. PMID:27257371

  3. A new method for Intra Ocular Pressure in vivo measurement: first clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Patrick; Zemmouri, Jaouad; Rouland, Jean Francois; Elena, Pierre Paul; Lopes, Renaud; Puech, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease clinically manifested by an abnormal rise of the Intra Ocular Pressure (IOP) that causes lesions of the optic nerve and can lead to blindness. Ophthalmologists currently use applanation tonometers whose utilization induces multiple constraints. We propose an investigative method being at one and the same time atraumatic and ambulatory. This original device, taking profit of a physical relation between frequency of mechanical vibration of the ocular globe and IOP, involves vibrometry by laser interferometry and spectral analysis of a mechanical impulse using a temporal micro hammer. The laser energy delivered to the eye by the device was confirmed to be safe and in full agreement with the authorized security norms. After preliminary in vitro experiments performed using enucleated animal eyes, we made a clinical study on 25 volunteers to evaluate the innocuity and the reliability of this device and to quantify the reproducibility of measurements. All patients declared that discomfort is comparable with that felt during similar tests. Reliability is good and the intra individual reproducibility reveals a high value (R > or = 0.93). These works will be carried on to check the correlation between the variation of measured values (resonance frequency of the eye-ball) and the variation of reference (IOP) values. PMID:18003322

  4. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Congenital ocular and adnexal disorders in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Sabater, Mikel; Pérez, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Ocular and adnexal congenital disorders are those that manifest at birth and could involve single or multiple tissues. Several abnormalities have been reported in literature affecting reptilian ocular and/or adnexal tissues. The objectives of this review are: (i) review those disorders previously reported in reptile literature; (ii) present new cases; (iii) provide a basic classification of them according to the moment of occurrence and (iv) indirectly, encourage the clinician dealing with these cases to go further in their diagnosis. The authors consider that categorizing ocular and adnexal congenital disorders could help the clinician to deal with them. The categorization of these disorders required an intense review of cases previously reported in literature and allows the authors suspect that some of them could not have been accurately diagnosed according to the definitions of the anomalies and/or not accurately described. The authors consider that ocular and adnexal congenital disorders could have been underestimated in reptiles and further studies could be helpful to promote the description of new disorders and to expand the knowledge about those previously reported. The review will first describe abnormalities reported during organogenesis (describing possible etiopathogenesis, cases reported, an approach to their diagnosis and recommended therapeutic options).Then a mention of the ocular disorders occurring after organogenesis is made. These disorders are divided when possible in those affecting all or most part of the globe and those affecting only specific tissues (surface ectoderm, neurocrest and mesenchyma and neuroectoderm).

  6. [Ocular ischemic syndrome--a case report].

    PubMed

    Zemba, M; Avram, Corina Ioana; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Stamate, Alina Cristina; Camburu, Raluca Lăcrămioara

    2013-01-01

    Ocular ischemic syndrome, also known as hypoperfusion/ hypotensive retinopathy or as ischemic oculopathy is a rare ocular disease determined by chronic arterial hypoperfusion through central retinal artery, posterior and anterior ciliary arteries. It is bilateral in 20% of the cases. Most often it appears due to severe occlusion of the carotid arteries (ICA, MCA>ECA), described in 1963 by Kearns and Hollenhorst. Occasionally it can be determined by the obstruction of ophtalmic artery or some arterities (Takayasu, giant cell arteritis). The risk factors are: age between 50-80 years, males (M:F = 2:1), arterial hypertension, diabetes, coronary diseases (5% of the cases develop ocular ischemic syndrome), vascular stroke, hemodialysis. The case we present is of an 63 years old man known with primary arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes type 2 non insulin dependent and diagnosticated with ischemic cerebral stroke and bilateral obstruction of internal carotid arteries in march 2010, who is presenting for visual impairment in both eyes. The imaging investigations show important carotid occlusion and at the ophthalmologic evaluation there are ocular hypertension and rubeosis iridis at the right eye, optic atrophy at both eyes (complete in the right eye and partial in the left eye), with superior altitudinal visual field defect in left eye. The following diagnosis was established: Chronic ocular ischemic syndrome in both eyes with Neovascular glaucoma at the right eye, Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy at the left eye and laser panphotocoagulation at the right eye was started. PMID:24386788

  7. Ocular Findings in Volcanic Fog Induced Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Lagunzad, John Kenneth D

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the ocular signs and symptoms of patients complaining of eye irritation due to volcanic fog (vog). Methods The study utilized a non-comparative, retrospective chart review of 30 patients who had a chief complaint of eye irritation, which the subjects attributed to vog. Ocular signs and symptoms are described and related to the ambient concentration of sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter sized 2.5 microns (PM2.5), and vog visibility in O‘ahu during the period of the study. Results Ocular signs noted were conjunctival injection (100%), clear mucous discharge (100%), papillary reaction (100%), punctal edema (80%), eyelid swelling (73.3%) and chemosis (63.3%). Ocular symptoms were itchiness (100%), foreign body sensation (100%), tearing (96.6%) and burning sensation (90%). All patients had concurrent respiratory symptoms. During the period of study, the highest 24-hour average concentration of particulate matter sized 2.5 microns (PM2.5) was 49.04 µg/m3 and vog was visually present. Conclusions Patients complaining of eye irritation due to vog have observable ocular signs and symptoms. PMID:22187513

  8. [Ocular ischemic syndrome--a case report].

    PubMed

    Zemba, M; Avram, Corina Ioana; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Stamate, Alina Cristina; Camburu, Raluca Lăcrămioara

    2013-01-01

    Ocular ischemic syndrome, also known as hypoperfusion/ hypotensive retinopathy or as ischemic oculopathy is a rare ocular disease determined by chronic arterial hypoperfusion through central retinal artery, posterior and anterior ciliary arteries. It is bilateral in 20% of the cases. Most often it appears due to severe occlusion of the carotid arteries (ICA, MCA>ECA), described in 1963 by Kearns and Hollenhorst. Occasionally it can be determined by the obstruction of ophtalmic artery or some arterities (Takayasu, giant cell arteritis). The risk factors are: age between 50-80 years, males (M:F = 2:1), arterial hypertension, diabetes, coronary diseases (5% of the cases develop ocular ischemic syndrome), vascular stroke, hemodialysis. The case we present is of an 63 years old man known with primary arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes type 2 non insulin dependent and diagnosticated with ischemic cerebral stroke and bilateral obstruction of internal carotid arteries in march 2010, who is presenting for visual impairment in both eyes. The imaging investigations show important carotid occlusion and at the ophthalmologic evaluation there are ocular hypertension and rubeosis iridis at the right eye, optic atrophy at both eyes (complete in the right eye and partial in the left eye), with superior altitudinal visual field defect in left eye. The following diagnosis was established: Chronic ocular ischemic syndrome in both eyes with Neovascular glaucoma at the right eye, Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy at the left eye and laser panphotocoagulation at the right eye was started.

  9. Abrupt onset of disturbed vigilance, bilateral third nerve palsy and masturbating behaviour: a rare presentation of stroke.

    PubMed

    Mondon, Karl; Bonnaud, Isabelle; Debiais, Séverine; Brunault, Paul; Saudeau, Denis; de Toffol, Bertrand; Autret, Alain

    2007-08-01

    The clinical presentation of stroke usually includes sensory-motor impairment, cranial nerve palsies, or cognitive dysfunction. Disorders in behaviour are less frequently seen. The case of a patient with a very disturbing presentation, which included a disturbance in vigilance, bilateral third nerve palsy and masturbating behaviour, is presented. The topography of the lesions and its implications on the deficits observed are discussed.

  10. Topotecan Delivery to the Optic Nerve after Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Taich, Paula; Requejo, Flavio; Asprea, Marcelo; Sgroi, Mariana; Gobin, Pierre; Abramson, David H.; Chantada, Guillermo; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Extraocular retinoblastoma is a major challenge worldwide, especially in developing countries. Current treatment involves the administration of systemic chemotherapy combined with radiation, but there is a clear need for improvement of chemotherapy bioavailability in the optic nerve. Our aim was to study the ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) local route for drug delivery assessing ocular and optic nerve exposure to chemotherapy and to compare it to exposure after intravenous infusion (IV) of the same dose in an animal model. Topotecan was used as a prototype drug that is active in retinoblastoma and based on the extensive knowledge of its pharmacokinetics in preclinical and clinical settings. Five Landrace pigs received 4mg of topotecan via OAC as performed in retinoblastoma patients. At the end of the infusion, the eyes were enucleated, the optic nerve and retina were dissected, and the vitreous and plasma were separated. After recovery and a wash-out period, the animals received a 30-min IV infusion of topotecan (4 mg). The remaining eye was enucleated and tissues and fluids were separated. All samples were stored until quantitation using HPLC. A significantly higher concentration of topotecan in the optic nerve, vitreous, and retina was obtained in eyes after OAC compared to IV infusion (p<0.05). The median (range) ratio between topotecan concentration attained after OAC to IV infusion in the optic nerve, retina and vitreous was 84(54–668), 143(49–200) and 246(56–687), respectively. However, topotecan systemic exposure after OAC and IV infusion remained comparable (p>0.05). The median optic nerve-to-plasma ratio after OAC and IV was 44 and 0.35, respectively. Topotecan OAC delivery attained an 80-fold higher concentration in the optic nerve compared to the systemic infusion of the same dose with similar plasma concentrations in a swine model. Patients with retinoblastoma extension into the optic nerve may benefit from OAC for tumor burden by increased

  11. Effect of Ocular Alignment on Emmetropization in Children <10 years with Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Marjean T.; Foster, Nicole C.; Holmes, Jonathan M.; Kraker, Raymond T.; Melia, B. Michele; Repka, Michael X.; Tien, D. Robbins

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether change in refractive error is associated with ocular alignment in 105 children 3 to <7 years of age who previously participated in a randomized trial comparing atropine and patching for moderate amblyopia. Design Prospective cohort study Methods One hundred five children 3 to <7 years of age previously participated in a randomized trial comparing atropine with patching for moderate amblyopia. Cycloplegic refraction was measured at baseline and 10 years of age. Ocular alignment at baseline was categorized as orthotropic, microtropic (1–8Δ horizontal tropia), or heterotropic (>8Δ horizontal tropia). Multivariate regression models evaluated whether change in spherical equivalent refractive error was associated with alignment category, after adjusting for age, baseline spherical equivalent refractive error, and type of amblyopia treatment. Results Between enrollment and the age 10-year exam there was a decrease in spherical equivalent refractive error from hyperopia to less hyperopia (amblyopic eye: − 0.65D, 95%CI −0.85, −0.46; fellow eye: −0.39D, 95%CI −0.58, −0.20). A greater decrease in amblyopic eye refractive error was associated with better ocular alignment category (p=0.004), with the greatest decrease occurring in orthotropic patients. There was no relationship between ocular alignment category and change in fellow-eye refractive error. Conclusions Among children treated for anisometropic, strabismic, or combined mechanism amblyopia, there is a decrease in amblyopic eye spherical equivalent refractive error to less hyperopia after controlling for baseline refractive error. This negative shift toward emmetropia is associated with ocular alignment, which supports the suggestion that better motor and sensory fusion promote emmetropization. PMID:22633344

  12. Strategy and timing of peripheral nerve surgery.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, G; Brunelli, F

    1990-01-01

    The authors review the latest theories of peripheral nerve regeneration and repair. They present their research on nerve regeneration including the alterations in the mother cell body, and in the distal part of the axon, and the time required to reach the best production of amino acids for cytoskeleton reconstruction. Other research of particular interest which is presented regards the chemotactic arrangement of motor and sensory axons inside a vein. This research has shown that the axons are able to find their way to the appropriate (sensory or motor) distal endoneural tubes. Adoption phenomena are also presented. The discussion of surgery includes the type (suture, glueing, grafts, tubulization) and the time of surgical repair. Timing and repair strategies are related to the site of the lesion (which can require that a greater or smaller amount of cytoskeleton be reconstructed), the type of the injury, the state of surrounding tissues, the age of the patients, injuries to muscles, tendons, bones, vessels and skin. A scheme of strategy is proposed. PMID:2187163

  13. Degeneration of proprioceptive sensory nerve endings in mice harboring amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sydney K; Kemp, Zachary; Hatzipetros, Theo; Vieira, Fernando; Valdez, Gregorio

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily targets the motor system. Although much is known about the effects of ALS on motor neurons and glial cells, little is known about its effect on proprioceptive sensory neurons. This study examines proprioceptive sensory neurons in mice harboring mutations associated with ALS, in SOD1(G93A) and TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. In both transgenic lines, we found fewer proprioceptive sensory neurons containing fluorescently tagged cholera toxin in their soma five days after injecting this retrograde tracer into the tibialis anterior muscle. We asked whether this is due to neuronal loss or selective degeneration of peripheral nerve endings. We found no difference in the total number and size of proprioceptive sensory neuron soma between symptomatic SOD1(G93A) and control mice. However, analysis of proprioceptive nerve endings in muscles revealed early and significant alterations at Ia/II proprioceptive nerve endings in muscle spindles before the symptomatic phase of the disease. Although these changes occur alongside those at α-motor axons in SOD1(G93A) mice, Ia/II sensory nerve endings degenerate in the absence of obvious alterations in α-motor axons in TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. We next asked whether proprioceptive nerve endings are similarly affected in the spinal cord and found that nerve endings terminating on α-motor neurons are affected during the symptomatic phase and after peripheral nerve endings begin to degenerate. Overall, we show that Ia/II proprioceptive sensory neurons are affected by ALS-causing mutations, with pathological changes starting at their peripheral nerve endings.

  14. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity. PMID:26319412

  15. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity.

  16. Peripheral nerve response to injury.

    PubMed

    Steed, Martin B

    2011-03-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeons caring for patients who have sustained a nerve injury to a branch of the peripheral trigeminal nerve must possess a basic understanding of the response of the peripheral nerves to trauma. The series of events that subsequently take place are largely dependent on the injury type and severity. Regeneration of the peripheral nerve is possible in many instances and future manipulation of the regenerative microenvironment will lead to advances in the management of these difficult injuries.

  17. Peptide therapy with pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in traumatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Gjurasin, Miroslav; Miklic, Pavle; Zupancic, Bozidar; Perovic, Darko; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Brcic, Luka; Kolenc, Danijela; Radic, Bozo; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2010-02-25

    We focused on the healing of rat transected sciatic nerve and improvement made by stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg, 10ng/kg) applied shortly after injury (i) intraperitoneally/intragastrically/locally, at the site of anastomosis, or after (ii) non-anastomozed nerve tubing (7 mm nerve segment resected) directly into the tube. Improvement was shown clinically (autotomy), microscopically/morphometrically and functionally (EMG, one or two months post-injury, walking recovery (sciatic functional index (SFI)) at weekly intervals). BPC 157-rats exhibited faster axonal regeneration: histomorphometrically (improved presentation of neural fascicles, homogeneous regeneration pattern, increased density and size of regenerative fibers, existence of epineural and perineural regeneration, uniform target orientation of regenerative fibers, and higher proportion of neural vs. connective tissue, all fascicles in each nerve showed increased diameter of myelinated fibers, thickness of myelin sheet, number of myelinated fibers per area and myelinated fibers as a percentage of the nerve transected area and the increased blood vessels presentation), electrophysiologically (increased motor action potentials), functionally (improved SFI), the autotomy absent. Thus, BPC 157 markedly improved rat sciatic nerve healing. PMID:19903499

  18. Exploring vocal recovery after cranial nerve injury in Bengalese finches.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Catherine M; Peterson, Jennifer R; Cooper, Brenton G

    2013-02-01

    Songbirds and humans use auditory feedback to acquire and maintain their vocalizations. The Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata domestica) is a songbird species that rapidly modifies its vocal output to adhere to an internal song memory. In this species, the left side of the bipartite vocal organ is specialized for producing louder, higher frequencies (≥2.2kHz) and denervation of the left vocal muscles eliminates these notes. Thus, the return of higher frequency notes after cranial nerve injury can be used as a measure of vocal recovery. Either the left or right side of the syrinx was denervated by resection of the tracheosyringeal portion of the hypoglossal nerve. Histologic analyses of syringeal muscle tissue showed significant muscle atrophy in the denervated side. After left nerve resection, songs were mainly composed of lower frequency syllables, but three out of five birds recovered higher frequency syllables. Right nerve resection minimally affected phonology, but it did change song syntax; syllable sequence became abnormally stereotyped after right nerve resection. Therefore, damage to the neuromuscular control of sound production resulted in reduced motor variability, and Bengalese finches are a potential model for functional vocal recovery following cranial nerve injury.

  19. Clinical significance of sacral and pudendal nerve anatomy.

    PubMed

    Juenemann, K P; Lue, T F; Schmidt, R A; Tanagho, E A

    1988-01-01

    The neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the external urethral closure mechanisms still are under debate because the motor fibers that emanate from the sacral plexus and pudendal nerve to supply this segment have not been traced, nor has their functional interrelationship been established. Therefore, we dissected 3 male human cadavers (aged 31 to 69 years) by tracing the entire sacral plexus, particularly the pudendal nerve, from the cauda equina throughout the branching of the nerves to their final destination. The dissection demonstrated that the extrinsic urethral sphincter, formed by the rhabdosphincter around the membranous urethra as well as the levator ani muscle and pelvic floor (especially the transversus perinei muscle), is innervated by somatic nerve fibers that emanate primarily from sacral roots S2 and S3. In 5 patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction electrostimulation of the sacral root and pudendal nerve markedly increased intraurethral closure pressures. Stimulation of the pudendal nerve or its transversus perinei branch alone resulted in an increase in intraurethral closure pressure to 60 to 70 cm. water--an increase similar to that produced by stimulation of the sacral root without neurotomy. By means of neurotomy and/or neural blockade with lidocaine we were able to differentiate between the contributions of each muscular element to the external sphincteric mechanism. Almost 70 per cent of the closure pressure of the external urethral sphincter is induced by stimulation of the S3 ventral root, while the other 30 per cent derives from S2 and S4 neuronal impulses.

  20. Haploinsufficient Bmp4 ocular phenotypes include anterior segment dysgenesis with elevated intraocular pressure

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bo; Smith, Richard S; Peters, Maureen; Savinova, Olga V; Hawes, Norman L; Zabaleta, Adriana; Nusinowitz, Steven; Martin, Janice E; Davisson, Muriel L; Cepko, Constance L; Hogan, Brigid LM; John, Simon WM

    2001-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a blinding disease usually associated with high intraocular pressure (IOP). In some families, abnormal anterior segment development contributes to glaucoma. The genes causing anterior segment dysgenesis and glaucoma in most of these families are not identified and the affected developmental processes are poorly understood. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) participate in various developmental processes. We tested the importance of Bmp4 gene dosage for ocular development and developmental glaucoma. Results Bmp4+/- mice have anterior segment abnormalities including malformed, absent or blocked trabecular meshwork and Schlemm's canal drainage structures. Mice with severe drainage structure abnormalities, over 80% or more of their angle's extent, have elevated IOP. The penetrance and severity of abnormalities is strongly influenced by genetic background, being most severe on the C57BL/6J background and absent on some other backgrounds. On the C57BL/6J background there is also persistence of the hyaloid vasculature, diminished numbers of inner retinal cells, and absence of the optic nerve. Conclusions We demonstrate that heterozygous deficiency of BMP4 results in anterior segment dysgenesis and elevated IOP. The abnormalities are similar to those in human patients with developmental glaucoma. Thus, BMP4 is a strong candidate to contribute to Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly and other developmental conditions associated with human glaucoma. BMP4 also participates in posterior segment development and wild-type levels are usually critical for optic nerve development on the C57BL/6J background. Bmp4+/- mice are useful for studying various components of ocular development, and may allow identification of strain specific modifiers affecting a variety of ocular phenotypes. PMID:11722794

  1. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  2. Optic Nerve Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the occipital lobe (the part of the brain that interprets vision) like a cable wire. What is optic nerve ... nystagmus. In older patients, peripheral vision and color vision assessment ... around the brain and spinal cord (hydrocephalus) may prevent further optic ...

  3. Ocular Fundus Photography as an Educational Tool.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Devin D; Garza, Philip S

    2015-10-01

    The proficiency of nonophthalmologists with direct ophthalmoscopy is poor, which has prompted a search for alternative technologies to examine the ocular fundus. Although ocular fundus photography has existed for decades, its use has been traditionally restricted to ophthalmology clinical care settings and textbooks. Recent research has shown a role for nonmydriatic fundus photography in nonophthalmic settings, encouraging more widespread adoption of fundus photography technology. Recent studies have also affirmed the role of fundus photography as an adjunct or alternative to direct ophthalmoscopy in undergraduate medical education. In this review, the authors examine the use of ocular fundus photography as an educational tool and suggest future applications for this important technology. Novel applications of fundus photography as an educational tool have the potential to resurrect the dying art of funduscopy.

  4. Platelet rich plasma in ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Riestra, A C; Alonso-Herreros, J M; Merayo-Lloves, J

    2016-10-01

    The use of platelet-rich preparations has experienced a significant increase in recent years due to its role in tissue-repair and regeneration. The aim of this study is to examine the available evidence regarding the application of plasma rich in growth factors, and its variations, on the ocular surface. A review is also presented on the effects of platelet-derived growth factors, the implications of the preparation methods, and the existing literature on the safety and efficacy of these therapies in ocular surface diseases. Despite the widespread use of platelet preparations there is no consensus on the most appropriate preparation method, and growth factors concentration vary with different systems. These preparations have been used in the treatment of ocular surface diseases, such as dry eye or persistent epithelial defects, among others, with good safety and efficacy profiles, but further studies are needed to compare to the currently available alternatives.

  5. Lymphocyte transformation in presumed ocular histoplasmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganley, J.P.; Nemo, G.J.; Comstock, G.W.; Brody, J.A.

    1981-08-01

    Lymphocytes from individuals with inactive macular disciform lesions of presumed ocular histoplasmosis challenged with three histoplasmin antigens incorporated tritiated thymidine at a significantly higher rate than histoplasmin-stimulated lymphocytes of matched control and peripheral scar groups. This finding is consistent with the etiologic association of the disciform ocular syndrome and previous systemic infection with Histoplasma capsulatum. The disciform group had a higher mean response than the other two groups to pokeweed mitogen but not to phytohemagglutinin and had higher mean counts per minute to the specific antigens Toxoplasma gondii, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M battery, and M gaus, but not to Candida albicans. These data would suggest that individuals with the disciform lesion of presumed ocular histoplasmosis have a hyperreactive cellular immune response; this response may play an important role in the development of the disciform.

  6. Neuroretinitis in ocular bartonellosis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Raihan, Abdul-Rahim; Zunaina, Embong; Wan-Hazabbah, Wan-Hitam; Adil, Hussein; Lakana-Kumar, Thavaratnam

    2014-01-01

    We report a case series of neuroretinitis in ocular bartonellosis and describe the serologic verification for Bartonella henselae. This is a retrospective interventional case series of four patients who presented in the ophthalmology clinic of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia from June 2012 to March 2013. All four patients had a history of contact with cats and had fever prior to ocular symptoms. Each patient presented with neuroretinitis characterized by optic disc swelling with macular star. Serology analysis showed strongly positive for B. henselae in all of the patients. All patients were treated with oral azithromycin (except case 4, who was treated with oral doxycycline), and two patients (case 1 and case 3) had poor vision at initial presentation that warranted the use of oral prednisolone. All patients showed a good visual outcome except case 3. Vision-threatening ocular manifestation of cat scratch disease can be improved with systemic antibiotics and steroids. PMID:25120352

  7. A Simplified Method to Fabricate a Pneumatic Ocular Prosthesis for Large Ocular Defects.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshi; Kumar, Pradeep; Singh, Raghuwar Dayal

    2014-12-01

    When an enucleation or exenteration procedure removes the entire orbital contents but not the eyelids, an abnormally large orbital socket is created that would require an equally sized volume enhancing, flush fitting ocular prosthesis. The solid acrylic prosthesis would rest on or in the lower fornix and owing to its weight, causes distortion of the lower eyelid and/or asymmetrical alignment of the entire palpebral fissure. The aim of this article was to describe a method of fabricating a pneumatic light weight custom ocular prosthesis using lost wax technique to overcome the deteriorating effects of conventional solid ocular prosthesis. PMID:26199499

  8. Electrical stimulation accelerates axonal and functional peripheral nerve regeneration across long gaps.

    PubMed

    Haastert-Talini, Kirsten; Schmitte, Ruth; Korte, Nele; Klode, Dorothee; Ratzka, Andreas; Grothe, Claudia

    2011-04-01

    Short-term low-frequency electrical stimulation (ESTIM) of proximal peripheral nerve stumps prior to end-to-end coaptation or tubular bridging of small distances has been reported to increase preferential motor reinnervation and functional motor recovery in animal models and human patients undergoing carpal tunnel release surgery. We investigated the effects of ESTIM on regeneration across rat sciatic nerve gaps, which exceed distances that allow spontaneous regeneration. Three different reconstruction approaches were combined with ESTIM in the experimental groups. Nerve gaps (13 mm) were bridged using (I) nerve autotransplantation, (II) transplantation of differentially filled silicone tubes, or (III) transplantation of tubular grafts containing fibroblast growth factor-2 overexpressing Schwann cells (SCs) for gene therapy. The regeneration outcome was followed for up to 8 weeks, and functionally as well as histomorphometrically analyzed in comparison to non-stimulated control groups. Combining ESTIM with nerve autotransplantation significantly increased the nerve fiber density in the regenerated nerve, and the grade of functional recovery as detected by electrodiagnostic recordings from the gastrocnemius muscle. The combination of ESTIM with transplantation of naïve SCs increased the regeneration of gap-bridging nerve tissue. Although macroscopic tissue regeneration was not further improved after combining ESTIM with FGF-2(21/23-kD) gene therapy, the latter resulted in a high rate of regenerated nerves that functionally reconnected to the target muscle. Based on our results, brief ESTIM shows high potential to accelerate axonal as well as functional (motor and sensory) outcomes in the clinical setting of peripheral nerve gap reconstruction in human patients. PMID:21265597

  9. Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials Using Head Striker Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N. E.; Kofman, I. S.; Peters, B. T.; Reschke, M. F.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Wood, S. J.; Noohi, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Seidler, R. D.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several studies have been published on the impact of long-duration (i.e., 22 days or longer) spaceflight on the central nervous system (CNS). In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers in-flight and post-flight, we are conducting a controlled prospective longitudinal study to investigate the effects of spaceflight on the extent, longevity and neural bases of sensorimotor, cognitive, and neural changes. Multiple studies have demonstrated the effects of spaceflight on the vestibular system. A different approach was taken for ocular VEMP (oVEMP) testing using a head striker system [1]. The oVEMP is generally considered to be a measure of utricle function. The otolithicin put to the inferior oblique muscle is predominately from the utricular macula. Thus, quantitatively, oVEMP tests utricular function. Another practical extension of these relationships is that the oVEMP reflects the superior vestibular nerve function. In this poster we describe the measurement technique used in the spaceflight study.

  10. Laminin-based Nanomaterials for Peripheral Nerve Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Rebekah Anne

    Peripheral nerve transection occurs commonly in traumatic injury, causing motor and sensory deficits distal to the site of injury. One option for surgical repair is the nerve conduit. Conduits currently on the market are hollow tubes into which the nerve ends are sutured. Although these conduits fill the gap, they often fail due to the slow rate of regeneration over long gaps. To facilitate increased speed of regeneration and greater potential for functional recovery, the ideal conduit should provide biochemically relevant signals and physical guidance cues, thus playing an active role in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this dissertation, I fabricated laminin-1 and laminin-polycaprolactone (PCL) blend nanofibers that mimic the geometry and functionality of the peripheral nerve basement membrane. These fibers resist hydration in aqueous media and require no harsh chemical crosslinkers. Adhesion and differentiation of both neuron-like and neuroprogenitor cells is improved on laminin nanofibrous meshes over two-dimensional laminin substrates. Blend meshes with varying laminin content were characterized for composition, tensile properties, degradation rates, and bioactivity in terms of cell attachment and axonal elongation. I have established that 10% (wt) laminin content is sufficient to retain the significant neurite-promoting effects of laminin critical in peripheral nerve repair. In addition, I utilized modified collector plate design to manipulate electric field gradients during electrospinning for the fabrication of aligned nanofibers. These aligned substrates provide enhanced directional guidance cues to the regenerating axons. Finally, I replicated the clinical problem of peripheral nerve transection using a rat tibial nerve defect model for conduit implantation. When the lumens of conduits were filled with nanofiber meshes of varying laminin content and alignment, I observed significant recovery of sensory and motor function over six weeks. This recovery was

  11. EXPRESSION AND DISTRIBUTION OF THIOL-REGULATING ENZYME GLUTAREDOXIN 2 (GRX2) IN PORCINE OCULAR TISSUES*

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Bijaya; Tian, Xiaoli; Wu, Hongli; Lou, Marjorie F.

    2014-01-01

    Glutaredoxin2 (Grx2) is a mitochondrial isozyme of the cytosolic glutaredoxin1 (thioltransferase or TTase). Both belong to the large oxidoreductase family and play an important role in maintaining thiol/disulfide redox homeostasis in the cells. Grx2 is recently found in the lens where its activities of disulfide reductase and peroxidase, similar to TTase, can protect the lens against oxidative stress. Since other eye tissues are also highly sensitive to oxidative stress, and TTase’s distribution in the eye is known, we focused on this study by investigating the Grx2 distribution in the ocular tissues in comparison to the lens. Fresh porcine eyes were dissected into cornea, iris, ciliary body, the lens, vitreous humor, retina, and optic nerve. Each tissue (pooled from three eyes) was homogenized and processed for mitochondrial isolation. The mitochondrial fraction was analyzed for Grx2 protein using Western blotting with anti-Grx2 antibody, and Grx2 activity using the published procedure. The eye tissues were also measured for Grx2 mRNA expression by RT-PCR with GAPDH as the control. Grx2-rich mouse liver and purified recombinant mouse Grx2 were used as positive controls for the above analyses. It was found that Grx2 was present in all the tested ocular tissues, except vitreous humor. In comparison with the mouse liver, the protein levels of Grx2 in porcine ciliary body and the lens were 27-fold and 0.75-fold, respectively. Comparing to the lens, Grx2 protein was highest in the ciliary body (13.5-fold), followed by retina (9.2-fold), iris and optic nerve (2-fold), and cornea (1.2-fold). Enzyme activity assays showed that the retina had the highest Grx2 specific activity (3.9 mU/mg protein), followed by ciliary body (3.1 mU/mg), the lens (0.58 mU/mg), and optic nerve (0.32 mU/mg). Grx2 gene expression in these ocular tissues was further confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. Grx2 mRNA expression showed the highest in ciliary body, followed by retina, optic nerve, cornea

  12. Ocular manifestations of systemic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Mohsenin, Amir; Huang, John J

    2012-10-01

    Inflammation of the eye is often times seen in association with systemic inflammatory diseases. Understanding the various forms of ocular involvement in these conditions is important as untreated ophthalmic involvement can lead to severe vision loss. In addition to providing a basic framework for diagnosis and treatment, this review will highlight the ocular manifestations of the following systemic inflammatory conditions: rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Wegener's granulomatosis, Sjögren's syndrome, polyarteritisnodosa, primary antiphospholipid syndrome, Behçet's syndrome, Kawasaki disease, Cogan's syndrome and relapsing polychondritis.

  13. New therapies in common ocular surface disorders.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, N; Parisi, F; Buomprisco, G; Librando, A

    2013-01-01

    Lacrimal dysfunction syndrome (LDS) and meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) are common pathologies of the ocular surface both characterized by quantitative and/or qualitative tear film changings. They may result in symptoms of eye irritation, clinically apparent inflammation and ocular surface disease. Recent researches about the chronic inflammatory nature of dry eye, revealed the possibility to develop new treatments for LDS like new immunological drugs. MGD, alone or if it occurs contemporary to LDS, can be treated with a thermal pulsation system, a useful tool to alleviate symptoms.

  14. Ocular laser bioeffects in Operation Iraqi Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Henry D.; Lund, Jack; Cheramie, Rachel; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2008-02-01

    Laser hazards on the modern battlefield include numerous applications with the potential for eye damage from both pulsed and high luminance continuous energy laser devices. The multitude of laser devices deployed both by friendly and threat forces represent a significant hazard to vision, and consequently duty performance. Increased application of high luminance devices for tactical use may result in accidental exposure and temporary or persistent symptoms. These symptoms may be confounded by ongoing ocular retinal disorders. The management of these patients requires additional laser training to prevent injury as well as more experience and training for first responders in order to triage individuals with vision disturbances thought secondary to ocular laser exposure.

  15. Instability of Ocular Alignment in Childhood Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective Instability of ocular alignment may cause surgeons to delay surgical correction of childhood esotropia. We investigated the stability of ocular alignment over 18 weeks in children with infantile esotropia (IET), acquired non-accommodative esotropia (ANAET), or acquired partially-accommodative esotropia (APAET). Design Prospective observational study Participants Two hundred thirty-three children aged 2 months to <5 years with IET, ANAET, or APAET of less than 6 months duration Methods Ocular alignment was measured at baseline and at six-week intervals for 18 weeks. Main Outcome Measure Using definitions derived from a nested test-retest study and computer simulation modeling, ocular alignment was classified as ‘unstable’ if there was a change of ≥ 15 prism diopters (PD) between any two of the four measurements, as ‘stable’ if all four measurements were within ≤ 5 PD of one another, or as ‘uncertain’ if neither criteria was met. Results Of those who completed all three follow-up visits within time windows for analysis, 27 (46%) of 59 subjects with IET had ocular alignment classified as unstable (95% confidence interval (CI) = 33 to 59%), 20% as stable (95% CI = 11 to 33%), and 34% as uncertain (95% CI = 22 to 47%). Thirteen (22%) of 60 subjects with ANAET had ocular alignment classified as unstable (95% confidence interval (CI) = 12 to 34%), 37% as stable (95% CI = 25 to 50%), and 42% as uncertain (95% CI = 29 to 55%). Six (15%) of 41 subjects with APAET had ocular alignment classified as unstable (95% CI = 6 to 29%), 39% as stable (95% CI = 24 to 56%), and 46% as uncertain (95% CI = 31 to 63%). For IET, subjects who were older at presentation were less likely to have unstable angles than subjects who were younger at presentation (risk ratio for unstable vs. stable per additional month of age = 0.85, 99% CI = 0.74 to 0.99). Conclusions Ocular alignment instability is common in children with IET, ANAET and APAET. The impact of this finding

  16. 21 CFR 886.4610 - Ocular pressure applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ocular pressure applicator. 886.4610 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4610 Ocular pressure applicator. (a) Identification. An ocular pressure applicator is a manual device that consists of a sphygmomanometer-type...

  17. 21 CFR 886.4610 - Ocular pressure applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ocular pressure applicator. 886.4610 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4610 Ocular pressure applicator. (a) Identification. An ocular pressure applicator is a manual device that consists of a sphygmomanometer-type...

  18. 21 CFR 886.4610 - Ocular pressure applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ocular pressure applicator. 886.4610 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4610 Ocular pressure applicator. (a) Identification. An ocular pressure applicator is a manual device that consists of a sphygmomanometer-type...

  19. 21 CFR 886.4360 - Ocular surgery irrigation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ocular surgery irrigation device. 886.4360 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4360 Ocular surgery irrigation device. (a) Identification. An ocular surgery irrigation device is a device intended to be suspended over...

  20. 21 CFR 886.4360 - Ocular surgery irrigation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ocular surgery irrigation device. 886.4360 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4360 Ocular surgery irrigation device. (a) Identification. An ocular surgery irrigation device is a device intended to be suspended over...