Science.gov

Sample records for oddball task measured

  1. Duration perception of visual and auditory oddball stimuli: does judgment task modulate the temporal oddball effect?

    PubMed

    Birngruber, Teresa; Schröter, Hannes; Ulrich, Rolf

    2014-04-01

    The duration of rare stimuli (oddballs) presented within a stream of homogenous standards tends to be overestimated. This temporal oddball effect (OE) has been attributed to perceptual processes. The OE is usually assessed with a comparative judgment task. It has been argued, however, that this task is prone to decision biases. The present experiments employed comparative and equality judgments, since it has been suggested that equality judgments are less vulnerable to such biases. Experiments 1a and 1b used visual stimuli, and Experiment 2 auditory stimuli. The results provide no strong evidence for decision biases influencing the OE. In addition, computational modeling clearly suggests that the equality judgment is not particularly suited to distinguish between perceptual and decisional effects. Taken together, the pattern of the present results is most consistent with a perceptual origin of the OE.

  2. Do Rare Stimuli Evoke Large P3s by Being Unexpected? A Comparison of Oddball Effects Between Standard-Oddball and Prediction-Oddball Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Verleger, Rolf; Śmigasiewicz, Kamila

    2016-01-01

    The P3 component of event-related potentials increases when stimuli are rarely presented. It has been assumed that this oddball effect (rare-frequent difference) reflects the unexpectedness of rare stimuli. The assumption of unexpectedness and its link to P3 amplitude were tested here. A standard- oddball task requiring alternative key-press responses to frequent and rare stimuli was compared with an oddball-prediction task where stimuli had to be first predicted and then confirmed by key-pressing. Oddball effects in the prediction task depended on whether the frequent or the rare stimulus had been predicted. Oddball effects on P3 amplitudes and error rates in the standard oddball task closely resembled effects after frequent predictions. This corroborates the notion that these effects occur because frequent stimuli are expected and rare stimuli are unexpected. However, a closer look at the prediction task put this notion into doubt because the modifications of oddball effects on P3 by expectancies were entirely due to effects on frequent stimuli, whereas the large P3 amplitudes evoked by rare stimuli were insensitive to predictions (unlike response times and error rates). Therefore, rare stimuli cannot be said to evoke large P3 amplitudes because they are unexpected. We discuss these diverging effects of frequency and expectancy, as well as general differences between tasks, with respect to concepts and hypotheses about P3b’s function and conclude that each discussed concept or hypothesis encounters some problems, with a conception in terms of subjective relevance assigned to stimuli offering the most consistent account of these basic effects. PMID:27512527

  3. The Cognitive Locus of Distraction by Acoustic Novelty in the Cross-Modal Oddball Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmentier, Fabrice B. R.; Elford, Gregory; Escera, Carles; Andres, Pilar; San Miguel, Iria

    2008-01-01

    Unexpected stimuli are often able to distract us away from a task at hand. The present study seeks to explore some of the mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon. Studies of involuntary attention capture using the oddball task have repeatedly shown that infrequent auditory changes in a series of otherwise repeating sounds trigger an automatic…

  4. A comparative study of event-related coupling patterns during an auditory oddball task in schizophrenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachiller, Alejandro; Poza, Jesús; Gómez, Carlos; Molina, Vicente; Suazo, Vanessa; Hornero, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Objective. The aim of this research is to explore the coupling patterns of brain dynamics during an auditory oddball task in schizophrenia (SCH). Approach. Event-related electroencephalographic (ERP) activity was recorded from 20 SCH patients and 20 healthy controls. The coupling changes between auditory response and pre-stimulus baseline were calculated in conventional EEG frequency bands (theta, alpha, beta-1, beta-2 and gamma), using three coupling measures: coherence, phase-locking value and Euclidean distance. Main results. Our results showed a statistically significant increase from baseline to response in theta coupling and a statistically significant decrease in beta-2 coupling in controls. No statistically significant changes were observed in SCH patients. Significance. Our findings support the aberrant salience hypothesis, since SCH patients failed to change their coupling dynamics between stimulus response and baseline when performing an auditory cognitive task. This result may reflect an impaired communication among neural areas, which may be related to abnormal cognitive functions.

  5. Disruptions in small-world cortical functional connectivity network during an auditory oddball paradigm task in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Shim, Miseon; Kim, Do-Won; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2014-07-01

    P300 deficits in patients with schizophrenia have previously been investigated using EEGs recorded during auditory oddball tasks. However, small-world cortical functional networks during auditory oddball tasks and their relationships with symptom severity scores in schizophrenia have not yet been investigated. In this study, the small-world characteristics of source-level functional connectivity networks of EEG responses elicited by an auditory oddball paradigm were evaluated using two representative graph-theoretical measures, clustering coefficient and path length. EEG signals from 34 patients with schizophrenia and 34 healthy controls were recorded while each subject was asked to attend to oddball tones. The results showed reduced clustering coefficients and increased path lengths in patients with schizophrenia, suggesting that the small-world functional network is disrupted in patients with schizophrenia. In addition, the negative and cognitive symptom components of positive and negative symptom scales were negatively correlated with the clustering coefficient and positively correlated with path length, demonstrating that both indices are indicators of symptom severity in patients with schizophrenia. Our study results suggest that disrupted small-world characteristics are potential biomarkers for patients with schizophrenia.

  6. Task requirements change signal strength of the primary somatosensory M50: Oddball vs. one-back tasks.

    PubMed

    Götz, Theresa; Huonker, Ralph; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Witte, Otto W; Dettner, Konrad; Weiss, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Studies on attention to tactile stimuli have produced conflicting results concerning the possibility and/or direction of modulation of early somatosensory-evoked fields (SEFs). To evaluate sources of these conflicting results, the same subjects performed four different tasks in which the stimulation site, type, and intensity were kept constant. Twelve subjects performed an oddball-like tactile task, two different one-back tactile tasks, and a visual task, while two distal phalanges of the index and ring finger were stimulated. Task-dependent SEF modulations were found as early as 50 ms after stimulus onset (M50 component). Target/non-target ratios of M50 revealed enhanced values for the oddball-like tactile task, but decreased values for the tactile one-back task. This indicates that previously obtained conflicting results might be due to different central mechanisms induced by different task requirements. Copyright © 2010 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  7. Valence and arousal of emotional stimuli impact cognitive-motor performance in an oddball task.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingzhi; Jaquess, Kyle J; Hatfield, Bradley D; Zhou, Chenglin; Li, Hong

    2017-04-01

    It is widely recognized that emotions impact an individual's ability to perform in a given task. However, little is known about how emotion impacts the various aspects of cognitive -motor performance. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) and chronometric responses from twenty-six participants while they performed a cognitive-motor oddball task in regard to four categories of emotional stimuli (high-arousing positive-valence, low-arousing positive-valence, high-arousing negative-valence, and low-arousing negative-valence) as "deviant" stimuli. Six chronometric responses (reaction time, press time, return time, choice time, movement time, and total time) and three ERP components (P2, N2 and late positive potential) were measured. Results indicated that reaction time was significantly affected by the presentation of emotional stimuli. Also observed was a negative relationship between N2 amplitude and elements of performance featuring reaction time in the low-arousing positive-valence condition. This study provides further evidence that emotional stimuli influence cognitive-motor performance in a specific manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. ERP Generator Patterns in Schizophrenia During Tonal and Phonetic Oddball Tasks: Effects of Response Hand and Silent Count

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Jürgen; Tenke, Craig E.; Gil, Roberto; Bruder, Gerard E.

    2012-01-01

    Greater left than right reductions of P3 amplitude in schizophrenia during auditory oddball tasks have been interpreted as evidence of left-lateralized dysfunction. However, the contributions of methodological factors (response mode, stimulus properties, recording reference), which affect event-related potential (ERP) topographies, remain unclear. We recorded 31-channel ERPs from 23 schizophrenic patients and 23 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (all right-handed) during tonal and phonetic oddball tasks, varying response mode (left press, right press, silent count) within subjects. Performance accuracy was high in both groups but patients were slower. ERP generator patterns were summarized by temporal Principal Components Analysis (PCA; unrestricted Varimax) from reference-free current source density (CSD; spherical spline Laplacians) waveforms, which sharpen scalp topographies. CSD represents the magnitude of the radial current flow entering (source) and leaving (sink) the scalp. Both patients and controls showed asymmetric frontolateral and parietotemporal N2 sinks peaking at 240 ms and asymmetric parietal P3 sources (355 ms) for targets (tonal R > L, phonetic L > R), but frontocentral N2 sinks and parietal P3 sources were bilaterally reduced in patients. A response-related midfrontal sink and accompanying centroparietal source (560 ms) were highly comparable across groups. However, a superimposed left temporal source was larger for silent count compared to button press, and this difference was smaller in patients. In both groups, left or right press produced opposite, region-specific asymmetries originating from central sites, modulating the N2/P3 complex. The results suggest bilaterally reduced neural generators of N2 and P3 in schizophrenia during auditory oddball tasks, but both groups showed comparable topographic effects of task and response mode. However, additional working memory demands during silent count may partially overlap in time the

  9. Sequential search asymmetry: Behavioral and psychophysiological evidence from a dual oddball task.

    PubMed

    Blundon, Elizabeth G; Rumak, Samuel P; Ward, Lawrence M

    2017-01-01

    We conducted five experiments in order to explore the generalizability of a new type of search asymmetry, which we have termed sequential search asymmetry, across sensory modalities, and to better understand its origin. In all five experiments rare oddballs occurred randomly within longer sequences of more frequent standards. Oddballs and standards all consisted of rapidly-presented runs of five pure tones (Experiments 1 and 5) or five colored annuli (Experiments 2 through 4) somewhat analogous to simultaneously-presented feature-present and feature-absent stimuli in typical visual search tasks. In easy tasks feature-present reaction times and P300 latencies were shorter than feature-absent ones, similar to findings in search tasks with simultaneously-presented stimuli. Moreover the P3a subcomponent of the P300 ERP was strongly apparent only in the feature-present condition. In more difficult tasks requiring focused attention, however, RT and P300 latency differences disappeared but the P300 amplitude difference was significant. Importantly in all five experiments d' for feature-present targets was larger than that for feature-absent targets. These results imply that sequential search asymmetry arises from discriminability differences between feature-present and feature-absent targets. Response time and P300 latency differences can be attributed to the use of different attention strategies in search for feature-present and feature-absent targets, indexed by the presence of a dominant P3a subcomponent in the feature-present target-evoked P300s that is lacking in the P300s to the feature-absent targets.

  10. Sequential search asymmetry: Behavioral and psychophysiological evidence from a dual oddball task

    PubMed Central

    Blundon, Elizabeth G.; Rumak, Samuel P.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted five experiments in order to explore the generalizability of a new type of search asymmetry, which we have termed sequential search asymmetry, across sensory modalities, and to better understand its origin. In all five experiments rare oddballs occurred randomly within longer sequences of more frequent standards. Oddballs and standards all consisted of rapidly-presented runs of five pure tones (Experiments 1 and 5) or five colored annuli (Experiments 2 through 4) somewhat analogous to simultaneously-presented feature-present and feature-absent stimuli in typical visual search tasks. In easy tasks feature-present reaction times and P300 latencies were shorter than feature-absent ones, similar to findings in search tasks with simultaneously-presented stimuli. Moreover the P3a subcomponent of the P300 ERP was strongly apparent only in the feature-present condition. In more difficult tasks requiring focused attention, however, RT and P300 latency differences disappeared but the P300 amplitude difference was significant. Importantly in all five experiments d’ for feature-present targets was larger than that for feature-absent targets. These results imply that sequential search asymmetry arises from discriminability differences between feature-present and feature-absent targets. Response time and P300 latency differences can be attributed to the use of different attention strategies in search for feature-present and feature-absent targets, indexed by the presence of a dominant P3a subcomponent in the feature-present target-evoked P300s that is lacking in the P300s to the feature-absent targets. PMID:28278202

  11. Dynamic information flow analysis in Vascular Dementia patients during the performance of a visual oddball task.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Xu, Jin; Lou, Wutao; Zhao, Songzhen

    2014-09-19

    This study investigated the information flow in patients with Vascular Dementia (VaD). Twelve VaD patients and twelve age-matched controls participated in the study. EEG signal was recorded when subjects were performing a visual oddball task. Information flow was analyzed between 9 electrodes in frontal, central, and parietal lobes using short-window Directed Transfer Function (sDTF). VaD patients presented a significant decline in the information flow from parietal to frontal and central lobes, compared with the healthy elderly. This decline mainly occurred in delta, theta, and lower alpha bands, from about 200ms to 300ms after target stimulus onset. The findings indicated an impaired parietal-to-frontal and parietal-to-central connectivity in VaD patients, which may be one reason for the cognitive deficits in VaD patients.

  12. Position but not color deviants result in visual mismatch negativity in an active oddball task.

    PubMed

    Berti, Stefan

    2009-05-06

    Changes in the visual environment might be detected automatically. This function is provided by the sensory systems and showed, for instance, by the pop-out phenomenon. Automatic change detection is also observable within visual oddball paradigms, where rare changes are introduced in an irrelevant stimulus feature; the detection of deviant stimuli is accompanied by a negative component (so-called visual mismatch negativity) in the human event-related brain potential. In this study, the deviating stimulus feature was embedded in a task-relevant object presented in the focus of attention. With this, visual mismatch negativity was observable only with position deviants presented in the upper visual half field but not by lower half field presentation or color deviants.

  13. Inhibition ability of food cues between successful and unsuccessful restrained eaters: a two-choice oddball task.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanchang; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have presented mixed findings on the inhibition ability in restrained eaters (REs) due to the limited amount of neural evidence and limitations of behavioral measures. The current study explores the neural correlations of the specific inhibition ability among successful restrained eaters (S-REs), unsuccessful restrained eaters (US-REs), and unrestrained eaters (UREs). Three groups of females (with 13 participants in each group) completed a two-choice Oddball task, while the event-related potentials (ERPs) are recorded synchronously. Results indicate that S-REs showed inhibition deficit in processing high-energy food cues whereas US-REs show inhibition deficit in processing both low- and high-energy food cues. Results indicate that S-REs and US-REs differ in terms of specific inhibition ability and that enhanced inhibition is essential to a successful diet.

  14. Stimulus intensity effects on P300 amplitude across repetitions of a standard auditory oddball task.

    PubMed

    Lindín, Mónica; Zurrón, Montserrat; Díaz, Fernando

    2005-07-01

    An evaluation was made of whether stimulus intensity affects changes of P300 amplitude in response to repeated presentation of the target stimulus in a standard auditory oddball task. P300 latency values were also evaluated. Three samples were selected, one for each intensity used: 65, 85 and 105 dB SPL (sound pressure level). Five hundred tones (5 subblocks, 100 tones each) were presented. P300 amplitude (1) increased from Fz to Pz, (2) was larger at 105 than 65 or 85 dB SPL, (3) increased from the first to second subblock and decreased from the second subblock onwards at the three intensities, replicating our previous findings at 85 dB SPL and demonstrating a consistent phenomenon, and (4) at 105 dB SPL, the decrease was less pronounced, which we attribute to the more intense stimuli capturing the attention in a sustained manner during the task and interfering with the possible automation of the context-updating process.

  15. Reduction in event-related alpha attenuation during performance of an auditory oddball task in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Higashima, Masato; Tsukada, Takahiro; Nagasawa, Tatsuya; Oka, Takashi; Okamoto, Takeshi; Okamoto, Yoko; Koshino, Yoshifumi

    2007-08-01

    EEG frequency-domain analyses have demonstrated that cognitive performance produces a reduction in alpha activity, i.e., alpha attenuation, such as event-related desynchronization (ERD), reflecting brain activation. To examine whether schizophrenic patients have abnormalities in frequency-domain, event-related alpha attenuation, as well as in time-domain EEG phenomena, such as event-related potential, we compared alpha power change and P300 elicited simultaneously in response to the presentation of target tones in an auditory oddball paradigm between patients with schizophrenia and normal control subjects. In both patients and controls, alpha power was smaller during the time window of 512 ms following targets than following non-targets, particularly at the parietal and the posterior temporal locations (Pz, T5, and T6). The size of alpha attenuation measured as percent reduction in alpha power produced by targets relative to non-targets was smaller in patients than in controls at the posterior temporal locations. The size of alpha attenuation showed no correlation with P300 amplitude or latency in either patients or controls. Furthermore, in patients, the size of alpha attenuation showed no correlation with symptom severity, while P300 amplitude was correlated negatively with the positive subscale score of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. These findings suggest that the symptom-independent reduction in event-related alpha attenuation in schizophrenia may be useful as an electrophysiological index of the impairment of neural processes distinct from that indexed by symptom-dependent P300 abnormalities.

  16. Neural correlates of emotional intelligence in a visual emotional oddball task: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Raz, Sivan; Dan, Orrie; Zysberg, Leehu

    2014-11-01

    The present study was aimed at identifying potential behavioral and neural correlates of Emotional Intelligence (EI) by using scalp-recorded Event-Related Potentials (ERPs). EI levels were defined according to both self-report questionnaire and a performance-based ability test. We identified ERP correlates of emotional processing by using a visual-emotional oddball paradigm, in which subjects were confronted with one frequent standard stimulus (a neutral face) and two deviant stimuli (a happy and an angry face). The effects of these faces were then compared across groups with low and high EI levels. The ERP results indicate that participants with high EI exhibited significantly greater mean amplitudes of the P1, P2, N2, and P3 ERP components in response to emotional and neutral faces, at frontal, posterior-parietal and occipital scalp locations. P1, P2 and N2 are considered indexes of attention-related processes and have been associated with early attention to emotional stimuli. The later P3 component has been thought to reflect more elaborative, top-down, emotional information processing including emotional evaluation and memory encoding and formation. These results may suggest greater recruitment of resources to process all emotional and non-emotional faces at early and late processing stages among individuals with higher EI. The present study underscores the usefulness of ERP methodology as a sensitive measure for the study of emotional stimuli processing in the research field of EI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Consecutive repetition effects for affective-distractor pictures in a visual oddball task: electrophysiological evidence from an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Donghong; Zheng, Xifu; Li, Fei

    2013-06-23

    Although repeated affective stimuli can promote habituation, most studies of event-related potentials (ERPs) have focused on habituation to targets that are repeated non-consecutively. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the consecutive repetition effects of affective-distractor stimuli are unclear. Using a three-stimulus oddball task (standard vs. target vs. distractor ratio: 60%:20%:20%) and measures of ERPs, we assessed the repetition effects of affective-distractor pictures that were repeated consecutively. Participants (N=16) were asked to distinguish the size of a geometric surface; they were asked to selectively respond to the target stimuli (larger geometric surfaces) and to ignore the standard stimuli (smaller geometric surfaces) and affective-distractor pictures. Forty pictures portraying a neutral affect and 40 pictures portraying a negative affect were taken from the Chinese Affective Picture System. Each picture was pseudo-randomly selected and consecutively repeated three times, and ERPs were recorded for the repeated affective-distractor pictures. Stimulus repetition was associated with amplitude increases for P3 and amplitude decreases for N1 and N2 as the presentations proceeded. Peak latency remained stable. The P2, N2, and P3 amplitudes were greater during negative vs. neutral pictures. The affective effects did not interact with stimulus repetition at any latency range. The results suggest that consecutive repetition and affective stimuli modulate ERP outcomes independently. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Auditory event-related potentials and alpha oscillations in the psychosis prodrome: Neuronal generator patterns during a novelty oddball task

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Jürgen; Tenke, Craig E.; Kroppmann, Christopher J.; Alschuler, Daniel M.; Fekri, Shiva; Ben-David, Shelly; Corcoran, Cheryl M.; Bruder, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    Prior research suggests that event-related potentials (ERP) obtained during active and passive auditory paradigms, which have demonstrated abnormal neurocognitive function in schizophrenia, may provide helpful tools in predicting transition to psychosis. In addition to ERP measures, reduced modulations of EEG alpha, reflecting top-down control required to inhibit irrelevant information, have revealed attentional deficits in schizophrenia and its prodromal stage. Employing a three-stimulus novelty oddball task, nose-referenced 48-channel ERPs were recorded from 22 clinical high-risk (CHR) patients and 20 healthy controls detecting target tones (12% probability, 500 Hz; button press) among nontargets (76%, 350 Hz) and novel sounds (12%). After current source density (CSD) transformation of EEG epochs (−200 to 1000 ms), event-related spectral perturbations were obtained for each site up to 30 Hz and 800 ms after stimulus onset, and simplified by unrestricted time-frequency (TF) principal components analysis (PCA). Alpha event-related desynchronization (ERD) as measured by TF factor 610–9 (spectral peak latency at 610 ms and 9 Hz; 31.9% variance) was prominent over right posterior regions for targets, and markedly reduced in CHR patients compared to controls, particularly in three patients who later developed psychosis. In contrast, low-frequency event-related synchronization (ERS) distinctly linked to novels (260–1; 16.0%; mid-frontal) and N1 sink across conditions (130–1; 3.4%; centro-temporoparietal) did not differ between groups. Analogous time-domain CSD-ERP measures (temporal PCA), consisting of N1 sink, novelty mismatch negativity (MMN), novelty vertex source, novelty P3, P3b, and frontal response negativity, were robust and closely comparable between groups. Novelty MMN at FCz was, however, absent in the three converters. In agreement with prior findings, alpha ERD and MMN may hold particular promise for predicting transition to psychosis among CHR

  19. Dissociating love-related attention from task-related attention: an event-related potential oddball study.

    PubMed

    Langeslag, Sandra J E; Franken, Ingmar H A; Van Strien, Jan W

    2008-02-06

    The present event-related potential (ERP) study was conducted to investigate the P3 component in response to love-related stimuli while controlling for task-related factors, and to dissociate the influences of both love-related and task-related attention on the P3 amplitude. In an oddball paradigm, photographs of beloved and friends served as target and distractor stimuli. Love-related and task-related attention were separated by varying the target and distractor status of the beloved and friends full factorially. As expected, the P3 amplitude was larger for beloved compared to friends and for targets compared to distractors. Moreover, task-related and love-related attention were unconfounded. These results are in line with findings that the P3 is modulated by both emotion- and task-related factors, supporting the view that the P3 amplitude reflects attention. Furthermore, this study validates the notion that romantic love is accompanied by increased attention for stimuli associated with the beloved, and also shows that this form of attention is different from task-related attention.

  20. Nicotine effects on brain function during a visual oddball task: a comparison between conventional and EEG-informed fMRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Warbrick, Tracy; Mobascher, Arian; Brinkmeyer, Jürgen; Musso, Francesco; Stoecker, Tony; Shah, N Jon; Fink, Gereon R; Winterer, Georg

    2012-08-01

    In a previous oddball task study, it was shown that the inclusion of electrophysiology (EEG), that is, single-trial P3 ERP parameters, in the analysis of fMRI responses can detect activation that is not apparent with conventional fMRI data modeling strategies [Warbrick, T., Mobascher, A., Brinkmeyer, J., Musso, F., Richter, N., Stoecker, T., et al. Single-trial P3 amplitude and latency informed event-related fMRI models yield different BOLD response patterns to a target detection task. Neuroimage, 47, 1532-1544, 2009]. Given that P3 is modulated by nicotine, including P3 parameters in the fMRI analysis might provide additional information about nicotine effects on brain function. A 1-mg nasal nicotine spray (0.5 mg each nostril) or placebo (pepper) spray was administered in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject, randomized, cross-over design. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI and behavioral data were recorded from 19 current smokers in response to an oddball-type visual choice RT task. Conventional general linear model analysis and single-trial P3 amplitude informed general linear model analysis of the fMRI data were performed. Comparing the nicotine with the placebo condition, reduced RTs in the nicotine condition were related to decreased BOLD responses in the conventional analysis encompassing the superior parietal lobule, the precuneus, and the lateral occipital cortex. On the other hand, reduced RTs were related to increased BOLD responses in the precentral and postcentral gyri, and ACC in the EEG-informed fMRI analysis. Our results show how integrated analyses of simultaneous EEG-fMRI data can be used to detect nicotine effects that would not have been revealed through conventional analysis of either measure in isolation. This emphasizes the significance of applying multimodal imaging methods to pharmacoimaging.

  1. Affective picture processing and motivational relevance: arousal and valence effects on ERPs in an oddball task.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Kate E; Martin, Frances H

    2009-06-01

    There are two dominant theories of affective picture processing; one that attention is more deeply engaged by motivationally relevant stimuli (i.e., stimuli that activate both the appetitive and aversive systems), and two that attention is more deeply engaged by aversive stimuli described as the negativity bias. In order to identify the theory that can best account for affective picture processing, event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from 34 participants during a modified oddball paradigm in which levels of stimulus valence, arousal, and motivational relevance were systematically varied. Results were partially consistent with motivated attention models of emotional perception, as P3b amplitude was enhanced in response to highly arousing and motivationally relevant sexual and unpleasant stimuli compared to respective low arousing and less motivationally relevant stimuli. However P3b amplitudes were significantly larger in response to the highly arousing sexual stimuli compared to all other affective stimuli, which is not consistent with either dominant theory. The current study therefore highlights the need for a revised model of affective picture processing and provides a platform for further research investigating the independent effects of sexual arousal on cognitive processing.

  2. The enhanced processing of visual novel events in females: ERP correlates from two modified three-stimulus oddball tasks.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiajin; Xu, Shuang; Li, Chengqiang; Yang, Jiemin; Li, Hong; Yuan, Yin; Huang, Yu

    2012-02-09

    The ability to detect and cope with unpredictable novel events is fundamental for adapting to a rapidly changing environment and ensuring the survival of the organism. Despite knowledge of gender differences in emotional processing, little is currently known about the impact of gender on neural processing of emotion-irrelevant, novel stimuli. Using two modified three-stimulus oddball tasks and event-related potentials (ERPs), the present study investigated the impact of sex on brain processing of novel events and the associated neurophysiological correlates. With novel and non-novel control stimuli used as task-irrelevant distracters, Experiment 1 showed higher novelty rating scores and larger size of novelty effects in brain potentials at 200-300 ms and 300-430 ms time intervals in females compared to males. After excluding the contribution of stimulus probability, Experiment 2 continued to display significant novelty effects in the response times and the amplitudes of the 130-500 ms time windows. Most importantly, females displayed a sustained novelty effect in the late positive component (LPC) amplitudes of the 500-600 ms interval, which was not observed in males. Therefore, Experiment 1 and 2 demonstrated that females are equipped with enhanced brain processing of emotion-irrelevant, novel stimuli. This phenomenon is independent of the established gender difference in infrequent stimulus processing. We suggest that our findings reflect the differential adaptive demands on females and males during evolution.

  3. Assessment of traumatic brain injury patients by WAIS-R, P300, and performance on oddball task.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yasuo; Ando, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Michio

    2005-01-01

    The present research investigates factors that prevent traumatic brain injury patients from returning to work. Participants included 40 patients and 40 healthy individuals. Participants' intelligence quotients and the P300 component of event-related potentials elicited during an auditory oddball task were compared. The patients' mean intelligence quotient was significantly lower than that of the control group. However, some patients had normative intelligence, suggesting that the WAIS-R test results could not fully explain their inability to return to work. The peak of the P300 component could not be determined from recordings of 9 patients. When compared to the control group, the mean latency and amplitude for the remaining 31 patients were significantly longer and smaller, respectively. The mean reaction time of the patients was significantly longer than that of the controls. Omission errors were significantly more frequent in the patient group than among controls, suggesting that the patients were suffering from deficits in the allocation and maintenance of attention. Based on the number of omission errors, patients were divided into a group comprising individuals who committed fewer than two omissions (n=26) and a group comprised of individuals who committed more than three omissions (n=14). The frequent omission errors observed among individuals in the latter group may indicate their inability to sustain an adequate level of vigilance. This deficit would be a factor preventing the patients' return to work.

  4. Evoked gamma band response in male adolescent subjects at high risk for alcoholism during a visual oddball task.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhapillai, Ajayan; Tang, Yongqiang; Ranganathan, Mohini; Rangaswamy, Madhavi; Jones, Kevin A; Chorlian, David B; Kamarajan, Chella; Stimus, Arthur; Kuperman, Samuel; Rohrbaugh, John; O'Connor, Sean J; Bauer, Lance O; Schuckit, Marc A; Begleiter, Henri; Porjesz, Bernice

    2006-11-01

    This study investigates early evoked gamma band activity in male adolescent subjects at high risk for alcoholism (HR; n=68) and normal controls (LR; n=27) during a visual oddball task. A time-frequency representation method was applied to EEG data in order to obtain stimulus related early evoked (phase-locked) gamma band activity (29-45 Hz) and was analyzed within a 0-150 ms time window range. Significant reduction of the early evoked gamma band response in the frontal and parietal regions during target stimulus processing was observed in HR subjects compared to LR subjects. Additionally, the HR group showed less differentiation between target and non-target stimuli in both frontal and parietal regions compared to the LR group, indicating difficulty in early stimulus processing, probably due to a dysfunctional frontoparietal attentional network. The results indicate that the deficient early evoked gamma band response may precede the development of alcoholism and could be a potential endophenotypic marker of alcoholism risk.

  5. Brain activity in predominantly-inattentive subtype attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder during an auditory oddball attention task

    PubMed Central

    Orinstein, Alyssa J.; Stevens, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Previous functional neuroimaging studies have found brain activity abnormalities in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on numerous cognitive tasks. However, little is known about brain dysfunction unique to the predominantly-inattentive subtype of ADHD (ADHD-I), despite debate as to whether DSM-IV-defined ADHD subtypes differ in etiology. This study compared brain activity of 18 ADHD-I adolescents (ages 12–18) and 20 non-psychiatric age-matched control participants on a functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) auditory oddball attention task. ADHD-I participants had significant activation deficits to infrequent target stimuli in bilateral superior temporal gyri, bilateral insula, several midline cingulate/medial frontal gyrus regions, right posterior parietal cortex, thalamus, cerebellum, and brainstem. To novel stimuli, ADHD-I participants had reduced activation in bilateral lateral temporal lobe structures. There were no brain regions where ADHD-I participants had greater hemodynamic activity to targets or novels than controls. Brain activity deficits in ADHD-I participants were found in several regions important to attentional orienting and working memory-related cognitive processes involved in target identification. These results differ from those in previously studied adolescents with combined-subtype ADHD, who had a lesser magnitude of activation abnormalities in frontoparietal regions and relatively more discrete regional deficits to novel stimuli. The divergent findings suggest different etiological factors might underlie attention deficits in different DSM-IV-defined ADHD subtypes, and they have important implications for the DSM-V reconceptualization of subtypes as varying clinical presentations of the same core disorder. PMID:24953999

  6. Brain activity in predominantly-inattentive subtype attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder during an auditory oddball attention task.

    PubMed

    Orinstein, Alyssa J; Stevens, Michael C

    2014-08-30

    Previous functional neuroimaging studies have found brain activity abnormalities in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on numerous cognitive tasks. However, little is known about brain dysfunction unique to the predominantly-inattentive subtype of ADHD (ADHD-I), despite debate as to whether DSM-IV-defined ADHD subtypes differ in etiology. This study compared brain activity of 18 ADHD-I adolescents (ages 12-18) and 20 non-psychiatric age-matched control participants on a functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) auditory oddball attention task. ADHD-I participants had significant activation deficits to infrequent target stimuli in bilateral superior temporal gyri, bilateral insula, several midline cingulate/medial frontal gyrus regions, right posterior parietal cortex, thalamus, cerebellum, and brainstem. To novel stimuli, ADHD-I participants had reduced activation in bilateral lateral temporal lobe structures. There were no brain regions where ADHD-I participants had greater hemodynamic activity to targets or novels than controls. Brain activity deficits in ADHD-I participants were found in several regions important to attentional orienting and working memory-related cognitive processes involved in target identification. These results differ from those in previously studied adolescents with combined-subtype ADHD, who had a lesser magnitude of activation abnormalities in frontoparietal regions and relatively more discrete regional deficits to novel stimuli. The divergent findings suggest different etiological factors might underlie attention deficits in different DSM-IV-defined ADHD subtypes, and they have important implications for the DSM-V reconceptualization of subtypes as varying clinical presentations of the same core disorder.

  7. Gender differences in behavioral inhibitory control: ERP evidence from a two-choice oddball task.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiajin; He, Yuanyuan; Qinglin, Zhang; Chen, Antao; Li, Hong

    2008-11-01

    The inhibition of inappropriate behaviors is important for adaptive living in changing environments. The present study investigated gender-related behavioral inhibitory control by recording event-related potentials for standard and deviant stimuli while subjects performed a standard/deviant distinction task by accurately pressing different keys within 1000 ms. The results showed faster reaction times (RTs) for deviant stimuli in women than in men, although RTs for standard stimuli were similar across genders. There were significant gender and stimulus interaction effects on mean amplitudes during each of the 170-230-ms, 250-330-ms, and 350-600-ms intervals, and women exhibited shorter latencies and larger amplitudes than men at deviant-related P2, N2, and P3 components. As an accurate, fast response to the rare deviant stimuli involves behavioral inhibitory control on the prepotent response whereas the response to the standard stimuli does not, it is clear that there is a general gender difference in behavioral control for human adults. This may relate to differential inhibitory demands by each gender during evolution.

  8. Go and no-go P3 with rare and frequent stimuli in oddball tasks: A study comparing key-pressing with counting.

    PubMed

    Verleger, Rolf; Grauhan, Nils; Śmigasiewicz, Kamila

    2016-12-01

    The P3 component of event-related potentials (ERPs) is large at posterior scalp sites with rare go stimuli (go-P3) and at anterior sites with rare no-go stimuli (no-go P3). Most hypotheses on P3, including our S-R link reactivation notion, imply that these characteristics are independent of specific response modes. This assumption was here investigated by comparing ERPs between key-pressing and covert counting responses in oddball tasks that required responses to either frequent or rare stimuli. Replicating previous results, topographic differences between parietal rare go-P3 and fronto-central rare no-go P3 were much reduced with counting compared to key-press responses. Besides, while go-P3 was generally more positive than no-go P3 in the key-press tasks (except for fronto-central no-go P3 with rare stimuli) the reverse was true in the counting tasks. Thus, the characteristic posterior and fronto-central go and no-go topographies appear to be specific to hand movements. Moreover, P3s evoked in counting tasks might not simply be P3 proper, uncontaminated by movement-related potentials, but rather the go/no-go logic might differ between counting and key-pressing, with the oddball effects being affected by specific processes implemented for these particular response modes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Decomposing delta, theta, and alpha time–frequency ERP activity from a visual oddball task using PCA

    PubMed Central

    Bernat, Edward M.; Malone, Stephen M.; Williams, William J.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Iacono, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Time–frequency (TF) analysis has become an important tool for assessing electrical and magnetic brain activity from event-related paradigms. In electrical potential data, theta and delta activities have been shown to underlie P300 activity, and alpha has been shown to be inhibited during P300 activity. Measures of delta, theta, and alpha activity are commonly taken from TF surfaces. However, methods for extracting relevant activity do not commonly go beyond taking means of windows on the surface, analogous to measuring activity within a defined P300 window in time-only signal representations. The current objective was to use a data driven method to derive relevant TF components from event-related potential data from a large number of participants in an oddball paradigm. Methods A recently developed PCA approach was employed to extract TF components [Bernat, E. M., Williams, W. J., and Gehring, W. J. (2005). Decomposing ERP time-frequency energy using PCA. Clin Neurophysiol, 116(6), 1314–1334] from an ERP dataset of 2068 17 year olds (979 males). TF activity was taken from both individual trials and condition averages. Activity including frequencies ranging from 0 to 14 Hz and time ranging from stimulus onset to 1312.5 ms were decomposed. Results A coordinated set of time–frequency events was apparent across the decompositions. Similar TF components representing earlier theta followed by delta were extracted from both individual trials and averaged data. Alpha activity, as predicted, was apparent only when time–frequency surfaces were generated from trial level data, and was characterized by a reduction during the P300. Conclusions Theta, delta, and alpha activities were extracted with predictable time-courses. Notably, this approach was effective at characterizing data from a single-electrode. Finally, decomposition of TF data generated from individual trials and condition averages produced similar results, but with predictable differences

  10. Relationship of P3b single-trial latencies and response times in one, two, and three-stimulus oddball tasks.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Matthew M; Gunzelmann, Glenn; Anderson, John R

    2017-02-01

    The P300 is one of the most widely studied components of the human event-related potential. According to a longstanding view, the P300, and particularly its posterior subcomponent (i.e., the P3b), is driven by stimulus categorization. Whether the P3b relates to tactical processes involved in immediate responding or strategic processes that affect future behavior remains controversial, however. It is difficult to determine whether variability in P3b latencies relates to variability in response times because of limitations in the methods currently available to quantify the latency of the P3b during single trials. In this paper, we report results from the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), the Hitchcock Radar Task, and a 3-Stimulus Oddball Task. These represent variants of the one-, two-, and three-stimulus oddball paradigms commonly used to study the P3b. The PVT requires simple detection, whereas the Hitchcock Radar Task and the 3-Stimulus Task require detection and categorization. We apply a novel technique that combines hidden semi-Markov models and multi-voxel pattern analysis (HSMM-MVPA) to data from the three experiments. HSMM-MVPA revealed a processing stage in each task corresponding to the P3b. Trial-by-trial variability in the latency of the processing stage correlated with response times in the Hitchcock Radar Task and the 3-Stimulus Task, but not the PVT. These results indicate that the P3b reflects a stimulus categorization process, and that its latency is strongly associated with response times when the stimulus must be categorized before responding. In addition to those theoretical insights, the ability to detect the onset of the P3b and other components on a single-trial basis using HSMM-MVPA opens the door for new uses of mental chronometry in cognitive neuroscience.

  11. Testing the S-R link hypothesis of P3b: The oddball effect on S1-evoked P3 gets reduced by increased task relevance of S2.

    PubMed

    Verleger, Rolf; Hamann, Lin Marlena; Asanowicz, Dariusz; Śmigasiewicz, Kamila

    2015-05-01

    We had previously reported that the oddball effect on the P3b EEG potential evoked by infrequent vs. frequent S1 presented in a sequence of two stimuli, S1 and S2, gets reduced in a "combination task". In this task, responses were determined by the combinations of S1 and S2 rather than by S1 only. We had attributed this reduction of the oddball effect to increased task difficulty. The present study investigated possible reasons for this reduction of S1-evoked P3b in more detail, by making the combination task easier in several respects: allowing for forming associations from S1 to responses (Experiment 1), reducing the complexity of stimulus-response (S-R) mappings (Experiment 2), and decreasing S2 relevance in defining responses (Experiment 3). The results showed that only S2 relevance affected the oddball effect on S1-evoked P3b. Namely, when S2 attained some relevance by inducing a go/no-go decision for S1-defined responses, the oddball effect on S1-evoked P3b was intermediate between the large effect in the simple oddball task and the small effect in the combination task. The results may be explained in terms of the S-R link hypothesis of P3b which interprets P3b as reflecting reactivation of well-established S-R links. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of a small dose of olanzapine on healthy subjects according to their schizotypy: an ERP study using a semantic categorization and an oddball task.

    PubMed

    Debruille, J Bruno; Rodier, Mitchell; Prévost, Marie; Lionnet, Claire; Molavi, Siamak

    2013-05-01

    Delusions and hallucinations are often meaningful. They thus reveal abnormal semantic activations. To start testing whether antipsychotics act by reducing abnormal semantic activations we focused on the N400 event-related brain potential, which is elicited by meaningful stimuli, such as words, and whose distribution on the scalp is known to depend on the semantic category of these stimuli. We used a semantic-categorization task specially designed to reduce the impact of the variations of context processing across subjects' groups and a classical oddball task as a control. Healthy subjects were recruited rather than psychotic patients to ensure that the medication effects could not be secondary to a reduction of symptoms. These participants (n=47) were tested in a double-blind cross-over paradigm where the ERP effects of 2.5mg of olanzapine taken on the eve of the testing were compared to those of the placebo. The amplitudes of the N400s elicited by the target words were greater at anterior scalp sites in the half of the subjects having higher schizotypal scores. Olanzapine reduced these larger N400s and had no effect on the small anterior N400s of the half of the subjects with lower scores. These results are discussed as consistent with the idea that antipsychotics reduce abnormal activations of particular semantic representations. Further studies should thus be done to see if this reduction correlates with and predicts the decrease of psychotic symptoms in patients.

  13. Comparison of DP3 Signals Evoked by Comfortable 3D Images and 2D Images - an Event-Related Potential Study using an Oddball Task.

    PubMed

    Ye, Peng; Wu, Xiang; Gao, Dingguo; Liang, Haowen; Wang, Jiahui; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; She, Juncong; Chen, Jun

    2017-02-22

    The horizontal binocular disparity is a critical factor for the visual fatigue induced by watching stereoscopic TVs. Stereoscopic images that possess the disparity within the 'comfort zones' and remain still in the depth direction are considered comfortable to the viewers as 2D images. However, the difference in brain activities between processing such comfortable stereoscopic images and 2D images is still less studied. The DP3 (differential P3) signal refers to an event-related potential (ERP) component indicating attentional processes, which is typically evoked by odd target stimuli among standard stimuli in an oddball task. The present study found that the DP3 signal elicited by the comfortable 3D images exhibits the delayed peak latency and enhanced peak amplitude over the anterior and central scalp regions compared to the 2D images. The finding suggests that compared to the processing of the 2D images, more attentional resources are involved in the processing of the stereoscopic images even though they are subjectively comfortable.

  14. Comparison of DP3 Signals Evoked by Comfortable 3D Images and 2D Images — an Event-Related Potential Study using an Oddball Task

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Peng; Wu, Xiang; Gao, Dingguo; Liang, Haowen; Wang, Jiahui; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; She, Juncong; Chen, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The horizontal binocular disparity is a critical factor for the visual fatigue induced by watching stereoscopic TVs. Stereoscopic images that possess the disparity within the ‘comfort zones’ and remain still in the depth direction are considered comfortable to the viewers as 2D images. However, the difference in brain activities between processing such comfortable stereoscopic images and 2D images is still less studied. The DP3 (differential P3) signal refers to an event-related potential (ERP) component indicating attentional processes, which is typically evoked by odd target stimuli among standard stimuli in an oddball task. The present study found that the DP3 signal elicited by the comfortable 3D images exhibits the delayed peak latency and enhanced peak amplitude over the anterior and central scalp regions compared to the 2D images. The finding suggests that compared to the processing of the 2D images, more attentional resources are involved in the processing of the stereoscopic images even though they are subjectively comfortable. PMID:28225044

  15. Comparison of DP3 Signals Evoked by Comfortable 3D Images and 2D Images — an Event-Related Potential Study using an Oddball Task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Peng; Wu, Xiang; Gao, Dingguo; Liang, Haowen; Wang, Jiahui; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; She, Juncong; Chen, Jun

    2017-02-01

    The horizontal binocular disparity is a critical factor for the visual fatigue induced by watching stereoscopic TVs. Stereoscopic images that possess the disparity within the ‘comfort zones’ and remain still in the depth direction are considered comfortable to the viewers as 2D images. However, the difference in brain activities between processing such comfortable stereoscopic images and 2D images is still less studied. The DP3 (differential P3) signal refers to an event-related potential (ERP) component indicating attentional processes, which is typically evoked by odd target stimuli among standard stimuli in an oddball task. The present study found that the DP3 signal elicited by the comfortable 3D images exhibits the delayed peak latency and enhanced peak amplitude over the anterior and central scalp regions compared to the 2D images. The finding suggests that compared to the processing of the 2D images, more attentional resources are involved in the processing of the stereoscopic images even though they are subjectively comfortable.

  16. Sex Differences in Gamma Band Functional Connectivity Between the Frontal Lobe and Cortical Areas During an Auditory Oddball Task, as Revealed by Imaginary Coherence Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Toshiro; Okumura, Eiichi; Kodabashi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Kouzou; Otsubo, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Katsumi; Yatsushiro, Kazutaka; Sekine, Masaki; Kamiya, Shinichiro; Shimooki, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiyo

    2016-01-01

    We studied sex-related differences in gamma oscillation during an auditory oddball task, using magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography assessment of imaginary coherence (IC). We obtained a statistical source map of event-related desynchronization (ERD) / event-related synchronization (ERS), and compared females and males regarding ERD / ERS. Based on the results, we chose respectively seed regions for IC determinations in low (30-50 Hz), mid (50-100 Hz) and high gamma (100-150 Hz) bands. In males, ERD was increased in the left posterior cingulate cortex (CGp) at 500 ms in the low gamma band, and in the right caudal anterior cingulate cortex (cACC) at 125 ms in the mid-gamma band. ERS was increased in the left rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) at 375 ms in the high gamma band. We chose the CGp, cACC and rACC as seeds, and examined IC between the seed and certain target regions using the IC map. IC changes depended on the height of the gamma frequency and the time window in the gamma band. Although IC in the mid and high gamma bands did not show sex-specific differences, IC at 30-50 Hz in males was increased between the left rACC and the frontal, orbitofrontal, inferior temporal and fusiform target regions. Increased IC in males suggested that males may acomplish the task constructively, analysingly, emotionally, and by perfoming analysis, and that information processing was more complicated in the cortico-cortical circuit. On the other hand, females showed few differences in IC. Females planned the task with general attention and economical well-balanced processing, which was explained by the higher overall functional cortical connectivity. CGp, cACC and rACC were involved in sex differences in information processing and were likely related to differences in neuroanatomy, hormones and neurotransmitter systems. PMID:27708745

  17. Brain Dynamics of Aging: Multiscale Variability of EEG Signals at Rest and during an Auditory Oddball Task1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita; Perdikis, Dionysios; Müller, Viktor; Blanc, Jean-Luc; Huys, Raoul; Temprado, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present work focused on the study of fluctuations of cortical activity across time scales in young and older healthy adults. The main objective was to offer a comprehensive characterization of the changes of brain (cortical) signal variability during aging, and to make the link with known underlying structural, neurophysiological, and functional modifications, as well as aging theories. We analyzed electroencephalogram (EEG) data of young and elderly adults, which were collected at resting state and during an auditory oddball task. We used a wide battery of metrics that typically are separately applied in the literature, and we compared them with more specific ones that address their limits. Our procedure aimed to overcome some of the methodological limitations of earlier studies and verify whether previous findings can be reproduced and extended to different experimental conditions. In both rest and task conditions, our results mainly revealed that EEG signals presented systematic age-related changes that were time-scale-dependent with regard to the structure of fluctuations (complexity) but not with regard to their magnitude. Namely, compared with young adults, the cortical fluctuations of the elderly were more complex at shorter time scales, but less complex at longer scales, although always showing a lower variance. Additionally, the elderly showed signs of spatial, as well as between, experimental conditions dedifferentiation. By integrating these so far isolated findings across time scales, metrics, and conditions, the present study offers an overview of age-related changes in the fluctuation electrocortical activity while making the link with underlying brain dynamics. PMID:26464983

  18. Effects of semantic relatedness on recall of stimuli preceding emotional oddballs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ryan M; Beversdorf, David Q

    2008-07-01

    Semantic and episodic memory networks function as highly interconnected systems, both relying on the hippocampal/medial temporal lobe complex (HC/MTL). Episodic memory encoding triggers the retrieval of semantic information, serving to incorporate contextual relationships between the newly acquired memory and existing semantic representations. While emotional material augments episodic memory encoding at the time of stimulus presentation, interactions between emotion and semantic memory that contribute to subsequent episodic recall are not well understood. Using a modified oddball task, we examined the modulatory effects of negative emotion on semantic interactions with episodic memory by measuring the free-recall of serially presented neutral or negative words varying in semantic relatedness. We found increased free-recall for words related to and preceding emotionally negative oddballs, suggesting that negative emotion can indirectly facilitate episodic free-recall by enhancing semantic contributions during encoding. Our findings demonstrate the ability of emotion and semantic memory to interact to mutually enhance free-recall.

  19. Is P3 a strategic or a tactical component? Relationships of P3 sub-components to response times in oddball tasks with go, no-go and choice responses.

    PubMed

    Verleger, Rolf; Grauhan, Nils; Śmigasiewicz, Kamila

    2016-12-01

    P3 (viz. P300) is a most prominent component of event-related EEG potentials recorded during task performance. There has been long-standing debate about whether the process reflected by P3 is tactical or strategic, i.e., required for making the present response or constituting some overarching process. Here, we used residue iteration decomposition (RIDE) to delineate P3 subcomponents time-locked to responses and tested for the temporal relations between P3 components and response times (RTs). Data were obtained in oddball tasks (i.e., tasks presenting two stimuli, one rarely and one frequently) with rare and frequent go, no-go, or choice responses (CRs). As usual, rare-go P3s were large at Pz and rare no-go P3s at FCz. Notably, P3s evoked with rare CRs were large at either site, probably comprising both go and no-go P3. Throughout, with frequent and rare responses, P3 latencies coincided with RTs. RIDE decomposed P3 complexes into a large CPz-focused C-P3 and an earlier Pz-focused response-locked R-P3. R-P3 had an additional large fronto-central focus with rare CRs, modeling the no-go-P3 part, suggesting that the process reflected by no-go P3 is tightly time-locked to making the alternative response. R-P3 coincided with the fast RTs to frequent stimuli and C-P3 coincided with the slower RTs to rare stimuli. Thus, the process reflected by C-P3 might be required for responding to rare events, but not to frequent ones. We argue that these results are nevertheless compatible with a tactical role of P3 because responses may not be contingent on stimulus analysis with frequent stimuli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Selective adaptation to "oddball" sounds by the human auditory system.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Andrew J R; Harper, Nicol S; Reiss, Joshua D; McAlpine, David

    2014-01-29

    Adaptation to both common and rare sounds has been independently reported in neurophysiological studies using probabilistic stimulus paradigms in small mammals. However, the apparent sensitivity of the mammalian auditory system to the statistics of incoming sound has not yet been generalized to task-related human auditory perception. Here, we show that human listeners selectively adapt to novel sounds within scenes unfolding over minutes. Listeners' performance in an auditory discrimination task remains steady for the most common elements within the scene but, after the first minute, performance improves for distinct and rare (oddball) sound elements, at the expense of rare sounds that are relatively less distinct. Our data provide the first evidence of enhanced coding of oddball sounds in a human auditory discrimination task and suggest the existence of an adaptive mechanism that tracks the long-term statistics of sounds and deploys coding resources accordingly.

  1. Facilitating masked visual target identification with auditory oddball stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Mary Kim; Spence, Charles

    2012-08-01

    When identifying a rapidly masked visual target display in a stream of visual distractor displays, a high-frequency tone (presented in synchrony with the target display) in a stream of low-tone distractors results in better performance than when the same low tone accompanies each visual display (Ngo and Spence in Atten Percept Psychophys 72:1938-1947, 2010; Vroomen and de Gelder in J Exp Psychol Hum 26:1583-1590, 2000). In the present study, we tested three oddball conditions: a louder tone presented amongst quieter tones, a quieter tone presented amongst louder tones, and the absence of a tone, within an otherwise identical tone sequence. Across three experiments, all three oddball conditions resulted in the crossmodal facilitation of participants' visual target identification performance. These results therefore suggest that salient oddball stimuli in the form of deviating tones, when synchronized with the target, may be sufficient to capture participants' attention and facilitate visual target identification. The fact that the absence of a sound in an otherwise-regular sequence of tones also facilitated performance suggests that multisensory integration cannot provide an adequate account for the 'freezing' effect. Instead, an attentional capture account is proposed to account for the benefits of oddball cuing in Vroomen and de Gelder's task.

  2. Diminished N1 Auditory Evoked Potentials to Oddball Stimuli in Misophonia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Arjan; van Diepen, Rosanne; Mazaheri, Ali; Petropoulos-Petalas, Diamantis; Soto de Amesti, Vicente; Vulink, Nienke; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Misophonia (hatred of sound) is a newly defined psychiatric condition in which ordinary human sounds, such as breathing and eating, trigger impulsive aggression. In the current study, we investigated if a dysfunction in the brain’s early auditory processing system could be present in misophonia. We screened 20 patients with misophonia with the diagnostic criteria for misophonia, and 14 matched healthy controls without misophonia, and investigated any potential deficits in auditory processing of misophonia patients using auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) during an oddball task. Subjects watched a neutral silent movie while being presented a regular frequency of beep sounds in which oddball tones of 250 and 4000 Hz were randomly embedded in a stream of repeated 1000 Hz standard tones. We examined the P1, N1, and P2 components locked to the onset of the tones. For misophonia patients, the N1 peak evoked by the oddball tones had smaller mean peak amplitude than the control group. However, no significant differences were found in P1 and P2 components evoked by the oddball tones. There were no significant differences between the misophonia patients and their controls in any of the ERP components to the standard tones. The diminished N1 component to oddball tones in misophonia patients suggests an underlying neurobiological deficit in misophonia patients. This reduction might reflect a basic impairment in auditory processing in misophonia patients. PMID:24782731

  3. Diminished n1 auditory evoked potentials to oddball stimuli in misophonia patients.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Arjan; van Diepen, Rosanne; Mazaheri, Ali; Petropoulos-Petalas, Diamantis; Soto de Amesti, Vicente; Vulink, Nienke; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Misophonia (hatred of sound) is a newly defined psychiatric condition in which ordinary human sounds, such as breathing and eating, trigger impulsive aggression. In the current study, we investigated if a dysfunction in the brain's early auditory processing system could be present in misophonia. We screened 20 patients with misophonia with the diagnostic criteria for misophonia, and 14 matched healthy controls without misophonia, and investigated any potential deficits in auditory processing of misophonia patients using auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) during an oddball task. Subjects watched a neutral silent movie while being presented a regular frequency of beep sounds in which oddball tones of 250 and 4000 Hz were randomly embedded in a stream of repeated 1000 Hz standard tones. We examined the P1, N1, and P2 components locked to the onset of the tones. For misophonia patients, the N1 peak evoked by the oddball tones had smaller mean peak amplitude than the control group. However, no significant differences were found in P1 and P2 components evoked by the oddball tones. There were no significant differences between the misophonia patients and their controls in any of the ERP components to the standard tones. The diminished N1 component to oddball tones in misophonia patients suggests an underlying neurobiological deficit in misophonia patients. This reduction might reflect a basic impairment in auditory processing in misophonia patients.

  4. Oddballs and a Low Odderon Intercept

    SciTech Connect

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Bicudo, Pedro; Cotanch, Stephen R.; /North Carolina State U.

    2005-07-27

    The authors report an odderon Regge trajectory emerging from a field theoretical Coulomb gauge QCD model for the odd signature J{sup PC} (P = C = -1) glueball states (oddballs). The trajectory intercept is clearly smaller than the pomeron and even the {omega} trajectory's intercept which provides an explanation for the nonobservation of the odderon in high energy scattering data. To further support this result we compare to glueball lattice data and also perform calculations with an alternative model based upon an exact Hamiltonian diagonalization for three constituent gluons.

  5. N100 and P300 amplitude to Go and No-Go variants of the auditory oddball in siblings discordant for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sumich, Alex; Kumari, Veena; Dodd, Phillipa; Ettinger, Ulrich; Hughes, Catherine; Zachariah, Elizabeth; Sharma, Tonmoy

    2008-01-01

    P300 amplitude reduction is reliably seen in schizophrenia. Inconsistent reports of isolated frontal and/or parietal deficits in unaffected family members may be clarified using a task that places greater load on frontal function. Go and No-Go versions of the auditory oddball task were performed by eighteen schizophrenia patients, age-matched unaffected siblings and healthy controls matched closely to unaffected siblings on age, sex, education, socioeconomic-status, handedness and ethnicity. Groups were compared on P300 and N100 amplitude and latency. Spearman correlations were used to test the relationship between ERP amplitudes and neuropsychological measures of executive function and memory. The relationship between schizotypy--as measured using the structured interview--and ERPs was explored in a combined group of siblings and controls. Independent of task, patients had lower P300 than controls and reduced parietal amplitude compared to siblings. Siblings had enhanced frontocentral N100 compared to controls. No-Go P300 amplitude and N100 latency was associated with executive function measures. There were significant intraclass correlations between patients and siblings for No-Go P300 amplitude, particularly at the central midline electrode. Frontocentral N100 and P300 amplitude were positively correlated with anxiety-related aspects of schizotypy. Enhanced N100 is present in unaffected siblings. Parietal P300 is intact in unaffected siblings, but reduced in patients. The No-Go-oddball is more sensitive than the Go-oddball to executive function deficits in patients and as an index of heritability.

  6. Electrical mapping in bipolar disorder patients during the oddball paradigm.

    PubMed

    Di Giorgio Silva, Luiza Wanick; Cartier, Consuelo; Cheniaux, Elie; Novis, Fernanda; Silveira, Luciana Angélica; Cavaco, Paola Anaquim; de Assis da Silva, Rafael; Batista, Washington Adolfo; Tanaka, Guaraci Ken; Gongora, Mariana; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Basile, Luis Fernando; Budde, Henning; Cagy, Mauricio; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is characterized by an alternated occurrence between acute mania episodes and depression or remission moments. The objective of this study is to analyze the information processing changes in BP (Bipolar Patients) (euthymia, depression and mania) during the oddball paradigm, focusing on the P300 component, an electric potential of the cerebral cortex generated in response to external sensorial stimuli, which involves more complex neurophysiological processes related to stimulus interpretation. Twenty-eight bipolar disorder patients (BP) (17 women and 11 men with average age of 32.5, SD: 9.5) and eleven healthy controls (HC) (7 women and 4 men with average age of 29.78, SD: 6.89) were enrolled in this study. The bipolar patients were divided into 3 major groups (i.e., euthymic, depressive and maniac) according to the score on the Clinical Global Impression--Bipolar Version (CGI-BP). The subjects performed the oddball paradigm simultaneously to the EEG record. EEG data were also recorded before and after the execution of the task. A one-way ANOVA was applied to compare the P300 component among the groups. After observing P300 and the subcomponents P3a and P3b, a similarity of amplitude and latency between euthymic and depressive patients was observed, as well as small amplitude in the pre-frontal cortex and reduced P3a response. This can be evidence of impaired information processing, cognitive flexibility, working memory, executive functions and ability to shift the attention and processing to the target and away from distracting stimuli in BD. Such neuropsychological impairments are related to different BD symptoms, which should be known and considered, in order to develop effective clinical treatment strategies.

  7. Faces are more attractive than motion: evidence from two simultaneous oddball paradigms.

    PubMed

    Marhöfer, David J; Bach, Michael; Heinrich, Sven P

    2014-06-01

    The P300 event-related potential reflects high-level cognitive processing; it is also sensitive to attentional modulation, impeding its use in malingering detection. Can this be overcome by particularly salient stimuli, e.g., motion or faces? In 11 subjects, we ran two concurrent, uncorrelated oddball sequences ("main sequence" and "distractor sequence"). We modulated the subjects' attention via three types of tasks: (1) count main oddballs, (2) passive viewing, and (3) count distractor oddballs. For the main sequence, the frequent stimulus was homogeneously gray, and oddballs were (a) stationary gratings, (b) moving gratings, or (c) faces. For the distractor sequence, the frequent stimulus was a black fixation target, with a white fixation target as oddball. P300 amplitudes were larger for faces than for stationary and moving gratings. Median P300 amplitudes were largest when attending; the P300 was substantially reduced in the "passive" condition (down to 30% for gratings and down to 80% for faces) and somewhat more for the "distraction" condition (down to 40% for gratings and down to 55% for faces). With distraction, significant P300s occurred in 9 of 11 subjects for faces, only in 5 or 4 with stationary or moving gratings, respectively. Face-evoked P300s were more resistant to distraction than those to stationary or moving gratings. This provides support for the socio-cognitive role of faces being associated with privileged processing mechanisms. Attentional modulation of P300 depends on stimulus category. Face stimuli may help to objectively access higher level processing while minimizing willful influences.

  8. Transmitter Signal Measurements, Task 5C Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, Kent; Eppic, Brian; Huffman, Mitch; White, Harrison

    2005-01-01

    Signal Measurements were obtained on four (4) different airport systems. Systems measured were Localizer (LOC), Very High Frequency Communication, (VHF), Glideslope, (G/S), and Global Positioning System (GPS). The task calls for path loss measurements to be taken at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (ATL) and one smaller airport which was Greenville/ Spartanburg Airport (GSP) to determine relative signal strengths on the airport properties.

  9. Equiprobable and oddball paradigms: two approaches for documenting auditory discrimination.

    PubMed

    Key, Alexandra P; Yoder, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    The oddball paradigm is frequently used to study auditory discrimination. However, due to its lengthy recording sessions, an alternative design may be considered when time constraints are paramount. In the current study, auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) were obtained in 10 typical adults in response to two speech sound contrasts (/ba/-/ga/, /ba/-/pa/) presented using the oddball and equiprobable (equal trial counts for all conditions) paradigms. Sound discrimination was evident within the 100-300 msec post-stimulus window in both paradigms. Therefore, the equiprobable design can be a reasonable alternative to the oddball paradigm in situations when recording length threatens the quantity of available data.

  10. Anterior insular cortex activity to emotional salience of voices in a passive oddball paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chenyi; Lee, Yu-Hsuan; Cheng, Yawei

    2014-01-01

    The human voice, which has a pivotal role in communication, is processed in specialized brain regions. Although a general consensus holds that the anterior insular cortex (AIC) plays a critical role in negative emotional experience, previous studies have not observed AIC activation in response to hearing disgust in voices. We used magnetoencephalography to measure the magnetic counterparts of mismatch negativity (MMNm) and P3a (P3am) in healthy adults while the emotionally meaningless syllables dada, spoken as neutral, happy, or disgusted prosodies, along with acoustically matched simple and complex tones, were presented in a passive oddball paradigm. The results revealed that disgusted relative to happy syllables elicited stronger MMNm-related cortical activities in the right AIC and precentral gyrus along with the left posterior insular cortex, supramarginal cortex, transverse temporal cortex, and upper bank of superior temporal cortex. The AIC activity specific to disgusted syllables (corrected p < 0.05) was associated with the hit rate of the emotional categorization task. These findings may clarify the neural correlates of emotional MMNm and lend support to the role of AIC in the processing of emotional salience already at the preattentive level. PMID:25346670

  11. Posterior EEG alpha at rest and during task performance: Comparison of current source density and field potential measures

    PubMed Central

    Tenke, Craig E.; Kayser, Jürgen; Abraham, Karen; Alvarenga, Jorge E.; Bruder, Gerard E.

    2015-01-01

    Resting and task-related EEG alpha are used in studies of cognition and psychopathogy. Although Laplacian methods have been applied, apprehensions about loss of global activity dissuade researchers from greater use except as a supplement to reference-dependent measures. The unfortunate result has been continued reliance on reference strategies that differ across labs, and a systemic preference for a montage-dependent average reference over true reference-free measures. We addressed these concerns by comparing resting- and task-related EEG alpha using three EEG transformations: nose- (NR) and average-referenced (AR) EEG, and the corresponding CSD. Amplitude spectra of resting and prestimulus task-related EEG (novelty oddball) and event-related spectral perturbations were scaled to equate each transformation. Alpha measures quantified for 8-12 Hz bands were: 1) net amplitude (eyes-closed minus eyes-open) and 2) overall amplitude (eyes-closed plus eyes-open); 3) task amplitude (prestimulus baseline) and 4) task event-related desynchronization (ERD). Mean topographies unambiguously represented posterior alpha for overall, net and task, as well as poststimulus alpha ERD. Topographies were similar for the three transformations, but differed in dispersion, CSD being sharpest and NR most broadly distributed. Transformations also differed in scale, AR showing less attenuation or spurious secondary maxima at anterior sites, consistent with simulations of distributed posterior generators. Posterior task alpha and alpha ERD were positively correlated with overall alpha, but not with net alpha. CSD topographies consistently and appropriately represented posterior EEG alpha for all measures. PMID:26026372

  12. The auditory P3 from passive and active three-stimulus oddball paradigm.

    PubMed

    Wronka, Eligiusz; Kaiser, Jan; Coenen, Anton M L

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was the comparison of basic characteristics of the P3 subcomponents elicited in passive and active versions of the auditory oddball paradigm. A 3-stimulus oddball paradigm was employed in which subjects were presented with random sequence of tones while they performed a discrimination task in visual modality with no response to the tone (passive task) or responded to an infrequently occurring target stimulus inserted into sequence of frequent standard and rare non-target stimuli (active task). Results show that the magnitude of the frontal P3 response is determined by the relative perceptual distinctiveness among stimuli. The amplitude of frontal component is larger for the stimuli more deviated from the standard in both passive and active tasks. In all cases however, a maximum over central or fronto-central scalp regions was demonstrated. Moreover, amplitude of this component was influenced by the strength of attentional focus--a significantly larger response was obtained in the active session than in its passive counterpart. The apparent parietal P3 responses were obtained only in the active condition. The amplitude of this component is larger for the target than the non-target across all electrode sites, but both demonstrated a parietal maxima. This findings suggest that generation of early frontal P3 could be related to alerting activity of frontal cortex irrespective of stimulus context, while generation of later parietal P3 is related to temporo-parietal network activated when neuronal model of perceived stimulation and attentional trace are comparing.

  13. Optimal Measurement Tasks and Their Physical Realizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, Vadim

    This thesis reflects works previously published by the author and materials hitherto unpublished on the subject of quantum information theory. Particularly, results in optimal discrimination, cloning, and separation of quantum states, and their relationships, are discussed. Our interest lies in the scenario where we are given one of two quantum states prepared with a known a-priori probability. We are given full information about the states and are assigned the task of performing an optimal measurement on the incoming state. Given that none of these tasks is in general possible to perform perfectly we must choose a figure of merit to optimize, and as we shall see there is always a trade-off between competing figures of merit, such as the likelihood of getting the desired result versus the quality of the result. For state discrimination the competing figures of merit are the success rate of the measurement, the errors involved, and the inconclusiveness. Similarly increasing the separation between states comes at a cost of less frequent successful applications of the separation protocol. For cloning, aside from successfully producing clones we are also interested in the fidelity of the clones compared to the original state, which is a measure of the quality of the clones. Because all quantum operations obey the same set of conditions for evolution one may expect similar restrictions on disparate measurement strategies, and our work shows a deep connection between all three branches, with cloning and separation asymptotically converging to state discrimination. Via Neumark's theorem, our description of these unitary processes can be implemented using single-photon interferometry with linear optical devices. Amazingly any quantum mechanical evolution may be decomposed as an experiment involving only lasers, beamsplitters, phase-shifters and mirrors. Such readily available tools allow for verification of the aforementioned protocols and we build upon existing results to

  14. Methodological Considerations about the Use of Bimodal Oddball P300 in Psychiatry: Topography and Reference Effect

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Elisa; Kajosch, Hendrik; Verbanck, Paul; Kornreich, Charles; Campanella, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) bimodal oddball task has disclosed increased sensitivity to show P300 modulations to subclinical symptoms. Even if the utility of such a procedure has still to be confirmed at a clinical level, gathering normative values of this new oddball variant may be of the greatest interest. We specifically addressed the challenge of defining the best location for the recording of P3a and P3b components and selecting the best reference to use by investigating the effect of an offline re-reference procedure on recorded bimodal P3a and P3b. Forty young and healthy subjects were submitted to a bimodal (synchronized and always congruent visual and auditory stimuli) three-stimulus oddball task in which 140 frequent bimodal stimuli, 30 deviant “target” stimuli and 30 distractors were presented. Task consisted in clicking as soon as possible on the targets, and not paying attention to frequent stimuli and distractors. This procedure allowed us to record, for each individual, the P3a component, referring to the novelty process related to distractors processing, and the P3b component, linked to the processing of the target stimuli. Results showed that both P3a and P3b showed maximal amplitude in Pz. However, P3a displayed a more central distribution. Nose reference was also shown to give maximal amplitudes compared with average and linked mastoids references. These data were discussed in light of the necessity to develop multi-site recording guidelines to furnish sets of ERPs data comparable across laboratories. PMID:27708597

  15. The auditory oddball paradigm revised to improve bedside detection of consciousness in behaviorally unresponsive patients.

    PubMed

    Morlet, Dominique; Ruby, Perrine; André-Obadia, Nathalie; Fischer, Catherine

    2017-07-20

    Active paradigms requiring subjects to engage in a mental task on request have been developed to detect consciousness in behaviorally unresponsive patients. Using auditory ERPs, the active condition consists in orienting patient's attention toward oddball stimuli. In comparison with passive listening, larger P300 in the active condition identifies voluntary processes. However, contrast between these two conditions is usually too weak to be detected at the individual level. To improve test sensitivity, we propose as a control condition to actively divert the subject's attention from the auditory stimuli with a mental imagery task that has been demonstrated to be within the grasp of the targeted patients: navigate in one's home. Twenty healthy subjects were presented with a two-tone oddball paradigm in the three following condition: (a) passive listening, (b) mental imagery, (c) silent counting of deviant stimuli. Mental imagery proved to be more efficient than passive listening to lessen P300 response to deviant tones as compared with the active counting condition. An effect of attention manipulation (oriented vs. diverted) was observed in 19/20 subjects, of whom 18 showed the expected P300 effect and 1 showed an effect restricted to the N2 component. The only subject showing no effect also proved insufficient engagement in the tasks. Our study demonstrated the efficiency of diverting attention using mental imagery to improve the sensitivity of the active oddball paradigm. Using recorded instructions and requiring a small number of electrodes, the test was designed to be conveniently and economically used at the patient's bedside. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  16. Neural activations during auditory oddball processing discriminating schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Ethridge, Lauren E; Hamm, Jordan P; Shapiro, John R; Summerfelt, Ann T; Keedy, Sarah K; Stevens, Michael C; Pearlson, Godfrey; Tamminga, Carol A; Boutros, Nash N; Sweeney, John A; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Thaker, Gunvant; Clementz, Brett A

    2012-11-01

    Reduced amplitude of the P300 event-related potential in auditory oddball tasks may characterize schizophrenia (SZ) but is also reported in bipolar disorder. Similarity of auditory processing abnormalities between these diagnoses is uncertain, given the frequent combination of both psychotic and nonpsychotic patients in bipolar samples; abnormalities may be restricted to psychosis. In addition, typically only latency and amplitude of brain responses at selected sensors and singular time points are used to characterize neural responses. Comprehensive quantification of brain activations involving both spatiotemporal and time-frequency analyses could better identify unique auditory oddball responses among patients with different psychotic disorders. Sixty SZ, 60 bipolar I with psychosis (BPP), and 60 healthy subjects (H) were compared on neural responses during an auditory oddball task using multisensor electroencephalography. Principal components analysis was used to reduce multisensor data before evaluating group differences on voltage and frequency of neural responses over time. Linear discriminant analysis revealed five variables that best differentiated groups: 1) late beta activity to standard stimuli; 2) late beta/gamma activity to targets discriminated BPP from other groups; 3) midlatency theta/alpha activity to standards; 4) target-related voltage at the late N2 response discriminated both psychosis groups from H; and 5) target-related voltage during early N2 discriminated BPP from H. Although the P300 significantly differentiated psychotic groups from H, it did not uniquely discriminate groups beyond the above variables. No variable uniquely discriminated SZ, perhaps indicating utility of this task for studying psychosis-associated neurophysiology generally and BPP specifically. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Structure and Topology Dynamics of Hyper-Frequency Networks during Rest and Auditory Oddball Performance

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Viktor; Perdikis, Dionysios; von Oertzen, Timo; Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita; Jirsa, Viktor; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state and task-related recordings are characterized by oscillatory brain activity and widely distributed networks of synchronized oscillatory circuits. Electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) were used to assess network structure and network dynamics during resting state with eyes open and closed, and auditory oddball performance through phase synchronization between EEG channels. For this assessment, we constructed a hyper-frequency network (HFN) based on within- and cross-frequency coupling (WFC and CFC, respectively) at 10 oscillation frequencies ranging between 2 and 20 Hz. We found that CFC generally differentiates between task conditions better than WFC. CFC was the highest during resting state with eyes open. Using a graph-theoretical approach (GTA), we found that HFNs possess small-world network (SWN) topology with a slight tendency to random network characteristics. Moreover, analysis of the temporal fluctuations of HFNs revealed specific network topology dynamics (NTD), i.e., temporal changes of different graph-theoretical measures such as strength, clustering coefficient, characteristic path length (CPL), local, and global efficiency determined for HFNs at different time windows. The different topology metrics showed significant differences between conditions in the mean and standard deviation of these metrics both across time and nodes. In addition, using an artificial neural network approach, we found stimulus-related dynamics that varied across the different network topology metrics. We conclude that functional connectivity dynamics (FCD), or NTD, which was found using the HFN approach during rest and stimulus processing, reflects temporal and topological changes in the functional organization and reorganization of neuronal cell assemblies. PMID:27799906

  18. Structure and Topology Dynamics of Hyper-Frequency Networks during Rest and Auditory Oddball Performance.

    PubMed

    Müller, Viktor; Perdikis, Dionysios; von Oertzen, Timo; Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita; Jirsa, Viktor; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state and task-related recordings are characterized by oscillatory brain activity and widely distributed networks of synchronized oscillatory circuits. Electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) were used to assess network structure and network dynamics during resting state with eyes open and closed, and auditory oddball performance through phase synchronization between EEG channels. For this assessment, we constructed a hyper-frequency network (HFN) based on within- and cross-frequency coupling (WFC and CFC, respectively) at 10 oscillation frequencies ranging between 2 and 20 Hz. We found that CFC generally differentiates between task conditions better than WFC. CFC was the highest during resting state with eyes open. Using a graph-theoretical approach (GTA), we found that HFNs possess small-world network (SWN) topology with a slight tendency to random network characteristics. Moreover, analysis of the temporal fluctuations of HFNs revealed specific network topology dynamics (NTD), i.e., temporal changes of different graph-theoretical measures such as strength, clustering coefficient, characteristic path length (CPL), local, and global efficiency determined for HFNs at different time windows. The different topology metrics showed significant differences between conditions in the mean and standard deviation of these metrics both across time and nodes. In addition, using an artificial neural network approach, we found stimulus-related dynamics that varied across the different network topology metrics. We conclude that functional connectivity dynamics (FCD), or NTD, which was found using the HFN approach during rest and stimulus processing, reflects temporal and topological changes in the functional organization and reorganization of neuronal cell assemblies.

  19. Two Approaches to Measuring Task Interdependence in Elementary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, W. W., Jr.

    This report compares two approaches to measuring task interdependence, a theoretically fruitful concept for analyzing an organization's technical system. Task interdependence exists among operating personnel in the degree that task performance of one operative constrains, augments, or otherwise poses contingencies for the performance of another.…

  20. A Measure of Scientific Reasoning: The Springs Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Marcia C.; Rice, Marian

    1979-01-01

    The Springs task, an individually administered measure of ability to criticize and control experiments, is described. The task has characteristics similar to Inhelder and Piaget's Bending Rods task; it yields scores on naming variables, controlling variables, and analyzing experiments. (See also RIE: ED 163 092.) (JKS)

  1. Sentence Repetition: What Does the Task Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polišenská, Kamila; Chiat, Shula; Roy, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sentence repetition is gaining increasing attention as a source of information about children's sentence-level abilities in clinical assessment, and as a clinical marker of specific language impairment. However, it is widely debated what the task is testing and therefore how informative it is. Aims: (1) To evaluate the effects of…

  2. Sentence Repetition: What Does the Task Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polišenská, Kamila; Chiat, Shula; Roy, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sentence repetition is gaining increasing attention as a source of information about children's sentence-level abilities in clinical assessment, and as a clinical marker of specific language impairment. However, it is widely debated what the task is testing and therefore how informative it is. Aims: (1) To evaluate the effects of…

  3. Measuring Category Intuitiveness in Unconstrained Categorization Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pothos, Emmanuel M.; Perlman, Amotz; Bailey, Todd M.; Kurtz, Ken; Edwards, Darren J.; Hines, Peter; McDonnell, John V.

    2011-01-01

    What makes a category seem natural or intuitive? In this paper, an unsupervised categorization task was employed to examine observer agreement concerning the categorization of nine different stimulus sets. The stimulus sets were designed to capture different intuitions about classification structure. The main empirical index of category…

  4. Measuring task-related changes in heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Moses, Ziev B; Luecken, Linda J; Eason, James C

    2007-01-01

    Small beat-to-beat differences in heart rate are the result of dynamic control of the cardiovascular system by the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been positively correlated with both mental and physical health. While many studies measure HRV under rest conditions, few have measured HRV during stressful situations. We describe an experimental protocol designed to measure baseline, task, and recovery values of HRV as a function of three different types of stressors. These stressors involve an attention task, a cold pressor test, and a videotaped speech presentation. We found a measurable change in heart rate in participants (n=10) during each task (all p's < 0.05). The relative increase or decrease from pre-task heart rate was predicted by task (one-way ANOVA, p= 0.0001). Spectral analysis of HRV during the attention task revealed consistently decreased measures of both high (68+/-7%, mean+/-S.E.) and low (62+/-13%) frequency HRV components as compared to baseline. HRV spectra for the cold pressor and speech tasks revealed no consistent patterns of increase or decrease from baseline measurements. We also found no correlation in reactivity measures between any of our tasks. These findings suggest that each of the tasks in our experimental design elicits a different type of stress response in an individual. Our experimental approach may prove useful to biobehavioral researchers searching for factors that determine individual differences in responses to stress in daily life.

  5. Comparison of Auditory and Visual Oddball fMRI in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Azurii K.; Wolf, Daniel H.; Valdez, Jeffrey N.; Turetsky, Bruce I.; Elliott, Mark A.; Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia often suffer from attentional deficits, both in focusing on task-relevant targets and inhibiting responses to distractors. Schizophrenia also has a differential impact on attention depending on modality: auditory or visual. However, it remains unclear how abnormal activation of attentional circuitry differs between auditory and visual modalities, as these two modalities have not been directly compared in the same individuals with schizophrenia. We utilized event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare patterns of brain activation during an auditory and visual oddball task in order to identify modality-specific attentional impairment. Healthy controls (n = 22) and patients with schizophrenia (n = 20) completed auditory and visual oddball tasks in separate sessions. For responses to targets, the auditory modality yielded greater activation than the visual modality (A-V) in auditory cortex, insula, and parietal operculum, but visual activation was greater than auditory (V-A) in visual cortex. For responses to novels, A-V differences were found in auditory cortex, insula, and supramarginal gyrus; and V-A differences in the visual cortex, inferior temporal gyrus, and superior parietal lobule. Group differences in modality-specific activation were found only for novel stimuli; controls showed larger A-V differences than patients in prefrontal cortex and the putamen. Furthermore, for patients, greater severity of negative symptoms was associated with greater divergence of A-V novel activation in the visual cortex. Our results demonstrate that patients have more pronounced activation abnormalities in auditory compared to visual attention, and link modality specific abnormalities to negative symptom severity. PMID:25037525

  6. Single-subject classification of schizophrenia using event-related potentials obtained during auditory and visual oddball paradigms.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Andres H; Popescu, Florin C; Bates, John A; Goldberg, Terry E; Malhotra, Anil K

    2013-04-01

    In the search for the biomarkers of schizophrenia, event-related potential (ERP) deficits obtained by applying the classic oddball paradigm are among the most consistent findings. However, the single-subject classification rate based on these parameters remains to be determined. Here, we present a data-driven approach by applying machine learning classifiers to relevant oddball ERPs. Twenty-four schizophrenic patients and 24 matched healthy controls finished auditory and visual oddball tasks while high-density electrophysiological recordings were applied. The N1 component in response to standards and target as well as the P3 component following targets were submitted to different machine learning algorithms and the resulting ERP features were submitted to further correlation analyses. We obtained a classification accuracy of 72.4 % using only two ERP components. Latencies of parietal N1 components to visual standard stimuli at electrode positions Pz and P1 were sufficient for classification. Further analysis revealed a high correlation of these features in controls and an intermediate correlation in schizophrenia patients. These data exemplarily show how automated inference may be applied to classify a pathological state in single subjects without prior knowledge of their diagnoses and illustrate the potential of machine learning algorithms for the identification of potential biomarkers. Moreover, this approach assesses the discriminative accuracy of one of the most consistent findings in schizophrenia research by means of single-subject classification.

  7. Sentence repetition: what does the task measure?

    PubMed

    Polišenská, Kamila; Chiat, Shula; Roy, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Sentence repetition is gaining increasing attention as a source of information about children's sentence-level abilities in clinical assessment, and as a clinical marker of specific language impairment. However, it is widely debated what the task is testing and therefore how informative it is. (1) To evaluate the effects of different types of long-term linguistic knowledge on immediate recall, (2) to assess age sensitivity of repetition tasks designed to evaluate these effects, and (3) to establish if the effects are similar across typologically different languages. The study also considers the implications of the findings for the use of sentence repetition as a research and clinical assessment tool. Participants were 50 English-speaking and 50 Czech-speaking typically developing 4-5-year-olds. Children's ability to recall sequences of items was compared in seven linguistic conditions ranging from fully well-formed sentences to sequences of non-words. In each condition, children repeated blocks of successively longer stimuli to establish their span. Results showed significant but differential effects of all linguistic factors in both languages. While syntactic violations and presence of non-words dramatically reduced children's span, semantic implausibility and the removal of sentence prosody played a significant but much smaller role. Familiarity of function words was more important than familiarity of content words. The effects of different linguistic factors on spans were the same for both languages and did not change between 4 and 5 years, although average spans increased over this age range. Children's ability to repeat sentences is more dependent on their familiarity with morphosyntax and lexical phonology than semantics or prosody, with function words of particular importance. Findings have implications for the use of recall in clinical assessment and as a research tool. © 2014 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  8. Developing a Measurement for Task Complexity in Flight.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiyuan; Lu, Yanyu; Wang, Zhen; Huang, Dan; Fu, Shan

    2015-08-01

    Task complexity is regarded as an essential metric that is related to a pilot's performance and workload. Normally, pilots follow Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) during a flight. In this study, we developed a measurement named Task Complexity in Flight (TCIF) to represent the task complexity in the SOPs. The TCIF measurement combined four complexity components into one index: actions logic complexity (ALC), actions size complexity (ASC), information control exchange complexity (ICEC), and control mode complexity (CMC).To verify the measurement, we calculated 11 tasks during the takeoff and landing phases from the SOPs, and invited 10 pilots to perform the same tasks in a flight simulator. After flight, the TCIF results were compared with two workload measurements: the Bedford scale and heart rate. The results of TCIF and the 4 components of the 11 tasks were calculated. Further, the TCIF results showed a significant correlation with the Bedford scores (R=0.851) and were also consistent with the difference in heart rate (R=0.816). Therefore, with the increased TCIF results, both the Bedford scale and the difference in heart rate increased. TCIF was proposed based on the flight operating conditions. Although additional studies of TCIF are necessary, the results of this study suggest this measurement could effectively indicate task complexity in flight, and could also be used to guide pilot training and task allocation on the flight deck.

  9. Psychopathy, attention, and oddball target detection: New insights from PCL-R facet scores.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nathaniel E; Steele, Vaughn R; Maurer, J Michael; Bernat, Edward M; Kiehl, Kent A

    2015-09-01

    Psychopathy is a disorder accompanied by cognitive deficits including abnormalities in attention. Prior studies examining cognitive features of psychopaths using ERPs have produced some inconsistent results. We examined psychopathy-related differences in ERPs during an auditory oddball task in a sample of incarcerated adult males. We extend previous work by deriving ERPs with principal component analysis (PCA) and relate these to the four facets of Hare's Psychopathy Checklist Revised (PCL-R). Features of psychopathy were associated with increased target N1 amplitude (facets 1, 4), decreased target P3 amplitude (facet 1), and reduced slow wave amplitude for frequent standard stimuli (facets 1, 3, 4). We conclude that employing PCA and examining PCL-R facets improve sensitivity and help clarify previously reported associations. Furthermore, attenuated slow wave during standards may be a novel marker for psychopaths' abnormalities in attention.

  10. Report of the Task Force on Institutional Effectiveness Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Board of Directors for Community Colleges, Phoenix.

    The Task Force on Institutional Effectiveness Measures was formed by the State Board of Directors for Community Colleges of Arizona to develop a statewide plan for systematically demonstrating the degree to which community colleges accomplish their diverse missions. Two subgroups were formed in the Task Force on transfer and college programs and…

  11. Measuring Metasyntactic Abilities: On a Classification of Metasyntactic Tasks.

    PubMed

    Simard, Daphnée; Labelle, Marie; Bergeron, Annie

    2017-04-01

    Researchers working on metasyntactic abilities (i.e., the metalinguistic ability associated with syntax) face the problem of defining and measuring them. Metasyntactic abilities is a multifaceted concept, which encompasses various types of behaviours, from being able to intentionally manipulate syntactic structures to being able to state syntactic rules, and the way in which it is defined and measured varies greatly from one study to another. The present paper proposes a theoretically informed classification of syntax related tasks. The first part presents previous research defining and distinguishing various types of syntactic and metasyntactic abilities and their interrelations. In the second part, commonly used tasks are described and analyzed in terms of the framework presented, with the aim of better pinpointing the type of ability measured by each task. Ultimately, with this analysis of commonly used tasks, we hope to offer criteria for discriminating between the various measures of metasyntactic abilities.

  12. Beta receptor-mediated modulation of the oddball P3 but not error-related ERP components in humans.

    PubMed

    de Rover, Mischa; Brown, Stephen B R E; Band, Guido P; Giltay, Erik J; van Noorden, Martijn S; van der Wee, Nic J A; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2015-09-01

    The P3 is a ubiquitous component of stimulus-driven neural activity that can be observed in scalp electrophysiological recordings. Multiple lines of evidence suggest an important role for the noradrenergic system in the generation of the P3. However, pharmacological studies of the P3 using noradrenergic manipulations have so far been limited to agents that affect α2-receptor signaling. The present study investigated whether β-adrenergic receptors are involved in the generation of the P3 and the error positivity (Pe), a component of the event-related potential that is elicited by errors and that bears many similarities to the P3. We used a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design in which we examined in human participants (N = 16) the effect of a single dose of propranolol (80 mg) on the amplitudes of the P3 observed in visual and auditory oddball tasks and the Pe observed in a flanker task. We found that P3s to auditory stimuli were increased in amplitude following treatment with propranolol. Propranolol also modulated the P3 to visual stimuli, but in a direction dependent on participants' level of trait anxiety: In participants with lower trait anxiety, propranolol resulted in a (non-significant) decrease in P3 amplitudes; in participants with higher trait anxiety, propranolol significantly enhanced P3 amplitude. Propranolol did not modulate the amplitude of the Pe or behavioral measures of conflict/error-related performance adjustments. These results provide the first evidence for involvement of β-adrenergic receptors in P3 generation. We speculate that propranolol affected the P3 through actions at β2-receptors in the locus coeruleus.

  13. Influences of perinatal dioxin load to visual motion and oddball stimuli examined with an EEG and MEG analysis.

    PubMed

    Schellart, Nico A M; Reits, Dik

    2008-07-01

    With MEG and EEG the effect of perinatal dioxin load of 38 healthy 7- to 12-year-old children was studied to assess possible disturbances of visual development. Latencies and amplitudes of the motion (N2 with subcomponents) and oddball responses (N200 and P3b) were analysed after age correction. With increasing load, latencies increased and the amplitudes of the oddball components tended to be reduced. The latency increase between the high- and low-loaded children was about 13 ms (P<0.004) and the oddball response showed an amplitude decrease of 12% (P=0.009). It may be concluded that, during the end-80s/early-90s, exposure to background levels in industrialized regions seems to have resulted in small underdevelopment or damage to visual motion processing and visual cognition. Since dioxin pollution by incinerators still exists in many regions in developing countries and also still, although at a smaller scale, in the industrialized world, perinatal loads of similar magnitude and possibly more as measured in this study may occur and as a consequence might affect the developing brain.

  14. Target and Non-Target Processing during Oddball and Cyberball: A Comparative Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Weschke, Sarah; Niedeggen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of social exclusion can be investigated by using a virtual ball-tossing game called Cyberball. In neuroimaging studies, structures have been identified which are activated during social exclusion. But to date the underlying mechanisms are not fully disclosed. In previous electrophysiological studies it was shown that the P3 complex is sensitive to exclusion manipulations in the Cyberball paradigm and that there is a correlation between P3 amplitude and self-reported social pain. Since this posterior event-related potential (ERP) was widely investigated using the oddball paradigm, we directly compared the ERP effects elicited by the target (Cyberball: “ball possession”) and non-target (Cyberball: “ball possession of a co-player) events in both paradigms. Analyses mainly focused on the effect of altered stimulus probabilities of the target and non-target events between two consecutive blocks of the tasks. In the first block, the probability of the target and non-target event was 33% (Cyberball: inclusion), in the second block target probability was reduced to 17%, and accordingly, non-target probability was increased to 66% (Cyberball: exclusion). Our results indicate that ERP amplitude differences between inclusion and exclusion are comparable to ERP amplitude effects in a visual oddball task. We therefore suggest that ERP effects–especially in the P3 range–in the Oddball and Cyberball paradigm rely on similar mechanisms, namely the probability of target and non-target events. Since the simulation of social exclusion (Cyberball) did not trigger a unique ERP response, the idea of an exclusion-specific neural alarm system is not supported. The limitations of an ERP-based approach will be discussed. PMID:27100787

  15. The effect of changing the secondary task in dual-task paradigms for measuring listening effort.

    PubMed

    Picou, Erin M; Ricketts, Todd A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of changing the secondary task in dual-task paradigms that measure listening effort. Specifically, the effects of increasing the secondary task complexity or the depth of processing on a paradigm's sensitivity to changes in listening effort were quantified in a series of two experiments. Specific factors investigated within each experiment were background noise and visual cues. Participants in Experiment 1 were adults with normal hearing (mean age 23 years) and participants in Experiment 2 were adults with mild sloping to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss (mean age 60.1 years). In both experiments, participants were tested using three dual-task paradigms. These paradigms had identical primary tasks, which were always monosyllable word recognition. The secondary tasks were all physical reaction time measures. The stimulus for the secondary task varied by paradigm and was a (1) simple visual probe, (2) a complex visual probe, or (3) the category of word presented. In this way, the secondary tasks mainly varied from the simple paradigm by either complexity or depth of speech processing. Using all three paradigms, participants were tested in four conditions, (1) auditory-only stimuli in quiet, (2) auditory-only stimuli in noise, (3) auditory-visual stimuli in quiet, and (4) auditory-visual stimuli in noise. During auditory-visual conditions, the talker's face was visible. Signal-to-noise ratios used during conditions with background noise were set individually so word recognition performance was matched in auditory-only and auditory-visual conditions. In noise, word recognition performance was approximately 80% and 65% for Experiments 1 and 2, respectively. For both experiments, word recognition performance was stable across the three paradigms, confirming that none of the secondary tasks interfered with the primary task. In Experiment 1 (listeners with normal hearing), analysis of median reaction times

  16. Visual mismatch response evoked by a perceptually indistinguishable oddball.

    PubMed

    Kogai, Takayoshi; Aoyama, Atsushi; Amano, Kaoru; Takeda, Tsunehiro

    2011-08-03

    Mismatch field (MMF) is an early magnetoencephalographic response evoked by deviant stimuli within a sequence of standard stimuli. Although auditory MMF is reported to be an automatic response, the automaticity of visual MMF has not been clearly demonstrated, partly because of the difficulty in designing an ignore condition. Our modified oddball paradigm had a masking stimulus inserted between briefly presented standard and deviant stimuli (vertical gratings with different spatial frequencies). Perceptual discrimination between masked standard and deviant stimuli was difficult, but the early magnetoencephalographic response for the deviant was significantly larger than that for the standard, when the former had a higher spatial frequency than the latter. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that visual MMF is evoked automatically.

  17. Adaptive Task-Space Cooperative Tracking Control of Networked Robotic Manipulators Without Task-Space Velocity Measurements.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xinwu; Wang, Hesheng; Liu, Yun-Hui; Chen, Weidong; Hu, Guoqiang; Zhao, Jie

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the task-space cooperative tracking control problem of networked robotic manipulators without task-space velocity measurements is addressed. To overcome the problem without task-space velocity measurements, a novel task-space position observer is designed to update the estimated task-space position and to simultaneously provide the estimated task-space velocity, based on which an adaptive cooperative tracking controller without task-space velocity measurements is presented by introducing new estimated task-space reference velocity and acceleration. Furthermore, adaptive laws are provided to cope with uncertain kinematics and dynamics and rigorous stability analysis is given to show asymptotical convergence of the task-space tracking and synchronization errors in the presence of communication delays under strongly connected directed graphs. Simulation results are given to demonstrate the performance of the proposed approach.

  18. Method for multimodal analysis of independent source differences in schizophrenia: combining gray matter structural and auditory oddball functional data.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, V D; Adali, T; Giuliani, N R; Pekar, J J; Kiehl, K A; Pearlson, G D

    2006-01-01

    The acquisition of both structural MRI (sMRI) and functional MRI (fMRI) data for a given study is a very common practice. However, these data are typically examined in separate analyses, rather than in a combined model. We propose a novel methodology to perform independent component analysis across image modalities, specifically, gray matter images and fMRI activation images as well as a joint histogram visualization technique. Joint independent component analysis (jICA) is used to decompose a matrix with a given row consisting of an fMRI activation image resulting from auditory oddball target stimuli and an sMRI gray matter segmentation image, collected from the same individual. We analyzed data collected on a group of schizophrenia patients and healthy controls using the jICA approach. Spatially independent joint-components are estimated and resulting components were further analyzed only if they showed a significant difference between patients and controls. The main finding was that group differences in bilateral parietal and frontal as well as posterior temporal regions in gray matter were associated with bilateral temporal regions activated by the auditory oddball target stimuli. A finding of less patient gray matter and less hemodynamic activity for target detection in these bilateral anterior temporal lobe regions was consistent with previous work. An unexpected corollary to this finding was that, in the regions showing the largest group differences, gray matter concentrations were larger in patients vs. controls, suggesting that more gray matter may be related to less functional connectivity in the auditory oddball fMRI task. Hum Brain Mapp, 2005. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Measurement of operator workload in an information processing task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenney, L. L.; Older, H. J.; Cameron, B. J.

    1972-01-01

    This was an experimental study to develop an improved methodology for measuring workload in an information processing task and to assess the effects of shift length and communication density (rate of information flow) on the ability to process and classify verbal messages. Each of twelve subjects was exposed to combinations of three shift lengths and two communication densities in a counterbalanced, repeated measurements experimental design. Results indicated no systematic variation in task performance measures or in other dependent measures as a function of shift length or communication density. This is attributed to the absence of a secondary loading task, an insufficiently taxing work schedule, and the lack of psychological stress. Subjective magnitude estimates of workload showed fatigue (and to a lesser degree, tension) to be a power function of shift length. Estimates of task difficulty and fatigue were initially lower but increased more sharply over time under low density than under high density conditions. An interpretation of findings and recommedations for furture research are included. This research has major implications to human workload problems in information processing of air traffic control verbal data.

  20. Adaptive task-space synchronisation of networked robotic agents without task-space velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijiao; Meng, Bin; Wang, Hanlei

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of task-space synchronisation of multiple robotic agents in the presence of uncertain kinematics and dynamics. Our control objective is to realise synchronisation without the measurements of task-space velocity. The communication topology is assumed to be directed graphs containing a spanning tree. A decentralised task-space observer with kinematic parameter updating is proposed to avoid the reliance of task-space velocity. Based on the observer, we propose the distributed adaptive synchronisation controller for two cases: (1) the leaderless consensus case and (2) the leader-follower case, where all the followers track the convex hull spanned by the virtual leaders and for each follower, it is required that there exists at least one leader that has a directed path to the follower. The asymptotic synchronisation is proved with Lyapunov analysis and input-output stability analysis tools. Simulations with multiple robotic agents are performed to show the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  1. Experimental measurements of motion cue effects on STOL approach tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringland, R. F.; Stapleford, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental program to investigate the effects of motion cues on STOL approach is presented. The simulator used was the Six-Degrees-of-Freedom Motion Simulator (S.01) at Ames Research Center of NASA which has ?2.7 m travel longitudinally and laterally and ?2.5 m travel vertically. Three major experiments, characterized as tracking tasks, were conducted under fixed and moving base conditions: (1) A simulated IFR approach of the Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Aircraft (AWJSRA), (2) a simulated VFR task with the same aircraft, and (3) a single-axis task having only linear acceleration as the motion cue. Tracking performance was measured in terms of the variances of several motion variables, pilot vehicle describing functions, and pilot commentary.

  2. An objective index of individual face discrimination in the right occipito-temporal cortex by means of fast periodic oddball stimulation.

    PubMed

    Liu-Shuang, Joan; Norcia, Anthony M; Rossion, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an approach based on fast periodic oddball stimulation that provides objective, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and behavior-free measures of the human brain's discriminative response to complex visual patterns. High-density electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded for human observers presented with 60s sequences containing a base-face (A) sinusoidally contrast-modulated at a frequency of 5.88 Hz (F), with face size varying every cycle. Different oddball-faces (B, C, D...) were introduced at fixed intervals (every 4 stimuli = F/5 = 1.18 Hz: AAAABAAAACAAAAD...). Individual face discrimination was indexed by responses at this 1.18 Hz oddball frequency. Following only 4 min of recording, significant responses emerged at exactly 1.18 Hz and its harmonics (e.g., 2F/5 = 2.35 Hz, 3F/5 = 3.53 Hz...), with up to a 300% signal increase over the right occipito-temporal cortex. This response was present in all participants, for both color and greyscale faces, providing a robust implicit neural measure of individual face discrimination. Face inversion or contrast-reversal did not affect the basic 5.88 Hz periodic response over medial occipital channels. However, these manipulations substantially reduced the 1.18 Hz oddball discrimination response over the right occipito-temporal region, indicating that this response reflects high-level processes that are partly face-specific. These observations indicate that fast periodic oddball stimulation can be used to rapidly and objectively characterize the discrimination of visual patterns and may become invaluable in characterizing this process in typical adult, developmental, and neuropsychological patient populations. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. One Year Developmental Stability and Covariance among Oddball, Novelty, Go/Nogo, and Flanker Event-Related Potentials in Adolescence: a Monozygotic Twin Study

    PubMed Central

    Burwell, Scott J.; Malone, Stephen M.; Iacono, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Event-related potential (ERP) measures may index genetic risk for psychopathology before disorder-onset in adolescence, but little is known about their developmental rank-order stability during this period of significant brain maturation. We studied ERP stability in 48 pairs of identical twins (age 14 – 16 years) tested one year apart. Trial-averaged voltage waveforms were extracted from electroencephalographic recordings from Oddball/Novelty, Go/Nogo, and Flanker tasks, and 16 amplitude measures were examined. Members of twin pairs were highly similar, whether based on ERP amplitude measures (intraclass correlation [ICC] median = .64, range = .44 – .86) or 3 factor scores (all ICCs ≥ .69) derived from them. Stability was high overall, with 69% of the 16 individual measures generating stability coefficients exceeding .70 and all factor scores showing stability above .75. Measures from 10 difference waveforms calculated from paired conditions within tasks were also examined, and were associated with lower twin similarity (ICC median = .52, .38 – .64) and developmental stability (only 30% exceeding .70). In a supplemental analysis, we found significant developmental stability for error-related negativity (range = .45 – .55) and positivity (.56 – .70) measures when average waveforms were based on 1 or more trials, and that these values were equivalent to those derived from averages using the current field recommendation which requires 6 or more trials. Overall, we conclude that the studied brain measures are largely stable over one year of mid- to late-adolescence, likely reflecting familial etiologic influences on brain functions pertaining to cognitive control and salience recognition. PMID:26997525

  4. One-year developmental stability and covariance among oddball, novelty, go/no-go, and flanker event-related potentials in adolescence: A monozygotic twin study.

    PubMed

    Burwell, Scott J; Malone, Stephen M; Iacono, William G

    2016-07-01

    ERP measures may index genetic risk for psychopathology before disorder onset in adolescence, but little is known about their developmental rank-order stability during this period of significant brain maturation. We studied ERP stability in 48 pairs of identical twins (age 14-16 years) tested 1 year apart. Trial-averaged voltage waveforms were extracted from electroencephalographic recordings from oddball/novelty, go/no-go, and flanker tasks, and 16 amplitude measures were examined. Members of twin pairs were highly similar, whether based on ERP amplitude measures (intraclass correlation [ICC] median = .64, range = .44-.86) or three factor scores (all ICCs ≥ .69) derived from them. Stability was high overall, with 69% of the 16 individual measures generating stability coefficients exceeding .70 and all factor scores showing stability above .75. Measures from 10 difference waveforms calculated from paired conditions within tasks were also examined, and were associated with lower twin similarity (ICC median = .52, .38-.64) and developmental stability (only 30% exceeding .70). In a supplemental analysis, we found significant developmental stability for error-related negativity (range = .45-.55) and positivity (.56-.70) measures when average waveforms were based on one or more trials, and that these values were equivalent to those derived from averages using the current field recommendation, which requires six or more trials. Overall, we conclude that the studied brain measures are largely stable over 1 year of mid- to late adolescence, likely reflecting familial etiologic influences on brain functions pertaining to cognitive control and salience recognition. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  5. Visual novel stimuli in an ERP novelty oddball paradigm: effects of familiarity on repetition and recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Cycowicz, Yael M; Friedman, David

    2007-01-01

    The orienting response, the brain's reaction to novel and/or out of context familiar events, is reflected by the novelty P3 of the ERP. Contextually novel events also engender high rates of recognition memory. We examined, under incidental and intentional conditions, the effects of visual symbol familiarity on the novelty P3 recorded during an oddball task and on the parietal episodic memory (EM) effect, an index of recollection. Repetition of familiar, but not unfamiliar, symbols elicited a reduction in the novelty P3. Better recognition performance for the familiar symbols was associated with a robust parietal EM effect, which was absent for the unfamiliar symbols in the incidental task. These data demonstrate that processing of novel events depends on expectation and whether stimuli have preexisting representations in long-term semantic memory.

  6. Metrics and Measures for Intelligence Analysis Task Difficulty

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Allwein, Kelcy M.

    2005-05-02

    Recent workshops and conferences supporting the intelligence community (IC) have highlighted the need to characterize the difficulty or complexity of intelligence analysis (IA) tasks in order to facilitate assessments of the impact or effectiveness of IA tools that are being considered for introduction into the IC. Some fundamental issues are: (a) how to employ rigorous methodologies in evaluating tools, given a host of problems such as controlling for task difficulty, effects of time or learning, small-sample size limitations; (b) how to measure the difficulty/complexity of IA tasks in order to establish valid experimental/quasi-experimental designs aimed to support evaluation of tools; and (c) development of more rigorous (summative), performance-based measures of human performance during the conduct of IA tasks, beyond the more traditional reliance on formative assessments (e.g., subjective ratings). Invited discussants will be asked to comment on one or more of these issues, with the aim of bringing the most salient issues and research needs into focus

  7. Measurement of dynamic task related functional networks using MEG.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, George C; Tewarie, Prejaas K; Colclough, Giles L; Gascoyne, Lauren E; Hunt, Benjamin A E; Morris, Peter G; Woolrich, Mark W; Brookes, Matthew J

    2017-02-01

    The characterisation of dynamic electrophysiological brain networks, which form and dissolve in order to support ongoing cognitive function, is one of the most important goals in neuroscience. Here, we introduce a method for measuring such networks in the human brain using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Previous network analyses look for brain regions that share a common temporal profile of activity. Here distinctly, we exploit the high spatio-temporal resolution of MEG to measure the temporal evolution of connectivity between pairs of parcellated brain regions. We then use an ICA based procedure to identify networks of connections whose temporal dynamics covary. We validate our method using MEG data recorded during a finger movement task, identifying a transient network of connections linking somatosensory and primary motor regions, which modulates during the task. Next, we use our method to image the networks which support cognition during a Sternberg working memory task. We generate a novel neuroscientific picture of cognitive processing, showing the formation and dissolution of multiple networks which relate to semantic processing, pattern recognition and language as well as vision and movement. Our method tracks the dynamics of functional connectivity in the brain on a timescale commensurate to the task they are undertaking.

  8. The Production of Specified Electrocortical Activity as a Measurable Task.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    subject to disruption by enviromental distractors in the same way that cognitive tasks were. If this last hypothesis was substantiated one might be able to...devices and software s.ysgms. Hardware Devices It was desirable that the measurement system be simple, economical , and Stransportable for possible...it appears to have a high degree of sensitivity to enviromental changes, it is, perhaps, overly sensitive and thus unstable. More productive metrics

  9. Phase Measurement of Galvanneal Task JPL Task Order Number: RF-152 Amendment Number: 543

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Lowry; Beverly Tai

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this task was to demonstrate an x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique which would measure the phase composition of galvanneal coatings of sheet steel rapidly and non-destructively with an accuracy of 0.5%. This data acquisition and analysis method would be implemented as an on-line process control input. The AISI sample matrix evaluated for this study is shown in Appendix I. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Data Measurement Corporation (DMC) measured iron and zinc XRF responses from these samples. In addition, JPL performed metallograph, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize the samples' galvanneal phase morphology. This data was correlated with the XRF experimental results and then compared to phase composition models, which were generated using a Fundamental Parameters Method (FPM) approach.

  10. Event-related delta, theta, alpha and gamma correlates to auditory oddball processing during Vipassana meditation

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Arnaud; Polich, John

    2013-01-01

    Long-term Vipassana meditators sat in meditation vs. a control (instructed mind wandering) states for 25 min, electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded and condition order counterbalanced. For the last 4 min, a three-stimulus auditory oddball series was presented during both meditation and control periods through headphones and no task imposed. Time-frequency analysis demonstrated that meditation relative to the control condition evinced decreased evoked delta (2–4 Hz) power to distracter stimuli concomitantly with a greater event-related reduction of late (500–900 ms) alpha-1 (8–10 Hz) activity, which indexed altered dynamics of attentional engagement to distracters. Additionally, standard stimuli were associated with increased early event-related alpha phase synchrony (inter-trial coherence) and evoked theta (4–8 Hz) phase synchrony, suggesting enhanced processing of the habituated standard background stimuli. Finally, during meditation, there was a greater differential early-evoked gamma power to the different stimulus classes. Correlation analysis indicated that this effect stemmed from a meditation state-related increase in early distracter-evoked gamma power and phase synchrony specific to longer-term expert practitioners. The findings suggest that Vipassana meditation evokes a brain state of enhanced perceptual clarity and decreased automated reactivity. PMID:22648958

  11. Genetic Determinants of Target and Novelty Related Event-related Potentials in the Auditory Oddball Response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyu; Kiehl, Kent A.; Pearlson, Godfrey; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Eichele, Tom; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2009-01-01

    Processing of novel and target stimuli in the auditory target detection or ‘oddball’ task encompasses the chronometry of perception, attention and working memory and is reflected in scalp recorded event-related potentials (ERPs). A variety of ERP components related to target and novelty processing have been described and extensively studied, and linked to deficits of cognitive processing. However, little is known about associations of genotypes with ERP endophenotypes. Here we sought to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of auditory oddball ERP components using a novel data analysis technique. A parallel independent component analysis of the electrophysiology and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data was used to extract relations between patterns of ERP components and SNP associations purely based on an analysis incorporating higher order statistics. The method allows for broader associations of genotypes with phenotypes than traditional hypothesis-driven univariate correlational analyses. We show that target detection and processing of novel stimuli are both associated with a shared cluster of genes linked to the adrenergic and dopaminergic pathways. These results provide evidence of genetic influences on normal patterns of ERP generation during auditory target detection and novelty processing at the SNP association level. PMID:19285141

  12. Event-related delta, theta, alpha and gamma correlates to auditory oddball processing during Vipassana meditation.

    PubMed

    Cahn, B Rael; Delorme, Arnaud; Polich, John

    2013-01-01

    Long-term Vipassana meditators sat in meditation vs. a control (instructed mind wandering) states for 25 min, electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded and condition order counterbalanced. For the last 4 min, a three-stimulus auditory oddball series was presented during both meditation and control periods through headphones and no task imposed. Time-frequency analysis demonstrated that meditation relative to the control condition evinced decreased evoked delta (2-4 Hz) power to distracter stimuli concomitantly with a greater event-related reduction of late (500-900 ms) alpha-1 (8-10 Hz) activity, which indexed altered dynamics of attentional engagement to distracters. Additionally, standard stimuli were associated with increased early event-related alpha phase synchrony (inter-trial coherence) and evoked theta (4-8 Hz) phase synchrony, suggesting enhanced processing of the habituated standard background stimuli. Finally, during meditation, there was a greater differential early-evoked gamma power to the different stimulus classes. Correlation analysis indicated that this effect stemmed from a meditation state-related increase in early distracter-evoked gamma power and phase synchrony specific to longer-term expert practitioners. The findings suggest that Vipassana meditation evokes a brain state of enhanced perceptual clarity and decreased automated reactivity.

  13. Unique sensor fusion system for coordinate-measuring machine tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nashman, Marilyn; Yoshimi, Billibon; Hong, Tsai Hong; Rippey, William G.; Herman, Martin

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes a real-time hierarchical system that fuses data from vision and touch sensors to improve the performance of a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) used for dimensional inspection tasks. The system consists of sensory processing, world modeling, and task decomposition modules. It uses the strengths of each sensor -- the precision of the CMM scales and the analog touch probe and the global information provided by the low resolution camera -- to improve the speed and flexibility of the inspection task. In the experiment described, the vision module performs all computations in image coordinate space. The part's boundaries are extracted during an initialization process and then the probe's position is continuously updated as it scans and measures the part surface. The system fuses the estimated probe velocity and distance to the part boundary in image coordinates with the estimated velocity and probe position provided by the CMM controller. The fused information provides feedback to the monitor controller as it guides the touch probe to scan the part. We also discuss integrating information from the vision system and the probe to autonomously collect data for 2-D to 3-D calibration, and work to register computer aided design (CAD) models with images of parts in the workplace.

  14. On the importance of Task 1 and error performance measures in PRP dual-task studies

    PubMed Central

    Strobach, Tilo; Schütz, Anja; Schubert, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The psychological refractory period (PRP) paradigm is a dominant research tool in the literature on dual-task performance. In this paradigm a first and second component task (i.e., Task 1 and Task 2) are presented with variable stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) and priority to perform Task 1. The main indicator of dual-task impairment in PRP situations is an increasing Task 2-RT with decreasing SOAs. This impairment is typically explained with some task components being processed strictly sequentially in the context of the prominent central bottleneck theory. This assumption could implicitly suggest that processes of Task 1 are unaffected by Task 2 and bottleneck processing, i.e., decreasing SOAs do not increase reaction times (RTs) and error rates of the first task. The aim of the present review is to assess whether PRP dual-task studies included both RT and error data presentations and statistical analyses and whether studies including both data types (i.e., RTs and error rates) show data consistent with this assumption (i.e., decreasing SOAs and unaffected RTs and/or error rates in Task 1). This review demonstrates that, in contrast to RT presentations and analyses, error data is underrepresented in a substantial number of studies. Furthermore, a substantial number of studies with RT and error data showed a statistically significant impairment of Task 1 performance with decreasing SOA. Thus, these studies produced data that is not primarily consistent with the strong assumption that processes of Task 1 are unaffected by Task 2 and bottleneck processing in the context of PRP dual-task situations; this calls for a more careful report and analysis of Task 1 performance in PRP studies and for a more careful consideration of theories proposing additions to the bottleneck assumption, which are sufficiently general to explain Task 1 and Task 2 effects. PMID:25904890

  15. On the importance of Task 1 and error performance measures in PRP dual-task studies.

    PubMed

    Strobach, Tilo; Schütz, Anja; Schubert, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The psychological refractory period (PRP) paradigm is a dominant research tool in the literature on dual-task performance. In this paradigm a first and second component task (i.e., Task 1 and Task 2) are presented with variable stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) and priority to perform Task 1. The main indicator of dual-task impairment in PRP situations is an increasing Task 2-RT with decreasing SOAs. This impairment is typically explained with some task components being processed strictly sequentially in the context of the prominent central bottleneck theory. This assumption could implicitly suggest that processes of Task 1 are unaffected by Task 2 and bottleneck processing, i.e., decreasing SOAs do not increase reaction times (RTs) and error rates of the first task. The aim of the present review is to assess whether PRP dual-task studies included both RT and error data presentations and statistical analyses and whether studies including both data types (i.e., RTs and error rates) show data consistent with this assumption (i.e., decreasing SOAs and unaffected RTs and/or error rates in Task 1). This review demonstrates that, in contrast to RT presentations and analyses, error data is underrepresented in a substantial number of studies. Furthermore, a substantial number of studies with RT and error data showed a statistically significant impairment of Task 1 performance with decreasing SOA. Thus, these studies produced data that is not primarily consistent with the strong assumption that processes of Task 1 are unaffected by Task 2 and bottleneck processing in the context of PRP dual-task situations; this calls for a more careful report and analysis of Task 1 performance in PRP studies and for a more careful consideration of theories proposing additions to the bottleneck assumption, which are sufficiently general to explain Task 1 and Task 2 effects.

  16. Can the Task-Cuing Paradigm Measure an Endogenous Task-Set Reconfiguration Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsell, Stephen; Mizon, Guy A.

    2006-01-01

    In 6 task-cuing experiments, with 2 cues per task, the authors varied cue-stimulus interval to investigate G. D. Logan and C. Bundesen's (2003) claim that when cue repetition is controlled for, task-switch cost and its reduction with preparation are largely eliminated and hence cannot index an endogenous control process. Experiment 1 replicates…

  17. Does the Iowa Gambling Task Measure Executive Function?

    PubMed Central

    Gansler, David A.; Jerram, Matthew W.; Vannorsdall, Tracy D.; Schretlen, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is assumed to measure executive functioning, but this has not been empirically tested by means of both convergent and discriminant validity. We used structural equation modeling (SEM) to test whether the IGT is an executive function (EF) task (convergent validity) and whether it is not related to other neuropsychological domains (discriminant validity). Healthy community-dwelling participants (N = 214) completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. We analyzed the conventional IGT metric and three alternative metrics based on the overall difference of advantageous minus disadvantageous choices made during the last 60 IGT responses and advantageous minus disadvantageous choices based on two specific decks of cards (D minus A). An a priori six-factor hierarchical model of neuropsychological functioning was confirmed with SEM. Attention and processing speed were grouped as “non-associative” factors. Fluency, executive functioning, visual learning/memory, and verbal learning/memory were grouped as higher-level “associative” factors. Of the non-associative factors, attention, but not speed, predicted IGT performance. When each associative factor was entered along with attention, only EF improved the model fit and that was only for metrics based on trials 41–100. SEM indicates metrics based on trails 1–100 are influenced by attention, and metrics based on trails 41–100 are influenced by attention and EF. Its associative strength with attention is twice that of EF. Conceptually, the IGT is a multi-trait task involving novel problem-solving and attentional domains to a greater extent, and executive functioning to a lesser extent. PMID:22015855

  18. First love does not die: a sustaining primacy effect on ERP components in an oddball paradigm.

    PubMed

    Kotchoubey, Boris

    2014-03-27

    Both primacy and frequency factors belong to very powerful regulators of human cognition and behavior, but their relationship is only scarcely investigated. This study aimed to investigate the interplay of primacy and frequency effects on behavioral and electrophysiological (event-related potential, ERP) measures using an oddball paradigm. In each experiment 234 frequent (standard) and 66 rare (deviant) harmonic tones were presented. Participants either responded to stimuli with a button press (motor experiment) or counted the rare stimulus (counting experiment). Each experiment entailed two counterbalanced conditions. In the "classical" condition both standards and deviants were equally distributed across the presentation series, while in the "primacy" condition more deviants were concentrated at the beginning of the series. In the motor experiment no differences between the two conditions were obtained at the behavioral level, but the amplitude of N2 to deviants was significantly larger in the classical than primacy condition, and the same trend was obtained for the P3 component at lateral posterior sites. In the counting experiment both N2b and P3 effects were strongly reduced in the primacy condition as compared with the classical condition. Therefore, stimuli that were frequently presented in the first stimulation run were subsequently processed as "less rare", although in fact they were even rarer than in the control condition. The data indicate that the initial pattern of stimulation can substantially affect the frequency effect during the processing of subsequent stimuli.

  19. Automatic processing of unattended lexical information in visual oddball presentation: neurophysiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Shtyrov, Yury; Goryainova, Galina; Tugin, Sergei; Ossadtchi, Alexey; Shestakova, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Previous electrophysiological studies of automatic language processing revealed early (100–200 ms) reflections of access to lexical characteristics of speech signal using the so-called mismatch negativity (MMN), a negative ERP deflection elicited by infrequent irregularities in unattended repetitive auditory stimulation. In those studies, lexical processing of spoken stimuli became manifest as an enhanced ERP in response to unattended real words, as opposed to phonologically matched but meaningless pseudoword stimuli. This lexical ERP enhancement was explained by automatic activation of word memory traces realized as distributed strongly intra-connected neuronal circuits, whose robustness guarantees memory trace activation even in the absence of attention on spoken input. Such an account would predict the automatic activation of these memory traces upon any presentation of linguistic information, irrespective of the presentation modality. As previous lexical MMN studies exclusively used auditory stimulation, we here adapted the lexical MMN paradigm to investigate early automatic lexical effects in the visual modality. In a visual oddball sequence, matched short word and pseudoword stimuli were presented tachistoscopically in perifoveal area outside the visual focus of attention, as the subjects' attention was concentrated on a concurrent non-linguistic visual dual task in the center of the screen. Using EEG, we found a visual analogue of the lexical ERP enhancement effect, with unattended written words producing larger brain response amplitudes than matched pseudowords, starting at ~100 ms. Furthermore, we also found significant visual MMN, reported here for the first time for unattended perifoveal lexical stimuli. The data suggest early automatic lexical processing of visually presented language which commences rapidly and can take place outside the focus of attention. PMID:23950740

  20. Validating the Electric Maze Task as a Measure of Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Kelly W.; Cheatham, Carol L.

    2017-01-01

    The Electric Maze Task (EMT) is a novel planning task designed to allow flexible testing of planning abilities across a broad age range and to incorporate manipulations to test underlying planning abilities, such as working-memory and inhibitory control skills. The EMT was tested in a group of 63 typically developing 7- to 12-year-olds.…

  1. Lifespan Differences in Nonlinear Dynamics during Rest and Auditory Oddball Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Viktor; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2012-01-01

    Electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) were used to assess age-associated differences in nonlinear brain dynamics during both rest and auditory oddball performance in children aged 9.0-12.8 years, younger adults, and older adults. We computed nonlinear coupling dynamics and dimensional complexity, and also determined spectral alpha power as an…

  2. Lifespan Differences in Nonlinear Dynamics during Rest and Auditory Oddball Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Viktor; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2012-01-01

    Electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) were used to assess age-associated differences in nonlinear brain dynamics during both rest and auditory oddball performance in children aged 9.0-12.8 years, younger adults, and older adults. We computed nonlinear coupling dynamics and dimensional complexity, and also determined spectral alpha power as an…

  3. Neuropharmacological effect of methylphenidate on attention network in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder during oddball paradigms as assessed using functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Masako; Monden, Yukifumi; Dan, Ippeita; Dan, Haruka; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Mizutani, Tsutomu; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Gunji, Yuji; Momoi, Mariko Y.; Watanabe, Eiju; Yamagata, Takanori

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The current study aimed to explore the neural substrate for methylphenidate effects on attentional control in school-aged children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), which can be applied to young children with ADHD more easily than conventional neuroimaging modalities. Using fNIRS, we monitored the oxy-hemoglobin signal changes of 22 ADHD children (6 to 14 years old) performing an oddball task before and 1.5 h after methylphenidate or placebo administration, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Twenty-two age- and gender-matched normal controls without methylphenidate administration were also monitored. In the control subjects, the oddball task recruited the right prefrontal and inferior parietal cortices, and this activation was absent in premedicated ADHD children. The reduced right prefrontal activation was normalized after methylphenidate but not placebo administration in ADHD children. These results are consistent with the neuropharmacological effects of methylphenidate to upregulate the dopamine system in the prefrontal cortex innervating from the ventral tegmentum (mesocortical pathway), but not the noradrenergic system from the parietal cortex to the locus coeruleus. Thus, right prefrontal activation would serve as an objective neurofunctional biomarker to indicate the effectiveness of methylphenidate on ADHD children in attentional control. fNIRS monitoring enhances early clinical diagnosis and the treatment of ADHD children, especially those with an inattention phenotype. PMID:26157971

  4. Neuropharmacological effect of atomoxetine on attention network in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder during oddball paradigms as assessed using functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Masako; Monden, Yukifumi; Dan, Ippeita; Dan, Haruka; Mizutani, Tsutomu; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Gunji, Yuji; Hirano, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Takamichi; Shimoizumi, Hideo; Momoi, Mariko Y.; Yamagata, Takanori; Watanabe, Eiju

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The current study aimed to explore the neural substrate for atomoxetine effects on attentional control in school-aged children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), which can be applied to young children with ADHD more easily than conventional neuroimaging modalities. Using fNIRS, we monitored the oxy-hemoglobin signal changes of 15 ADHD children (6 to 14 years old) performing an oddball task before and 1.5 h after atomoxetine or placebo administration, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Fifteen age-, gender-, and intelligence quotient-matched normal controls without atomoxetine administration were also monitored. In the control subjects, the oddball task recruited the right prefrontal and inferior parietal cortices. The right prefrontal and parietal activation was normalized after atomoxetine administration in ADHD children. This was in contrast to our previous study using a similar protocol showing methylphenidate-induced normalization of only the right prefrontal function. fNIRS allows the detection of differential neuropharmacological profiles of both substances in the attentional network: the neuropharmacological effects of atomoxetine to upregulate the noradrenergic system reflected in the right prefrontal and inferior parietal activations and those of methylphenidate to upregulate the dopamine system reflected in the prefrontal cortex activation. PMID:26157979

  5. Neuropharmacological effect of methylphenidate on attention network in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder during oddball paradigms as assessed using functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Masako; Monden, Yukifumi; Dan, Ippeita; Dan, Haruka; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Mizutani, Tsutomu; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Gunji, Yuji; Momoi, Mariko Y; Watanabe, Eiju; Yamagata, Takanori

    2014-07-01

    The current study aimed to explore the neural substrate for methylphenidate effects on attentional control in school-aged children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), which can be applied to young children with ADHD more easily than conventional neuroimaging modalities. Using fNIRS, we monitored the oxy-hemoglobin signal changes of 22 ADHD children (6 to 14 years old) performing an oddball task before and 1.5 h after methylphenidate or placebo administration, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Twenty-two age- and gender-matched normal controls without methylphenidate administration were also monitored. In the control subjects, the oddball task recruited the right prefrontal and inferior parietal cortices, and this activation was absent in premedicated ADHD children. The reduced right prefrontal activation was normalized after methylphenidate but not placebo administration in ADHD children. These results are consistent with the neuropharmacological effects of methylphenidate to upregulate the dopamine system in the prefrontal cortex innervating from the ventral tegmentum (mesocortical pathway), but not the noradrenergic system from the parietal cortex to the locus coeruleus. Thus, right prefrontal activation would serve as an objective neurofunctional biomarker to indicate the effectiveness of methylphenidate on ADHD children in attentional control. fNIRS monitoring enhances early clinical diagnosis and the treatment of ADHD children, especially those with an inattention phenotype.

  6. Stress and the Measurement of Task Performance. I. Decision Making in Complex Tasks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    P. R. The effect of crowding on human task performance. Journal of Applied Social Psychology , 1971, 1, 7-25. Higbee, K. L. Expression of "Walter...uncontrollable and unpredictable noise. Journal of Applied Social Psychology , 1971, 1, 44-56 Schroder, H. M., Driver, M. J. and Streufert, S. Human

  7. Cortical potentials in an auditory oddball task reflect individual differences in working memory capacity

    PubMed Central

    Yurgil, Kate A.; Golob, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    This study determined whether auditory cortical responses associated with mechanisms of attention vary with individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC) and perceptual load. The operation span test defined subjects with low vs. high WMC, who then discriminated target/nontarget tones while EEG was recorded. Infrequent white noise distracters were presented at midline or ±90° locations, and perceptual load was manipulated by varying nontarget frequency. Amplitude of the N100 to distracters was negatively correlated with WMC. Relative to targets, only high WMC subjects showed attenuated N100 amplitudes to nontargets. In the higher WMC group, increased perceptual load was associated with decreased P3a amplitudes to distracters and longer-lasting negative slow wave to nontargets. Results show that auditory cortical processing is associated with multiple facets of attention control related to WMC and possibly higher-level cognition. PMID:24016201

  8. Gender difference in event related potentials to masked emotional stimuli in the oddball task.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Park, Gewnhi; Kim, Sangrae; Kim, Imyel; Chae, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Hyun Taek

    2013-06-01

    We investigated gender differences in event-related potential (ERP) responses to subliminally presented threat-related stimuli. Twenty-four participants were presented with threat-related and neutral pictures for a very brief period of time (17 ms). To explore gender differences in ERP responses to subliminally presented stimuli, we examined six ERP components [P1, N170, N250, P300, Early Posterior Negativity (EPN) and Late Positive Potential (LPP)]. The result revealed that only female participants showed significant increases in the N170 and the EPN in response to subliminally presented threat-related stimuli compared to neutral stimuli. Our results suggest that female participants exhibit greater cortical processing of subliminally presented threat-related stimuli than male participants.

  9. Gender Difference in Event Related Potentials to Masked Emotional Stimuli in the Oddball Task

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Park, Gewnhi; Kim, Sangrae; Kim, Imyel; Chae, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Hyun Taek

    2013-01-01

    Objective We investigated gender differences in event-related potential (ERP) responses to subliminally presented threat-related stimuli. Methods Twenty-four participants were presented with threat-related and neutral pictures for a very brief period of time (17 ms). To explore gender differences in ERP responses to subliminally presented stimuli, we examined six ERP components [P1, N170, N250, P300, Early Posterior Negativity (EPN) and Late Positive Potential (LPP)]. Results The result revealed that only female participants showed significant increases in the N170 and the EPN in response to subliminally presented threat-related stimuli compared to neutral stimuli. Conclusion Our results suggest that female participants exhibit greater cortical processing of subliminally presented threat-related stimuli than male participants. PMID:23798965

  10. Capturing dynamic patterns of task-based functional connectivity with EEG.

    PubMed

    Karamzadeh, Nader; Medvedev, Andrei; Azari, Afrouz; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Najafizadeh, Laleh

    2013-02-01

    A new approach to trace the dynamic patterns of task-based functional connectivity, by combining signal segmentation, dynamic time warping (DTW), and Quality Threshold (QT) clustering techniques, is presented. Electroencephalography (EEG) signals of 5 healthy subjects were recorded as they performed an auditory oddball and a visual modified oddball tasks. To capture the dynamic patterns of functional connectivity during the execution of each task, EEG signals are segmented into durations that correspond to the temporal windows of previously well-studied event-related potentials (ERPs). For each temporal window, DTW is employed to measure the functional similarities among channels. Unlike commonly used temporal similarity measures, such as cross correlation, DTW compares time series by taking into consideration that their alignment properties may vary in time. QT clustering analysis is then used to automatically identify the functionally connected regions in each temporal window. For each task, the proposed approach was able to establish a unique sequence of dynamic pattern (observed in all 5 subjects) for brain functional connectivity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Robust Long-Range Optical Tracking for Tunneling Measurement Tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossel, Annette; Gerstweiler, Georg; Vonach, Emanuel; Chmelina, Klaus; Kaufmann, Hannes

    2013-04-01

    Over the last years, automation for tunnel construction and mining activities increased rapidly. To allow for enhanced tunneling measurement, monitoring of workers and remote control of machines, systems are required that are capable of real-time positioning of several static as well as moving targets. Such a system must provide continuous and precise 3D position estimation in large volumes and must be capable to be installed and work correctly during on-going tunneling or mining tasks. Tracking systems are a fundamental component of a VR system to determine the 3D-position and orientation of a target in 3D space. Infrared optical tracking systems use infrared light to track several static or moving targets simultaneously with low latency in small tracking volumes. To benefit from the capabilities of infrared optical tracking, a system is proposed to track static as well as moving optical targets in large tracking volumes with a maximum depth extend of 70 meters. Our system needs a minimal hardware setup consisting out of two high quality machine vision cameras, which are mounted on both walls of the tunnel, and a standard (portable) workstation for data processing. Targets are equipped with infrared LEDs and can be either carried by workers or attached to a machine. The two cameras form a stereo rig and face into the measurement volume to allow for continuous tracking. Using image processing techniques, the LEDs of the target(s) are detected in both 2D camera images and are back-projected into 3D using projective reconstruction algorithms. Thereby, the 3D position estimate of the target is determined. Using image filtering techniques, fitting methods based on target's geometric constraints and prediction heuristics, the system allows for unique target identification during calibration and tracking even in environments with heavy interferences such as vibrations, tunnel illumination or machine lights. We extensively tested the system to (1) determine optimal

  12. Language lateralization as measured by dichotic VRT and recognition tasks.

    PubMed

    Leksa, B J; Jackson, T L

    1983-01-01

    A dichotic color-naming VRT task and a dichotic digits recognition task were administered. The first required the naming of five colors paired with their backward pronunciation: the second of five nonsimilar digits. Forty-eight right-handed male and female subjects were used, controlling for the factors of sex, handedness, and familial sinistrality. A highly significant left-ear advantage was obtained, suggesting that previous results of dichotic studies may only pertain to a limited class of phenomic stimuli. Results implicate different cerebral processes in the analysis of familiar and novel auditory and phenomic stimuli.

  13. Measuring Children's Age Stereotyping Using a Modified Piagetian Conservation Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwong See, Sheree T.; Rasmussen, Carmen; Pertman, S. Quinn

    2012-01-01

    We examined five-year-old-children's age stereotyping using a modified Piagetian conservation task. Children were asked if two lines of objects were the "same" after one line had been made longer (transformed). A conversational account posits that children's answers reflect assumptions about the asker's motivation for the question (Schwarz, 1996).…

  14. Measuring Attention in Rodents: Comparison of a Modified Signal Detection Task and the 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Karly M.; Peak, James; Burne, Thomas H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric research has utilized cognitive testing in rodents to improve our understanding of cognitive deficits and for preclinical drug development. However, more sophisticated cognitive tasks have not been as widely exploited due to low throughput and the extensive training time required. We developed a modified signal detection task (SDT) based on the growing body of literature aimed at improving cognitive testing in rodents. This study directly compares performance on the modified SDT with a traditional test for measuring attention, the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5CSRTT). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on either the 5CSRTT or the SDT. Briefly, the 5CSRTT required rodents to pay attention to a spatial array of five apertures and respond with a nose poke when an aperture was illuminated. The SDT required the rat to attend to a light panel and respond either left or right to indicate the presence of a signal. In addition, modifications were made to the reward delivery, timing, control of body positioning, and the self-initiation of trials. It was found that less training time was required for the SDT, with both sessions to criteria and daily session duration significantly reduced. Rats performed with a high level of accuracy (>87%) on both tasks, however omissions were far more frequent on the 5CSRTT. The signal duration was reduced on both tasks as a manipulation of task difficulty relevant to attention and a similar pattern of decreasing accuracy was observed on both tasks. These results demonstrate some of the advantages of the SDT over the traditional 5CSRTT as being higher throughput with reduced training time, fewer omission responses and their body position was controlled at stimulus onset. In addition, rats performing the SDT had comparable high levels of accuracy. These results highlight the differences and similarities between the 5CSRTT and a modified SDT as tools for assessing attention in preclinical animal models. PMID

  15. Measuring pilot workload in a motion base simulator. III - Synchronous secondary task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantowitz, Barry H.; Bortolussi, Michael R.; Hart, Sandra G.

    1987-01-01

    This experiment continues earlier research of Kantowitz et al. (1983) conducted in a GAT-1 motion-base trainer to evaluate choice-reaction secondary tasks as measures of pilot work load. The earlier work used an asynchronous secondary task presented every 22 sec regardless of flying performance. The present experiment uses a synchronous task presented only when a critical event occurred on the flying task. Both two- and four-choice visual secondary tasks were investigated. Analysis of primary flying-task results showed no decrement in error for altitude, indicating that the key assumption necessary for using a choice secondary task was satisfied. Reaction times showed significant differences between 'easy' and 'hard' flight scenarios as well as the ability to discriminate among flight tasks.

  16. Measurement of brain activation difference during different mathematical tasks by near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Naoko; Kuroda, Yasufumi; Chance, Britton; Nioka, Shoko; Eda, Hideo; Maesako, Takanori

    2009-02-01

    This study examines differences in concentration changes of hemoglobin in the brain while finding algebraic solutions versus geometrical solutions. We use Near Infrared Spectroscopy imaging system to measure the hemoglobin changes while subjects are solving algebraic task and geometrical task. NIRS imaging system can measure changes in the concentration of hemoglobin. This brain activity data shows a difference between the two different experimental tasks which helps us to identify the characteristics of thinking processes.

  17. Comparison of Psychophysiological and Dual-Task Measures of Listening Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeman, Scott; Sims, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We wished to make a comparison of psychophysiological measures of listening effort with subjective and dual-task measures of listening effort for a diotic-dichotic-digits and a sentences-in-noise task. Method: Three groups of young adults (18-38 years old) with normal hearing participated in three experiments: two psychophysiological…

  18. Technical Adequacy of the Maze Task for Curriculum-based Measurement of Reading Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Jongho; Deno, Stanley L.; Espin, Christine

    2000-01-01

    A study examined the technical adequacy of curriculum-based measurement for assessing growth in 43 second-graders whose reading performance was measured monthly over the school year with the maze task. Results showed that the maze task had good alternate-form reliability, sensitively reflected improvement of student performance, and revealed…

  19. Task Listings Resulting from the Vocational Competency Measures Project. Memorandum Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    This memorandum report consists of 14 task listings resulting from the Vocational Competency Measures Project. (The Vocational Competency Measures Project was a test development project that involved the writing and verification of task listings for 14 vocational occupational areas through over 225 interviews conducted in 27 states.) Provided in…

  20. Comparison of Psychophysiological and Dual-Task Measures of Listening Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeman, Scott; Sims, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We wished to make a comparison of psychophysiological measures of listening effort with subjective and dual-task measures of listening effort for a diotic-dichotic-digits and a sentences-in-noise task. Method: Three groups of young adults (18-38 years old) with normal hearing participated in three experiments: two psychophysiological…

  1. Measuring treatment effects on dual-task performance: a framework for research and clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Prudence; Eskes, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of dual-task walking to everyday ambulation is widely acknowledged, and numerous studies have demonstrated that dual-task interference can significantly impact recovery of functional walking in people with neurological disorders. The magnitude and direction of dual-task interference is influenced by the interaction between the two tasks, including how individuals spontaneously prioritize their attention. Therefore, to accurately interpret and characterize dual-task interference and identify changes over time, it is imperative to evaluate single and dual-task performance in both tasks, as well as the tasks relative to each other. Yet, reciprocal dual-task effects (DTE) are frequently ignored. The purpose of this perspective paper is to present a framework for measuring treatment effects on dual-task interference, specifically taking into account the interactions between the two tasks and how this can provide information on whether overall dual-task capacity has improved or a different attentional strategy has been adopted. In discussing the clinical implications of using this framework, we provide specific examples of using this method and provide some explicit recommendations for research and clinical practice. PMID:25972801

  2. Curriculum-Based Measures for Secondary Students: Utility and Task Specificity of Text-Based Reading and Vocabulary Measures for Predicting Performance on Content-Area Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espin, Christine A.; Deno, Stanley L.

    1995-01-01

    This study of 121 10th-grade students investigated the criterion-related validity of 2 potential curriculum-based measurements, reading from text and identifying vocabulary meaning, for predicting student performance on content-area study tasks. Correlational and multiple regression techniques found the vocabulary measure to be the stronger…

  3. Evaluation of 16 measures of mental workload using a simulated flight task emphasizing mediational activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wierwille, W. W.; Rahimi, M.; Casali, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    As aircraft and other systems become more automated, a shift is occurring in human operator participation in these systems. This shift is away from manual control and toward activities that tap the higher mental functioning of human operators. Therefore, an experiment was performed in a moving-base flight simulator to assess mediational (cognitive) workload measurement. Specifically, 16 workload estimation techniques were evaluated as to their sensitivity and intrusion in a flight task emphasizing mediational behavior. Task loading, using navigation problems presented on a display, was treated as an independent variable, and workload-measure values were treated as dependent variables. Results indicate that two mediational task measures, two rating scale measures, time estimation, and two eye behavior measures were reliably sensitive to mediational loading. The time estimation measure did, however, intrude on mediational task performance. Several of the remaining measures were completely insensitive to mediational load.

  4. Measuring perceived ceiling height in a visual comparison task.

    PubMed

    von Castell, Christoph; Hecht, Heiko; Oberfeld, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    When judging interior space, a dark ceiling is judged to be lower than a light ceiling. The method of metric judgments (e.g., on a centimetre scale) that has typically been used in such tasks may reflect a genuine perceptual effect or it may reflect a cognitively mediated impression. We employed a height-matching method in which perceived ceiling height had to be matched with an adjustable pillar, thus obtaining psychometric functions that allowed for an estimation of the point of subjective equality (PSE) and the difference limen (DL). The height-matching method developed in this paper allows for a direct visual match and does not require metric judgment. It has the added advantage of providing superior precision. Experiment 1 used ceiling heights between 2.90 m and 3.00 m. The PSE proved sensitive to slight changes in perceived ceiling height. The DL was about 3% of the physical ceiling height. Experiment 2 found similar results for lower (2.30 m to 2.50 m) and higher (3.30 m to 3.50 m) ceilings. In Experiment 3, we additionally varied ceiling lightness (light grey vs. dark grey). The height matches showed that the light ceiling appeared significantly higher than the darker ceiling. We therefore attribute the influence of ceiling lightness on perceived ceiling height to a direct perceptual rather than a cognitive effect.

  5. Verb production tasks in the measurement of communicative abilities in aphasia.

    PubMed

    Rofes, Adrià; Capasso, Rita; Miceli, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The neurofunctional correlates of verbs and nouns have been the focus of many theoretically oriented studies. In clinical practice, however, more attention is typically paid to nouns, and the relative usefulness of tasks probing nouns and verbs is unclear. The routine administration of tasks that use verbs could be a relevant addition to current batteries. Evaluating performance on both noun and verb tasks may provide a more reliable account of everyday language abilities than an evaluation restricted to nouns. To assess the benefits of administering verb tasks in addition to noun tasks, and their relation to three functional measures of language. Twenty-one subjects with poststroke language disorders completed four picture-naming tasks and a role-playing test (Communicative Abilities in Daily Living, Second Edition, CADL-2), commonly used as measure of everyday language abilities. Two questionnaires (Communicative Effectiveness Index, CETI, and Communicative Activity Log, CAL) were completed by caregivers. Picture-naming tasks were matched for psycholinguistic variables to avoid lexicosemantic and morphosyntactic confounds. No significant differences emerged across picture-naming tasks. Scores on the role-playing test and the two questionnaires differed; scores between the two questionnaires did not. The four naming tasks correlated significantly with CADL-2, CETI, and CAL. The strength of the correlation with CADL-2 was significantly greater for Naming Finite Verbs than for Object Naming. Thirteen participants showed no differences in performance between tasks, 6 fared significantly worse on verb tasks than on Object Naming, 1 fared better at Naming Finite Verbs though his performance was poor overall, and 1 was significantly more impaired on verbs. Performance on tasks that use verbs, and especially Naming Finite Verbs, may provide a more accurate estimate of language abilities in daily living than Object Naming alone. Administering both verb and noun tasks may

  6. Objective Assessment of Spectral Ripple Discrimination in Cochlear Implant Listeners Using Cortical Evoked Responses to an Oddball Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Lopez Valdes, Alejandro; Mc Laughlin, Myles; Viani, Laura; Walshe, Peter; Smith, Jaclyn; Zeng, Fan-Gang; Reilly, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) can partially restore functional hearing in deaf individuals. However, multiple factors affect CI listener's speech perception, resulting in large performance differences. Non-speech based tests, such as spectral ripple discrimination, measure acoustic processing capabilities that are highly correlated with speech perception. Currently spectral ripple discrimination is measured using standard psychoacoustic methods, which require attentive listening and active response that can be difficult or even impossible in special patient populations. Here, a completely objective cortical evoked potential based method is developed and validated to assess spectral ripple discrimination in CI listeners. In 19 CI listeners, using an oddball paradigm, cortical evoked potential responses to standard and inverted spectrally rippled stimuli were measured. In the same subjects, psychoacoustic spectral ripple discrimination thresholds were also measured. A neural discrimination threshold was determined by systematically increasing the number of ripples per octave and determining the point at which there was no longer a significant difference between the evoked potential response to the standard and inverted stimuli. A correlation was found between the neural and the psychoacoustic discrimination thresholds (R2 = 0.60, p<0.01). This method can objectively assess CI spectral resolution performance, providing a potential tool for the evaluation and follow-up of CI listeners who have difficulty performing psychoacoustic tests, such as pediatric or new users. PMID:24599314

  7. Assessing Measurement Invariance for Spanish Sentence Repetition and Morphology Elicitation Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapantzoglou, Maria; Thompson, Marilyn S.; Gray, Shelley; Restrepo, M. Adelaida

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate evidence supporting the construct validity of two grammatical tasks (sentence repetition, morphology elicitation) included in the Spanish Screener for Language Impairment in Children (Restrepo, Gorin, & Gray, 2013). We evaluated if the tasks measured the targeted grammatical skills in the same…

  8. Measuring Grammatical Development in Bilingual Mandarin-English Speaking Children with a Sentence Repetition Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woon, Chai Ping; Yap, Ngee Thai; Lim, Hui Woan; Wong, Bee Eng

    2014-01-01

    Sentence repetition (SR) tasks have been used to measure children's expressive language skills in normal and abnormal language development, and to examine the development of the speaking skills in second language acquisition, as well as to survey the proficiency of bilingual language development. Recently, SR tasks have been recognized as a…

  9. Assessing Measurement Invariance for Spanish Sentence Repetition and Morphology Elicitation Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapantzoglou, Maria; Thompson, Marilyn S.; Gray, Shelley; Restrepo, M. Adelaida

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate evidence supporting the construct validity of two grammatical tasks (sentence repetition, morphology elicitation) included in the Spanish Screener for Language Impairment in Children (Restrepo, Gorin, & Gray, 2013). We evaluated if the tasks measured the targeted grammatical skills in the same…

  10. Capacity limitations of a classic M-power measure: a modified dual-task approach.

    PubMed

    Foley, E J; Berch, D B

    1997-08-01

    A modified dual-task approach was employed with 7- to 9-year-olds in an effort to determine whether one of the classic M-power measures, the digit placement task, is indeed capacity-limited. To this end, a computerized version of a three-item digit placement task was administered in addition to three other computerized tasks: a four-item digit placement task, simple reaction time (RT) to a tone presented alone, and reaction time to a tone occurring during the performance of another three-item digit placement task. Careful examination of the data revealed that several critical assumptions concerning the use of the dual-task procedure were successfully met. This permitted a test of the extent to which dual-task RTs were predictive of accuracy in the harder, four-item digit placement task. Not only was this relationship significant, but after partialling out other possible sources of variance, a significant correlation remained, indicating that the digit placement task is indeed capacity-limited.

  11. Critical Tasks to Measure Teacher Performance: A Design Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Judy R.; Lang, William Steve

    2006-01-01

    NCATE (2002) requires the measurement of knowledge, skills, and dispositions as part of its accreditation requirements for teacher education programs (Standard 1) and the use of unit assessment systems to aggregate and analyse data with a view toward program improvement (Standard 2). Data must indicate that candidates meet professional, state, and…

  12. Measuring Spatial Ability with a Computer Managed Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Ernest; And Others

    This study presents data augmenting the validity studies of the Wheatley Cube (McDaniel and Kroll, 1984), a computer managed test of spatial visualization. Twenty-one students in pilot training are administered several instruments designed to measure the ability to construct a cognitive three-dimensional space, including: (1) the Wheatley Cube,…

  13. Task committee on experimental uncertainty and measurement errors in hydraulic engineering: An update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlin, B.; Wahl, T.; Gonzalez-Castro, J. A.; Fulford, J.; Robeson, M.

    2005-01-01

    As part of their long range goals for disseminating information on measurement techniques, instrumentation, and experimentation in the field of hydraulics, the Technical Committee on Hydraulic Measurements and Experimentation formed the Task Committee on Experimental Uncertainty and Measurement Errors in Hydraulic Engineering in January 2003. The overall mission of this Task Committee is to provide information and guidance on the current practices used for describing and quantifying measurement errors and experimental uncertainty in hydraulic engineering and experimental hydraulics. The final goal of the Task Committee on Experimental Uncertainty and Measurement Errors in Hydraulic Engineering is to produce a report on the subject that will cover: (1) sources of error in hydraulic measurements, (2) types of experimental uncertainty, (3) procedures for quantifying error and uncertainty, and (4) special practical applications that range from uncertainty analysis for planning an experiment to estimating uncertainty in flow monitoring at gaging sites and hydraulic structures. Currently, the Task Committee has adopted the first order variance estimation method outlined by Coleman and Steele as the basic methodology to follow when assessing the uncertainty in hydraulic measurements. In addition, the Task Committee has begun to develop its report on uncertainty in hydraulic engineering. This paper is intended as an update on the Task Committee's overall progress. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  14. Measuring family management of transplant tasks: the transplant responsibility questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kullgren, Kristin A; Hmiel, S Paul; Gevers, Anik

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about how parents and youth perceive their roles in post-transplant management and how this relates to post-transplant adherence. The goals of this study are to (1) describe a new measure, the TRQ, (2) to describe parent and child performance on the TRQ, and to (3) determine the relationship between the TRQ and adherence. We hypothesized that older youth would describe higher post-transplant self-care behaviors, parents would underestimate youth self-care, and greater parent involvement would be associated with better adherence. Participants included 59 parent-child dyads. Inclusion criteria included: (i) youth aged 7-18 yr and (ii) at least three months post-kidney or post-liver transplant. Parents and youth completed the TRQ, and adherence was measured by s.d. of sequential immunosuppressant blood levels. Youth perceived greater levels of self-care than their parents perceived. Older youth reportedly engaged in more self-care than younger youth. Less than 25% of the sample was non-adherent, and non-adherence was unrelated to performance on the TRQ. The TRQ may have utility as a clinical tool to address areas for improvement in youth self-care. The high degree of parental involvement likely explains the high degree of adherence in this sample.

  15. Measuring the cost of cognitive-motor dual tasking during walking in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leone, Carmela; Patti, Francesco; Feys, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Purposeful, safe locomotion requires higher-level cortical processes, to meet the real-life demands of walking while performing concurrent cognitive tasks (e.g. recalling a shopping list or attending to a conversation). The assessment of walking and a secondary cognitive task under these 'dual tasking' conditions may represent a more valid outcome measure in multiple sclerosis (MS), by examining the occurrence and magnitude of the cognitive-motor interference of walking. This topical review provides a state-of-the-art overview of research into dual-tasking during walking in persons with MS, based on 14 recent papers. Studies consistently demonstrate a slowing of ambulation under dual tasking, regardless of the cognitive task demand, the stage of the disease and the disability level. The reciprocal effect of walking on the cognitive tasks was rarely assessed. We present our main findings, highlight the different factors contributing to dual-task deficits, identify methodological shortcomings and offer recommendations for constructing dual-tasking paradigms useful in clinical practice and research.

  16. Measuring movement fluency during the sit-to-walk task.

    PubMed

    Kerr, A; Pomeroy, V P; Rowe, P J; Dall, P; Rafferty, D

    2013-04-01

    Restoring movement fluency is a key focus for physical rehabilitation; it's measurement, however, lacks objectivity. The purpose of this study was to find whether measurable movement fluency variables differed between groups of adults with different movement abilities whilst performing the sit-to-walk (STW) movement. The movement fluency variables were: (1) hesitation during movement (reduction in forward velocity of the centre of mass; CoM), (2) coordination (percentage of temporal overlap of joint rotations) and (3) smoothness (number of inflections in the CoM jerk signal). Kinematic data previously collected for another study were extracted for three groups: older adults (n=18), older adults at risk of falling (OARF, n=18), and younger adults (n=20). Each subject performed the STW movement freely while a motion analysis system tracked 11 body segments. The fluency variables were derived from the processed kinematic data and tested for group variation using analysis of variance. All three variables showed statistically significant differences among the groups. Hesitation (F=15.11, p<0.001) was greatest in the OARF 47.5% (SD 18.0), compared to older adults 30.3% (SD 15.9) and younger adults 20.8% (SD 11.4). Co-ordination (F=44.88, p<0.001) was lowest for the OARF (6.93%, SD 10.99) compared to both the young (31.21%, SD 5.48) and old (26.24%, SD 5.84). Smoothness (F=35.96, p<0.001) was best in the younger adults, 18.3 (SD 5.2) inflections, compared to the old, 42.5 (SD 11.5) and OARF, 44.25 (SD 7.29). Hesitation, co-ordination and smoothness may be valid indicators of movement fluency in adults, with important consequences for research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Measuring listening effort: driving simulator vs. simple dual-task paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Aksan, Nazan; Rizzo, Matthew; Stangl, Elizabeth; Zhang, Xuyang; Bentler, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The dual-task paradigm has been widely used to measure listening effort. The primary objectives of the study were to (1) investigate the effect of hearing aid amplification and a hearing aid directional technology on listening effort measured by a complicated, more real world dual-task paradigm, and (2) compare the results obtained with this paradigm to a simpler laboratory-style dual-task paradigm. Design The listening effort of adults with hearing impairment was measured using two dual-task paradigms, wherein participants performed a speech recognition task simultaneously with either a driving task in a simulator or a visual reaction-time task in a sound-treated booth. The speech materials and road noises for the speech recognition task were recorded in a van traveling on the highway in three hearing aid conditions: unaided, aided with omni directional processing (OMNI), and aided with directional processing (DIR). The change in the driving task or the visual reaction-time task performance across the conditions quantified the change in listening effort. Results Compared to the driving-only condition, driving performance declined significantly with the addition of the speech recognition task. Although the speech recognition score was higher in the OMNI and DIR conditions than in the unaided condition, driving performance was similar across these three conditions, suggesting that listening effort was not affected by amplification and directional processing. Results from the simple dual-task paradigm showed a similar trend: hearing aid technologies improved speech recognition performance, but did not affect performance in the visual reaction-time task (i.e., reduce listening effort). The correlation between listening effort measured using the driving paradigm and the visual reaction-time task paradigm was significant. The finding showing that our older (56 to 85 years old) participants’ better speech recognition performance did not result in reduced

  18. Measuring listening effort: driving simulator versus simple dual-task paradigm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Aksan, Nazan; Rizzo, Matthew; Stangl, Elizabeth; Zhang, Xuyang; Bentler, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The dual-task paradigm has been widely used to measure listening effort. The primary objectives of the study were to (1) investigate the effect of hearing aid amplification and a hearing aid directional technology on listening effort measured by a complicated, more real world dual-task paradigm and (2) compare the results obtained with this paradigm to a simpler laboratory-style dual-task paradigm. The listening effort of adults with hearing impairment was measured using two dual-task paradigms, wherein participants performed a speech recognition task simultaneously with either a driving task in a simulator or a visual reaction-time task in a sound-treated booth. The speech materials and road noises for the speech recognition task were recorded in a van traveling on the highway in three hearing aid conditions: unaided, aided with omnidirectional processing (OMNI), and aided with directional processing (DIR). The change in the driving task or the visual reaction-time task performance across the conditions quantified the change in listening effort. Compared to the driving-only condition, driving performance declined significantly with the addition of the speech recognition task. Although the speech recognition score was higher in the OMNI and DIR conditions than in the unaided condition, driving performance was similar across these three conditions, suggesting that listening effort was not affected by amplification and directional processing. Results from the simple dual-task paradigm showed a similar trend: hearing aid technologies improved speech recognition performance, but did not affect performance in the visual reaction-time task (i.e., reduce listening effort). The correlation between listening effort measured using the driving paradigm and the visual reaction-time task paradigm was significant. The finding showing that our older (56 to 85 years old) participants' better speech recognition performance did not result in reduced listening effort was not

  19. A Novel Method for Assessing Task Complexity in Outpatient Clinical-Performance Measures.

    PubMed

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Amspoker, Amber B; Petersen, Laura A

    2016-04-01

    Clinical-performance measurement has helped improve the quality of health-care; yet success in attaining high levels of quality across multiple domains simultaneously still varies considerably. Although many sources of variability in care quality have been studied, the difficulty required to complete the clinical work itself has received little attention. We present a task-based methodology for evaluating the difficulty of clinical-performance measures (CPMs) by assessing the complexity of their component requisite tasks. Using Functional Job Analysis (FJA), subject-matter experts (SMEs) generated task lists for 17 CPMs; task lists were rated on ten dimensions of complexity, and then aggregated into difficulty composites. Eleven outpatient work SMEs; 133 VA Medical Centers nationwide. Clinical Performance: 17 outpatient CPMs (2000-2008) at 133 VA Medical Centers nationwide. Measure Difficulty: for each CPM, the number of component requisite tasks and the average rating across ten FJA complexity scales for the set of tasks comprising the measure. Measures varied considerably in the number of component tasks (M = 10.56, SD = 6.25, min = 5, max = 25). Measures of chronic care following acute myocardial infarction exhibited significantly higher measure difficulty ratings compared to diabetes or screening measures, but not to immunization measures ([Formula: see text] = 0.45, -0.04, -0.05, and -0.06 respectively; F (3, 186) = 3.57, p = 0.015). Measure difficulty ratings were not significantly correlated with the number of component tasks (r = -0.30, p = 0.23). Evaluating the difficulty of achieving recommended CPM performance levels requires more than simply counting the tasks involved; using FJA to assess the complexity of CPMs' component tasks presents an alternate means of assessing the difficulty of primary-care CPMs and accounting for performance variation among measures and performers. This in turn could be used in designing

  20. Students' Coordination of Geometric Reasoning and Measuring Strategies on a Fixed Perimeter Task: Developing Mathematical Understanding of Linear Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Jeffrey E.; Clements, Douglas H.; Klanderman, David; Pennisi, Sarah-Jean; Polaki, Mokaeane V.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines students' development of levels of understanding for measurement by describing the coordination of geometric reasoning with measurement and numerical strategies. In analyzing the reasoning and argumentation of 38 Grade 2 through Grade 10 students on linear measure tasks, we found support for the application and elaboration of…

  1. Time estimation as a secondary task to measure workload. [attention sharing effect on operator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, S. G.

    1975-01-01

    Variation in the length of time productions and verbal estimates of duration was investigated to determine the influence of concurrent activity on operator time perception. The length of 10-, 20-, and 30-sec intervals produced while performing six different compensatory tracking tasks was significantly longer, 23% on the average, than those produced while performing no other task. Verbal estimates of session duration, taken at the end of each of 27 experimental sessions, reflected a parallel increase in subjective underestimation of the passage of time as the difficulty of the task performed increased. These data suggest that estimates of duration made while performing a manual control task provide stable and sensitive measures of the workload imposed by the primary task, with minimal interference.

  2. Time estimation as a secondary task to measure workload. [attention sharing effect on operator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, S. G.

    1975-01-01

    Variation in the length of time productions and verbal estimates of duration was investigated to determine the influence of concurrent activity on operator time perception. The length of 10-, 20-, and 30-sec intervals produced while performing six different compensatory tracking tasks was significantly longer, 23% on the average, than those produced while performing no other task. Verbal estimates of session duration, taken at the end of each of 27 experimental sessions, reflected a parallel increase in subjective underestimation of the passage of time as the difficulty of the task performed increased. These data suggest that estimates of duration made while performing a manual control task provide stable and sensitive measures of the workload imposed by the primary task, with minimal interference.

  3. Aspects of psychodynamic neuropsychiatry I: episodic memory, transference, and the oddball paradigm.

    PubMed

    Brockman, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Psychotherapy has, since the time of Freud, focused on the unconscious and dynamically repressed memory. This article explores a therapy where the focus is on what is known, on episodic memory. Episodic memory, along with semantic memory, is part of the declarative memory system. Episodic memory depends on frontal, parietal, as well as temporal lobe function. It is the system related to the encoding and recall of context-rich memory. While memory usually decays with time, powerfully encoded episodic memory may augment. This article explores the hypothesis that such augmentation is the result of conditioning and kindling. Augmented memory could lead to a powerful "top-down" focus of attention-such that one would perceive only what one had set out to perceive. The "oddball paradigm" is suggested as a route out of such a self-perpetuating system. A clinical example (a disguised composite of several clinical histories) is used to demonstrate how such an intensification of memory and attention came about as a result of the transference, and how the "oddball paradigm" was used as a way out of what had become a treatment stalemate.

  4. Measuring deviant sexual interest in adolescents using the emotional Stroop task.

    PubMed

    Price, Shelley A; Beech, Anthony R; Mitchell, Ian; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2014-10-01

    Adolescent sexual abusers are a heterogeneous group of offenders that often receive generic assessment and treatment services that are modeled on research findings from adult sex offender samples. The emotional Stroop task has been used to measure deviant sexual interest in adult samples. The purpose of the present study was to test whether the emotional Stroop task could also be used to assess deviant sexual interest in adolescent samples. Three groups of adolescents (a) sexual abusers (n = 24); (b) offending controls (n = 21); and (c) nonoffending controls (n = 21) completed two emotional Stroop tasks related to deviant sexual interest and tests of executive function. Adolescent sexual abusers were significantly slower to color-name some word stimuli than both adolescent offending controls and adolescent nonoffending controls. However, the task was unable to differentiate between the groups on most of the Stroop word categories. Very little research has been conducted with adolescent offender samples and the emotional Stroop task. Reaction time (RT) and Stroop bias outcome data for adolescent samples appear to be more unsystematic and weaker than has been observed in previous adult data. Based on potential difficulties with reading and development, the emotional Stroop task may not be a task suitable for measuring deviant sexual interest in adolescent samples. © The Author(s) 2013.

  5. Measuring pilot workload in a moving-base simulator. I Asynchronous secondary choice-reaction task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantowitz, B. H.; Hart, S. G.; Bortolussi, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    The de facto method for measuring airplane pilot workload is based upon subjective ratings. While researchers agree that such subjective data should be bolstered by using objective behavioral measures, results to date have been mixed. No clear objective technique has surfaced as the metric of choice. It is believed that this difficulty is in part due to neglect of theoretical work in psychology that predicts some of the difficulties that are inherent in a futile search for 'the one and only' best secondary task to measure workload. An initial study that used both subjective ratings and an asynchronous choice-reaction secondary task was conducted to determine if such a secondary task could indeed meet the methodological constraints imposed by current theories of attention. Two variants of a flight scenario were combined with two levels of the secondary task. Appropriate single-task control conditions were also included. Results give grounds for cautious optimism but indicate that future research should use synchronous secondary tasks where possible.

  6. Measuring pilot workload in a moving-base simulator. I Asynchronous secondary choice-reaction task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantowitz, B. H.; Hart, S. G.; Bortolussi, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    The de facto method for measuring airplane pilot workload is based upon subjective ratings. While researchers agree that such subjective data should be bolstered by using objective behavioral measures, results to date have been mixed. No clear objective technique has surfaced as the metric of choice. It is believed that this difficulty is in part due to neglect of theoretical work in psychology that predicts some of the difficulties that are inherent in a futile search for 'the one and only' best secondary task to measure workload. An initial study that used both subjective ratings and an asynchronous choice-reaction secondary task was conducted to determine if such a secondary task could indeed meet the methodological constraints imposed by current theories of attention. Two variants of a flight scenario were combined with two levels of the secondary task. Appropriate single-task control conditions were also included. Results give grounds for cautious optimism but indicate that future research should use synchronous secondary tasks where possible.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of time-domain fNIRS and physiological signals during a cognitive task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelzow, A.; Tachtsidis, I.; Kirilina, E.; Niessing, M.; Brühl, R.; Wabnitz, H.; Heine, A.; Ittermann, B.; Macdonald, R.

    2011-07-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a commonly used technique to measure the cerebral vascular response related to brain activation. It is known that systemic physiological processes, either independent or correlated with the stimulation task, can influence the optical signal making its interpretation challenging. The aim of the present work is to investigate the impact of task-evoked changes in the systemic physiology on fNIRS measurements for a cognitive paradigm. For this purpose we carried out simultaneous measurements of time-domain fNIRS on the forehead and systemic physiological signals, i.e. mean blood pressure, heart rate, respiration, galvanic skin response, scalp blood flow (flux) and red blood cell (RBC) concentration changes. We performed measurements on 15 healthy volunteers during a semantic continuous performance task (CPT). The optical data was analyzed in terms of depth-selective moments of distributions of times of flight of photons through the tissue. In addition, cerebral activation was localized by a subsequent fMRI experiment on the same subject population using the same task. We observed strong non-cerebral task-evoked changes in concentration changes of oxygenated hemoglobin in the forehead. We investigated the temporal behavior and mutual correlations between hemoglobin changes and the systemic processes. Mean blood pressure (BP), galvanic skin response (GSR) and heart rate exhibited significant changes during the activation period, whereby BP and GSR showed the highest correlation with optical measurements.

  8. Validity of General Outcome Measures for Predicting Secondary Students' Performance on Content-Area Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espin, Christine A.; Foegen, Anne

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the validity of 3 curriculum-based measures for predicting the performance of 184 secondary students (including 13 with mild disabilities) on content-area tasks. Reliable correlations were found between oral reading, maze, and vocabulary measures; and students' performance on comprehension, acquisition, and retention of…

  9. Measuring motivation in schizophrenia: Is a general state of motivation necessary for task-specific motivation?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jimmy; Choi, Kee-Hong; Reddy, Felice; Fiszdon, Joanna M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important role of motivation in rehabilitation and functional outcomes in schizophrenia, to date, there has been little emphasis on how motivation is assessed. This is important, since different measures may tap potentially discrete motivational constructs, which in turn may have very different associations to important outcomes. In the current study, we used baseline data from 71 schizophrenia spectrum outpatients enrolled in a rehabilitation program to examine the relationship between task-specific motivation, as measured by the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI), and a more general state of volition/initiation, as measured by the three item Quality of Life (QLS) motivation index. We also examined the relationship of these motivation measures to demographic, clinical and functional variables relevant to rehabilitation outcomes. The two motivation measures were not correlated, and participants with low general state motivation exhibited a full range of task-specific motivation. Only the QLS motivation index correlated with variables relevant to rehabilitation outcomes. The lack of associations between QLS motivation index and IMI subscales suggests that constructs tapped by these measures may be divergent in schizophrenia, and specifically that task-specific intrinsic motivation is not contingent on a general state of motivation. That is, even in individuals with a general low motivational state (i.e. amotivation), interventions aimed at increasing task-specific motivation may still be effective. Moreover, the pattern of interrelationships between the QLS motivation index and variables relevant to psychosocial rehabilitation supports its use in treatment outcome studies. PMID:24529609

  10. Clinical Complexity in Medicine: A Measurement Model of Task and Patient Complexity.

    PubMed

    Islam, R; Weir, C; Del Fiol, G

    2016-01-01

    Complexity in medicine needs to be reduced to simple components in a way that is comprehensible to researchers and clinicians. Few studies in the current literature propose a measurement model that addresses both task and patient complexity in medicine. The objective of this paper is to develop an integrated approach to understand and measure clinical complexity by incorporating both task and patient complexity components focusing on the infectious disease domain. The measurement model was adapted and modified for the healthcare domain. Three clinical infectious disease teams were observed, audio-recorded and transcribed. Each team included an infectious diseases expert, one infectious diseases fellow, one physician assistant and one pharmacy resident fellow. The transcripts were parsed and the authors independently coded complexity attributes. This baseline measurement model of clinical complexity was modified in an initial set of coding processes and further validated in a consensus-based iterative process that included several meetings and email discussions by three clinical experts from diverse backgrounds from the Department of Biomedical Informatics at the University of Utah. Inter-rater reliability was calculated using Cohen's kappa. The proposed clinical complexity model consists of two separate components. The first is a clinical task complexity model with 13 clinical complexity-contributing factors and 7 dimensions. The second is the patient complexity model with 11 complexity-contributing factors and 5 dimensions. The measurement model for complexity encompassing both task and patient complexity will be a valuable resource for future researchers and industry to measure and understand complexity in healthcare.

  11. Measuring motivation in schizophrenia: is a general state of motivation necessary for task-specific motivation?

    PubMed

    Choi, Jimmy; Choi, Kee-Hong; Felice Reddy, L; Fiszdon, Joanna M

    2014-03-01

    Despite the important role of motivation in rehabilitation and functional outcomes in schizophrenia, to date, there has been little emphasis on how motivation is assessed. This is important, since different measures may tap potentially discrete motivational constructs, which in turn may have very different associations to important outcomes. In the current study, we used baseline data from 71 schizophrenia spectrum outpatients enrolled in a rehabilitation program to examine the relationship between task-specific motivation, as measured by the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI), and a more general state of volition/initiation, as measured by the three item Quality of Life (QLS) motivation index. We also examined the relationship of these motivation measures to demographic, clinical and functional variables relevant to rehabilitation outcomes. The two motivation measures were not correlated, and participants with low general state motivation exhibited a full range of task-specific motivation. Only the QLS motivation index correlated with variables relevant to rehabilitation outcomes. The lack of associations between QLS motivation index and IMI subscales suggests that constructs tapped by these measures may be divergent in schizophrenia, and specifically that task-specific intrinsic motivation is not contingent on a general state of motivation. That is, even in individuals with a general low motivational state (i.e. amotivation), interventions aimed at increasing task-specific motivation may still be effective. Moreover, the pattern of interrelationships between the QLS motivation index and variables relevant to psychosocial rehabilitation supports its use in treatment outcome studies.

  12. Sex Differences in Task Distribution and Task Exposures among Danish House Painters: An Observational Study Combining Questionnaire Data with Biomechanical Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Heilskov-Hansen, Thomas; Wulff Svendsen, Susanne; Frølund Thomsen, Jane; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Hansson, Gert-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Sex differences in occupational biomechanical exposures may be part of the explanation why musculoskeletal complaints and disorders tend to be more common among women than among men. We aimed to determine possible sex differences in task distribution and task-specific postures and movements of the upper extremities among Danish house painters, and to establish sex-specific task exposure matrices. Methods To obtain task distributions, we sent out a questionnaire to all members of the Painters' Union in Denmark (N = 9364), of whom 53% responded. Respondents reported their task distributions in a typical week. To obtain task exposures, postures and movements were measured in 25 male and 25 female house painters for one whole working day per person. We used goniometers on the wrists, and inclinometers on the forehead and the upper arms. Participants filled in a logbook allowing task-specific exposures to be identified. Percentiles and % time with non-neutral postures were used to characterise postures. Velocity, range of motion, repetitiveness, and variation were used as measures of movement. Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel statistics and unpaired double-sided t-tests with post-hoc Bonferroni correction were used to evaluate sex differences. Results Statistically significant (p<0.05) sex differences were revealed in task proportions, but the proportions differed by less than 4%. For task exposures, no statistically significant sex differences were found. Conclusions Only minor sex differences were found in task distribution and task exposures regarding postures and movements among Danish house painters. Sex-specific task exposure matrices were established. PMID:25365301

  13. The Multidimensional Card Selection Task: A new way to measure concurrent cognitive flexibility in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Podjarny, Gal; Kamawar, Deepthi; Andrews, Katherine

    2017-07-01

    Most executive function research examining preschoolers' cognitive flexibility, the ability to think about something in more than one way, has focused on preschoolers' facility for sequentially switching their attention from one dimension to another (e.g., sorting bivalent cards first by color and then by shape). We know very little about preschoolers' ability to coordinate more than one dimension simultaneously (concurrent cognitive flexibility). Here we report on a new task, the Multidimensional Card Selection Task, which was designed to measure children's ability to consider two dimensions, and then three dimensions, concurrently (e.g., shape and size, and then shape, size, and color). More than half of the preschoolers in our sample of 107 (50 3-year-olds and 57 4-year-olds) could coordinate three dimensions simultaneously and consistently across three test trials. Furthermore, performance on the Multidimensional Card Selection Task was related, but not identical, to performance on other cognitive tasks, including a widely used measure of switching cognitive flexibility (the Dimensional Change Card Sort). The Multidimensional Card Selection Task provides a new way to measure concurrent cognitive flexibility in preschoolers, and opens another avenue for exploring the emergence of early cognitive flexibility development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Speech task effects on acoustic measure of fundamental frequency in Cantonese-speaking children.

    PubMed

    Ma, Estella P-M; Lam, Nina L-N

    2015-12-01

    Speaking fundamental frequency (F0) is a voice measure frequently used to document changes in vocal performance over time. Knowing the intra-subject variability of speaking F0 has implications on its clinical usefulness. The present study examined the speaking F0 elicited from three speech tasks in Cantonese-speaking children. The study also compared the variability of speaking F0 elicited from different speech tasks. Fifty-six vocally healthy Cantonese-speaking children (31 boys and 25 girls) aged between 7.0 and 10.11 years participated. For each child, speaking F0 was elicited using speech tasks at three linguistic levels (sustained vowel /a/ prolongation, reading aloud a sentence and passage). Two types of variability, within-session (trial-to-trial) and across-session (test-retest) variability, were compared across speech tasks. Significant differences in mean speaking F0 values were found between speech tasks. Mean speaking F0 value elicited from sustained vowel phonations was significantly higher than those elicited from the connected speech tasks. The variability of speaking F0 was higher in sustained vowel prolongation than that in connected speech. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Beyond task time: automated measurement augments fundamentals of laparoscopic skills methodology.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Timothy M; White, Lee W; Lendvay, Thomas S; Jiang, Iris S; Sweet, Robert; Wright, Andrew; Hannaford, Blake; Sinanan, Mika N

    2014-12-01

    Laparoscopic psychomotor skills are challenging to learn and objectively evaluate. The Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Skills (FLS) program provides a popular, inexpensive, widely-studied, and reported method for evaluating basic laparoscopic skills. With an emphasis on training safety before efficiency, we present data that explore the metrics in the FLS curriculum. A multi-institutional (n = 3) cross-sectional study enrolled subjects (n = 98) of all laparoscopic skill levels to perform FLS tasks in an instrumented box trainer. Recorded task videos were postevaluated by faculty reviewers (n = 2) blinded to subject identity using a modified Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) protocol. FLS scores were computed for each completed task and compared with demographically established skill levels (training level and number of procedures), video review scoring, and objective performance metrics including path length, economy of motion, and peak grasping force. Three criteria used to determine expert skill, training and experience level, blinded review of performance by faculty via OSATS, and FLS scores, disagree in establishing concurrent validity for determining "true experts" in FLS tasks. FLS-scoring exhibited near-perfect correlation with task time for all three tasks (Pearson r = 0.99, 1.00, 1.00 with P <0.00000001). FLS error penalties had negligible effect on FLS scores. Peak grasping force did not correlate with task time or FLS scores. FLS technical skills scores presented negligible benefit beyond the measurement of task time. FLS scoring is weighted more toward speed than precision and may not significantly address poor tissue handling skills, especially regarding excessive grasping force. Categories of experience or training level may not form a suitable basis for establishing proficiency thresholds or for construct validity studies for technical skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An analysis of physiological signals as a measure of task engagement in a multi-limb-coordination motor-learning task.

    PubMed

    Murray, Spencer A; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There is widespread agreement in the physical rehabilitation community that task engagement is essential to effective neuromuscular recovery. Despite this, there are no clear measures of such task engagement. This paper assesses the extent to which certain physiological measurements might provide a measure of task engagement. In previous studies, correlations between mental focus and certain physiological measurements have been observed in subjects performing tasks requiring mental effort. In this study, the authors analyzed whether these signals showed similar correlation when subjects performed a multi-limb-coordination motor-learning task. Subjects played a video game which required the use of both arms and one leg to play a simplified electronic drum set with varying difficulty. Heart rate (HR), skin conductance level (SCL), and facial electromyogram (EMG) were recorded while the subjects played. Analysis of the recordings showed statistically significant correlations relating task difficulty to SCL, HR and EMG amplitude in corrugator supercilii. No statistically significant correlation was observed between task difficulty and EMG in frontalis.

  17. Anticipation measures of sequence learning: manual versus oculomotor versions of the serial reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Eli; Bloch, Ayala; Cohen, Haggar

    2017-03-01

    The serial reaction time (SRT) task has generated a very large amount of research. Nevertheless the debate continues as to the exact cognitive processes underlying implicit sequence learning. Thus, the first goal of this study is to elucidate the underlying cognitive processes enabling sequence acquisition. We therefore compared reaction time (RT) in sequence learning in a standard manual activated (MA) to that in an ocular activated (OA) version of the task, within a single experimental setting. The second goal is to use eye movement measures to compare anticipation, as an additional indication of sequence learning, between the two versions of the SRT. Performance of the group given the MA version of the task (n = 29) was compared with that of the group given the OA version (n = 30). The results showed that although overall, RT was faster for the OA group, the rate of sequence learning was similar to that of the MA group performing the standard version of the SRT. Because the stimulus-response association is automatic and exists prior to training in the OA task, the decreased reaction time in this version of the task reflects a purer measure of the sequence learning that occurs in the SRT task. The results of this study show that eye tracking anticipation can be measured directly and can serve as a direct measure of sequence learning. Finally, using the OA version of the SRT to study sequence learning presents a significant methodological contribution by making sequence learning studies possible among populations that struggle to perform manual responses.

  18. Relationship between Adolescent Risk Preferences on a Laboratory Task and Behavioral Measures of Risk-taking

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Uma; Sidhartha, Tanuj; Harker, Karen R.; Bidesi, Anup S.; Chen, Li-Ann; Ernst, Monique

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The goal of the study was to assess individual differences in risk-taking behavior among adolescents in the laboratory. A second aim was to evaluate whether the laboratory-based risk-taking behavior is associated with other behavioral and psychological measures associated with risk-taking behavior. Methods Eighty-two adolescents with no personal history of psychiatric disorder completed a computerized decision-making task, the Wheel of Fortune (WOF). By offering choices between clearly defined probabilities and real monetary outcomes, this task assesses risk preferences when participants are confronted with potential rewards and losses. The participants also completed a variety of behavioral and psychological measures associated with risk-taking behavior. Results Performance on the task varied based on the probability and anticipated outcomes. In the winning sub-task, participants selected low probability-high magnitude reward (high-risk choice) less frequently than high probability-low magnitude reward (low-risk choice). In the losing sub-task, participants selected low probability-high magnitude loss more often than high probability-low magnitude loss. On average, the selection of probabilistic rewards was optimal and similar to performance in adults. There were, however, individual differences in performance, and one-third of the adolescents made high-risk choice more frequently than low-risk choice while selecting a reward. After controlling for sociodemographic and psychological variables, high-risk choice on the winning task predicted “real-world” risk-taking behavior and substance-related problems. Conclusions These findings highlight individual differences in risk-taking behavior. Preliminary data on face validity of the WOF task suggest that it might be a valuable laboratory tool for studying behavioral and neurobiological processes associated with risk-taking behavior in adolescents. PMID:21257113

  19. Development of the Biology Card Sorting Task to Measure Conceptual Expertise in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Julia I.; Combs, Elijah D.; Nagami, Paul H.; Alto, Valerie M.; Goh, Henry G.; Gourdet, Muryam A. A.; Hough, Christina M.; Nickell, Ashley E.; Peer, Adrian G.; Coley, John D.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2013-01-01

    There are widespread aspirations to focus undergraduate biology education on teaching students to think conceptually like biologists; however, there is a dearth of assessment tools designed to measure progress from novice to expert biological conceptual thinking. We present the development of a novel assessment tool, the Biology Card Sorting Task, designed to probe how individuals organize their conceptual knowledge of biology. While modeled on tasks from cognitive psychology, this task is unique in its design to test two hypothesized conceptual frameworks for the organization of biological knowledge: 1) a surface feature organization focused on organism type and 2) a deep feature organization focused on fundamental biological concepts. In this initial investigation of the Biology Card Sorting Task, each of six analytical measures showed statistically significant differences when used to compare the card sorting results of putative biological experts (biology faculty) and novices (non–biology major undergraduates). Consistently, biology faculty appeared to sort based on hypothesized deep features, while non–biology majors appeared to sort based on either surface features or nonhypothesized organizational frameworks. Results suggest that this novel task is robust in distinguishing populations of biology experts and biology novices and may be an adaptable tool for tracking emerging biology conceptual expertise. PMID:24297290

  20. Development of the biology card sorting task to measure conceptual expertise in biology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julia I; Combs, Elijah D; Nagami, Paul H; Alto, Valerie M; Goh, Henry G; Gourdet, Muryam A A; Hough, Christina M; Nickell, Ashley E; Peer, Adrian G; Coley, John D; Tanner, Kimberly D

    2013-01-01

    There are widespread aspirations to focus undergraduate biology education on teaching students to think conceptually like biologists; however, there is a dearth of assessment tools designed to measure progress from novice to expert biological conceptual thinking. We present the development of a novel assessment tool, the Biology Card Sorting Task, designed to probe how individuals organize their conceptual knowledge of biology. While modeled on tasks from cognitive psychology, this task is unique in its design to test two hypothesized conceptual frameworks for the organization of biological knowledge: 1) a surface feature organization focused on organism type and 2) a deep feature organization focused on fundamental biological concepts. In this initial investigation of the Biology Card Sorting Task, each of six analytical measures showed statistically significant differences when used to compare the card sorting results of putative biological experts (biology faculty) and novices (non-biology major undergraduates). Consistently, biology faculty appeared to sort based on hypothesized deep features, while non-biology majors appeared to sort based on either surface features or nonhypothesized organizational frameworks. Results suggest that this novel task is robust in distinguishing populations of biology experts and biology novices and may be an adaptable tool for tracking emerging biology conceptual expertise.

  1. The Development of an Individuals-within-Dyads Multilevel Performance Measure for an Interactive Cheerleading Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habeeb, Christine M.; Eklund, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Dyadic interactions generate direct relationships in which interdependent sport behaviors can be destructured. The focus of this investigation was to develop a two-level performance framework and corresponding measures of individual- and dyad-level sport performance. The described procedures surrounded a male-female cheerleading paired-stunt task,…

  2. Measuring Search Efficiency in Complex Visual Search Tasks: Global and Local Clutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Melissa R.; Lohrenz, Maura C.; Trafton, J. Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Set size and crowding affect search efficiency by limiting attention for recognition and attention against competition; however, these factors can be difficult to quantify in complex search tasks. The current experiments use a quantitative measure of the amount and variability of visual information (i.e., clutter) in highly complex stimuli (i.e.,…

  3. Stimulus, Task, and Learning Effects on Measures of Temporal Resolution: Implications for Predictors of Language Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nicholas A.; Trainor, Laurel J.; Gray, Kellie; Plantinga, Judy A.; Shore, David I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Some studies find that temporal processing ability predicts language outcome whereas other studies do not. Resolution of this debate is hindered by the variety of temporal measures used, nonsensory loading of the tasks, and differential amounts of practice across studies. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of stimulus…

  4. Preschool Executive Control on the Shape School Task: Measurement Considerations and Utility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Verena E.; Woodward, Lianne J.

    2011-01-01

    Executive functions (EF) necessary for purposeful goal-directed activities undergo rapid change and development during the preschool years. However, of the few psychometrically valid measures of EF suitable for use with preschoolers, information on task sensitivity and predictive validity is scant. The neurodevelopmental correlates of early…

  5. Unaccounted-for gas project. Measurement Task Force (orifice meter studies). Volume 2B. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Godkin, B.J.; Robertson, J.D.; Wlasenko, R.G.; Cowgill, R.M.; Grinstead, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. Activities and methods are described and results are presented for research conducted on orifice meter accuracy. The Measurement Task Force determined that orifice metering inaccuracies were the largest single contributor to 1987 UAF.

  6. The Development of an Individuals-within-Dyads Multilevel Performance Measure for an Interactive Cheerleading Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habeeb, Christine M.; Eklund, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Dyadic interactions generate direct relationships in which interdependent sport behaviors can be destructured. The focus of this investigation was to develop a two-level performance framework and corresponding measures of individual- and dyad-level sport performance. The described procedures surrounded a male-female cheerleading paired-stunt task,…

  7. Development of the Biology Card Sorting Task to Measure Conceptual Expertise in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julia I.; Combs, Elijah D.; Nagami, Paul H.; Alto, Valerie M.; Goh, Henry G.; Gourdet, Muryam A. A.; Hough, Christina M.; Nickell, Ashley E.; Peer, Adrian G.; Coley, John D.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2013-01-01

    There are widespread aspirations to focus undergraduate biology education on teaching students to think conceptually like biologists; however, there is a dearth of assessment tools designed to measure progress from novice to expert biological conceptual thinking. We present the development of a novel assessment tool, the Biology Card Sorting Task,…

  8. Using the Biology Card Sorting Task to Measure Changes in Conceptual Expertise during Postsecondary Biology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissonnette, Sarah A.; Combs, Elijah D.; Nagami, Paul H.; Byers, Victor; Fernandez, Juliana; Le, Dinh; Realin, Jared; Woodham, Selina; Smith, Julia I.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2017-01-01

    While there have been concerted efforts to reform undergraduate biology toward teaching students to organize their conceptual knowledge like experts, there are few tools that attempt to measure this. We previously developed the Biology Card Sorting Task (BCST), designed to probe how individuals organize their conceptual biological knowledge.…

  9. Development of the Biology Card Sorting Task to Measure Conceptual Expertise in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julia I.; Combs, Elijah D.; Nagami, Paul H.; Alto, Valerie M.; Goh, Henry G.; Gourdet, Muryam A. A.; Hough, Christina M.; Nickell, Ashley E.; Peer, Adrian G.; Coley, John D.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2013-01-01

    There are widespread aspirations to focus undergraduate biology education on teaching students to think conceptually like biologists; however, there is a dearth of assessment tools designed to measure progress from novice to expert biological conceptual thinking. We present the development of a novel assessment tool, the Biology Card Sorting Task,…

  10. Stimulus, Task, and Learning Effects on Measures of Temporal Resolution: Implications for Predictors of Language Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nicholas A.; Trainor, Laurel J.; Gray, Kellie; Plantinga, Judy A.; Shore, David I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Some studies find that temporal processing ability predicts language outcome whereas other studies do not. Resolution of this debate is hindered by the variety of temporal measures used, nonsensory loading of the tasks, and differential amounts of practice across studies. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of stimulus…

  11. Clinical Utility of the Modified Stroop Task as a Treatment Outcome Measure: Questions Raised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Jillian R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Touyz, Stephen W.; Griffiths, Rosalyn A.; Beumont, Pierre J. V.

    2004-01-01

    Data from an outpatient treatment trial for anorexia nervosa were examined to gain preliminary insights as to whether the modified Stroop colour-naming task might offer a useful measure of treatment outcome. It was hypothesised that interference for eating-, weight- and shape-related words on a modified version on the Stroop colour-naming task…

  12. Clinical Utility of the Modified Stroop Task as a Treatment Outcome Measure: Questions Raised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Jillian R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Touyz, Stephen W.; Griffiths, Rosalyn A.; Beumont, Pierre J. V.

    2004-01-01

    Data from an outpatient treatment trial for anorexia nervosa were examined to gain preliminary insights as to whether the modified Stroop colour-naming task might offer a useful measure of treatment outcome. It was hypothesised that interference for eating-, weight- and shape-related words on a modified version on the Stroop colour-naming task…

  13. Preschool Executive Control on the Shape School Task: Measurement Considerations and Utility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Verena E.; Woodward, Lianne J.

    2011-01-01

    Executive functions (EF) necessary for purposeful goal-directed activities undergo rapid change and development during the preschool years. However, of the few psychometrically valid measures of EF suitable for use with preschoolers, information on task sensitivity and predictive validity is scant. The neurodevelopmental correlates of early…

  14. Measurement of task delegations among nurses by nominal group process analysis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, V M

    1982-02-01

    Task delegations among different nursing skill levels (RNs, LPNs, NAs) are empirically measured in this study by performing a nursing activity analysis. Instead of relying on conventional techniques of time study and work sampling, this study incorporates Nominal Group Process and specially designed questionnaires for analyzing nursing activities. Approximately 100 nurses from a 193-bed short-term general hospital participated in the study. The resulting task delegation rates are compared with hospital policy, and a comparison is also made between different nursing units.

  15. Pilot-model measurements of pilot responses in a lateral-directional control task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    Pilot response during an aircraft bank-angle compensatory control task was measured by using an adaptive modeling technique. In the main control loop, which is the bank angle to aileron command loop, the pilot response was the same as that measured previously in single-input, single-output systems. The pilot used a rudder to aileron control coordination that canceled up to 80 percent of the vehicle yawing moment due to aileron deflection.

  16. Measurement of functional task difficulty during motor learning: What level of difficulty corresponds to the optimal challenge point?

    PubMed

    Akizuki, Kazunori; Ohashi, Yukari

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between task difficulty and learning benefit was examined, as was the measurability of task difficulty. Participants were required to learn a postural control task on an unstable surface at one of four different task difficulty levels. Results from the retention test showed an inverted-U relationship between task difficulty during acquisition and motor learning. The second-highest level of task difficulty was the most effective for motor learning, while learning was delayed at the most and least difficult levels. Additionally, the results indicate that salivary α-amylase and the performance dimension of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) are useful indices of task difficulty. Our findings suggested that instructors may be able to adjust task difficulty based on salivary α-amylase and the performance dimension of the NASA-TLX to enhance learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Two measures of performance in a peg-in-hole manipulation task with force feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The results are described from two manipulators on a peg-in-hole task, which is part of a continued effort to develop models for human performance with remote manipulators. Task difficulty is varied by changing the diameter of the peg to be inserted in a 50 mm diameter hole. An automatic measuring system records the distance between the tool being held by the manipulator and the receptacle into which it is to be inserted. The data from repeated insertions are processed by computer to determine task times, accumulated distances, and trajectories. Experiments with both the MA-11 cable-connected master-slave manipulator common to hot cell work and the MA-23 servo-controlled manipulator (with and without force feedback) are described. Comparison of these results with previous results of the Ames Manipulator shows that force feedback provides a consistent advantage.

  18. Task-based measures of image quality and their relation to radiation dose and patient risk

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Myers, Kyle J.; Hoeschen, Christoph; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Little, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of task-based assessment of image quality is reviewed in the context of imaging with ionizing radiation, and objective figures of merit (FOMs) for image quality are summarized. The variation of the FOMs with the task, the observer and especially with the mean number of photons recorded in the image is discussed. Then various standard methods for specifying radiation dose are reviewed and related to the mean number of photons in the image and hence to image quality. Current knowledge of the relation between local radiation dose and the risk of various adverse effects is summarized, and some graphical depictions of the tradeoffs between image quality and risk are introduced. Then various dose-reduction strategies are discussed in terms of their effect on task-based measures of image quality. PMID:25564960

  19. The Betrayal Aversion Elicitation Task: An Individual Level Betrayal Aversion Measure

    PubMed Central

    Aimone, Jason; Ball, Sheryl; King-Casas, Brooks

    2015-01-01

    Research on betrayal aversion shows that individuals’ response to risk depends not only on probabilities and payoffs, but also on whether the risk includes a betrayal of trust. While previous studies focus on measuring aggregate levels of betrayal aversion, the connection between an individual’s own betrayal aversion and other individually varying factors, including risk preferences, are currently unexplored. This paper develops a new task to elicit an individual’s level of betrayal aversion that can then be compared to individual characteristics. We demonstrate the feasibility of our new task and show that our aggregate individual results are consistent with previous studies. We then use this classification to ask whether betrayal aversion is correlated with risk aversion. While we find risk aversion and betrayal aversion have no significant relationship, we do observe that risk aversion is correlated with non-social risk preferences, but not the social, betrayal related, risk component of the new task. PMID:26331944

  20. Reliability and validity of the beats above baseline index: a new measure of task difficulty.

    PubMed

    Pine, Z M; Colbran, E; Corpolongo, R

    1994-05-01

    The Beats Above Baseline Index (BABI) is mathematically based on the integral of effort (estimated by instantaneous heart rate increase) across the time interval for task completion. This is equivalent to the number of heart beats occurring during a task minus the number of beats that would have occurred during the same time interval at the baseline rate. We assessed the test-retest reliability and construct validity of the BABI using 19 normal subjects accomplishing a stair-climbing task. Subjects completed the task under normal conditions (N), with a knee immobilizer and cane (CANE), and using crutches (CRUTCH). Reliability of the BABI was high within (ICC 0.84, 95% CI 0.70-0.92) and between sessions (ICC 0.91, 95% CI 0.77-0.97). Individual BABI values for all 19 subjects conformed to the underlying construct, namely N < CANE < CRUTCH. In contrast, two commonly used alternative measures, namely maximum change in heart rate and time for task completion, showed inferior concordance to the construct.

  1. Measuring working memory capacity in children using adaptive tasks: Example validation of an adaptive complex span.

    PubMed

    Gonthier, Corentin; Aubry, Alexandre; Bourdin, Béatrice

    2017-06-22

    Working memory tasks designed for children usually present trials in order of ascending difficulty, with testing discontinued when the child fails a particular level. Unfortunately, this procedure comes with a number of issues, such as decreased engagement from high-ability children, vulnerability of the scores to temporary mind-wandering, and large between-subjects variations in number of trials, testing time, and proactive interference. To circumvent these problems, the goal of the present study was to demonstrate the feasibility of assessing working memory using an adaptive testing procedure. The principle of adaptive testing is to dynamically adjust the level of difficulty as the task progresses to match the participant's ability. We used this method to develop an adaptive complex span task (the ACCES) comprising verbal and visuo-spatial subtests. The task presents a fixed number of trials to all participants, allows for partial credit scoring, and can be used with children regardless of ability level. The ACCES demonstrated satisfying psychometric properties in a sample of 268 children aged 8-13 years, confirming the feasibility of using adaptive tasks to measure working memory capacity in children. A free-to-use implementation of the ACCES is provided.

  2. Multicenter validation of a bedside antisaccade task as a measure of executive function

    PubMed Central

    Hellmuth, J.; Mirsky, J.; Heuer, H.W.; Matlin, A.; Jafari, A.; Garbutt, S.; Widmeyer, M.; Berhel, A.; Sinha, L.; Miller, B.L.; Kramer, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To create and validate a simple, standardized version of the antisaccade (AS) task that requires no specialized equipment for use as a measure of executive function in multicenter clinical studies. Methods: The bedside AS (BAS) task consisted of 40 pseudorandomized AS trials presented on a laptop computer. BAS performance was compared with AS performance measured using an infrared eye tracker in normal elders (NE) and individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia (n = 33). The neuropsychological domain specificity of the BAS was then determined in a cohort of NE, MCI, and dementia (n = 103) at UCSF, and the BAS was validated as a measure of executive function in a 6-center cohort (n = 397) of normal adults and patients with a variety of brain diseases. Results: Performance on the BAS and laboratory AS task was strongly correlated and BAS performance was most strongly associated with neuropsychological measures of executive function. Even after controlling for disease severity and processing speed, BAS performance was associated with multiple assessments of executive function, most strongly the informant-based Frontal Systems Behavior Scale. Conclusions: The BAS is a simple, valid measure of executive function in aging and neurologic disease. PMID:22573640

  3. Clinical complexity in medicine: A measurement model of task and patient complexity

    PubMed Central

    Islam, R.; Weir, C.; Fiol, G. Del

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Complexity in medicine needs to be reduced to simple components in a way that is comprehensible to researchers and clinicians. Few studies in the current literature propose a measurement model that addresses both task and patient complexity in medicine. Objective The objective of this paper is to develop an integrated approach to understand and measure clinical complexity by incorporating both task and patient complexity components focusing on infectious disease domain. The measurement model was adapted and modified to healthcare domain. Methods Three clinical Infectious Disease teams were observed, audio-recorded and transcribed. Each team included an Infectious Diseases expert, one Infectious Diseases fellow, one physician assistant and one pharmacy resident fellow. The transcripts were parsed and the authors independently coded complexity attributes. This baseline measurement model of clinical complexity was modified in an initial set of coding process and further validated in a consensus-based iterative process that included several meetings and email discussions by three clinical experts from diverse backgrounds from the Department of Biomedical Informatics at the University of Utah. Inter-rater reliability was calculated using Cohen’s kappa. Results The proposed clinical complexity model consists of two separate components. The first is a clinical task complexity model with 13 clinical complexity-contributing factors and 7 dimensions. The second is the patient complexity model with 11 complexity-contributing factors and 5 dimensions. Conclusion The measurement model for complexity encompassing both task and patient complexity will be a valuable resource for future researchers and industry to measure and understand complexity in healthcare. PMID:26404626

  4. The relational responding task: toward a new implicit measure of beliefs

    PubMed Central

    De Houwer, Jan; Heider, Niclas; Spruyt, Adriaan; Roets, Arne; Hughes, Sean

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the Relational Responding Task (RRT) as a tool for capturing beliefs at the implicit level. Flemish participants were asked to respond as if they believed that Flemish people are more intelligent than immigrants (e.g., respond “true” to the statement “Flemish people are wiser than immigrants”) or to respond as if they believed that immigrants are more intelligent than Flemish people (e.g., respond “true” to the statement “Flemish people are dumber than immigrants”). The difference in performance between these two tasks correlated with ratings of the extent to which participants explicitly endorsed the belief that Flemish people are more intelligent than immigrants and with questionnaire measures of subtle and blatant racism. The current study provides a first step toward validating RRT effects as a viable measure of implicit beliefs. PMID:25852624

  5. Kinetic measurements of hand motor impairments after mild to moderate stroke using grip control tasks.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yu; Ma, Le; Yan, Tiebin; Liu, Huihua; Wei, Xijun; Song, Rong

    2014-05-11

    The aim of this study is to investigate quantitative outcome measurements of hand motor performance for subjects after mild to moderate stroke using grip control tasks and characterize abnormal flexion synergy of upper extremities after stroke. A customized dynamometer with force sensors was used to measure grip force and calculate rotation torque during the sub-maximal grip control tasks. The paretic and nonpartic sides of eleven subjects after stroke and the dominant sides of ten healthy persons were tested. Their maximal voluntary grip force was measured and used to set sub-maximal grip control tasks at three different target force levels. Force control ability was characterized by the maximal grip force, mean force percentage, coefficient of variation (CV), target deviation ratio (TDR), and rotation torque ratio (RTR). The motor impairments of subjects after stroke were also evaluated using the Fugl-Meyer assessment for upper extremity (FMA-UE) and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). Maximal grip force of the paretic side was significantly reduced as compared to the nonparetic side and the healthy group, while the difference of maximal grip force between the nonparetic side and the healthy group was not significant. TDR and RTR increased for all three groups with increasing target force level. There were significant differences of CV, TDR and RTR between the paretic side and the healthy group at all the force levels. CV, TDR and RTR showed significant negative correlations with FMA-UE and WMFT at 50% of maximum grip force. This study designed a customized dynamometer together with an innovative measurement, RTR, to investigate the hand motor performance of subjects after mild to moderate stroke during force control tasks. And stroke-induced abnormal flexion synergy of wrist and finger muscles could be characterized by RTR. This study also identified a set of kinetic parameters which can be applied to quantitatively assess the hand motor function of subjects after

  6. Quantitative projections of a quality measure: Performance of a complex task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, K.; Kleppe, Gisle; Vold, Martin; Frette, Vidar

    2014-12-01

    Complex data series that arise during interaction between humans (operators) and advanced technology in a controlled and realistic setting have been explored. The purpose is to obtain quantitative measures that reflect quality in task performance: on a ship simulator, nine crews have solved the same exercise, and detailed maneuvering histories have been logged. There are many degrees of freedom, some of them connected to the fact that the vessels may be freely moved in any direction. To compare maneuvering histories, several measures were used: the time needed to reach the position of operation, the integrated angle between the hull direction and the direction of motion, and the extent of movement when the vessel is to be manually kept in a fixed position. These measures are expected to reflect quality in performance. We have also obtained expert quality evaluations of the crews. The quantitative measures and the expert evaluations, taken together, allow a ranking of crew performance. However, except for time and integrated angle, there is no correlation between the individual measures. This may indicate that complex situations with social and man-machine interactions need complex measures of quality in task performance. In general terms, we have established a context-dependent and flexible framework with quantitative measures in contact with a social-science concept that is hard to define. This approach may be useful for other (qualitative) concepts in social science that contain important information on the society.

  7. Measuring vigilance while assessing the functioning of the three attentional networks: the ANTI-Vigilance task.

    PubMed

    Roca, Javier; Castro, Cándida; López-Ramón, María Fernanda; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2011-06-15

    Vigilance could be a crucial aspect of attention that may modulate the functioning of the attentional system. Some behavioural tests, such as the Attention Network Test (ANT), have been developed to obtain an individual index of the three attentional networks (alertness, orientation, and executive control). However, alerting network measures are usually inferred using a phasic alertness task, and some indirect indexes of tonic alertness or vigilance have been proposed but not properly evaluated. The general aim for the present study is to provide the ANT with a direct measure of vigilance and then to analyse the relationship between this measure and other alternative indirect indexes. The obtained results suggest that the proposed new test (ANTI-Vigilance or ANTI-V) is useful to achieve a direct measure of vigilance and could be considered as a new tool available in cognitive, clinical or behavioural neurosciences for analysing vigilance in addition to the usual ANT scores. Other alternative indexes (such as global reaction time and global accuracy averaged across conditions) are only moderately correlated to a direct vigilance measure. As a consequence, although they may be to some extent related to the participants' vigilance level, they could not be used isolatedly as appropriate indexes of vigilance. Also, the role played by these global measures in the ANT task, which have been previously associated with some performance measures in applied areas (such as driving performance), is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Balloon Analog Insurance Task (BAIT): A Behavioral Measure of Protective Risk Management

    PubMed Central

    Essex, Brian G.; Lejuez, Carl W.; Qian, Rebecca Y.; Bernstein, Katherine; Zald, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Prior methods used to assess individual differences related to risk have not focused on an important component of risk management: how willing individuals are to pay for or take actions to insure what they already have. It is not clear whether this type of protective risk management taps into the same individual differences as does risk taking propensity measured by existing risk taking tasks. We developed a novel task to assess protective risk management, the Balloon Analog Insurance Task (BAIT), which is modeled after the Balloon Analog Risk Task (BART). In the BAIT, individuals are forced to decide how much money they are willing to pay in order to insure a specific fraction of their prior winnings given changing but imprecise levels of risk of monetary loss. Participants completed the BART and BAIT for real monetary rewards, and completed six self report questionnaires. The amount of insurance purchased on the BAIT was positively correlated with scores on the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale and on the Checking scale of the revised Obsessive Compulsive Inventory. Conversely, the amount of insurance purchased was negatively correlated with scores on the Domain Specific Risk Taking Questionnaire, and on the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI). Furthermore, relationships between insurance purchased and these scales remained significant after controlling for the BART in linear regression analyses, and the BART was only a significant predictor for measures on one scale - the PPI. Our results reveal that behavior on the BAIT taps into a number of individual differences that are not related to behavior on another measure of risk taking. We propose that the BAIT may provide a useful complement to the BART in the assessment of risk management style. PMID:21738666

  9. Complexity Measures, Task Type, and Analytic Evaluations of Speaking Proficiency in a School-Based Assessment Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Zhengdong

    2012-01-01

    This study, which is part of a large-scale study of using objective measures to validate assessment rating scales and assessment tasks in a high-profile school-based assessment initiative in Hong Kong, examined how grammatical complexity measures relate to task type and analytic evaluations of students' speaking proficiency in a classroom-based…

  10. An Analysis of Content and Task Dimensions of Mathematics Items Designed to Measure Level of Concept Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Margaret L.; Romberg, Thomas A.

    1974-01-01

    Thirty concepts from the areas of sets, division, and expressing relationships were studied with twelve tasks dealing with naming or selecting attributes or concepts involved. A factor analysis indicated that all concepts were measures of a single functional relationship and that all tasks measure a single underlying trait. (LS)

  11. Complexity Measures, Task Type, and Analytic Evaluations of Speaking Proficiency in a School-Based Assessment Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Zhengdong

    2012-01-01

    This study, which is part of a large-scale study of using objective measures to validate assessment rating scales and assessment tasks in a high-profile school-based assessment initiative in Hong Kong, examined how grammatical complexity measures relate to task type and analytic evaluations of students' speaking proficiency in a classroom-based…

  12. Widespread cortical α-ERD accompanying visual oddball target stimuli is frequency but non-modality specific.

    PubMed

    Peng, Weiwei; Hu, Yong; Mao, Yanhui; Babiloni, Claudio

    2015-12-15

    Previous studies have shown that alpha event-related desynchronization (α-ERD) is associated with reaction to visual stimuli in oddball paradigm, as a reflection of attention allocation and memory updating. The present study tested the hypothesis that it reflects a modality and/or frequency specific mechanism. Electroencephalography (EEG) recordings (64 channels) were performed on 18 healthy subjects during visual, auditory, somatosensory, and pain oddball paradigms. Low- and high-frequency α-rhythm were analyzed on individual basis, and their sources were estimated by low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). α-ERD, served as an index of cortical activation, was computed on the cortical voxel level and compared across the conditions (target vs. non-target), α sub-bands (lower vs. higher frequency), and modalities (visual, auditory, somatosensory, and pain). The results showed that visual α-ERD was mainly generated from occipital cortex for both target and non-target conditions. Its magnitude was enhanced across widespread cortical regions (e.g., bilateral occipital, parietal, and frontal areas) in the target condition and was greater in high-frequency α-band. Finally, α-ERD difference between target and non-target conditions was not higher in visual than that in other control modalities. All these findings indicated that human high-frequency α-ERD reflects cognitive attention processes underlying reaction to oddball target stimuli regardless of stimulus modality.

  13. Measurement the thickness of the transverse abdominal muscle in different tasks

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ling; Yin, Liquan; Tajiri, Kimiko; Huo, Ming; Maruyama, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the measurement of the thickness of the transverse abdominal muscle in different tasks. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were eleven healthy adult females. Thicknesses of transverse abdominal muscle were measured in seven tasks in the supine position. The tasks were: 1) Resting state, 2) Maximal contraction of transverse abdominal muscle, 3) Maximal contraction of levator ani muscle, 4) Maximal simultaneous contraction of both transverse abdominal muscle and levator ani muscle, 5) Maximal simultaneous contraction of both transverse abdominal muscle and levator ani muscle with front side resistance added to both knee, 6) Maximal simultaneous contraction of both transverse abdominal muscle and levator ani muscle with diagonal resistance added to both knees, and 7) Maximal simultaneous contraction of both transverse abdominal muscle and levator ani muscle with lateral resistance added to both knees. [Results] The thicknesses of transverse abdominal muscle during maximal simultaneous contraction and maximal simultaneous contraction with resistance were greater than during the resting state. [Conclusion] The muscle output during simultaneous contraction and resistance movement were larger than that of each individual muscle. PMID:28265140

  14. Measures of Dogs' Inhibitory Control Abilities Do Not Correlate across Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Brucks, Désirée; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Wallis, Lisa Jessica; Huber, Ludwig; Range, Friederike

    2017-01-01

    Inhibitory control, the ability to overcome prepotent but ineffective behaviors, has been studied extensively across species, revealing the involvement of this ability in many different aspects of life. While various different paradigms have been created in order to measure inhibitory control, only a limited number of studies have investigated whether such measurements indeed evaluate the same underlying mechanism, especially in non-human animals. In humans, inhibitory control is a complex construct composed of distinct behavioral processes rather than of a single unified measure. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the validity of inhibitory control paradigms in dogs. Sixty-seven dogs were tested in a battery consisting of frequently used inhibitory control tests. Additionally, dog owners were asked to complete an impulsivity questionnaire about their dog. No correlation of dogs' performance across tasks was found. In order to understand whether there are some underlying behavioral aspects explaining dogs' performance across tests, we performed principle component analyses. Results revealed that three components (persistency, compulsivity and decision speed) explained the variation across tasks. The questionnaire and dogs' individual characteristics (i.e., age and sex) provided only limited information for the derived components. Overall, results suggest that no unique measurement for inhibitory control exists in dogs, but tests rather measure different aspects of this ability. Considering the context-specificity of inhibitory control in dogs and most probably also in other non-human animals, extreme caution is needed when making conclusions about inhibitory control abilities based on a single test. PMID:28596749

  15. Measures of Dogs' Inhibitory Control Abilities Do Not Correlate across Tasks.

    PubMed

    Brucks, Désirée; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Wallis, Lisa Jessica; Huber, Ludwig; Range, Friederike

    2017-01-01

    Inhibitory control, the ability to overcome prepotent but ineffective behaviors, has been studied extensively across species, revealing the involvement of this ability in many different aspects of life. While various different paradigms have been created in order to measure inhibitory control, only a limited number of studies have investigated whether such measurements indeed evaluate the same underlying mechanism, especially in non-human animals. In humans, inhibitory control is a complex construct composed of distinct behavioral processes rather than of a single unified measure. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the validity of inhibitory control paradigms in dogs. Sixty-seven dogs were tested in a battery consisting of frequently used inhibitory control tests. Additionally, dog owners were asked to complete an impulsivity questionnaire about their dog. No correlation of dogs' performance across tasks was found. In order to understand whether there are some underlying behavioral aspects explaining dogs' performance across tests, we performed principle component analyses. Results revealed that three components (persistency, compulsivity and decision speed) explained the variation across tasks. The questionnaire and dogs' individual characteristics (i.e., age and sex) provided only limited information for the derived components. Overall, results suggest that no unique measurement for inhibitory control exists in dogs, but tests rather measure different aspects of this ability. Considering the context-specificity of inhibitory control in dogs and most probably also in other non-human animals, extreme caution is needed when making conclusions about inhibitory control abilities based on a single test.

  16. Sensitivity of modified Biel-maze task, compared with Y-maze task, to measure spatial learning and memory deficits of ethanol teratogenicity in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Christine C; Mongillo, Daniel L; Poklewska-Koziell, Margo; Winterborn, Andrew; Brien, James F; Reynolds, James N

    2012-07-15

    Ethanol consumption during pregnancy can produce a variety of teratogenic effects in offspring, termed Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). The most debilitating and permanent consequence of chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE) is neurobehavioral teratogenicity, which often manifests as cognitive and behavioral impairments, including deficits in spatial learning and memory. This study tested the hypothesis that a modified dry-land version of the multi-choice Biel-maze task is more sensitive than the rewarded-alternation Y-maze task for the determination of spatial learning and memory deficits of ethanol teratogenicity. Pregnant guinea pigs received ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight/day) or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding (control) for 5days/week throughout gestation. CPEE resulted in ethanol neurobehavioral teratogenicity in offspring, as demonstrated by increased spontaneous locomotor activity at postnatal day (PD) 10 and decreased brain weight at euthanasia (PD 150-200). On PD 21, offspring were randomly assigned to one of two tasks to assess spatial learning and memory performance: a dry-land version of the Biel maze or a rewarded-alternation Y-maze. Animals were habituated to the environment of their assigned task and performance of each CPEE or control offspring was measured. In the modified Biel maze, CPEE and control offspring were not different for percent completed trials or time to complete a trial. However, CPEE offspring made more errors (reversals and entering dead ends) in the Biel maze, demonstrating impaired spatial learning and memory. In contrast, CPEE offspring did not have impaired performance of the rewarded-alternation Y-maze task. Therefore, the modified dry-land version of the Biel-maze task, which measures cognitive performance using a complex multi-choice design, is more sensitive in demonstrating CPEE-induced spatial learning and memory deficits compared with a simple, rewarded-alternation Y-maze task.

  17. Children's original thinking: an empirical examination of alternative measures derived from divergent thinking tasks.

    PubMed

    Mouchiroud, C; Lubart, T

    2001-12-01

    Children's creative potential is often assessed using cognitive tests that require divergent thinking, such as the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT; E. P. Torrance, 1974, 1976, 1990). In this study the authors investigated the effect of various scoring systems on the originality index, evaluating the high intercorrelation of fluency and originality measures found in the TTCT scoring system and the applicability of TTCT scoring norms over time and across age groups. In 3 studies, the originality of elementary school children was measured using TTCT norms and various sample-specific scoring methods with the TTCT Unusual Uses of a Box test as well as social-problem-solving tasks. Results revealed an effect of scoring technique on creativity indices as well as on the reliability of originality scores and the relationship between originality and other ability measures. The usefulness of the various measures for understanding children's original thinking are discussed.

  18. On the Need of Objective Vigilance Monitoring: Effects of Sleep Loss on Target Detection and Task-Negative Activity Using Combined EEG/fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Czisch, Michael; Wehrle, Renate; Harsay, Helga A.; Wetter, Thomas C.; Holsboer, Florian; Sämann, Philipp G.; Drummond, Sean P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep loss affects attention by reducing levels of arousal and alertness. The neural mechanisms underlying the compensatory efforts of the brain to maintain attention and performance after sleep deprivation (SD) are not fully understood. Previous neuroimaging studies of SD have not been able to separate the effects of reduced arousal from the effects of SD on cerebral responses to cognitive challenges. Here, we used a simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) approach to study the effects of 36 h of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Specifically, we focused on changes in selective attention processes as induced by an active acoustic oddball task, with the ability to isolate runs with objective EEG signs of high (SDalert) or reduced (SDsleepy) vigilance. In the SDalert condition, oddball task-related activity appears to be sustained by compensatory co-activation of insular regions, but task-negative activity in the right posterior node of the default mode network is altered following TSD. In the SDsleepy condition, oddball task-positive activity was massively impaired, but task-negative activation was showing levels comparable with the control condition after a well-rested night. Our results suggest that loss of strict negative correlation between oddball task-positive and task-negative activation reflects the effects of TSD, while the actual state of vigilance during task performance can affects either task-related or task-negative activity, depending on the exact vigilance level. PMID:22557992

  19. Shoulder muscle fatigue during repetitive tasks as measured by electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Sue A; Allread, W Gary; Le, Peter; Rose, Joseph; Marras, William S

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify shoulder muscle fatigue during repetitive exertions similar to motions found in automobile assembly tasks. Shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a common and costly problem in automotive manufacturing. Ten subjects participated in the study. There were three independent variables: shoulder angle, frequency, and force. There were two types of dependent measures: percentage change in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measures and change in electromyography (EMG) median frequency. The anterior deltoid and trapezius muscles were measured for both NIRS and EMG. Also, EMG was collected on the middle deltoid and biceps muscles. The results showed that oxygenated hemoglobin decreased significantly due to the main effects (shoulder angle, frequency, and force). The percentage change in oxygenated hemoglobin had a significant interaction attributable to force and repetition for the anterior deltoid muscle, indicating that as repetition increased, the magnitude of the differences between the forces increased. The interaction of repetition and shoulder angle was also significant for the percentage change in oxygenated hemoglobin. The median frequency decreased significantly for the main effects; however, no interactions were statistically significant. There was significant shoulder muscle fatigue as a function of shoulder angle, task frequency, and force level. Furthermore, percentage change in oxygenated hemoglobin had two statistically significant interactions, enhancing our understanding of these risk factors. Ergonomists should examine interactions of force and repetition as well as shoulder angle and repetition when evaluating the risk of shoulder MSDs.

  20. The Switch Task for Children: Measuring Mental Flexibility in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dibbets, Pauline; Jolles, Jellemer

    2006-01-01

    Age-related changes in mental flexibility, in the form of task switching, were assessed in 292 children (58-156 months old). Task switching was examined with a new task for young children, the Switch Task for Children (STC). The STC consists of two easy, comparable games and does not require reading skills, which makes it suitable for children…

  1. A Teacher-Report Measure of Children's Task-Avoidant Behavior: A Validation Study of the Behavioral Strategy Rating Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiao; Nurmi, Jari-Erik; Kiuru, Noona; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Aunola, Kaisa

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to validate a teacher-report measure of children's task-avoidant behavior, namely the Behavioral Strategy Rating Scale (BSRS), in a sample of 352 Finnish children. In each of the four waves from Kindergarten to Grade 2, teachers rated children's task-avoidant behavior using the BSRS, children completed reading and mathematics…

  2. A Teacher-Report Measure of Children's Task-Avoidant Behavior: A Validation Study of the Behavioral Strategy Rating Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiao; Nurmi, Jari-Erik; Kiuru, Noona; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Aunola, Kaisa

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to validate a teacher-report measure of children's task-avoidant behavior, namely the Behavioral Strategy Rating Scale (BSRS), in a sample of 352 Finnish children. In each of the four waves from Kindergarten to Grade 2, teachers rated children's task-avoidant behavior using the BSRS, children completed reading and mathematics…

  3. A one-week 5-choice serial reaction time task to measure impulsivity and attention in adult and adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Remmelink, Esther; Chau, Uyen; Smit, August B; Verhage, Matthijs; Loos, Maarten

    2017-02-15

    Many psychiatric disorders emerge during adolescence. The study of executive functions in animal models of these disorders critically requires short-duration tasks measuring these functions before the animal ages. Here, a novel 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) protocol is presented, to measure attention and impulsivity within one week, without scheduled food deprivation and with little animal handling. Mice were allowed 24-h/day task access from their home-cage, during which they could self-pace task progression and earn unlimited food rewards depending on task performance. Manipulation of task parameters in this self-paced 5-CSRTT protocol (SP-5C) affected attentional performance and impulsivity to a similar extent as previously observed in the 5-CSRTT. Task activity followed intrinsic circadian rhythm, distinctive for the SP-5C protocol, with task performance stable over the day. The sensitivity of the SP-5C protocol to detect strain differences between C57BL/6J, DBA/2 J, BXD16 and BXD62 mice was demonstrated as well as its suitability for testing adolescent mice. Acute administration of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine impaired attentional performance, providing initial pharmacological validation of the task. The SP-5C substantially shortens the assessment of impulsivity and attention, increases test efficiency and enables the assessment of adolescent mouse models of psychiatric disorders.

  4. Graphical Tasks to Measure Upper Limb Function in Patients With Parkinson's Disease: Validity and Response to Dopaminergic Medication.

    PubMed

    Smits, Esther J; Tolonen, Antti J; Cluitmans, Luc; van Gils, Mark; Zietsma, Rutger C; Borgemeester, Robbert W K; van Laar, Teus; Maurits, Natasha M

    2017-01-01

    The most widely used method to assess motor functioning in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients is the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale-III (UPDRS-III). The UPDRS-III has limited ability to detect subtle changes in motor symptoms. Alternatively, graphical tasks can be used to provide objective measures of upper limb motor dysfunction. This study investigated the validity of such graphical tasks to assess upper limb function in PD patients and their ability to detect subtle changes in performance. Fourteen PD patients performed graphical tasks before and after taking dopaminergic medication. Graphical tasks included figure tracing, writing, and a modified Fitts' task. The Purdue pegboard test was performed to validate these graphical tasks. Movement time (MT), writing size, and the presence of tremor were assessed. MT on the graphical tasks correlated significantly with performance on the Purdue pegboard test (Spearman's ρ > 0.65; p < 0.05). MT decreased significantly after the intake of dopaminergic medication. Tremor power decreased after taking dopaminergic medication in most PD patients who suffered from tremor. Writing size did not correlate with performance on the Purdue pegboard test, nor did it change after taking medication. Our set of graphical tasks is valid to assess upper limb function in PD patients. MT proved to be the most useful measure for this purpose. The response on dopaminergic medication was optimally reflected by an improved MT on the graphical tasks in combination with a decreased tremor power, whereas writing size did not respond to dopaminergic treatment.

  5. A one-week 5-choice serial reaction time task to measure impulsivity and attention in adult and adolescent mice

    PubMed Central

    Remmelink, Esther; Chau, Uyen; Smit, August B.; Verhage, Matthijs; Loos, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    Many psychiatric disorders emerge during adolescence. The study of executive functions in animal models of these disorders critically requires short-duration tasks measuring these functions before the animal ages. Here, a novel 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) protocol is presented, to measure attention and impulsivity within one week, without scheduled food deprivation and with little animal handling. Mice were allowed 24-h/day task access from their home-cage, during which they could self-pace task progression and earn unlimited food rewards depending on task performance. Manipulation of task parameters in this self-paced 5-CSRTT protocol (SP-5C) affected attentional performance and impulsivity to a similar extent as previously observed in the 5-CSRTT. Task activity followed intrinsic circadian rhythm, distinctive for the SP-5C protocol, with task performance stable over the day. The sensitivity of the SP-5C protocol to detect strain differences between C57BL/6J, DBA/2 J, BXD16 and BXD62 mice was demonstrated as well as its suitability for testing adolescent mice. Acute administration of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine impaired attentional performance, providing initial pharmacological validation of the task. The SP-5C substantially shortens the assessment of impulsivity and attention, increases test efficiency and enables the assessment of adolescent mouse models of psychiatric disorders. PMID:28198416

  6. Perception time measured with the slope-transition paradigm (STP): category, set size, and task manipulations.

    PubMed

    Matin, Ethel; Nofer, David C; Christodoulou, Androula; Koski, Hope

    2005-01-01

    A perception time measure was obtained with the 'slope-transition paradigm' (STP), which is described in detail. In two experiments with the paradigm, participants viewed two sequential data frames, each presented for a wide range of durations. They made a binary response based on combined information from the two frames. The results showed piecewise linear response-time versus frame-duration functions with a slope-0 branch at short durations, followed by a slope-1 branch. The duration where the two branches met (the slope transition) was interpreted as the end of the perception of frame 1. For longer durations, the participant had completed the perception of frame 1 and was forced to waste time waiting for data from frame 2. In experiment 1, an odd-digit enumeration task was used, and set size and distractor category (even digits versus consonants) were varied. In experiment 2, a same/different task with digits was used and the type of judgment (literal versus parity) was varied. Perception time increased with set size. Distractor category and judgment type affected post-perceptual processes. The perception time measure of the STP is considered in relation to the attentional blink, repetition blindness, and object files.

  7. Sustained attention in adult ADHD: time-on-task effects of various measures of attention.

    PubMed

    Tucha, Lara; Fuermaier, Anselm B M; Koerts, Janneke; Buggenthin, Rieka; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Weisbrod, Matthias; Thome, Johannes; Lange, Klaus W; Tucha, Oliver

    2017-02-01

    Neuropsychological research on adults with ADHD showed deficits in various aspects of attention. However, the majority of studies failed to explore the change of performance over time, so-called time-on-task effects. As a consequence, little is known about sustained attention performance of adults with ADHD. The aim of the present study was therefore to test the hypothesis of sustained attention deficits of adults with ADHD. Twenty-nine adults with ADHD and 30 healthy individuals were assessed on four 20-min tests of sustained attention, measuring alertness, selective attention, divided attention and flexibility. The deterioration of performance over time (time-on-task effects) was compared between patients with ADHD and healthy individuals to conclude on sustained attention performance. Compared to healthy individuals, patients with ADHD showed significant deficits of medium size in selective attention and divided attention. Furthermore, medium sustained attention deficits was observed in measures of alertness, selective attention and divided attention. This study supports the notion of sustained attention deficits of adults with ADHD.

  8. Brain potentials measured during a Go/NoGo task predict completion of substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Steele, Vaughn R; Fink, Brandi C; Maurer, J Michael; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R; Wilber, Charles H; Jaffe, Adam J; Sidz, Anna; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Calhoun, Vince D; Clark, Vincent P; Kiehl, Kent A

    2014-07-01

    U.S. nationwide estimates indicate that 50% to 80% of prisoners have a history of substance abuse or dependence. Tailoring substance abuse treatment to specific needs of incarcerated individuals could improve effectiveness of treating substance dependence and preventing drug abuse relapse. We tested whether pretreatment neural measures of a response inhibition (Go/NoGo) task would predict which individuals would or would not complete a 12-week cognitive behavioral substance abuse treatment program. Adult incarcerated participants (n = 89; women n = 55) who volunteered for substance abuse treatment performed a Go/NoGo task while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. Stimulus- and response-locked ERPs were compared between participants who completed (n = 68; women = 45) and discontinued (n = 21; women = 10) treatment. As predicted, stimulus-locked P2, response-locked error-related negativity (ERN/Ne), and response-locked error positivity (Pe), measured with windowed time-domain and principal component analysis, differed between groups. Using logistic regression and support-vector machine (i.e., pattern classifiers) models, P2 and Pe predicted treatment completion above and beyond other measures (i.e., N2, P300, ERN/Ne, age, sex, IQ, impulsivity, depression, anxiety, motivation for change, and years of drug abuse). Participants who discontinued treatment exhibited deficiencies in sensory gating, as indexed by smaller P2; error-monitoring, as indexed by smaller ERN/Ne; and adjusting response strategy posterror, as indexed by larger Pe. The combination of P2 and Pe reliably predicted 83.33% of individuals who discontinued treatment. These results may help in the development of individualized therapies, which could lead to more favorable, long-term outcomes. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry Published by Society of Biological Psychiatry All rights reserved.

  9. Investigating a Novel Measure of Brain Networking Following Sports Concussion.

    PubMed

    Broglio, S P; Rettmann, A; Greer, J; Brimacombe, S; Moore, B; Narisetty, N; He, X; Eckner, J

    2016-08-01

    Clinicians managing sports-related concussions are left to their clinical judgment in making diagnoses and return-to-play decisions. This study was designed to evaluate the utility of a novel measure of functional brain networking for concussion management. 24 athletes with acutely diagnosed concussion and 21 control participants were evaluated in a research laboratory. At each of the 4 post-injury time points, participants completed the Axon assessment of neurocognitive function, a self-report symptom inventory, and the auditory oddball and go/no-go tasks while electroencephalogram (EEG) readings were recorded. Brain Network Activation (BNA) scores were calculated from EEG data related to the auditory oddball and go/no-go tasks. BNA scores were unable to differentiate between the concussed and control groups or by self-report symptom severity. These findings conflict with previous work implementing electrophysiological assessments in concussed athletes, suggesting that BNA requires additional investigation and refinement before clinical implementation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Comparative evaluation of twenty pilot workload assessment measure using a psychomotor task in a moving base aircraft simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, S. A.; Wierwille, W. W.

    1983-01-01

    A comparison of the sensitivity and intrusion of twenty pilot workload assessment techniques was conducted using a psychomotor loading task in a three degree of freedom moving base aircraft simulator. The twenty techniques included opinion measures, spare mental capacity measures, physiological measures, eye behavior measures, and primary task performance measures. The primary task was an instrument landing system (ILS) approach and landing. All measures were recorded between the outer marker and the middle marker on the approach. Three levels (low, medium, and high) of psychomotor load were obtained by the combined manipulation of windgust disturbance level and simulated aircraft pitch stability. Six instrument rated pilots participated in four seasons lasting approximately three hours each.

  11. The measurement of executive function at age 3 years: psychometric properties and criterion validity of a new battery of tasks.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Michael T; Blair, Clancy B; Wirth, R J; Greenberg, Mark

    2010-06-01

    In this study, the authors examined the psychometric properties and criterion validity of a newly developed battery of tasks that were designed to assess executive function (EF) abilities in early childhood. The battery was included in the 36-month assessment of the Family Life Project (FLP), a prospective longitudinal study of 1,292 children oversampled from low-income and African American families. Ninety-one percent of children were able to complete 1 or more of the tasks. Psychometric analyses were used to test the dimensionality of each task, evaluate the item and task properties, test the dimensionality of the task battery, and evaluate the criterion validity of the battery with multi-informant measures of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptomatology and child performance on two subtests of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence. Results indicated that the tasks were successful in measuring interindividual differences in child EF ability, that task scores were most informative about ability level for children in the low to moderate range of ability, that children's performance across the entire battery was adequately summarized by a single factor, and that individual differences on the EF battery were related to ADHD symptomatology and intelligence in expected ways. Results are discussed with respect to the importance of developing psychometrically sound, scalable instruments that facilitate the measurement of interindividual differences in intraindividual change of EF across the early childhood period.

  12. A Novel Wearable Apparatus to Measure Fingertip Forces in Manipulation Tasks Based on MEMS Barometric Sensors.

    PubMed

    Cerveri, Pietro; Quinzi, Mauro; Bovio, Dario; Frigo, Carlo Albino

    2017-01-01

    Artificial tactile sensing is a challenging research topic in robotics, motor control, and rehabilitation engineering encompassing multi-disciplinary skills and different technologies. This paper presents the development of a wearable tactile thimble system using MEMS barometric sensors and flexible printed circuit board. Barometric sensors were carefully processed to make them able to transduce contact forces. Thumb, index, and medium fingers were equipped with an array of six sensing elements each, covering the central, lateral, and medial aspects of the fingertip. The sensor integration, signal read-out and processing, hardware architecture of the device, along with the calibration protocol, were described. The test results showed adequate sensitivity at very low forces with an almost linear transduction range up to about 4N (RMSE: 0.04N). Tests on object manipulation tasks highlighted the value of the proposed system demonstrating the ability of measuring both the force amplitude and contact points, demonstrating the suitability of barometric sensors for tactile applications.

  13. ERP correlates of object recognition memory in Down syndrome: Do active and passive tasks measure the same thing?

    PubMed

    Van Hoogmoed, A H; Nadel, L; Spanò, G; Edgin, J O

    2016-02-01

    Event related potentials (ERPs) can help to determine the cognitive and neural processes underlying memory functions and are often used to study populations with severe memory impairment. In healthy adults, memory is typically assessed with active tasks, while in patient studies passive memory paradigms are generally used. In this study we examined whether active and passive continuous object recognition tasks measure the same underlying memory process in typically developing (TD) adults and in individuals with Down syndrome (DS), a population with known hippocampal impairment. We further explored how ERPs in these tasks relate to behavioral measures of memory. Data-driven analysis techniques revealed large differences in old-new effects in the active versus passive task in TD adults, but no difference between these tasks in DS. The group with DS required additional processing in the active task in comparison to the TD group in two ways. First, the old-new effect started 150 ms later. Second, more repetitions were required to show the old-new effect. In the group with DS, performance on a behavioral measure of object-location memory was related to ERP measures across both tasks. In total, our results suggest that active and passive ERP memory measures do not differ in DS and likely reflect the use of implicit memory, but not explicit processing, on both tasks. Our findings highlight the need for a greater understanding of the comparison between active and passive ERP paradigms before they are inferred to measure similar functions across populations (e.g., infants or intellectual disability).

  14. Concurrent validity of the tower tasks as measures of executive function in adults: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jeremy R; Riccio, Cynthia A; Castillo, Christine L

    2009-01-01

    Executive function refers to a variety of behaviors and abilities related to planning and strategy use, as well as to the maintenance of attention and behavior in the pursuit of some goal. Many instruments have been designed for the purpose of assessing executive function, and the tower tasks represent a specific group of measures commonly used in the assessment of this construct. This review and meta-analysis examines the theoretical and psychometric basis for the use of the various tower tasks in neuropsychological assessment of adults. Neuroimaging and electrophysiological evidence are consistent with theoretical hypotheses of frontal involvement (e.g., planning and strategy use) in tower task performance. Further, adults with various disorders of presumed neurological basis demonstrate impaired performance on tower tasks. Implications for the use of tower tasks in practice and research are discussed.

  15. Monitoring task loading with multivariate EEG measures during complex forms of human-computer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. E.; Gevins, A.; Brown, H.; Karnik, A.; Du, R.

    2001-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were made while 16 participants performed versions of a personal-computer-based flight simulation task of low, moderate, or high difficulty. As task difficulty increased, frontal midline theta EEG activity increased and alpha band activity decreased. A participant-specific function that combined multiple EEG features to create a single load index was derived from a sample of each participant's data and then applied to new test data from that participant. Index values were computed for every 4 s of task data. Across participants, mean task load index values increased systematically with increasing task difficulty and differed significantly between the different task versions. Actual or potential applications of this research include the use of multivariate EEG-based methods to monitor task loading during naturalistic computer-based work.

  16. Monitoring task loading with multivariate EEG measures during complex forms of human-computer interaction.

    PubMed

    Smith, M E; Gevins, A; Brown, H; Karnik, A; Du, R

    2001-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were made while 16 participants performed versions of a personal-computer-based flight simulation task of low, moderate, or high difficulty. As task difficulty increased, frontal midline theta EEG activity increased and alpha band activity decreased. A participant-specific function that combined multiple EEG features to create a single load index was derived from a sample of each participant's data and then applied to new test data from that participant. Index values were computed for every 4 s of task data. Across participants, mean task load index values increased systematically with increasing task difficulty and differed significantly between the different task versions. Actual or potential applications of this research include the use of multivariate EEG-based methods to monitor task loading during naturalistic computer-based work.

  17. Monitoring task loading with multivariate EEG measures during complex forms of human-computer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. E.; Gevins, A.; Brown, H.; Karnik, A.; Du, R.

    2001-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were made while 16 participants performed versions of a personal-computer-based flight simulation task of low, moderate, or high difficulty. As task difficulty increased, frontal midline theta EEG activity increased and alpha band activity decreased. A participant-specific function that combined multiple EEG features to create a single load index was derived from a sample of each participant's data and then applied to new test data from that participant. Index values were computed for every 4 s of task data. Across participants, mean task load index values increased systematically with increasing task difficulty and differed significantly between the different task versions. Actual or potential applications of this research include the use of multivariate EEG-based methods to monitor task loading during naturalistic computer-based work.

  18. An optimization algorithm for joint mechanics estimate using inertial measurement unit data during a squat task.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Vincent; Mazzà, Claudia; Fraisse, Philippe; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2011-01-01

    The use of dynamic optimization as a tool to estimate joint kinematics and kinetics, and ground reaction forces using data from a single inertial measurement unit (IMU) positioned on the lower trunk was investigated. The feasibility of this approach and its accuracy was explored for the analysis of a squat task, focusing on the ankle, knee and hip joints. An optimal motor control strategy aimed at minimizing the sum of the intersegmental couples and of their time derivatives was imposed to estimate the mechanics of a three-segment sagittal model. Moreover, in the optimization process constraints to the measured vertical acceleration, to the maximal vertical IMU excursion, and with regard to the maintenance of dynamic balance were imposed. Experiments were performed using 10 volunteers. Data were collected from the IMU, from a stereophotogrammetric system (SS) and from a force platform for validation purposes. Results showed a very good consistency of the model output with the lower limb joint trajectories, as obtained using the SS, and with the measured vertical component of the ground reaction (low root mean square differences (<10%) and high correlation coefficients (0.98)).

  19. Field evaluation of measuring indoor noise exposure in workplace with task-based active RFID technology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Chuan; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Wang, Te-Shun; Wang, Peng-Yau

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes the research using RFEMS (Radio Frequency Identification Exposure Monitoring System), which is designed by applying the task-based active RFID (radio frequency identification) technology, to measure the indoor noise exposure dose in a workplace. The RFEMS and sound level meter are mounted on the vests of eight workers to carry out on-site field test by monitoring the time activity pattern (TAP), and the noise dose level exposed by the workers. The data are recorded and instantaneously transmitted to a computer to be saved in the server and later compared to those obtained using the standard method. The results that have a 0.909 correlation coefficient (R(2)), and 1.64% average measure error confirm the accuracy of using RFEMS for monitoring TAP. Additionally, the combined use of RFEMS and sound level meter leads to the development of a semi noise dosimetry (SND), a real-time electronic indirect noise dosimetry (REIND), and an equivalent electronic recording indirect noise dosimetry (EEIND). The results obtained using these three devices are well correlated with the results monitored by using a PND (personal noise dosimetry) with correlation coefficients (R(2)) of 0.915, 0.779 and 0.873, respectively. The errors of noise dose expressed in TWA (time weight average) for these three methods are 0.81, 1.57 and 1.23 dBA, respectively; they are well within the general errors of the average dosimetries. These observations indicate that the RFEMS developed in this research is applicable for conducting task-based measurements of indoor noise. It uses a relatively inexpensive sound level meter to measure the noise exposure doses that are comparable to those obtained with a standard dosimetry in addition to monitoring the worker's time activity pattern. The findings will assist in studying the source of long-term noise exposed by workers, and hence this devise is a valuable tool for tracing and monitoring long-term noise exposure with reduced manpower

  20. Indirect Measurement of Sexual Orientation: Comparison of the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure, Viewing Time, and Choice Reaction Time Tasks.

    PubMed

    Rönspies, Jelena; Schmidt, Alexander F; Melnikova, Anna; Krumova, Rosina; Zolfagari, Asadeh; Banse, Rainer

    2015-07-01

    The present study was conducted to validate an adaptation of the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) as an indirect latency-based measure of sexual orientation. Furthermore, reliability and criterion validity of the IRAP were compared to two established indirect measures of sexual orientation: a Choice Reaction Time task (CRT) and a Viewing Time (VT) task. A sample of 87 heterosexual and 35 gay men completed all three indirect measures in an online study. The IRAP and the VT predicted sexual orientation nearly perfectly. Both measures also showed a considerable amount of convergent validity. Reliabilities (internal consistencies) reached satisfactory levels. In contrast, the CRT did not tap into sexual orientation in the present study. In sum, the VT measure performed best, with the IRAP showing only slightly lower reliability and criterion validity, whereas the CRT did not yield any evidence of reliability or criterion validity in the present research. The results were discussed in the light of specific task properties of the indirect latency-based measures (task-relevance vs. task-irrelevance).

  1. Thermal effects on human performance in office environment measured by integrating task speed and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Lan, Li; Wargocki, Pawel; Lian, Zhiwei

    2014-05-01

    We have proposed a method in which the speed and accuracy can be integrated into one metric of human performance. This was achieved by designing a performance task in which the subjects receive feedback on their performance by informing them whether they have committed errors, and if did, they can only proceed when the errors are corrected. Traditionally, the tasks are presented without giving this feedback and thus the speed and accuracy are treated separately. The method was examined in a subjective experiment with thermal environment as the prototypical example. During exposure in an office, 12 subjects performed tasks under two thermal conditions (neutral & warm) repeatedly. The tasks were presented with and without feedback on errors committed, as outlined above. The results indicate that there was a greater decrease in task performance due to thermal discomfort when feedback was given, compared to the performance of tasks presented without feedback. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolic equivalents of task are confounded by adiposity, which disturbs objective measurement of physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Tompuri, Tuomo T.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity refers any bodily movements produced by skeletal muscles that expends energy. Hence the amount and the intensity of physical activity can be assessed by energy expenditure. Metabolic equivalents of task (MET) are multiplies of the resting metabolism reflecting metabolic rate during exercise. The standard MET is defined as 3.5 ml/min/kg. However, the expression of energy expenditure by body weight to normalize the size differences between subjects causes analytical hazards: scaling by body weight does not have a physiological, mathematical, or physical rationale. This review demonstrates by examples that false methodology may cause paradoxical observations if physical activity would be assessed by body weight scaled values such as standard METs. While standard METs are confounded by adiposity, lean mass proportional measures of energy expenditure would enable a more truthful choice to assess physical activity. While physical activity as a behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness or adiposity as a state represents major determinants of public health, specific measurements of health determinants must be understood to enable a truthful evaluation of the interactions and their independent role as a health predictor. PMID:26321958

  3. Metabolic equivalents of task are confounded by adiposity, which disturbs objective measurement of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Tompuri, Tuomo T

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity refers any bodily movements produced by skeletal muscles that expends energy. Hence the amount and the intensity of physical activity can be assessed by energy expenditure. Metabolic equivalents of task (MET) are multiplies of the resting metabolism reflecting metabolic rate during exercise. The standard MET is defined as 3.5 ml/min/kg. However, the expression of energy expenditure by body weight to normalize the size differences between subjects causes analytical hazards: scaling by body weight does not have a physiological, mathematical, or physical rationale. This review demonstrates by examples that false methodology may cause paradoxical observations if physical activity would be assessed by body weight scaled values such as standard METs. While standard METs are confounded by adiposity, lean mass proportional measures of energy expenditure would enable a more truthful choice to assess physical activity. While physical activity as a behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness or adiposity as a state represents major determinants of public health, specific measurements of health determinants must be understood to enable a truthful evaluation of the interactions and their independent role as a health predictor.

  4. Using the Biology Card Sorting Task to Measure Changes in Conceptual Expertise during Postsecondary Biology Education.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, Sarah A; Combs, Elijah D; Nagami, Paul H; Byers, Victor; Fernandez, Juliana; Le, Dinh; Realin, Jared; Woodham, Selina; Smith, Julia I; Tanner, Kimberly D

    2017-01-01

    While there have been concerted efforts to reform undergraduate biology toward teaching students to organize their conceptual knowledge like experts, there are few tools that attempt to measure this. We previously developed the Biology Card Sorting Task (BCST), designed to probe how individuals organize their conceptual biological knowledge. Previous results showed the BCST could differentiate between different populations, namely non-biology majors (NBM) and biology faculty (BF). In this study, we administered the BCST to three additional populations, using a cross-sectional design: entering biology majors (EBM), advanced biology majors (ABM), and biology graduate students (BGS). Intriguingly, ABM did not initially sort like experts any more frequently than EBM. However, once the deep-feature framework was revealed, ABM were able to sort like experts more readily than did EBM. These results are consistent with the conclusion that biology education enables advanced biology students to use an expert-like conceptual framework. However, these results are also consistent with a process of "selection," wherein students who persist in the major may have already had an expert-like conceptual framework to begin with. These results demonstrate the utility of the BCST in measuring differences between groups of students over the course of their undergraduate education.

  5. Using the Biology Card Sorting Task to Measure Changes in Conceptual Expertise during Postsecondary Biology Education

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Sarah A.; Combs, Elijah D.; Nagami, Paul H.; Byers, Victor; Fernandez, Juliana; Le, Dinh; Realin, Jared; Woodham, Selina; Smith, Julia I.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2017-01-01

    While there have been concerted efforts to reform undergraduate biology toward teaching students to organize their conceptual knowledge like experts, there are few tools that attempt to measure this. We previously developed the Biology Card Sorting Task (BCST), designed to probe how individuals organize their conceptual biological knowledge. Previous results showed the BCST could differentiate between different populations, namely non–biology majors (NBM) and biology faculty (BF). In this study, we administered the BCST to three additional populations, using a cross-sectional design: entering biology majors (EBM), advanced biology majors (ABM), and biology graduate students (BGS). Intriguingly, ABM did not initially sort like experts any more frequently than EBM. However, once the deep-feature framework was revealed, ABM were able to sort like experts more readily than did EBM. These results are consistent with the conclusion that biology education enables advanced biology students to use an expert-like conceptual framework. However, these results are also consistent with a process of “selection,” wherein students who persist in the major may have already had an expert-like conceptual framework to begin with. These results demonstrate the utility of the BCST in measuring differences between groups of students over the course of their undergraduate education. PMID:28213584

  6. Visual search tasks: measurement of dynamic visual lobe and relationship with display movement velocity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin-Dong; Yu, Rui-Feng; Lin, Xue-Lian; Xie, Ya-Qing; Ma, Liang

    2017-07-13

    Visual lobe is a useful tool for predicting visual search performance. Up till now, no study has focused on dynamic visual lobe. This study developed a dynamic visual lobe measurement system (DVLMS) that could effectively map dynamic visual lobe and calculate visual lobe shape indices. The effects of display movement velocity on lobe shape indices were examined under four velocity conditions: 0, 4, 8 and 16 deg/s. In general, with the increase of display movement velocity, visual lobe area and perimeter became smaller, whereas lobe shape roundness, boundary smoothness, symmetry and regularity deteriorated. The elongation index was not affected by velocity. Regression analyses indicated that display movement velocity was important in determining dynamic visual lobe shape indices. Dynamic visual lobe provides another option for better understanding dynamic vision, in addition to dynamic visual acuity. Findings of this study can provide guidelines for analysing and designing dynamic visual tasks. Practitioner Summary: Dynamic visual lobe is important in reflecting the visual ability of searching for a moving target. We developed a dynamic visual lobe measurement system (DVLMS) and examined display movement velocity's effects on lobe shape. Findings revealed that velocity was a key factor affecting dynamic visual lobe shape indices.

  7. What do verbal fluency tasks measure? Predictors of verbal fluency performance in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zeshu; Janse, Esther; Visser, Karina; Meyer, Antje S.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the contributions of verbal ability and executive control to verbal fluency performance in older adults (n = 82). Verbal fluency was assessed in letter and category fluency tasks, and performance on these tasks was related to indicators of vocabulary size, lexical access speed, updating, and inhibition ability. In regression analyses the number of words produced in both fluency tasks was predicted by updating ability, and the speed of the first response was predicted by vocabulary size and, for category fluency only, lexical access speed. These results highlight the hybrid character of both fluency tasks, which may limit their usefulness for research and clinical purposes. PMID:25101034

  8. Heartfelt empathy? No association between interoceptive awareness, questionnaire measures of empathy, reading the mind in the eyes task or the director task.

    PubMed

    Ainley, Vivien; Maister, Lara; Tsakiris, Manos

    2015-01-01

    Interoception, defined as afferent information arising from within the body, is the basis of all emotional experience and underpins the 'self.' However, people vary in the extent to which interoceptive signals reach awareness. This trait modulates both their experience of emotion and their ability to distinguish 'self' from 'other' in multisensory contexts. The experience of emotion and the degree of self/other distinction or overlap are similarly fundamental to empathy, which is an umbrella term comprising affect sharing, empathic concern and perspective-taking (PT). A link has therefore often been assumed between interoceptive awareness (IA) and empathy despite a lack of clear evidence. To test the hypothesis that individual differences in both traits should correlate, we measured IA in four experiments, using a well-validated heartbeat perception task, and compared this with scores on several tests that relate to various aspects of empathy. We firstly measured scores on the Index of Interpersonal Reactivity and secondly on the Questionnaire of Cognitive and Affective Empathy. Thirdly, because the 'simulationist' account assumes that affect sharing is involved in recognizing emotion, we employed the 'Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task' for the recognition of facial expressions. Contrary to expectation, we found no significant relationships between IA and any aspect of these measures. This striking lack of direct links has important consequences for hypotheses about the extent to which empathy is necessarily embodied. Finally, to assess cognitive PT ability, which specifically requires self/other distinction, we used the 'Director Task' but found no relationship. We conclude that the abilities that make up empathy are potentially related to IA in a variety of conflicting ways, such that a direct association between IA and various components of empathy has yet to be established.

  9. General versus Task-Specific Measures of Children's Causal Attributions: Their Relationship to Achievement Behavior and Reading Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butkowsky, Irwin S.

    The relationships of children's perceptions of the causes of academic success or failure to achievement behavior and to reading ability were examined using two measures: Crandall's Intellectual Achievement Responsibility Scale (IAR), and a measure of students' causal attributions relating to performance of a single, specific task. Subjects were…

  10. Use of the Hayling Task to Measure Inhibition of Prepotent Responses in Normal Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belleville, Sylvie; Rouleau, Nancie; Van der Linden, Martial

    2006-01-01

    This study measures the effect of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and normal aging on the inhibition of prepotent responses. AD patients, normal aged controls, and young subjects were tested with the Hayling task, which measures the ability to inhibit a semantically constrained response, and with the Stroop procedure. AD patients showed a severe deficit…

  11. Stop Signal and Conners' Continuous Performance Tasks: Test-Retest Reliability of Two Inhibition Measures in ADHD Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soreni, Noam; Crosbie, Jennifer; Ickowicz, Abel; Schachar, Russell

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To measure test-retest reliability of the Stop-Signal Task (SST) and the Conners' Continuous Performance Test (CPT) in children with ADHD. Methods: 12 children with ADHD (age 11.46 plus or minus 1.66) participated in the study. Primary outcome measures were stop-signal reaction time (SSRT) for the SST and CPT's commission errors (%FP).…

  12. Stop Signal and Conners' Continuous Performance Tasks: Test-Retest Reliability of Two Inhibition Measures in ADHD Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soreni, Noam; Crosbie, Jennifer; Ickowicz, Abel; Schachar, Russell

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To measure test-retest reliability of the Stop-Signal Task (SST) and the Conners' Continuous Performance Test (CPT) in children with ADHD. Methods: 12 children with ADHD (age 11.46 plus or minus 1.66) participated in the study. Primary outcome measures were stop-signal reaction time (SSRT) for the SST and CPT's commission errors (%FP).…

  13. Intelligence and P3 Components of the Event-Related Potential Elicited during an Auditory Discrimination Task with Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Pascalis, V.; Varriale, V.; Matteoli, A.

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between fluid intelligence (indexed by scores on Raven Progressive Matrices) and auditory discrimination ability was examined by recording event-related potentials from 48 women during the performance of an auditory oddball task with backward masking. High ability (HA) subjects exhibited shorter response times, greater response…

  14. Measurement and Evidence of Computer-Based Task Switching and Multitasking by "Net Generation" Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Terry; Kennedy, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Logs of on-campus computer and Internet usage were used to conduct a study of computer-based task switching and multitasking by undergraduate medical students. A detailed analysis of over 6000 individual sessions revealed that while a majority of students engaged in both task switching and multitasking behaviours, they did so less frequently than…

  15. Measurement and Evidence of Computer-Based Task Switching and Multitasking by "Net Generation" Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Terry; Kennedy, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Logs of on-campus computer and Internet usage were used to conduct a study of computer-based task switching and multitasking by undergraduate medical students. A detailed analysis of over 6000 individual sessions revealed that while a majority of students engaged in both task switching and multitasking behaviours, they did so less frequently than…

  16. Summary and Review: Correlational Studies of Piagetian Tasks and Various Measures of Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Valerie Barnes; Brownlee, Linda

    The relationship between performance on various Piagetian and reading achievement tasks as examined through 26 correlational studies is reviewed. The following areas of concern are addressed: (1) sample characteristics of the subjects; (2) classification of the Piagetian tasks into five categories of logical operations, spatial concepts, general…

  17. Observational Measures of Parenting in Anxious and Nonanxious Mothers: Does Type of Task Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Grover, Rachel L.; Cord, Jennalee J.; Ialongo, Nick

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the relation between type of parent-child interaction task and parenting behaviors among a predominantly African American community-based sample. Twenty-five anxious and matched nonanxious (N = 50) mothers were videotaped with their children (M age = 5.8 years) engaging in both a structured and unstructured task. Blind raters…

  18. Role of Dual Task Design When Measuring Cognitive Load during Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoor, Cornelia; Bannert, Maria; Brunken, Roland

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the role different kinds of secondary tasks play for researching the modality effect of cognitive load theory. Ninety-six university students worked with a computer-based training program for approximately 13 min and had to fulfill an additional secondary task. In a 2 x 2 factorial design, modality of information presentation…

  19. Optical measures of changes in cerebral vascular tone during voluntary breath holding and a Sternberg memory task.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chin Hong; Low, Kathy A; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Fletcher, Mark A; Maclin, Edward L; Chiarelli, Antonio M; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2016-07-01

    The human cerebral vasculature responds to changes in blood pressure and demands for oxygenation via cerebral autoregulation. Changes in cerebrovascular tone (vasoconstriction and vasodilation) also mediate the changes in blood flow measured by the BOLD fMRI signal. This cerebrovascular reactivity is known to vary with age. In two experiments, we demonstrate that cerebral pulse parameters measured using optical imaging can quantify changes in cerebral vascular tone, both globally and locally. In experiment 1, 51 older adults (age range=55-87) performed a voluntary breath-holding task while cerebral pulse amplitude measures were taken. We found significant pulse amplitude variations across breath-holding periods, indicating vasodilation during, and vasoconstriction after breath holding. The breath-holding index (BHI), a measure of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) was derived and found to correlate with age. BHI was also correlated with performance in the Modified Mini-Mental Status Examination, even after controlling for age and education. In experiment 2, the same participants performed a Sternberg task, and changes in regional pulse amplitude between high (set-size 6) and low (set-size 2) task loads were compared. Only task-related areas in the fronto-parietal network (FPN) showed significant reduction in pulse amplitude, indicating vasodilation. Non-task-related areas such as the somatosensory and auditory cortices did not show such reductions. Taken together, these experiments suggest that optical pulse parameters can index changes in brain vascular tone both globally and locally, using both physiological and cognitive load manipulations.

  20. The competition with a concurrent cognitive task affects posturographic measures in patients with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Alessandra Ferreira; Souza, Carolina de Oliveira; Chen, Janini; Francato, Débora Valente; Caromano, Fátima Aparecida; Chien, Hsin Fen; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andrea; Voos, Mariana Callil

    2015-11-01

    To estimate the impact of a sensory-motor- cognitive task on postural balance, in Parkinson disease patients (Hoehn and Yahr 2-3) and to investigate possible relationships between posturography and functional balance clinical scales. Parkinson disease patients (n = 40) and healthy controls (n = 27) were evaluated with fluency tests, Berg Balance scale, Mini Best test and static posturography on the conditions eyes open, eyes closed and dual-task (simultaneous balance and fluency tasks). Posturographic data showed that Parkinson disease patients performed worse than controls in all evaluations. In general, balance on dual-task was significantly poorer than balance with eyes closed. Posturographic data were weakly correlated to clinical balance scales. In clinical practice, Parkinson disease patients are commonly assessed with eyes closed, to sensitize balance. Our study showed that adding a cognitive task is even more effective. Static posturographic data should be carefully overgeneralized to infer functional balance impairments.

  1. Rhythmic oscillations in quantitative EEG measured during a continuous performance task.

    PubMed

    Arruda, James E; Zhang, Hongmei; Amoss, R Toby; Coburn, Kerry L; Aue, William R

    2009-03-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to determine if cyclic variations in human performance recorded during a 30 min continuous performance task would parallel cyclic variations in right-hemisphere beta-wave activity. A fast fourier transformation was performed on the quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) and the performance record of each participant (N = 62), producing an individual periodogram for each outcome measure. An average periodogram was then produced for both qEEG and performance by combining (averaging) the amplitudes associated with each periodicity in the 62 original periodograms. Periodicities ranging from 1.00 to 2.00 min and from 4.70 to 5.70 min with amplitudes greater than would be expected due to chance were retained (Smith et al. 2003). The results of the present investigation validate the existence of cyclic variations in human performance that have been identified previously (Smith et al. 2003) and extend those findings by implicating right-hemisphere mediated arousal in the process (Arruda et al. 1996, 1999, 2007). Significant cyclic variations in left-hemisphere beta-wave activity were not observed. Taken together, the findings of the present investigation support a model of sustained attention that predicts cyclic changes in human performance that are the result of cyclic changes in right-hemisphere arousal.

  2. Proprioceptive ability at the lips and jaw measured using the same psychophysical discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Frayne, Ellie; Coulson, Susan; Adams, Roger; Croxson, Glen; Waddington, Gordon

    2016-06-01

    In the human face, the muscles and joints that generate movement have different properties. Whereas the jaw is a conventional condyle joint, the facial musculature has neither distinct origin nor insertion points, and the muscles do not contain muscle spindle proprioceptors. This current study aims to compare the proprioceptive ability at the orofacial muscles with that of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in 21 neuro-typical people aged between 18 and 65 years. A novel psychophysical task was devised for use with both structures that involved a fixed 30.5 mm start separation followed by closure onto stimuli of 5, 6, 7, 8 mm diameter. The mean proprioceptive score when using the lips was 0.84 compared to 0.79 at the jaw (p < 0.001), and response error was lower by 0.1 mm. The greater accuracy in discrimination of lip movement is significant because, unlike the muscles controlling the TMJ, the orbicularis oris muscle controlling the lips inserts on to connective tissue and other muscle, and contains no muscle spindles, implying a different more effective, proprioceptive mechanism. Additionally, unlike the lack of correlation previously observed between joints in the upper and lower limbs, at the face the scores from performing the task with the two different structures were significantly correlated (r = 0.5, p = 0.018). These data extend the understanding of proprioception being correlated for the same left and right joints and correlated within the same structure (e.g. ankle dorsiflexion and inversion), to include use-dependant proprioception, with performance in different structures being correlated through extended coordinated use. At the lips and jaw, it is likely that this arises from extensive coordinated use. This informs clinical assessment and suggests a potential for coordinated post-injury training of the lips and jaw, as well as having the potential to predict premorbid function via measurement of the uninjured structure, when monitoring

  3. Expansion and Compression of Time Correlate with Information Processing in an Enumeration Task.

    PubMed

    Wutz, Andreas; Shukla, Anuj; Bapi, Raju S; Melcher, David

    2015-01-01

    Perception of temporal duration is subjective and is influenced by factors such as attention and context. For example, unexpected or emotional events are often experienced as if time subjectively expands, suggesting that the amount of information processed in a unit of time can be increased. Time dilation effects have been measured with an oddball paradigm in which an infrequent stimulus is perceived to last longer than standard stimuli in the rest of the sequence. Likewise, time compression for the oddball occurs when the duration of the standard items is relatively brief. Here, we investigated whether the amount of information processing changes when time is perceived as distorted. On each trial, an oddball stimulus of varying numerosity (1-14 items) and duration was presented along with standard items that were either short (70 ms) or long (1050 ms). Observers were instructed to count the number of dots within the oddball stimulus and to judge its relative duration with respect to the standards on that trial. Consistent with previous results, oddballs were reliably perceived as temporally distorted: expanded for longer standard stimuli blocks and compressed for shorter standards. The occurrence of these distortions of time perception correlated with perceptual processing; i.e. enumeration accuracy increased when time was perceived as expanded and decreased with temporal compression. These results suggest that subjective time distortions are not epiphenomenal, but reflect real changes in sensory processing. Such short-term plasticity in information processing rate could be evolutionarily advantageous in optimizing perception and action during critical moments.

  4. Expansion and Compression of Time Correlate with Information Processing in an Enumeration Task

    PubMed Central

    Wutz, Andreas; Shukla, Anuj; Bapi, Raju S.; Melcher, David

    2015-01-01

    Perception of temporal duration is subjective and is influenced by factors such as attention and context. For example, unexpected or emotional events are often experienced as if time subjectively expands, suggesting that the amount of information processed in a unit of time can be increased. Time dilation effects have been measured with an oddball paradigm in which an infrequent stimulus is perceived to last longer than standard stimuli in the rest of the sequence. Likewise, time compression for the oddball occurs when the duration of the standard items is relatively brief. Here, we investigated whether the amount of information processing changes when time is perceived as distorted. On each trial, an oddball stimulus of varying numerosity (1–14 items) and duration was presented along with standard items that were either short (70 ms) or long (1050 ms). Observers were instructed to count the number of dots within the oddball stimulus and to judge its relative duration with respect to the standards on that trial. Consistent with previous results, oddballs were reliably perceived as temporally distorted: expanded for longer standard stimuli blocks and compressed for shorter standards. The occurrence of these distortions of time perception correlated with perceptual processing; i.e. enumeration accuracy increased when time was perceived as expanded and decreased with temporal compression. These results suggest that subjective time distortions are not epiphenomenal, but reflect real changes in sensory processing. Such short-term plasticity in information processing rate could be evolutionarily advantageous in optimizing perception and action during critical moments. PMID:26308546

  5. Measuring cognitive load during simulation-based psychomotor skills training: sensitivity of secondary-task performance and subjective ratings.

    PubMed

    Haji, Faizal A; Khan, Rabia; Regehr, Glenn; Drake, James; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Dubrowski, Adam

    2015-12-01

    As interest in applying cognitive load theory (CLT) to the study and design of pedagogic and technological approaches in healthcare simulation grows, suitable measures of cognitive load (CL) are needed. Here, we report a two-phased study investigating the sensitivity of subjective ratings of mental effort (SRME) and secondary-task performance (signal detection rate, SDR and recognition reaction time, RRT) as measures of CL. In phase 1 of the study, novice learners and expert surgeons attempted a visual-monitoring task under two conditions: single-task (monitoring a virtual patient's heart-rate) and dual-task (tying surgical knots on a bench-top simulator while monitoring the virtual patient's heart-rate). Novices demonstrated higher mental effort and inferior secondary-task performance on the dual-task compared to experts (RRT 1.76 vs. 0.73, p = 0.012; SDR 0.27 vs. 0.97, p < 0.001; SRME 7.75 vs. 2.80, p < 0.001). Similarly, secondary task performance deteriorated from baseline to dual-task among novices (RRT 0.63 vs. 1.76 s, p < 0.006 and SDR 1.00 vs. 0.27, p < 0.001), but not experts (RRT 0.63 vs. 0.73 s, p = 0.124 and SDR 1.00 vs. 0.97, p = 0.178). In phase 2, novices practiced surgical knot-tying on the bench top simulator during consecutive dual-task trials. A significant increase in SDR (F(9,63) = 6.63, p < 0.001, f = 0.97) and decrease in SRME (F(9,63) = 9.39, p < 0.001, f = 1.04) was observed during simulation training, while RRT did not change significantly (F(9,63) = 1.18, p < 0.32, f = 0.41). The results suggest subjective ratings and dual-task performance can be used to track changes in CL among novices, particularly in early phases of simulation-based skills training. The implications for measuring CL in simulation instructional design research are discussed.

  6. Measuring theory of mind across middle childhood: Reliability and validity of the Silent Films and Strange Stories tasks.

    PubMed

    Devine, Rory T; Hughes, Claire

    2016-09-01

    Recent years have seen a growth of research on the development of children's ability to reason about others' mental states (or "theory of mind") beyond the narrow confines of the preschool period. The overall aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a task battery composed of items from Happé's Strange Stories task and Devine and Hughes' Silent Film task. A sample of 460 ethnically and socially diverse children (211 boys) between 7 and 13years of age completed the task battery at two time points separated by 1month. The Strange Stories and Silent Film tasks were strongly correlated even when verbal ability and narrative comprehension were taken into account, and all items loaded onto a single theory-of-mind latent factor. The theory-of-mind latent factor provided reliable estimates of performance across a wide range of theory-of-mind ability and showed no evidence of differential item functioning across gender, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status. The theory-of-mind latent factor also exhibited strong 1-month test-retest reliability, and this stability did not vary as a function of child characteristics. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for the validity and reliability of the Strange Stories and Silent Film task battery as a measure of individual differences in theory of mind suitable for use across middle childhood. We consider the methodological and conceptual implications of these findings for research on theory of mind beyond the preschool years.

  7. A Comparison of Assessment Tasks Used to Measure FL Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Darlene F.

    1993-01-01

    Data from a study on second-language reading comprehension show that assessment task type, language of assessment, and target language experience uniformly affect learners' ability to demonstrate their reading comprehension. A literature review is included. (Contains 57 references.) (LB)

  8. Developing Performance Measures for the Navy Radioman (RM): Selecting Critical Tasks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    Erffmeyer, 1993; Guion , 1975). Thus, selecting an array of critical tasks Is the firsC -.nd perhaps most important step in te’st development...the Guion model is the job content universe, which consists of all the tasks, duties, and characteristics of the job. The constrained ’Job content...Washington, DC: American Council on Education. Guion , R. M. (1975). issues for a discussion of content validity. In R. hi. Guion (Ed.), Proceedings

  9. EEG measures reveal dual-task interference in postural performance in young adults.

    PubMed

    Little, C Elaine; Woollacott, Marjorie

    2015-01-01

    The study used a dual-task (DT) postural paradigm (two tasks performed at once) that included electroencephalography (EEG) to examine cortical interference when a visual working memory (VWM) task was paired with a postural task. The change detection task was used, as it requires storage of information without updating or manipulation and predicts VWM capacity. Ground reaction forces (GRFs) (horizontal and vertical), EMG, and EEG elements, time locked to support surface perturbations, were used to infer the active neural processes underlying the automatic control of balance in 14 young adults. A significant reduction was seen between single task (ST) and DT conditions in VWM capacity (F(1,13) = 6.175, p < 0.05, r = 06) and event-related potential (ERP) N1 component amplitude over the L motor (p < 0.001) and R sensory (p < 0.05) cortical areas. In addition, a significant increase in the COP trajectory peak (pkcopx) was seen in the DT versus ST condition. Modulation of VWM capacity as well as ERP amplitude and pkcopx in DT conditions provided evidence of an interference pattern, suggesting that the two modalities shared a similar set of attentional resources. The results provide direct evidence of the competition for central processing attentional resources between the two modalities, through the reduction in amplitude of the ERP evoked by the postural perturbation.

  10. Overlooking the obvious: a meta-analytic comparison of digit symbol coding tasks and other cognitive measures in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Dwight; Ramsey, Mary E; Gold, James M

    2007-05-01

    In focusing on potentially localizable cognitive impairments, the schizophrenia meta-analytic literature has overlooked the largest single impairment: on digit symbol coding tasks. To compare the magnitude of the schizophrenia impairment on coding tasks with impairments on other traditional neuropsychological instruments. MEDLINE and PsycINFO electronic databases and reference lists from identified articles. English-language studies from 1990 to present, comparing performance of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls on coding tasks and cognitive measures representing at least 2 other cognitive domains. Of 182 studies identified, 40 met all criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Means, standard deviations, and sample sizes were extracted for digit symbol coding and 36 other cognitive variables. In addition, we recorded potential clinical moderator variables, including chronicity/severity, medication status, age, and education, and potential study design moderators, including coding task variant, matching, and study publication date. Main analyses synthesized data from 37 studies comprising 1961 patients with schizophrenia and 1444 comparison subjects. Combination of mean effect sizes across studies by means of a random effects model yielded a weighted mean effect for digit symbol coding of g = -1.57 (95% confidence interval, -1.66 to -1.48). This effect compared with a grand mean effect of g = -0.98 and was significantly larger than effects for widely used measures of episodic memory, executive functioning, and working memory. Moderator variable analyses indicated that clinical and study design differences between studies had little effect on the coding task effect. Comparison with previous meta-analyses suggested that current results were representative of the broader literature. Subsidiary analysis of data from relatives of patients with schizophrenia also suggested prominent coding task impairments in this group. The 5-minute digit symbol coding

  11. A Comparative Study of the Variables Used to Measure Syntactic Complexity and Accuracy in Task-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inoue, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    The constructs of complexity, accuracy and fluency (CAF) have been used extensively to investigate learner performance on second language tasks. However, a serious concern is that the variables used to measure these constructs are sometimes used conventionally without any empirical justification. It is crucial for researchers to understand how…

  12. A Comparative Study of the Variables Used to Measure Syntactic Complexity and Accuracy in Task-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inoue, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    The constructs of complexity, accuracy and fluency (CAF) have been used extensively to investigate learner performance on second language tasks. However, a serious concern is that the variables used to measure these constructs are sometimes used conventionally without any empirical justification. It is crucial for researchers to understand how…

  13. Measuring Cognitive Load during Simulation-Based Psychomotor Skills Training: Sensitivity of Secondary-Task Performance and Subjective Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haji, Faizal A.; Khan, Rabia; Regehr, Glenn; Drake, James; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Dubrowski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    As interest in applying cognitive load theory (CLT) to the study and design of pedagogic and technological approaches in healthcare simulation grows, suitable measures of cognitive load (CL) are needed. Here, we report a two-phased study investigating the sensitivity of subjective ratings of mental effort (SRME) and secondary-task performance…

  14. Measuring Cognitive Load during Simulation-Based Psychomotor Skills Training: Sensitivity of Secondary-Task Performance and Subjective Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haji, Faizal A.; Khan, Rabia; Regehr, Glenn; Drake, James; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Dubrowski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    As interest in applying cognitive load theory (CLT) to the study and design of pedagogic and technological approaches in healthcare simulation grows, suitable measures of cognitive load (CL) are needed. Here, we report a two-phased study investigating the sensitivity of subjective ratings of mental effort (SRME) and secondary-task performance…

  15. An Analysis of Content and Task Dimensions of Mathematics Items Designed to Measure Level of Concept Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Margaret L; Romberg, Thomas A.

    Mathematics items developed to measure concept attainment for the topics of set theory, division, and expressing relationships were studied. A completely crossed design with 30 concepts and 12 tasks was used. The items were administered to 196 girls who had just completed the fifth grade and to 195 boys who had just begun the sixth grade.…

  16. Developing the Impossible Figures Task to Assess Visual-Spatial Talents among Chinese Students: A Rasch Measurement Model Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Data of item responses to the Impossible Figures Task (IFT) from 492 Chinese primary, secondary, and university students were analyzed using the dichotomous Rasch measurement model. Item difficulty estimates and person ability estimates located on the same logit scale revealed that the pooled sample of Chinese students, who were relatively highly…

  17. ERP measures of math anxiety: how math anxiety affects working memory and mental calculation tasks?

    PubMed Central

    Klados, Manousos A.; Simos, Panagiotis; Micheloyannis, Sifis; Margulies, Daniel; Bamidis, Panagiotis D.

    2015-01-01

    There have been several attempts to account for the impact of Mathematical Anxiety (MA) on brain activity with variable results. The present study examines the effects of MA on ERP amplitude during performance of simple arithmetic calculations and working memory tasks. Data were obtained from 32 university students as they solved four types of arithmetic problems (one- and two-digit addition and multiplication) and a working memory task comprised of three levels of difficulty (1, 2, and 3-back task). Compared to the Low-MA group, High-MA individuals demonstrated reduced ERP amplitude at frontocentral (between 180–320 ms) and centroparietal locations (between 380–420 ms). These effects were independent of task difficulty/complexity, individual performance, and general state/trait anxiety levels. Results support the hypothesis that higher levels of self-reported MA are associated with lower cortical activation during the early stages of the processing of numeric stimuli in the context of cognitive tasks. PMID:26578912

  18. A Flexible Question-and-Answer Task for Measuring Speech Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, Timothy; Roverud, Elin; Mason, Christine R.; Kidd, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This report introduces a new speech task based on simple questions and answers. The task differs from a traditional sentence recall task in that it involves an element of comprehension and can be implemented in an ongoing fashion. It also contains two target items (the question and the answer) that may be associated with different voices and locations to create dynamic listening scenarios. A set of 227 questions was created, covering six broad categories (days of the week, months of the year, numbers, colors, opposites, and sizes). All questions and their one-word answers were spoken by 11 female and 11 male talkers. In this study, listeners were presented with question-answer pairs and asked to indicate whether the answer was true or false. Responses were given as simple button or key presses, which are quick to make and easy to score. Two preliminary experiments are presented that illustrate different ways of implementing the basic task. In the first experiment, question-answer pairs were presented in speech-shaped noise, and performance was compared across subjects, question categories, and time, to examine the different sources of variability. In the second experiment, sequences of question-answer pairs were presented amidst competing conversations in an ongoing, spatially dynamic listening scenario. Overall, the question-and-answer task appears to be feasible and could be implemented flexibly in a number of different ways. PMID:27888257

  19. The reliability of a VISION COACH task as a measure of psychomotor skills.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yubin; Rosopa, Patrick J; Mossey, Mary; Crisler, Matthew C; Drouin, Nathalie; Kopera, Kevin; Brooks, Johnell O

    2014-10-01

    The VISION COACH™ interactive light board is designed to test and enhance participants' psychomotor skills. The primary goal of this study was to examine the test-retest reliability of the Full Field 120 VISION COACH task. One hundred eleven male and 131 female adult participants completed six trials where they responded to 120 randomly distributed lights displayed on the VISION COACH interactive light board. The mean time required for a participant to complete a trial was 101 seconds. Intraclass correlation coefficients, ranging from 0.962 to 0.987 suggest the VISION COACH Full Field 120 task was a reliable task. Cohen's d's of adjacent pairs of trials suggest learning effects did not negatively affect reliability after the third trial.

  20. Test-retest reliability and measurement invariance of executive function tasks in young children with and without ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Karalunas, Sarah L.; Bierman, Karen; Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Measurement reliability is assumed when executive function (EF) tasks are used to compare between groups or to examine relationships between cognition and etiologic and maintaining factors for psychiatric disorders. However, the test-retest reliabilities of EF tasks have rarely been examined in young children. Further, measurement invariance between typically-developing and psychiatric populations has not been examined. Method Test-retest reliability of a battery of commonly-used EF tasks was assessed in a group of children between the ages of 5–6 years old with (n=63) and without (n=44) ADHD. Results Few individual tasks achieved adequate reliability. However, CFA models identified two factors, working memory and inhibition, with test-retest correlations approaching 1.0. Multiple indicator multiple causes (MIMIC) models confirmed configural measurement invariance between the groups. Conclusion Problems created by poor reliability, including reduced power to index change over time or to detect relationships with functional outcomes, may be mitigated using latent variable approaches. PMID:26861156

  1. The ecological and construct validity of a newly developed measure of executive function: the Virtual Library Task.

    PubMed

    Renison, Belinda; Ponsford, Jennie; Testa, Renee; Richardson, Barry; Brownfield, Kylie

    2012-05-01

    Virtual reality (VR) assessment paradigms have the potential to address the limited ecological validity of pen and paper measures of executive function (EF) and the pragmatic and reliability issues associated with functional measures. To investigate the ecological validity and construct validity of a newly developed VR measure of EF, the Virtual Library Task (VLT); a real life analogous task--the Real Library Task (RLT); and five neuropsychological measures of EF were administered to 30 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 30 healthy Controls. Significant others for each participant also completed the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX), which is a behavioral rating scale of everyday EF. Performances on the VLT and the RLT were significantly positively correlated indicating that VR performance is similar to real world performance. The TBI group performed significantly worse than the Control group on the VLT and the Modified Six Elements Test (MSET) but the other four neuropsychological measures of EF failed to differentiate the groups. Both the MSET and the VLT significantly predicted everyday EF suggesting that they are both ecologically valid tools for the assessment of EF. The VLT has the advantage over the MSET of providing objective measurement of individual components of EF.

  2. Strong Radio Emission from a Hyperactive L Dwarf: A Low-Mass Oddball or a Rosetta Stone for Ultracool Dwarf Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Melis, C.; Zauderer, B. A.; Berger, E.

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection of radio emission at 5.5 GHz from the unusually active L5 + T7 binary 2MASS J13153094-2649513AB, based on observations conducted with the Australian Telescope Compact Array. An unresolved source at the proper-motion-corrected position of 2MASS J1315-2649AB was detected with a continuum flux of 0.37+/-0.05 mJy, corresponding to a radio luminosity L_rad = (9+/-3)x10^23 erg/s or log(L_rad/L_bol) = -5.24+/-0.22. While we cannot resolve the emission to one or both components, its strength strongly favors the L5 primary, making this component the latest-type L dwarf to be detected in the radio. No detection is made at 9.0 GHz to a 5-sigma limit of 0.29 mJy, consistent with a declining power law spectrum scaling as nu^-0.5 or steeper. The emission is quiescent, with no evidence of variability or bursts over 3 hours, and no measurable polarization (V/I < 34%). 2MASS J1315-2649AB is one of the most radio-luminous ultracool dwarfs detected in quiescent emission to date, comparable in strength to other ultracool dwarfs detected while in outburst. Its combination of strong and persistent H-alpha and radio emission is unique among L dwarfs, but we find no evidence of interaction between primary and secondary. We suggest further observations that may reveal whether 2MASS J1315-2649AB is a true oddball or a benchmark for understanding the origins of activity in the coldest stars and brown dwarfs.

  3. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI reveals a temporal cascade of task-related and default-mode activations during a simple target detection task.

    PubMed

    Walz, Jennifer M; Goldman, Robin I; Carapezza, Michael; Muraskin, Jordan; Brown, Truman R; Sajda, Paul

    2014-11-15

    Focused attention continuously and inevitably fluctuates, and to completely understand the mechanisms responsible for these modulations it is necessary to localize the brain regions involved. During a simple visual oddball task, neural responses measured by electroencephalography (EEG) modulate primarily with attention, but source localization of the correlates is a challenge. In this study we use single-trial analysis of simultaneously-acquired scalp EEG and functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) data to investigate the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) correlates of modulations in task-related attention, and we unravel the temporal cascade of these transient activations. We hypothesize that activity in brain regions associated with various task-related cognitive processes modulates with attention, and that their involvements occur transiently in a specific order. We analyze the fMRI BOLD signal by first regressing out the variance linked to observed stimulus and behavioral events. We then correlate the residual variance with the trial-to-trial variation of EEG discriminating components for identical stimuli, estimated at a sequence of times during a trial. Post-stimulus and early in the trial, we find activations in right-lateralized frontal regions and lateral occipital cortex, areas that are often linked to task-dependent processes, such as attentional orienting, and decision certainty. After the behavioral response we see correlates in areas often associated with the default-mode network and introspective processing, including precuneus, angular gyri, and posterior cingulate cortex. Our results demonstrate that during simple tasks both task-dependent and default-mode networks are transiently engaged, with a distinct temporal ordering and millisecond timescale.

  4. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Reveals a Temporal Cascade of Task-Related and Default-Mode Activations During a Simple Target Detection Task

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Jennifer M.; Goldman, Robin I.; Carapezza, Michael; Muraskin, Jordan; Brown, Truman R.; Sajda, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Focused attention continuously and inevitably fluctuates, and to completely understand the mechanisms responsible for these modulations it is necessary to localize the brain regions involved. During a simple visual oddball task, neural responses measured by electroencephalography (EEG) modulate primarily with attention, but source localization of the correlates is a challenge. In this study we use single-trial analysis of simultaneously-acquired scalp EEG and functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) data to investigate the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) correlates of modulations in task-related attention, and we unravel the temporal cascade of these transient activations. We hypothesize that activity in brain regions associated with various task-related cognitive processes modulates with attention, and that their involvements occur transiently in a specific order. We analyze the fMRI BOLD signal by first regressing out the variance linked to observed stimulus and behavioral events. We then correlate the residual variance with the trial-to-trial variation of EEG discriminating components for identical stimuli, estimated at a sequence of times during a trial. Post-stimulus and early in the trial, we find activations in right-lateralized frontal regions and lateral occipital cortex, areas that are often linked to task-dependent processes, such as attentional orienting, and decision certainty. After the behavioral response we see correlates in areas often associated with the default-mode network and introspective processing, including precuneus, angular gyri, and posterior cingulate cortex. Our results demonstrate that during simple tasks both task-dependent and default-mode networks are transiently engaged, with a distinct temporal ordering and millisecond timescale. PMID:23962956

  5. Short-term Music Training Enhances Complex, Distributed Neural Communication during Music and Linguistic Tasks.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Sarah M; Moreno, Sylvain; McIntosh, Anthony R

    2016-10-01

    Musical training is frequently associated with benefits to linguistic abilities, and recent focus has been placed on possible benefits of bilingualism to lifelong executive functions; however, the neural mechanisms for such effects are unclear. The aim of this study was to gain better understanding of the whole-brain functional effects of music and second-language training that could support such previously observed cognitive transfer effects. We conducted a 28-day longitudinal study of monolingual English-speaking 4- to 6-year-old children randomly selected to receive daily music or French language training, excluding weekends. Children completed passive EEG music note and French vowel auditory oddball detection tasks before and after training. Brain signal complexity was measured on source waveforms at multiple temporal scales as an index of neural information processing and network communication load. Comparing pretraining with posttraining, musical training was associated with increased EEG complexity at coarse temporal scales during the music and French vowel tasks in widely distributed cortical regions. Conversely, very minimal decreases in complexity at fine scales and trends toward coarse-scale increases were displayed after French training during the tasks. Spectral analysis failed to distinguish between training types and found overall theta (3.5-7.5 Hz) power increases after all training forms, with spatially fewer decreases in power at higher frequencies (>10 Hz). These findings demonstrate that musical training increased diversity of brain network states to support domain-specific music skill acquisition and music-to-language transfer effects.

  6. Short-term Music Training Enhances Complex, Distributed Neural Communication during Music and Linguistic Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Sarah M.; Moreno, Sylvain; McIntosh, Anthony R.

    2016-01-01

    Musical training is frequently associated with benefits to linguistic abilities, and recent focus has been placed on possible benefits of bilingualism to lifelong executive functions; however, the neural mechanisms for such effects are unclear. The aim of this study was to gain better understanding of the whole-brain functional effects of music and second-language training that could support such previously observed cognitive transfer effects. We conducted a 28-day longitudinal study of monolingual English-speaking 4- to 6-year-old children randomly selected to receive daily music or French language training, excluding weekends. Children completed passive EEG music note and French vowel auditory oddball detection tasks before and after training. Brain signal complexity was measured on source waveforms at multiple temporal scales as an index of neural information processing and network communication load. Comparing pretraining with posttraining, musical training was associated with increased EEG complexity at coarse temporal scales during the music and French vowel tasks in widely distributed cortical regions. Conversely, very minimal decreases in complexity at fine scales and trends toward coarse-scale increases were displayed after French training during the tasks. Spectral analysis failed to distinguish between training types and found overall theta (3.5–7.5 Hz) power increases after all training forms, with spatially fewer decreases in power at higher frequencies (>10 Hz). These findings demonstrate that musical training increased diversity of brain network states to support domain-specific music skill acquisition and music-to-language transfer effects. PMID:27243611

  7. Behavioral and ERP Measures of Holistic Face Processing in a Composite Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letourneau, Susan M.; Mitchell, Teresa V.

    2008-01-01

    Holistic processing of faces is characterized by encoding of the face as a single stimulus. This study employed a composite face task to examine whether holistic processing varies when attention is restricted to the top as compared to the bottom half of the face, and whether evidence of holistic processing would be observed in event-related…

  8. Exploring the Needs for Competency Measures in Eight Occupational Fields: Position Reports of Task Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergquist, William H.; And Others

    These position reports describe the findings of task forces which focused on the need to translate work-related experience into degree or certificate credit at postsecondary institutions. The eight occupational fields examined included Accounting, Agribusiness, Data Processing, Day Care, Electronics Technology, Management, Police Science and…

  9. Proposition Generating Task (PGT): A Measure of Meaningful Learning and of Conceptual Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Ruth; Tamir, Pinchas

    The use and analysis of student generated propositions linking two scientific concepts (photosynthesis and respiration) were examined before and after the study of photosynthesis. A proposition-generating task (PGT) was used as a diagnostic tool to indicate student misconceptions and partial understandings. Focus was on determining: how the nature…

  10. Behavioral and ERP Measures of Holistic Face Processing in a Composite Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letourneau, Susan M.; Mitchell, Teresa V.

    2008-01-01

    Holistic processing of faces is characterized by encoding of the face as a single stimulus. This study employed a composite face task to examine whether holistic processing varies when attention is restricted to the top as compared to the bottom half of the face, and whether evidence of holistic processing would be observed in event-related…

  11. Leveraging a Sorting Task as a Measure of Knowledge Structure in Bilingual Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Hengtao; Clariana, Roy

    2017-01-01

    This descriptive exploratory study considers whether a simple sorting task can elicit readers' knowledge structure in learners' first and second language. In this investigation, knowledge structure is considered from a symbolic connectionist viewpoint as the fundamental pre-meaningful aspect of knowledge, where structure is the precursor of…

  12. Optometric measurements predict performance but not comfort on a virtual object placement task with a stereoscopic three-dimensional display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntire, John P.; Wright, Steve T.; Harrington, Lawrence K.; Havig, Paul R.; Watamaniuk, Scott N. J.; Heft, Eric L.

    2014-06-01

    Twelve participants were tested on a simple virtual object precision placement task while viewing a stereoscopic three-dimensional (S3-D) display. Inclusion criteria included uncorrected or best corrected vision of 20/20 or better in each eye and stereopsis of at least 40 arc sec using the Titmus stereotest. Additionally, binocular function was assessed, including measurements of distant and near phoria (horizontal and vertical) and distant and near horizontal fusion ranges using standard optometric clinical techniques. Before each of six 30 min experimental sessions, measurements of phoria and fusion ranges were repeated using a Keystone View Telebinocular and an S3-D display, respectively. All participants completed experimental sessions in which the task required the precision placement of a virtual object in depth at the same location as a target object. Subjective discomfort was assessed using the simulator sickness questionnaire. Individual placement accuracy in S3-D trials was significantly correlated with several of the binocular screening outcomes: viewers with larger convergent fusion ranges (measured at near distance), larger total fusion ranges (convergent plus divergent ranges, measured at near distance), and/or lower (better) stereoscopic acuity thresholds were more accurate on the placement task. No screening measures were predictive of subjective discomfort, perhaps due to the low levels of discomfort induced.

  13. fMRI Validation of fNIRS Measurements During a Naturalistic Task

    PubMed Central

    Noah, J. Adam; Ono, Yumie; Nomoto, Yasunori; Shimada, Sotaro; Tachibana, Atsumichi; Zhang, Xian; Bronner, Shaw; Hirsch, Joy

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to compare brain activity recorded with near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in a dance video game task to that recorded in a reduced version of the task using fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Recently, it has been shown that fNIRS can accurately record functional brain activities equivalent to those concurrently recorded with functional magnetic resonance imaging for classic psychophysical tasks and simple finger tapping paradigms. However, an often quoted benefit of fNIRS is that the technique allows for studying neural mechanisms of complex, naturalistic behaviors that are not possible using the constrained environment of fMRI. Our goal was to extend the findings of previous studies that have shown high correlation between concurrently recorded fNIRS and fMRI signals to compare neural recordings obtained in fMRI procedures to those separately obtained in naturalistic fNIRS experiments. Specifically, we developed a modified version of the dance video game Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) to be compatible with both fMRI and fNIRS imaging procedures. In this methodology we explain the modifications to the software and hardware for compatibility with each technique as well as the scanning and calibration procedures used to obtain representative results. The results of the study show a task-related increase in oxyhemoglobin in both modalities and demonstrate that it is possible to replicate the findings of fMRI using fNIRS in a naturalistic task. This technique represents a methodology to compare fMRI imaging paradigms which utilize a reduced-world environment to fNIRS in closer approximation to naturalistic, full-body activities and behaviors. Further development of this technique may apply to neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, late states of dementia, or those with magnetic susceptibility which are contraindicated for fMRI scanning. PMID:26132365

  14. Synchronous activity of two people's prefrontal cortices during a cooperative task measured by simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Funane, Tsukasa; Kiguchi, Masashi; Atsumori, Hirokazu; Sato, Hiroki; Kubota, Kisou; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-07-01

    The brain activity during cooperation as a form of social process is studied. We investigate the relationship between coinstantaneous brain-activation signals of multiple participants and their cooperative-task performance. A wearable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system is used for simultaneously measuring the brain activities of two participants. Each pair of participants perform a cooperative task, and their relative changes in cerebral blood are measured with the NIRS system. As for the task, the participants are told to count 10 s in their mind after an auditory cue and press a button. They are also told to adjust the timing of their button presses to make them as synchronized as possible. Certain information, namely, the "intertime interval" between the two button presses of each participant pair and which of the participants was the faster, is fed back to the participants by a beep sound after each trial. When the spatiotemporal covariance between the activation patterns of the prefrontal cortices of each participant is higher, the intertime interval between their button-press times was shorter. This result suggests that the synchronized activation patterns of the two participants' brains are associated with their performance when they interact in a cooperative task.

  15. Neurophysiological Pharmacodynamic Measures of Groups and Individuals Extended from Simple Cognitive Tasks to More “Lifelike” Activities

    PubMed Central

    Gevins, Alan; Chan, Cynthia S.; Jiang, An; Sam-Vargas, Lita

    2012-01-01

    Objective Extend a method to track neurophysiological pharmacodynamics during repetitive cognitive testing to a more complex “lifelike” task. Methods Alcohol was used as an exemplar psychoactive substance. An equation, derived in an exploratory analysis to detect alcohol’s EEGs effects during repetitive cognitive testing, was validated in a confirmatory study on a new group whose EEGs after alcohol and placebo were recorded during working memory testing and while operating an automobile driving simulator. Results The equation recognized alcohol by combining five times beta plus theta power. It worked well (p<.0001) when applied to both tasks in the confirmatory group. The maximum EEG effect occurred 2–2.5 hours after drinking (>1hr after peak BAC) and remained at 90% at 3.5–4 hours (BAC <50% of peak). Individuals varied in the magnitude and timing of the EEG effect. Conclusion The equation tracked the EEG response to alcohol in the confirmatory study during both repetitive cognitive testing and a more complex “lifelike” task. The EEG metric was more sensitive to alcohol than several autonomic physiological measures, task performance measures or self-reports. Significance Using EEG as a biomarker to track neurophysiological pharmacodynamics during complex “lifelike” activities may prove useful for assessing how drugs affect integrated brain functioning. PMID:23194853

  16. Synchronous activity of two people's prefrontal cortices during a cooperative task measured by simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funane, Tsukasa; Kiguchi, Masashi; Atsumori, Hirokazu; Sato, Hiroki; Kubota, Kisou; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-07-01

    The brain activity during cooperation as a form of social process is studied. We investigate the relationship between coinstantaneous brain-activation signals of multiple participants and their cooperative-task performance. A wearable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system is used for simultaneously measuring the brain activities of two participants. Each pair of participants perform a cooperative task, and their relative changes in cerebral blood are measured with the NIRS system. As for the task, the participants are told to count 10 s in their mind after an auditory cue and press a button. They are also told to adjust the timing of their button presses to make them as synchronized as possible. Certain information, namely, the ``intertime interval'' between the two button presses of each participant pair and which of the participants was the faster, is fed back to the participants by a beep sound after each trial. When the spatiotemporal covariance between the activation patterns of the prefrontal cortices of each participant is higher, the intertime interval between their button-press times was shorter. This result suggests that the synchronized activation patterns of the two participants' brains are associated with their performance when they interact in a cooperative task.

  17. SU-E-I-40: New Method for Measurement of Task-Specific, High-Resolution Detector System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Loughran, B; Singh, V; Jain, A; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although generalized linear system analytic metrics such as GMTF and GDQE can evaluate performance of the whole imaging system including detector, scatter and focal-spot, a simplified task-specific measured metric may help to better compare detector systems. Methods: Low quantum-noise images of a neuro-vascular stent with a modified ANSI head phantom were obtained from the average of many exposures taken with the high-resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and with a Flat Panel Detector (FPD). The square of the Fourier Transform of each averaged image, equivalent to the measured product of the system GMTF and the object function in spatial-frequency space, was then divided by the normalized noise power spectra (NNPS) for each respective system to obtain a task-specific generalized signal-to-noise ratio. A generalized measured relative object detectability (GM-ROD) was obtained by taking the ratio of the integral of the resulting expressions for each detector system to give an overall metric that enables a realistic systems comparison for the given detection task. Results: The GM-ROD provides comparison of relative performance of detector systems from actual measurements of the object function as imaged by those detector systems. This metric includes noise correlations and spatial frequencies relevant to the specific object. Additionally, the integration bounds for the GM-ROD can be selected to emphasis the higher frequency band of each detector if high-resolution image details are to be evaluated. Examples of this new metric are discussed with a comparison of the MAF to the FPD for neuro-vascular interventional imaging. Conclusion: The GM-ROD is a new direct-measured task-specific metric that can provide clinically relevant comparison of the relative performance of imaging systems. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  18. Time estimation as a secondary task to measure workload: Summary of research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, S. G.; Mcpherson, D.; Loomis, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    Actively produced intervals of time were found to increase in length and variability, whereas retrospectively produced intervals decreased in length although they also increased in variability with the addition of a variety of flight-related tasks. If pilots counted aloud while making a production, however, the impact of concurrent activity was minimized, at least for the moderately demanding primary tasks that were selected. The effects of feedback on estimation accuracy and consistency were greatly enhanced if a counting or tapping production technique was used. This compares with the minimal effect that feedback had when no overt timekeeping technique was used. Actively made verbal estimates of sessions filled with different activities performed during the interval were increased. Retrospectively made verbal estimates, however, increased in length as the amount and complexity of activities performed during the interval were increased.

  19. Operational intelligence and school problems measured by Piagetian tasks and Rhode Island Pupil Identification Scale.

    PubMed

    Cardaci, M; Gangemi, A; Miragliotta, A; Sprini, G

    1998-06-01

    To explore the relations between operational intelligence rated on several Piagetian tasks and school learning problems identified by the Rhode Island Pupil Identification Scale by Novack, Bonaventura, and Merenda we assumed that Piagetian performances would allow predicting learning problems of first graders. 38 pupils were evaluated by three teachers, who were asked to complete the Rhode Island scale. Then the same children were individually given 8 Piagetian tests (including conservation and logical tasks) by an examiner who had no information about the pupils' other scores. Analysis showed that successful Piagetian performances were associated with ratings of successful schoolwork. Analysis of variance confirmed that difficulties in operational reasoning predict occurrence of learning problems. We concluded that operational intelligence and school learning in children are closely related.

  20. Measuring time with different neural chronometers during a synchronization-continuation task.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Hugo; Zarco, Wilbert; Pérez, Oswaldo; Prado, Luis; Bartolo, Ramón

    2011-12-06

    Temporal information processing is critical for many complex behaviors including speech and music cognition, yet its neural substrate remains elusive. We examined the neurophysiological properties of medial premotor cortex (MPC) of two Rhesus monkeys during the execution of a synchronization-continuation tapping task that includes the basic sensorimotor components of a variety of rhythmic behaviors. We show that time-keeping in the MPC is governed by separate cell populations. One group encoded the time remaining for an action, showing activity whose duration changed as a function of interval duration, reaching a peak at similar magnitudes and times with respect to the movement. The other cell group showed a response that increased in duration or magnitude as a function of the elapsed time from the last movement. Hence, the sensorimotor loops engaged during the task may depend on the cyclic interplay between different neuronal chronometers that quantify the time passed and the remaining time for an action.

  1. Measuring time with different neural chronometers during a synchronization-continuation task

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Hugo; Zarco, Wilbert; Pérez, Oswaldo; Prado, Luis; Bartolo, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Temporal information processing is critical for many complex behaviors including speech and music cognition, yet its neural substrate remains elusive. We examined the neurophysiological properties of medial premotor cortex (MPC) of two Rhesus monkeys during the execution of a synchronization-continuation tapping task that includes the basic sensorimotor components of a variety of rhythmic behaviors. We show that time-keeping in the MPC is governed by separate cell populations. One group encoded the time remaining for an action, showing activity whose duration changed as a function of interval duration, reaching a peak at similar magnitudes and times with respect to the movement. The other cell group showed a response that increased in duration or magnitude as a function of the elapsed time from the last movement. Hence, the sensorimotor loops engaged during the task may depend on the cyclic interplay between different neuronal chronometers that quantify the time passed and the remaining time for an action. PMID:22106292

  2. The performance of human infants on a measure of frontal cortex function, the delayed response task.

    PubMed

    Diamond, A; Doar, B

    1989-04-01

    The Delayed Response task is the best-established marker of frontal lobe function in nonhuman primates. This article reports the developmental progression of human infants on that task. It is proposed that maturation of prefrontal cortex may make possible these age-related improvements in Delayed Response performance. This would suggest the importance of prefrontal cortex functioning very early in life. Twelve infants (6 male, 6 female) were tested longitudinally every two weeks from 6-12 months of age. Another 36 infants (18 male, 18 female) were tested only once: 12 each at 8, 10, and 12 months. We predicted that infants would improve on Delayed Response over these ages because infants' performance on AB improves during this time, and Delayed Response is very similar to AB. The AB task, devised by Piaget, is used to study cognitive development in infants. The ages over which AB performance improves are well established. In both AB and Delayed Response, the subject watches as the experimenter hides a desired object in one of two identical wells. After a brief delay, the subject is allowed to reach. In AB, the object is hidden in the same well on subsequent trials until the subject reaches to the correct well; then side of hiding is reversed and the procedure repeated. In Delayed Response, side of hiding is varied randomly over trials. In the present study of Delayed Response each testing session consisted of 16 trials (eight to the right, eight to the left). We found: (1) the developmental progression for Delayed Response is almost identical to that for AB. (2) Infants of 7 1/2-9 months fail Delayed Response under the same conditions and in the same ways as do monkeys with lesions of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. It is therefore suggested that AB and Delayed Response require the same cognitive abilities, and that improved performance on these tasks provides an index of maturation of frontal cortex function.

  3. Cognitive deterioration and functional compensation in ALS measured with fMRI using an inhibitory task.

    PubMed

    Witiuk, Kelsey; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; McKee, Ryan; Alahyane, Nadia; Coe, Brian C; Melanson, Michel; Munoz, Douglas P

    2014-10-22

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons, resulting in progressive weakness and muscle atrophy. Recent studies suggest that nondemented ALS patients can show selective cognitive impairments, predominantly executive dysfunction, but little is known about the neural basis of these impairments. Oculomotor studies in ALS have described deficits in antisaccade execution, which requires the implementation of a task set that includes inhibition of automatic responses followed by generation of a voluntary action. It has been suggested that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) contributes in this process. Thus, we investigated whether deterioration of executive functions in ALS patients, such as the ability to implement flexible behavior during the antisaccade task, is related to DLPFC dysfunction. While undergoing an fMRI scan, 12 ALS patients and 12 age-matched controls performed an antisaccade task with concurrent eye tracking. We hypothesized that DLPFC deficits would appear during the antisaccade preparation stage, when the task set is being established. ALS patients made more antisaccade direction errors and showed significant reductions in DLPFC activation. In contrast, regions, such as supplementary eye fields and frontal eye fields, showed increased activation that was anticorrelated with the number of errors. The ALS group also showed reduced saccadic latencies that correlated with increased activation across the oculomotor saccade system. These findings suggest that ALS results in deficits in the inhibition of automatic responses that are related to impaired DLPFC activation. However, they also suggest that ALS patients undergo functional changes that partially compensate the neurological impairment. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414260-12$15.00/0.

  4. New indirect measures of "inattentive" visual grouping in a change-detection task.

    PubMed

    Russell, Charlotte; Driver, Jon

    2005-05-01

    It has often been suggested that Gestalt-like visual grouping processes may operate preattentively, but Mack and Rock (1998) suggested that no visual grouping takes place under "inattention." We introduced a new method to assess this. While participants performed a demanding change-detection task on a small matrix at fixation, task-irrelevant background elements were arranged by color sinilarity into columns, rows, or pseudorandomly. Independent of any change in the target matrix, background grouping could also change or remain the same on each trial. This influenced accuracy of change judgments for the central task, even though background grouping or its change usually could not be explicitly reported when probed with surprise questions as in Mack and Rock. This suggests that visual grouping may arise implicitly under inattention and provides a new method for testing the boundaries of this processing. Here we extended the initial result to changes in background grouping remote from the target and to those occurring across an intervening saccade.

  5. Applying fractal analysis to pupil dilation for measuring complexity in a process monitoring task.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hyup; Yang, Xiaonan

    2017-11-01

    This laboratory experiment was designed to use fractal dimension as a new method to analyze pupil dilation to evaluate the level of complexity in a multitasking environment. By using the eye-head integrated tracking system, we collected both pupil responses and head positions while participants conducted both process monitoring task and Multi-Attribute Task Battery (MATB-II) tasks. There was a significant effect of scenario complexity on a composite index of multitasking performance (Low Complexity » High Complexity). The fractal dimension of pupil dilation was also significantly influenced by complexity. The results clearly showed that the correlation between pupil dilation and multitasking performance was stronger when the pupil data was analyzed by using the fractal dimension method. The participants showed a higher fractal dimension when they performed a low complexity multitasking scenario. The findings of this research help us to advance our understanding of how to evaluate the complexity level of real-world applications by using pupillary responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Visual motor response of crewmen during a simulated 90 day space mission as measured by the critical task battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. W.; Jex, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    In order to test various components of a regenerative life support system and to obtain data on the physiological and psychological effects of long-duration exposure to confinement in a space station atmosphere, four carefully screened young men were sealed in space station simulator for 90 days. A tracking test battery was administered during the above experiment. The battery included a clinical test (critical instability task) related to the subject's dynamic time delay, and a conventional steady tracking task, during which dynamic response (describing functions) and performance measures were obtained. Good correlation was noted between the clinical critical instability scores and more detailed tracking parameters such as dynamic time delay and gain-crossover frequency. The comprehensive data base on human operator tracking behavior obtained in this study demonstrate that sophisticated visual-motor response properties can be efficiently and reliably measured over extended periods of time.

  7. Factor Structure of Attention Capacities Measured With Eye-Tracking Tasks in 18-Month-Old Toddlers.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Marjanneke; Verhoeven, Marjolein; Hooge, Ignace T C; van Baar, Anneloes L

    2016-03-01

    Attention capacities are critical for adaptive functioning and development. Reliable assessment measures are needed for the study of attention capacities in early childhood. In the current study, we investigated the factor structure of the Utrecht Tasks of Attention in Toddlers Using Eye-tracking (UTATE) test battery that assesses attention capacities in 18-month-old toddlers with eye-tracking techniques. The factor structure of 13 measures of attention capacities, based on four eye-tracking tasks, was investigated in a sample of 95 healthy toddlers (18 months of age) using confirmatory factor analysis. Results showed that a three-factor model best fitted the data. The latent constructs reflected an orienting, alerting, and executive attention system. This study showed support for a three-factor model of attention capacities in 18-month-old toddlers. Further study is needed to investigate whether the model can also be used with children at risk of attention problems. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Visual-motor response of crewmen during a simulated 90-day space mission as measured by the critical task battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. W.; Jex, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    In order to test various components of a regenerative life support system and to obtain data on the physiological and psychological effects of long duration exposure to confinement in a space station atmosphere, four carefully screened young men were sealed in a space station simulator for 90 days and administered a tracking test battery. The battery included a clinical test (Critical Instability Task) designed to measure a subject's dynamic time delay, and a more conventional steady tracking task, during which dynamic response (describing functions) and performance measures were obtained. Good correlation was noted between the clinical critical instability scores and more detailed tracking parameters such as dynamic time delay and gain-crossover frequency. The levels of each parameter span the range observed with professional pilots and astronaut candidates tested previously. The chamber environment caused no significant decrement on the average crewman's dynamic response behavior, and the subjects continued to improve slightly in their tracking skills during the 90-day confinement period.

  9. Heartfelt empathy? No association between interoceptive awareness, questionnaire measures of empathy, reading the mind in the eyes task or the director task

    PubMed Central

    Ainley, Vivien; Maister, Lara; Tsakiris, Manos

    2015-01-01

    Interoception, defined as afferent information arising from within the body, is the basis of all emotional experience and underpins the ‘self.’ However, people vary in the extent to which interoceptive signals reach awareness. This trait modulates both their experience of emotion and their ability to distinguish ‘self’ from ‘other’ in multisensory contexts. The experience of emotion and the degree of self/other distinction or overlap are similarly fundamental to empathy, which is an umbrella term comprising affect sharing, empathic concern and perspective-taking (PT). A link has therefore often been assumed between interoceptive awareness (IA) and empathy despite a lack of clear evidence. To test the hypothesis that individual differences in both traits should correlate, we measured IA in four experiments, using a well-validated heartbeat perception task, and compared this with scores on several tests that relate to various aspects of empathy. We firstly measured scores on the Index of Interpersonal Reactivity and secondly on the Questionnaire of Cognitive and Affective Empathy. Thirdly, because the ‘simulationist’ account assumes that affect sharing is involved in recognizing emotion, we employed the ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task’ for the recognition of facial expressions. Contrary to expectation, we found no significant relationships between IA and any aspect of these measures. This striking lack of direct links has important consequences for hypotheses about the extent to which empathy is necessarily embodied. Finally, to assess cognitive PT ability, which specifically requires self/other distinction, we used the ‘Director Task’ but found no relationship. We conclude that the abilities that make up empathy are potentially related to IA in a variety of conflicting ways, such that a direct association between IA and various components of empathy has yet to be established. PMID:25983715

  10. The crossmodal congruency task as a means to obtain an objective behavioral measure in the rubber hand illusion paradigm.

    PubMed

    Zopf, Regine; Savage, Greg; Williams, Mark A

    2013-07-26

    The rubber hand illusion (RHI) is a popular experimental paradigm. Participants view touch on an artificial rubber hand while the participants' own hidden hand is touched. If the viewed and felt touches are given at the same time then this is sufficient to induce the compelling experience that the rubber hand is one's own hand. The RHI can be used to investigate exactly how the brain constructs distinct body representations for one's own body. Such representations are crucial for successful interactions with the external world. To obtain a subjective measure of the RHI, researchers typically ask participants to rate statements such as "I felt as if the rubber hand were my hand". Here we demonstrate how the crossmodal congruency task can be used to obtain an objective behavioral measure within this paradigm. The variant of the crossmodal congruency task we employ involves the presentation of tactile targets and visual distractors. Targets and distractors are spatially congruent (i.e. same finger) on some trials and incongruent (i.e. different finger) on others. The difference in performance between incongruent and congruent trials - the crossmodal congruency effect (CCE) - indexes multisensory interactions. Importantly, the CCE is modulated both by viewing a hand as well as the synchrony of viewed and felt touch which are both crucial factors for the RHI. The use of the crossmodal congruency task within the RHI paradigm has several advantages. It is a simple behavioral measure which can be repeated many times and which can be obtained during the illusion while participants view the artificial hand. Furthermore, this measure is not susceptible to observer and experimenter biases. The combination of the RHI paradigm with the crossmodal congruency task allows in particular for the investigation of multisensory processes which are critical for modulations of body representations as in the RHI.

  11. A method for predicting the risk of virtual crashes in a simulated driving task using behavioural and subjective drowsiness measures.

    PubMed

    Murata, Atsuo; Naitoh, Kensuke; Karwowski, Waldemar

    2016-08-29

    This study proposed a procedure for predicting the point in time with high risk of virtual crash using a control chart methodology for behavioural measures during a simulated driving task. Tracking error, human back pressure, sitting pressure and horizontal and vertical neck bending angles were measured during the simulated driving task. The time with a high risk of a virtual crash occurred in 9 out of 10 participants. The time interval between the successfully detected point in time with high risk of virtual crash and the point in time of virtual crash ranged from 80 to 324 s. The proposed procedure for predicting the point in time with a high risk of a crash is promising for warning drivers of the state of high risk of crash. Practitioner Summary: Many fatal crashes occur due to drowsy driving. We proposed a method to predict the point in time with high risk of virtual crash before such a virtual crash occurs. This is done using behavioural measures during a simulated driving task. The effectiveness of the method is also demonstrated.

  12. Temporal processing dysfunction in schizophrenia as measured by time interval discrimination and tempo reproduction tasks.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Charalabos; Karanasiou, Irene S; Kapsali, Fotini; Stachtea, Xanthy; Kyprianou, Miltiades; Tsianaka, Eleni I; Karakatsanis, Nikolaos A; Rabavilas, Andreas D; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos K; Papadimitriou, George N

    2013-01-10

    Time perception deficiency has been implicated in schizophrenia; however the exact nature of this remains unclear. The present study was designed with the aim to delineate timing deficits in schizophrenia by examining performance of patients with schizophrenia and healthy volunteers in an interval discrimination test and their accuracy and precision in a pacing reproduction–replication test. The first task involved temporal discrimination of intervals, in which participants (60 patients with schizophrenia and 35 healthy controls) had to judge whether intervals were longer, shorter or equal than a standard interval. The second task required repetitive self-paced tapping to test accuracy and precision in the reproduction and replication of tempos. Patients were found to differ significantly from the controls in the psychoticism scale of EPQ, the proportion of correct responses in the interval discrimination test and the overall accuracy and precision in the reproduction and replication of sound sequences (p < 0.01). Within the patient group bad responders concerning the ability to discriminate time intervals were associated with increased scores in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and in the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) in comparison to good responders (p < 0.01). There were no gender effects and there were no differences between subgroups of patients taking different kinds or combinations of drugs. Analysis has shown that performance on timing tasks decreased with increasing psychopathology and therefore that timing dysfunctions are directly linked to the severity of the illness. Different temporal dysfunctions can be traced to different psychophysiological origins that can be explained using the Scalar Expectancy Theory (SET).

  13. Investigating the predictive validity of implicit and explicit measures of motivation in problem-solving behavioural tasks.

    PubMed

    Keatley, David; Clarke, David D; Hagger, Martin S

    2013-09-01

    Research into the effects of individuals'autonomous motivation on behaviour has traditionally adopted explicit measures and self-reported outcome assessment. Recently, there has been increased interest in the effects of implicit motivational processes underlying behaviour from a self-determination theory (SDT) perspective. The aim of the present research was to provide support for the predictive validity of an implicit measure of autonomous motivation on behavioural persistence on two objectively measurable tasks. SDT and a dual-systems model were adopted as frameworks to explain the unique effects offered by explicit and implicit autonomous motivational constructs on behavioural persistence. In both studies, implicit autonomous motivation significantly predicted unique variance in time spent on each task. Several explicit measures of autonomous motivation also significantly predicted persistence. Results provide support for the proposed model and the inclusion of implicit measures in research on motivated behaviour. In addition, implicit measures of autonomous motivation appear to be better suited to explaining variance in behaviours that are more spontaneous or unplanned. Future implications for research examining implicit motivation from dual-systems models and SDT approaches are outlined. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  14. Forward Air Controller: Task Analysis and Development of Team Training Measures for Close Air Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    d’AAR, ainsi que de déterminer les mesures adéquates pour évaluer le rendement de l’équipe. À cette fin, on a effectué une analyse hiérarchique des...certain nombre de recommandations visant à améliorer l’instrument avant son application aux exercices futurs de simulation répartie. Les...assessing the team’s performance as a whole. To that end, the contractor constructed hierarchical task analyses for the principal members of this team, the

  15. Reproducibility of hypocapnic cerebrovascular reactivity measurements using BOLD fMRI in combination with a paced deep breathing task.

    PubMed

    Sousa, I; Vilela, P; Figueiredo, P

    2014-09-01

    It has recently been proposed that hypocapnic cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) can be assessed by measuring the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response to paced deep breathing (PDB) tasks inducing mild hypocapnia and vasoconstriction. In this work, we aim to assess the test-retest reproducibility and inter-subject variability of BOLD CVR measurements obtained using a PDB task and different methods to analyse the associated BOLD signal. The respiratory protocol consisted of alternating 40s of PDB with normal free breathing; expired CO2 pressure levels (PETCO2) were continuously monitored. CVR was quantified using either a timecourse curve analysis (TCA) approach, where the magnitude of response peaks is emphasized, or general linear modelling (GLM) including optimisation of the BOLD response latencies. The GLM fit was carried out using two types of response regressors: one that was computed as the convolution of PETCO2 traces with a gamma function and another that consisted of the convolution of PDB paradigm blocks with a physiological model of the respiratory response. Haemodynamic response latencies were optimised either on a voxel basis or for the whole imaging region. We found that the GLM method based on PDB task or PETCO2 traces and voxelwise optimisation of response latencies provided the most reproducible measures of CVR. For the average grey matter CVR, the inter-subject coefficient of variation (CVinter) / intra-subject coefficient of variation (CVintra) / intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) were 20%/8%/0.8 and 27%/8%/0.9, using the task and PETCO2 timecourses, respectively. In terms of the spatial reproducibility, the group mean (±standard deviation) of the spatial ICC (ICCspatial) was 1.04±0.23 and 1.02±0.26, for the task and PETCO2 timecourses, respectively. These results indicate generally good reproducibility of the hypocapnic CVR maps obtained using the proposed PDB task and analysis methodology. This suggests that such protocol

  16. Within-subject joint independent component analysis of simultaneous fMRI/ERP in an auditory oddball paradigm

    PubMed Central

    MANGALATHU-ARUMANA, J.; BEARDSLEY, S. A.; LIEBENTHAL, E.

    2012-01-01

    The integration of event-related potential (ERP) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can contribute to characterizing neural networks with high temporal and spatial resolution. This research aimed to determine the sensitivity and limitations of applying joint independent component analysis (jICA) within-subjects, for ERP and fMRI data collected simultaneously in a parametric auditory frequency oddball paradigm. In a group of 20 subjects, an increase in ERP peak amplitude ranging 1–8 μV in the time window of the P300 (350–700ms), and a correlated increase in fMRI signal in a network of regions including the right superior temporal and supramarginal gyri, was observed with the increase in deviant frequency difference. JICA of the same ERP and fMRI group data revealed activity in a similar network, albeit with stronger amplitude and larger extent. In addition, activity in the left pre- and post- central gyri, likely associated with right hand somato-motor response, was observed only with the jICA approach. Within-subject, the jICA approach revealed significantly stronger and more extensive activity in the brain regions associated with the auditory P300 than the P300 linear regression analysis. The results suggest that with the incorporation of spatial and temporal information from both imaging modalities, jICA may be a more sensitive method for extracting common sources of activity between ERP and fMRI. PMID:22377443

  17. Robotic and Virtual Reality BCIs Using Spatial Tactile and Auditory Oddball Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Tomasz M

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews nine robotic and virtual reality (VR) brain-computer interface (BCI) projects developed by the author, in collaboration with his graduate students, within the BCI-lab research group during its association with University of Tsukuba, Japan. The nine novel approaches are discussed in applications to direct brain-robot and brain-virtual-reality-agent control interfaces using tactile and auditory BCI technologies. The BCI user intentions are decoded from the brainwaves in realtime using a non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG) and they are translated to a symbiotic robot or virtual reality agent thought-based only control. A communication protocol between the BCI output and the robot or the virtual environment is realized in a symbiotic communication scenario using an user datagram protocol (UDP), which constitutes an internet of things (IoT) control scenario. Results obtained from healthy users reproducing simple brain-robot and brain-virtual-agent control tasks in online experiments support the research goal of a possibility to interact with robotic devices and virtual reality agents using symbiotic thought-based BCI technologies. An offline BCI classification accuracy boosting method, using a previously proposed information geometry derived approach, is also discussed in order to further support the reviewed robotic and virtual reality thought-based control paradigms.

  18. Robotic and Virtual Reality BCIs Using Spatial Tactile and Auditory Oddball Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Tomasz M.

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews nine robotic and virtual reality (VR) brain–computer interface (BCI) projects developed by the author, in collaboration with his graduate students, within the BCI–lab research group during its association with University of Tsukuba, Japan. The nine novel approaches are discussed in applications to direct brain-robot and brain-virtual-reality-agent control interfaces using tactile and auditory BCI technologies. The BCI user intentions are decoded from the brainwaves in realtime using a non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG) and they are translated to a symbiotic robot or virtual reality agent thought-based only control. A communication protocol between the BCI output and the robot or the virtual environment is realized in a symbiotic communication scenario using an user datagram protocol (UDP), which constitutes an internet of things (IoT) control scenario. Results obtained from healthy users reproducing simple brain-robot and brain-virtual-agent control tasks in online experiments support the research goal of a possibility to interact with robotic devices and virtual reality agents using symbiotic thought-based BCI technologies. An offline BCI classification accuracy boosting method, using a previously proposed information geometry derived approach, is also discussed in order to further support the reviewed robotic and virtual reality thought-based control paradigms. PMID:27999538

  19. Comparing Treatment Effect Measurements in Narcolepsy: The Sustained Attention to Response Task, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test

    PubMed Central

    van der Heide, Astrid; van Schie, Mojca K.M.; Lammers, Gert Jan; Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Mayer, Geert; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Ding, Claire-Li; Lehert, Philippe; van Dijk, J. Gert

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To validate the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) as a treatment effect measure in narcolepsy, and to compare the SART with the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Design: Validation of treatment effect measurements within a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Patients: Ninety-five patients with narcolepsy with or without cataplexy. Interventions: The RCT comprised a double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter trial comparing the effects of 8-w treatments with pitolisant (BF2.649), modafinil, or placebo (NCT01067222). MWT, ESS, and SART were administered at baseline and after an 8-w treatment period. The severity of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy was also assessed using the Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI-C). Measurements and Results: The SART, MWT, and ESS all had good reliability, obtained for the SART and MWT using two to three sessions in 1 day. The ability to distinguish responders from nonresponders, classified using the CGI-C score, was high for all measures, with a high performance for the SART (r = 0.61) and the ESS (r = 0.54). Conclusions: The Sustained Attention to Response Task is a valid and easy-to-administer measure to assess treatment effects in narcolepsy, enhanced by combining it with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Citation: van der Heide A, van Schie MK, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Arnulf I, Mayer G, Bassetti CL, Ding CL, Lehert P, van Dijk JG. Comparing treatment effect measurements in narcolepsy: the Sustained Attention to Response Task, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test. SLEEP 2015;38(7):1051–1058. PMID:25902810

  20. Work-related problems in metal handling tasks in Bangladesh: obstacles to the development of safety and health measures.

    PubMed

    Ahasan, M R; Mohiuddin, G; Väyrynen, S; Ironkannas, H; Quddus, R

    1999-02-01

    Many manual labourers in Bangladesh are involved with metal-handling tasks that are both physically demanding and stressful. The metal workers have been significantly exposed to prolonged hammering and cutting activities in excessive noise and with awkward body postures. Moreover, stressors from heat and humidity, welding fumes and metal dusts often cause excess strain, and are reflected in a deterioration of their physical work performance. Indeed, physical work is the economic source in many developing countries for the support of worker's family and relatives. Unfortunately, there are many obstacles and a lack of efficient steps to restore ergonomics principles as well as occupational safety and health measures. Thus, in this paper, tasks, and jobs are classified and analysed from the results of an ergonomics survey from 343 subjects (293 adults men, age 20-40 years; 17 women, 19-32 years) and 33 child workers (14-17 years). Four types of metal working sites from two districts in Bangladesh were surveyed using questionnaires and interviews. The results showed that a significant number of workers experienced a high prevalence of work-related problems. The main aim was to identify stressful task that are related to musculoskeletal and psychosocial symptoms. Moreover, the findings reveal the possibility of why ergonomics measures are unsuccessful; and if they could have an immediate effect on the safety and health of metal workers in Bangladesh.

  1. Citicoline Treatment Improves Measures of Impulsivity and Task Performance in Chronic Marijuana Smokers: A Pilot BOLD fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Staci A.; Sagar, Kelly A.; Dahlgren, Mary Kathryn; Gonenç, Atilla; Conn, Nina A.; Winer, Jeffrey P.; Penetar, David; Lukas, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Citicoline is an endogenous nucleotide that has historically been used to treat stroke, traumatic brain injury, and cognitive dysfunction. Research has also shown that citicoline treatment is associated with improved cognitive performance in substance-abusing populations. We hypothesized that marijuana (MJ) smokers who received citicoline would demonstrate improvement in cognitive performance as well as increased neural efficiency during tasks of cognitive control relative to those who received placebo. Method The current study tested this hypothesis by examining the effects of citicoline in treatment-seeking chronic MJ smokers. In an 8-week double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 19 MJ smokers were randomly assigned via a double-blind procedure to the citicoline (8 Males, 2 Females) or placebo group (9 Males, 0 Females). All participants completed fMRI scanning at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment during two cognitive measures of inhibitory processing, the Multi Source Interference Test (MSIT) and Stroop Color Word Test, and also completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), a self-report measure of impulsivity. Results Following the 8 week trial, MJ smokers treated with citicoline demonstrated significantly lower levels of behavioral impulsivity, improved task accuracy on both the MSIT and Stroop tasks, and exhibited significantly different patterns of brain activation relative to baseline levels and relative to those who received placebo. Conclusions Findings suggest that citicoline may facilitate the treatment of MJ use disorders by improving the cognitive skills necessary to fully engage in comprehensive treatment programs. PMID:26658924

  2. The Emotion Recognition Task: a paradigm to measure the perception of facial emotional expressions at different intensities.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Barbara; Kessels, Roy P C; De Haan, Edward H F; Perrett, David I

    2007-04-01

    The Emotion Recognition Task is a computer-generated paradigm for measuring the recognition of six basic facial emotional expressions: anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise. Video clips of increasing length were presented, starting with a neutral face that changes into a facial expression of different intensities (20%-100%). The present study describes methodological aspects of the paradigm and its applicability in healthy participants (N=58; 34 men; ages between 22 and 75), specifically focusing on differences in recognition performance between the six emotion types and age-related change. The results showed that happiness was the easiest emotion to recognize, while fear was the most difficult. Moreover, older adults performed worse than young adults on anger, sadness, fear, and happiness, but not on disgust and surprise. These findings indicate that this paradigm is probably more sensitive than emotion perception tasks using static images, suggesting it is a useful tool in the assessment of subtle impairments in emotion perception.

  3. Measuring novices' field mapping abilities using an in-class exercise based on expert task analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulkins, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    We are interested in developing a model of expert-like behavior for improving the teaching methods of undergraduate field geology. Our aim is to assist students in mastering the process of field mapping more efficiently and effectively and to improve their ability to think creatively in the field. To examine expert-mapping behavior, a cognitive task analysis was conducted with expert geologic mappers in an attempt to define the process of geologic mapping (i.e. to understand how experts carry out geological mapping). The task analysis indicates that expert mappers have a wealth of geologic scenarios at their disposal that they compare against examples seen in the field, experiences that most undergraduate mappers will not have had. While presenting students with many geological examples in class may increase their understanding of geologic processes, novices still struggle when presented with a novel field situation. Based on the task analysis, a short (45-minute) paper-map-based exercise was designed and tested with 14 pairs of 3rd year geology students. The exercise asks students to generate probable geologic models based on a series of four (4) data sets. Each data set represents a day’s worth of data; after the first “day,” new sheets simply include current and previously collected data (e.g. “Day 2” data set includes data from “Day 1” plus the new “Day 2” data). As the geologic complexity increases, students must adapt, reject or generate new geologic models in order to fit the growing data set. Preliminary results of the exercise indicate that students who produced more probable geologic models, and produced higher ratios of probable to improbable models, tended to go on to do better on the mapping exercises at the 3rd year field school. These results suggest that those students with more cognitively available geologic models may be more able to use these models in field settings than those who are unable to draw on these models for whatever

  4. Development of measurement system for task oriented step tracking using laser range finder.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Tetsuya; Moriguchi, Toshiki; Yamada, Minoru; Uemura, Kazuki; Nishiguchi, Shu; Aoyama, Tomoki; Takahashi, Masaki

    2013-05-22

    Avoiding a fall requires fast and appropriate step responses, stepping speed as a fall risk indicator has only been assessed in older adults. We have developed a new measurement system that applies a laser range finder to assess temporal and spatial parameters of stepping performance such as step speed, length, and accuracy. This measurement system has higher portability, lower cost, and can analyze a larger number of temporal and spatial parameters than existing measurement systems. The aim of this study was to quantify the system for measuring reaction time and stride duration by compared to that obtained using a force platform. Ten healthy young adults performed steps in response to visual cues. The measurement system applied a laser range finder to measure the position and velocity of the center of each leg and of both legs.We applied the developed measurement system to the rhythmic stepping exercise and measured reaction time and stride duration. In addition, the foot-off time and foot-contact time were quantified using the measurement system, and compared to the foot-off time and foot-contact time quantified using a force platform. We confirmed that the measurement system can detect where a participant stood and measured reaction time and stride duration.Remarkable consistency was observed in the test-retest reliability of the foot-off time and foot-contact time quantified by the measurement system (p < 0.001). The foot-off time and foot-contact time quantified by the measurement system were highly correlated with the foot-off time and foot-contact time quantified by the force platform (reaction time: r = 0.997, stride duration: r = 0.879; p < 0.001). The new measurement system provided a valid measure of temporal step parameters in young healthy adults.The validity of the system to measure reaction time and stride duration was evaluated, and confirmed by applying to the rhythmic stepping exercise.

  5. A Measure of Inspection Time in 4-Year-Old Children: The Benny Bee IT Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sarah E.; Turley, Christopher; Nettelbeck, Ted; Burns, Nicholas R.

    2009-01-01

    Inspection time (IT) measures speed of information processing without the confounding influence of motor speed. While IT has been found to relate to cognitive abilities in adults and older children, no measure of IT has been validated for use with children younger than 6 years. This study examined the validity of a new measure of IT for preschool…

  6. Measuring Mentalizing Ability: A Within-Subject Comparison between an Explicit and Implicit Version of a Ball Detection Task

    PubMed Central

    Nijhof, Annabel D.; Brass, Marcel; Bardi, Lara; Wiersema, Jan R.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of mentalizing has been widely studied, but almost exclusively through tasks with explicit instructions. Recent studies suggest that people also mentalize on a more implicit level. However, to our knowledge, no study to date has directly contrasted the effects of implicit and explicit mentalizing processes on an implicit dependent measure within-subjects. We implemented this by using two versions of an object detection task, differing only on secondary catch questions. We hypothesized that if explicit mentalizing relies on complementary processes beyond those underlying implicit mentalizing, this would be reflected in enhanced belief effects in the explicit version. Twenty-eight healthy adults watched movies in which, during the first phase, both they themselves and another agent formed a belief about the location of a ball, and although irrelevant, these beliefs could influence their ball detection reaction times in the second phase. After this response phase, there were occasional catch questions that were different for the explicit and implicit task version. Finally, self-report measures of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptomatology were included, as the literature suggests that ASD is related to a specific deficit in implicit mentalizing. Both in the explicit and implicit version, belief conditions had a significant effect on reaction times, with responses being slower when neither the participant nor the other agent expected the ball to be present compared to all other conditions. Importantly, after the implicit version, participants reported no explicit mentalizing awareness. In our neurotypical sample, ASD symptoms were not found to correlate with either explicit or implicit mentalizing. In conclusion, the reaction time patterns in the explicit and implicit version of the task show strikingly similar effects of mentalizing, indicating that participants processed beliefs to the same extent regardless of whether they mentalized explicitly or

  7. Measuring Mentalizing Ability: A Within-Subject Comparison between an Explicit and Implicit Version of a Ball Detection Task.

    PubMed

    Nijhof, Annabel D; Brass, Marcel; Bardi, Lara; Wiersema, Jan R

    2016-01-01

    The concept of mentalizing has been widely studied, but almost exclusively through tasks with explicit instructions. Recent studies suggest that people also mentalize on a more implicit level. However, to our knowledge, no study to date has directly contrasted the effects of implicit and explicit mentalizing processes on an implicit dependent measure within-subjects. We implemented this by using two versions of an object detection task, differing only on secondary catch questions. We hypothesized that if explicit mentalizing relies on complementary processes beyond those underlying implicit mentalizing, this would be reflected in enhanced belief effects in the explicit version. Twenty-eight healthy adults watched movies in which, during the first phase, both they themselves and another agent formed a belief about the location of a ball, and although irrelevant, these beliefs could influence their ball detection reaction times in the second phase. After this response phase, there were occasional catch questions that were different for the explicit and implicit task version. Finally, self-report measures of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptomatology were included, as the literature suggests that ASD is related to a specific deficit in implicit mentalizing. Both in the explicit and implicit version, belief conditions had a significant effect on reaction times, with responses being slower when neither the participant nor the other agent expected the ball to be present compared to all other conditions. Importantly, after the implicit version, participants reported no explicit mentalizing awareness. In our neurotypical sample, ASD symptoms were not found to correlate with either explicit or implicit mentalizing. In conclusion, the reaction time patterns in the explicit and implicit version of the task show strikingly similar effects of mentalizing, indicating that participants processed beliefs to the same extent regardless of whether they mentalized explicitly or

  8. Attentional Effects on Phenomenological Appearance: How They Change with Task Instructions and Measurement Methods

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Britt

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that exogenous cues accentuate contrast appearance. The empirical finding is controversial because non-veridical perception challenges the idea that attention prioritizes processing resources to make perception better, and because philosophers have used the finding to challenge representational accounts of mental experience. The present experiments confirm that when evaluated with comparison paradigms exogenous cues increase the apparent contrast. In addition, contrast appearance was also changed by simply changing the purpose of a secondary task. When comparison and discrimination reports were combined in a single experiment there was a behavioral disassociation: contrast enhanced for comparison responses, but did not change for discrimination judgments, even when participants made both types of judgment for a single stimulus. That a single object can have multiple simultaneous appearances leads inescapably to the conclusion that our unitary mental experience is illusory. PMID:27022928

  9. Attentional Effects on Phenomenological Appearance: How They Change with Task Instructions and Measurement Methods.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Britt

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that exogenous cues accentuate contrast appearance. The empirical finding is controversial because non-veridical perception challenges the idea that attention prioritizes processing resources to make perception better, and because philosophers have used the finding to challenge representational accounts of mental experience. The present experiments confirm that when evaluated with comparison paradigms exogenous cues increase the apparent contrast. In addition, contrast appearance was also changed by simply changing the purpose of a secondary task. When comparison and discrimination reports were combined in a single experiment there was a behavioral disassociation: contrast enhanced for comparison responses, but did not change for discrimination judgments, even when participants made both types of judgment for a single stimulus. That a single object can have multiple simultaneous appearances leads inescapably to the conclusion that our unitary mental experience is illusory.

  10. Ontogeny of Rat Recognition Memory Measured by the Novel Object Recognition Task

    PubMed Central

    Reger, Maxine L.; Hovda, David A.; Giza, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    Detection of novelty is an essential component of recognition memory, which develops throughout cerebral maturation. To better understand the developmental aspects of this memory system, the novel object recognition task (NOR) was used with the immature rat and ontogenically profiled. It was hypothesized that object recognition would vary across development and be inferior to adult performance. The NOR design was made age-appropriate by downsizing the testing objects and arena. Weanling (P20-23), juvenile (P29-40) and adult (P50+) rats were tested after 0.25 hr, 1 hr, 24 hr and 48 hr delays. Weanlings exhibited novel object recognition at 0.25 and 1 hrs, while older animals showed a preference for the novel object out to 24 hrs. These findings are consistent with previous research performed in humans and monkeys, as well as to studies using the NOR after medial temporal lobe damage in adult rats. PMID:19739136

  11. Effects on Task Performance and Psychophysiological Measures of Performance During Normobaric Hypoxia Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Chad; Kennedy, Kellie; Napoli, Nicholas; Demas, Matthew; Barnes, Laura; Crook, Brenda; Williams, Ralph; Last, Mary Carolyn; Schutte, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Human-autonomous systems have the potential to mitigate pilot cognitive impairment and improve aviation safety. A research team at NASA Langley conducted an experiment to study the impact of mild normobaric hypoxia induction on aircraft pilot performance and psychophysiological state. A within-subjects design involved non-hypoxic and hypoxic exposures while performing three 10-minute tasks. Results indicated the effect of 15,000 feet simulated altitude did not induce significant performance decrement but did produce increase in perceived workload. Analyses of psychophysiological responses evince the potential of biomarkers for hypoxia onset. This study represents on-going work at NASA intending to add to the current knowledge of psychophysiologically-based input to automation to increase aviation safety. Analyses involving coupling across physiological systems and wavelet transforms of cortical activity revealed patterns that can discern between the simulated altitude conditions. Specifically, multivariate entropy of ECG/Respiration components were found to be significant predictors (p< 0.02) of hypoxia. Furthermore, in EEG, there was a significant decrease in mid-level beta (15.19-18.37Hz) during the hypoxic condition in thirteen of sixteen sites across the scalp. Task performance was not appreciably impacted by the effect of 15,000 feet simulated altitude. Analyses of psychophysiological responses evince the potential of biomarkers for mild hypoxia onset.The potential for identifying shifts in underlying cortical and physiological systems could serve as a means to identify the onset of deteriorated cognitive state. Enabling such assessment in future flightdecks could permit increasingly autonomous systems-supported operations. Augmenting human operator through assessment of cognitive impairment has the potential to further improve operator performance and mitigate human error in safety critical contexts. This study represents ongoing work at NASA intending to add

  12. Comparing Treatment Effect Measurements in Narcolepsy: The Sustained Attention to Response Task, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Astrid; van Schie, Mojca K M; Lammers, Gert Jan; Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Mayer, Geert; Bassetti, Claudio L; Ding, Claire-Li; Lehert, Philippe; van Dijk, J Gert

    2015-07-01

    To validate the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) as a treatment effect measure in narcolepsy, and to compare the SART with the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Validation of treatment effect measurements within a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Ninety-five patients with narcolepsy with or without cataplexy. The RCT comprised a double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter trial comparing the effects of 8-w treatments with pitolisant (BF2.649), modafinil, or placebo (NCT01067222). MWT, ESS, and SART were administered at baseline and after an 8-w treatment period. The severity of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy was also assessed using the Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI-C). The SART, MWT, and ESS all had good reliability, obtained for the SART and MWT using two to three sessions in 1 day. The ability to distinguish responders from nonresponders, classified using the CGI-C score, was high for all measures, with a high performance for the SART (r = 0.61) and the ESS (r = 0.54). The Sustained Attention to Response Task is a valid and easy-to-administer measure to assess treatment effects in narcolepsy, enhanced by combining it with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  13. Measuring nursing care time and tasks in long-term services and supports: one size does not fit all.

    PubMed

    Bettger, Janet Prvu; Sochalski, Julie A; Foust, Janice B; Zubritsky, Cynthia D; Hirschman, Karen B; Abbott, Katherine M; Naylor, Mary D

    2012-09-01

    Although most staff in long-term care services and support (LTSS) are nursing care personnel, a method for measuring the provision of nursing care has not yet been developed. We sought to understand the challenges of measuring nursing care across different types of LTSS using a qualitative approach that included the triangulation of data from three unique sources. Six primary challenges to measuring nursing care across LTSS emerged. These included (a) level of detail about time of day, amount of time, or type of tasks varied by type of nursing and organization; (b) time and tasks were documented across clinical records and administrative databases; (c) data existed in both paper and electronic formats; (d) several sources of information were needed to create the fullest picture of nursing care; (e) data were inconsistently available for contracted providers; and (f) documentation of informal caregiving was unavailable. Differences were observed between assisted living facilities and home- and community-based services compared with nursing homes. Differences were also observed across organizations within a setting. A commonality across settings and organizations was the availability of an electronically stored care plan specifying individual needs, but not necessarily how these would be met. Findings demonstrate the variability of data availability and specificity across three distinct LTSS settings. This study is an initial step toward establishing a process for measuring the provision of nursing care across LTSS in order to explore the range of nursing care needs of LTSS recipients and how these needs are currently fulfilled.

  14. A time estimation task as a possible measure of emotions: difference depending on the nature of the stimulus used

    PubMed Central

    Gros, Auriane; Giroud, Maurice; Bejot, Yannick; Rouaud, Olivier; Guillemin, Sophie; Aboa Eboulé, Corine; Manera, Valeria; Daumas, Anaïs; Lemesle Martin, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Time perception is fundamental for human experience. A topic which has attracted the attention of researchers for long time is how the stimulus sensory modality (e.g., images vs. sounds) affects time judgments. However, so far, no study has directly compared the effect of two sensory modalities using emotional stimuli on time judgments. Methods: In the present two studies, healthy participants were asked to estimate the duration of a pure sound preceded by the presentation of odors vs. emotional videos as priming stimuli (implicit emotion-eliciting task). During the task, skin conductance (SC) was measured as an index of arousal. Results: Olfactory stimuli resulted in an increase in SC and in a constant time overestimation. Video stimuli resulted in an increase in SC (emotional arousal), which decreased linearly overtime. Critically, video stimuli resulted in an initial time underestimation, which shifted progressively towards a time overestimation. These results suggest that video stimuli recruited both arousal-related and attention-related mechanisms, and that the role played by these mechanisms changed overtime. Conclusions: These pilot studies highlight the importance of comparing the effect of different kinds on temporal estimation tasks, and suggests that odors are well suited to investigate arousal-related temporal distortions, while videos are ideal to investigate both arousal-related and attention-related mechanisms. PMID:26124711

  15. Phase-locking and amplitude modulations of EEG alpha: Two measures reflect different cognitive processes in a working memory task.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Christoph S; Senkowski, Daniel; Röttger, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    It has been demonstrated in numerous experiments that oscillatory EEG responses in the alpha frequency band (8-12 Hz) increase with memory load during the retention interval in working memory tasks. However, the findings diverge with respect to which measurement of alpha activity is influenced by memory processes. Here, we differentiate between evoked and total alpha activity in order to separate effects of phase-locking and amplitude modulation. We present data from a delayed-matching-to-sample task (S1-S2 paradigm) for which we compared EEG alpha responses between a perception and a memory condition. Increased total alpha activity was found in the retention interval for the memory as compared to the perception condition. Evoked alpha activity, however, did not differentiate between memory and perception conditions but, instead, was increased for the more complex condition of processing non-Kanizsa figures as compared to Kanizsa figures. Thus, our results demonstrate a functional differentiation between evoked and total alpha activity. While alpha phase locking seemed to be influenced mainly by task complexity, alpha amplitude clearly reflected memory demands in our paradigm.

  16. The Reliability and Validity of Tasks Measuring Perception of Rapid Sequences in Children with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Steve M.; Hogben, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Claims that children with reading and oral language deficits have impaired perception of sequential sounds are usually based on psychophysical measures of auditory temporal processing (ATP) designed to characterise group performance. If we are to use these measures (e.g., the Tallal, 1980, Repetition Test) as the basis for intervention…

  17. Effects of Task Training on Kindergarten Students' Performance on Early Literacy Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackiewicz, Sara Moore

    2010-01-01

    The use of early literacy screening measures helps determine which students are at risk for future reading difficulties. However, there has been some recent concern related to the classification validity of screening measures (Hintze, Ryan, & Stoner, 2003; Nelson, 2008). Low classification validity results in the identification of a large number…

  18. The Reliability and Validity of Tasks Measuring Perception of Rapid Sequences in Children with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Steve M.; Hogben, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Claims that children with reading and oral language deficits have impaired perception of sequential sounds are usually based on psychophysical measures of auditory temporal processing (ATP) designed to characterise group performance. If we are to use these measures (e.g., the Tallal, 1980, Repetition Test) as the basis for intervention…

  19. Spatial Visualization Tasks to Support Students' Spatial Structuring in Learning Volume Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revina, Shintia; Zulkardi; Darmawijoyo; van Galen, Frans

    2011-01-01

    Many prior researches found that most of students in grade five tended to have difficulty in fully grasping the concept of volume measurement because they have to build their competence in spatial structuring. The unit of volume "packing" measurement must be integrated and coordinated in three-dimension. On the other hand, it is revealed…

  20. Evaluation of an objective listening effort measure in a selective, multi-speaker listening task using different hearing aid settings.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Patrick J; Serman, Maja; Arnold, Mirko; Corona-Strauss, Farah I; Strauss, Daniel J; Seidler-Fallbohmer, Brigit; Seidler, Harald

    2015-08-01

    Speaker recognition in a multi-speaker environment is a complex listening task that requires effort to be solved. Especially people with hearing loss show an increased listening effort in demanding listening situations compared to normal hearing people. However, a standardized method to quantify listening effort does not exist yet. Recently we have shown a possible way to determine listening effort objectively. The aim of this study was to validate the proposed objective measure in a challenging, true-to-life listening situation, and to get an insight on the influence of different hearing aid (HA) settings on the listening effort using the proposed measure. To achieve this we investigated the influence of four different HA settings and two different listening task difficulties (LTD) on the listening effort of people with hearing loss in a selective, real-speech listening task. HA setting A, B and C all had an adaptive compression with static characteristic, but differed in the gain and compression settings (more and less gain and more and less linear). Setting D had an adaptive compression whose characteristic was situation-dependent. To quantify the listening effort the ongoing oscillatory EEG activity was recorded as the basis to calculate the objective measure (OLEosc). By way of comparison a subjective listening effort score was determined on an individual basis (SLEscr). The results show that the OLEosc maps the SLEscr well in every of the tested conditions. Furthermore, the results also suggest that OLEosc might be more sensitive to small variances in listening effort than the employed subjective rating scale.

  1. Time-Varying Network Measures in Resting and Task States Using Graph Theoretical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chia-Yen; Lin, Ching-Po

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have shown the importance of graph theory in analyzing characteristic features of functional networks of the human brain. However, many of these explorations have focused on static patterns of a representative graph that describe the relatively long-term brain activity. Therefore, this study established and characterized functional networks based on the synchronization likelihood and graph theory. Quasidynamic graphs were constructed simply by dividing a long-term static graph into a sequence of subgraphs that each had a timescale of 1 s. Irregular changes were then used to investigate differences in human brain networks between resting and math-operation states using magnetoencephalography, which may provide insights into the functional substrates underlying logical reasoning. We found that graph properties could differ from brain frequency rhythms, with a higher frequency indicating a lower small-worldness, while changes in human brain state altered the functional networks into more-centralized and segregated distributions according to the task requirements. Time-varying connectivity maps could provide detailed information about the structure distribution. The frontal theta activity represents the essential foundation and may subsequently interact with high-frequency activity in cognitive processing.

  2. Relationship between simulated extravehicular activity tasks and measurements of physical performance.

    PubMed

    Ade, C J; Broxterman, R M; Craig, J C; Schlup, S J; Wilcox, S L; Barstow, T J

    2014-11-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the relationships between tests of fitness and two activities that simulate components of Lunar- and Martian-based extravehicular activities (EVA). Seventy-one subjects completed two field tests: a physical abilities test and a 10km Walkback test. The relationships between test times and the following parameters were determined: running V˙O2max, gas exchange threshold (GET), speed at V˙O2max (s-V˙O2max), highest sustainable rate of aerobic metabolism [critical speed (CS)], and the finite distance that could be covered above CS (D'): arm cranking V˙O2peak, GET, critical power (CP), and the finite work that can be performed above CP (W'). CS, running V˙O2max, s-V˙O2max, and arm cranking V˙O2peak had the highest correlations with the physical abilities field test (r=0.66-0.82, P<0.001). For the 10km Walkback, CS, s-V˙O2max, and running V˙O2max were significant predictors (r=0.64-0.85, P<0.001). CS and to a lesser extent V˙O2max are most strongly associated with tasks that simulate aspects of EVA performance, highlighting CS as a method for evaluating astronaut physical capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of skin blood flow on near-infrared spectroscopy signals measured on the forehead during a verbal fluency task.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshimitsu; Takikawa, Yoriko; Kawagoe, Reiko; Shibuya, Satoshi; Iwano, Takayuki; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2011-08-01

    Brain activity during a verbal fluency task (VFT) has been the target of many functional imaging studies. Most studies using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) have reported major activation in the frontal pole, but those using PET or fMRI have not. This led us to hypothesize that changes in the NIRS signals measured in the forehead during VFT were due to changes in skin blood flow. To test this hypothesis, we measured NIRS signals and the Doppler tissue blood flow signals in the foreheads of 50 participants. The measurements were performed while each participant produced words during two 60-s periods with an interval of 100 s. In addition to a conventional optode separation distance of 30 mm (FAR channels), we used a short distance--5mm (NEAR channels)--to measure NIRS signals that originated exclusively from surface tissues. The oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) concentration in the FAR and NEAR channels, as well as the Doppler blood flow signal, increased in a similar manner during the two periods of word production; the signal increase in the first period was twice as high as that in the second period. Accordingly, the mean changes in oxyHb concentration in the FAR channels were correlated closely with the changes in the NEAR channels (R(2) = 0.91) and with the integrated Doppler skin blood flow signal (R(2) = 0.94). Furthermore, task-related NIRS responses disappeared when we blocked skin blood flows by pressing a small area that covered a pair of optodes. Additionally, changes in the FAR channel signals were correlated closely with the magnitude of pulsatile waves in the Doppler signal (R(2) = 0.92), but these signals were not highly correlated with the pulse rate (R(2) = 0.43). These results suggest that a major part of the task-related changes in the oxyHb concentration in the forehead is due to task-related changes in the skin blood flow, which is under different autonomic control than heart rate.

  4. Adapting the Crossmodal Congruency Task for Measuring the Limits of Visual-Tactile Interactions Within and Between Groups.

    PubMed

    Poole, Daniel; Couth, Samuel; Gowen, Emma; Warren, Paul A; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The crossmodal congruency task (CCT) is a commonly used paradigm for measuring visual-tactile interactions and how these may be influenced by discrepancies in space and time between the tactile target and visual distractors. The majority of studies which have used this paradigm have neither measured, nor attempted to control, individual variability in unisensory (tactile) performance. We have developed a version of the CCT in which unisensory baseline performance is constrained to enable comparisons within and between participant groups. Participants were instructed to discriminate between single and double tactile pulses presented to their dominant hand, at their own approximate threshold level. In Experiment 1, visual distractors were presented at -30 ms, 100 ms, 200 ms and 400 ms stimulus onset asynchronies. In Experiment 2, ipsilateral visual distractors were presented 0 cm, 21 cm, and 42 cm vertically from the target hand, and 42 cm in a symmetrical, contralateral position. Distractors presented -30 ms and 0 cm from the target produced a significantly larger congruency effect than at other time points and spatial locations. Thus, the typical limits of visual-tactile interactions were replicated using a version of the task in which baseline performance can be constrained. The usefulness of this approach is supported by the observation that tactile thresholds correlated with self-reported autistic traits in this non-clinical sample. We discuss the suitability of this adapted version of the CCT for measuring visual-tactile interactions in populations where unisensory tactile ability may differ within and between groups.

  5. Phenotypic and genetic correlations between evoked EEG/ERP measures during the response anticipation period of a delayed response task.

    PubMed

    Smit, Dirk J A; Posthuma, Danielle; Boomsma, Dorret I; De Geus, Eco J C

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the relationship between three electrophysiological indices of response anticipation in a spatial delayed response task with a low and high memory load manipulation: a slow cortical potential (SCP), theta desynchronization, and upper alpha synchronization. Individual differences in these three measures were examined in 531 adult twins and siblings. Heritability of the SCP at occipital-parietal leads varied from 30% to 43%. Heritability of upper alpha synchronization (35% to 65%) and theta desynchronization (31% to 50%) was significant at all leads. Theta desynchronization and upper alpha synchronization were significantly correlated (r approximately 43%), but SCP was not correlated with either. The effect of working memory load on all three measures was not heritable. Response anticipation reliably evokes an SCP, upper alpha synchronization and theta desynchronization, but variation in these measures reflects different (genetic) sources.

  6. Within-subject joint independent component analysis of simultaneous fMRI/ERP in an auditory oddball paradigm.

    PubMed

    Mangalathu-Arumana, J; Beardsley, S A; Liebenthal, E

    2012-05-01

    The integration of event-related potential (ERP) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can contribute to characterizing neural networks with high temporal and spatial resolution. This research aimed to determine the sensitivity and limitations of applying joint independent component analysis (jICA) within-subjects, for ERP and fMRI data collected simultaneously in a parametric auditory frequency oddball paradigm. In a group of 20 subjects, an increase in ERP peak amplitude ranging 1-8 μV in the time window of the P300 (350-700 ms), and a correlated increase in fMRI signal in a network of regions including the right superior temporal and supramarginal gyri, was observed with the increase in deviant frequency difference. JICA of the same ERP and fMRI group data revealed activity in a similar network, albeit with stronger amplitude and larger extent. In addition, activity in the left pre- and post-central gyri, likely associated with right hand somato-motor response, was observed only with the jICA approach. Within-subject, the jICA approach revealed significantly stronger and more extensive activity in the brain regions associated with the auditory P300 than the P300 linear regression analysis. The results suggest that with the incorporation of spatial and temporal information from both imaging modalities, jICA may be a more sensitive method for extracting common sources of activity between ERP and fMRI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MEASURING WORKLOAD OF ICU NURSES WITH A QUESTIONNAIRE SURVEY: THE NASA TASK LOAD INDEX (TLX)

    PubMed Central

    Hoonakker, Peter; Carayon, Pascale; Gurses, Ayse; Brown, Roger; McGuire, Kerry; Khunlertkit, Adjhaporn; Walker, James M.

    2012-01-01

    High workload of nurses in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) has been identified as a major patient safety and worker stress problem. However, relative little attention has been dedicated to the measurement of workload in healthcare. The objectives of this study are to describe and examine several methods to measure workload of ICU nurses. We then focus on the measurement of ICU nurses’ workload using a subjective rating instrument: the NASA TLX. We conducted secondary data analysis on data from two, multi-side, cross-sectional questionnaire studies to examine several instruments to measure ICU nurses’ workload. The combined database contains the data from 757 ICU nurses in 8 hospitals and 21 ICUs. Results show that the different methods to measure workload of ICU nurses, such as patient-based and operator-based workload, are only moderately correlated, or not correlated at all. Results show further that among the operator-based instruments, the NASA TLX is the most reliable and valid questionnaire to measure workload and that NASA TLX can be used in a healthcare setting. Managers of hospitals and ICUs can benefit from the results of this research as it provides benchmark data on workload experienced by nurses in a variety of ICUs. PMID:22773941

  8. Investigation of pacing as a control measure for an industrial lifting task above waist height.

    PubMed

    Abdoli-E, Mohammad; Damecour, Caroline; Petersen, Anne; Potvin, Jim

    2014-01-01

    In industrial supply companies, the pressure for productivity can conflict with the ergonomic safety of material handling on the loading dock, with workers tending to rush through the lifting tasks at the expense of higher biomechanical loads. The purpose of this investigation was to determine: a) the potential benefit of introducing an ergonomic safety initiative, which slows the speed of lifting, and b) the need to use more complex biomechanical models in work assessments. One experienced worker and nine university male students between the ages of 22 and 42 participated in this study; all reported no recent history of musculoskeletal injuries. The investigation involved stacking empty propane cylinders, one on top of the other, while using a single-handed lift at a self-selected slow and fast pace, and lifting small, weighted beverage bottles at a slow, medium and fast pace, this time using a metronome to set the pace. The results demonstrated a significant main effect for lift pace for both peak static and dynamic external moments at the shoulder and at L4/L5, with a larger effect occurring with the lighter loads. A reduction in peak acceleration with heavier weights partially explained the confounding influence from load. Significant differences occurred between the peak static moments according to load, suggesting an accommodation in the lift strategy. There were also significant differences between the static and dynamic external moments, which became meaningful when the lift pace was medium or fast, suggesting that a dynamic analysis is not necessary if the pace is slow. This investigation further supports that the pace of lifting is an important work factor in safe lifting and material handling.

  9. Using the Hand Laterality Judgement Task to Assess Motor Imagery: A Study of Practice Effects in Repeated Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boonstra, Anne M.; de Vries, Sjoerd J.; Veenstra, Evelien; Tepper, Marga; Feenstra, Wya; Otten, Egbert

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a practice effect on the Hand Laterality Judgement Task (HLJT). The HLJT task is a mental rotation task that can be used to assess motor imagery ability in stroke patients. Thirty-three healthy individuals performed the HLJT and two control tasks twice at a 3-week interval. Differences in the…

  10. Using the Hand Laterality Judgement Task to Assess Motor Imagery: A Study of Practice Effects in Repeated Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boonstra, Anne M.; de Vries, Sjoerd J.; Veenstra, Evelien; Tepper, Marga; Feenstra, Wya; Otten, Egbert

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a practice effect on the Hand Laterality Judgement Task (HLJT). The HLJT task is a mental rotation task that can be used to assess motor imagery ability in stroke patients. Thirty-three healthy individuals performed the HLJT and two control tasks twice at a 3-week interval. Differences in the…

  11. A Cognition Analysis of QUASAR's Mathematics Performance Assessment Tasks and Their Sensitivity to Measuring Changes in Middle School Students' Thinking and Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Jinfa, And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents a conceptual framework for analyzing students' mathematical understanding, reasoning, problem solving, and communication. Analyses of student responses indicated that the tasks appear to measure the complex thinking and reasoning processes that they were designed to assess. Concludes that the QUASAR assessment tasks can capture changes in…

  12. A Cognition Analysis of QUASAR's Mathematics Performance Assessment Tasks and Their Sensitivity to Measuring Changes in Middle School Students' Thinking and Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Jinfa, And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents a conceptual framework for analyzing students' mathematical understanding, reasoning, problem solving, and communication. Analyses of student responses indicated that the tasks appear to measure the complex thinking and reasoning processes that they were designed to assess. Concludes that the QUASAR assessment tasks can capture changes in…

  13. The STS AVR+CABG composite score: a report of the STS Quality Measurement Task Force.

    PubMed

    Shahian, David M; He, Xia; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Rankin, J Scott; Welke, Karl F; Edwards, Fred H; Filardo, Giovanni; Fazzalari, Frank L; Furnary, Anthony; Kurlansky, Paul A; Brennan, J Matthew; Badhwar, Vinay; O'Brien, Sean M

    2014-05-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) is developing a portfolio of composite performance measures for the most commonly performed adult cardiac procedures. This manuscript describes the third composite measure in this series, aortic valve replacement (AVR) combined with coronary artery bypass grafting surgery (CABG). We identified all patients in the STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database who underwent AVR+CABG during recent 3-year (July 1, 2009, through June 30, 2012) and 5-year (July 1, 2007, through June 30, 2012) periods. Variables from the STS risk model for AVR+CABG were used to adjust morbidity and mortality outcomes. Evidence for internal mammary artery use in AVR+CABG was examined. We compared composite measures constructed using 3 or 5 years of outcomes with Bayesian credible intervals of 90%, 95%, or 98%. The final STS AVR+CABG composite performance measure is based on 3 years of data and 95% credible intervals. It includes risk-adjusted mortality and morbidity but not internal mammary artery use. Median composite score is 91.0% (interquartile range, 89.5% to 92.2%). There were 2.6% (24 of 915) one-star (lower performing) and 6.5% (59 of 915) three-star (higher performing) programs. Morbidity and mortality decrease monotonically as star ratings increase. The percentage of three-star programs increased substantially among programs that performed more than 150 procedures over 3 years compared with those performing 25 to 50 procedures (32.8% versus 1.6 %). Measure reliability was 0.51. The STS has developed a composite performance measure for AVR+CABG based on 3-year data samples and 95% credible intervals. This composite measure identified 9.1% of STS participants as having higher or lower than expected performance. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychophysiological Control of Acognitive Task Using Adaptive Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Frederick; Pope, Alan T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The major focus of the present proposal was to examine psychophysiological variables related to hazardous states of awareness induced by monitoring automated systems. With the increased use of automation in today's work environment, people's roles in the work place are being redefined from that of active participant to one of passive monitor. Although the introduction of automated systems has a number of benefits, there are also a number of disadvantages regarding worker performance. Byrne and Parasuraman have argued for the use of psychophysiological measures in the development and the implementation of adaptive automation. While both performance based and model based adaptive automation have been studied, the use of psychophysiological measures, especially EEG, offers the advantage of real time evaluation of the state of the subject. The current study used the closed-loop system, developed at NASA-Langley Research Center, to control the state of awareness of subjects while they performed a cognitive vigilance task. Previous research in our laboratory, supported by NASA, has demonstrated that, in an adaptive automation, closed-loop environment, subjects perform a tracking task better under a negative than a positive, feedback condition. In addition, this condition produces less subjective workload and larger P300 event related potentials to auditory stimuli presented in a concurrent oddball task. We have also recently shown that the closed-loop system used to control the level of automation in a tracking task can also be used to control the event rate of stimuli in a vigilance monitoring task. By changing the event rate based on the subject's index of arousal, we have been able to produce improved monitoring, relative to various control groups. We have demonstrated in our initial closed-loop experiments with the the vigilance paradigm that using a negative feedback contingency (i.e. increasing event rates when the EEG index is low and decreasing event rates when

  15. Measuring the Elongational Properties of Polymer Melts—a Simple Task?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschta, Joachim; Münstedt, Helmut

    2008-07-01

    Elongational flow measurements were performed on a number of samples under similar conditions using two different elongational rheometers, a Münstedt type oil bath rheometer (MTR) and the elongational viscosity fixture (EVF) of TA Instruments in an ARES rheometer. Deviations of several degrees from the set temperature are found in the case of the EVF/ARES and had to be corrected before comparing results. Inhomogeneous deformation, e.g. due to sagging, leads to an artificial strain-hardening of the EVF. For strain-hardening and/or high viscous materials a good agreement between measurements from both rheometers is found. The strain hardening measured in the EVF/ARES starts at smaller strains compared the MTR. This effect is more pronounced for weakly strain-hardening materials. The possibility of creep and creep-recovery experiments performed by the MTR demonstrates its wide application range.

  16. Effects of Sex and Fatigue on Biomechanical Measures During the Drop-Jump Task in Children

    PubMed Central

    Briem, Kristín; Jónsdóttir, Kolbrún Vala; Árnason, Árni; Sveinsson, Þórarinn

    2017-01-01

    Background: Female athletes have a higher rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury than males from adolescence and into maturity, which is suggested to result from sex-specific changes in dynamic movement patterns with maturation. Few studies have studied movement strategies and response to fatigue in children. Purpose: To evaluate the effect of fatigue on biomechanical variables associated with increased risk for ACL injury during a drop-jump (DJ) performance in children. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 116 children (mean age, 10.4 years) were recruited from local sports clubs and performed 5 repetitions of a DJ task before and after a fatigue protocol. Kinematic and kinetic data from initial contact (IC) to the first peak vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) were analyzed for both limbs, including limb and fatigue as within-subject factors for analyses between boys and girls. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to identify associations between variables of interest. Results: Girls demonstrated greater peak vGRF values than boys (by 8.1%; P < .05), there were greater peak vGRF values for the right limb than the left (by 6.2%; P < .001), and fatigue led to slightly greater values (P < .05). Although weak, the correlation between peak vGRF values and knee flexion excursion was stronger for girls (r = –0.20) than boys (r = –0.08) (P < .006). Fatigue resulted in greater knee flexion angles at IC and less excursion during landing, more so for girls (by 6.1° vs 1.4°; interaction, P < .001), although the knee flexion moment was generally lowered by fatigue (P < .001). Limb asymmetry in knee flexion moments was more pronounced for boys than for girls (interaction, P < .05), contrary to that seen in frontal plane knee moments, where asymmetry was much greater in girls than boys (interaction, P < .001). Conclusion: Even as young athletes, girls and boys seem to adopt dissimilar movement strategies and are differently

  17. JV Task 125-Mercury Measurement in Combustion Flue Gases Short Course

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Laudal

    2008-09-30

    The short course, designed to train personnel who have an interest in measuring mercury in combustion flue gases, was held twice at the Drury Inn in Marion, Illinois. The short course helped to provide attendees with the knowledge necessary to avoid the many pitfalls that can and do occur when measuring mercury in combustion flue gases. The first short course, May 5-8, 2008, included both a classroom-type session and hands-on demonstration of mercury-sampling equipment. The hands-on demonstration of equipment was staged at Southern Illinois Power Cooperative. Not including the Illinois Clean Coal Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy project managers, there were 12 attendees. The second short course was conducted September 16-17, 2008, but only included the classroom portion of the course; 14 people attended. In both cases, lectures were provided on the various mercury measurement methods, and interaction between attendees and EERC research personnel to discuss specific mercury measurement problems was promoted. Overall, the response to the course was excellent.

  18. Measuring Group Work Dynamics and Its Relation with L2 Learners' Task Motivation and Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poupore, Glen

    2016-01-01

    While learners of a second language (L2) are increasingly interacting in small groups as part of a communicative methodological paradigm, very few studies have investigated the social dynamics that occur in such groups. The aim of this study is to introduce a group work dynamic measuring instrument and to investigate the relationship between group…

  19. Measuring Group Work Dynamics and Its Relation with L2 Learners' Task Motivation and Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poupore, Glen

    2016-01-01

    While learners of a second language (L2) are increasingly interacting in small groups as part of a communicative methodological paradigm, very few studies have investigated the social dynamics that occur in such groups. The aim of this study is to introduce a group work dynamic measuring instrument and to investigate the relationship between group…

  20. Measuring the Slot Machine Zone With Attentional Dual Tasks and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Murch, W Spencer; Chu, Stephanie W M; Clark, Luke

    2017-02-02

    Recent accounts of problematic electronic gaming machine (EGM) gambling have suggested attentional pathology among at-risk players. A putative slot machine zone is characterized by an intense immersion during game play, causing a neglect of outside events and competing goals. Prior studies of EGM immersion have relied heavily upon retrospective self-report scales. Here, the authors attempt to identify behavioral and psychophysiological correlates of the immersion experience. In samples of undergraduate students and experienced EGM users from the community, they tested 2 potential behavioral measures of immersion during EGM use: peripheral target detection and probe-caught mind wandering. During the EGM play sessions, electrocardiogram data were collected for analysis of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a measure of calming self-regulation governed by the parasympathetic nervous system. Subjective measures of immersion during the EGM play session were consistently related to risk of problem gambling. Problem gambling score, in turn, significantly predicted decrements in peripheral target detection among experienced EGM users. Both samples showed robust RSA decreases during EGM play, indicating parasympathetic withdrawal, but neither immersion nor gambling risk were related to this change. This study identifies peripheral attention as a candidate for quantifying game immersion and its links with risk of problem gambling, with implications for responsible gambling interventions at both the game and venue levels. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Using Mean Absolute Relative Phase, Deviation Phase and Point-Estimation Relative Phase to Measure Postural Coordination in a Serial Reaching Task.

    PubMed

    Galgon, Anne K; Shewokis, Patricia A

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this communication are to present the methods used to calculate mean absolute relative phase (MARP), deviation phase (DP) and point estimate relative phase (PRP) and compare their utility in measuring postural coordination during the performance of a serial reaching task. MARP and DP are derived from continuous relative phase time series representing the relationship between two body segments or joints during movements. MARP is a single measure used to quantify the coordination pattern and DP measures the stability of the coordination pattern. PRP also quantifies coordination patterns by measuring the relationship between the timing of maximal or minimal angular displacements of two segments within cycles of movement. Seven young adults practiced a bilateral serial reaching task 300 times over 3 days. Relative phase measures were used to evaluate inter-joint relationships for shoulder-hip (proximal) and hip-ankle (distal) postural coordination at early and late learning. MARP, PRP and DP distinguished between proximal and distal postural coordination. There was no effect of practice on any of the relative phase measures for the group, but individual differences were seen over practice. Combined, MARP and DP estimated stability of in-phase and anti-phase postural coordination patterns, however additional qualitative movement analyses may be needed to interpret findings in a serial task. We discuss the strengths and limitations of using MARP and DP and compare MARP and DP to PRP measures in assessing coordination patterns in the context of various types of skillful tasks. Key pointsMARP, DP and PRP measures coordination between segments or joint anglesAdvantages and disadvantages of each measure should be considered in relationship to the performance taskMARP and DP may capture coordination patterns and stability of the patterns during discrete tasks or phases of movements within a taskPRP and SD or PRP may capture coordination patterns and

  2. A validation of neural co-activation as a measure of attentional focus in a postural task.

    PubMed

    Ellmers, Toby J; Machado, Guilherme; Wong, Thomson Wai-Lung; Zhu, Frank; Williams, A Mark; Young, William R

    2016-10-01

    Postural threat can induce conscious involvement in movement control. This internal focus has been implicated in compromising attentional processing efficiency during postural control, leading to behavioral adaptations that might increase the risk of falling in the elderly. It is suggested that electroencephalography (EEG) coherence, or 'communication', between T3 (verbal-analytical) and Fz (motor-planning) regions may provide an objective measure of internal focus in learned movement skills. However, it is currently unknown whether this experimental technique can be applied to the control of gait and posture; skills which develop early in life, without the use of declarative knowledge/explicit verbal cues to guide performance. We validate the utility of the EEG T3-Fz coherence analysis in a postural task. A total of 24 young adults produced small voluntary swaying movements in medial-lateral or anterior-posterior direction under conditions that directed their attentional focus either internally or externally. Although EEG coherence was sensitive to voluntary changes in attentional focus, the lack of observed between-group (High/Low-trait-reinvestment) difference in coherence may suggest that younger adults cannot be assumed to utilize explicit verbal cues to control voluntary postural sway unless explicitly instructed to do so. As a result, while these results indicate that EEG T3-Fz is a valid technique for assessing attentional focus in postural tasks, our data do not support the clinical application of this method of analysis in providing an objective indication of trait-reinvestment in tasks involving voluntary postural sway. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of operational comfort in manual tasks using human force manipulability measure.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Nishikawa, Kazuo; Yamada, Naoki; Tsuji, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme for human force manipulability (HFM) based on the use of isometric joint torque properties to simulate the spatial characteristics of human operation forces at an end-point of a limb with feasible magnitudes for a specified limb posture. This is also applied to the evaluation/prediction of operational comfort (OC) when manually operating a human-machine interface. The effectiveness of HFM is investigated through two experiments and computer simulations of humans generating forces by using their upper extremities. Operation force generation with maximum isometric effort can be roughly estimated with an HFM measure computed from information on the arm posture during a maintained posture. The layout of a human-machine interface is then discussed based on the results of operational experiments using an electric gear-shifting system originally developed for robotic devices. The results indicate a strong relationship between the spatial characteristics of the HFM and OC levels when shifting, and the OC is predicted by using a multiple regression model with HFM measures.

  4. Mid-Task Break Improves Global Integration of Functional Connectivity in Lower Alpha Band

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junhua; Lim, Julian; Chen, Yu; Wong, Kianfoong; Thakor, Nitish; Bezerianos, Anastasios; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Numerous efforts have been devoted to revealing neurophysiological mechanisms of mental fatigue, aiming to find an effective way to reduce the undesirable fatigue-related outcomes. Until recently, mental fatigue is thought to be related to functional dysconnectivity among brain regions. However, the topological representation of brain functional connectivity altered by mental fatigue is only beginning to be revealed. In the current study, we applied a graph theoretical approach to analyse such topological alterations in the lower alpha band (8~10 Hz) of EEG data from 20 subjects undergoing a two-session experiment, in which one session includes four successive blocks with visual oddball tasks (session 1) whereas a mid-task break was introduced in the middle of four task blocks in the other session (session 2). Phase lag index (PLI) was then employed to measure functional connectivity strengths for all pairs of EEG channels. Behavior and connectivity maps were compared between the first and last task blocks in both sessions. Inverse efficiency scores (IES = reaction time/response accuracy) were significantly increased in the last task block, showing a clear effect of time-on-task in participants. Furthermore, a significant block-by-session interaction was revealed in the IES, suggesting the effectiveness of the mid-task break on maintaining task performance. More importantly, a significant session-independent deficit of global integration and an increase of local segregation were found in the last task block across both sessions, providing further support for the presence of a reshaped topology in functional brain connectivity networks under fatigue state. Moreover, a significant block-by-session interaction was revealed in the characteristic path length, small-worldness, and global efficiency, attributing to the significantly disrupted network topology in session 1 in comparison of the maintained network structure in session 2. Specifically, we found increased

  5. Electrophysiological measurement of interest during walking in a simulated environment.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yuji; Okuma, Takashi; Kimura, Motohiro; Kurata, Takeshi; Takenaka, Takeshi; Iwaki, Sunao

    2014-09-01

    A reliable neuroscientific technique for objectively estimating the degree of interest in a real environment is currently required in the research fields of neuroergonomics and neuroeconomics. Toward the development of such a technique, the present study explored electrophysiological measures that reflect an observer's interest in a nearly-real visual environment. Participants were asked to walk through a simulated shopping mall and the attractiveness of the shopping mall was manipulated by opening and closing the shutters of stores. During the walking task, participants were exposed to task-irrelevant auditory probes (two-stimulus oddball sequence). The results showed a smaller P2/early P3a component of task-irrelevant auditory event-related potentials and a larger lambda response of eye-fixation-related potentials in an interesting environment (i.e., open-shutter condition) than in a boring environment (i.e., closed-shutter condition); these findings can be reasonably explained by supposing that participants allocated more attentional resources to visual information in an interesting environment than in a boring environment, and thus residual attentional resources that could be allocated to task-irrelevant auditory probes were reduced. The P2/early P3a component and the lambda response may be useful measures of interest in a real visual environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantum Tasks with Non-maximally Quantum Channels via Positive Operator-Valued Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jia-Yin; Luo, Ming-Xing; Mo, Zhi-Wen

    2013-01-01

    By using a proper positive operator-valued measure (POVM), we present two new schemes for probabilistic transmission with non-maximally four-particle cluster states. In the first scheme, we demonstrate that two non-maximally four-particle cluster states can be used to realize probabilistically sharing an unknown three-particle GHZ-type state within either distant agent's place. In the second protocol, we demonstrate that a non-maximally four-particle cluster state can be used to teleport an arbitrary unknown multi-particle state in a probabilistic manner with appropriate unitary operations and POVM. Moreover the total success probability of these two schemes are also worked out.

  7. The measurement and facilitation of cooperative task performance. [reactions of humans to stress exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine under what conditions jaw clenching will occur in humans as a response to stress exposure. The method for measuring reactions to stress involves a series of electrical recordings of the masseter and temporalis muscles. A high fixed-ratio response requirement in the first series of experiments shows that jaw clenching in humans occurs in situations analogous to those which produce biting in infrahuman subjects. In the second series, reduction in the amounts of money recieved by subjects is shown to cause increases in the jaw clench response and other negative effect motor behaviors. The third series demonstrates that perception of more favorable conditions existing for another person can increase anger and hostility in the subject.

  8. Measuring information processing in a client with extreme agitation following traumatic brain injury using the Perceive, Recall, Plan and Perform System of Task Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nott, Melissa T; Chapparo, Christine

    2008-09-01

    Agitation following traumatic brain injury is characterised by a heightened state of activity with disorganised information processing that interferes with learning and achieving functional goals. This study aimed to identify information processing problems during task performance of a severely agitated adult using the Perceive, Recall, Plan and Perform (PRPP) System of Task Analysis. Second, this study aimed to examine the sensitivity of the PRPP System to changes in task performance over a short period of rehabilitation, and third, to evaluate the guidance provided by the PRPP in directing intervention. A case study research design was employed. The PRPP System of Task Analysis was used to assess changes in task embedded information processing capacity during occupational therapy intervention with a severely agitated adult in a rehabilitation context. Performance is assessed on three selected tasks over a one-month period. Information processing difficulties during task performance can be clearly identified when observing a severely agitated adult following a traumatic brain injury. Processing skills involving attention, sensory processing and planning were most affected at this stage of rehabilitation. These processing difficulties are linked to established descriptions of agitated behaviour. Fluctuations in performance across three tasks of differing processing complexity were evident, leading to hypothesised relationships between task complexity, environment and novelty with information processing errors. Changes in specific information processing capacity over time were evident based on repeated measures using the PRPP System of Task Analysis. This lends preliminary support for its utility as an outcome measure, and raises hypotheses about the type of therapy required to enhance information processing in people with severe agitation. The PRPP System is sensitive to information processing changes in severely agitated adults when used to reassess performance

  9. Development of a clinical measure of dual-task performance in walking: reliability and preliminary validity of the Walking and Remembering Test.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Karen L; Mercer, Vicki; Giuliani, Carol; Marshall, Steve

    2009-01-01

    (1) To examine the reliability of a new clinical measure of simultaneous walking with performance of a working memory task, the Walking and Remembering Test (WART). (2) To compare older adult to younger adult WART performance to illustrate preliminary validity. Convenience sample of 25 young adults (ages 22-35) and 25 older adults (ages 65-86) performed the WART twice. Subjects walked 6.1 meters at their fastest safe speed along a path requiring a narrowed base of support in both single and dual-task (with simultaneous digit span task) conditions. Reductions in walking and cognitive performance were examined in the dual-task condition for older adults as compared to younger adults. Walking time, step accuracy, digit span memory accuracy, and dual-task costs for walking and cognitive tasks. Inter-rater reliability ICC (2,1) values were > or = .97 for walking time and digit span accuracy. Rater agreement of steps off the path was excellent (93%) for young adults and good (76%) for older adults. Test-retest reliability ICC (2,1) values for walking time were > or = .79. Older adults were slower and remembered shorter digit spans, and demonstrated greater dual-task costs for digit span accuracy and steps off the path than younger adults, but relative dual-task costs for walking time were not significantly different between groups. The WART is a reliable clinical measure of dual-task memory and walking that can be administered safely with community-dwelling older adults. Expected greater dual-task costs for older adults were observed, but not as strongly as anticipated in this group of very active subjects. The WART provides information that may be useful in targeting patients for intervention to reduce risk of falls in dual-task conditions, but needs validation with older adults across a greater range of walking ability.

  10. The measurement of regional cerebral blood flow during the complex cognitive task of meditation: a preliminary SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Newberg, A; Alavi, A; Baime, M; Pourdehnad, M; Santanna, J; d'Aquili, E

    2001-04-10

    This study measured changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during the complex cognitive task of meditation using single photon emission computed tomography. Eight experienced Tibetan Buddhist meditators were injected at baseline with 7 mCi HMPAO and scanned 20 min later for 45 min. The subjects then meditated for 1 h at which time they were injected with 25 mCi HMPAO and scanned 20 min later for 30 min. Values were obtained for regions of interest in major brain structures and normalized to whole brain activity. The percentage change between meditation and baseline was compared. Correlations between structures were also determined. Significantly increased rCBF (P<0.05) was observed in the cingulate gyrus, inferior and orbital frontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and thalamus. The change in rCBF in the left DLPFC correlated negatively (P<0.05) with that in the left superior parietal lobe. Increased frontal rCBF may reflect focused concentration and thalamic increases overall increased cortical activity during meditation. The correlation between the DLPFC and the superior parietal lobe may reflect an altered sense of space experienced during meditation. These results suggest a complex rCBF pattern during the task of meditation.

  11. Comparison of Physiological and Psychological Relaxation Using Measurements of Heart Rate Variability, Prefrontal Cortex Activity, and Subjective Indexes after Completing Tasks with and without Foliage Plants.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Ae; Song, Chorong; Oh, Yun-Ah; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi; Son, Ki-Cheol

    2017-09-20

    The objective of this study was to compare physiological and psychological relaxation by assessing heart rate variability (HRV), prefrontal cortex activity, and subjective indexes while subjects performed a task with and without foliage plants. In a crossover experimental design, 24 university students performed a task transferring pots with and without a foliage plant for 3 min. HRV and oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) concentration in the prefrontal cortex were continuously measured. Immediately thereafter, subjective evaluation of emotions was performed using a modified semantic differential (SD) method and a profile of mood state questionnaire (POMS). Results showed that the natural logarithmic (ln) ratio of low frequency/high frequency, as an estimate of sympathetic nerve activity, was significantly lower while performing the task with foliage plants for the average 3 min measurement interval. Oxy-Hb concentration in the left prefrontal cortex showed a tendency to decrease in the 2-3 min interval in the task with foliage plants compared to the task without plants. Moreover, significant psychological relaxation according to POMS score and SD was demonstrated when the task involved foliage plants. In conclusion, the task involving foliage plants led to more physiological and psychological relaxation compared with the task without foliage plants.

  12. [Measuring impairment of facial affects recognition in schizophrenia. Preliminary study of the facial emotions recognition task (TREF)].

    PubMed

    Gaudelus, B; Virgile, J; Peyroux, E; Leleu, A; Baudouin, J-Y; Franck, N

    2015-06-01

    The impairment of social cognition, including facial affects recognition, is a well-established trait in schizophrenia, and specific cognitive remediation programs focusing on facial affects recognition have been developed by different teams worldwide. However, even though social cognitive impairments have been confirmed, previous studies have also shown heterogeneity of the results between different subjects. Therefore, assessment of personal abilities should be measured individually before proposing such programs. Most research teams apply tasks based on facial affects recognition by Ekman et al. or Gur et al. However, these tasks are not easily applicable in a clinical exercise. Here, we present the Facial Emotions Recognition Test (TREF), which is designed to identify facial affects recognition impairments in a clinical practice. The test is composed of 54 photos and evaluates abilities in the recognition of six universal emotions (joy, anger, sadness, fear, disgust and contempt). Each of these emotions is represented with colored photos of 4 different models (two men and two women) at nine intensity levels from 20 to 100%. Each photo is presented during 10 seconds; no time limit for responding is applied. The present study compared the scores of the TREF test in a sample of healthy controls (64 subjects) and people with stabilized schizophrenia (45 subjects) according to the DSM IV-TR criteria. We analysed global scores for all emotions, as well as sub scores for each emotion between these two groups, taking into account gender differences. Our results were coherent with previous findings. Applying TREF, we confirmed an impairment in facial affects recognition in schizophrenia by showing significant differences between the two groups in their global results (76.45% for healthy controls versus 61.28% for people with schizophrenia), as well as in sub scores for each emotion except for joy. Scores for women were significantly higher than for men in the population

  13. Construct Validity of the Emotion Matching Task: Preliminary Evidence for Convergent and Criterion Validity of a New Emotion Knowledge Measure for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Judith K.; Izard, Carroll E.; King, Kristen A.

    2010-01-01

    Current emotion knowledge (EK) measures examine only one component of the multifaceted construct. We examined the reliability and the construct validity of a new measure of EK, the emotion matching task (EMT). The EMT consists of four parts which measure the components of receptive EK, expressive EK, emotion situation knowledge, and emotion…

  14. Task difficulty affects the predictive process indexed by visual mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Motohiro; Takeda, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Visual mismatch negativity (MMN) is an event-related brain potential (ERP) component that is elicited by prediction-incongruent events in successive visual stimulation. Previous oddball studies have shown that visual MMN in response to task-irrelevant deviant stimuli is insensitive to the manipulation of task difficulty, which supports the notion that visual MMN reflects attention-independent predictive processes. In these studies, however, visual MMN was evaluated in deviant-minus-standard difference waves, which may lead to an underestimation of the effects of task difficulty due to the possible superposition of N1-difference reflecting refractory effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of task difficulty on visual MMN, less contaminated by N1-difference. While the participant performed a size-change detection task regarding a continuously-presented central fixation circle, we presented oddball sequences consisting of deviant and standard bar stimuli with different orientations (9.1 and 90.9%) and equiprobable sequences consisting of 11 types of control bar stimuli with different orientations (9.1% each) at the surrounding visual fields. Task difficulty was manipulated by varying the magnitude of the size-change. We found that the peak latencies of visual MMN evaluated in the deviant-minus-control difference waves were delayed as a function of task difficulty. Therefore, in contrast to the previous understanding, the present findings support the notion that visual MMN is associated with attention-demanding predictive processes.

  15. The Virtual Tray of Objects Task as a novel method to electrophysiologically measure visuo-spatial recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Amico, Francesco; Ambrosini, Ettore; Guillem, François; Mento, Giovanni; Power, Dermot; Pergola, Giulio; Vallesi, Antonino

    2015-12-01

    We explored a novel method to electrophysiologically measure visuo-spatial recognition memory using a modified version of the Virtual Tray of Objects Task (VTOT). Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded from 18 healthy volunteers during performance in the VTOT. Participants were required to detect random repetitions of three-dimensional visual stimuli (OLD) and to refrain from responding to non-repeated stimuli (NEW). Differences in ERP between the NEW and OLD conditions were tested for statistical significance using assumption-free non-parametric analyses. Further, a correlation between ERP and behavioral measures was sought. Significant OLD-NEW effects were found for four ERP components showing distinct spatio-temporal characteristics: a posterior positive component appearing at 100 ms (P100), a left-lateralized negative component peaking at ≈250 ms (N250), a frontal negative component at ≈300-450 ms (FN400), and a right late frontal negativity (rLFN) at ≈500-720 ms. Moreover, individual differences in the OLD-NEW effect computed for the rLFN positively correlated with repeated stimulus recognition efficiency. However, there were no late left parietal P600 old/new effects. These findings suggest that the P100 component might reflect early visual perception processes taking place during performance in the task, whereas the N250 and FN400 components could be linked to stimulus-dependent access to visual memory representations and familiarity-related processes, respectively. In contrast, we propose that the rLFN component could be associated with higher-level cognitive functions, such as attention and monitoring processes. Altogether, our results suggest that the ERP version of the VTOT could play a role in the electrophysiological assessment of visuo-spatial memory and related sub-processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Measures of performance in nonlinear estimation tasks: prediction of estimation performance at low signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Stefan P.; Abbey, Craig K.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Moore, Stephen C.; Foley Kijewski, Marie

    2005-08-01

    Maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation is an established paradigm for the assessment of imaging system performance in nonlinear quantitation tasks. At high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), ML estimates are asymptotically Gaussian-distributed, unbiased and efficient, thereby attaining the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). Therefore, at high SNR the CRB is useful as a predictor of the variance of ML estimates and, consequently, as a basis for measures of estimation performance. At low SNR, however, the achievable parameter variances are often substantially larger than the CRB and the estimates are no longer Gaussian-distributed. These departures imply that inference about the estimates that is based on the CRB and the assumption of a normal distribution will not be valid. We have found previously that for some tasks these effects arise at noise levels considered clinically acceptable. We have derived the mathematical relationship between a new measure, χ2pdf-ML, and the expected probability density of the ML estimates, and have justified the use of χ2pdf-ML-isocontours in parameter space to describe the ML estimates. We validated this approach by simulation experiments using spherical objects imaged with a Gaussian point spread function. The parameters, activity concentration and size, were estimated simultaneously by ML, and variances and covariances calculated over 1000 replications per condition from 3D image volumes and from 2D tomographic projections of the same object. At low SNR, where the CRB is no longer achievable, χ2pdf-ML-isocontours provide a robust prediction of the distribution of the ML estimates. At high SNR, the χ2pdf-ML-isocontours asymptotically approach the analogous χ2pdf-F-contours derived from the Fisher information matrix. The χ2pdf-ML model appears to be suitable for characterization of the influence of the noise level and characteristics, the task, and the object on the shape of the probability density of the ML estimates at low SNR. Furthermore, it

  17. Results of the second Round Robin on opening-load measurement conducted by ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on crack closure measurement and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, E. P.

    1993-01-01

    A second experimental Round Robin on the measurement of the crack opening load in fatigue crack growth tests has been completed by the ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on Crack Closure Measurement and Analysis. Fourteen laboratories participated in the testing of aluminum alloy compact tension specimens. Opening-load measurements were made at three crack lengths during constant Delta K, constant stress ratio tests by most of the participants. Four participants made opening-load measurements during threshold tests. All opening-load measurements were based on the analysis of specimens compliance behavior, where the displacement/strain was measured either at the crack mouth or the mid-height back face location. The Round Robin data were analyzed for opening load using two non-subjective analysis methods: the compliance offset and the correlation coefficient methods. The scatter in the opening load results was significantly reduced when some of the results were excluded from the analysis population based on an accept/reject criterion for raw data quality. The compliance offset and correlation coefficient opening load analysis methods produced similar results for data populations that had been screened to eliminate poor quality data.

  18. Worth the ‘EEfRT’? The Effort Expenditure for Rewards Task as an Objective Measure of Motivation and Anhedonia

    PubMed Central

    Treadway, Michael T.; Buckholtz, Joshua W.; Schwartzman, Ashley N.; Lambert, Warren E.; Zald, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Of the putative psychopathological endophenotypes in major depressive disorder (MDD), the anhedonic subtype is particularly well supported. Anhedonia is generally assumed to reflect aberrant motivation and reward responsivity. However, research has been limited by a lack of objective measures of reward motivation. We present the Effort-Expenditure for Rewards Task (EEfRT or “effort”), a novel behavioral paradigm as a means of exploring effort-based decision-making in humans. Using the EEfRT, we test the hypothesis that effort-based decision-making is related to trait anhedonia. Methods/Results 61 undergraduate students participated in the experiment. Subjects completed self-report measures of mood and trait anhedonia, and completed the EEfRT. Across multiple analyses, we found a significant inverse relationship between anhedonia and willingness to expend effort for rewards. Conclusions These findings suggest that anhedonia is specifically associated with decreased motivation for rewards, and provide initial validation for the EEfRT as a laboratory-based behavioral measure of reward motivation and effort-based decision-making in humans. PMID:19672310

  19. Task-specific tailored multiple-reflection mirror systems for sensitivity enhancement of spectroscopic measurements: application for aircraft engine exhaust emission measurements with FT-IR spectro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockmann, Klaus; Kurtenbach, Ralf; Kriesche, Volker; Wiesen, Peter; Heland, Joerg; Schaefer, Klaus

    1999-09-01

    Multi-path reflection mirror systems in White- or Herriott- type configuration have been widely used to enhance the absorption path-length and thus the sensitivity of laboratory spectroscopic systems, e.g. for smog chamber studies and molecular spectroscopy. Field studies, for instance using mobile tunable diode laser spectroscopy have widened the range of applications of these mirror systems for specific measurement tasks. In this paper a special designed White-type system mounted in two racks with 5 m base-length and adjustable optical path-length up to 74 passes is described. This system has been tested and successfully used to enhance the sensitivity of non-intrusive FT-IR measurements of aircraft engine exhaust emissions in the harsh environment of an engine test bed. The open cell around the engine plume including the transfer optics for the adaption of the spectrometers in a separate room allowed manual switching between passive FT-IR emission measurements, FT-IR absorption measurements with the cell, and, by covering the infrared source (globar) with a shutter, multi-path FT-IR emission measurements. Tests prior to the aircraft engine measurements were made to investigate the influence of different path- lengths, the position of the plume in the White cell, soot in the exhaust gas, and vibrations of the mirrors. The FT-IR spectra from all three measurement modes using the White cell during the engine measurements were found to be of good quality and the results of the analyses were comparable to the results from intrusive measurement systems.

  20. Effects of nicotine on electroencephalographic (EEG) and behavioural measures of visual working memory in non-smokers during a dual-task paradigm.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Derek J; Knobelsdorf, Amy; Jaworska, Natalia; Daniels, Richelle; Knott, Verner J

    2013-01-01

    Research in smokers has shown that nicotine may have the ability to improve certain aspects of cognitive performance, including working memory and attention, processes which implicate frontal and frontal-parietal brain networks. There is limited research on the cognitive effects of nicotine and their associated neural underpinnings in non-smokers. This study examined the effects of acute nicotine on a working memory task alone or combined with a visual detection task (single- and dual-task conditions) using electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings and behavioural performance measures. Twenty non-smokers (13 females; 7 males) received nicotine gum (6 mg) in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, repeated measures design. Spectral EEG, together with response speed and accuracy measures, were obtained while participants completed a series of N-Back tasks under single- and dual-task conditions. Nicotine failed to exert any significant effects on performance measures, however, EEG changes were observed, primarily in frontal recordings, which varied with memory load, task condition and hemisphere. These findings, discussed in relation to previous studies in smokers, support the notion that nicotine may modulate central executive systems and contribute to smoking behaviour.

  1. Out with the old, in with the new: more valid measures of switch cost and retrieval time in the task span procedure.

    PubMed

    Logan, Gordon D

    2006-02-01

    Two experiments provided new measures of switch cost and retrieval time in the task span procedure. In Experiment 1, subjects were given lists of six task names to remember, followed by six targets on which to perform the tasks named in the list. The lists contained alternations and repetitions, and switch costs were estimated by comparing reaction time (RT) on alternation and repetition trials. The experiment also included memory span and single task conditions, so switch costs could be estimated by subtracting the sum of the RT in those conditions from the task span RT, as in the original report (Logan, 2004). The data suggested that the original measure of switch cost was invalid and that the new measure was preferable. In Experiment 2, subjects performed each task on the list twice. Retrieval was required on the first but not on the second trial in each pair. Retrieval time was estimated by comparing the RT on trials that required retrieval with trials that did not require retrieval. This measure was more valid than the RT in the memory span condition of Experiment 1, which was used in the original report.

  2. Dysfunctional information processing during an auditory event-related potential task in individuals with Internet gaming disorder.

    PubMed

    Park, M; Choi, J-S; Park, S M; Lee, J-Y; Jung, H Y; Sohn, B K; Kim, S N; Kim, D J; Kwon, J S

    2016-01-26

    Internet gaming disorder (IGD) leading to serious impairments in cognitive, psychological and social functions has gradually been increasing. However, very few studies conducted to date have addressed issues related to the event-related potential (ERP) patterns in IGD. Identifying the neurobiological characteristics of IGD is important to elucidate the pathophysiology of this condition. P300 is a useful ERP component for investigating electrophysiological features of the brain. The aims of the present study were to investigate differences between patients with IGD and healthy controls (HCs), with regard to the P300 component of the ERP during an auditory oddball task, and to examine the relationship of this component to the severity of IGD symptoms in identifying the relevant neurophysiological features of IGD. Twenty-six patients diagnosed with IGD and 23 age-, sex-, education- and intelligence quotient-matched HCs participated in this study. During an auditory oddball task, participants had to respond to the rare, deviant tones presented in a sequence of frequent, standard tones. The IGD group exhibited a significant reduction in response to deviant tones compared with the HC group in the P300 amplitudes at the midline centro-parietal electrode regions. We also found a negative correlation between the severity of IGD and P300 amplitudes. The reduced amplitude of the P300 component in an auditory oddball task may reflect dysfunction in auditory information processing and cognitive capabilities in IGD. These findings suggest that reduced P300 amplitudes may be candidate neurobiological marker for IGD.

  3. Dexterity: A MATLAB-based analysis software suite for processing and visualizing data from tasks that measure arm or forelimb function.

    PubMed

    Butensky, Samuel D; Sloan, Andrew P; Meyers, Eric; Carmel, Jason B

    2017-07-15

    Hand function is critical for independence, and neurological injury often impairs dexterity. To measure hand function in people or forelimb function in animals, sensors are employed to quantify manipulation. These sensors make assessment easier and more quantitative and allow automation of these tasks. While automated tasks improve objectivity and throughput, they also produce large amounts of data that can be burdensome to analyze. We created software called Dexterity that simplifies data analysis of automated reaching tasks. Dexterity is MATLAB software that enables quick analysis of data from forelimb tasks. Through a graphical user interface, files are loaded and data are identified and analyzed. These data can be annotated or graphed directly. Analysis is saved, and the graph and corresponding data can be exported. For additional analysis, Dexterity provides access to custom scripts created by other users. To determine the utility of Dexterity, we performed a study to evaluate the effects of task difficulty on the degree of impairment after injury. Dexterity analyzed two months of data and allowed new users to annotate the experiment, visualize results, and save and export data easily. Previous analysis of tasks was performed with custom data analysis, requiring expertise with analysis software. Dexterity made the tools required to analyze, visualize and annotate data easy to use by investigators without data science experience. Dexterity increases accessibility to automated tasks that measure dexterity by making analysis of large data intuitive, robust, and efficient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Reliability and Global Context on Explicit and Implicit Measures of Sensed Hand Position in Cursor-Control Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Miya K.; Heuer, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    In a cursor-control task in which the motion of the cursor is rotated randomly relative to the movement of the hand, the sensed directions of hand and cursor are mutually biased. In our previous study, we used implicit and explicit measures of the bias of sensed hand direction toward the direction of the cursor and found different characteristics. The present study serves to explore further differences and commonalities of these measures. In Experiment 1, we examined the effects of different relative reliabilities of visual and proprioceptive information on the explicitly and implicitly assessed bias of sensed hand direction. In two conditions, participants made an aiming movement and returned to the start position immediately or after a delay of 6 s during which the cursor was no longer visible. The unimodal proprioceptive information on final hand position in the delayed condition served to increase its relative reliability. As a result, the bias of sensed hand direction toward the direction of the cursor was reduced for the explicit measure, with a complementary increase of the bias of sensed cursor direction, but unchanged for the implicit measure. In Experiment 2, we examined the influence of global context, specifically of the across-trial sequence of judgments of hand and cursor direction. Both explicitly and implicitly assessed biases of sensed hand direction did not significantly differ between the alternated condition (trial-to-trial alternations of judgments of hand and cursor direction) and the blocked condition (judgments of hand or cursor directions in all trials). They both substantially decreased from the alternated to the randomized condition (random sequence of judgments of hand and cursor direction), without a complementary increase of the bias of sensed cursor direction. We conclude that our explicit and implicit measures are equally sensitive to variations of coupling strength as induced by the variation of global context in Experiment 2, but

  5. Facial expression movement enhances the measurement of temporal dynamics of attentional bias in the dot-probe task.

    PubMed

    Caudek, Corrado; Ceccarini, Francesco; Sica, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    The facial dot-probe task is one of the most common experimental paradigms used to assess attentional bias toward emotional information. In recent years, however, the psychometric properties of this paradigm have been questioned. In the present study, attentional bias to emotional face stimuli was measured with dynamic and static images of realistic human faces in 97 college students (63 women) who underwent either a positive or a negative mood-induction prior to the experiment. We controlled the bottom-up salience of the stimuli in order to dissociate the top-down orienting of attention from the effects of the bottom-up physical properties of the stimuli. A Bayesian analysis of our results indicates that 1) the traditional global attentional bias index shows a low reliability, 2) reliability increases dramatically when biased attention is analyzed by extracting a series of bias estimations from trial-to-trial (Zvielli, Bernstein, & Koster, 2015), 3) dynamic expression of emotions strengthens biased attention to emotional information, and 4) mood-congruency facilitates the measurement of biased attention to emotional stimuli. These results highlight the importance of using ecologically valid stimuli in attentional bias research, together with the importance of estimating biased attention at the trial level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Measurements of electromagnetic properties of LCT (Large Coil Task) coils in IFSMTF (International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S.S.; Baylor, L.R.; Dresner, L.; Fehling, D.T.; Lubell, M.S.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Wilson, C.T.; Wintenberg, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Participants in the international Large Coil Task (LCT) have designed, built, and tested six different toroidal field coils. Each coil has a 2.5- by 3.5-m, D-shaped bore and a current between 10 and 18 kA and is designed to demonstrate stable operation at 8 T, with a superimposed averaged pulsed field of 0.14 T in 1.0 s and simulated nuclear heating. Testing of the full six-coil toroidal array began early in 1986 and was successfully completed on September 3, 1987, in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper summarizes electromagnetic properties of LCT coils measured in different modes of energization and fast dump. Effects of mutual coupling and induced eddy currents are analyzed and discussed. Measurements of the ac loss caused by the superimposed pulsed fields are summarized. Finally, the interpretation of the test results and their relevance to practical fusion are presented. 11 refs., 10 figs., 4 tab.

  7. Electrocortical and Behavioral Measures of Response Monitoring in Young Children During a Go/No-Go Task

    PubMed Central

    Torpey, Dana C.; Hajcak, Greg; Kim, Jiyon; Kujawa, Autumn; Klein, Daniel N.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined behavioral measures and response-locked event-related brain potentials (ERPs) derived from a Go/No-Go task in a large (N = 328) sample of 5- to 7-year-olds in order to better understand the early development of response monitoring and the impact of child age and sex. In particular, the error-related negativity (ERN, defined on both error trials alone and the difference between error and correct trials, or ΔERN), correct response negativity (CRN), and error positivity (Pe) were examined. Overall, the ERN, CRN, and the Pe were spatially and temporally similar to those measured in adults and older children. Even within our narrow age range, older children were faster and more accurate; a more negative ΔERN and a more positive Pe were associated with: increasing age, increased accuracy, and faster reaction times on errors, suggesting these enhanced components reflected more efficient response monitoring of errors over development. Girls were slower and more accurate than boys, although both genders exhibited comparable ERPs. Younger children and girls were characterized by increased posterror slowing, although they did not demonstrate improved posterror accuracy. Posterror slowing was also related to a larger Pe and reduced posterror accuracy. Collectively, these data suggest that posterror slowing may be unrelated to cognitive control and may, like the Pe, reflect an orienting response to errors. PMID:21815136

  8. Electrocortical and behavioral measures of response monitoring in young children during a Go/No-Go task.

    PubMed

    Torpey, Dana C; Hajcak, Greg; Kim, Jiyon; Kujawa, Autumn; Klein, Daniel N

    2012-03-01

    The current study examined behavioral measures and response-locked event-related brain potentials (ERPs) derived from a Go/No-Go task in a large (N = 328) sample of 5- to 7-year-olds in order to better understand the early development of response monitoring and the impact of child age and sex. In particular, the error-related negativity (ERN, defined on both error trials alone and the difference between error and correct trials, or ΔERN), correct response negativity (CRN), and error positivity (P(e)) were examined. Overall, the ERN, CRN, and the P(e) were spatially and temporally similar to those measured in adults and older children. Even within our narrow age range, older children were faster and more accurate; a more negative ΔERN and a more positive P(e) were associated with: increasing age, increased accuracy, and faster reaction times on errors, suggesting these enhanced components reflected more efficient response monitoring of errors over development. Girls were slower and more accurate than boys, although both genders exhibited comparable ERPs. Younger children and girls were characterized by increased posterror slowing, although they did not demonstrate improved posterror accuracy. Posterror slowing was also related to a larger P(e) and reduced posterror accuracy. Collectively, these data suggest that posterror slowing may be unrelated to cognitive control and may, like the P(e), reflect an orienting response to errors. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Time and Motion: Measuring the Effects of the Conceptual Demands of Tasks on Second Language Speech Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Peter; Cadierno, Teresa; Shirai, Yasuhiro

    2009-01-01

    The Cognition Hypothesis (Robinson 2005) claims that pedagogic tasks should be sequenced for learners in an order of increasing cognitive complexity, and that along resource-directing dimensions of task demands increasing effort at conceptualization promotes more complex and grammaticized second language (L2) speech production. This article…

  10. Development of a Performance Assessment Task and Rubric to Measure Prospective Secondary School Mathematics Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koirala, Hari P.; Davis, Marsha; Johnson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to share a performance assessment task and rubric designed to assess secondary school mathematics preservice teachers' pedagogical content knowledge and skills. The assessment task and rubric were developed in collaboration with five education faculty, four arts and sciences faculty, and four high school teachers over…

  11. Spatial sequence memory and spatial error monitoring in the Groton Maze Learning Task (GMLT): A validation study of GMLT sub-measures in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth; Maruff, Paul; Paul, Jacob; Reeve, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The stepping-stone variant of the hidden pathway maze learning (HPML) task paradigm has been extensively used to investigate cognitive functions in neuropsychology and neuropharmacology. Previous studies have used total error across trials, as well as rule-break errors and learning errors, to define spatial memory and/or executive function in healthy and impaired adults and children. However, the construct validity of performance measures on HPML tasks has not been established in healthy children. To assess the construct validity of measures of exploratory and rule-break errors on the Groton Maze Learning Task (GMLT) measures of spatial sequence memory (Corsi Blocks Task) and spatial error monitoring (Continuous Paired Associate Learning; CPAL) were used. The results indicate that Corsi span predicted GMLT spatial sequence memory and CPAL accuracy predicted GMLT spatial error monitoring. The construct validity of the GMLT as a measure of spatial memory and executive function are discussed with regard to prior research using HPML tasks in neuropsychological contexts.

  12. Thoracic and lumbar posture behaviour in sitting tasks and standing: Progressing the biomechanics from observations to measurements.

    PubMed

    Claus, Andrew P; Hides, Julie A; Moseley, G Lorimer; Hodges, Paul W

    2016-03-01

    Few studies quantify spinal posture behaviour at both the thoracolumbar and lumbar spinal regions. This study compared spontaneous spinal posture in 50 asymptomatic participants (21 males) during three conditions: 10-min computer task in sitting (participants naïve to the measure), during their perceived 'correct' sitting posture, and standing. Three-dimensional optical tracking quantified surface spinal angles at the thoracolumbar and lumbar regions, and spinal orientation with respect to the vertical. Despite popular belief that lordotic lumbar angles are 'correct' for sitting, this was rarely adopted for 10-min sitting. In 10-min sitting, spinal angles flexed 24(7-9)deg at lumbar and 12(6-8)deg at thoracolumbar regions relative to standing (P < 0.001). When participants 'corrected' their sitting posture, their thoracolumbar angle -2(7)deg was similar to the angle in standing -1(6)deg (P = 1.00). Males were flexed at the lumbar angle relative to females for 10-min sitting, 'correct' sitting and standing, but showed no difference at the thoracolumbar region.

  13. Optogenetics in Mice Performing a Visual Discrimination Task: Measurement and Suppression of Retinal Activation and the Resulting Behavioral Artifact.

    PubMed

    Danskin, Bethanny; Denman, Daniel; Valley, Matthew; Ollerenshaw, Douglas; Williams, Derric; Groblewski, Peter; Reid, Clay; Olsen, Shawn; Blanche, Timothy; Waters, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques are used widely to perturb and interrogate neural circuits in behaving animals, but illumination can have additional effects, such as the activation of endogenous opsins in the retina. We found that illumination, delivered deep into the brain via an optical fiber, evoked a behavioral artifact in mice performing a visually guided discrimination task. Compared with blue (473 nm) and yellow (589 nm) illumination, red (640 nm) illumination evoked a greater behavioral artifact and more activity in the retina, the latter measured with electrical recordings. In the mouse, the sensitivity of retinal opsins declines steeply with wavelength across the visible spectrum, but propagation of light through brain tissue increases with wavelength. Our results suggest that poor retinal sensitivity to red light was overcome by relatively robust propagation of red light through brain tissue and stronger illumination of the retina by red than by blue or yellow light. Light adaptation of the retina, via an external source of illumination, suppressed retinal activation and the behavioral artifact without otherwise impacting behavioral performance. In summary, long wavelength optogenetic stimuli are particularly prone to evoke behavioral artifacts via activation of retinal opsins in the mouse, but light adaptation of the retina can provide a simple and effective mitigation of the artifact.

  14. The development of the N1 and N2 components in auditory oddball paradigms: a systematic review with narrative analysis and suggested normative values.

    PubMed

    Tomé, David; Barbosa, Fernando; Nowak, Kamila; Marques-Teixeira, João

    2015-03-01

    Auditory event-related potentials (AERPs) are widely used in diverse fields of today's neuroscience, concerning auditory processing, speech perception, language acquisition, neurodevelopment, attention and cognition in normal aging, gender, developmental, neurologic and psychiatric disorders. However, its transposition to clinical practice has remained minimal. Mainly due to scarce literature on normative data across age, wide spectrum of results, variety of auditory stimuli used and to different neuropsychological meanings of AERPs components between authors. One of the most prominent AERP components studied in last decades was N1, which reflects auditory detection and discrimination. Subsequently, N2 indicates attention allocation and phonological analysis. The simultaneous analysis of N1 and N2 elicited by feasible novelty experimental paradigms, such as auditory oddball, seems an objective method to assess central auditory processing. The aim of this systematic review was to bring forward normative values for auditory oddball N1 and N2 components across age. EBSCO, PubMed, Web of Knowledge and Google Scholar were systematically searched for studies that elicited N1 and/or N2 by auditory oddball paradigm. A total of 2,764 papers were initially identified in the database, of which 19 resulted from hand search and additional references, between 1988 and 2013, last 25 years. A final total of 68 studies met the eligibility criteria with a total of 2,406 participants from control groups for N1 (age range 6.6-85 years; mean 34.42) and 1,507 for N2 (age range 9-85 years; mean 36.13). Polynomial regression analysis revealed that N1 latency decreases with aging at Fz and Cz, N1 amplitude at Cz decreases from childhood to adolescence and stabilizes after 30-40 years and at Fz the decrement finishes by 60 years and highly increases after this age. Regarding N2, latency did not covary with age but amplitude showed a significant decrement for both Cz and Fz. Results

  15. Measuring soccer technique with easy-to-administer field tasks in female soccer players from four different competitive levels.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Arve Vorland; Lorås, Håvard; Norvang, Ole Petter; Asplund, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    Soccer is a multidimensional sport that requires skills in many different domains. Reports from competitions at the highest levels around the world suggest that a particularly decisive performance factor is a team's technical execution. Testing of technical skills in soccer has been infrequent compared with testing of physiological variables, and there has been a lack of consensus as to which tasks should be included in test batteries. In this study, the validity of four field tasks (heading, long pass, juggling, and hit-the-post) was examined by testing 108 female soccer players from four different competitive levels, representing a hierarchy of skill levels. Correlation analysis indicated that the tasks' results appeared statistically unrelated (Spearman's ρ ≤ .36). Statistical comparisons across competitive levels showed that task performance was closely correlated with players' competition level, with regression analysis indicating that 92% of the variance in mean rankings across tasks could be explained by competitive level. As the easily administered and low-cost tasks identified differences in technical skills across competitive levels, such tasks appear valid for inclusion in tests of technical skills.

  16. Smoking and the bandit: a preliminary study of smoker and nonsmoker differences in exploratory behavior measured with a multiarmed bandit task.

    PubMed

    Addicott, Merideth A; Pearson, John M; Wilson, Jessica; Platt, Michael L; McClernon, F Joseph

    2013-02-01

    Advantageous decision-making is an adaptive trade-off between exploring alternatives and exploiting the most rewarding option. This trade-off may be related to maladaptive decision-making associated with nicotine dependence; however, explore/exploit behavior has not been previously investigated in the context of addiction. The explore/exploit trade-off is captured by the multiarmed bandit task, in which different arms of a slot machine are chosen to discover the relative payoffs. The goal of this study was to preliminarily investigate whether smokers differ from nonsmokers in their degree of exploratory behavior. Smokers (n = 18) and nonsmokers (n = 17) completed a 6-armed bandit task as well as self-report measures of behavior and personality traits. Smokers were found to exhibit less exploratory behavior (i.e., made fewer switches between slot machine arms) than nonsmokers within the first 300 trials of the bandit task. The overall proportion of exploratory choices negatively correlated with self-reported measures of delay aversion and nonplanning impulsivity. These preliminary results suggest that smokers make fewer initial exploratory choices on the bandit task. The bandit task is a promising measure that could provide valuable insights into how nicotine use and dependence is associated with explore/exploit decision-making.

  17. Smoking and the bandit: A preliminary study of smoker and non-smoker differences in exploratory behavior measured with a multi-armed bandit task

    PubMed Central

    Addicott, Merideth A.; Pearson, John M.; Wilson, Jessica; Platt, Michael L.; McClernon, F. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Advantageous decision-making is an adaptive trade-off between exploring alternatives and exploiting the most rewarding option. This trade-off may be related to maladaptive decision-making associated with nicotine dependence; however, explore/exploit behavior has not been previously investigated in the context of addiction. The explore/exploit trade-off is captured by the multi-armed bandit task, in which different arms of a slot machine are chosen to discover the relative payoffs. The goal of this study was to preliminarily investigate whether smokers differ from non-smokers in their degree of exploratory behavior. Smokers (n = 18) and non-smokers (n = 17) completed a six-armed bandit task as well as self-report measures of behavior and personality traits. Smokers were found to exhibit less exploratory behavior (i.e. made fewer switches between slot machine arms) than non-smokers within the first 300 trials of the bandit task. The overall proportion of exploratory choices negatively correlated with self-reported measures of delay aversion and nonplanning impulsivity. These preliminary results suggest that smokers make fewer initial exploratory choices on the bandit task. The bandit task is a promising measure that could provide valuable insights into how nicotine use and dependence is associated with explore/exploit decision-making. PMID:23245198

  18. The impact of secondary-task type on the sensitivity of reaction-time based measurement of cognitive load for novices learning surgical skills using simulation.

    PubMed

    Rojas, David; Haji, Faizal; Shewaga, Rob; Kapralos, Bill; Dubrowski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Interest in the measurement of cognitive load (CL) in simulation-based education has grown in recent years. In this paper we present two pilot experiments comparing the sensitivity of two reaction time based secondary task measures of CL. The results suggest that simple reaction time measures are sensitive enough to detect changes in CL experienced by novice learners in the initial stages of simulation-based surgical skills training.

  19. Validity of an upper-body-mounted accelerometer to measure peak vertical and resultant force during running and change-of-direction tasks.

    PubMed

    Wundersitz, Daniel W T; Netto, Kevin J; Aisbett, Brad; Gastin, Paul B

    2013-11-01

    This study assessed the validity of a tri-axial accelerometer worn on the upper body to estimate peak forces during running and change-of-direction tasks. Seventeen participants completed four different running and change-of-direction tasks (0 degrees, 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and 180 degrees; five trials per condition). Peak crania-caudal and resultant acceleration was converted to force and compared against peak force plate ground reaction force (GRF) in two formats (raw and smoothed). The resultant smoothed (10 Hz) and crania-caudal raw (except 180 degrees) accelerometer values were not significantly different to resultant and vertical GRF for all running and change-of-direction tasks, respectively. Resultant accelerometer measures showed no to strong significant correlations (r = 0.00-0.76) and moderate to large measurement errors (coefficient of variation [CV] = 11.7-23.9%). Crania-caudal accelerometer measures showed small to moderate correlations (r = -0.26 to 0.39) and moderate to large measurement errors (CV = 15.0-20.6%). Accelerometers, within integrated micro-technology tracking devices and worn on the upper body, can provide a relative measure of peak impact force experienced during running and two change-of-direction tasks (45 degrees and 90 degrees) provided that resultant smoothed values are used.

  20. Adult age differences in subjective and objective measures of strategy use on a sequentially cued prediction task

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, Kendra L.; Howard, Darlene V.; Howard, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Differences in strategy use are thought to underlie age-related performance deficits on many learning and decision-making tasks. Recently, age-related differences in learning to make predictions were reported on the Triplets Prediction Task (TPT; Seaman, Howard & Howard, 2013). Notably, deficits appeared early in training and continued with experience. To assess if age differences were due to early strategy use, neural networks were used to objectively assess the strategies implemented by participants during Session 1. Then the relationship between these strategies and performance was examined. Results revealed that older adults were more likely to implement a disadvantageous strategy early in learning, and this led to poorer task performance. Importantly the relationship between age and task performance was partially mediated by early strategy use, suggesting that early strategy selection played a role in the lower quality of predictions in older adults. PMID:24673615

  1. Involvement of the anterior cingulate cortex in time-based prospective memory task monitoring: An EEG analysis of brain sources using Independent Component and Measure Projection Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Gabriela; Burgos, Pablo; Kilborn, Kerry; Evans, Jonathan J

    2017-01-01

    Time-based prospective memory (PM), remembering to do something at a particular moment in the future, is considered to depend upon self-initiated strategic monitoring, involving a retrieval mode (sustained maintenance of the intention) plus target checking (intermittent time checks). The present experiment was designed to explore what brain regions and brain activity are associated with these components of strategic monitoring in time-based PM tasks. 24 participants were asked to reset a clock every four minutes, while performing a foreground ongoing word categorisation task. EEG activity was recorded and data were decomposed into source-resolved activity using Independent Component Analysis. Common brain regions across participants, associated with retrieval mode and target checking, were found using Measure Projection Analysis. Participants decreased their performance on the ongoing task when concurrently performed with the time-based PM task, reflecting an active retrieval mode that relied on withdrawal of limited resources from the ongoing task. Brain activity, with its source in or near the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), showed changes associated with an active retrieval mode including greater negative ERP deflections, decreased theta synchronization, and increased alpha suppression for events locked to the ongoing task while maintaining a time-based intention. Activity in the ACC was also associated with time-checks and found consistently across participants; however, we did not find an association with time perception processing per se. The involvement of the ACC in both aspects of time-based PM monitoring may be related to different functions that have been attributed to it: strategic control of attention during the retrieval mode (distributing attentional resources between the ongoing task and the time-based task) and anticipatory/decision making processing associated with clock-checks.

  2. Involvement of the anterior cingulate cortex in time-based prospective memory task monitoring: An EEG analysis of brain sources using Independent Component and Measure Projection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, Pablo; Kilborn, Kerry; Evans, Jonathan J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Time-based prospective memory (PM), remembering to do something at a particular moment in the future, is considered to depend upon self-initiated strategic monitoring, involving a retrieval mode (sustained maintenance of the intention) plus target checking (intermittent time checks). The present experiment was designed to explore what brain regions and brain activity are associated with these components of strategic monitoring in time-based PM tasks. Method 24 participants were asked to reset a clock every four minutes, while performing a foreground ongoing word categorisation task. EEG activity was recorded and data were decomposed into source-resolved activity using Independent Component Analysis. Common brain regions across participants, associated with retrieval mode and target checking, were found using Measure Projection Analysis. Results Participants decreased their performance on the ongoing task when concurrently performed with the time-based PM task, reflecting an active retrieval mode that relied on withdrawal of limited resources from the ongoing task. Brain activity, with its source in or near the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), showed changes associated with an active retrieval mode including greater negative ERP deflections, decreased theta synchronization, and increased alpha suppression for events locked to the ongoing task while maintaining a time-based intention. Activity in the ACC was also associated with time-checks and found consistently across participants; however, we did not find an association with time perception processing per se. Conclusion The involvement of the ACC in both aspects of time-based PM monitoring may be related to different functions that have been attributed to it: strategic control of attention during the retrieval mode (distributing attentional resources between the ongoing task and the time-based task) and anticipatory/decision making processing associated with clock-checks. PMID:28863146

  3. Resting and Task-Modulated High-Frequency Brain Rhythms Measured by Scalp Encephalography in Infants with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Degregorio, Geneva; Jeste, Shafali S.; Nelson, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    The electrophysiological correlates of cognitive deficits in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) are not well understood, and modulations of neural dynamics by neuroanatomical abnormalities that characterize the disorder remain elusive. Neural oscillations (rhythms) are a fundamental aspect of brain function, and have dominant frequencies in a wide frequency range. The spatio-temporal dynamics of these frequencies in TSC are currently unknown. Using a novel signal decomposition approach this study investigated dominant cortical frequencies in 10 infants with TSC, in the age range 18–30 months, and 12 age-matched healthy controls. Distinct spectral characteristics were estimated in the two groups. High-frequency (in the high-gamma (>50 Hz) and ripple (>80 Hz) ranges), non-random EEG components were identified in both TSC and healthy infants at 18 months. Additional components in the lower gamma (30–50 Hz) ranges were also identified, with higher characteristic frequencies in TSC than in controls. Lower frequencies were statistically identical in both sub-groups. A significant shift in the high-frequency spectral content of the EEG was observed as a function of age, independently of task performance, possibly reflecting an overall maturation of developing neural circuits. This shift occurred earlier in healthy infants than in TSC, i.e., by age 20 months the highest dominant frequencies were in the high gamma range, whereas in TSC dominant frequencies above 100 Hz were still measurable. At age 28–30 months a statistically significant decrease in dominant high frequencies was observed in both TSC and healthy infants, possibly reflecting increased myelination and neuronal connection strengthening with age. Although based on small samples, and thus preliminary, the findings in this study suggest that dominant cortical rhythms, a fundamental aspect of neurodynamics, may be affected in TSC, possibly leading to impaired information processing in the brain. PMID:23838730

  4. Measurement of constructs using self-report and behavioral lab tasks: is there overlap in nomothetic span and construct representation for impulsivity?

    PubMed

    Cyders, Melissa A; Coskunpinar, Ayca

    2011-08-01

    There has been little empirical evidence examining the overlap in nomothetic span for self-report measures and construct representation for behavioral lab tasks in most psychological constructs. Using the personality trait of impulsivity as an example, the authors completed a meta-analysis of 27 published research studies examining the relationship between these methods. In general, although there is a statistically significant relationship between multidimensional self-report and lab task impulsivity (r = 0.097), practically, the relationship is small. Examining relationships among unidimensional impulsivity self-report and lab task conceptualizations indicated very little overlap in self-report and behavioral lab task constructs. Significant relationships were found between lack of perseverance and prepotent response inhibition (r = 0.099); between lack of planning and prepotent response inhibition (r = 0.106), delay response (r = 0.134), and distortions in elapsed time (r = 0.104); between negative urgency and prepotent response inhibition (r = 0.106); and between sensation seeking and delay response (r = 0.131). Researchers should take care to specify which particular unidimensional constructs are operationalized with not only impulsivity, but with all traits. If self-report and lab task conceptualizations measure disparate aspects of impulsivity, we, as a field, should not expect large conceptual overlap between these methods. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Comparisons of an Open-Ended vs. Forced-Choice ‘Mind Reading’ Task: Implications for Measuring Perspective-Taking and Emotion Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Cassels, Tracy G.; Birch, Susan A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Perspective-taking and emotion recognition are essential for successful social development and have been the focus of developmental research for many years. Although the two abilities often overlap, they are distinct and our understanding of these abilities critically rests upon the efficacy of existing measures. Lessons from the literature differentiating recall versus recognition memory tasks led us to hypothesize that an open-ended emotion recognition measure would be less reliant on compensatory strategies and hence a more specific measure of emotion recognition abilities than a forced-choice task. To this end, we compared an open-ended version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task with the original forced-choice version in two studies: 118 typically-developing 4- to 8-year-olds (Study 1) and 139 5- to 12-year-olds; 85 typically-developing and 54 with learning disorders (Study 2). We found that the open-ended version of the task was a better predictor of empathy and more reliably discriminated typically-developing children from those with learning disorders. As a whole, the results suggest that the open-ended version is a more sensitive measure of emotion recognition specifically. PMID:25474645

  6. The Development and Evaluation of an Achievement Test for Measuring the Efficacy of Task-Based Writing Activities to Enhance Iranian EFL Learners' Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nejad, Ferdows Mohsen; Khosravian, Fereshteh

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the reliability of an achievement test to measure the efficacy of task-based writing activities to improve Iranian EFL learners' reading comprehension at the intermediate level in a private language institute in Ilam, Iran, namely Alefba language institute. To achieve the goal, the techniques for evaluating reliability…

  7. Measuring the Cool Tool as a Targeted Intervention to Minimize Teacher Reprimands and Students' On-Task Behaviors in an Urban Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utley, Cheryl A.; Obiakor, Festus E.

    2015-01-01

    This study measured the effects of a targeted intervention, The Cool Tool, implemented in the secondary prevention tier to minimize teacher reprimands and students' on-task behaviors in an urban elementary school. The participants in the social skills intervention programs were seven teachers, across grades K-5. Assessments included pre-posttest…

  8. Assessing stimulus-stimulus (semantic) conflict in the Stroop task using saccadic two-to-one color response mapping and preresponse pupillary measures.

    PubMed

    Hasshim, Nabil; Parris, Benjamin A

    2015-11-01

    Conflict in the Stroop task is thought to come from various stages of processing, including semantics. Two-to-one response mappings, in which two response-set colors share a common response location, have been used to isolate stimulus-stimulus (semantic) from stimulus-response conflict in the Stroop task. However, the use of congruent trials as a baseline means that the measured effects could be exaggerated by facilitation, and recent research using neutral, non-color-word trials as a baseline has supported this notion. In the present study, we sought to provide evidence for stimulus-stimulus conflict using an oculomotor Stroop task and an early, preresponse pupillometric measure of effort. The results provided strong (Bayesian) evidence for no statistical difference between two-to-one response-mapping trials and neutral trials in both saccadic response latencies and preresponse pupillometric measures, supporting the notion that the difference between same-response and congruent trials indexes facilitation in congruent trials, and not stimulus-stimulus conflict, thus providing evidence against the presence of semantic conflict in the Stroop task. We also demonstrated the utility of preresponse pupillometry in measuring Stroop interference, supporting the idea that pupillary effects are not simply a residue of making a response.

  9. Measuring the Cool Tool as a Targeted Intervention to Minimize Teacher Reprimands and Students' On-Task Behaviors in an Urban Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utley, Cheryl A.; Obiakor, Festus E.

    2015-01-01

    This study measured the effects of a targeted intervention, The Cool Tool, implemented in the secondary prevention tier to minimize teacher reprimands and students' on-task behaviors in an urban elementary school. The participants in the social skills intervention programs were seven teachers, across grades K-5. Assessments included pre-posttest…

  10. Reactive and regulative temperament in patients with compulsive buying and non-clinical controls measured by self-report and performance-based tasks.

    PubMed

    Voth, Eva M; Claes, Laurence; Georgiadou, Ekaterini; Selle, Janine; Trotzke, Patrick; Brand, Matthias; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2014-10-01

    To examine reactive and regulative temperament in patients with compulsive buying (CB) by means of self-report measures and performance-based tasks and to explore the relationship between both measurement approaches. The study included 31 treatment-seeking patients with CB (25 women, 6 men) and an age and gender matched non-clinical control group without CB (CG). All participants answered the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS). Reactive temperament was assessed using the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System Scales (BIS/BAS) and the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). Regulative temperament was measured using the Effortful Control subscale of the Adult Temperament Questionnaire (ATQ-EC) and a computerized version of the Stroop Task. To control the results for depression, the Patient Health Questionnaire-Depression Scale (PHQ-9) was administered. Crude group comparisons revealed higher BIS and BAS scores, poorer IGT performance and lower ATQ-EC scores in the CB-group compared to the CG. The groups did not differ in their performance on the Stroop task. After controlling for depressive symptoms that were significantly higher in the CB-group, only the group differences in BAS reactivity remained significant. No significant associations were found between questionnaires and performance-based tasks. Overall, the findings indicate that CB in the present clinical sample of treatment-seeking patients was mainly associated with higher approach tendencies and more depressive symptoms. The lacking correlation between self-reports and performance-based tasks is in line with prior research and suggests that both methodologies tap into different aspects of temperament. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Calculations of two new dose metrics proposed by AAPM Task Group 111 using the measurements with standard CT dosimetry phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the equilibrium dose-pitch product D-caret{sub eq} for scan modes involving table translation and the midpoint dose D{sub L}(0) for stationary-table modes on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long (e.g., at least 40 cm) phantoms. This paper presents an alternative approach to calculate both metrics using the measurements of scanning the standard computed tomographic (CT) dosimetry phantoms on CT scanners.Methods: D-caret{sub eq} was calculated from CTDI{sub 100} and ε(CTDI{sub 100}) (CTDI{sub 100} efficiency), and D{sub L}(0) was calculated from D-caret{sub eq} and the approach to equilibrium function H(L) =D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq}, where D{sub eq} was the equilibrium dose. CTDI{sub 100} may be directly obtained from several sources (such as medical physicist's CT scanner performance evaluation or the IMPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator), or be derived from CTDI{sub Vol} using the central to peripheral CTDI{sub 100} ratio (R{sub 100}). The authors have provided the required ε(CTDI{sub 100}) and H(L) data in two previous papers [X. Li, D. Zhang, and B. Liu, Med. Phys. 39, 901–905 (2012); and ibid. 40, 031903 (10pp.) (2013)]. R{sub 100} was assessed for a series of GE, Siemens, Philips, and Toshiba CT scanners with multiple settings of scan field of view, tube voltage, and bowtie filter.Results: The calculated D{sub L}(0) and D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq} in PMMA and water cylinders were consistent with the measurements on two GE CT scanners (LightSpeed 16 and VCT) by Dixon and Ballard [Med. Phys. 34, 3399–3413 (2007)], the measurements on a Siemens CT scanner (SOMATOM Spirit Power) by Descamps et al. [J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 13, 293–302 (2012)], and the Monte Carlo simulations by Boone [Med. Phys. 36, 4547–4554 (2009)].Conclusions: D-caret{sub eq} and D{sub L}(0) can be calculated using the alternative approach. The authors have provided the required ε(CTDI{sub 100}) and H(L) data in two previous

  12. Power spectral density changes and language lateralization during covert object naming tasks measured with high-density EEG recordings.

    PubMed

    Ramon, C; Holmes, M; Freeman, Walter J; Gratkowski, Maciej; Eriksen, K J; Haueisen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to study changes in EEG time-domain power spectral density (PSDt) and localization of language areas during covert object naming tasks in human subjects with epilepsy. EEG data for subjects with epilepsy were acquired during the covert object naming tasks using a net of 256 electrodes. The trials required each subject to provide the names of common objects presented every 4 seconds on slides. Each trial comprised the 1.0 second before and 3.0 seconds after initial object presentation. PSDt values at baseline and during tasks were calculated in the theta, alpha, beta, low gamma, and high gamma bands. The spatial contour plots reveal that PSDt values during object naming were 10-20% higher than the baseline values for different bands. Language was lateralized to left frontal or temporal areas. In all cases, the Wada test disclosed language lateralization to the left hemisphere as well.

  13. Your Eyes Give You Away: Prestimulus Changes in Pupil Diameter Correlate with Poststimulus Task-Related EEG Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sajda, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Pupillary measures have been linked to arousal and attention as well as activity in the brainstem's locus coeruleus norepinephrine (LC-NE) system. Similarly, there is evidence that evoked EEG responses, such as the P3, might have LC-NE activity as their basis. Since it is not feasible to record electrophysiological data directly from the LC in humans due to its location in the brainstem, an open question has been whether pupillary measures and EEG variability can be linked in a meaningful way to shed light on the nature of the LC-NE role in attention and arousal. We used an auditory oddball task with a data-driven approach to learn task-relevant projections of the EEG, for windows of data spanning the entire trial. We investigated linear and quadratic relationships between the evoked EEG along these projections and both prestimulus (baseline) and poststimulus (evoked dilation) pupil diameter measurements. We found that baseline pupil diameter correlates with early (175–200 ms) and late (350–400 ms) EEG component variability, suggesting a linear relationship between baseline (tonic) LC-NE activity and evoked EEG. We found no relationships between evoked EEG and evoked pupil dilation, which is often associated with evoked (phasic) LC activity. After regressing out reaction time (RT), the correlation between EEG variability and baseline pupil diameter remained, suggesting that such correlation is not explainable by RT variability. We also investigated the relationship between these pupil measures and prestimulus EEG alpha activity, which has been reported as a marker of attentional state, and found a negative linear relationship with evoked pupil dilation. In summary, our results demonstrate significant relationships between prestimulus and poststimulus neural and pupillary measures, and they provide further evidence for tight coupling between attentional state and evoked neural activity and for the role of cortical and subcortical networks underlying the process

  14. Your eyes give you away: prestimulus changes in pupil diameter correlate with poststimulus task-related EEG dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hong, Linbi; Walz, Jennifer M; Sajda, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Pupillary measures have been linked to arousal and attention as well as activity in the brainstem's locus coeruleus norepinephrine (LC-NE) system. Similarly, there is evidence that evoked EEG responses, such as the P3, might have LC-NE activity as their basis. Since it is not feasible to record electrophysiological data directly from the LC in humans due to its location in the brainstem, an open question has been whether pupillary measures and EEG variability can be linked in a meaningful way to shed light on the nature of the LC-NE role in attention and arousal. We used an auditory oddball task with a data-driven approach to learn task-relevant projections of the EEG, for windows of data spanning the entire trial. We investigated linear and quadratic relationships between the evoked EEG along these projections and both prestimulus (baseline) and poststimulus (evoked dilation) pupil diameter measurements. We found that baseline pupil diameter correlates with early (175-200 ms) and late (350-400 ms) EEG component variability, suggesting a linear relationship between baseline (tonic) LC-NE activity and evoked EEG. We found no relationships between evoked EEG and evoked pupil dilation, which is often associated with evoked (phasic) LC activity. After regressing out reaction time (RT), the correlation between EEG variability and baseline pupil diameter remained, suggesting that such correlation is not explainable by RT variability. We also investigated the relationship between these pupil measures and prestimulus EEG alpha activity, which has been reported as a marker of attentional state, and found a negative linear relationship with evoked pupil dilation. In summary, our results demonstrate significant relationships between prestimulus and poststimulus neural and pupillary measures, and they provide further evidence for tight coupling between attentional state and evoked neural activity and for the role of cortical and subcortical networks underlying the process of

  15. Targeted brain activation using an MR-compatible wrist torque measurement device and isometric motor tasks during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Vlaar, Martijn P; Mugge, Winfred; Groot, Paul F C; Sharifi, Sarvi; Bour, Lo J; van der Helm, Frans C T; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Schouten, Alfred C

    2016-07-01

    Dedicated pairs of isometric wrist flexion tasks, with and without visual feedback of the exerted torque, were designed to target activation of the CBL and BG in healthy subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Selective activation of the cerebellum (CBL) and basal ganglia (BG), often implicated in movement disorders such as tremor and dystonia, may help identify pathological changes and expedite diagnosis. A prototyped MR-compatible wrist torque measurement device, free of magnetic and conductive materials, allowed safe execution of tasks during fMRI without causing artifacts. A significant increase of activity in CBL and BG was found in healthy volunteers during a constant torque task with visual feedback compared to a constant torque task without visual feedback. This study shows that specific pairs of motor tasks using MR-compatible equipment at the wrist allow for targeted activation of CBL and BG, paving a new way for research into the pathophysiology of movement disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Outcome Measures for Persons With Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Recommendations From the American Physical Therapy Association Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy TBI EDGE Task Force.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Karen L; de Joya, Anna Lisa; Hays, Kaitlin; Donnelly, Erin; Johnson, Tammie Keller; Nirider, Coby D; Roth, Heidi; Saliga, Sue; Ward, Irene

    2016-10-01

    The use of standardized outcome measures (OMs) is essential in assessing the effectiveness of physical therapy (PT) interventions. The purposes of this article are (1) to describe the process used by the TBI EDGE task force to assess the psychometrics and clinical utility of OMs used with individuals with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); (2) to describe the consensus recommendations for OM use in clinical practice, research, and professional (entry-level) PT education; and (3) to make recommendations for future work. An 8-member task force used a modified Delphi process to develop recommendations on the selection of OMs for individuals with TBI. A 4-point rating scale was used to make recommendations based on practice setting and level of ambulation. Recommendations for appropriateness for research use and inclusion in entry-level education were also provided. The TBI EDGE task force reviewed 88 OMs across the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) domains: 15 measured body functions/structure only, 21 measured activity only, 23 measured participation only, and 29 OMs covered more than 1 ICF domain. Recommendations made by the TBI EDGE task force provide clinicians, researchers, and educators with guidance for the selection of OMs. The use of these recommendations may facilitate identification of appropriate OMs in the population with moderate to severe TBI. TBI EDGE task force recommendations can be used by clinicians, researchers, and educators when selecting OMs for their respective needs. Future efforts to update the recommendations are warranted in order to ensure that recommendations remain current and applicable.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A140).

  17. Effect of Posttraumatic Stress on Study Time in a Task Measuring Four Component Processes Underlying Text-Level Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael P.; Griffiths, Gina G.; Sohlberg, Mckay Moore

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on 4 components underlying text-level reading comprehension. Method: A group of 17 veterans with PTSD and 17 matched control participants took part. An experimental task required participants to read and study 3-sentence paragraphs describing semantic…

  18. Knowledge on Accelerated Motion as Measured by Implicit and Explicit Tasks in 5 to 16 Year Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebersbach, Mirjam; Van Dooren, Wim; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating children's and adolescents' understanding of constant and accelerated motions. The main objectives were (1) to investigate whether different task formats would affect the performance and (2) to track developmental changes in this domain. Five to 16 year olds (N = 157) predicted the distances of a moving…

  19. REPEATED INHALATION OF TOLUENE BY RATS PERFORMING A SIGNAL DETECTION TASK LEADS TO BEHVIORAL TOLERANCE ON SOME PERFORMANCE MEASURES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work showed that trichloroethylene (TCE) impairs sustained attention as evidenced by a reduction in accuracy and elevation of response latencies in rats trained to perform a visual signal detection task (SDT). This work also showed that these effects abate during repeat...

  20. Dual-Task Processing as a Measure of Executive Function: A Comparison between Adults with Williams and Down Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittler, Phyllis M.; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Devenny, Darlynne A.

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral phenotypes of individuals with Williams syndrome and individuals with Down syndrome have been contrasted in relation to short-term memory. People with Down syndrome are stronger visuospatially and those with Williams syndrome are stronger verbally. We examined short-term memory, then explored whether dual-task processing further…

  1. The Development of Measures of Children's Interpersonal and Task Strategies: Animal Stalls and Children's Strategies Assessment System (CSAS). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Doris B.; And Others

    A framework for conceptualizing young children's theoretical and task-related strategies in everyday situations is presented in this Head Start final report. The first section of the report discusses the concept of strategies, reviews relevant literature, and presents a theoretical model of the organization of strategic behavior. The second…

  2. Measuring Flow in the EFL Classroom: Learners' Perceptions of Inter- and Intra-Cultural Task-Based Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubrey, Scott

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on a study that investigates the effects of inter-cultural contact on flow experiences during the performance of five oral tasks in an English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom. Using a quasi-experimental design, Japanese EFL learners in the inter-cultural group (n = 21) and the intra-cultural group (n = 21) reported on…

  3. The Measurement of Executive Function at Age 3 Years: Psychometric Properties and Criterion Validity of a New Battery of Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willoughby, Michael T.; Blair, Clancy B.; Wirth, R. J.; Greenberg, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the psychometric properties and criterion validity of a newly developed battery of tasks that were designed to assess executive function (EF) abilities in early childhood. The battery was included in the 36-month assessment of the Family Life Project (FLP), a prospective longitudinal study of 1,292 children…

  4. Effect of Posttraumatic Stress on Study Time in a Task Measuring Four Component Processes Underlying Text-Level Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael P.; Griffiths, Gina G.; Sohlberg, Mckay Moore

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on 4 components underlying text-level reading comprehension. Method: A group of 17 veterans with PTSD and 17 matched control participants took part. An experimental task required participants to read and study 3-sentence paragraphs describing semantic…

  5. Knowledge on Accelerated Motion as Measured by Implicit and Explicit Tasks in 5 to 16 Year Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebersbach, Mirjam; Van Dooren, Wim; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating children's and adolescents' understanding of constant and accelerated motions. The main objectives were (1) to investigate whether different task formats would affect the performance and (2) to track developmental changes in this domain. Five to 16 year olds (N = 157) predicted the distances of a moving…

  6. The Measurement of Executive Function at Age 3 Years: Psychometric Properties and Criterion Validity of a New Battery of Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willoughby, Michael T.; Blair, Clancy B.; Wirth, R. J.; Greenberg, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the psychometric properties and criterion validity of a newly developed battery of tasks that were designed to assess executive function (EF) abilities in early childhood. The battery was included in the 36-month assessment of the Family Life Project (FLP), a prospective longitudinal study of 1,292 children…

  7. Novel Modeling of Task vs. Rest Brain State Predictability Using a Dynamic Time Warping Spectrum: Comparisons and Contrasts with Other Standard Measures of Brain Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Martin; Lorenz, Romy; Scott, Gregory; Sharp, David J.; Fagerholm, Erik D.; Leech, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic time warping, or DTW, is a powerful and domain-general sequence alignment method for computing a similarity measure. Such dynamic programming-based techniques like DTW are now the backbone and driver of most bioinformatics methods and discoveries. In neuroscience it has had far less use, though this has begun to change. We wanted to explore new ways of applying DTW, not simply as a measure with which to cluster or compare similarity between features but in a conceptually different way. We have used DTW to provide a more interpretable spectral description of the data, compared to standard approaches such as the Fourier and related transforms. The DTW approach and standard discrete Fourier transform (DFT) are assessed against benchmark measures of neural dynamics. These include EEG microstates, EEG avalanches, and the sum squared error (SSE) from a multilayer perceptron (MLP) prediction of the EEG time series, and simultaneously acquired FMRI BOLD signal. We explored the relationships between these variables of interest in an EEG-FMRI dataset acquired during a standard cognitive task, which allowed us to explore how DTW differentially performs in different task settings. We found that despite strong correlations between DTW and DFT-spectra, DTW was a better predictor for almost every measure of brain dynamics. Using these DTW measures, we show that predictability is almost always higher in task than in rest states, which is consistent to other theoretical and empirical findings, providing additional evidence for the utility of the DTW approach. PMID:27242502

  8. Response competition and response inhibition during different choice-discrimination tasks: evidence from ERP measured inside MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier J; Inuggi, Alberto; Blasi, Valeria; Cursi, Marco; Annovazzi, Pietro; Comi, Giancarlo; Falini, Andrea; Leocani, Letizia

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the neural correlates underlying response inhibition and conflict detection processes using ERPs and source localization analyses simultaneously acquired during fMRI scanning. ERPs were elicited by a simple reaction time task (SRT), a Go/NoGo task, and a Stroop-like task (CST). The cognitive conflict was thus manipulated in order to probe the degree to which information processing is shared across cognitive systems. We proposed to dissociate inhibition and interference conflict effects on brain activity by using identical Stroop-like congruent/incongruent stimuli in all three task contexts and while varying the response required. NoGo-incongruent trials showed a larger N2 and enhanced activations of rostral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and pre-supplementary motor area, whereas Go-congruent trials showed a larger P3 and increased parietal activations. Congruent and incongruent conditions of the CST task also elicited similar N2, P3 and late negativity (LN) ERPs, though CST-incongruent trials revealed a larger LN and enhanced prefrontal and ACC activations. Considering the stimulus probability and experimental manipulation of our study, current findings suggest that NoGo N2 and frontal NoGo P3 appear to be more associated to response inhibition rather than a specific conflict monitoring, whereas occipito-parietal P3 of Go and CST conditions may be more linked to a planned response competition between the prepared and required response. LN, however, appears to be related to higher level conflict monitoring associated with response choice-discrimination but not when the presence of cognitive conflict is associated with response inhibition. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. In vivo measurements of limbic glutamate and GABA concentrations in epileptic patients during affective and cognitive tasks: A microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Robert J; Gjini, Klevest; Modur, Pradeep; Meier, Kevin T; Nadasdy, Zoltan; Robinson, Jennifer L

    2016-05-01

    Limbic system structures such as the amygdala (AMG) and the hippocampus (HIPP) are involved in affective and cognitive processing. However, because of the limitations in noninvasive technology, absolute concentrations of the neurotransmitters underlying limbic system engagement are not known. Here, we report changes in the concentrations of the neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the HIPP and the AMG of patients with nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy undergoing surgery for intracranial subdural and depth electrode implantation. We utilized an in-vivo microdialysis technique while subjects were engaged in cognitive tasks with or without emotional content. The performance of an emotion learning task (EmoLearn) was associated with a significant increase in the concentration of glutamate in the HIPP when images with high valence content were processed, as compared to its concentration while processing images with low valence. In addition, significantly decreased levels of glutamate were found in the AMG when images with predominantly low valence content were processed, as compared to its concentration at baseline. The processing of face stimuli with anger/fear content (FaceMatch task) was accompanied with significantly decreased concentrations of GABA in the AMG and HIPP compared to its levels at the baseline. The processing of shapes on the other hand was accompanied with a significantly decreased concentration of the glutamate in the AMG as well as in the HIPP compared to the baseline. Finally, the performance of a nondeclarative memory task (weather prediction task-WPT) was associated with relatively large and opposite changes in the GABA levels compared to the baseline in the AMG (decrease) and the HIPP (increase). These data are relevant for showing an involvement of the amygdala and the hippocampus in emotional processing and provide additional neurochemical clues towards a more refined model of the functional circuitry of the

  10. Psychophysiological correlates of sexually and non-sexually motivated attention to film clips in a workload task.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Galdo-Álvarez, Santiago; Gonçalves, Oscar F

    2011-01-01

    Some authors have speculated that the cognitive component (P3) of the Event-Related Potential (ERP) can function as a psychophysiological measure of sexual interest. The aim of this study was to determine if the P3 ERP component in a workload task can be used as a specific and objective measure of sexual motivation by comparing the neurophysiologic response to stimuli of motivational relevance with different levels of valence and arousal. A total of 30 healthy volunteers watched different films clips with erotic, horror, social-positive and social-negative content, while answering an auditory oddball paradigm. Erotic film clips resulted in larger interference when compared to both the social-positive and auditory alone conditions. Horror film clips resulted in the highest levels of interference with smaller P3 amplitudes than erotic and also than social-positive, social-negative and auditory alone condition. No gender differences were found. Both horror and erotic film clips significantly decreased heart rate (HR) when compared to both social-positive and social-negative films. The erotic film clips significantly increased the skin conductance level (SCL) compared to the social-negative films. The horror film clips significantly increased the SCL compared to both social-positive and social-negative films. Both the highly arousing erotic and non-erotic (horror) movies produced the largest decrease in the P3 amplitude, a decrease in the HR and an increase in the SCL. These data support the notion that this workload task is very sensitive to the attentional resources allocated to the film clip, although they do not act as a specific index of sexual interest. Therefore, the use of this methodology seems to be of questionable utility as a specific measure of sexual interest or as an objective measure of the severity of Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder.

  11. Psychophysiological Correlates of Sexually and Non-Sexually Motivated Attention to Film Clips in a Workload Task

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Galdo-Álvarez, Santiago; Gonçalves, Óscar F.

    2011-01-01

    Some authors have speculated that the cognitive component (P3) of the Event-Related Potential (ERP) can function as a psychophysiological measure of sexual interest. The aim of this study was to determine if the P3 ERP component in a workload task can be used as a specific and objective measure of sexual motivation by comparing the neurophysiologic response to stimuli of motivational relevance with different levels of valence and arousal. A total of 30 healthy volunteers watched different films clips with erotic, horror, social-positive and social-negative content, while answering an auditory oddball paradigm. Erotic film clips resulted in larger interference when compared to both the social-positive and auditory alone conditions. Horror film clips resulted in the highest levels of interference with smaller P3 amplitudes than erotic and also than social-positive, social-negative and auditory alone condition. No gender differences were found. Both horror and erotic film clips significantly decreased heart rate (HR) when compared to both social-positive and social-negative films. The erotic film clips significantly increased the skin conductance level (SCL) compared to the social-negative films. The horror film clips significantly increased the SCL compared to both social-positive and social-negative films. Both the highly arousing erotic and non-erotic (horror) movies produced the largest decrease in the P3 amplitude, a decrease in the HR and an increase in the SCL. These data support the notion that this workload task is very sensitive to the attentional resources allocated to the film clip, although they do not act as a specific index of sexual interest. Therefore, the use of this methodology seems to be of questionable utility as a specific measure of sexual interest or as an objective measure of the severity of Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder. PMID:22216305

  12. Ultrasound measurement of deep and superficial abdominal muscles thickness during standing postural tasks in participants with and without chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, Fatemeh; Arab, Amir Massoud; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Salavati, Mahyar

    2016-06-01

    Activity of deep abdominal muscles increases the lumbar stability. Majority of previous studies indicated abdominal muscle activity dysfunction during static activity in patients with low back pain (LBP). However, the number of studies that evaluated deep abdominal muscle activity in dynamic standing activities in patients is limited, while this assessment provides better understanding of pain behavior during these activities. Investigation of superficial and deep abdominal muscles activity in participants with chronic LBP as compared to healthy individuals during standing tasks. Case control study. Ultrasound imaging was used to measure the thickness of transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) muscles in female participants with (N = 45) and without chronic LBP (CLBP) (N = 45) during tests. The Biodex Balance System was used to provide standing tasks. The thickness of each muscle in a standing task was normalized to actual thickness at rest in the supine lying position to estimate its activity. The results indicate increases in thickness of all muscles in both groups during dynamic as compared to static standing tasks (P < 0.05, ES > 0.5). Lower percentages of thickness change for TrA muscle and higher for EO muscle were found in the patients as compared to healthy individuals during all tests (P < 0.05, ES > 1.28). Higher activity of superficial than deep abdominal muscles in patients as compared to healthy individuals during standing tasks indicates motor control dysfunction in patients with CLBP. Standing tasks can discriminate the individuals with and without LBP and can be progressively used in training. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Memory enhancement by intrahippocampal, intraamygdala, or intraentorhinal infusion of platelet-activating factor measured in an inhibitory avoidance task.

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, I; Fin, C; Schmitz, P K; Da Silva, R C; Jerusalinsky, D; Quillfeldt, J A; Ferreira, M B; Medina, J H; Bazan, N G

    1995-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), which is thought to be a retrograde messenger in long-term potentiation (LTP), enhances glutamate release and LTP through an action on presynaptic nerve endings. The PAF antagonist BN 52021 blocks CA1 LTP in hippocampal slices, and, when infused into rat dorsal hippocampus pre- or posttraining, blocks retention of inhibitory avoidance. Here we report that memory is affected by pre- or posttraining infusion of the PAF analog 1-O-hexadecyl-2-N-methylcarbamoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (mc-PAF) into either rat dorsal hippocampus, amygdala, or entorhinal cortex. Male Wistar rats were implanted bilaterally with cannulae in these brain regions. After recovery from surgery, the animals were trained in step-down inhibitory avoidance or in a spatial habituation task and tested for retention 24 h later. mc-PAF (1.0 microgram per side) enhanced retention test performance of the two tasks when infused into the hippocampus before training without altering training session performance. In addition, mc-PAF enhanced retention test performance of the avoidance task when infused into (i) the hippocampus 0 but not 60 min after training; (ii) the amygdala immediately after training; and (iii) the entorhinal cortex 100 but not 0 or 300 min after training. In confirmation of previous findings, BN 52021 (0.5 microgram per side) was found to be amnestic for the avoidance task when infused into the hippocampus or the amygdala immediately but not 30 or more minutes after training or into the entorhinal cortex 100 but not 0 or 300 min after training. These findings support the hypothesis that memory involves PAF-regulated events, possibly LTP, generated at the time of training in hippocampus and amygdala and 100 min later in the entorhinal cortex. PMID:7761446

  14. Stroop color-word task as a measure of selective attention: efficiency in closed-head-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Vakil, E; Weisz, H; Jedwab, L; Groswasser, Z; Aberbuch, S

    1995-05-01

    Deficits in attention and concentration are reported to be among the most common symptoms following head injury. Various underlying mechanisms of selective attention such as excitation, inhibition, and habituation have been isolated in recent studies. In the present study 27 control and 25 closed-head-injured (CHI) subjects were compared on four conditions based on the Stroop color-word task (neutral, habituation, Stroop, and negative priming). Cross-comparison of the different tasks enables examination of the various components of selective attention. The hypothesis that the control group's overall reading time would be faster than that of the CHI group was confirmed. Also confirmed was the hypothesis that the overall reading time pattern between task conditions would be neutral < habituation < Stroop < negative priming. The prediction that the CHI patients, due to their impaired inhibitory mechanism, would not show a slower reading time on the negative priming as compared to the Stroop condition, was confirmed as well. The theoretical and diagnostic implications of the results are discussed.

  15. Auditory Oddball fMRI in Schizophrenia: Association of Negative Symptoms with Regional Hypoactivation to Novel Distractors

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel H.; Turetsky, Bruce I.; Loughead, James; Elliott, Mark A.; Pratiwadi, Ramapriyan; Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with abnormal processing of salient stimuli, which may contribute to clinical symptoms. We used fMRI and a standard auditory 3-stimulus task to examine attention processing. Target stimuli and novel distractors were presented to 17 patients and 21 healthy controls and activation was correlated with negative and positive symptoms. To targets, patients overactivated multiple regions including premotor cortex, anterior cingulate, temporal cortex, insula, and hippocampus, and also showed attenuated deactivation within occipital cortex. To distractors, patients overactivated left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. This overactivation may reflect hypersensitivity to salient stimuli in schizophrenia. Patients also exhibited an inverse correlation between negative symptom severity and activation to novel distractors in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, premotor area, and ventral striatum. Novelty-induced activity within prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum may represent a useful intermediate phenotype for studies of negative symptoms. PMID:19756228

  16. Recall initiation strategies must be controlled in training studies that use immediate free recall tasks to measure the components of working memory capacity across time.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Bradley S; Gondoli, Dawn M; Johnson, Ann C; Robison, Matthew K

    2014-01-01

    There has been great interest in using working memory (WM) training regimens as an alternative treatment for ADHD, but it has recently been concluded that existing training regimens may not be optimally designed because they target the primary memory component but not the secondary component of WM capacity. This conclusion requires the ability to accurately measure changes in primary and secondary memory abilities over time. The immediate free recall task has been used in previous studies to measure these changes; however, one concern with these tasks is that the recall order required on training exercises may influence the recall strategy used during free recall, which may in turn influence the relative number of items recalled from primary and secondary memory. To address this issue, previous training studies have explicitly controlled recall strategy before and after training. However, the necessity of controlling for recall strategies has not been explicitly tested. The present study investigated the effects of forward-serial-order training on free recall performance under conditions in which recall strategy was not controlled using a sample of adolescents with ADHD. Unlike when recall order was controlled, the main findings showed selective improvement of the secondary memory component (as opposed to the primary memory component) when recall order was uncontrolled. This finding advances our understanding of WM training by highlighting the importance of controlling for recall strategies when free recall tasks are used to measure changes in the primary and secondary components of WM across time.

  17. Comparing methods for measuring peak look duration: are individual differences observed on screen-based tasks also found in more ecologically valid contexts?

    PubMed

    Wass, Sam V

    2014-08-01

    Convergent research points to the importance of studying the ontogenesis of sustained attention during the early years of life, but little research hitherto has compared and contrasted different techniques available for measuring sustained attention. Here, we compare methods that have been used to assess one parameter of sustained attention, namely infants' peak look duration to novel stimuli. Our focus was to assess whether individual differences in peak look duration are stable across different measurement techniques. In a single cohort of 42 typically developing 11-month-old infants we assessed peak look duration using six different measurement paradigms (four screen-based, two naturalistic). Zero-order correlations suggested that individual differences in peak look duration were stable across all four screen-based paradigms, but no correlations were found between peak look durations observed on the screen-based and the naturalistic paradigms. A factor analysis conducted on the dependent variable of peak look duration identified two factors. All four screen-based tasks loaded onto the first factor, but the two naturalistic tasks did not relate, and mapped onto a different factor. Our results question how individual differences observed on screen-based tasks manifest in more ecologically valid contexts.

  18. The reliability of the quantitative timed up and go test (QTUG) measured over five consecutive days under single and dual-task conditions in community dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Smith, Erin; Walsh, Lorcan; Doyle, Julie; Greene, Barry; Blake, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The timed up and go (TUG) test is a commonly used assessment in older people with variations including the addition of a motor or cognitive dual-task, however in high functioning older adults it is more difficult to assess change. The quantified TUG (QTUG) uses inertial sensors to detect test and gait parameters during the test. If it is to be used in the longitudinal assessment of older adults, it is important that we know which parameters are reliable and under which conditions. This study aims to examine the relative reliability of the QTUG over five consecutive days under single, motor and cognitive dual-task conditions. Twelve community dwelling older adults (10 females, mean age 74.17 (3.88)) performed the QTUG under three conditions for five consecutive days. The relative reliability of each of the gait parameters was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC 3,1) and standard error of measurement (SEM). Five of the measures demonstrated excellent reliability (ICC>0.70) under all three conditions (time to complete test, walk time, number of gait cycles, number of steps and return from turn time). Measures of variability and turn derived parameters demonstrated weak reliability under all three conditions (ICC=0.05-0.49). For the most reliable parameters under single-task conditions, the addition of a cognitive task resulted in a reduction in reliability suggesting caution when interpreting results under these conditions. Certain sensor derived parameters during the QTUG test may provide an additional resource in the longitudinal assessment of older people and earlier identification of falls risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cost/Benefit Analysis of Mitigation Measures for Minimizing Environmental Impacts of Residential Wood Combustion : Task F, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, William T.

    1988-06-01

    This task evaluates the costs and benefits associated with effective residential wood smoke control strategies. Annualized costs and benefits for each of the eight effective control strategies identified in Task E are presented. An estimate of annual net benefits is presented for the area covering Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington states. This investigation covers available information for the following cost or benefit categories: air pollution effects on health, soiling, and visibility; safety issues, including creosote effects and effects on frequency of chimney cleaning; equipment costs; regulatory costs; and energy efficiency effects. There are many large uncertainties associated with the estimates presented in this report. The data presented should be considered to be estimates which can be used to aid decision-making, but should not be relied upon as exact or precise. Section 2 reviews the available cost benefit information. Section 3 applies the cost and benefit factors identified to eight specific residential wood smoke control strategies. Section 4 present conclusions and summarizes the cost and benefit findings. 22 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  20. Task breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlich, Jane

    1990-01-01

    The topics concerning the Center for Space Construction (CSC) space construction breakdown structure are presented in viewgraph form. It is concluded that four components describe a task -- effecting, information gathering, analysis, and regulation; uncertainties effect the relative amount of information gathering and analysis that occurs; and that task timing requirements drive the 'location in time' of cognition.

  1. The role of spectral and periodicity cues in auditory stream segregation, measured using a temporal discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Vliegen, J; Moore, B C; Oxenham, A J

    1999-08-01

    In a previous paper, it was shown that sequential stream segregation could be based on both spectral information and periodicity information, if listeners were encouraged to hear segregation [Vliegen and Oxenham, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 339-346 (1999)]. The present paper investigates whether segregation based on periodicity information alone also occurs when the task requires integration. This addresses the question: Is segregation based on periodicity automatic and obligatory? A temporal discrimination task was used, as there is evidence that it is difficult to compare the timing of auditory events that are perceived as being in different perceptual streams. An ABA ABA ABA... sequence was used, in which tone B could be either exactly at the temporal midpoint between two successive tones A or slightly delayed. The tones A and B were of three types: (1) both pure tones; (2) both complex tones filtered through a fixed passband so as to contain only harmonics higher than the 10th, thereby eliminating detectable spectral differences, where only the fundamental frequency (f0) was varied between tones A and B; and (3) both complex tones with the same f0, but where the center frequency of the spectral passband varied between tones. Tone A had a fixed frequency of 300 Hz (when A and B were pure tones) or a fundamental frequency (f0) of 100 Hz (when A and B were complex tones). Five different intervals, ranging from 1 to 18 semitones, were used. The results for all three conditions showed that shift thresholds increased with increasing interval between tones A and B, but the effect was largest for the conditions where A and B differed in spectrum (i.e., the pure-tone and the variable-center-frequency conditions). The results suggest that spectral information is dominant in inducing (involuntary) segregation, but periodicity information can also play a role.

  2. Informational Masking in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners Measured in a Nonspeech Pattern Identification Task.

    PubMed

    Roverud, Elin; Best, Virginia; Mason, Christine R; Swaminathan, Jayaganesh; Kidd, Gerald

    2016-04-08

    Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) often experience more difficulty with listening in multisource environments than do normal-hearing (NH) listeners. While the peripheral effects of sensorineural hearing loss certainly contribute to this difficulty, differences in central processing of auditory information may also contribute. To explore this issue, it is important to account for peripheral differences between NH and these hearing-impaired (HI) listeners so that central effects in multisource listening can be examined. In the present study, NH and HI listeners performed a tonal pattern identification task at two distant center frequencies (CFs), 850 and 3500 Hz. In an attempt to control for differences in the peripheral representations of the stimuli, the patterns were presented at the same sensation level (15 dB SL), and the frequency deviation of the tones comprising the patterns was adjusted to obtain equal quiet pattern identification performance across all listeners at both CFs. Tonal sequences were then presented at both CFs simultaneously (informational masking conditions), and listeners were asked either to selectively attend to a source (CF) or to divide attention between CFs and identify the pattern at a CF designated after each trial. There were large differences between groups in the frequency deviations necessary to perform the pattern identification task. After compensating for these differences, there were small differences between NH and HI listeners in the informational masking conditions. HI listeners showed slightly greater performance asymmetry between the low and high CFs than did NH listeners, possibly due to central differences in frequency weighting between groups. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Vocal impact of a prolonged reading task at two intensity levels: objective measurements and subjective self-ratings.

    PubMed

    Remacle, Angélique; Finck, Camille; Roche, Anne; Morsomme, Dominique

    2012-07-01

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the impact on voice of both duration and intensity level of 2 hours of continuous oral reading. Voice modifications accompanying changes in intensity level during prolonged reading tasks are analyzed. Fifty normophonic women undergo two sessions of voice loading in which the required intensity level of voice varied between 60-65 dB(A) for the first session and 70-75 dB(A) for the second session. The effects of loading on objective data (average fundamental frequency [F0], jitter%, shimmer%, noise-to-harmonic ratio, maximum phonation time, lowest frequency [F-Low], highest frequency [F-High], frequency range [Range], lowest intensity [I-Low] level, and highest intensity level) and self-ratings (voice quality, phonation effort, vocal fatigue, and laryngeal discomfort) are assessed every 30 minutes during the loading tasks. Results indicate that average F0, F-Low, I-Low, maximum phonation time, feeling of phonation effort, vocal fatigue, and laryngeal discomfort increase during prolonged reading, whereas shimmer% and self-rating of voice quality decrease. Average F0, F-High, and Range are the only parameters influenced by the required intensity of vocal load; they are significantly higher in the 70- to 75-dB session compared with the 60- to 65-dB session. Concerning the subjective self-ratings, similar results for the four ratings used suggest that only one would suffice in future studies. These results confirm the importance of both duration and intensity level as loading factors, even if intensity level affects fewer variables than duration. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Informational Masking in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners Measured in a Nonspeech Pattern Identification Task

    PubMed Central

    Best, Virginia; Mason, Christine R.; Swaminathan, Jayaganesh; Kidd, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) often experience more difficulty with listening in multisource environments than do normal-hearing (NH) listeners. While the peripheral effects of sensorineural hearing loss certainly contribute to this difficulty, differences in central processing of auditory information may also contribute. To explore this issue, it is important to account for peripheral differences between NH and these hearing-impaired (HI) listeners so that central effects in multisource listening can be examined. In the present study, NH and HI listeners performed a tonal pattern identification task at two distant center frequencies (CFs), 850 and 3500 Hz. In an attempt to control for differences in the peripheral representations of the stimuli, the patterns were presented at the same sensation level (15 dB SL), and the frequency deviation of the tones comprising the patterns was adjusted to obtain equal quiet pattern identification performance across all listeners at both CFs. Tonal sequences were then presented at both CFs simultaneously (informational masking conditions), and listeners were asked either to selectively attend to a source (CF) or to divide attention between CFs and identify the pattern at a CF designated after each trial. There were large differences between groups in the frequency deviations necessary to perform the pattern identification task. After compensating for these differences, there were small differences between NH and HI listeners in the informational masking conditions. HI listeners showed slightly greater performance asymmetry between the low and high CFs than did NH listeners, possibly due to central differences in frequency weighting between groups. PMID:27059627

  5. P300-based Stroop study with low probability and target Stroop oddballs: the evidence still favors the response selection hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, J Peter; Skogsberg, Katieann R

    2006-06-01

    This paper addresses the issue of the locus of action in cognitive processing during Stroop effects. It uses the P300 latency to assess stimulus processing effects, but, for the first time, under conditions in which Stroop stimuli are rare and target stimuli. The study was also concerned with demonstrating that apparent P300s during verbal responding are in fact uninterpretable due to contamination of EEG by speech-related artifact. Three studies were presented. In Study 1, there were 3 blocks, each containing 1 of 3 types of rare Stroop stimuli (p = .15), congruent, neutral, and incongruent. There were also 3 response modes: button press (BUTTON), speaking aloud (VERBAL), and speaking to self (SILENT). Three sessions were used, each for a different response style. The only task was to name the color on each trial. In the 2 non-verbal blocks, Reaction Time (RT) varied by stimulus type; congruent < neutral < incongruent. P300 latency was the same across blocks in these non-verbal conditions in which one saw the classic Pz > Cz > Fz distribution. The much larger, speech artifact-contaminated "P300s" in the VERBAL blocks did suggest a Stroop effect, especially at Fz and Cz, where "P300s" were larger than at Pz. In Study 2, there were 2 response modes, VERBAL and SILENT, and only two rare Stroop stimuli; neutral and incongruent, 1 per block. In each of these blocks, one word-color combination was a designated target requiring a unique response. The subject was to name the color followed by a yes or no to categorize the target or non-target. Again the RT for incongruents was greater than RT for neutrals, without a parallel effect in P300 latency. Again, the rostral ERPs appeared artifactual in the VERBAL condition. Study 3 was a replication of the second study, except that motivated subjects, versus Psychology pool recruits, were used. The latency-RT correlation still failed to obtain. Thus, using classic P300-eliciting antecedents-rare and target (Stroop) stimuli

  6. Effect of iron deficiency on simultaneous measures of behavior, brain activity, and energy expenditure in the performance of a cognitive task.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Michael J; DellaValle, Diane M; Murray-Kolb, Laura E; Haas, Jere D

    2017-08-07

    Iron deficiency (ID) - the highly prevalent nutritional deficiency - has been shown to have deleterious effects on measures of cognitive performance and brain activity. Many of these results are suggestive of the impact of ID on neurotransmitter regulation and myelination. A third critical potential effect of ID on brain function is at the level of brain energy expenditure; however, to date there has not been any method for indirectly estimating the impact of ID on energy expenditure in humans in the context of cognitive work. We report here a study comparing ID and iron sufficient (IS) college students in which simultaneous behavioral, encephelographic (EEG), and metabolic data were collected in a task designed as a cognitive analog to standard physical exertion tasks. We show that increases in cognitive demands produced decrements in behavioral measures of performance, and increases in EEG and metabolic measures of work. Critically, we found that the magnitudes of those changes were directly related to iron levels. We find support for the idea that brain activity mediates the relationship between cognitive demands and energy expenditure, with ferritin and hemoglobin moderating those relationships in distinct ways. Finally, we show that levels of energy expenditure can be indirectly estimated by measures of EEG spectral power.

  7. EEG delta oscillations index inhibitory control of contextual novelty to both irrelevant distracters and relevant task-switch cues.

    PubMed

    Prada, Laura; Barceló, Francisco; Herrmann, Christoph S; Escera, Carles

    2014-07-01

    Delta oscillations contribute to the human P300 event-related potential evoked by oddball targets, although it is unclear whether they index contextual novelty (event oddballness, novelty P3, nP3), or target-related processes (event targetness, target P3b). To examine this question, the electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded during a cued task-switching version of the Wisconsin card-sorting test. Each target card was announced by a tone cueing either to switch or repeat the task. Novel sound distracters were interspersed among trials. Time-frequency EEG analyses revealed bursts of delta (2-4 Hz) power associated with enhanced nP3 amplitudes to both task-switch cues and novel distracters-but no association with target P3b. These findings indicate that the P300-delta response indexes contextual novelty regardless of whether novelty emanates from endogenous (new task rules) or exogenous (novel distracters) sources of information. Copyright © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  8. High-sucrose diets in male rats disrupt aspects of decision making tasks, motivation and spatial memory, but not impulsivity measured by operant delay-discounting.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alanna; Dogra, Vimi R; Reichelt, Amy C

    2017-03-30

    Excessive consumption of sugar sweetened drinks is proposed to produce functional changes in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, leading to perturbations in behavioural control. Impairments in behavioural control have been observed in obese people on tasks that involve making choices, including delay-discounting, indicative of increased impulsivity. In this study we examined the impact of 2h daily access to 10% sucrose (or no sucrose in controls) in young male rats on behavioural tasks reliant on hippocampal function including delay-discounting, T-maze forced choice alternation and place recognition memory, as well as progressive ratio to measure motivation. We observed deficits in place recognition memory and T-maze forced choice alternation, indicative of hippocampal deficits in rats with a history of sucrose consumption. Moreover, rats with a history of sucrose consumption were less motivated to lever press for rewards on a progressive ratio schedule. However, rats with a history of sucrose consumption performed equally to control animals during the delay-discounting task, suggesting that they discounted for reward size over a delay in a manner comparable to control animals. These findings indicate that high-sucrose diets impact on spatial and working memory processes, but do not induce impulsive-like choice behaviours in rats, suggesting that unhealthy diet choices may not influence this aspect of decision-making behaviour.

  9. Using Time-on-Task Measurements to Understand Student Performance in a Physics Class: A Four-Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, John; Stewart, Gay; Taylor, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Student use of out-of-class time was measured for four years in the introductory second-semester calculus-based physics course at the University of Arkansas. Two versions of the course were presented during the time of the measurement. In both versions, the total out-of-class time a student invested in the course explained less than 1% of the…

  10. Using Time-on-Task Measurements to Understand Student Performance in a Physics Class: A Four-Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, John; Stewart, Gay; Taylor, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Student use of out-of-class time was measured for four years in the introductory second-semester calculus-based physics course at the University of Arkansas. Two versions of the course were presented during the time of the measurement. In both versions, the total out-of-class time a student invested in the course explained less than 1% of the…

  11. Task-Based and Questionnaire Measures of Inhibitory Control Are Differentially Affected by Acute Food Restriction and by Motivationally Salient Food Stimuli in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bartholdy, Savani; Cheng, Jiumu; Schmidt, Ulrike; Campbell, Iain C.; O'Daly, Owen G.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive eating behaviors are dependent on an interaction between motivational states (e.g., hunger) and the ability to control one's own behavior (inhibitory control). Indeed, behavioral paradigms are emerging that seek to train inhibitory control to improve eating behavior. However, inhibitory control is a multifaceted concept, and it is not yet clear how different types (e.g., reactive motor inhibition, proactive motor inhibition, reward-related inhibition) are affected by hunger. Such knowledge will provide insight into the contexts in which behavioral training paradigms would be most effective. The present study explored the impact of promoting a “need” state (hunger) together with motivationally salient distracting stimuli (food/non-food images) on inhibitory control in 46 healthy adults. Participants attended two study sessions, once after eating breakfast as usual and once after acute food restriction on the morning of the session. In each session, participants completed questionnaires on hunger, mood and inhibitory control, and undertook task-based measures of inhibitory control, and had physiological measurements (height, weight, and blood glucose) obtained by a researcher. Acute food restriction influenced task-based assessments but not questionnaire measures of inhibitory control, suggesting that hunger affects observable behavioral control but not self-reported inhibitory control. After acute food restriction, participants showed greater temporal discounting (devaluation of future rewards), and subjective hunger and these were inversely correlated with stop accuracy on the stop signal task. Finally, participants generally responded faster when food-related distractor images were presented, compared to non-food images, independent of state. This suggests that although food stimuli motivate approach behavior, stimulus relevance does not impact inhibitory control in healthy individuals, nor interact with motivational state. These findings may provide

  12. A stop-signal task for sheep: introduction and validation of a direct measure for the stop-signal reaction time.

    PubMed

    Knolle, Franziska; McBride, Sebastian D; Stewart, James E; Goncalves, Rita P; Morton, A Jennifer

    2017-04-07

    Huntington's disease (HD) patients show reduced flexibility in inhibiting an already-started response. This can be quantified by the stop-signal task. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a sheep version of the stop-signal task that would be suitable for monitoring the progression of cognitive decline in a transgenic sheep model of HD. Using a semi-automated operant system, sheep were trained to perform in a two-choice discrimination task. In 22% of the trials, a stop-signal was presented. Upon the stop-signal presentation, the sheep had to inhibit their already-started response. The stopping behaviour was captured using an accelerometer mounted on the back of the sheep. This set-up provided a direct read-out of the individual stop-signal reaction time (SSRT). We also estimated the SSRT using the conventional approach of subtracting the stop-signal delay (i.e., time after which the stop-signal is presented) from the ranked reaction time during a trial without a stop-signal. We found that all sheep could inhibit an already-started response in 91% of the stop-trials. The directly measured SSRT (0.974 ± 0.04 s) was not significantly different from the estimated SSRT (0.938 ± 0.04 s). The sheep version of the stop-signal task adds to the repertoire of tests suitable for investigating both cognitive dysfunction and efficacy of therapeutic agents in sheep models of neurodegenerative disease such as HD, as well as neurological conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

  13. Methods development for measuring and classifying flammability/combustibility of refrigerants. Interim report, Task 1 -- Annotated bibliography and summary

    SciTech Connect

    Heinonen, E.W.; Tapscott, R.E.

    1994-06-01

    For Task 1 of the flammable refrigerant methods development contract, NMERI performed a literature search to identify references on the flammability of refrigerants. A database to store a bibliographic record of the literature search was then developed. This database is contained in the Microsoft Access{reg_sign} relational database management system for Windows{trademark}. Searches for applicable sources were made on-line using the STN{reg_sign} scientific and technical network; off-line using the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) database; WorldCat CD-rom database; the University of New Mexico library search; the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration institute (ARI) Refrigerant Database; and personal contacts. Three specific areas were searched: refrigerant properties, flammability test methods, and ignition technology. Many of the articles retrieved fall into multiple categories. Ignition technology was included as a separate category because of the importance of the ignition process to flammability and the vast amount of information available on ignition of gaseous fuels, especially hydrocarbons. Over 90 separate references have been entered into the database. Two separate report formats have been developed to display the results of the literature search. Appendix B is the short report format--without abstract, while Appendix C is the long format--with abstract.

  14. The use of EEG to measure cerebral changes during computer-based motion-sickness-inducing tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strychacz, Christopher; Viirre, Erik; Wing, Shawn

    2005-05-01

    Motion sickness (MS) is a stressor commonly attributed with causing serious navigational and performance errors. The distinct nature of MS suggests this state may have distinct neural markers distinguishable from other states known to affect performance (e.g., stress, fatigue, sleep deprivation, high workload). This pilot study used new high-resolution electro-encephalograph (EEG) technologies to identify distinct neuronal activation changes that occur during MS. Brain EEG activity was monitored while subjects performed a ball-tracking task and viewed stimuli on a projection screen intended to induce motion sickness/spatial disorientation. Results show the presence of EEG spectral changes in all subjects who developed motion sickness when compared to baseline levels. These changes included: 1) low frequency (1 to 10 Hz) changes that may reflect oculomotor movements rather than intra-cerebral sources; 2) increased spectral power across all frequencies (attributable to increased scalp conductivity related to sweating), 3) local increases of power spectra in the 20-50 Hz range (likely attributable to external muscles on the skull) and; 4) a central posterior (occipital) independent component that shows suppression of a 20 Hz peak in the MS condition when compared to baseline. Further research is necessary to refine neural markers, characterize their origin and physiology, to distinguish between motion sickness and other states and to enable markers to be used for operator state monitoring and the designing of interventions for motion sickness.

  15. Why quality of life measurement is important in dermatology clinical practice: An expert-based opinion statement by the EADV Task Force on Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Finlay, A Y; Salek, M S; Abeni, D; Tomás-Aragonés, L; van Cranenburgh, O D; Evers, A W M; Jemec, G B E; Linder, D; Manolache, L; Marrón, S E; Prinsen, C A C; Susitaival, P; Chernyshov, P V

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the many ways in which quality of life (QoL) measurement may potentially be advantageous in routine clinical dermatology practice. Thirteen members of the EADV Task Force on Quality of Life, eight dermatologists, three health psychologists, one epidemiologist and one pharmacoepidemiologist, independently listed all of the ways they thought this may be advantageous. A total of 108 different ways of using QoL information in clinical practice were suggested (median per participant = 8, range = 4-15), and were classified into 20 descriptive groups. These were sorted into the following five categories: inform clinical decisions, clinician-patient communication, awareness of skin disease burden, informing the consultation and clinical service administration. The wide range of potential benefits identified may not only encourage clinicians to use these measures but also highlights many areas requiring evidence to establish the true value of routine use of QoL measures.

  16. Selecting Measures to Evaluate Complex Sociotechnical Systems: An Empirical Comparison of a Task-based and Constraint-based Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    system design. iv. Theory can be used as a means for representing normative human behaviour or system performance. From the review of the... behaviour or system performance. In this way, cost-benefit relationships may be ascertained.  Theory can be used to aid measurement and system...evaluation of aircrew systems, states “There is no general theory to guide Crew Performance Measurement and to relate behavioural processes within the

  17. Expectancy and Repetition in Task Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthruff, E.; Remington, R. W.; Johnston, James C.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We studied the mechanisms of task preparation using a design that pitted task expectancy against task repetition. In one experiment, two simple cognitive tasks were presented in a predictable sequence containing both repetitions and non-repetitions. The typical task sequence was AABBAABB. Occasional violations of this sequence allowed us to measure the effects of valid versus invalid expectancy. With this design, we were able to study the effects of task expectancy, task repetition, and interaction.

  18. Single-subject classification of schizophrenia patients based on a combination of oddball and mismatch evoked potential paradigms.

    PubMed

    Laton, Jorne; Van Schependom, Jeroen; Gielen, Jeroen; Decoster, Jeroen; Moons, Tim; De Keyser, Jacques; De Hert, Marc; Nagels, Guy

    2014-12-15

    The diagnostic process for schizophrenia is mainly clinical and has to be performed by an experienced psychiatrist, relying primarily on clinical signs and symptoms. Current neurophysiological measurements can distinguish groups of healthy controls and groups of schizophrenia patients. Individual classification based on neurophysiological measurements mostly shows moderate accuracy. We wanted to examine whether it is possible to distinguish controls and patients individually with a good accuracy. To this end we used a combination of features extracted from the auditory and visual P300 paradigms and the mismatch negativity paradigm. We selected 54 patients and 54 controls, matched for age and gender, from the data available at the UPC Kortenberg. The EEG-data were high- and low-pass filtered, epoched and averaged. Features (latencies and amplitudes of component peaks) were extracted from the averaged signals. The resulting dataset was used to train and test classification algorithms. First on separate paradigms and then on all combinations, we applied Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine and Decision Tree, with two of its improvements: Adaboost and Random Forest. For at least two classifiers the performance increased significantly by combining paradigms compared to single paradigms. The classification accuracy increased from at best 79.8% when trained on features from single paradigms, to 84.7% when trained on features from all three paradigms. A combination of features originating from three evoked potential paradigms allowed us to accurately classify individual subjects as either control or patient. Classification accuracy was mostly above 80% for the machine learners evaluated in this study and close to 85% at best. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. JT9D engine diagnostics. Task 2: Feasibility study of measuring in-service flight loads. [747 aircraft performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafka, P. G.; Skibo, M. A.; White, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring JT9D propulsion system flight inertia loads on a 747 airplane is studied. Flight loads background is discussed including the current status of 747/JT9D loads knowledge. An instrumentation and test plan is formulated for an airline-owned in-service airplane and the Boeing-owned RA001 test airplane. Technical and cost comparisons are made between these two options. An overall technical feasibility evaluation is made and a cost summary presented. Conclusions and recommendations are presented in regard to using existing inertia loads data versus conducting a flight test to measure inertia loads.

  20. Exploring the Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching Geometry and Measurement through the Design and Use of Rich Assessment Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    While recent national and international assessments have shown mathematical progress being made by US students, little to no gains are evident in the areas of geometry and measurement. These reports also suggest that practicing teachers have traditionally had few opportunities to engage in content learning around topics in geometry and…

  1. Exploring the Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching Geometry and Measurement through the Design and Use of Rich Assessment Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    While recent national and international assessments have shown mathematical progress being made by US students, little to no gains are evident in the areas of geometry and measurement. These reports also suggest that practicing teachers have traditionally had few opportunities to engage in content learning around topics in geometry and…

  2. Methods development for measuring and classifying flammability/combustibility of refrigerants. Interim report, task 2 - test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Heinonen, E.W.; Tapscott, R.E.

    1994-07-01

    Regulations on alternative refrigerants and concerns for the environment are forcing the refrigeration industry to consider the use of potentially flammable fluids to replace CFC fluids currently in use. The objectives of this program are to establish the conditions under which refrigerants and refrigerant blends exhibit flammability and to develop appropriate methods to measure flammability.

  3. Measuring the cognitive resources consumed per second for real-time lie-production and recollection: a dual-tasking paradigm.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chao; Huang, Kun; Hu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Yanshuo; Yuan, Fang; Wang, Qiandong; Fu, Genyue

    2015-01-01

    This research report presents a novel method of dual-tasking lie-detection. Novel software "Follow Me" was invented for a concurrent eye-hand coordination task during truth-telling/lying. Undergraduate participants were instructed to tell truths on questions about undergraduate school whereas they were instructed to tell lies on interview questions about graduate school, pretending they were graduate students. Throughout the experiment, they operated the "Follow Me" software: moving the mouse pointer to follow a randomly-moving dot on a computer screen. The distance between the mouse pointer tip and the dot center was measured by the software every 50 ms. Frequency of distance fluctuation was analyzed as the index of cognitive effort consumed per second (i.e., "degree of cognitive effort"). The results revealed that the dominant frequency of distance fluctuation was significantly lower during encoding than during retrieving responses; and lower during lying than truth-telling. Thus, dominant frequency of distance fluctuation may be an effective index of cognitive effort. Moreover, both encoding and retrieving bald-faced lies were more cognitively effortful than truth-telling. This novel definition and measurement of degree of cognitive effort may contribute to the research field of deception as well as to many other fields in social cognition.

  4. Measuring the cognitive resources consumed per second for real-time lie-production and recollection: a dual-tasking paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chao; Huang, Kun; Hu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Yanshuo; Yuan, Fang; Wang, Qiandong; Fu, Genyue

    2015-01-01

    This research report presents a novel method of dual-tasking lie-detection. Novel software “Follow Me” was invented for a concurrent eye-hand coordination task during truth-telling/lying. Undergraduate participants were instructed to tell truths on questions about undergraduate school whereas they were instructed to tell lies on interview questions about graduate school, pretending they were graduate students. Throughout the experiment, they operated the “Follow Me” software: moving the mouse pointer to follow a randomly-moving dot on a computer screen. The distance between the mouse pointer tip and the dot center was measured by the software every 50 ms. Frequency of distance fluctuation was analyzed as the index of cognitive effort consumed per second (i.e., “degree of cognitive effort”). The results revealed that the dominant frequency of distance fluctuation was significantly lower during encoding than during retrieving responses; and lower during lying than truth-telling. Thus, dominant frequency of distance fluctuation may be an effective index of cognitive effort. Moreover, both encoding and retrieving bald-faced lies were more cognitively effortful than truth-telling. This novel definition and measurement of degree of cognitive effort may contribute to the research field of deception as well as to many other fields in social cognition. PMID:25999903

  5. Intra-Rater Reliability and Minimal Detectable Change of Vertical Ground Reaction Force Measurement during Gait and Half-Squat Tasks on Healthy Male Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fairus, Fariza Zainudin; Joseph, Leonard Henry; Omar, Baharudin; Ahmad, Johan; Sulaiman, Riza

    2016-01-01

    Background The understanding of vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) during walking and half-squatting is necessary and commonly utilised during the rehabilitation period. The purpose of this study was to establish measurement reproducibility of VGRF that reports the minimal detectable changes (MDC) during walking and half-squatting activity among healthy male adults. Methods 14 male adults of average age, 24.88 (5.24) years old, were enlisted in this study. The VGRF was assessed using the force plates which were embedded into a customised walking platform. Participants were required to carry out three trials of gait and half-squat. Each participant completed the two measurements within a day, approximately four hours apart. Results Measurements of VGRF between sessions presented an excellent VGRF data for walking (ICC Left = 0.88, ICC Right = 0.89). High reliability of VGRF was also noted during the half-squat activity (ICC Left = 0.95, ICC Right = 0.90). The standard errors of measurement (SEM) of VGRF during the walking and half-squat activity are less than 8.35 Nm/kg and 4.67 Nm/kg for the gait and half-squat task respectively. Conclusion The equipment set-up and measurement procedure used to quantify VGRF during walking and half-squatting among healthy males displayed excellent reliability. Researcher should consider using this method to measure the VGRF during functional performance assessment. PMID:27547111

  6. A Full Mission Simulator Study of Aircrew Performances: the Measurement of Crew Coordination and Decisionmaking Factors and Their Relationships to Flight Task Performances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, M. R.; Randle, R. J.; Tanner, T. A.; Frankel, R. M.; Goguen, J. A.; Linde, C.

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen three man crews flew a full mission scenario in an airline flight simulator. A high level of verbal interaction during instances of critical decision making was located. Each crew flew the scenario only once, without prior knowledge of the scenario problem. Following a simulator run and in accord with formal instructions, each of the three crew members independently viewed and commented on a videotape of their performance. Two check pilot observers rated pilot performance across all crews and, following each run, also commented on the video tape of the crew's performance. A linguistic analysis of voice transcript is made to provide assessment of crew coordination and decision making qualities. Measures of crew coordination and decision making factors are correlated with flight task performance measures.

  7. A Full Mission Simulator Study of Aircrew Performances: the Measurement of Crew Coordination and Decisionmaking Factors and Their Relationships to Flight Task Performances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, M. R.; Randle, R. J.; Tanner, T. A.; Frankel, R. M.; Goguen, J. A.; Linde, C.

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen three man crews flew a full mission scenario in an airline flight simulator. A high level of verbal interaction during instances of critical decision making was located. Each crew flew the scenario only once, without prior knowledge of the scenario problem. Following a simulator run and in accord with formal instructions, each of the three crew members independently viewed and commented on a videotape of their performance. Two check pilot observers rated pilot performance across all crews and, following each run, also commented on the video tape of the crew's performance. A linguistic analysis of voice transcript is made to provide assessment of crew coordination and decision making qualities. Measures of crew coordination and decision making factors are correlated with flight task performance measures.

  8. [The preanalytical stage of under measuring of concentration of catalytic activity of enzymes: the characteristics and tasks of standardization].

    PubMed

    Lukicheva, T I; Men'shikov, V V

    2012-06-01

    The article explains the importance of standardization, the development and maintenance of rules and recommendations regulating the conditions and order of implementation of particular parts of preanalytical stage. The order of these conditions is noted including the rules stated and published in such normative documents as national standards GOST R 15 189-2009, GOST R 53079.4-2008, GOST R ISO 6710-209 and in the recommendations of foreign National societies ofclini-cal chemistry and laboratory medicine. These requirements concern all the analytes, enzymes included. The cited data have a practical significance for acquisition of reliable results in everyday functioning of laboratories. Enough to mention data concerning the anticoagulants influence on catalytic concentration of enzymes, the most often measured concentrations of alpha-amylase, lipase, amynotransferase, alkaline and acid phosphatase, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, choline esterase, hemolysis impact, the increased concentration of bilirubin and hyperlipemia in samples and significance of measurement of indices of serum and plasma as well. The possible mechanisms of impact of these interferents on the results of measurement of catalytic concentration of enzymes are discussed.

  9. Measurement properties and feasibility of clinical tests to assess sit-to-stand/stand-to-sit tasks in subjects with neurological disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paula F S; Quintino, Ludmylla F; Franco, Juliane; Faria, Christina D C M

    2014-01-01

    Subjects with neurological disease (ND) usually show impaired performance during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit tasks, with a consequent reduction in their mobility levels. To determine the measurement properties and feasibility previously investigated for clinical tests that evaluate sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit in subjects with ND. A systematic literature review following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) protocol was performed. Systematic literature searches of databases (MEDLINE/SCIELO/LILACS/PEDro) were performed to identify relevant studies. In all studies, the following inclusion criteria were assessed: investigation of any measurement property or the feasibility of clinical tests that evaluate sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit tasks in subjects with ND published in any language through December 2012. The COSMIN checklist was used to evaluate the methodological quality of the included studies. Eleven studies were included. The measurement properties/feasibility were most commonly investigated for the five-repetition sit-to-stand test, which showed good test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient:ICC=0.94-0.99) for subjects with stroke, cerebral palsy and dementia. The ICC values were higher for this test than for the number of repetitions in the 30-s test. The five-repetition sit-to-stand test also showed good inter/intra-rater reliabilities (ICC=0.97-0.99) for stroke and inter-rater reliability (ICC=0.99) for subjects with Parkinson disease and incomplete spinal cord injury. For this test, the criterion-related validity for subjects with stroke, cerebral palsy and incomplete spinal cord injury was, in general, moderate (correlation=0.40-0.77), and the feasibility and safety were good for subjects with Alzheimer's disease. The five-repetition sit-to-stand test was used more often in subjects with ND, and most of the measurement properties were investigated and showed adequate results.

  10. Results of the Round Robin on opening-load measurement conducted by ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on Crack Closure Measurement and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental Round Robin on the measurement of the opening load in fatigue crack growth tests was conducted on Crack Closure Measurement and Analysis. The Round Robin evaluated the current level of consistency of opening load measurements among laboratories and to identify causes for observed inconsistency. Eleven laboratories participated in the testing of compact and middle-crack specimens. Opening-load measurements were made for crack growth at two stress-intensity factor levels, three crack lengths, and following an overload. All opening-load measurements were based on the analysis of specimen compliance data. When all of the results reported (from all participants, all measurement methods, and all data analysis methods) for a given test condition were pooled, the range of opening loads was very large--typically spanning the lower half of the fatigue loading cycle. Part of the large scatter in the reported opening-load results was ascribed to consistent differences in results produced by the various methods used to measure specimen compliance and to evaluate the opening load from the compliance data. Another significant portion of the scatter was ascribed to lab-to-lab differences in producing the compliance data when using nominally the same method of measurement.

  11. Convergent Validity of a Wearable Sensor System for Measuring Sub-Task Performance during the Timed Up-and-Go Test

    PubMed Central

    Beyea, James; McGibbon, Chris A.; Sexton, Andrew; Noble, Jeremy; O’Connell, Colleen

    2017-01-01

    Background: The timed-up-and-go test (TUG) is one of the most commonly used tests of physical function in clinical practice and for research outcomes. Inertial sensors have been used to parse the TUG test into its composite phases (rising, walking, turning, etc.), but have not validated this approach against an optoelectronic gold-standard, and to our knowledge no studies have published the minimal detectable change of these measurements. Methods: Eleven adults performed the TUG three times each under normal and slow walking conditions, and 3 m and 5 m walking distances, in a 12-camera motion analysis laboratory. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) with tri-axial accelerometers and gyroscopes was worn on the upper-torso. Motion analysis marker data and IMU signals were analyzed separately to identify the six main TUG phases: sit-to-stand, 1st walk, 1st turn, 2nd walk, 2nd turn, and stand-to-sit, and the absolute agreement between two systems analyzed using intra-class correlation (ICC, model 2) analysis. The minimal detectable change (MDC) within subjects was also calculated for each TUG phase. Results: The overall difference between TUG sub-tasks determined using 3D motion capture data and the IMU sensor data was <0.5 s. For all TUG distances and speeds, the absolute agreement was high for total TUG time and walk times (ICC > 0.90), but less for chair activity (ICC range 0.5–0.9) and typically poor for the turn time (ICC < 0.4). MDC values for total TUG time ranged between 2–4 s or 12–22% of the TUG time measurement. MDC of the sub-task times were higher proportionally, being 20–60% of the sub-task duration. Conclusions: We conclude that a commercial IMU can be used for quantifying the TUG phases with accuracy sufficient for clinical applications; however, the MDC when using inertial sensors is not necessarily improved over less sophisticated measurement tools. PMID:28441748

  12. Convergent Validity of a Wearable Sensor System for Measuring Sub-Task Performance during the Timed Up-and-Go Test.

    PubMed

    Beyea, James; McGibbon, Chris A; Sexton, Andrew; Noble, Jeremy; O'Connell, Colleen

    2017-04-23

    The timed-up-and-go test (TUG) is one of the most commonly used tests of physical function in clinical practice and for research outcomes. Inertial sensors have been used to parse the TUG test into its composite phases (rising, walking, turning, etc.), but have not validated this approach against an optoelectronic gold-standard, and to our knowledge no studies have published the minimal detectable change of these measurements. Eleven adults performed the TUG three times each under normal and slow walking conditions, and 3 m and 5 m walking distances, in a 12-camera motion analysis laboratory. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) with tri-axial accelerometers and gyroscopes was worn on the upper-torso. Motion analysis marker data and IMU signals were analyzed separately to identify the six main TUG phases: sit-to-stand, 1st walk, 1st turn, 2nd walk, 2nd turn, and stand-to-sit, and the absolute agreement between two systems analyzed using intra-class correlation (ICC, model 2) analysis. The minimal detectable change (MDC) within subjects was also calculated for each TUG phase. The overall difference between TUG sub-tasks determined using 3D motion capture data and the IMU sensor data was <0.5 s. For all TUG distances and speeds, the absolute agreement was high for total TUG time and walk times (ICC > 0.90), but less for chair activity (ICC range 0.5-0.9) and typically poor for the turn time (ICC < 0.4). MDC values for total TUG time ranged between 2-4 s or 12-22% of the TUG time measurement. MDC of the sub-task times were higher proportionally, being 20-60% of the sub-task duration. We conclude that a commercial IMU can be used for quantifying the TUG phases with accuracy sufficient for clinical applications; however, the MDC when using inertial sensors is not necessarily improved over less sophisticated measurement tools.

  13. Good research practices for measuring drug costs in cost-effectiveness analyses: a societal perspective: the ISPOR Drug Cost Task Force report--Part II.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Louis P; Mansley, Edward C; Abbott, Thomas A; Bresnahan, Brian W; Hay, Joel W; Smeeding, James

    2010-01-01

    Major guidelines regarding the application of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) have recommended the common and widespread use of the "societal perspective" for purposes of consistency and comparability. The objective of this Task Force subgroup report (one of six reports from the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research [ISPOR] Task Force on Good Research Practices-Use of Drug Costs for Cost Effectiveness Analysis [Drug Cost Task Force (DCTF)]) was to review the definition of this perspective, assess its specific application in measuring drug costs, identify any limitations in theory or practice, and make recommendations regarding potential improvements. Key articles, books, and reports in the methodological literature were reviewed, summarized, and integrated into a draft review and report. This draft report was posted for review and comment by ISPOR membership. Numerous comments and suggestions were received, and the report was revised in response to them. The societal perspective can be defined by three conditions: 1) the inclusion of time costs, 2) the use of opportunity costs, and 3) the use of community preferences. In practice, very few, if any, published CEAs have met all of these conditions, though many claim to have taken a societal perspective. Branded drug costs have typically used actual acquisition cost rather than the much lower social opportunity costs that would reflect only short-run manufacturing and distribution costs. This practice is understandable, pragmatic, and useful to current decision-makers. Nevertheless, this use of CEA focuses on static rather than dynamic efficacy and overlooks the related incentives for innovation. Our key recommendation is that current CEA practice acknowledge and embrace this limitation by adopting a new standard for the reference case as one of a "limited societal" or "health systems" perspective, using acquisition drug prices while including indirect costs and community preferences. The

  14. A Working Memory Deficit among Dyslexic Readers with No Phonological Impairment as Measured Using the N-Back Task: An fNIR Study

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Itamar; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Izzetoglu, Kurtulus; Onaral, Banu

    2012-01-01

    Data indicated that dyslexic individuals exhibited difficulties on tasks involving Working Memory (WM). Previous studies have suggested that these deficits stem from impaired processing in the Phonological Loop (PL). The PL impairment was connected to poor phonological processing. However, recent data has pointed to the Central Executive (CE) system as another source of WM deficit in dyslexic readers. This opened a debate whether the WM deficit stems solely from PL or can also be seen as an outcome of poor CE processing. In an attempt to verify this question, the current study compared adult skilled and compensated dyslexic readers with no impairment of phonological skills. The participants’ PL and CE processing were tested by using the fNIR device attached to the frontal lobe and measured the changes in brain oxygen values when performing N-back task. As it was previously suggested, the N = 0 represented PL and N = 1 to 3 represent CE processing. It was hypothesized that dyslexic readers who show non-impaired phonological skills will exhibit deficits mainly in the CE subsystem and to a lesser extent in the PL. Results indicated that the two reading level groups did not differ in their accuracy and reaction times in any of the N-Back conditions. However, the dyslexic readers demonstrated significant lower maximum oxyHb values in the upper left frontal lobe, mainly caused due to a significant lower activity under the N = 1 condition. Significant task effects were found in the medial left hemisphere, and the high medial right hemisphere. In addition, significant correlations between fNIR-features, reading performance and speed of processing were found. The higher oxyHb values, the better reading and speed of processing performance obtained. The results of the current study support the hypothesis that at least for the group of dyslexics with non-impaired PL, WM deficit stems from poor CE activity. PMID:23152750

  15. Delay aversion but preference for large and rare rewards in two choice tasks: implications for the measurement of self-control parameters

    PubMed Central

    Adriani, Walter; Laviola, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    Background Impulsivity is defined as intolerance/aversion to waiting for reward. In intolerance-to-delay (ID) protocols, animals must choose between small/soon (SS) versus large/late (LL) rewards. In the probabilistic discount (PD) protocols, animals are faced with choice between small/sure (SS) versus large/luck-linked (LLL) rewards. It has been suggested that PD protocols also measure impulsivity, however, a clear dissociation has been reported between delay and probability discounting. Results Wistar adolescent rats (30- to 46-day-old) were tested using either protocol in drug-free state. In the ID protocol, animals showed a marked shift from LL to SS reward when delay increased, and this despite adverse consequences on the total amount of food obtained. In the PD protocol, animals developed a stable preference for LLL reward, and maintained it even when SS and LLL options were predicted and demonstrated to become indifferent. We demonstrate a clear dissociation between these two protocols. In the ID task, the aversion to delay was anti-economical and reflected impulsivity. In the PD task, preference for large reward was maintained despite its uncertain delivery, suggesting a strong attraction for unitary rewards of great magnitude. Conclusion Uncertain delivery generated no aversion, when compared to delays producing an equivalent level of large-reward rarefaction. The PD task is suggested not to reflect impulsive behavior, and to generate patterns of choice that rather resemble the features of gambling. In summary, present data do indicate the need to interpret choice behavior in ID and PD protocols differently. PMID:16796752

  16. Delay aversion but preference for large and rare rewards in two choice tasks: implications for the measurement of self-control parameters.

    PubMed

    Adriani, Walter; Laviola, Giovanni

    2006-06-23

    Impulsivity is defined as intolerance/aversion to waiting for reward. In intolerance-to-delay (ID) protocols, animals must choose between small/soon (SS) versus large/late (LL) rewards. In the probabilistic discount (PD) protocols, animals are faced with choice between small/sure (SS) versus large/luck-linked (LLL) rewards. It has been suggested that PD protocols also measure impulsivity, however, a clear dissociation has been reported between delay and probability discounting. Wistar adolescent rats (30- to 46-day-old) were tested using either protocol in drug-free state. In the ID protocol, animals showed a marked shift from LL to SS reward when delay increased, and this despite adverse consequences on the total amount of food obtained. In the PD protocol, animals developed a stable preference for LLL reward, and maintained it even when SS and LLL options were predicted and demonstrated to become indifferent. We demonstrate a clear dissociation between these two protocols. In the ID task, the aversion to delay was anti-economical and reflected impulsivity. In the PD task, preference for large reward was maintained despite its uncertain delivery, suggesting a strong attraction for unitary rewards of great magnitude. Uncertain delivery generated no aversion, when compared to delays producing an equivalent level of large-reward rarefaction. The PD task is suggested not to reflect impulsive behavior, and to generate patterns of choice that rather resemble the features of gambling. In summary, present data do indicate the need to interpret choice behavior in ID and PD protocols differently.

  17. Geophysical and transport properties of reservoir rocks. Final report for task 4: Measurements and analysis of seismic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, N.G.W.

    1993-05-01

    The principal objective of research on the seismic properties of reservoir rocks is to develop a basic understanding of the effects of rock microstructure and its contained pore fluids on seismic velocities and attenuation. Ultimately, this knowledge would be used to extract reservoir properties information such as the porosity, permeability, clay content, fluid saturation, and fluid type from borehole, cross-borehole, and surface seismic measurements to improve the planning and control of oil and gas recovery. This thesis presents laboratory ultrasonic measurements for three granular materials and attempts to relate the microstructural properties and the properties of the pore fluids to P- and S-wave velocities and attenuation. These experimental results show that artificial porous materials with sintered grains and a sandstone with partially cemented grains exhibit complexities in P- and S-wave attenuation that cannot be adequately explained by existing micromechanical theories. It is likely that some of the complexity observed in the seismic attenuation is controlled by details of the rock microstructure, such as the grain contact area and grain shape, and by the arrangement of the grain packing. To examine these effects, a numerical method was developed for analyzing wave propagation in a grain packing. The method is based on a dynamic boundary integral equation and incorporates generalized stiffness boundary conditions between individual grains to account for viscous losses and grain contact scattering.

  18. Space station integrated wall damage and penetration damage control. Task 5: Space debris measurement, mapping and characterization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempriere, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    The procedures and results of a study of a conceptual system for measuring the debris environment on the space station is discussed. The study was conducted in two phases: the first consisted of experiments aimed at evaluating location of impact through panel response data collected from acoustic emission sensors; the second analyzed the available statistical description of the environment to determine the probability of the measurement system producing useful data, and analyzed the results of the previous tests to evaluate the accuracy of location and the feasibility of extracting impactor characteristics from the panel response. The conclusions were that for one panel the system would not be exposed to any event, but that the entire Logistics Module would provide a modest amount of data. The use of sensors with higher sensitivity than those used in the tests could be advantageous. The impact location could be found with sufficient accuracy from panel response data. The waveforms of the response were shown to contain information on the impact characteristics, but the data set did not span a sufficient range of the variables necessary to evaluate the feasibility of extracting the information.

  19. Real-time estimate of body kinematics during a planar squat task using a single inertial measurement unit.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Vincent; Mazzà, Claudia; Fraisse, Philippe; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed at the real-time estimation of the lower-limb joint and torso kinematics during a squat exercise, performed in the sagittal plane, using a single inertial measurement unit placed on the lower back. The human body was modeled with a 3-DOF planar chain. The planar IMU orientation and vertical displacement were estimated using one angular velocity and two acceleration components and a weighted Fourier linear combiner. The ankle, knee, and hip joint angles were thereafter obtained through a novel inverse kinematic module based on the use of a Jacobian pseudoinverse matrix and null-space decoupling. The aforementioned algorithms were validated on a humanoid robot for which the mechanical model used and the measured joint angles virtually exhibited no inaccuracies. Joint angles were estimated with a maximal error of 1.5°. The performance of the proposed analytical and experimental methodology was also assessed by conducting an experiment on human volunteers and by comparing the relevant results with those obtained through the more conventional photogrammetric approach. The joint angles provided by the two methods displayed differences equal to 3±1°. These results, associated with the real-time capability of the method, open the door to future field applications in both rehabilitation and sport.

  20. Generic cognitive adaptations to task interference in task switching.

    PubMed

    Poljac, Edita; Bekkering, Harold

    2009-11-01

    The present study investigated how the activation of previous tasks interferes with the execution of future tasks as a result of temporal manipulations. Color and shape matching tasks were organized in runs of two trials each. The tasks were specified by a cue presented before a task run, cueing only the first trials of each run. Response times (RTs) and error rates were measured for task switching and task repetition conditions. Task interference was varied as a function of response-cue interval (RCI of 300 and 900ms), that is, the interval between the task runs. Keeping the response-stimulus interval within the task runs constant at 300ms allowed the disentangling of the direct effects of RCI manipulation on performance (first trials) from the general effects on performance (both trials in the run). The data showed similar performance improvement due to RCI increase on both trials in the task run. Furthermore, increasing RCI improved both switch and repetition performance to a similar extent. Together, our findings provide further evidence for accounts stressing generic effects of proactive task interference in task switching.

  1. A Mixed Methods Task Analysis of the Implementation and Validation of EHR-Based Clinical Quality Measures

    PubMed Central

    Weiskopf, Nicole G.; Khan, Faiza J.; Woodcock, Deborah; Dorr, David A.; Cigarroa, Joaquin E.; Cohen, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical quality measures (CQMs) are important tools for the assessment and improvement of health care quality. Federal requirements initially set forth in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and advanced in subsequent stages of the requirements, codified electronic health record (EHR)-based CQM reporting, and have made automated CQM implementation a priority amongst the clinical and informatics communities. Nevertheless, the processes surrounding CQM implementation and validation remain complex, time-consuming, and largely undefined. We collected issue-tracking data during the course of an agile and rigorous collaborative project to build an analytics platform for the Knight Cardiovascular Institute at OHSU, with nine heart failure CQMs defined by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) as an exemplar. Using a mixed methods approach we provide an overview of our CQM implementation and validation process, identify major roadblocks and bottlenecks, and make recommendations for other professionals working in the area of health care quality assessment and improvement. PMID:28269920

  2. A Mixed Methods Task Analysis of the Implementation and Validation of EHR-Based Clinical Quality Measures.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Nicole G; Khan, Faiza J; Woodcock, Deborah; Dorr, David A; Cigarroa, Joaquin E; Cohen, Aaron M

    2016-01-01

    Clinical quality measures (CQMs) are important tools for the assessment and improvement of health care quality. Federal requirements initially set forth in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and advanced in subsequent stages of the requirements, codified electronic health record (EHR)-based CQM reporting, and have made automated CQM implementation a priority amongst the clinical and informatics communities. Nevertheless, the processes surrounding CQM implementation and validation remain complex, time-consuming, and largely undefined. We collected issue-tracking data during the course of an agile and rigorous collaborative project to build an analytics platform for the Knight Cardiovascular Institute at OHSU, with nine heart failure CQMs defined by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) as an exemplar. Using a mixed methods approach we provide an overview of our CQM implementation and validation process, identify major roadblocks and bottlenecks, and make recommendations for other professionals working in the area of health care quality assessment and improvement.

  3. Behavioral measures of risk tasking, sensation seeking and sensitivity to reward may reflect different motivations for spicy food liking and consumption

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Nadia K.; Hayes, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Based on work a quarter century ago, it is widely accepted personality traits like sensation seeking are related to the enjoyment and intake of spicy foods; however, data supporting this belief is actually quite limited. Recently, we reported strong to moderate correlations between remembered spicy food liking and two personality traits measured with validated questionnaires. Here, participants consumed capsaicin-containing strawberry jelly to generate acute estimates of spicy food liking. Additionally, we used a laboratory-based behavioral measure of risk taking (the momentary Balloon Analogue Risk Task; mBART) to complement a range of validated self-report measures of risk-related personality traits. Present data confirm Sensation Seeking correlates with overall spicy meal liking and liking of the burn of a spicy meal, and extends prior findings by showing novel correlations with the liking of sampled stimuli. Other personality measures, including Sensitivity to Punishment (SP), Sensitivity to Reward (SR), and the Impulsivity and Risk Taking subscales of the DSM5 Personality Inventory (PID5) did not show significant relationships with liking of spicy foods, either sampled or remembered. Our behavioral risk taking measure, the mBART, also failed to show a relationship with remembered or sampled liking. However, significant relationships were observed between reported intake of spicy foods and Sensitivity to Reward, and the Risk Taking subscale of the PID-5 (PID5-RT). Based on the observed patterns among various personality measures, and spicy food liking and intake, we propose that personality measures may exert their influence on intake of spicy food via different mechanisms. We also speculate that Sensation Seeking may reflect motivations for consuming spicy foods that are more intrinsic, while the motivations for eating spicy foods measured by SR and PID5-RT may be more extrinsic. PMID:27137410

  4. Behavioral measures of risk tasking, sensation seeking and sensitivity to reward may reflect different motivations for spicy food liking and consumption.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Nadia K; Hayes, John E

    2016-08-01

    Based on work a quarter century ago, it is widely accepted personality traits like sensation seeking are related to the enjoyment and intake of spicy foods; however, data supporting this belief is actually quite limited. Recently, we reported strong to moderate correlations between remembered spicy food liking and two personality traits measured with validated questionnaires. Here, participants consumed capsaicin-containing strawberry jelly to generate acute estimates of spicy food liking. Additionally, we used a laboratory-based behavioral measure of risk taking (the mobile Balloon Analogue Risk Task; mBART) to complement a range of validated self-report measures of risk-related personality traits. Present data confirm Sensation Seeking correlates with overall spicy meal liking and liking of the burn of a spicy meal, and extends prior findings by showing novel correlations with the liking of sampled stimuli. Other personality measures, including Sensitivity to Punishment (SP), Sensitivity to Reward (SR), and the Impulsivity and Risk Taking subscales of the DSM5 Personality Inventory (PID-5) did not show significant relationships with liking of spicy foods, either sampled or remembered. Our behavioral risk taking measure, the mBART, also failed to show a relationship with remembered or sampled liking. However, significant relationships were observed between reported intake of spicy foods and Sensitivity to Reward, and the Risk Taking subscale of the PID-5 (PID5-RT). Based on the observed patterns among various personality measures, and spicy food liking and intake, we propose that personality measures may exert their influence on intake of spicy food via different mechanisms. We also speculate that Sensation Seeking may reflect motivations for consuming spicy foods that are more intrinsic, while the motivations for eating spicy foods measured by SR and PID5-RT may be more extrinsic.

  5. Introduction to meteorological measurements and data handling for solar energy applications. Task IV-Development of an insolation handbook and instrument package

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    Recognizing a need for a coordinated approach to resolve energy problems, certain members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) met in September 1974 and agreed to develop an International Energy Program. The International Energy Agency (IEA) was established within the OECD to administer, monitor and execute this International Energy Program. In July 1975, Solar Heating and Cooling was selected as one of the sixteen technology fields for multilateral cooperation. Five project areas, called tasks, were identified for cooperative activities within the IEA Program to Develop and Test Solar Heating and Cooling Systems. The objective of one task was to obtain improved basic resource information for the design and operation of solar heating and cooling systems through a better understanding of the required insolation (solar radiation) and related weather data, and through improved techniques for measurement and evaluation of such data. At the February 1976 initial experts meeting in Norrkoeping, Sweden, the participants developed the objective statement into two subtasks. (1) an insolation handbook; and (2) a portable meteorological instrument package. This handbook is the product of the first subtask. The objective of this handbook is to provide a basis for a dialogue between solar scientists and meteorologists. Introducing the solar scientist to solar radiation and related meteorological data enables him to better express his scientific and engineering needs to the meteorologist; and introducing the meteorologist to the special solar radiation and meteorological data applications of the solar scientist enables him to better meet the needs of the solar energy community.

  6. Processes of task performance as measured by the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS): A predictor of work-related outcomes for adults with schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Haslam, Julie; Pépin, Geneviève; Bourbonnais, Renée; Grignon, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether the processes of task performance as measured by the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) would discriminate between the employment levels of adults with schizophrenia. Twenty adults with schizophrenia who were engaged either in competitive employment, supported employment, prevocational training, or non-vocational activities, participated in this exploratory study. Each participant completed the AMPS, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), and the Worker Role Interview (WRI) to gather data about their occupational performance, symptoms, drug / alcohol use, and psychosocial / environmental factors that might influence their work-related outcomes. Analysis revealed a moderate correlation between the level of employment and the global scores of the process skills scale in the AMPS. This should be seen as preliminary evidence that beyond the basic cognitive functions, processes of task performance may also be a predictor of work-related outcomes for this population. The results also highlighted the importance of considering personal causation and worker roles when assessing the work capacities of these clients. Finally, findings supported the four levels of employment used in this study, which appeared to form a continuum from non-vocational activities, prevocational training, supported employment, through to competitive employment.

  7. Snap Your Fingers! An ERP/sLORETA Study Investigating Implicit Processing of Self- vs. Other-Related Movement Sounds Using the Passive Oddball Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Justen, Christoph; Herbert, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    So far, neurophysiological studies have investigated implicit and explicit self-related processing particularly for self-related stimuli such as the own face or name. The present study extends previous research to the implicit processing of self-related movement sounds and explores their spatio-temporal dynamics. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were assessed while participants (N = 12 healthy subjects) listened passively to previously recorded self- and other-related finger snapping sounds, presented either as deviants or standards during an oddball paradigm. Passive listening to low (500 Hz) and high (1000 Hz) pure tones served as additional control. For self- vs. other-related finger snapping sounds, analysis of ERPs revealed significant differences in the time windows of the N2a/MMN and P3. An subsequent source localization analysis with standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) revealed increased cortical activation in distinct motor areas such as the supplementary motor area (SMA) in the N2a/mismatch negativity (MMN) as well as the P3 time window during processing of self- and other-related finger snapping sounds. In contrast, brain regions associated with self-related processing [e.g., right anterior/posterior cingulate cortex (ACC/PPC)] as well as the right inferior parietal lobule (IPL) showed increased activation particularly during processing of self- vs. other-related finger snapping sounds in the time windows of the N2a/MMN (ACC/PCC) or the P3 (IPL). None of these brain regions showed enhanced activation while listening passively to low (500 Hz) and high (1000 Hz) pure tones. Taken together, the current results indicate (1) a specific role of motor regions such as SMA during auditory processing of movement-related information, regardless of whether this information is self- or other-related, (2) activation of neural sources such as the ACC/PCC and the IPL during implicit processing of self-related movement stimuli, and (3

  8. Snap Your Fingers! An ERP/sLORETA Study Investigating Implicit Processing of Self- vs. Other-Related Movement Sounds Using the Passive Oddball Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Justen, Christoph; Herbert, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    So far, neurophysiological studies have investigated implicit and explicit self-related processing particularly for self-related stimuli such as the own face or name. The present study extends previous research to the implicit processing of self-related movement sounds and explores their spatio-temporal dynamics. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were assessed while participants (N = 12 healthy subjects) listened passively to previously recorded self- and other-related finger snapping sounds, presented either as deviants or standards during an oddball paradigm. Passive listening to low (500 Hz) and high (1000 Hz) pure tones served as additional control. For self- vs. other-related finger snapping sounds, analysis of ERPs revealed significant differences in the time windows of the N2a/MMN and P3. An subsequent source localization analysis with standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) revealed increased cortical activation in distinct motor areas such as the supplementary motor area (SMA) in the N2a/mismatch negativity (MMN) as well as the P3 time window during processing of self- and other-related finger snapping sounds. In contrast, brain regions associated with self-related processing [e.g., right anterior/posterior cingulate cortex (ACC/PPC)] as well as the right inferior parietal lobule (IPL) showed increased activation particularly during processing of self- vs. other-related finger snapping sounds in the time windows of the N2a/MMN (ACC/PCC) or the P3 (IPL). None of these brain regions showed enhanced activation while listening passively to low (500 Hz) and high (1000 Hz) pure tones. Taken together, the current results indicate (1) a specific role of motor regions such as SMA during auditory processing of movement-related information, regardless of whether this information is self- or other-related, (2) activation of neural sources such as the ACC/PCC and the IPL during implicit processing of self-related movement stimuli, and (3

  9. The Use of Dual Task Paradigms in Memory Research: A Methodological Assessment and an Evaluation of Effort as a Measure of Levels of Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    tasks were employed as primary tasks in an incidental learning paradi ,m similar to that used by Craik and Watkins (1973). For each orienting condition...from one specified semantic category (such as birds ) in Orient 3 or from two such categories (such as sports and fruits) in Orient 4. Secondary task

  10. Task instructions modulate the attentional mode affecting the auditory MMN and the semantic N400

    PubMed Central

    Erlbeck, Helena; Kübler, Andrea; Kotchoubey, Boris; Veser, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) have been proven to be a useful tool to complement clinical assessment and to detect residual cognitive functions in patients with disorders of consciousness. These ERPs are often recorded using passive or unspecific instructions. Patient data obtained this way are then compared to data from healthy participants, which are usually recorded using active instructions. The present study investigates the effect of attentive modulations and particularly the effect of active vs. passive instruction on the ERP components mismatch negativity (MMN) and N400. A sample of 18 healthy participants listened to three auditory paradigms: an oddball, a word priming, and a sentence paradigm. Each paradigm was presented three times with different instructions: ignoring auditory stimuli, passive listening, and focused attention on the auditory stimuli. After each task, the participants indicated their subjective effort. The N400 decreased from the focused task to the passive task, and was extinct in the ignore task. The MMN exhibited higher amplitudes in the focused and passive task compared to the ignore task. The data indicate an effect of attention on the supratemporal component of the MMN. Subjective effort was equally high in the passive and focused tasks but reduced in the ignore task. We conclude that passive listening during EEG recording is stressful and attenuates ERPs, which renders the interpretation of the results obtained in such conditions difficult. PMID:25221494

  11. ACCF/AHA methodology for the development of quality measures for cardiovascular technology: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures.

    PubMed

    Bonow, Robert O; Douglas, Pamela S; Buxton, Alfred E; Cohen, David J; Curtis, Jeptha P; Delong, Elizabeth; Drozda, Joseph P; Ferguson, T Bruce; Heidenreich, Paul A; Hendel, Robert C; Masoudi, Frederick A; Peterson, Eric D; Taylor, Allen J

    2011-09-27

    Consistent with the growing national focus on healthcare quality, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have taken a leadership role over the past decade in developing measures of the quality of cardiovascular care by convening a joint ACCF/AHA Task Force on Performance Measures. The Task Force is charged with identifying the clinical topics appropriate for the development of performance measures and with assembling writing committees composed of clinical and methodological experts in collaboration with appropriate subspecialty societies. The Task Force has also created methodology documents that offer guidance in the development of process, outcome, composite, and efficiency measures. Cardiovascular performance measures using existing ACCF/AHA methodology are based on Class I or Class III guidelines recommendations, usually with Level A evidence. These performance measures, based on evidence-based ACCF/AHA guidelines, remain the most rigorous quality measures for both internal quality improvement and public reporting. However, many of the tools for diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease involve advanced technologies, such as cardiac imaging, for which there are often no underlying guideline documents. Because these technologies affect the quality of cardiovascular care and also have the potential to contribute to cardiovascular health expenditures, there is a need for more critical assessment of the use of technology, including the development of quality and performance measures in areas in which guideline recommendations are absent. The evaluation of quality in the use of cardiovascular technologies requires consideration of multiple parameters that differ from other healthcare processes. The present document describes methodology for development of 2 new classes of quality measures in these situations, appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures. Appropriate use measures are based on

  12. ACCF/AHA methodology for the development of quality measures for cardiovascular technology: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Performance Measures.

    PubMed

    Bonow, Robert O; Douglas, Pamela S; Buxton, Alfred E; Cohen, David J; Curtis, Jeptha P; Delong, Elizabeth; Drozda, Joseph P; Ferguson, T Bruce; Heidenreich, Paul A; Hendel, Robert C; Masoudi, Frederick A; Peterson, Eric D; Taylor, Allen J

    2011-09-27

    Consistent with the growing national focus on healthcare quality, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have taken a leadership role over the past decade in developing measures of the quality of cardiovascular care by convening a joint ACCF/AHA Task Force on Performance Measures. The Task Force is charged with identifying the clinical topics appropriate for the development of performance measures and with assembling writing committees composed of clinical and methodological experts in collaboration with appropriate subspecialty societies. The Task Force has also created methodology documents that offer guidance in the development of process, outcome, composite, and efficiency measures. Cardiovascular performance measures using existing ACCF/AHA methodology are based on Class I or Class III guidelines recommendations, usually with Level A evidence. These performance measures, based on evidence-based ACCF/AHA guidelines, remain the most rigorous quality measures for both internal quality improvement and public reporting. However, many of the tools for diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease involve advanced technologies, such as cardiac imaging, for which there are often no underlying guideline documents. Because these technologies affect the quality of cardiovascular care and also have the potential to contribute to cardiovascular health expenditures, there is a need for more critical assessment of the use of technology, including the development of quality and performance measures in areas in which guideline recommendations are absent. The evaluation of quality in the use of cardiovascular technologies requires consideration of multiple parameters that differ from other healthcare processes. The present document describes methodology for development of 2 new classes of quality measures in these situations, appropriate use measures and structure/safety measures. Appropriate use measures are based on

  13. Deficits in interval timing measured by the dual-task paradigm among children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shoou-Lian; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Hsu, Wen-Yau; Wu, Yu-Yu

    2010-03-01

    The underlying mechanism of time perception deficit in long time intervals in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is still unclear. This study used the time reproduction dual task to explore the role of the attentional resource in time perception deficits among children and adolescents with ADHD. Participants included 168 children and adolescents with DSM-IV ADHD and 90 control children and adolescents without ADHD, aged 10 to 17 years, in Taipei. The DSM-IV diagnoses of ADHD and other psychiatric comorbid conditions were made by clinical assessments and confirmed by the psychiatric interviews of both parents and participants using the Chinese Kiddie Epidemiologic version of the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia. The participants were also assessed by using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-3(rd) edition (WISC-III), and time reproduction tasks (the single task and the simple and difficult versions of the dual tasks) at 5-second, 12-second, and 17-second intervals. The linear mixed model was used for data analysis. Children and adolescents with ADHD had less precise time reproduction than the controls in all three tasks except the 5-second interval of the single task. There were significant interactions between group and interval (12-second vs. 5-second, p = .030; 17-second vs. 5-second, p < .001), and between group and task (simple dual task vs. single task, p = .016; difficult dual task vs. single task, p < .001) after controlling for FSIQ, comorbidity, sex, age, use of methylphenidate, and the performance of the non-temporal tasks in dual tasks, if relevant. Significantly increased estimation errors in ADHD with increased task difficulties suggest that impaired timing processing in children and adolescents with ADHD during long time intervals may be accounted for by the limited attentional capacity rather than a primary problem in timing per se. This finding does not apply to rapid time intervals, in which cerebellar

  14. Measurement properties and feasibility of clinical tests to assess sit-to-stand/stand-to-sit tasks in subjects with neurological disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Paula F. S.; Quintino, Ludmylla F.; Franco, Juliane; Faria, Christina D. C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Subjects with neurological disease (ND) usually show impaired performance during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit tasks, with a consequent reduction in their mobility levels. Objective To determine the measurement properties and feasibility previously investigated for clinical tests that evaluate sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit in subjects with ND. Method A systematic literature review following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) protocol was performed. Systematic literature searches of databases (MEDLINE/SCIELO/LILACS/PEDro) were performed to identify relevant studies. In all studies, the following inclusion criteria were assessed: investigation of any measurement property or the feasibility of clinical tests that evaluate sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit tasks in subjects with ND published in any language through December 2012. The COSMIN checklist was used to evaluate the methodological quality of the included studies. Results Eleven studies were included. The measurement properties/feasibility were most commonly investigated for the five-repetition sit-to-stand test, which showed good test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient:ICC=0.94-0.99) for subjects with stroke, cerebral palsy and dementia. The ICC values were higher for this test than for the number of repetitions in the 30-s test. The five-repetition sit-to-stand test also showed good inter/intra-rater reliabilities (ICC=0.97-0.99) for stroke and inter-rater reliability (ICC=0.99) for subjects with Parkinson disease and incomplete spinal cord injury. For this test, the criterion-related validity for subjects with stroke, cerebral palsy and incomplete spinal cord injury was, in general, moderate (correlation=0.40-0.77), and the feasibility and safety were good for subjects with Alzheimer's disease. Conclusions The five-repetition sit-to-stand test was used more often in subjects with ND, and most of the measurement properties were

  15. Investigating Perfect Timesharing: The Relationship between IM-Compatible Tasks and Dual-Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvorson, Kimberly M.; Ebner, Herschel; Hazeltine, Eliot

    2013-01-01

    Why are dual-task costs reduced with ideomotor (IM) compatible tasks (Greenwald & Shulman, 1973; Lien, Proctor & Allen, 2002)? In the present experiments, we first examine three different measures of single-task performance (pure single-task blocks, mixed blocks, and long stimulus onset asynchrony [SOA] trials in dual-task blocks) and two…

  16. Investigating Perfect Timesharing: The Relationship between IM-Compatible Tasks and Dual-Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvorson, Kimberly M.; Ebner, Herschel; Hazeltine, Eliot

    2013-01-01

    Why are dual-task costs reduced with ideomotor (IM) compatible tasks (Greenwald & Shulman, 1973; Lien, Proctor & Allen, 2002)? In the present experiments, we first examine three different measures of single-task performance (pure single-task blocks, mixed blocks, and long stimulus onset asynchrony [SOA] trials in dual-task blocks) and two…

  17. Measuring Multi-tasking Ability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    world MT ability or performance. Consideration of the cognitive operations most likely tapped by the PRP procedure reveal its probable limitations...including error, decreased morale, high training costs, high turnover rates, and attrition. This research shows that it is now possible to develop a...very nature, stressful. Hence, many jobs that require MT also have high turnover rates and attrition. These jobs often require extensive training

  18. Effects of task demands on the early neural processing of fearful and happy facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Itier, Roxane J; Neath-Tavares, Karly N

    2017-05-15

    Task demands shape how we process environmental stimuli but their impact on the early neural processing of facial expressions remains unclear. In a within-subject design, ERPs were recorded to the same fearful, happy and neutral facial expressions presented during a gender discrimination, an explicit emotion discrimination and an oddball detection tasks, the most studied tasks in the field. Using an eye tracker, fixation on the face nose was enforced using a gaze-contingent presentation. Task demands modulated amplitudes from 200 to 350ms at occipito-temporal sites spanning the EPN component. Amplitudes were more negative for fearful than neutral expressions starting on N170 from 150 to 350ms, with a temporo-occipital distribution, whereas no clear effect of happy expressions was seen. Task and emotion effects never interacted in any time window or for the ERP components analyzed (P1, N170, EPN). Thus, whether emotion is explicitly discriminated or irrelevant for the task at hand, neural correlates of fearful and happy facial expressions seem immune to these task demands during the first 350ms of visual processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Reliable jitter and shimmer measurements in voice clinics: the relevance of vowel, gender, vocal intensity, and fundamental frequency effects in a typical clinical task.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Meike; Drinnan, Michael J; Storck, Claudio; Carding, Paul N

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine vowel and gender effects on jitter and shimmer in a typical clinical voice task while correcting for the confounding effects of voice sound pressure level (SPL) and fundamental frequency (F(0)). Furthermore the relative effect sizes of vowel, gender, voice SPL, and F(0) were assessed, and recommendations for clinical measurements were derived. With this cross-sectional single cohort study, 57 healthy adults (28 women, 29 men) aged 20-40 years were investigated. Three phonations of /a/, /o/, and /i/ at "normal" voice loudness were analyzed using Praat (software). The effects of vowel, gender, voice SPL, and F(0) on jitter and shimmer were assessed using descriptive and inferential (analysis of covariance) statistics. The effect sizes were determined with the eta-squared statistic. Vowels, gender, voice SPL, and F(0), each had significant effects either on jitter or on shimmer, or both. Voice SPL was the most important factor, whereas vowel, gender, and F(0) effects were comparatively small. Because men had systematically higher voice SPL, the gender effects on jitter and shimmer were smaller when correcting for SPL and F(0). Surprisingly, in clinical assessments, voice SPL has the single biggest impact on jitter and shimmer. Vowel and gender effects were clinically important, whereas fundamental frequency had a relatively small influence. Phonations at a predefined voice SPL (80 dB minimum) and vowel (/a/) would enhance measurement reliability. Furthermore, gender-specific thresholds applying these guidelines should be established. However, the efficiency of these measures should be verified and tested with patients. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  20. Creativity, Overinclusion, and Everyday Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottemiller, Dylan D.; Elliott, Colette Seter; Giovannetti, Tania

    2014-01-01

    This study examined relations between creative thinking and performance on routine, everyday tasks. Results were considered in light of past research on the putative relation between creativity and schizophrenia/psychotic thinking. Thirty healthy undergraduates completed the Alternative Uses Task, a measure of divergent thinking, and the 2 × 3…

  1. Creativity, Overinclusion, and Everyday Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottemiller, Dylan D.; Elliott, Colette Seter; Giovannetti, Tania

    2014-01-01

    This study examined relations between creative thinking and performance on routine, everyday tasks. Results were considered in light of past research on the putative relation between creativity and schizophrenia/psychotic thinking. Thirty healthy undergraduates completed the Alternative Uses Task, a measure of divergent thinking, and the 2 × 3…

  2. Service Excellence Task Force Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Buffalo. Univ. Libraries.

    A task force was appointed to measure user satisfaction with library services, establish a university libraries' service excellence philosophy and policy, bring the service excellence concept to the attention of every library employee, and recommend approaches for recognizing outstanding staff service. The members of the task force--two library…

  3. Facilitation of responses by task-irrelevant complex deviant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Schomaker, J; Meeter, M

    2014-05-01

    Novel stimuli reliably attract attention, suggesting that novelty may disrupt performance when it is task-irrelevant. However, under certain circumstances novel stimuli can also elicit a general alerting response having beneficial effects on performance. In a series of experiments we investigated whether different aspects of novelty--stimulus novelty, contextual novelty, surprise, deviance, and relative complexity--lead to distraction or facilitation. We used a version of the visual oddball paradigm in which participants responded to an occasional auditory target. Participants responded faster to this auditory target when it occurred during the presentation of novel visual stimuli than of standard stimuli, especially at SOAs of 0 and 200 ms (Experiment 1). Facilitation was absent for both infrequent simple deviants and frequent complex images (Experiment 2). However, repeated complex deviant images did facilitate responses to the auditory target at the 200 ms SOA (Experiment 3). These findings suggest that task-irrelevant deviant visual stimuli can facilitate responses to an unrelated auditory target in a short 0-200 millisecond time-window after presentation. This only occurs when the deviant stimuli are complex relative to standard stimuli. We link our findings to the novelty P3, which is generated under the same circumstances, and to the adaptive gain theory of the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system (Aston-Jones and Cohen, 2005), which may explain the timing of the effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurement and Analysis of Olfactory Responses with the Aim of Establishing an Objective Diagnostic Method for Central Olfactory Disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Tominori; Wang, Li-Qun; Miwakeichi, Fumikazu; Tonoike, Mitsuo; Kaneda, Teruo

    In order to establish a new diagnostic method for central olfactory disorders and to identify objective indicators, we measured and analyzed brain activities in the parahippocampal gyrus and uncus, region of responsibility for central olfactory disorders. The relationship between olfactory stimulation and brain response at region of responsibility can be examined in terms of fitted responses (FR). FR in these regions may be individual indicators of changes in brain olfactory responses. In the present study, in order to non-invasively and objectively measure olfactory responses, an odor oddball task was conducted on four healthy volunteers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a odorant stimulator with blast-method. The results showed favorable FR and activation in the parahippocampal gyrus or uncus in all subjects. In some subjects, both the parahippocampal gyrus and uncus were activated. Furthermore, activation was also confirmed in the cingulate gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus, superior temporal gyrus and insula. The hippocampus and uncus are known to be involved in the olfactory disorders associated with early-stage Alzheimer's disease and other olfactory disorders. In the future, it will be necessary to further develop the present measurement and analysis method to clarify the relationship between central olfactory disorders and brain activities and establish objective indicators that are useful for diagnosis.

  5. Task Prioritization in Dual-Tasking: Instructions versus Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Reinier J.; van Egmond, René; de Ridder, Huib

    2016-01-01

    The role of task prioritization in performance tradeoffs during multi-tasking has received widespread attention. However, little is known on whether people have preferences regarding tasks, and if so, whether these preferences conflict with priority instructions. Three experiments were conducted with a high-speed driving game and an auditory memory task. In Experiment 1, participants did not receive priority instructions. Participants performed different sequences of single-task and dual-task conditions. Task performance was evaluated according to participants’ retrospective accounts on preferences. These preferences were reformulated as priority instructions in Experiments 2 and 3. The results showed that people differ in their preferences regarding task prioritization in an experimental setting, which can be overruled by priority instructions, but only after increased dual-task exposure. Additional measures of mental effort showed that performance tradeoffs had an impact on mental effort. The interpretation of these findings was used to explore an extension of Threaded Cognition Theory with Hockey’s Compensatory Control Model. PMID:27391779

  6. Who Multi-Tasks and Why? Multi-Tasking Ability, Perceived Multi-Tasking Ability, Impulsivity, and Sensation Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Sanbonmatsu, David M.; Strayer, David L.; Medeiros-Ward, Nathan; Watson, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between personality and individual differences in multi-tasking ability. Participants enrolled at the University of Utah completed measures of multi-tasking activity, perceived multi-tasking ability, impulsivity, and sensation seeking. In addition, they performed the Operation Span in order to assess their executive control and actual multi-tasking ability. The findings indicate that the persons who are most capable of multi-tasking effectively are not the persons who are most likely to engage in multiple tasks simultaneously. To the contrary, multi-tasking activity as measured by the Media Multitasking In