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Sample records for odontogenic myxoma reconstructive

  1. [Odontogenic myxoma].

    PubMed

    Romero-Flores, Jovita; García-Huerta, Marco Antonio; Hernández-Miranda, Abel

    2012-01-01

    the odontogenic myxoma is a recurrent benign neoplasm that when it grows can generate pain, tooth mobility and dysesthesia. Prevalent in adults with an average between the 28.8 years and is rare in minors; It is more common in women. His prognosis is good after enucleation and its malignant transformation is rare. 53 years old woman who attended the service of maxillofacial surgery by increase of volume in right geniana region, without other symptoms; He referred traumatic background by fall of 5 m in height at age 33. Her studies were carried out laboratory; the results were normal. Computerized axial tomography revealed poorly delimited hipodensa central image. The histopathology of the incisional biopsy report indicated Odontogenic myxoma, so it was decided to resection in block, with margins of safety. In the follow-up to a year without complications or recurrence. described odontogenic myxoma presented in the right upper jaw, so it represented a challenge given the characteristics of the unusual location, it is crucial to recognize the progress of the lesion to individually regulate the therapeutic procedure.

  2. Mandibular odontogenic myxoma. Reconstructive considerations by means of the vascularized fibular free flap.

    PubMed

    González García, Raúl; Rodríguez Campo, Francisco J; Naval Gías, Luis; Muñoz Guerra, Mario F; Sastre Pérez, Jesús; Díaz González, Francisco J

    2006-11-01

    The odontogenic myxoma is a rare entity located in mandible and upper maxilla. Due to its local aggressiveness, wide surgical excision is mandatory. Several surgical techniques have been described for the reconstruction of segmental mandibular defects. In comparison with other free flaps, the vascularized free fibular flap (VFFF) supports the longest amount of bone and, due to the nature of the vascular supply a complete freedom in location of the osteotomy is present. A precise mandibular arc can be performed following bone resection. We suggest the performance of the in situ VFFF technique in order to recreate mandibular contour by means of several osteotomies, while the pedicle is still attached to the leg. Substantial decrease in surgical time is obtained. With the double-barrel technique and subsequent osseointegrated implants, good results are obtained in the reconstruction of dentate patients without maxillary atrophy. We present two new cases of large odontogenic mandibular myxoma. Wide surgical excision by means of hemimandibulectomies and subsequent reconstruction with VFFF were performed.

  3. Odontogenic myxoma involving the orbit in a 3-year-old boy: removal, reconstruction and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Teis Schjals; Danielsson, Lina Isabella; Fast, Søren; Thygesen, Torben H

    2016-02-17

    We present a rare case of a 3-year-old boy with an odontogenic myxoma (OM) involving the orbita. Including our case, only nine cases of OM have been reported to involve the eye in children.There is no gold standard for treatment of OM in children with orbital involvement. The recurrence rate of OM in children seems low, which advocates for less invasive surgery. A gentle resection of the OM was carried out. The floor and medial wall of the orbit was reconstructed immediately using a non-resorbable Medpor implant with passive adaptation. Reconstruction with a Medpor implant in children has rarely been reported in the literature. No clinical or radiological recurrence was observed 24 months after surgical removal, and the patient presented with symmetric appearance and normal vision.

  4. Odontogenic myxomas are not associated with GNAS1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Reinhard E; Scheuer, Hanna A; Assaf, Alexandre T; Grob, Tobias; Zustin, Jozef

    2012-05-01

    Myxomas are rare tumors of unknown aetiology arising in the jaws. Myxomas are also diagnosed in soft tissues. Recent reports on Gs alpha subunit gene (GNAS1) mutations occasionally being identified in soft tissue myxomas in non-syndromatic patients and the effects of myxoma on bone in variants of fibrous dysplasia led us to re-examine the putative role of GNAS1 mutations in odontogenic myxoma. Seven biopsies from patients with confirmed diagnosis of odontogenic myxoma and two cases of fibrous dyplasia of the jaw were investigated for GNAS1 mutations by polymerase chain reaction. Although GNAS1 was mutated in cases of fibrous dysplasia, no GNAS1 mutations were detected in odontogenic myxomas. The development of odontogenic myxoma is independent of mutations of GNAS1.

  5. Odontogenic myxoma of the maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Kaymakci, Mustafa; Yazici, Selçuk

    2011-01-01

    Myxomas are mostly seen in the 2th and 3rd decades. They rarely occur in childhood and maxillofacial region is rarely involved. The recurrence incidence is high. We report this unusual case occurring in a 9-year-old girl in the maxillofacial region and recurrence four months after initial treatment. PMID:24765377

  6. Odontogenic Myxoma of the Maxilla- A Rare case Report

    PubMed Central

    Subramaiam, Ramkumar; Narasimhan, Malathi; Giri, Veda; Kumar, Santhosh

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an uncommon, benign, locally invasive, non-metastasizing neoplasm arising from the odontogenic ectomesenchyme that usually occurs in the tooth bearing areas of the jaws. These lesions arouse special interest as they pose high diagnostic challenge. Here, we present a rare case of OM of the maxilla in an 18-year-old male. The clinical, radiographic and histopathological features of the lesion are discussed in this paper. PMID:26155585

  7. Condyloma acuminatum associated with odontogenic myxoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rajasekhar, G; Mushtaq, Mohammed; Vura, Nanda Gopal; Shekar, Ravi; Kumar, Sravan

    2009-12-01

    Condylomata acuminatum is a sexually transmitted infectious disease caused by human papiloma virus on the skin. The transmission is mainly by close contact with infected person and autoinoculation. In oral cavity the condition manifests as soft pink nodules which proliferate and coalesce rapidly to form diffuse papillomatous clusters of varying size. Odontogenic myxoma is a rare tumor of jaws which occurs in the tooth-bearing areas of the mandible and maxilla. It is an uncommon, benign, but locally aggressive neoplasm. This case report highlights a 17-year-old girl with two lesions in oral cavity with soft tissue growth on the palate which has been diagnosed as Condyloma Acuminatum, treated by surgical excision and a large swelling on the right side of the mandible in the same patient diagnosed as odontogenic myxoma where marginal resection was performed.

  8. Peripheral odontogenic myxoma in a 12-year-old girl: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Kanitkar, Sampada; Kamat, Mamata; Tamagond, Sridevi; Varekar, Aniruddha; Datar, Uma

    2017-06-01

    Peripheral odontogenic myxoma is a rare odontogenic tumor representing an extra osseous counterpart of central odontogenic myxoma. It is commonly seen in gingiva between the 3rd and 4th decades of life and appears predominantly in females. Compared to central odontogenic myxoma, it is a less aggressive, slow-growing lesion with a low recurrence rate. However, close postoperative follow-up is required because of the unlimited growth potential of incompletely removed lesions. It shares many features with other soft tissue myxoid proliferations occurring in the oral cavity and hence needs to be differentiated from them. Very few cases of peripheral odontogenic myxomas have been reported and, to the best of our knowledge, no case has been reported in a pediatric patient. We present an unusual case of peripheral odontogenic myxoma occurring in a 12-year-old girl located in the anterior mandibular gingiva, with an emphasis on differential diagnosis.

  9. Assessment of CD-105 as an Angiogenic Modulator in Odontogenic Myxomas and Dental Follicles.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen González-Galván, María; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Farfán-Morales, J Eduardo; Gainza-Cirauqui, Maria Luisa; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto

    2016-06-01

    Aim Odontogenic myxoma is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of the jaws, with a locally aggressive behavior and a high recurrence rate. CD-105 is a homodimeric cell membrane glycoprotein and is a component of the TGF-β1 growth factor receptor complex that modulates angiogenesis by regulating the proliferation, differentiation and cellular migration. The aim of this study is to quantify the microvascular density of the odontogenic myxoma based on the expression of CD-105. Materials and Methods The analysis included 18 odontogenic myxoma and 18 dental follicles as controls. A standard immunohistochemical procedure was performed with the CD-105 antibody. Five representative fields (40×) of the odontogenic myxoma and the dental follicles were selected to determine the microvascular density, which was then followed by a descriptive and comparative statistical analysis. Results Dental follicles presented a significantly higher microvascular density compared with odontogenic myxoma (P = .001). The odontogenic myxoma smaller than 3 cm showed a greater microvascular density than those larger than 3 cm in size (P > .05), and the microvascular density was lower in large odontogenic myxomas as compared with the dental follicles (P = .003). Conclusion A weaker expression of CD-105 in odontogenic myxoma might indicate a lower angiogenic activity, suggesting that vascular proliferation has a limited role in the growth mechanisms and in the aggressive behavior of this neoplasm. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Odontogenic myxoma in a 52-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Hari; Mehta, Gagan; Kumar, Manoj; Lone, Parveen

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare benign but locally aggressive tumour of the jaws. It is usually seen in the second to third decade of life. Women are more frequently affected than men and it has more predilections for the mandible rather than the maxilla. OM presents as an asymptomatic swelling in most of the cases. Owing to the non-capsulated and aggressive nature of OM, a high rate of recurrence has been reported. Here we present a case of OM in a 52-year-old woman managed by segmental mandibulectomy. Sign of recurrence was seen after 18 months of follow-up. PMID:24859552

  11. [Odontogenic myxoma of nasosinusal localization in a pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    Arjona Amo, M; Belmonte Caro, R; Valdivieso del Pueblo, C; Batista Cruzado, A; Torres Lagares, D; Gutiérrez Pérez, J L

    2011-04-01

    In the present study we report and discuss a case of odontogenic myxoma in a 13-month-old patient. Only two other reports have been published in the literature describing the occurrence of this type of tumor at an earlier age. Odontogenic myxoma is a benign mesenchymal neoplasm of the maxilla more common between the third and fourth decades of life. The case here reported is exceptional as it presents in an infant and, although some cases have been reported in the literature, this type of tumor is rare in early childhood. The most common locations include the ascending ramus and the angle of the jaw, although these tumors may also affect the upper maxilla, in which case they may involve the maxillary sinus. According to the review of the literature, these tumors show a recurrence rate of about 25%. Consequently, after the intraoperative clinical examination of the lesion and the assessment of the initial suspected diagnosis by means of intraoperative biopsy under general anesthesia, we carried out the resection of the tumor with wide margins at some points of the tumor location.

  12. Rare appearance of an odontogenic myxoma in cone-beam computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Dabbaghi, Arash; Nikkerdar, Nafiseh; Bayati, Soheyla; Golshah, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an infiltrative benign bone tumor that occurs almost exclusively in the facial skeleton. The radiographic characteristics of odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns, making diagnosis difficult. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may prove extremely useful in clarifying the intraosseous extent of the tumor and its effects on surrounding structures. Here, we report a case of odontogenic myxoma of the mandible in a 27-year-old female. The patient exhibited a slight swelling in the left mandible. Surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted. In the CBCT sections, we observed perforation of the cortical plate and radiopaque line that extended from the periosteum, resembling "sunray" appearance—a rare feature of OM—which could not be assessed by panoramic radiography. PMID:27092217

  13. Management of Recurrent Odontogenic Myxoma of Mandible: A Clinical Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Ankita; Varghese, K George; Dwivedi, Shailendra; Goyal, Vidhi

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic Myxoma (OM) is a slow growing painless locally aggressive tumor seen in gnathic bones and is generally asymptomatic. OM is characterized by spindle, wedge or stellate shaped cells loosely arranged in an abundant mucoid stroma. It is found incidentally on radiographs and may vary from a unilocular radiolucency to a multilocular lesion with well-defined or diffuse margins. Treatment includes surgical management that may range from simple enucleation and curettage to surgical excision including peripheral osteotomy, segmental resection, hemimandibulectomy and maxillectomy. Here we are presenting a case report on odontogenic myxoma with recurrence after conservative treatment. PMID:27891488

  14. The orosomucoid 1 protein (α1 acid glycoprotein) is overexpressed in odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a benign, but locally invasive, neoplasm occurring in the jaws. However, the molecules implicated in its development are unknown. OM as well as Dental Follicle (DF), an odontogenic tissue surrounding the enamel organ, is derived from ectomesenchymal/mesencyhmal elements. To identify some protein that could participate in the development of this neoplasm, total proteins from OM were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the profiles were compared with those obtained from DF, used as a control. Results We identified eight proteins with differential expression; two of them were downregulated and six upregulated in OM. A spot consistently overexpressed in odontogenic myxoma, with a molecular weight of 44-kDa and a pI of 3.5 was identified as the orosomucoid 1 protein. Western blot experiments confirmed the overexpression of this protein in odontogenic myxoma and immunohistochemical assays showed that this protein was mainly located in the cytoplasm of stellate and spindle-shaped cells of this neoplasm. Conclusion Orosomucoid 1, which belongs to a group of acute-phase proteins, may play a role in the modulation of the immune system and possibly it influences the development of OM. PMID:22888844

  15. Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a slow-growing odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Miranda Rius, Jaume; Nadal, Alfons; Lahor, Eduard; Mtui, Beatus; Brunet, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a subjacent tumoural pathology is reported. The patient was a 55-year-old black male, whose chief complaint was a progressive gingival overgrowth for more than ten years, in the buccal area of the anterior left mandible. According to the clinical features and the radiological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst, a conservative surgery with enucleation and curettage was performed. Tissue submitted for histopathological analysis rendered the diagnosis of odontogenic myxoma. After 12-month of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was found. Clinicians should be cautious when facing any gingival enlargement to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and to indicate the appropriate treatment. PMID:23722914

  16. Argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) in odontogenic myxoma (OM) and ameloblastic fibroma (AF).

    PubMed

    Martins, C; Carvalho, Y R; do Carmo, M A

    2001-09-01

    Ten cases of odontogenic myxoma (OM) and six cases of ameloblastic fibroma (AF) were subjected to comparative analysis by the AgNOR technique, in order to determine a possible difference in cell proliferation index between these lesions. The mean AgNOR number of the mesenchymal component of AF was compared with its epithelial component and the difference was not found to be statistically significant. The mean AgNOR index of the AF group was significantly higher than that of the OM group. Moreover, the mesenchymal component of AF demonstrated increased AgNOR numbers compared with that of OM (P<0.05). These results suggest that the epithelial and mesenchymal components of AF may have similar cell proliferative activity. However, the cell proliferative index of this lesion seems to be higher than that of OM.

  17. Osteo-cementum Producing Odontogenic Myxomas. A Literature Review of a Distinctive Variant.

    PubMed

    Rallis, George; Dais, Panagiotis; Kostakis, George; Stathopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-06-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a benign neoplasm of mesenchymal origin with growth characteristics, clinical behaviour and radiographic presentation similar to those of ameloblastoma. It is an intraosseous neoplasm characterized by stellate and spindleshaped cells embedded in loose myxoid or mucoid extracellular matrix. Although sometimes bony islands that represent residual trabeculae are found throughout the lesion, the formation of osteocement-like calcified spherules within the tumour is an extremely rare phenomenon. We report a very rare case of an OM of the left maxilla exhibiting osteo-cementous metaplasia within the substance of the tumour and beyond the facial skeleton, in the nasopharynx. A review of all four similar cases previously reported in the literature is also presented. Whether or not this property to produce significant amounts of bone can be associated with a different biological behavior for this specific variant of OM remains to be proved with the study of more similar cases.

  18. Odontogenic Cysts and Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Elizabeth Ann; Collins, Bobby M

    2017-03-01

    This article reviews a myriad of common and uncommon odontogenic cysts and tumors. The clinical presentation, gross and microscopic features, differential diagnosis, prognosis, and diagnostic pitfalls are addressed for inflammatory cysts (periapical cyst, mandibular infected buccal cyst/paradental cyst), developmental cysts (dentigerous, lateral periodontal, glandular odontogenic, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst), benign tumors (keratocystic odontogenic tumor, ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, ameloblastic fibroma and fibroodontoma, odontoma, squamous odontogenic tumor, calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, primordial odontogenic tumor, central odontogenic fibroma, and odontogenic myxomas), and malignant tumors (clear cell odontogenic carcinoma, ameloblastic carcinoma, ameloblastic fibrosarcoma). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term clinical and radiologic documentation of a maxillary odontogenic myxoma from early clinical signs to implant-supported prosthodontic rehabilitation: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sebastian; Hakl, Paul; Meier, Marius; Sutter, Walter; Kielbassa, Andrej M; Turhani, Dritan

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a non-metastasizing neoplasm of mesenchymal origin, arising in the tooth-bearing areas of the jaws. When regarding the whole spectrum of differential diagnoses for osteolytic jaw lesions, OM constitutes a benign tumor rarely located in the maxilla. Radiographically, displacement of teeth and frequent involvement of the sinus will be found with advanced maxillary OM. The tumor can be removed by means of several techniques, ranging from conservative measures to extended surgical procedures that differ according to type of bone resection and reconstruction of the defect. This report documents 10 years of follow-up in a patient suffering from a Type IV lesion of maxillary OM; with a radiographically proven growth extending into the right maxillary sinus, the patient underwent a segmental maxillectomy. After a tumor-free period of 5 years, the alveolar ridge splitting technique (ARST) was modified to insert dental implants into the horizontally deficient alveolar ridge of the maxilla, and final rehabilitation by means of a conditionally removable prosthetic reconstruction followed. In this paper, the most striking clinical signs of OM with which the dentist should be familiar are reviewed, and we discuss the advantages of segmental maxillectomy in case of an OM, along with the possibility of using ARST, aiming at prosthetic rehabilitation by placement of dental implants in cases of moderate alveolar ridge deficiency after tumor resection.

  20. Odontogenic myxoma: a 63-year retrospective multicenter study of 85 cases in a Brazil population and a review of 999 cases from literature.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ana Carolina Uchoa; Silveira, Felipe Martins; Gomes, Ana Paula Neutzling; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves; Sobral, Ana Paula Veras; de Arruda, José Alcides Almeida; Silva, Leorik Pereira da; Silveira, Marcia Maria Fonseca da; Barbosa, Larissa Ferreira; de Nazaré Alves de Oliveira Kato, Camila; Jaeger, Filipe; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida da; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2017-10-06

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an uncommon neoplasm of the jaws. Considering the importance of defining the relative incidence and demographic profile of these lesions in South America, the aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and imagiological features of OM from three South American oral pathology services and to discuss these findings in light of the literature. Data regarding age, gender, anatomic site and imagiological features from 85 cases of OM were collected. Additionally, we did a review of OM studies published in three electronic databases. Among 63,450 oral biopsies, 1,178 (1.85%) were odontogenic tumors (World Health Organization - 2017), of which 85 (7.21%) met the criteria of OM. The mean age was 30.7 years (range: 10-61 years; SD: 12.22). Forty-five (52.9%) cases occurred in females and 40 (47.1%) in males (ratio: 1:1.12). Maxilla was affected in 44 cases (53%) and mandible in 39 (47%). Of the 41 informed cases (48.2%), all of them were radiolucent lesions. The literature review indicated a majority of mean ages in third decade and a predilection for females, mandible and multilocular radiolucent lesions. The features of OM samples have strong similarity to that reported in studies from other continents. It is possible to infer that geographic variation does not help to explain some differences observed in the clinical features of OM. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Periocular Myxoma in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Ríos y Valles-Valles, Dolores; Vera-Torres, Ana María; Rodríguez-Martínez, Héctor A.; Rodríguez-Reyes, Abelardo A.

    2012-01-01

    Myxomas are locally invasive, benign mesenchymal neoplasms with odontogenic, osteogenic, or soft tissue origin. Facial myxomas probably account for less than 0.5% of all paranasal sinus and nasal tumors. We report a case of a left painless periocular mass in a 11-month-old girl. The lesion was resected with a clinical diagnosis of lacrimal sac tumor. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry proved the tumor to be a myxoma. There has been no recurrence after 4 years of followup. Midfacial myxomas should be differentiated from other benign and malignant tumors such as dermoid, hamartoma, neurofibroma, nasolacrimal duct cyst, and sarcomas in particular embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Because of the infiltrative nature of these tumors, a wide surgery is required to achieve clear resection margins and avoid recurrence. PMID:22606502

  2. Recurrent odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma (OGCC) at a reconstructed fibular flap: a case report with immunohistochemical findings.

    PubMed

    Li, B-H; Cho, Y-A; Kim, S-M; Kim, M-J; Hong, S-P; Lee, J-H

    2011-08-01

    Odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma (OGCC), a malignant counterpart of the odontogenic ghost cell tumor (OGCT), with aggressive growth characteristics, is exceedingly rare. A painful swelling in the jaw with local paresthesia is the most common symptom. We described a case of 47-year Korean woman who had a rare central epithelial odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma which recurred at reconstructed fibular flap. Immunohistochemical differences between OGCT and OGCC analyzed using primary and recurred surgical specimen. On the basis of this case, the tumor started as an OGCT and transformed into OGCC with highly aggressive, rapidly growing, infiltrative tumors. Our findings suggest that some of the cytokines produced by ghost cells may play important roles in causing extensive bone resorption in the odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma. Wide local excision with histologically clean margins is the treatment mode of selection. Also, we recommend close long-term surveillance of OGCT because of high recurrence and potential for malignancy transformation.

  3. Reconstruction of defects of maxillary sinus wall after removal of a huge odontogenic lesion using prebended 3D titanium-mesh and CAD/CAM technique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A 63 year-old male with a huge odontogenic lesion of sinus maxillaris was treated with computer-assisted surgery. After resection of the odontogenic lesion, the sinus wall was reconstructed with a prebended 3D titanium-mesh using CAD/CAM technique. This work provides a new treatment device for maxillary reconstruction via rapid prototyping procedures. PMID:22070833

  4. Nestin expression in odontoblasts and odontogenic ectomesenchymal tissue of odontogenic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, S; Hideshima, K; Ikeda, T

    2006-01-01

    Background Nestin, one of the intermediate filaments constituting the cytoskeleton, is a marker of neural stem cells or progenitor cells. Its expression is also related to tooth development and repair of dentine. Aims The aim of this study was to investigate nestin expression in various odontogenic tumours and evaluate its usefulness for histopathological diagnosis. Methods We studied formalin fixed, paraffin embedded specimens from 129 cases of odontogenic tumours and 9 of mandibular intraosseous myxoma. After characterisation of odontogenic ectomesenchymal tissues in these tumours using antibodies to vimentin, desmin, neurofilament, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, we immunohistochemically examined nestin expression. Results No differentiation towards muscle and nervous tissues was found in the odontogenic ectomesenchymal tissues. Although almost all the ameloblastomas and malignant ameloblastomas were negative for nestin, odontogenic ectomesenchyme in the odontogenic mixed tumours demonstrated nestin immunolocalisation, particularly in the region adjacent to the odontogenic epithelium. Odontoblasts and their processes, pulp cells near the positive odontoblasts, and flat cells adhering to the dentine showed immunoreaction with nestin in the odontomas and odontoma‐like component in the ameloblastic fibro‐odontomas. Neoplastic cells in almost half cases of jaw myxoma and one case of odontogenic fibroma expressed nestin. Conclusions The distribution of nestin in the odontogenic mixed tumours suggests that nestin expression in the odontogenic ectomesenchyme is upregulated by stimulation from odontogenic epithelium. In addition, nestin may also be involved in the differentiation from pulp cells to odontoblasts in odontogenic tumours. Therefore, nestin is a useful marker for the odontogenic ectomesenchyme and odontoblasts in odontogenic tumours. Nestin, one of the intermediate filaments constituting the cytoskeleton, is a marker of neural stem cells or

  5. DNA methyltransferase immunohistochemical expression in odontogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Douglas Magno; Antunes, Daniella Moraes; Duarte, Carina Magalhães Esteves; Ferro, Leonardo Borges; Nunes, Fabio Daumas

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic tumours are a heterogeneous group of lesions formed from tissues that give rise to the tooth. DNA methylation, a covalent addition of a methyl group to the 5-carbon position of a cytosine nucleotide, is considered an important regulator of gene expression. The addition of the methyl radical is catalysed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). Although some epigenetic studies have been conducted in odontogenic tumours, a study with the three types of DNMTs in several different members of this group is missing. This study analyses the expression of DNMTs in odontogenic tumours. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 20 ameloblastomas, 10 calcifying cystic odontogenic tumours, 10 calcifying epithelial tumours, 10 adenomatoid odontogenic tumours, 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumours, five ameloblastic fibromas, two ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, four central odontogenic fibromas, seven peripheral odontogenic fibromas and 10 odontogenic myxomas were included. Immunohistochemical expression of DNMT1, 3A and 3B was assessed using a semi-quantitative analysis, and also a correlation with p21, p27 and E-cadherin immunoexpression was made. DNMT1, 3A and 3B were expressed in the nucleus and/or cytoplasm of all odontogenic tumours. DNMT1 expression was directly correlated with p27 expression in ameloblastomas. The high expression of DNMTs in odontogenic tumour cells suggests methylation as an important mechanism for this group of tumours. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P < 0.001). The intensity of MFs was significantly higher in odontogenic tumors compared to odontogenic cysts (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between odontogenic tumors, except between UAM and OM (P = 0.041). The difference between OKC and odontogenic tumors was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors. PMID:27092213

  7. A case of central carcinoma of the mandible arising from a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst: delineation of surgical margins and reconstruction with bilateral rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flaps.

    PubMed

    Ota, Y; Karakida, K; Watanabe, D; Miyasaka, M; Tsukinoki, K

    1998-10-01

    A case of central carcinoma of the mandible arising from a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst is reported. A 38-year-old man was admitted to the Tokai University Hospital due to postoperative infection of a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst of the left mandible. He had had a cystectomy for an odontogenic keratocyst 4 years ago. The lesion revealed bony destruction of the mandible with worm-eating shaped margins with extension to the facial skin. A biopsy specimen revealed squamous cell carcinoma. The mandible was resected with facial skin and the sublingual space was dissected to preserve the lingual nerve. The oral and the facial resections were reconstructed with a titanium plate and bilateral rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flaps. The plate was removed due to infection around the margins and readjustment of the flaps was conducted 5 months after the surgery. He has not had a local relapse, metastasis, or incisional hernia for 8 months following surgery. Good occlusion has been attained by the residual mandible, and he is able to eat without any problems.

  8. A 10-year retrospective study on odontogenic tumors in Iran.

    PubMed

    Taghavi, Nasim; Rajabi, Moones; Mehrdad, Leili; Sajjadi, Samad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review cases of odontogenic tumors diagnosed in two pathology centers in Tehran, Iran, during a 10-year period. Patients' records were seen at two teaching pathology Centre's of Shahid Beheshti University between the months of March 2000 to 2010 with histologic diagnosis of any type of odontogenic tumors. The records were analyzed for frequency, age, sex, site, as well as clinical, radiographic and histopathologic findings. Of 30706 biopsies, 4767 (15.5%) cases were diagnosed as oral and maxillofacial lesions. Among these, 720 cases were tumoral with 188 (26.1%) cases of odontogenic tumors. Tumors with odontogenic epithelium origin formed 70.2% of total numbers of odontogenic tumors. Mixed odontogenic tumors and tumors of odontogenic ectomesenchyme comprised 12.2% and 17.5% of the cases respectively. Ameloblastoma, with a frequency of 62.2% was the most common tumor in this review which was followed by odontoma and odontogenic myxoma. Although there are few studies on odontogenic tumors in literature, the comparison of our results with existing data shows significant differences in the distribution of tumors and age of patients, which may be due to ethnic features and geographic distribution of patients. Future studies on other ethnic groups are essential for further clarification of the findings in this research.

  9. The left atrial "Medusa myxoma".

    PubMed

    Williams, Elbert E; Pratt, Jerry W; Martin, David E

    2014-02-01

    Although myxomas are the most commonly seen primary cardiac tumors, encompassing 30% to 50% of all primary tumors of the heart, they remain a rare finding with an annual reported incidence of 0.5 per million. The presenting symptoms of an atrial myxoma are widely varied as are the clinical consequences. Regardless of presentation, once a diagnosis is made prompt surgical excision is recommended to minimize the potential complications of obstruction or embolization. We present the "Medusa myxoma," an arborizing 4-fingered left atrial myxoma extending from the fossa ovalis across the left atrium.

  10. Atrial Myxoma: A Case Presentation and Review

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ronny; Singh, Gagandeep; Mena, Derrick; Garcia, Christine A.; Loarte, Pablo; Mirrer, Brooks

    2012-01-01

    Myxomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors, most frequently found in the left atrium. We present a case of an atrial myxoma. An in-depth review of atrial myxoma is presented, examining the important clinical symptoms and diagnostic indicators. The treatment of atrial myxoma is then discussed, with an emphasis on current therapies. An extensive literature review has been performed to present a comprehensive review of the causes, pathophysiology of atrial myxoma.

  11. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of liesegang rings in odontogenic cysts: analysis of three-dimensional image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Scivetti, Michele; Lucchese, Alberta; Crincoli, Vito; Pilolli, Giovanni Pietro; Favia, Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    Liesegang rings are concentric noncellular lamellar structures, occasionally found in inflammatory tissues. They have been confused with various parasites, algas, calcification, and psammoma bodies. The authors examined Liesegang rings from oral inflammatory cysts by both optical and confocal laser scanning microscopy, and perfomed a three-dimensional reconstruction. These investigations indicate that Liesegang rings are composed of multiple birefringent concentric rings, resulting from a progressive deposition of organic substances, with an unclear pathogenesis.

  12. Odontogenic tumors in Mexico: a collaborative retrospective study of 349 cases.

    PubMed

    Mosqueda-Taylor, A; Ledesma-Montes, C; Caballero-Sandoval, S; Portilla-Robertson, J; Ruíz-Godoy Rivera, L M; Meneses-García, A

    1997-12-01

    Reports about the frequency of odontogenic tumors are scarce, and diagnostic criteria used in the reports are not uniform. This article presents the results of a retrospective study of odontogenic tumors recorded in four services of diagnostic pathology in Mexico City (two dental schools, one cancer hospital, and one private oral pathology service). The final diagnosis in each case was based on the 1992 histologic criteria of the World Health Organization. The frequency of odontogenic tumors, expressed as a percent of all oral and maxillofacial specimens, ranged from 0.8% in the cancer hospital (0.02% of all biopsies) to 3.7% in the private oral pathology service. The frequency was identical for the two dental schools (2.5%). We found a total of 349 odontogenic tumors; of these, 345 were benign (98.8%), and 4 (1.1%) were malignant (3 were primary intraosseous carcinomas and 1 was a malignant ameloblastoma). The most frequently occurring tumors were odontoma (34.6%), ameloblastoma (23.7%), myxoma (17.7%), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (7.1%), and calcifying odontogenic cyst (6.8%). Although relatively rare, odontogenic tumors are still an important cause of extensive surgical procedures in Mexico.

  13. Defects of the Carney complex gene (PRKAR1A) in odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Sílvia F; Gomez, Ricardo S; Diniz, Marina G; Bernardes, Vanessa F; Soares, Flávia F C; Brito, João Artur R; Liu, Sophie; Pontes, Hélder Antônio R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Gomes, Carolina C

    2015-06-01

    The surgical treatment of some odontogenic tumors often leads to tooth and maxillary bone loss as well as to facial deformity. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in the pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors may result in alternative molecular therapies. The PRKAR1A gene displays a loss of protein expression as well as somatic mutations in odontogenic myxomas, an odontogenic ectomesenchymal neoplasm. We used a combination of quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis, and direct sequencing of all PRKAR1A exons to assess if this gene is altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. Thirteen tumors were included in the study: six ameloblastic fibromas, four ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, one ameloblastic fibrodentinoma, and two ameloblastic fibrosarcomas. The epithelial components of the tumors were separated from the mesenchymal by laser microdissection in most of the cases. We also searched for odontogenic pathology in Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice. PRKAR1A mRNA/protein expression was decreased in the benign mixed odontogenic tumors in association with LOH at markers around the PRKAR1A gene. We also detected a missense and two synonymous mutations along with two 5'-UTR and four intronic mutations in mixed odontogenic tumors. Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice did not show evidence of odontogenic tumor formation, which indicates that additional genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of such tumors, at least in rodents. We conclude that the PRKAR1A gene and its locus are altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. PRKAR1A expression is decreased in a subset of tumors but not in all, and Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice do not show abnormalities, which indicates that additional genes play a role in this tumor's pathogenesis. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  14. Odontogenic epithelial stem cells: hidden sources.

    PubMed

    Padma Priya, Sivan; Higuchi, Akon; Abu Fanas, Salem; Pooi Ling, Mok; Kumari Neela, Vasantha; Sunil, P M; Saraswathi, T R; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Kumar, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    The ultimate goal of dental stem cell research is to construct a bioengineered tooth. Tooth formation occurs based on the well-organized reciprocal interaction of epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The dental mesenchymal stem cells are the best explored, but because the human odontogenic epithelium is lost after the completion of enamel formation, studies on these cells are scarce. The successful creation of a bioengineered tooth is achievable only when the odontogenic epithelium is reconstructed to produce a replica of natural enamel. This article discusses the untapped sources of odontogenic epithelial stem cells in humans, such as those present in the active dental lamina in postnatal life, in remnants of dental lamina (the gubernaculum cord), in the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, and in reduced enamel epithelium. The possible uses of these stem cells in regenerative medicine, not just for enamel formation, are discussed.

  15. [Carney's Complex: familial cardiac myxoma].

    PubMed

    Guerra, Miguel S; Santos, Nelson; Neves, Fátima; Carlos Mota, João; Miranda, José António; Vouga, Luis

    2006-01-01

    The Carney Complex is a very rare autosomal dominant disease including multiple neoplasia syndrome. This syndrome was initially described in 1985 under the rubric "...the complex of myxomas, spotty pigmentation, and endocrine overactivity". We present a case report of an old woman with Carney Complex who had the characteristic features of facial hirsutism and acromegalic facies, a large pigmented swelling over the face and a cardiac myxoma arising from the left atrium. We emphasize the need for periodic echocardiographic screening of patients and family members.

  16. Odontogenic tumors: A collaborative study of 218 cases diagnosed over 12 years and comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nazlım, Sinan; Etoz, Meryem; Denız, Kemal; Yasa, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to analyze the frequency and distribution of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in the Cappadocia region of Turkey, and to compare the findings with those reported in the literature. Study Design: The records of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Pathology Departments at Erciyes University, with histologic diagnosis of odontogenic tumors (based on the World Health Organization classification, 2005), over a 12-year period, were analyzed. The relative frequency of different types of tumors was also analyzed and compared with the literature. Results: OTs in the present study constituted 2.74% of all the 7,942 registered biopsies. A total of 218 cases of OTs were collected and reviewed. Of these, (94.04%) were benign and (5.96%) were malignant. The mandible was the most commonly affected anatomic location, with 170 cases (77.9%). Ameloblastoma with a predilection for the posterior mandible was the most frequent odontogenic tumor (30.28%), followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (19.5%), odontoma (13.4%), and odontogenic myxoma (8.5%). Conclusions: OTs are rare neoplasms and appear to show geographic variations in the world. In Cappadocia, Turkey, they are more common in the mandible, with ameloblastoma followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumors with the incidences observed in the present study being similar to those of previous studies from Asia and Africa, and in contrast to those reported from American countries. Key words:Odontogenic tumors, WHO classification, prevalence, jaws. PMID:25481228

  17. Odontogenic carcinosarcoma of the mandible: a case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Pae, Sang-Pill; Cho, Hyun-Young; Cho, Hyun-Woo; Seo, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Dong-Hwan; Park, In-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic carcinosarcoma is an extremely rare malignant odontogenic tumor with only a few reported cases. It is characterized by a true mixed tumor showing malignant cytology of both epithelial and mesenchymal components. It has been assumed to arise from pre-existing lesions such as ameloblastoma, ameloblastic fibroma, and ameloblastic fibrosarcoma. To date, the reported cases have exhibited considerably aggressive clinical behavior. The case of an odontogenic carcinosarcoma in the mandible of a 61-year-old male is described herein. The tumor destroyed the cortex of the mandible and invaded the adjacent tissues. Treatment was performed by surgical resection and reconstruction. The purposes of this article are to introduce odontogenic carcinosarcoma through this case study, to distinguish it from related diseases and to discuss features of the tumor in the existing literature. PMID:26131431

  18. Non-odontogenic toothache.

    PubMed

    Okeson, J P

    2000-01-01

    Toothache is a common complaint in the dental office. Most toothaches have their origin in the pulpal tissues of periodontal structures. These odontogenic pains are managed well and predictably by dental therapies. Non-odontogenic toothaches are often difficult to identify and can challenge the diagnostic ability of the clinician. The most important step toward proper management of toothache is to be suspicious that the pain may not be of dental origin. The cardinal warning symptoms of non-odontogenic toothache are as follow: A. Spontaneous multiple toothaches. B. Inadequate local dental cause for the pain. C. Stimulating, burning, non-pulsatile toothaches. D. Constant, unremitting, non-variable toothaches. E. Persistent, recurrent toothaches. F. Local anesthetic blocking of the offending tooth does not eliminate the pain. G. Failure of the toothache to respond to reasonable dental therapy.

  19. Left ventricular myxoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wei; Wang, Liming; Chen, Xin; Liu, Peisheng; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac myxoma, the most common primary heart tumor, is located mainly in the left atrium. We reported a rare case of left ventricular myxoma incidentally found on echocardiography in an asymptomatic 60-year-old male. The tumor was carefully resected without fragmentation. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged home on the 4th postoperative day. Surgical resection of this type of cardiac myxoma is recommended due to the rarity of tumor location. PMID:25469121

  20. Primordial odontogenic tumour: clinicopathological analysis of six cases of a previously undescribed entity.

    PubMed

    Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Pires, Fabio Ramoa; Aguirre-Urízar, José Manuel; Carlos-Bregni, Roman; de la Piedra-Garza, José Mario; Martínez-Conde, Rafael; Martínez-Mata, Guillermo; Carreño-Álvarez, Sergio J; da Silveira, Henrique Martins; de Barros Dias, Bruno Santos; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2014-11-01

    To describe the clinicopathological and immuno-histochemical features of six tumours that do not fulfil the criteria of any of the currently classified odontogenic tumours. The patients were three males and three females, whose ages ranged from 3 years to 18 years (mean, 11.05 years). In all cases there were well-defined radiolucencies associated with unerupted teeth apparently showing a pericoronal relationship. Microscopically, all tumours were composed of variably cellular loose fibrous tissue with areas similar to dental papilla, entirely surrounded by cuboidal to columnar epithelium resembling the internal epithelium of the enamel organ. Mesenchymal tissue was positive only for vimentin, and Ki67 expression was very low (<2%). The epithelium was positive for CK AE1/AE3, CK5, CK14, and CK19, but negative for CK18 and CK20. All cases showed clear demarcation from the surrounding bone, and were surgically removed, with no recurrences after follow-up ranging from 6 months to 20 years. These findings differ from those observed in other odontogenic lesions, such as ameloblastic fibroma, odontogenic myxoma, odontogenic fibroma, and hyperplastic dental follicles. The term primordial odontogenic tumour is proposed to describe this novel lesion. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Transforming growth factor beta 2 in epithelial differentiation of developing teeth and odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Heikinheimo, K; Happonen, R P; Miettinen, P J; Ritvos, O

    1993-01-01

    Dysregulation of TGF beta 2, a modulator of cell growth and differentiation, can result in uncontrolled growth and tumor formation. Our comparative studies on the expression of TGF beta 2 mRNA and protein indicate that TGF beta 2 may primarily be a regulator of epithelial differentiation during tooth development (between 13 and 20 gestational wk) and tumorigenesis of odontogenic neoplasms. A paracrine mode of action for TGF beta 2 in early human tooth germ (cap/early bell stage) is suggested by location of mRNA in the mesenchyme surrounding the tooth germ, whereas protein is found in the epithelial dental lamina and enamel organ. During the late bell stage, TGF beta 2 gene expression shifted from the mesenchyme to the odontogenic epithelium and was colocalized with protein, suggesting an autocrine role for the terminal differentiation of ameloblasts. In odontogenic tumors of epithelial origin (ameloblastomas) and epithelial-ectomesencymal origin (ameloblastic fibromas), TGF beta 2 mRNA was mostly located in the mesenchymal tumor component and protein in the epithelial tumor component. Odontogenic ectomesenchymal tumors (myxomas) were not associated with TGF beta 2 mRNA and protein expression. The results imply that TGF beta 2 may play an important role in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in human tooth morphogenesis and development of odontogenic tumors. Images PMID:8450031

  2. Left atrial myxoma masquerading as viral flu

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Lovely; Kiernan, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is a rare cardiac tumor that may be diagnosed incidentally on cardiac imaging or may present with life-threatening cardiac symptoms. We present a case of giant left atrial myxoma that presented as a flulike illness. PMID:27695187

  3. An unusual presentation of atrial myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Anpalakhan, Shaemala; Ramasamy, Dewi; Fan, Kin Sing

    2014-01-01

    Myxomas are uncommon primary cardiac tumours that usually affect the left atrium. We herein report the case of a patient who presented with right heart failure and proteinuria, leading to the diagnosis of atrial myxoma. Surgical resection resulted in resolution of the patient’s symptoms. PMID:25631903

  4. Spinal cord ischemia and left atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Hirose, G; Kosoegawa, H; Takado, M; Shimazaki, K; Murakami, E

    1979-07-01

    A 62-year-old man had an acute, transient, flaccid paraplegia. Examination showed a primary cardiac tumor with emboli to major branches of the aorta. A myxoma was removed from the left atrium, and normal function returned. Left atrial myxoma should be suspected as a cause for embolism to the CNS.

  5. [Secondary pulmonary embolism to right atrial myxoma].

    PubMed

    Vico Besó, L; Zúñiga Cedó, E

    2013-10-01

    A case of pulmonary thromboembolism secondary to atrial myxoma right. The myxoma is a primary cardiac tumor, namely, has his origin in the cardiac tissue. Primary cardiac tumors are rare, including myxomas, the most common type. Have a predilection for females and the most useful tool for diagnosis is echocardiography. About 75% of myxomas occur in the left atrium of the heart and rest are in the right atrium. Right atrial myxomas in some sometimes associated with tricuspid stenosis and atrial fibrillation. The most common clinical manifestations include symptoms of this neoplasm constitutional, and embolic phenomena resulting from the obstruction to the flow intracavitary. The treatment of this condition is surgical. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Cystic Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sonal; Rahim, Ahmed Mujib Bangalore; Parakkat, Nithin Kavassery; Kapoor, Shekhar; Mittal, Kumud; Sharma, Bhushan; Shivappa, Anil Bangalore

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor (AOT) is a well-established benign epithelial lesion of odontogenic origin. Rightfully called “the master of disguise,” this lesion has been known for its varied clinical and histoarchitectural patterns. Not only does AOT predominantly present radiologically as a unilocular cystic lesion enclosing the unerupted tooth (which is commonly mistaken as a dentigerous cyst) but the lesion also presents rarely with a cystic component histopathologically. We present one such unusual case of cystic AOT associated with an impacted canine, mimicking a dentigerous cyst. The present case aims to highlight the difference between cystic AOT and dentigerous cyst radiographically. The exact histogenesis of AOT and its variants still remains obscure. An attempt has been made to hypothesize the new school of thought regarding the origin of AOT. PMID:26579317

  7. [Botryoid odontogenic cyst].

    PubMed

    Chbicheb, S; Bennani, A; Taleb, B; Wady, W El

    2008-04-01

    The botryoid odontogenic cyst (BOC) is a developmental cyst of odontogenic epithelial origin considered as a rare multilocular variety of lateral periodontal cyst (WHO 1992). This cystic lesion site is in the periodontal space of vital teeth. A 21-year-old woman consulted for a swelling of the anterior maxillary region. The clinical examination revealed bucal swelling extending from the left central incisor to the first left premolar. The mucosa was normal. The adjacent teeth were vital. X-ray revealed a bilocular radiolucency extending between the roots of teeth 21 and 24. The lesion was enucleated, under local anaesthesia via a vestibular approach. Histology was typical of a BOC with cystic spaces lined by squamous epithelium with thickening and clear cells. Forty-eight months after surgery, there was sign of recurrence. BOC is known to be a recurrent odontogenic cyst. Several cases of multiple recurrences have been reported up to nine years after the initial surgery. Long-term follow-up is thus mandatory.

  8. Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumour of the Mandible: An Unusually Aggressive Presentation of an Indolent Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Dev, DP Arul; Michael, Manoj Joseph; Akhilesh, AV; Das, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumour (CEOT) or Pindborg tumour is a rare odontogenic tumour of epithelial origin. They constitute less than 1% of odontogenic tumours. Intra-ossseous variant of CEOT are more common compared to extra-osseous variant. Although benign, these can exhibit deceptively aggressive presentation. Here we report a rare case of CEOT in a 36-year-old female patient who presented with aggressive intra-osseous lesion with cortical breach and exuberant soft tissue proliferation. The lesion was treated with resection and reconstructed with titanium reconstruction plate. PMID:27790590

  9. Huge cardiac myxoma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Traisrisilp, Kuntharee; Kanjanavanit, Rungsrit; Taksaudom, Noppon; Lorsomradee, Suraphong

    2017-07-31

    A 28-year-old pregnant woman presented at 28 weeks of gestation. She was diagnosed to have a left atrial myxoma 2 years earlier, but was lost to follow-up. During this pregnancy, the transthoracic echocardiography showed a 9 cm mass in the left atrium obstructing mitral valve inflow, interfering with mitral valve closure, causing severe mitral regurgitation and severe pulmonary hypertension. However, there were no clinical signs of pulmonary and systemic congestion or obstruction. Based on the clinical symptoms of the patient, the echocardiographic findings and the term of her pregnancy, the patient decided to schedule for a vaginal delivery with surgical correction after delivery. She gave birth at 32 weeks of gestation. During labour, pulmonary oedema developed but was detected early and it responded to therapy. Two weeks after delivery, a right anterior thoracotomy was performed to facilitate the removal of the left atrial myxoma and repair of the mitral valve. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Intrascrotal Muscular Myxoma - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Debata, Prasanna Kumar; Mohanty, Ramakant; Barad, Jitendra Kumar; Debata, Debasis

    2017-01-01

    Myxomas are gelatinous tumours that commonly appear as circumscribed masses situated within muscles. It can occur at various sites. However, mostly found in cardiac muscles and skeletal muscles of extremities. Published cases of intrascrotal myxoma are rare in literature. A 28-year-old male was admitted to our General Surgery Department with a history of a gradually enlarging mass in the scrotum and scrotal discomfort since two years. After cytological and imaging investigations, a scrotal exploration was performed with plexiform neurofibroma as the preoperative diagnosis. Histopathological examination of the specimen revealed features of intramuscular myxoma. Although a relatively rare diagnosis, intramuscular myxoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis of testicular and paratesticular tumours.

  11. Hybrid odontogenic tumor of calcifying odontogenic cyst and ameloblastic fibroma.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Hoon; Kim, Hyung Jun; Yook, Jong In; Cha, In Ho; Ellis, Gary L; Kim, Jin

    2004-07-01

    Odontogenic tumors composed of 2 distinct types of lesions are unusual. We report an odontogenic tumor that was composed of calcifying odontogenic cyst and ameloblastic fibroma that occurred in the right posterior maxilla of a 22-year-old Korean woman. The tumor had a cystic component with an ameloblastic epithelial lining and conglomerates of so-called ghost cells, and there were deposits of dentinoid material adjacent to the cyst. These are features characteristic of calcifying odontogenic cyst. Enamel organ-like epithelial islands were observed within a dental papilla-like stroma of the cyst wall. Additionally, a solid portion of the tumor had characteristic features of ameloblastic fibroma, i.e., a myxoid cellular stroma with numerous elongated islands of ameloblastic epithelium. Ghost cell masses were found in the area of ameloblastic fibroma as well. The distribution of the ghost cells suggests that this is a hybrid lesion rather than a collision tumor.

  12. Infected Cardiac Myxoma: an Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aims to present an updated clinical picture of the infected cardiac myxoma. Revankar & Clark made a systematic review of infected cardiac myxoma based on the literature before 1998. Since then, there has not been any updated information describing its recent changing trends. METHODS A comprehensive literature search of infected cardiac myxoma was conducted on MEDLINE, Highwire Press and Google between 1998 and 2014. RESULTS In comparison with Revankar & Clark's series, the present series disclosed a significantly decreased overall mortality. It is believed that refinement of the prompt diagnosis and timely management (use of sensitive antibiotics and surgical resection of the infected myxoma) have resulted in better outcomes of such patients. CONCLUSION The present series of infected cardiac myxoma illustrated some aggravated clinical manifestations (relative more occasions of high-grade fever, multiple embolic events and the presence of refractory microorganisms), which should draw enough attention to careful diagnosis and treatment. In general, the prognosis of infected cardiac myxoma is relatively benign and the long-term survival is always promising. PMID:26735605

  13. Benign paediatric mandibular tumours: experience in reconstruction using vascularised fibula.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamoon; Tamimy, Muhammad Sarmad; Ehtesham-Ul-Haq; Sarwar, Saad Ur Rahman; Rizvi, Syed Taokeer Ahmed

    2012-12-01

    The majority of the paediatric oral and maxillofacial tumours are benign and the mandible is involved in one-third of these cases. A review of the literature reveals only a handful of studies pertaining exclusively to benign paediatric mandibular tumours. The basis of this study was to fulfil the need to assess the suitability of major mandibular reconstructions using a vascularised fibular graft in cases of benign tumours in children. From April 1999 to April 2011 we have managed 18 cases of benign paediatric mandibular tumours. All the reconstructions were done using vascularised fibular graft. The age of these patients ranged from 8 to 16 years. The most common pathology seen in our series was Ameloblastoma, followed by Giant Cell Granuloma and vascular malformation. Other cases included fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst and odontogenic myxoma. Five of these were recurrent lesions. The mean length of the fibula harvested was 12 ± 2 cm. All the flaps in this series survived. Bone union occurred in all cases by 6 weeks. All the patients have maintained a satisfactory chin contour of the mandible during the follow-up period with minimal distortion occurring secondary to contralateral native mandibular growth in two cases. We conclude that, for benign paediatric mandibular tumours requiring major bone resection, the vascularised fibula is an excellent reconstructive option with the advantages of having a good bone stock, possibility for osteotomy, long pedicle length and potential for growth along with the possibility of dental rehabilitation.

  14. Valuable Radiographic Tool for Odontogenic Jaw Keratocyst Diagnosis and Surgical Planning

    PubMed Central

    Lai, R-F; Li, Z-J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical use of cone beam computed tomography in the diagnosis of patients with odontogenic jaw keratocyst and to guide computer-aided surgical treatment planning. Methods: Imaging, image processing, and visualization technologies were used to produce clear diagnosis, provide proper treatment, and formulate favourable prognosis. Cone beam computed tomography was used to collect medical information including site, extent, shape, and other characteristic features of a patient with large odontogenic jaw keratocyst. Results: The imaging technique produced excellent results in imaging, image processing and threedimensional (3D) visualization. Conclusion: The 3D digital reconstruction model of the odontogenic jaw keratocyst was shown intuitively. PMID:25429483

  15. Atrial myxoma: a rare cause of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Negi, R C; Chauhan, Vivek; Sharma, Brij; Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Thakur, Surinder

    2013-04-01

    Arial myxoma can present as stroke and should be considered as a differential diagnosis of stroke in young individuals. We present here a 42 years female who presented with sudden loss of conciousness. After extensive work up for young stroke, left atrial myxoma was detected and tumor was removed surgically and histopathological report was consistent with the atrial myxoma.

  16. Report of Two Cases of Combined Odontogenic Tumors: Ameloblastoma with Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastic Fibroma with Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Ashley Nicole; Montague, Lindsay; Cohen, Donald; Islam, Nadim; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel

    2015-09-01

    Combined odontogenic neoplasms have rarely been documented. Such tumors have also been described by other researchers as "hybrid" lesions. The histologic features are often identical to other individually well-established odontogenic neoplasms such as ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, ameloblastic fibroma (AF), and ameloblastic fibro-odontoma. Their clinical presentation is variable, ranging from cysts to neoplasms showing varying degrees of aggressive behavior. Most combined tumors contain features of one of the odontogenic tumors in combination with either a calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) or a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. We present two new cases of combined odontogenic tumors: an ameloblastoma with an odontogenic keratocyst and an AF with COC. Predicting clinical outcome is challenging when a combination tumor is encountered due to the paucity of such lesions. One must understand salient features of these entities and differentiate them from the more common conventional neoplasms to expand classification and provide prognostic criteria.

  17. Odontogenic tumors in Port Harcourt: South–South geopolitical zone of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Iyogun, CA; Omitola, OG; Ukegheson, GE

    2016-01-01

    Aim: A retrospective study of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in Port Harcourt was undertaken to establish its prevalence and compare with known data in the literature from Nigeria and elsewhere. Materials and Methods: All pathologically diagnosed OTs between 2008 and 2013 at the archives of the Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Biology of the University of Port Harcourt/University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital were retrospectively studied and classified according to the 2005 WHO classification of OTs and allied diseases. These were recorded into a computer and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 21.0, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: A total of sixty-three cases of OTs were recorded for the period under review. Fifty-two of these were cases of ameloblastoma (82.54%). This was followed by adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) 4 (6.35%) and odontogenic myxoma 3 (4.76%). Most lesions were seen within the second to fourth decades of life and mandible was most frequently affected. Conclusion: It is concluded that the pattern of occurrence of OTs in Port Harcourt followed a general pattern in Nigeria and other African countries but slightly differs from findings from other parts of the world. PMID:27601807

  18. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin is a well-known condition in both the dental and otolaryngology communities. It occurs when the Schneiderian membrane is violated by conditions arising from dentoalveolar unit. This type of sinusitis differs in its pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics and management from sinusitis of other causes, therefore, failure to accurately identify a dental cause in these patients usually lead to persistent symptomatology and failure of medical and surgical therapies directed toward sinusitis. Unilateral recalcitrant disease associated with foul smelling drainage is a most common feature of odontogenic sinusitis. Also, high-resolution CT scans and cone-beam volumetric computed tomography can assist in identifying dental disease. Sometimes dental treatment alone is adequate to resolve the odontogenic sinusitis and sometimes concomitant or subsequent functional endoscopic sinus surgery or Caldwell-Luc operation is required. The aim of this article is to give a review of the most common causes, symptoms, diagnostic and treatment methods of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Search on Cochrane Library, PubMed and Science Direct data bases by key words resulted in 35 articles which met our criteria. It can be concluded that the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis is likely underreported in the available literature.

  19. Odontogenic Orofacial Infections.

    PubMed

    Bertossi, Dario; Barone, Antonio; Iurlaro, Antonio; Marconcini, Simone; De Santis, Daniele; Finotti, Marco; Procacci, Pasquale

    2017-01-01

    Acute dental abscess is a frequent and sometimes underestimated disease of the oral cavity. The acute dental abscess usually occurs secondary to caries, trauma, or failed endodontic treatment. After the intact pulp chamber is opened, colonization of the root canals takes place with a variable set of anaerobic bacteria, which colonize the walls of the necrotic root canals forming a specialized mixed anaerobic biofilm. Asymptomatic necrosis is common. However, abscess formation occurs when these bacteria and their toxic products breach into the periapical tissues through the apical foramen and induce acute inflammation and pus formation. The main signs and symptoms of the acute dental abscess (often referred to as a periapical abscess or infection) are pain, swelling, erythema, and suppuration usually localized to the affected tooth, even if the abscess can eventually spread causing a severe odontogenic infection which is characterized by local and systemic involvement culminating in sepsis syndrome. The vast majority of dental abscesses respond to antibiotic treatment, however, in some patients surgical management of the infection may be indicated. In the present work, a retrospective analysis of the patients with dental orofacial infections referred to the Unit of Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery of the University of Verona from 1991 to 2011 has been performed.

  20. A prospective epidemiological study on odontogenic tumours in a black African population, with emphasis on the relative frequency of ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Oginni, F O; Stoelinga, P J W; Ajike, S A; Obuekwe, O N; Olokun, B Aluko; Adebola, R A; Adeyemo, W L; Fasola, O; Adesina, O A; Akinbami, B O; Iwegbu, I O; Ogunmuyiwa, S A; Obimakinde, O S; Uguru, C C

    2015-09-01

    The persistent view in the literature is that the relative frequency of ameloblastomas is higher in the black population than in Caucasians. The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of all odontogenic tumours (OT) in a 100% black population and to compare our findings with those of previous studies. A prospective study was undertaken of all patients presenting with OT to all 16 Nigerian departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery over a 4-year period. The following data were obtained: patient demographics, delay to presentation, extent of the lesion, and histological diagnosis. Six hundred and twenty-two cases were studied. A slight male preponderance was observed (male to female ratio 1.17:1). Patients ranged in age from 5 to 89 years, with a peak incidence in the third decade. The relative frequency of OT was 0.99 per million and that of ameloblastoma was 0.76 per million. Ameloblastoma was the most prevalent OT (76.5%), followed by adenomatoid odontogenic tumours (5.6%), odontogenic myxoma (4.5%), and keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOT) (3.1%). The relative frequency of ameloblastoma among Nigerians was not different from frequencies reported previously among Caucasian and Tanzanian black populations. KCOTs were, however, rarely diagnosed in Nigerians as compared to the white population in the Western world. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dumb-bell in the heart: rare case of biatrial myxoma with mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Ananthanarayanan, Chandrasekaran; Bishnoi, Arvind Kumar; Ramani, Jayadip; Gandhi, Hemang

    2016-10-01

    Cardiac myxomas are rare intracardiac tumors, and the majority are benign myxomas involving the left atrium. We report a case of the very rare occurrence of biatrial myxoma associated with mitral regurgitation, which was successfully treated.

  2. Stroke of a cardiac myxoma origin

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Humuruola, Gulimila

    2015-01-01

    Objective The clinical features of cardiac myxoma stroke have not been sufficiently described. Debates remain concerning the options and timing of treatment and the clinical outcomes are unknown. This article aims to highlight the pertinent aspects of this rare condition. Methods Data source of the present study came from a comprehensive literature collection of cardiac myxoma stroke in PubMed, Google search engine and Highwire Press for the year range 2000-2014. Results Young adults, female predominance, single cerebral vessel (mostly the middle cerebral artery), multiple territory involvements and solitary left atrial myxoma constituted the outstanding characteristics of this patient setting. The most common affected cerebral vessel (the middle cerebral artery) and areas (the basal ganglion, cerebellum and parietal and temporal regions) corresponded well to the common manifestations of this patient setting, such as conscious alteration, ataxia, hemiparesis and hemiplegia, aphasia and dysarthria. Initial computed tomography scan carried a higher false negative rate for the diagnosis of cerebral infarction than magnetic resonance imaging did. A delayed surgical resection of cardiac myxoma was associated with an increased risk of potential consequences in particular otherwise arterial embolism. The mortality rate of this patient population was 15.3%. Conclusion Cardiac myxoma stroke is rare. Often does it affect young females. For an improved diagnostic accuracy, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and echocardiography are imperative for young stroke patients in identifying the cerebral infarct and determining the stroke of a cardiac origin. Immediate thrombolytic therapy may completely resolve the cerebral stroke and improve the neurologic function of the patients. An early surgical resection of cardiac myxoma is recommended in patients with not large territory cerebral infarct. PMID:26107455

  3. Stroke of a cardiac myxoma origin.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Humuruola, Gulimila

    2015-01-01

    The clinical features of cardiac myxoma stroke have not been sufficiently described. Debates remain concerning the options and timing of treatment and the clinical outcomes are unknown. This article aims to highlight the pertinent aspects of this rare condition. Data source of the present study came from a comprehensive literature collection of cardiac myxoma stroke in PubMed, Google search engine and Highwire Press for the year range 2000-2014. Young adults, female predominance, single cerebral vessel (mostly the middle cerebral artery), multiple territory involvements and solitary left atrial myxoma constituted the outstanding characteristics of this patient setting. The most common affected cerebral vessel (the middle cerebral artery) and areas (the basal ganglion, cerebellum and parietal and temporal regions) corresponded well to the common manifestations of this patient setting, such as conscious alteration, ataxia, hemiparesis and hemiplegia, aphasia and dysarthria. Initial computed tomography scan carried a higher false negative rate for the diagnosis of cerebral infarction than magnetic resonance imaging did. A delayed surgical resection of cardiac myxoma was associated with an increased risk of potential consequences in particular otherwise arterial embolism. The mortality rate of this patient population was 15.3%. Cardiac myxoma stroke is rare. Often does it affect young females. For an improved diagnostic accuracy, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and echocardiography are imperative for young stroke patients in identifying the cerebral infarct and determining the stroke of a cardiac origin. Immediate thrombolytic therapy may completely resolve the cerebral stroke and improve the neurologic function of the patients. An early surgical resection of cardiac myxoma is recommended in patients with not large territory cerebral infarct.

  4. Synchronous Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Auricular Myxoma

    PubMed Central

    González-Cantú, Yessica M.; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; García de la Fuente, Alberto; Mejía-Bañuelos, Rosa María; Díaz Mendoza, Raymundo; Quintanilla-Garza, Samuel; Batisda-Acuña, Yolaester

    2015-01-01

    Synchronic occurrence of benign and malignant tumors is extremely rare. Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma represents 1% to 2% of all hepatocarcinomas, while myxomas represent about half of all the cases of primary tumors of the heart. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with a left atrial myxoma that was surgically removed. Several weeks later, the patient returned to the hospital with abdominal pain. CT scan showed a mass in the left lobe of the liver that was resected and diagnosed as fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. As of this writing, the patient is healthy. PMID:26509093

  5. Cardiac myxoma in pregnancy: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cardiac myxoma in pregnancy is rare and the clinical characteristics of this entity have been insufficiently elucidated. This article aims to describe the treatment options and the risk factors responsible for the maternal and feto-neonatal prognoses. Methods A comprehensive search of the literature of cardiac myxoma in pregnancy was conducted and 44 articles with 51 patients were included in the present review. Results Transthoracic echocardiography was the most common diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of cardiac myxoma during pregnancy. Cardiac myxoma resection was performed in 95.9% (47/49); while no surgical resection was performed in 4.1% (2/49) patients (P=0.000). More patients had an isolated cardiac myxoma resection in comparison to those with a concurrent or staged additional cardiac operation [87.2% (41/47) vs. 12.8% (6/47), P=0.000]. A voluntary termination of the pregnancy was done in 7 (13.7%) cases. In the remaining 31 (60.8%) pregnant patients, cesarean section was the most common delivery mode representing 61.3% and vaginal delivery was more common accounting for 19.4%. Cardiac surgery was performed in the first, second and third trimester in 5 (13.9%), 14 (38.9%) and 17 (47.2%) patients, respectively. No patients died. In the delivery group, 20 (76.9%) neonates were event-free survivals, 4 (15.4%) were complicated and 2 (7.7%) died. Neonatal prognoses did not differ between the delivery modes, treatment options, timing of cardiac surgery and sequence of cardiac myxoma resection in relation to delivery. Conclusion The diagnosis of cardiac myxoma in pregnancy is important. Surgical treatment of cardiac myxoma in the pregnant patients has brought about favorable maternal and feto-neonatal outcomes in the delivery group, which might be attributable to the shorter operation duration and non-emergency nature of the surgical intervention. Proper timing of cardiac surgery and improved cardiopulmonary bypass conditions may result in even better

  6. Synchronous Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Auricular Myxoma.

    PubMed

    González-Cantú, Yessica M; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; García de la Fuente, Alberto; Mejía-Bañuelos, Rosa María; Díaz Mendoza, Raymundo; Quintanilla-Garza, Samuel; Batisda-Acuña, Yolaester

    2015-01-01

    Synchronic occurrence of benign and malignant tumors is extremely rare. Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma represents 1% to 2% of all hepatocarcinomas, while myxomas represent about half of all the cases of primary tumors of the heart. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with a left atrial myxoma that was surgically removed. Several weeks later, the patient returned to the hospital with abdominal pain. CT scan showed a mass in the left lobe of the liver that was resected and diagnosed as fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. As of this writing, the patient is healthy.

  7. Pathogenesis and Nomenclature of Odontogenic Carcinomas: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Swagatika; Sahoo, Sujit Ranjan; Srivastav, Gunjan; Padhiary, Subrat; Dhull, Kanika Singh; Aggarwal, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic carcinoma is rare group of malignant epithelial odontogenic neoplasms with characteristic clinical behavior and histological features, which requires an aggressive surgical approach. The pathogenesis of this rare group remains still controversial and there have been many varied opinions over the classification of this rare group of lesions. As there have not been many reviews on odontogenic carcinoma, the existing knowledge is mostly derived from the published case reports. This review is discussing the pathogenetic mechanisms and is updating the knowledge on nomenclature system of less explored odontogenic carcinomas. This review might throw light on the pathogenesis and nomenclature system of odontogenic carcinoma and this knowledge may be applied therapeutically. PMID:24799899

  8. Relationship Between Oral Perception and Habitual Chewing Side for Bare Bone Graft With Dental Implants After Mandibular Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Tadahide; Tsuchiya, Yoshiyuki; Sarukawa, Shunji; Yamazaki, Yuko; Hayasaka, Jun-Ichi; Sasaguri, Ken-Ichi; Jinbu, Yoshinori; Mori, Yoshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between habitual chewing side and perception of the oral mucosa following reconstruction with dental implants. Five patients comprised 2 males and 3 females, with ameloblastoma in 2 patients, odontogenic myxoma in 2 patients, and oral squamous cell carcinoma in 1 patient. They were treated using mandibular reconstruction with bare bone graft after segmental resection of the mandible. Perception (tactile, warm, and cold) was measured at 8 points (chin, lower lip, gingiva, and lateral edge of the tongue, bilaterally). Habitual chewing side was evaluated using a computerized index, the first chewing cycle, and a question on chewing. Perception on resected sides was improved at all measurement points for tactile and cold sensitive evaluation, although sensitivities on the resected side remained below the normal range. In the relationship between habitual chewing side and implanted prostheses in reconstructed bone, the chewing side was the resected side in 2 of the 5 patients. When those 2 patients underwent prosthesis implantation after removal of denture, the chewing side changed from the nonresected side to the resected side. Implant prostheses on resected side were suggested to contribute to masticatory function. Perception in those patients was incomplete but was improved compared with other patients. When prosthesis implantation is performed on the reconstructed side, the resected side may become the habitual chewing side. Recovery of perception can influence acquisition of the habitual chewing side.

  9. A rare large right atrial myxoma with rapid growth rate.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Shawn C; Steffen, Kelly; Stys, Adam T

    2014-10-01

    Atrial myxomas are the most common benign intracavitary cardiac neoplasms. They most frequently occur in the left atrium. Right atrial tumors are rare, comprising 20 percent of myxomas achieving an incidence of 0.02 percent. Due to their rarity, right atrial tumor development and associated clinical symptoms has not been well described. The classical clinical triad for the presentation of left atrial myxomas--heart failure, embolic events, and constitutional symptoms--may not be applicable to right sided tumors. Also, natural development of myxoma is not well described, as surgical resection is the common practice. Previously ascribed growth rates of myxomas refer mostly to left atrial ones, as right atrial tumors are rare. We present a case of right atrial myxoma with growth rates exceeding those previously described.

  10. Bone metastasis of glandular cardiac myxoma mimicking a metastatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Uppin, Shantveer G; Jambhekar, Nirmala; Puri, Ajay; Kumar, Rajiv; Agarwal, Manish; Sanghvi, Darshana

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal metastasis from a cardiac myxoma is rare. We describe an extremely unusual case of a cardiac myxoma metastasing to the femur in a 46-year-old female presenting with pain in the right hip. Radiographs showed an expansile lytic lesion with pathological fracture involving the neck and proximal shaft of the right femur. Histology revealed features of cardiac myxoma with heterologous glandular elements, which was initially mistaken for a metastatic mucin-secreting adenocarcinoma.

  11. Odontogenic myxofibroma of gingiva in a pediatric patient with tuberous sclerosis: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Bhoyar, Nidhi; Gupta, Sunita; Ghosh, Sujoy

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare multisystem genetic disease, with an estimated incidence of 1 in 6000–1 in 10,000. TSC is an autosomal dominant syndrome involving heart, kidneys, lungs, and skin. The classic triad of TSC is seizures, mental retardation, and angiofibromas; this triad occurs in only 29% of patients. The clinical diagnostic guidelines on TSC are prepared based on clinical features, radiographic findings. The most common oral manifestations of TSC are fibroma, gingival hyperplasia, and enamel hypoplasia. Odontogenic myxofibroma represents a rare slow-growing benign neoplasm found rarely in children below 10 years or adults over 50 years of age. The prevalence of myxoma is between 0.04% and 3.7%. Here, we are reporting a rare case of myxofibroma of gingiva in an 8-year-old female TSC patient. PMID:27994429

  12. An unusually large aggressive adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of maxilla involving the third molar: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Khandelwal, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare tumor comprising only 3% of all odontogenic tumors. It is a benign, encapsulated, noninvasive, nonaggressive, slowly growing odontogenic lesion associated with an impacted tooth. These lesions may go unnoticed for years. The usual treatment is enucleation and curettage, and the lesion does not recur. Here, we present a rare case of an unusually large aggressive AOT of maxilla associated with impacted third molar. The authors also discuss clinical, radiographic, histopathologic, and therapeutic features of the case. Subtotal maxillectomy with simultaneous reconstruction of the surgical defect with temporalis myofascial flap was planned and carried out. PMID:27095910

  13. Mandibular intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma lesion associated with odontogenic keratocyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Han-Kyul; Kim, Tae-Seop; Geum, Dong-Ho; Yoon, Sang-Yong; Song, Jae-Min; Hwang, Dae-Seok; Cho, Yeong-Cheol; Kim, Uk-Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common malignant tumor in the oral cavity, and it accounts for about 90% of all oral cancers. Several risk factors for oral SCC have been identified; however, SCC associated with odontogenic keratocysts have rarely been reported. The present study describes the case of a 36-year-old man with SCC of the right ramus of the mandible, which was initially diagnosed as a benign odontogenic cyst. He underwent enucleation at another hospital followed by segmental mandibulectomy and fibular free flap reconstruction at our institution. In this case, we introduce a patient with oral cancer associated with odontogenic cyst on the mandible and report a satisfactory outcome with wide resection and immediate free flap reconstruction.

  14. Mandibular intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma lesion associated with odontogenic keratocyst: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Seop; Geum, Dong-Ho; Yoon, Sang-Yong; Song, Jae-Min; Hwang, Dae-Seok; Cho, Yeong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common malignant tumor in the oral cavity, and it accounts for about 90% of all oral cancers. Several risk factors for oral SCC have been identified; however, SCC associated with odontogenic keratocysts have rarely been reported. The present study describes the case of a 36-year-old man with SCC of the right ramus of the mandible, which was initially diagnosed as a benign odontogenic cyst. He underwent enucleation at another hospital followed by segmental mandibulectomy and fibular free flap reconstruction at our institution. In this case, we introduce a patient with oral cancer associated with odontogenic cyst on the mandible and report a satisfactory outcome with wide resection and immediate free flap reconstruction. PMID:25922819

  15. Odontogenic carcinoma with dentinoid: a new odontogenic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Neville, Brad W; Tatemoto, Yukihiro; Ogawa, Ikuko; Takata, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Dentinoid is an integral part of some odontogenic tumors. This article describes the clinico-pathological features of three cases of odontogenic carcinomas with dentinoid (OCD). A comparison of these with previously reported cases of dentinoid-producing epithelial odontogenic tumors allowed us to identify another six cases that may be considered as examples of OCD. Six cases occurred in the mandible and three in the maxilla, all developing behind the canines. There was no sex predilection (five men and four women; age range 14-61 years, mean 38.1). Pain or discomfort was mentioned in five cases, four of which showed tooth resorption. All cases appeared initially as well-defined radiolucencies, five of which showed variable amounts of calcified material. Recurrences were recorded in three instances, but no evidence of metastasis has been found. Seven cases were composed predominantly or entirely of clear cells, usually with minimal cellular atypia and variable mitotic activity; however, in all cases there was evidence of tumor infiltration into adjacent tissues, including the presence of perineural invasion in two tumors. Those cases in which no reference was made to the presence of clear cells exhibited evident mitotic activity and cellular pleomorphism. The epithelium in OCD does not produce buds or enamel organ-like structures such as those found in ameloblastic fibro-dentinoma and this tumor does not contain a mesenchyme-like connective tissue resembling dental papilla as observed in several mixed odontogenic tumors. Based on the existing data and the present series of cases, OCD appears to represent a distinct entity.

  16. Brain abscess of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Antonio Azoubel; de Santana Santos, Thiago; de Carvalho, Ricardo Wathson Feitosa; Avelar, Rafael Linard; Pereira, Carlos Umberto; Pereira, José Carlos

    2011-11-01

    Brain abscess is a rare and threatening infection, which is in a suppuration area, caused either by trauma, neurosurgical complication, or by a secondary infection of dental origin complication. The infectious process spread from the start focus can occur in 2 ways: hematogenous or by contiguity. The treatment should ideally be based on the etiological factor excision, combined with drainage and antibiotics as adjuvant; this philosophy is not observed in the reports described in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. This study's goal was to report a case of brain abscess consequent of an odontogenic outbreak, where an adequate treatment was set up, but it was already in advanced stages and had as a result the lethal outcome. Complications from the odontogenic infections have a low incidence, but should never be disregarded, because they can lead to death, as described in this manuscript.

  17. Treatment options in odontogenic infection.

    PubMed

    Maestre-Vera, Juan Ramón

    2004-01-01

    Most infections of the oral cavity are primary, odontogenic infections, with dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis the most common. Treating these infections will encompass odontologic, antimicrobial, surgical or combined treatment. Antimicrobial treatment includes the use of betalactams, macrolydes, tetracyclins, metronidazole, clindamycin, or combined treatment. The most commonly used ones are administered orally. PK/ PD parameters predict THE clinical and microbiological efficacy of the antibiotic. The three indices that are generally used to measure clinical efficacy are: T >MIC (time during which the concentration is above the minimum inhibitory concentration), Cmax/ MIC (ratio between peak concentration and the minimum inhibitory concentration) and AUC/ MIC (ratio between the area under the curve and the minimum inhibitory concentration). Amoxicillin/ clavulanic acid is one of the antibiotics recommended for the treatment of odontogenic infections due to its wide spectrum, low incidence of resistance, pharmacokinetic profile, tolerance and dosage.

  18. Neurological manifestations of cardiac myxoma: experience in a referral hospital.

    PubMed

    Pérez Andreu, J; Parrilla, G; Arribas, J M; García-Villalba, B; Lucas, J J; Garcia Navarro, M; Marín, F; Gutierrez, F; Moreno, A

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myxoma is an important but uncommon cause of stroke in younger patients. Few published case series analyse the frequency and clinical presentation of neurological complications in patients with myxoma. To list all neurological complications from cardiac myxoma recorded in our hospital in the past 28 years. We retrospectively reviewed the neurological manifestations of cardiac myxoma in patients treated in our hospital between December 1983 and March 2012. Of the 36 patients with cardiac myxoma, 8 (22%) presented neurological manifestations. Half were women and mean age of patients was 52.4 ± 11.6 years. Sudden-onset hemiparesis was the most frequent neurological symptom (63%). Established ischaemic stroke was the most common clinical manifestation (75%), followed by transient ischemic attack. The most commonly affected territory corresponded to the middle cerebral artery. Myxoma was diagnosed by echocardiography in all cases. Mean myxoma size was 4.1cm and most of the tumours (63%) had a polypoid surface. All tumours were successfully removed by surgery. There were no in-hospital deaths. Cardiac myxomas frequently present with neurological symptoms, especially ischaemic events (established stroke or transient ischaemic attack), in younger patients with no cardiovascular risk factors. The anterior circulation is more frequently affected, especially the middle cerebral artery. Echocardiography can facilitate prompt diagnosis and early treatment of the lesion. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Gerstmann's syndrome: can cardiac myxoma be the cause?

    PubMed

    Sakellaridis, Timothy; Argiriou, Michalis; Koukis, Ioannis; Panagiotakopoulos, Vicror; Spiliotopoulos, Constantinos; Dimakopoulou, Antonia; Charitos, Christos

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas are primary cardiac tumours. Clinical presentations vary. Central nervous embolism has been a constant association. We describe a case of a 40-year-old female who presented with neurological signs and symptoms of Gerstmann's syndrome secondary to a left atrial myxoma.

  20. Intramuscular myxoma of the deltoid muscle: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Costamagna, Daniela; Erra, Stefania; Durando, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Intramuscular myxoma is a rare, benign lesion of mesenchymal origin, affecting the skeletal muscles. We report the case of a 75-year-old woman presenting with a mass of the right deltoid region. On the MRI examination it was interpreted as a lipomatous lesion. She underwent marginal excision. The pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of intramuscular myxoma. PMID:21686685

  1. Intramuscular myxoma of the deltoid muscle: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Costamagna, Daniela; Erra, Stefania; Durando, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Intramuscular myxoma is a rare, benign lesion of mesenchymal origin, affecting the skeletal muscles. We report the case of a 75-year-old woman presenting with a mass of the right deltoid region. On the MRI examination it was interpreted as a lipomatous lesion. She underwent marginal excision. The pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of intramuscular myxoma.

  2. Fatal Disruption of a Left Atrial Myxoma Associated with Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Iacco, Anthony; Billimoria, Nazneen; Howells, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas are benign tumors composed of sparse stellate cells in an extensive mucoid stroma. The surface of these tumors is often friable and gelatinous. Their intracardiac location makes embolization a constant threat. We report a patient who had diffuse systemic embolization of a left atrial myxoma coincident with a low-velocity frontal motor vehicle crash. PMID:22489244

  3. [Histopathological and immunohistochemical features of cardiac myxomas].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Bringas, Omar; Ortiz-Hidalgo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Mixomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors with an estimate incidence of 0,5-1 per 10(6) individuals per year. These tumors have generated interest due to their unique location (left side of the atrial septum near the fossa ovalis), variable clinical presentation and undefined histogenesis. Most cardiac myxomas occur sporadically while approximately 10% of diagnosed cases develop as part of Carney complex. This neoplasm is of uncertain histogenesis, however, endothelial, neurogenic, fibroblastic, and cardiac and smooth muscle cells differentiation has been proposed, and rarely glandular differentiation has been observed. Recently, due to the expression of certain cardiomyocyte-specific factors, an origin of mesenchymal cardiomyocytes progenitor cells has been suggested. Histologically cardiac myxomas are mainly composed of stellated, fusiform and polygonal cells, immersed in an amorphous myxoid matrix. Immunohistochemically some endothelial markers, such as CD31, CD34, FVIIIAg, are present. Positive staining has also been reported for S-100 protein, calretinin, vimentin, desmin, smooth muscle myosin, CD56, α1 antitrypsin and α 1antichymotrypsin. Surgical resection is currently the only treatment of choice. We present in this article a histopathological and immunohistochemical review of cardiac myxomas.

  4. Atrial Myxoma in a Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Mahmoud; Hayek, Salim; Williams, Byron R.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is the most common primary cardiac tumor. Patients with atrial myxoma typically present with obstructive, embolic, or systemic symptoms; asymptomatic presentation is very rare. To our knowledge, isolated association of atrial myxoma with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been reported only once in the English-language medical literature. We report the case of an asymptomatic 71-year-old woman with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in whom a left atrial mass was incidentally identified on cardiac magnetic resonance images. After surgical excision of the mass and partial excision of the left atrial septum, histopathologic analysis confirmed the diagnosis of atrial myxoma. The patient was placed on preventive implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy and remained asymptomatic. The management of asymptomatic cardiac myxoma is a topic of debate, because no reports definitively favor either conservative or surgical measures. PMID:24082380

  5. Nerve Sheath Myxoma: Report of A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Amoolya; C, Vijaya; VK, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    Nerve sheath myxoma defined by Harkin and Reed is an uncommon benign neoplasm with nerve sheath like features. It has several cytological and histological differential diagnoses. One such lesion is neurothekeoma, which can be differentiated using immunohistochemistry. In most of the previous reports nerve sheath myxoma and neurothekeoma were considered synonymous and were often confused for one another. This case report separates the two using immunohistochemistry. Also, the cytological features of nerve sheath myxoma are not well documented in the past. This case report attempts to display the cyto-morphology of nerve sheath myxoma. We report a rare case of nerve sheath myxoma diagnosed on cytological features confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry in a 32-year-old lady who presented with an asymptomatic nodule over the left cervical area and discuss its cyto-histological mimics. PMID:26023558

  6. Nerve sheath myxoma: report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Amoolya; Narasimha, Apaparna; C, Vijaya; Vk, Sundeep

    2015-04-01

    Nerve sheath myxoma defined by Harkin and Reed is an uncommon benign neoplasm with nerve sheath like features. It has several cytological and histological differential diagnoses. One such lesion is neurothekeoma, which can be differentiated using immunohistochemistry. In most of the previous reports nerve sheath myxoma and neurothekeoma were considered synonymous and were often confused for one another. This case report separates the two using immunohistochemistry. Also, the cytological features of nerve sheath myxoma are not well documented in the past. This case report attempts to display the cyto-morphology of nerve sheath myxoma. We report a rare case of nerve sheath myxoma diagnosed on cytological features confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry in a 32-year-old lady who presented with an asymptomatic nodule over the left cervical area and discuss its cyto-histological mimics.

  7. Odontogenic tumors in children and adolescents. A 15-year retrospective study in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Guerrisi, Marcela; Piloni, María Julia; Keszler, Alicia

    2007-05-01

    There are few studies on bucco-maxillary lesions in children and adolescents, and reports on odontogenic tumors (OT) are scanty. Comparison among the available data is difficult due to differences in the criteria used in each study. The aim of the present work was to perform a retrospective study of OT in patients aged up to 20 years diagnosed at a center specialized in histopathologic diagnosis of oral diseases. All cases diagnosed with OT between 1990 and 2004 were retrieved from the Service archives. The 153 retrieved cases accounted for 7% of total biopsies performed during that period, and to 78.4% of tumors of the jaws. Mean age of the whole population was 12.7 years and the male to female ratio was 2:1. The most frequent tumor types were Odontoma, (50.9%), Ameloblastoma (18.3%) and Myxoma (8.5%), and the most infrequent was Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor (1.3%). According to our results, OT cannot be considered infrequent. They are the prevalent tumors of the jaws in the age group studied herein.

  8. "Syndrome myxoma": a subset of patients with cardiac myxoma associated with pigmented skin lesions and peripheral and endocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Vidaillet, H J; Seward, J B; Fyke, F E; Su, W P; Tajik, A J

    1987-01-01

    From January 1954 to December 1985 cardiac myxoma was diagnosed in 75 patients at the Mayo Clinic. The clinical presentation was typical in 70 cases and was referred to as "sporadic myxoma". Forty four other cases of cardiac myxomas (five from the Mayo Clinic) presented with a combination of distinctive clinical features and these cases are described as "syndrome myxoma". The patients with syndrome myxoma were younger (mean age, 25 vs 56 years) and had unusual skin freckling (68%), associated benign non-cardiac myxomatous tumours (57%), endocrine neoplasms (30%), and a high frequency of familial cardiac myxoma (25%) and familial endocrine tumours (14%). The two types of cardiac tumour were different (syndrome vs sporadic): atrial location, 87% vs 100%; ventricular location, 13% vs 0%; single tumour, 50% vs 99%; multiple tumours, 50% vs 1%; and recurrent tumour, 18% vs 0%. It is concluded that patients with syndrome myxoma represent a distinctive subgroup in which there are important clinical, surgical, and genetic implications. More importantly, syndrome myxoma appears to be only one expression of a much larger disease entity. Images Fig 3 Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 4 PMID:3566983

  9. Peripheral odontogenic fibroma. Report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Buchner, A

    1989-04-01

    The peripheral odontogenic fibroma (WHO type) is a relatively rare, benign, unencapsulated, exophytic gingival mass of fibrous connective tissue. Odontogenic epithelium is found within the gingival mass, but usually appears to play a minor role when compared to the fibrous component. According to the present concept, cases reported in the literature under the terms "odontogenic gingival epithelial harmartoma" "hamartoma of the dental lamina" and "peripheral ameloblastic fibrodentinoma" are actually examples of peripheral odontogenic fibroma. Review of the literature revealed only 30 acceptable cases that fit the present concept of peripheral odontogenic fibroma. Because of the paucity of reported cases, the histomorphological spectrum and the clinical features of this lesion have not yet been fully established. This article presents five new cases of peripheral odontogenic fibroma. The connective tissue ranged from markedly cellular to relatively acellular well collagenized. Islands and strands of epithelium were present in all five cases: in four they were scanty and in one abundant. A matrix of mineralized material was present in four cases. The peripheral odontogenic fibroma must be differentiated histologically from peripheral ossifying fibroma, which is a reactive lesion, and from the peripheral ameloblastoma and the calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour.

  10. Karyotyping and analysis of GNAS locus in intramuscular myxomas.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Lobmaier, Ingvild; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Heim, Sverre

    2017-03-28

    Intramuscular myxoma is a benign soft tissue tumor about which very limited genetic information exists. We studied 68 intramuscular myxomas by means of chromosome banding analysis finding abnormal karyotypes in 21 of them. The most clearly nonrandom involvement was of chromosome 8 which was found gained in seven tumors (+8 was the sole change in five myxomas) and structurally rearranged in another two. Since mutation of the gene GNAS (20q13) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of both solitary and hereditary multiple myxomas, we assessed the transcription and mutation status of this gene in five tumors from which we had suitable RNA. All five intramuscular myxomas expressed biallelic transcripts. The mutated GNAS allele found in one tumor was also biallelically transcribed. In none of the five myxomas were maternally expressed transcripts detected. Collectively, the data suggest that intramuscular myxomas have acquired genetic abnormalities that often include chromosome 8 changes but may also involve alterations of GNAS. To what extent these aberrations are pathogenetically important, remains uncertain.

  11. Karyotyping and analysis of GNAS locus in intramuscular myxomas

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Lobmaier, Ingvild; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Heim, Sverre

    2017-01-01

    Intramuscular myxoma is a benign soft tissue tumor about which very limited genetic information exists. We studied 68 intramuscular myxomas by means of chromosome banding analysis finding abnormal karyotypes in 21 of them. The most clearly nonrandom involvement was of chromosome 8 which was found gained in seven tumors (+8 was the sole change in five myxomas) and structurally rearranged in another two. Since mutation of the gene GNAS (20q13) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of both solitary and hereditary multiple myxomas, we assessed the transcription and mutation status of this gene in five tumors from which we had suitable RNA. All five intramuscular myxomas expressed biallelic transcripts. The mutated GNAS allele found in one tumor was also biallelically transcribed. In none of the five myxomas were maternally expressed transcripts detected. Collectively, the data suggest that intramuscular myxomas have acquired genetic abnormalities that often include chromosome 8 changes but may also involve alterations of GNAS. To what extent these aberrations are pathogenetically important, remains uncertain. PMID:28160572

  12. Odontogenic infections: Microbiology and management

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Rashi; Sandhu, Sumeet; Singh, Kanwardeep; Sahai, Nilanchal; Gupta, Mohita

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the involvement of fascial spaces, their bacteriology, sensitivity to antibiotics and management of odontogenic infection in 100 patients of age less than 60 years. Resuls: The mandibular 3rd molar was found to be the most commonly offending tooth, followed by the mandibular 2nd molar. The submandibular space was the most frequently involved fascial space both in single fascial space infections and multiple fascial space infections. Mixed growth (aerobic and anaerobic) was seen in culture smears of 60 patients, only aerobic bacterial growth was seen in 25 patients and anaerobic bacterial growth was seen in culture smears of 15 patients. Streptococcus viridans was the most frequently isolated bacteria among the aerobes, whereas Bacteroides and Prevotella were the most common bacterial species among anaerobes. Empirical antibiotic therapy in the form of Co amoxiclav and Metronidazole was given. Incision and drainage followed by extraction of the offending tooth/teeth was carried out. Conclusion: It was concluded that odontogenic infections were mixed aerobic–anaerobic infections. Anaerobic as well as aerobic cultures were necessary to isolate all pathogens. Successful management of these infections depends on changing the environment through decompression, removal of the etiologic factor and by choosing the proper antibiotic. PMID:25191064

  13. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst masquerading as dentigerous cyst

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Devi Charan; Rathore, Ajit Singh; Jain, Anshi; Thokchom, Natasha; Khurana, Neha

    2016-01-01

    The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst that has been considered as a variant of the keratocystic odontogenic tumor until Wright (1981) defined it as a different entity. Recognition of OOC as a unique entity has long been due, yet its inexplicable clinical, radiographic presentation resembling dentigerous cyst due to its association to an impacted tooth, and its histological features makes it rather perplexing. This is the report of a case of OOC in relation to an impacted maxillary canine and its immunohistochemical analysis with Ki-67. PMID:27857903

  14. A review of complications of odontogenic infections.

    PubMed

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these "space infections" has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms "odontogenic infections," "complications," and "risk factors."

  15. A Large Extragnathic Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M.; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Narasimhamurthy, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are developmental cysts which occur typically in the jawbones. They present more commonly in the posterior mandible of young adults than the maxilla. OKCs have been reclassified under odontogenic tumours in 2005 by the WHO and have since been termed as keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs). Here we report a case of a recurrent buccal lesion in a 62-year-old man which was provisionally diagnosed as a space infection (buccal abscess) but surprisingly turned out to be a soft tissue KCOT in an unusual location on histopathologic examination. PMID:26770859

  16. The odontogenic keratocyst: a potential endodontic misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Garlock, J A; Pringle, G A; Hicks, M L

    1998-04-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts manifest themselves as radiolucencies that can appear anywhere in the maxilla or mandible, including periradicular areas; they may thus masquerade as lesions of endodontic origin. This retrospective study examined 239 odontogenic keratocysts received by the Oral Pathology Laboratory at Temple University School of Medicine over a 3-year period. Twenty-one (9%) of the cysts received were located periradicularly; of these 21, 12 (57%) were associated with nonvital or endodontically treated teeth and thus mimicked lesions of endodontic origin. Because of its aggressive nature and tendency to recur, the periradicular odontogenic keratocyst should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions that are refractory to endodontic treatment.

  17. [Resection of intracardiac myxoma. Case report].

    PubMed

    Carmona-Delgado, Víctor Manuel; Deloya-Maldonado, Angélica María; Carranza-Bernal, María Lourdes; Hinojosa-Pérez, Arturo; Farías-Mayene, Leobardo

    2017-01-01

    Myxomas are the most common benign cardiac tumors, which are considered emergency surgery. The resection should not be delayed because 8-9% of affected patients may die due to intracardiac blood flow obstruction. We presente a clinical case of a 47 year old female, history of dyslipidemia. Disease starts with retrosternal oppression feeling, dyspnea on moderate exercise, dizziness, pain in joints hands. Arrhytmic heart sounds, diastolic mitral murmur II/IV, breth sounds present, no lymph. Laboratory: hemoglobin 11.0, leucocyte 9000, glucose 96 mg/dL, chest RX medium arch prominence cardiac silhouette. ECO transthoracic LVEF 60 %, with left atrial intracardiac tumor 13x11 cm, pedicle fixed the interatrial septum, the mitral valve bulges, with mild mitral valve. Half sternotomy is performed intracardiac tumor resection, pericardial placement interatrial with extracorporeal circulation support 65', aortic clamping time of 40'. Intracardiac tumor surgical findings interatrial septum fixed to left side, pedicle, rounded, yellow, multiloculated, soft, 13x10 cm in diameter. Histopathological diagnosis cardiac myxoma. We conclude that the tumor resection was carried in a timely manner with satisfactory evolution.

  18. Giant biatrial myxoma with two different gross findings.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Taiyo; Yokoyama, Yukifusa; Yuhara, Satoshi; Okawa, Hideyuki; Hasegawa, Hiroki; Yokote, Jun; Tamaki, Shuji; Mii, Shinji

    2017-08-18

    We experienced a giant biatrial myxoma concomitant with hepatocellular carcinoma. Most of myxomas originate from the left atrium, and biatrial myxomas are extremely rare. Excision of the giant cardiac tumor was performed to avoid risks of life-threatening complications. The resected mass was grossly composed of two parts with the border of interatrial septum and with the shape of peanut shell. Although microscopic examinations revealed enlarged vessels, hemorrhages and hemosiderosis in the left part and high cellularity with chronic inflammation in the right part, spindle-shaped cells in a loose myxoid stroma were observed in both parts of the tumor, consistent with the diagnosis of myxoma. His second operation for hepatic cancer was successfully performed following 1 month after the first operation. Surgical treatment should be considered for giant atrium tumor which has risk of life-threatening complications even if patients have another cancer.

  19. Coronary steal by left atrial myxoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Jose Rubio; Quiroga, Juan Sierra; Cereijo, Jose Manuel Martinez; Lopez, Laura Reija

    2009-06-18

    This report describes a 41-year-old man who had atypical angina resulting from coronary steal by left atrial myxoma. The tumor was completely excised and the patient was symptoms free after operation.

  20. A Primary Ossifying Intracranial Myxoma Arising from the Ethmoid Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Je Il; Kim, Jae Min; Kim, Choong Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Myxomas are rare benign tumors that originate from mesenchymal tissue. They usually develop in the atrium of the heart, the skin, subcutaneous tissue, or bone. Involvement of the skull base with an intracranial extension is very rare and not well-described in the literature. We report a rare case of primary intracranial ossifying myxoma arising from the anterior skull base and mimicking a huge chondrosarcoma, and we review the relevant literature. PMID:26539274

  1. Cerebral abscess of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Mylonas, Anastassios I; Tzerbos, Fotios H; Mihalaki, Maria; Rologis, Dimitrios; Boutsikakis, Iossif

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral abscess is a rare but serious and life-threatening infection. Dental infections have occasionally been reported as the source of bacteria for such an abcess. A 54-year-old man was admitted with a right hemiparesis and epileptic fits. After clinical, laboratory and imaging examination, the diagnosis of a cerebral abscess of the left parietal lobe was made. The intraoral clinical examination as well as a panoramic radiograph confirmed the presence of generalized periodontal disease, multiple dental caries, and periapical pathology. The treatment included: (i) Immediate administration of high-dose intravenous antibiotics and (ii) surgical procedures consisting of craniotomy and resection of the abscess cavity first, and secondly removal of the periodontal, decayed and periapically involved teeth of the patient, in an effort to eradicate all the possible septic foci, presuming the cerebral abscess to be of odontogenic infection. The patient made an uneventful recovery, and 29 months postoperatively he had completely recovered from the hemiparesis.

  2. Preoperative Emboli in a Pregnant Woman with Myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Freidoun; Faraji, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The left atrium is the most common location of myxomas, which are benign tumors. Only a few cases of myxomas in pregnancies have been reported. Our thorough medical literature search showed only 17 reported cases in the course of pregnancy. Myxomas during pregnancy and in the preterm period constitute a serious phenomenon that can mimic an early sign of a life-threatening pathology like severe mitral stenosis. We describe a 33-year-old woman, who presented with acute dyspnea to a gynecology center and was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of pulmonary embolism. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a huge left atrial myxoma, and computed tomography scan illustrated paradoxical pulmonary embolism in the left upper lung lobe via a large patent foramen ovale. The tumor required urgent cardiac surgery. In this article, we review causes of dyspnea in pregnancy and the cardiovascular effects of myxomas in pregnancy. We also describe the pathophysiological effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on the mother, fetus, and the feto-placental system during open-heart surgery. We performed a successful surgical resection of a myxoma in a pregnant woman. Given the rarity of such cases, individual multidisciplinary assessment and management strategies are essential. PMID:27365558

  3. [Recurrent multiple cardiac myxomas: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hada, Y; Sakamoto, T; Takenaka, K; Amano, K; Yamaguchi, T; Ishimitsu, T; Takahashi, H

    1982-06-01

    A case of recurrent multiple cardiac myxomas was presented. The patient was a 27-year-old housewife. Four years ago, she underwent urgent resection of a left atrial myxoma and replacement of the interatrial septum with a patch graft by right atrial approach. The tumor was very friable and a part of the tumor dropped into cardiac chambers during the operation, and immediately saline lavage and aspiration were performed. The recovery was uneventful. On March, 1981, she was readmitted to our hospital because of increasing dry cough. Two-dimensional echocardiography demonstrated abnormal masses in the right atrium, right ventricle, and left atrium. Open heart surgery revealed three independent tumors, which were successfully removed. All tumors were benign myxomas histologically. The patient returned to full-time housework again. A case of recurrent multiple myxomas has not been previously reported. The recurrence of the myxoma in our case is thought to be caused by implantation of tumor cells during the initial operative procedure. Our case will suggest the malignant potentiality of cardiac myxoma. The necessity of radical excision and gentle handling of the tumor during the operation are reemphasized. Postoperative follow-up study is also mandatory for early detection of the recurrence of this potentially malignant neoplasm.

  4. Clinical Features and Treatments of Odontogenic Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Jin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate how clinical features such as sex, age, etiologic factors, and presenting symptoms of odontogenic sinusitis are differentiated from other types of sinusitis. Also, this study was designed to find methods for reducing the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis. Materials and Methods A retrospective chart analysis was completed on twenty-seven patients with odontogenic sinusitis. They were all treated at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital between February 2006 and August 2008. The study protocol and informed consent forms were approved by the institutional review boards for human beings at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital. Results Ten patients (37.0%) had dental implant related complications and 8 (29.6%) had dental extraction related complications. Unilateral purulent nasal discharge was the most common symptom (66.7%). The therapeutic modality included transnasal endoscopic sinus surgery in 19 (70.4%) patients, and a Caldwell-Luc operation in two (7.4%) patients. Conclusion In our study, there was no significant difference in the incidence between genders. The average age of the patients was 42.9 years. The incidence was highest in the fourth decade. There were no significant differences between the symptoms of odontogenic sinusitis and that of other types of sinusitis. However, almost all of the patients with odontogenic sinusitis had unilateral symptoms. Iatrogenic causes, which include dental implants and dental extractions, were the most common etiologic factors related to the development of odontogenic sinusitis. Therefore, a preoperative consultation between a rhinologist and a dentist prior to the dental procedure should be able to reduce the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis. PMID:20879062

  5. Odontogenic Infections: A 1-year Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Benjamin; Weusmann, Jens; Azaripour, Adriano; Braun, Benedikt; Walter, Christian; Willershausen, Brita

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence, demographic patterns and management of odontogenic infections in patients undergoing treatment in an outpatient dental emergency service of a university hospital. In a retrospective study of the year 2012, all patients suffering from odontogenic infections were included. Demographic data, diagnosis and the conducted treatment were analyzed. Odontogenic infections were defined as pulpitis, apical and marginal periodontitis, abscesses and pericoronitis. A total of 2,058 out of 4,209 emergency patients suffered from odontogenic infections. The majority (45.0%) had an apical periodontitis, 20.8% abscesses, 17.3% a marginal periodontitis, 16.3% a pulpitis and 5.8% a pericoronitis. Mean age was 37.5 ± 17.0 years standard deviation (SD) (1.2-96.4). Most patients were 20 to 29 years (24.6%), followed by the age group of 30 to 39 year old patients (21.0%). Males were affected more frequently (55.5%) than females (45.5%). Most of the patients (64.5%) of the patients received a dental or surgical treatment. Antibiotics were prescribed in 31.7% of cases. Amoxicillin was the most common prescribed antibiotic (54.5%). Odontogenic infections represent one of the main reasons for consulting the emergency service. Due to the high number of cases and the severe complications, dentists have to be familiar with the surgical management of odontogenic infections as well as the appropriate use of antibiotics. Nearly half of all patients who sought, treatment in the emergency service had an odontogenic infectious disease. This should be considered for the organization and planning of the service.

  6. Clinical features and treatments of odontogenic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Chul; Lee, Sung Jin

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how clinical features such as sex, age, etiologic factors, and presenting symptoms of odontogenic sinusitis are differentiated from other types of sinusitis. Also, this study was designed to find methods for reducing the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis. A retrospective chart analysis was completed on twenty-seven patients with odontogenic sinusitis. They were all treated at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital between February 2006 and August 2008. The study protocol and informed consent forms were approved by the institutional review boards for human beings at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital. Ten patients (37.0%) had dental implant related complications and 8 (29.6%) had dental extraction related complications. Unilateral purulent nasal discharge was the most common symptom (66.7%). The therapeutic modality included transnasal endoscopic sinus surgery in 19 (70.4%) patients, and a Caldwell-Luc operation in two (7.4%) patients. In our study, there was no significant difference in the incidence between genders. The average age of the patients was 42.9 years. The incidence was highest in the fourth decade. There were no significant differences between the symptoms of odontogenic sinusitis and that of other types of sinusitis. However, almost all of the patients with odontogenic sinusitis had unilateral symptoms. Iatrogenic causes, which include dental implants and dental extractions, were the most common etiologic factors related to the development of odontogenic sinusitis. Therefore, a preoperative consultation between a rhinologist and a dentist prior to the dental procedure should be able to reduce the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis.

  7. Conserved odontogenic potential in embryonic dental tissues.

    PubMed

    Hu, X; Lin, C; Shen, B; Ruan, N; Guan, Z; Chen, Y; Zhang, Y

    2014-05-01

    Classic tissue recombination studies have demonstrated that, in the early developing mouse tooth germ, the odontogenic potential, known as the tooth-inductive capability, resides initially in the dental epithelium and then shifts to the dental mesenchyme. However, it remains unknown if human embryonic dental tissues also acquire such odontogenic potential. Here we present evidence that human embryonic dental tissues indeed possess similar tooth-inductive capability. We found that human dental epithelium from the cap stage but not the bell stage was able to induce tooth formation when confronted with human embryonic lip mesenchyme. In contrast, human dental mesenchyme from the bell stage but not the cap stage could induce mouse embryonic second-arch epithelium as well as human keratinocyte stem cells, to become enamel-secreting ameloblasts. We showed that neither post-natal human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) nor stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) possess odontogenic potential or are odontogenic-competent. Our results demonstrate a conservation of odontogenic potential in mouse and human dental tissues during early tooth development, and will have an implication in the future generation of stem-cell-based bioengineered human replacement teeth.

  8. Simultaneous adenomatoid odontogenic and keratocystic odontogenic tumours in a patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shephard, M; Shepard, M; Coleman, H

    2014-03-01

    Gorlin and Goltz described a syndrome in which multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts and bifid ribs occurred in combination. The jaw keratocysts are a consistent feature of 'Gorlin-Goltz' or naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Central nervous system and ocular involvement occurred together with the fairly typical facial features of frontal bossing and hypertelorism. This case report documents the pathology associated with an impacted maxillary canine tooth in a boy with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. The patient presented for investigation of the failure of eruption of the right permanent maxillary canine tooth. Radiographic investigation showed the presence of a well circumscribed radiolucency located around the crown of an impacted right maxillary canine tooth. The patient's medical history revealed a medulloblastoma that was treated 13 years ago. The right maxillary canine tooth and associated peri-coronal tissue were removed under general anaesthetic. A diagnosis of a keratocystic odontogenic tumour with an associated adenomatoid odontogenic tumour was made. The common differential diagnoses for a peri-coronal radiolucency in the maxilla that need to be considered by dentists include a dentigerous cyst, follicular keratocystic odontogenic tumour and adenomatoid odontogenic tumour. A rare case of both keratocystic odontogenic tumour and associated follicular adenomatoid odontogenic tumour is described in a patient with naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

  9. Keratocystic odontogenic tumour: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald-Jankowski, D S

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this review is to evaluate the principal clinical and conventional radiographic features of non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) by systematic review (SR), and to compare the frequencies between four global groups. Methods The databases searched were the PubMed interface of Medline and LILACS. Only those reports of KCOTs that occurred in a series of consecutive cases, in the reporting authors' caseload, were considered. Results 51 reports, of 49 series of cases, were included in the SR. 11 SR-included series were in languages other than English. KCOTs affected males more frequently and were three times more prevalent in the mandible. Although the mean age at first presentation was 37 years, the largest proportion of cases first presented in the third decade. The main symptom was swelling. Over a third were found incidentally. Nearly two-thirds displayed buccolingual expansion. Over a quarter of cases recurred. Only a quarter of all SR-included reported series of cases included details of at least one radiological feature. The East Asian global group presented significantly as well-defined, even corticated, multilocular radiolucencies with buccolingual expansion. The KCOTs affecting the Western global group significantly displayed an association with unerupted teeth. Conclusions Long-term follow-up of large series that would have revealed detailed radiographic description and long-term outcomes of non-syndromic KCOT was lacking. PMID:21159911

  10. Odontogenic infections. Complications. Systemic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Yolanda; Bagán, José Vicente; Murillo, Judith; Poveda, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    The term, odontogenic infection refers to an infection that originates in the tooth proper or in the tissues that closely surround it; said infection then progresses along the periodontia down to the apex, involving periapical bone and from this area, it then spreads through the bone and periosteum towards near-by or more distant structures. The relevance of this type of infection lies in that it can cause infections that compromise more distant structures (via direct spread and distant spread), for example, intracraneal, retropharyngeal and pulmonary pleural infections. Dissemination by means of the bloodstream can lead to rheumatic problems and deposits on the valves of the heart (endocarditis), etc. The conditions or factors that influence the spread of infection are dependent on the balance between patient-related conditions and microorganism-related conditions. The virulence of the affecting germs is dependent upon their quality and quantity and is one of the microbiological conditions that influences the infection. It is this virulence that promotes infectious invasion and the deleterious effects the microbe will have on the host. Patient-related conditions include certain systemic factors that determine host resistance, which may be impaired in situations such as immunodeficiency syndrome or in brittle diabetes, as well as local factors that will also exert their impact on the spread of the infection.

  11. A review of complications of odontogenic infections

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these “space infections” has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “odontogenic infections,” “complications,” and “risk factors.” PMID:27390486

  12. Immunolocalization of PTCH protein in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    PubMed

    Barreto, D C; Bale, A E; De Marco, L; Gomez, R S

    2002-11-01

    The human patched gene (PTCH) functions in both embryologic development and tumor suppression. PTCH mutations have been found in odontogenic keratocysts. However, the expression and localization of the protein product of the gene have not been determined in odontogenic tumors and cysts. We investigated 68 odontogenic lesions by immunohistochemistry, and compared their PTCH expression with that in basal cell carcinomas. All odontogenic lesions, including two keratocysts with truncating mutations, were positive for PTCH. Different types of lesions had different amounts of staining. Lack of staining was noted in the majority of basal cell carcinomas. Taken together, these data suggest that odontogenic keratocysts arise with heterozygous mutations of the PTCH gene.

  13. Systemic and Odontogenic Etiologies in Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Suh, Jeffrey D

    2017-02-01

    Systemic and odontogenic etiologies of chronic rhinosinusitis, although rare, are an integral consideration in the comprehensive management of patients with sinonasal disease. Proper knowledge and timely recognition of each disease process, with referrals to appropriate consultants, will facilitate treatment, because many of these conditions require both local and systemic therapy. In some instances, medical therapy plays a pivotal role, with surgery being a supplemental treatment technique. We review the most commonly encountered systemic etiologies of chronic rhinosinusitis and odontogenic sinusitis, including clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and treatment outcomes.

  14. [Spontaneous course of myxoma of the left atrium].

    PubMed

    Allal, J; Coisne, D; Ciber, M; Malin, F; Christiaens, L; Foullon, P; Barraine, R

    1988-10-01

    Little is known about the natural history of left intra-atrial myxomas. We report 3 cases of that disease where successive echocardiographic examinations provided figures of 11, 12 and 14 months respectively for the formation of the tumour in the left atrium. Echocardiography is perfectly reliable for the diagnosis of myxoma. False-negative results are rare and usually due to very small myxomas being beyond the resolution potential of the instrument; this seems to have been the case in 2 of our 3 patients. Two data, however, remain unknown: the beginning of formation and the rapidity of tumoral growth. These 3 cases raise the problem of repeat echocardiography some time after a cerebral accident of suspected embolic origin, when the initial examination is negative.

  15. An interleukin-6-producing cardiac myxoma associated with mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, T; Sumino, H; Kanda, T; Kobayashi, I; Nagai, R; Ichikawa, S

    1999-01-01

    We report our experience with a patient whose mediastinal lymphadenopathy resolved after resection of a cardiac myxoma that secreted interleukin-6 (IL-6). The patient was a 68-year-old female who complained of nocturnal chest discomfort related to congestive heart failure. An echocardiogram demonstrated a large left atrial mass. A computed tomogram showed not only the left atrial mass but multiple enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. The serum IL-6 level was markedly elevated at 13.7 pg/ml. After resection of the cardiac myxoma, serum IL-6 returned to the normal range. A repeat computed tomogram showed no mediastinal lymphadenopathy. We believe that overproduction of IL-6 by the cardiac myxoma was the cause of the mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

  16. The loud first heart sound in left atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Gershlick, A H; Leech, G; Mills, P G; Leatham, A

    1984-10-01

    The interrelation between the loudness of the first heart sound, the time interval from the Q wave to the onset of the first heart sound (QM1), and the mitral valve closure rate was studied in nine patients presenting with left atrial myxomata. In seven patients the first heart sound was loud preoperatively and was associated with delayed mitral valve closure. After removal of the myxoma the onset of mitral valve closure returned towards normal, the mitral valve closure rate was reduced, and the first heart sound became softer. In two patients the first heart sound was normal before and after operation as were both the time of onset of mitral valve closure and the mitral valve closure rate. In neither of these patients did the myxoma completely fill the mitral orifice during diastole. The loud first heart sound in left atrial myxoma is a useful clinical sign, and intensity is directly related to the delay in onset of closure of mitral leaflets.

  17. Glandular odontogenic cyst: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald-Jankowski, D S

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the principal features of “glandular odontogenic cyst” (GOC), by systematic review (SR), and to compare their frequencies among four global groups. Methods The databases searched were the PubMed interface of MEDLINE and LILACS. Only those reports of GOCs that occurred in a series in the reporting authors' caseload were considered. All cases were confirmed histopathologically. Results 18 reports on 17 series of consecutive cases were included in the SR. GOC affected males twice as frequently and the mandible almost three times as frequently. The mean age at first presentation was 44 years, coincident with that of the Western global group, in which the largest proportion of reports and cases first presented in the second half of the fifth decade. However, age at presentation of GOCs in the East Asian and sub-Saharan African global groups was nearly a decade younger, this was significant. Six reports included details of at least one clinical presentation. Eight reports included at least one conventional radiological feature. There were some significant differences between global groups. The Western global group had a particular predilection for the anterior sextants of both jaws. The sub-Saharan African group displayed buccolingual expansion (as did the Latin American group) and tooth displacement in every case. 18% of GOCs recurred overall, except in the sub-Saharan African global group. Conclusions GOCs have a marked propensity to recur in most global groups. GOCs presented in older patients and with swellings, affected the anterior sextants of both jaws, and radiologically were more likely to present as a well-defined unilocular radiolucency with buccolingual expansion. Tooth displacement, root resorption and an association with unerupted teeth occurred in 50%, 30% and 11% of cases, respectively. PMID:20203274

  18. Genetic Variability of Myxoma Virus Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Christoph; Thürmer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Schultz, Anne-Kathrin; Bulla, Ingo; Schirrmeier, Horst; Mayer, Dietmar; Neubert, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Myxomatosis is a recurrent problem on rabbit farms throughout Europe despite the success of vaccines. To identify gene variations of field and vaccine strains that may be responsible for changes in virulence, immunomodulation, and immunoprotection, the genomes of 6 myxoma virus (MYXV) strains were sequenced: German field isolates Munich-1, FLI-H, 2604, and 3207; vaccine strain MAV; and challenge strain ZA. The analyzed genomes ranged from 147.6 kb (strain MAV) to 161.8 kb (strain 3207). All sequences were affected by several mutations, covering 24 to 93 open reading frames (ORFs) and resulted in amino acid substitutions, insertions, or deletions. Only strains Munich-1 and MAV revealed the deletion of 10 ORFs (M007L to M015L) and 11 ORFs (M007L to M008.1L and M149R to M008.1R), respectively. Major differences were observed in the 27 immunomodulatory proteins encoded by MYXV. Compared to the reference strain Lausanne, strains FLI-H, 2604, 3207, and ZA showed the highest amino acid identity (>98.4%). In strains Munich-1 and MAV, deletion of 5 and 10 ORFs, respectively, was observed, encoding immunomodulatory proteins with ankyrin repeats or members of the family of serine protease inhibitors. Furthermore, putative immunodominant surface proteins with homology to vaccinia virus (VACV) were investigated in the sequenced strains. Only strain MAV revealed above-average frequencies of amino acid substitutions and frameshift mutations. Finally, we performed recombination analysis and found signs of recombination in vaccine strain MAV. Phylogenetic analysis showed a close relationship of strain MAV and the MSW strain of Californian MYXV. However, in a challenge model, strain MAV provided full protection against lethal challenges with strain ZA. IMPORTANCE Myxoma virus (MYXV) is pathogenic for European rabbits and two North American species. Due to sophisticated strategies in immune evasion and oncolysis, MYXV is an important model virus for immunological and

  19. Genetic Variability of Myxoma Virus Genomes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Christoph; Thürmer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Schultz, Anne-Kathrin; Bulla, Ingo; Schirrmeier, Horst; Mayer, Dietmar; Neubert, Andreas; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2017-02-15

    Myxomatosis is a recurrent problem on rabbit farms throughout Europe despite the success of vaccines. To identify gene variations of field and vaccine strains that may be responsible for changes in virulence, immunomodulation, and immunoprotection, the genomes of 6 myxoma virus (MYXV) strains were sequenced: German field isolates Munich-1, FLI-H, 2604, and 3207; vaccine strain MAV; and challenge strain ZA. The analyzed genomes ranged from 147.6 kb (strain MAV) to 161.8 kb (strain 3207). All sequences were affected by several mutations, covering 24 to 93 open reading frames (ORFs) and resulted in amino acid substitutions, insertions, or deletions. Only strains Munich-1 and MAV revealed the deletion of 10 ORFs (M007L to M015L) and 11 ORFs (M007L to M008.1L and M149R to M008.1R), respectively. Major differences were observed in the 27 immunomodulatory proteins encoded by MYXV. Compared to the reference strain Lausanne, strains FLI-H, 2604, 3207, and ZA showed the highest amino acid identity (>98.4%). In strains Munich-1 and MAV, deletion of 5 and 10 ORFs, respectively, was observed, encoding immunomodulatory proteins with ankyrin repeats or members of the family of serine protease inhibitors. Furthermore, putative immunodominant surface proteins with homology to vaccinia virus (VACV) were investigated in the sequenced strains. Only strain MAV revealed above-average frequencies of amino acid substitutions and frameshift mutations. Finally, we performed recombination analysis and found signs of recombination in vaccine strain MAV. Phylogenetic analysis showed a close relationship of strain MAV and the MSW strain of Californian MYXV. However, in a challenge model, strain MAV provided full protection against lethal challenges with strain ZA. Myxoma virus (MYXV) is pathogenic for European rabbits and two North American species. Due to sophisticated strategies in immune evasion and oncolysis, MYXV is an important model virus for immunological and pathological research. In

  20. [Big myxoma of the left atrium suggesting pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Teresa; Stachurski, Andrzej; Rachwalik, Maciej; Kustrzycki, Wojciech; Szełemej, Roman

    2010-06-01

    Cardiac myxomas are rare. They usually appear as a sporadic isolated mass in the left atrium of women with no other pathology. Our patient had symptoms which may suggest pulmonary embolism (PE)-TTE, D-dimers, ECG, laboratory findings seemed to confirm acute PE. Physical examination was unremarkable. Signs of pulmonary hypertension and shortened acceleration time also suggested PE. However, angio-CT excluded it. The patient was transfered to surgical department. During the operation the big myxoma filling the whole space of the left atrium and blocking the entrance to the left ventricle was found and easily removed. Kardiol Pol 2010; 68, 6: 695-696.

  1. Esophageal ulcer of unknown origin complicated by left atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Yuji; Yamagami, Shinichiro; Hayakawa, Daisuke; Takashima, Shiori; Nomura, Osamu; Sai, Eiryu; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Matsuyama, Shujiro; Watanabe, Sumio; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Myxoma induces the onset of paraneoplastic syndromes by excreting various humoral mediators and is therefore known to present with diverse symptoms. A 40-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of an esophageal ulcer, the cause of which could not be identified on various examinations. Notably, a left atrial tumor was incidentally found on chest enhanced computed tomography. The esophageal ulcer, which was intractable to conventional therapy, improved with the administration of 5-aminosalicylate, a drug known to inhibit IL-1β. This inhibitory action effectively suppressed the development of myxoma-induced paraneoplastic syndrome.

  2. Biochemical and Cytological Comparison of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumours to Nonkeratinising Odontogenic Cysts Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Pushparaj; Patidar, Nitesh; Mittal, Sugandh; Singh, Hanspal; Chethna

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the levels of albumin, prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and presence of keratinocytes in the cystic fluid for the diagnosis and appropriate treatment planning of keratocystic odontogenic tumours and other non keratinizing odontogenic cysts. Materials and Methods Fifteen keratocystic odontogenic tumour and 15 controls were studied. The cystic fluid was aspirated and analysed to determine the levels of albumin, prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and the presence of keratinocytes. The data collected was statistically evaluated using Mann Whitney U-Test and Student’s t-test. Results A highly significant difference (p<0.0001) was seen when a comparison of Prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and presence of keratinocytes was made between keratocystic odontogenic tumour and non keratinizing odontogenic cysts. The presence of albumin also showed a significant difference (p<0.01). Conclusion A combined analysis of total protein, albumin, prealbumin, inorganic phosphorous and detection of epithelial squames may be used as a diagnostic adjunct in the preoperative diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumour in a minimally invasive and highly accurate fashion. PMID:26393202

  3. Oncolytic Myxoma Virus: The path to clinic

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Winnie M.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; McFadden, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Many common neoplasms are still noncurative with current standards of cancer therapy. More therapeutic modalities need to be developed to significantly prolong the lives of patients and eventually cure a wider spectrum of cancers. Oncolytic virotherapy is one of the promising new additions to clinical cancer therapeutics. Successful oncolytic virotherapy in the clinic will be those strategies that best combine tumor cell oncolysis with enhanced immune responses against tumor antigens. The current candidate oncolytic viruses all share the common property that they are relatively nonpathogenic to humans, yet they have the ability to replicate selectively in human cancer cells and induce cancer regression by direct oncolysis and/or induction of improved anti-tumor immune responses. Many candidate oncolytic viruses are in various stages of clinical and preclinical development. One such preclinical candidate is myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family that, in its natural setting, exhibits a very restricted host range and is only pathogenic to European rabbits. Despite its narrow host range in nature, MYXV has been shown to productively infect various classes of human cancer cells. Several preclinical in vivo modeling studies have demonstrated that MYXV is an attractive and safe candidate oncolytic virus, and hence, MYXV is currently being developed as a potential therapeutic for several cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, and hematologic malignancies. This review highlights the preclinical cancer models that have shown the most promise for translation of MYXV into human clinical trials. PMID:23726825

  4. Oncolytic myxoma virus: the path to clinic.

    PubMed

    Chan, Winnie M; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2013-09-06

    Many common neoplasms are still noncurative with current standards of cancer therapy. More therapeutic modalities need to be developed to significantly prolong the lives of patients and eventually cure a wider spectrum of cancers. Oncolytic virotherapy is one of the promising new additions to clinical cancer therapeutics. Successful oncolytic virotherapy in the clinic will be those strategies that best combine tumor cell oncolysis with enhanced immune responses against tumor antigens. The current candidate oncolytic viruses all share the common property that they are relatively nonpathogenic to humans, yet they have the ability to replicate selectively in human cancer cells and induce cancer regression by direct oncolysis and/or induction of improved anti-tumor immune responses. Many candidate oncolytic viruses are in various stages of clinical and preclinical development. One such preclinical candidate is myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family that, in its natural setting, exhibits a very restricted host range and is only pathogenic to European rabbits. Despite its narrow host range in nature, MYXV has been shown to productively infect various classes of human cancer cells. Several preclinical in vivo modeling studies have demonstrated that MYXV is an attractive and safe candidate oncolytic virus, and hence, MYXV is currently being developed as a potential therapeutic for several cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, and hematologic malignancies. This review highlights the preclinical cancer models that have shown the most promise for translation of MYXV into human clinical trials.

  5. Myxoma virus: propagation, purification, quantification, and storage.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Sherin E; Rahman, Masmudur M; Smith, Dorothy W; McFadden, Grant

    2010-05-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a member of the Poxviridae family and prototype for the genus Leporipoxvirus. It is pathogenic only for European rabbits, in which it causes the lethal disease myxomatosis, and two North American species, in which it causes a less severe disease. MYXV replicates exclusively in the cytoplasm of the host cell. Although not infectious in humans, its genome encodes proteins that can interfere with or modulate host defense mechanisms; it is able to productively infect a number of human cancer cell lines, but not normal human cells, and has also been shown to increase survival time in mouse models of human glioma. These characteristics suggest that MYXV could be a viable therapeutic agent, e.g., in anti-inflammatory or anti-immune therapy, or as an oncolytic agent. MYXV is also an excellent model for poxvirus biology, pathogenesis, and host tropism studies. It is easily propagated in a number of cell lines, including adherent cells and suspension cultures, and minimal purification is required to provide a stock for in vivo and in vitro studies.

  6. Malignant transformation in odontogenic keratocysts. Case report.

    PubMed

    Keszler, A; Piloni, M J

    2002-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma arising in the epithelial lining of an odontogenic keratocyst is a rare finding. Up to now, only 12 cases have been reported in the literature. The present work reports a new case diagnosed in a 70 year old man. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings and the treatment are described.

  7. Cartilage in the walls of odontogenic keratocyst.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Barrero, Mario; Báez-Marrero, Oswaldo; Alfonso-Martín, Juan Luis; Knezevic, Milan; Báez-Acosta, Beatriz; Camacho-García, Maria del Carmen; Montenegro-Dámaso, Társila

    2004-01-01

    There are seven published cases in world literature on cartilage in the walls of odontogenic keratocysts. Herein is presented one further case with keratin inclusions in the cystic wall, which also bears a cartilaginous component. X-rays, clinical images and pathohistological images are included.

  8. Primordial odontogenic tumor: An immunohistochemical profile

    PubMed Central

    Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Mikami, Toshinari; Pereira-Prado, Vanesa; Pires, Fabio-Ramoa; Carlos-Bregni, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Background Primordial Odontogenic Tumor (POT) is a recently described odontogenic tumor characterized by a variably cellular loose fibrous tissue with areas similar to the dental papilla, covered by cuboidal to columnar epithelium that resembles the internal epithelium of the enamel organ, surrounded at least partly by a delicate fibrous capsule. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible histogenesis and biological behavior of this rare tumor by means of a wide immunohistochemical analysis of its epithelial and mesenchymal components. Material and Methods The immunoexpression of twenty-three different antibodies were evaluated in four cases of POT. Results The epithelial cells that cover the periphery of the tumor showed immunopositivity for Cytokeratins 14 and 19, while Amelogenin, Glut-1, MOC-31, Caveolin-1. Galectin-3, PITX2, p53, Bax, Bcl-2, Survivin and PTEN were variably expressed in focal areas. The mesenchymal component of the tumor was positive for Vimentin, Syndecan-1, PITX2, Endoglin (CD105), CD 34, Cyclin D1, Bax, Bcl-2, Survivin and p53. PTEN and CD 90 showed a moderate positivity. BRAF V600E and Calretinin were negative in all samples. Cell proliferation markers (Ki-67, MCM-7) were expressed in <5% of the tumor cells. Conclusions According to these immunohistochemical findings, we may conclude that POT is a benign odontogenic tumor in which there is both epithelial and mesenchymal activity during its histogenesis, as there is expression of certain components in particular zones in both tissues that suggests this tumor develops during the immature (primordial) stage of tooth development, leading to its inclusion within the group of benign mixed epithelial and mesenchymal odontogenic tumours in the current World Health Organization classification of these lesions. Key words:Immunohistochemistry, jaw tumors, odontogenic, primordial. PMID:28390134

  9. An Interesting Case of Intramuscular Myxoma with Scapular Bone Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Tirefort, Jérôme; Kolo, Frank C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Intramuscular myxoma is a rare benign primitive tumor of the mesenchyme founded at the skeletal muscle level; it presents itself like an unpainful, slow-growing mass. Myxomas with bone lysis are even more rare; only 7 cases have been reported in the English literature, but never at the shoulder level. Case Presentation. We describe an 83-year-old patient with a growing mass in the deltoid muscle with unique scapular lysis, without any symptom. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a biopsy were performed and the diagnosis of intramuscular myxoma has been retained. In front of this diagnosis of nonmalignant lesion, the decision of a simple follow-up was taken. One year after this decision, the patient was still asymptomatic. Conclusion. In the presence of an intramuscular growing mass with associated bone lysis, intramuscular myxoma as well as malignant tumor should be evoked. MRI has to be part of the initial radiologic appraisal but biopsy is essential to confirm the diagnosis. By consensus, the standard treatment is surgical excision but conservative treatment with simple follow-up can be an option. PMID:28194289

  10. Juxtaarticular Myxoma in a Pigtail Macaque (Macaca nemestrina)

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Brianna L; Johnson, Crystal H; Lacy, Shannon H

    2016-01-01

    A 10-y-old pigtail macaque presented with a subcutaneous, soft-tissue mass overlying the right stifle joint. Here we describe the clinical case and histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis of this lesion. This case represents the first published report of juxtaarticular myxoma in a pigtail macaque. PMID:27780010

  11. Juxta-articular Myxoma of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhou-Xi; Yang, Chi; Chen, Min-Jie; Wilson, Julian J

    2015-11-01

    The juxta-articular myxoma represents a benign mesenchymal neoplasm that arises from tissue within or adjacent to a joint space. There have been a number of reported cases involving myxomas of the knee, shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hip. To our knowledge there, however, have been no reported cases of juxta-articular myxomas of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This report describes the case of a 57-year-old woman with a juxta-articular myxoma of the left TMJ extending into the infratemporal fossa (ITF). Access to the tumor was accomplished via a preauricular incision and low condylar osteotomy which allowed for displacement of the condyle for direct visualization and excision of the tumor. The postoperative course was benign and the patient demonstrated no cosmetic or functional limitation. Likewise, follow-up at 30 months showed no evidence of recurrence. Benign encapsulated tumors of the ITF can be effectively accessed by means of a modified preauricular incision, low condylar osteotomy, and anterior meniscal release. This direct approach allows for excellent surgical exposure, minimal surgical site morbidity, and maintenance of physiologic joint function and occlusion.

  12. Sporadic Multicentric Right Atrial and Right Ventricular Myxoma Presenting as Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyajit; Tripathy, Mahendra Prasad; Mohanty, Bipin Bihari; Biswas, Sutapa

    2016-01-01

    Multicentric cardiac myxoma is a rare syndrome; usually it is familial. We report a rare case of sporadic right atrium (RA) and right ventricle (RV) myxoma in a 26-year-old female presenting to our hospital for the evaluation of sudden onset of dyspnea and left precordial pain attributed to the embolization of degenerating tumor fragments to the pulmonary artery (PA). The exact incidence of sporadic multicentric RA and RV myxoma presenting as acute pulmonary embolism is unknown as multicentric RA and RV myxoma are very rare. Myxomas presenting as pulmonary embolism is <10%. Majority of cardiac myxomas present as exertional dyspnea, chest pain, positional syncope, fever, weight loss and other constitutional symptoms. Any young patient presenting with acute onset dyspnea with multiple cardiac masses may have tumor embolization to the PA diagnosis with transthoracic echocardiography and high-resolution computed tomography of thorax, fast-tracks patient transfer for urgent cardiac surgery to prevent further embolization.

  13. Cardiac myxoma causing acute ischemic stroke in a pediatric patient and a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jennifer; Leszczyszyn, David; Mathew, Don

    2014-05-01

    Ischemic stroke in the pediatric population is a rare occurrence, and its possible causes span a wide differential that includes atrial myxomas. Myxomas are friable cardiac tumors that produce "showers" of emboli resulting in transient neurological deficits, cutaneous eruptions, and ophthalmologic deficits. We present an 11-year-old boy with a months-long history of an intermittent spotted "rash" who presented with acute ischemic stroke caused by a left atrial myxoma. We also review clinical features in all 16 other cases of cardiac myxoma causing pediatric stroke reported in the literature. Our case, along with the review of the literature, highlights the fact that myxomas often initially present as stroke with acute hemiplegia and transient cutaneous eruptions due to fragmentation of the tumor. Cardiac myxoma should be considered in any child presenting with ischemic stroke, and transient skin findings may provide an important diagnostic clue prior to onset of neurological symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Maxillary peripheral keratocystic odontogenic tumor. A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Romero, María del Carmen; Serrera-Figallo, María de los Angeles; Alberdi-Navarro, Javier; Cabezas-Talavero, Javier; Romero-Ruiz, Manuel-María; Aguirre-Urizar, Jose-Manuel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, Jose-Luis

    2017-01-01

    The keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign odontogenic cystic neoplasia characterized by its thin, squamous epithelium with superficial parakeratosis. It has the potential for infiltration and local aggressiveness and has a high rate of recurrence. This neoplasia is predominantly found in males and people of white origin. The mandible is the most frequently involved site, in particular the third molar region, mandibular angle, and ramus. It has a mandible-maxilla ratio of 2:1. Only about twenty cases of peripheral keratocystic odontogenic tumors (PKCOT) have been reported in the international literature. This study presents a case of PKCOT localized in the anterior region of the maxilla, on the vestibular side of the upper left lateral incisor and the upper left canine. The diagnosis and treatment procedures, as based on the literature, are also discussed. Key words:Odontogenic cysts, odontogenic tumors, keratocyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:28149484

  15. Extrafollicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor: An Unusual Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Kundoor, Vinay Kumar; Maloth, Kotya Naik; Guguloth, Nagu Naik; Kesidi, Sunitha

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is an uncommon tumor of odontogenic origin and often misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst. It is predominantly found in young female patients, located more often in maxilla, and in most cases associated with an unerupted permanent tooth. There are three variants of AOT namely follicular, extra follicular, and peripheral. We report an unusual case of extrafollicular AOT in maxilla of a 50-year old male patient. PMID:27942555

  16. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with ameloblastic fibro-odontoma of the anterior mandible.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Song, Young-Gook; Moon, Seong-Yong; Choi, Boyoung; Kim, Bong Chul; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2014-05-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, which was formerly named calcifying odontogenic cyst, is a benign odontogenic tumor containing clusters of ghost cells within ameloblastic epithelium. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors have been associated with other odontogenic tumors, a finding that is a rare event in other types of odontogenic cysts or tumors. This report describes a case of hybrid odontogenic tumor composed of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastic fibroma-odontoma of the anterior mandible that occurred in a 4-year-old Korean girl.

  17. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: As an unusual mandibular manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neeraj; Passi, Sidhi; Kumar, Vinay V.

    2012-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare odontogenic tumor which is often misdiagnosed as odontogenic cyst and accounts for about 1% until 9% of all odontogenic tumors. It is predominantly found in young and female patients, located more often in the maxilla in most cases associated with an unerupted permanent tooth. It is a benign (hamartomatous), noninvasive lesion with slow but progressive growth. There are three variants of AOT: follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral. We report a rare case of follicular-type AOT in the mandible of a 14-year-old male patient who presented with right -sided jaw swelling. PMID:22629062

  18. Left atrial myxoma, ruptured chordae tendinae causing mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Raj, Ravi; Jayant, Aveek; Kuthe, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation is uncommon with left atrial myxoma. The echocardiographic assessment of presence of mitral regurgitation and its severity are impaired by the presence of left atrial myxoma. We describe an uncommon association of left atrial myxoma with coronary artery disease and mitral regurgitation. MR was reported as mild on pre-operative transthoracic echocardiography but found to be severe due to ruptured chordae tendinae during intra-operative transesophageal echocardiography, which lead to change in the surgical plan to mitral valve replacement in addition to excision of myxoma.

  19. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst

    PubMed Central

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-01-01

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. This case emphases on including OOC in the differential diagnosis of radiolucencies occurring in the periapical region of non-vital tooth. PMID:24099763

  20. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-10-07

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. This case emphases on including OOC in the differential diagnosis of radiolucencies occurring in the periapical region of non-vital tooth.

  1. Odontogenic keratocyst: a clinical experience in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chow, H T

    1998-11-01

    The odontogenic keratocyst has been well documented and extensively studied. It is of particular interest because of its high recurrence rate and aggressive nature. The material for this study consisted of 70 cases of odontogenic keratocysts in predominantly ethnic Chinese patients who were treated from 1981 to 1996. The cases were retrospectively studied to compare characteristics of the lesion in this population with those in previous reports. Most of the patients in this series were 21 to 30 years of age. Association with an impacted mandibular third molar was found in more than 50% of the cases. The recurrence rate was 20% for 35 patients with a follow-up period of at least 5 years. The follow-up period for the whole series ranged from 1 to 16 years. Treatment was surgical enucleation with peripheral ostectomy. There were no significant differences in characteristics with respect to presentation and prognosis between this series and those described in previous publications.

  2. Pigmented odontogenic tumors: Adding color to diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Bhanu, Udhay; Kulkarni, Rasika; Boaz, Karen; Srikant, N

    2014-01-01

    Melanocytes are neural crest derivatives that exhibit a ubiquitous presence in the epidermis. They determine the complexion of an individual and most importantly, provide a barrier against ultraviolet radiations from the sun. Their presence in the oral cavity is a consistent finding, especially in the gingiva and buccal mucosa of the dark complexioned. Melanocytes occasionally form a part of the histology of a variety of odontogenic cysts and tumors. How these cells make their way into the lesional tissue and the diagnostic relevance of their presence remains elusive. This write up attempts to trace the path melanocytes take to find themselves within odontogenic tumors and also offer possible explanations for the same. PMID:25948995

  3. Severe odontogenic infection: An emergency. Case report

    PubMed Central

    Crisosto-Jara, Claudia; Diaz-Ricouz, Camilo; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenic infections (OI) are a major reason for consultation in dental practice. They affect people of all ages, and most of them respond well to current medical and surgical treatments. However, some OI can spread to vital and deep structures, overcome the host immune system - especially in diabetic, immunocompromised or weakened patients - and even prove fatal. Ludwig’s angina is a severe form of diffuse cellulitis that can have an acute onset and spread very rapidly, bilaterally affecting areas of the head and neck, and may prove life threatening. A case of severe dental infection is presented in which emphasis is placed on the importance of airway maintenance, followed by surgical decompression under adequate antibiotic coverage. Key words:Ludwig’s angina, severe odontogenic infection, surgical decompression, dental infection. PMID:28210456

  4. Giant keratocystic odontogenic tumor: a challenging diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Rachna; Punyani, Silky Rajesh; Raj, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    The keratocystic odontogenic tumor, although a benign lesion, is peculiarly aggressive with a high recurrence rate. Its involvement with the maxillary antrum is atypical. We report the unusual case of a 20-year-old male patient with an extensive antral tumor associated with an impacted third molar, which was initially misdiagnosed as a dentigerous cyst. Clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic aspects were analyzed to provide useful information for the correct diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis within a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27818958

  5. Odontogenic ghost cell tumour with clear cell components: clear cell odontogenic ghost cell tumour?

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Hoon; Ahn, Sang Gun; Kim, Su Gwan; Kim, Jin

    2004-07-01

    A case of odontogenic ghost cell tumour (OGCT) with clear cell components was encountered in the mandible of a 63-year-old man. The tumour revealed ameloblastomatous-type epithelial components accompanied by clusters of ghost cells and dentinoid juxtaposed to the odontogenic epithelium. In addition, some areas of the tumour tissue showed sheets and islands of clear, glycogen containing epithelial cells, which were separated by a thin fibrous connective tissue stroma. Both ameloblastic and clear cells exhibited positive immunoreactivities for cytokeratin 19 and AE1/3. It is not known whether this tumour represents a clear cell change of a pre-existing OGCT or a separate and distinct neoplasm derived de novo from the odontogenic epithelium. This tumour was given the term 'clear cell OGCT' because it captures the clear cell components, which is one of the most prominent distinguishing features of the tumour.

  6. Different manifestations of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Utumi, Estevam Rubens; Pedron, Irineu Gregnanin; da Silva, Leopoldo Penteado Nucci; Machado, Gustavo Grothe; Rocha, André Caroli

    2012-01-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor normally presents as a painless, slow-growing mass, involving both maxilla and mandible, primarily the anterior segment (incisor/canine area). It generally affects young adults in the third to fourth decades, with no gender predilection. Computerized tomography images revealed important characteristics that were not detected by panoramic radiography, such as fenestration, calcification and tooth-like structures. The typical microscopic feature of this lesion is the presence of variable amounts of aberrant epithelial cells, without nuclei, which are named "ghost cells". In addition, dysplastic dentine can be found and occasionally the cyst can be associated with an area of dental hard tissue formation resembling an odontoma. The treatment for calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor involves simple enucleation and curettage. The purpose of this article is to present two different manifestation of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor in which computerized tomography, associated to clinical features, served as an important tool for diagnosis, adequate surgical planning and follow-up of patients.

  7. Classification of odontogenic tumours. A historical review.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Hans Peter; Reichart, Peter A

    2006-10-01

    Using the term odontome for any tumour arising from the dental formative tissues, Broca suggested a classification of odontogenic tumours (OTs) in 1869. From 1888 to 1914, Bland-Sutton and Gabell, James and Payne modified tumour terminology, while maintaining Broca's odontome concept. Thoma and Goldman's classification (1946) divided the OTs into tumours of ectodermal, mesodermal and mixed origin and abolished the general term odontome. The Pindborg and Clausen classification (1958) based on the idea that the reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal tissue interactions were also operating in the pathogenesis of OTs. In 1966, WHO established a Collaborating Centre for the Histological Classification of Odontogenic Tumours and Allied Lesions (including jaw cysts) headed by Dr Jens Pindborg. In 1971, the first authoritative WHO guide to the classification of OTs and cysts appeared followed in 1992 by a second edition. In 2002, Philipsen and Reichart produced a revision of the 1992-edition and in 2003, the editors of the WHO Blue Book series: 'WHO Classification of Tumours' decided to produce a volume on the Head and Neck Tumours including a chapter on Odontogenic Tumours and Bone Related Lesions. In July of 2005 this volume was published by IARC, Lyon.

  8. PTCH gene mutations in odontogenic keratocysts.

    PubMed

    Barreto, D C; Gomez, R S; Bale, A E; Boson, W L; De Marco, L

    2000-06-01

    An odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a benign cystic lesion of the jaws that occurs sporadically or in association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). Recently, the gene for NBCCS was cloned and shown to be the human homologue of the Drosophila segment polarity gene Patched (PTCH), a tumor suppressor gene. The PTCH gene encodes a transmembrane protein that acts in opposition to the Hedgehog signaling protein, controlling cell fates, patterning, and growth in numerous tissues, including tooth. We investigated three cases of sporadic odontogenic keratocysts and three other cases associated with NBCCS, looking for mutations of the PTCH gene. Non-radioactive single-strand conformational polymorphism and direct sequencing of PCR products revealed a deletion of 5 base pairs (bp) in exon 3 (518delAAGCG) in one sporadic cyst as well as mutations in two cysts associated with NBCCS, a nonsense (C2760A) and a missense (G3499A) alteration. This report is the first to describe a somatic mutation of PTCH in sporadic odontogenic keratocysts as well as two novel mutations in cysts associated with NBCCS, indicating a similar pathogenesis in a subset of sporadic keratocysts.

  9. Ameloblastic fibrosarcoma: a rare malignant odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Gilani, S M; Raza, A; Al-Khafaji, B M

    2014-02-01

    Ameloblastic fibrosarcoma (AFS) is a rare malignant odontogenic tumor. It can arise de novo, however one-third of cases may arise from a recurrent ameloblastic fibroma, in which case they appear to present at an older age. A 16-year-old female presented with one month history of right mandibular mass. Computerized tomography (CT) scan showed a large destructive mass. A biopsy of the mass was performed. Histologically, it consisted of a mixed epithelial-mesenchymal odontogenic neoplasm composed of benign islands of well-differentiated ameloblastic epithelium within a malignant fibrous stroma consisting of spindle cells or fibroblasts with a brisk mitotic activity. The malignant spindle cell proliferation showed positive staining with p-53 and a high proliferation index with ki-67. A diagnosis of AFS was rendered. The differential diagnosis includes other odontogenic sarcomas, ameloblastic carcinosarcoma and spindle cell carcinoma. Treatment of choice is wide surgical excision, with long-term follow-up. Postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy has been used successfully in a few reported cases. AFS is a locally aggressive malignant tumor, with regional and distant metastases being uncommon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Odontogenic Keratocyst in Children: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamil, Ahmed H.; Tarakji, Bassel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Is to highlight the characteristics and management of odontogenic keratocyst in children only Material and Method: Computerized search in pubmed between (2005-2015) using specific words such as odontogenic keratocyst in children, odontogenic keratocyst association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with abstract written in English only. Result: During computerized literature search 77 articles in the years (2005-2015) were found. All these publications were miscellaneous studies including case series and case reports. Only 35 papers were selected which conform to our criteria. Most of the papers indicate that the histological type of keratocyst prevalent in children was parakeratinized variant, and most of the cases occurred in maxilla rather than mandible. Conclusion: We recommend that the surgeons who treat keratocysts in children take into consideration the late presentation in addition to the destructive nature and high recurrence rate. General practitioners face difficulty in early detection and referral of children with keratocysts or Gorlin syndrome. Treatment by multidiscplinary team is important if associated with Gorlin's syndrome Postoperative follow up is advised every 6 months. PMID:27335612

  11. The management of odontogenic infections. A rationale for appropriate chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baker, K A; Fotos, P G

    1994-10-01

    Odontogenic infections are one of the most frequently occurring infectious processes known to health practice. Significant changes have occurred in the use of antibiotics and antimicrobials since the use of chemotherapeutic agents became widespread. This article provides some important considerations for selecting appropriate chemotherapeutic agents during the management of odontogenic infections.

  12. [Fever, asthenia, myalgia and murmur due to cardiac myxoma].

    PubMed

    Giménez Roca, C; Felipe Villalobos, A; Cambra Lasaosa, F J; Prada Martínez, F; Caffarena Calvar, J M; Jou Muñoz, C

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac tumours are rare, especially in children, and most of them are benign. Myxomas are unusual in children, being more common among adults. They are usually located in the left atrium, with 25% appearing in the right. The clinical signs and symptoms depend mainly on where the tumour is located. A feature of these tumours is that they can be accompanied by constitutional symptoms and laboratory abnormalities. Echocardiography is the study of choice, and a prompt resection is required to prevent serious complications. We present a case of a 10 year-old girl diagnosed with right atrial myxoma who presented with a fever, myalgia, asthenia and laboratory abnormalities. Diagnosis was made by echocardiography, and the early surgical resection of the tumour ran smoothly and showed a good postoperative recovery.

  13. A large left atrial myxoma causing multiple cerebral infarcts.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Saba; Edmunds, Eiry; Raybould, Adrian

    2013-11-27

    A 52-year-old man presented with a history of sudden onset diplopia. On neurological examination, the only abnormality was a right-sided oculomotor (third nerve) palsy. A brain CT was performed and reported as showing no abnormality. He was discharged to be investigated as an outpatient. He presented 1 month later with a new expressive dysphasia and confusional state. MRI was performed which revealed multiple cerebral infarcts. He was discharged on secondary stroke prevention medication. Six months elapsed, before a transthoracic echocardiogram was performed. This showed a large left atrial myxoma. The patient underwent an emergency resection and made a good postoperative recovery. This case report showed the importance of considering a cardiogenic source of emboli in patients who present with cerebral infarcts. Performing echocardiography early will help to detect treatable conditions such as atrial myxoma, and prevent further complications.

  14. Treatment of an 8-mm Myxoma Using Acellular Corneal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyung Sup; Wee, Sung Wook

    2014-01-01

    A myxoma is a benign tumor found in the heart and in various soft tissues; however, a corneal myxoma is rare. A mucinous mass of unknown etiology was observed on the left cornea of a 32-year-old male patient. We performed deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty using acellular corneal tissue and concurrent amniotic membrane transplantation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed vacuolation of the parenchyma and myxoid change in the corneal tissue that occurred in the anterior half of the corneal parenchyma. We identified a myxoid stroma by Alcian blue staining and observed collagen fibers with denatured stroma by Masson trichrome staining. The patient's visual acuity improved from light perception to 20 / 200, and the intraocular pressure remained within the normal range for one year after surgery. The transplanted cornea survived successfully with well-maintained transparency, and recurrence was not observed one year after surgery. PMID:24505204

  15. A large left atrial myxoma causing multiple cerebral infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Kebede, Saba; Edmunds, Eiry; Raybould, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    A 52-year-old man presented with a history of sudden onset diplopia. On neurological examination, the only abnormality was a right-sided oculomotor (third nerve) palsy. A brain CT was performed and reported as showing no abnormality. He was discharged to be investigated as an outpatient. He presented 1 month later with a new expressive dysphasia and confusional state. MRI was performed which revealed multiple cerebral infarcts. He was discharged on secondary stroke prevention medication. Six months elapsed, before a transthoracic echocardiogram was performed. This showed a large left atrial myxoma. The patient underwent an emergency resection and made a good postoperative recovery. This case report showed the importance of considering a cardiogenic source of emboli in patients who present with cerebral infarcts. Performing echocardiography early will help to detect treatable conditions such as atrial myxoma, and prevent further complications. PMID:24285802

  16. JAB1 accelerates odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lian, Min; Zhang, Ye; Shen, Qijie; Xing, Jing; Lu, Xiaohui; Huang, Dan; Cao, Peipei; Shen, Shuling; Zheng, Ke; Zhang, Jinlong; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yi; Feng, Guijuan; Feng, Xingmei

    2016-06-01

    Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) is a multifunctional protein that participates in the control of cell proliferation and the stability of multiple proteins. JAB1 regulates several key proteins, and thereby produces varied effects on cell cycle progression, genome stability and cell survival. Some studies have shown that the loss of JAB1 in osteochondral progenitor cells severely impairs embryonic limb development in mice. However, the biological significance of JAB1 activity in the odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the role of JAB1, a key player in tooth development, in reparative dentin formation, especially odontogenic differentiation. We found that increased expression of JAB1 promoted odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs via Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The role of JAB1 in the odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs was further confirmed by knocking down JAB1. Our findings provide novel insights on odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs.

  17. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors. PMID:26221475

  18. Multiple non-syndromic odontogenic keratocysts in three siblings

    PubMed Central

    Nirwan, Amit; Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Saikhedkar, Rashmi; Karun, Vinayak

    2013-01-01

    Occurrence of multiple cysts (MC) involving the jaw is rare. When multiple, it is usually associated with a syndrome. Occurrence of MC without syndromic association is extremely rare. Multiple odontogenic cysts mostly could be odontogenic keratocysts or dentigerous cysts. Odontogenic keratocyst shows involvement of mandible over maxilla, with peak incidence in second and third decade and it is exceedingly rare before 10 years of age. However multiple odontogenic keratocysts found in children are often reflective of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Here is a case report which documents multiple jaw cysts involving both the jaws, in three siblings of ages 10, 13 and 17 years with negative parental history. All three reported cases were free of any systemic involvement. As odontogenic keratocyst spreads through bone marrow, destruction is more before any clinical manifestation. Therefore, early detection and intervention are essential in preventing extensive destruction. PMID:23505078

  19. Multiple non-syndromic odontogenic keratocysts in three siblings.

    PubMed

    Nirwan, Amit; Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Saikhedkar, Rashmi; Karun, Vinayak

    2013-03-14

    Occurrence of multiple cysts (MC) involving the jaw is rare. When multiple, it is usually associated with a syndrome. Occurrence of MC without syndromic association is extremely rare. Multiple odontogenic cysts mostly could be odontogenic keratocysts or dentigerous cysts. Odontogenic keratocyst shows involvement of mandible over maxilla, with peak incidence in second and third decade and it is exceedingly rare before 10 years of age. However multiple odontogenic keratocysts found in children are often reflective of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Here is a case report which documents multiple jaw cysts involving both the jaws, in three siblings of ages 10, 13 and 17 years with negative parental history. All three reported cases were free of any systemic involvement. As odontogenic keratocyst spreads through bone marrow, destruction is more before any clinical manifestation. Therefore, early detection and intervention are essential in preventing extensive destruction.

  20. Huge right atrial myxoma causing fixed tricuspid stenosis with constitutional symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kuralay, Erkan; Cingöz, Faruk; Günay, Celalettin; Demirkiliç, Ufuk; Tatar, Harun

    2003-01-01

    Nonspecific constitutional symptoms are reported mostly in patients with left-atrial myxomas, which occur five times as often as its right-atrial counterpart. We present huge right-atrial myxoma, which obstructs tricuspid orifice with nonspecific constitutional symptoms without any pulmonary embolism attack.

  1. Simultaneous resection of left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma via right thoraco-abdominal approach

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Buqing; Lu, Xiaohu; Gong, Qixing

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant occurrence of atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma is an extremely rare entity. Here we present two cases of synchronously suffered left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma. Both patients underwent simultaneous resection of two tumors via the right thoraco-abdominal approach and recovered well. PMID:27499990

  2. Central odontogenic fibroma: Retrospective study of 8 clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    Hrichi, Radia; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: The central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a benign odontogenic tumour derived from the dental mesenchymal tissues. It is a rare tumour and only 70 cases of it have been published. Bearing in mind the rareness of the tumour, 8 new cases of central odontogenic fibroma have been found by analyzing the clinical, radiological and histopathological characteristics of COF. Patients and Method: A retrospective study was carried out on 3011 biopsies in the Service of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Dental Clinic of Barcelona University between January 1995 and March 2008. 85 odontogenic tumours were diagnosed of which 8 were central odontogenic fibroma. The radiological study was based on orthopantomographs, periapical and occlusal radiographies and computerised tomographics. The variables collected were: sex, age, clinical characteristics of the lesion, treatment received and possible reappearances of the tumour. Results: The central odontogenic fibroma represents 9.4% of all odontogenic tumours. Of the 8 cases, 5 were diagnosed in men and 3 in women. The average age was 19.9 years with an age range of 11 to 38 years. The most common location of the tumour was in the mandible. All cases were associated with unerupted teeth. Of the 8 tumours, 3 provoked rhizolysis of the adjacent teeth and 4 cases caused cortical bone expansion. 50% of the patients complained of pain associated to the lesion. No case of recurrence was recorded up to 2 years after the treatment. Conclusions: Central odontogenic fibromas usually evolve asymptomatically although they can manifest very aggressively provoking dental displacement and rhizolysis. Radiologically, COF manifest as a uni or multilocular radiotransparent image although they can be indistinguishable from other radiotransparent lesions making diagnosis more difficult. COF treatment involves conservative surgery as well as follow-up patient checks. Key words: Odontogenic tumour, central odontogenic

  3. Fever of unknown origin from a left atrial myxoma: an immunologic basis and cytokine association.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiun-Nong; Lai, Chung-Hsu; Lu, Li-Fen; Lin, Hsi-Hsun

    2011-05-01

    Myxoma is the most common primary tumor of the heart. The typical presentations include a triad of embolic phenomena, intracardiac flow obstruction, and constitutional symptoms. We report a case of cardiac myxoma presenting as prolonged fever. Leukocytosis with a left shift, anemia, and elevated C-reactive protein were noted. A large left atrial myxoma was found incidentally by chest computed tomography. The fever subsided after surgical removal of the myxoma. His elevated serum interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6, IL-12 p70, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α returned to undetectable levels four days after surgery. Cardiac myxomas should be included in the differential diagnosis of prolonged fever, even though no typical symptoms could be found.

  4. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis obscured by midfacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Ryškienė, Silvija; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis whose sinonasal symptomatology was thought to be the consequence of a previous midfacial trauma. The patient was admitted to the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery after more than 10 years of exacerbations of sinonasal symptoms, which began to plague soon after a facial contusion. We decided to perform CT of paranasal sinuses, and despite the absence dental symptomatology, the dental origin of sinusitis was discovered. The majority of sinonasal symptoms resolved after appropriate dental treatment, and there was no need for nasal or sinus surgery.

  5. Orbital abscess from an odontogenic infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Kyu; Kim, Ju-Rok; Jang, Keum-Soo; Moon, Yeon-Sung; Park, Sun-Won

    2007-01-01

    An orbital abscess is a rare but serious complication of an odontogenic infection, which can lead to loss of vision or worse. This paper presents a case of orbital abscess secondary to an infection from the upper molar teeth, which extended to the retobulbar and posterosuperior region of the orbit, close to the superior orbital fissure. The infection spreaded to the pterygopalatine and infratemporal fossa and then to the orbit via the inferior orbital fissure. This paper reviews the clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, route of spread, value of serial CT scanning, treatment and possible complications.

  6. Follicular adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Vera Sempere, Francisco José; Artes Martínez, María Jose; Vera Sirera, Beatriz; Bonet Marco, Jaime

    2006-07-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is an uncommon benign odontogenic lesion that affects young patients, with female predominance, mainly in second decade, showing a radiolucent unilocular image associated with an unerupted tooth, usually a canine. In spite of previous and confusing denominations, such as adenoameloblastoma or adenomatoid ameloblastic tumor, AOT is a benign tumor with a very low rate of recurrence, that show a peculiar morphological picture (basaloid appearance with glandular-like structures, calcifying areas, and amiloid-like material) that allow its histopathological recognition. We present a clinicopathological analysis of a case of follicular AOT affecting the mandible in a 9 years-old female patient associated with unerupted lower left canine. Immunohistochemical study showed some data previously unrecognised. All cellular types that composed AOT showed nuclear positivity for p63 indicating a basal characterization in the different cellular components. According to its benign character and low potential for recurrence, AOT revealed a scant proliferative activity (2-3% nuclei showed Ki-67 positivity) limited to some epithelial nodules (AE1-3 +) of fusiform appearance. Absence of reactivity for hormonal receptors (RE and RPg) excluded a possible hormonodependence in AOT that could explain the observed female predominance.

  7. Odontogenic Cyst with Verrucous Proliferation Exhibiting Melanin Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Krupa Mehta; Ahmed, Junaid; Bhat, Keshava; Kottieth Pallam, Nandita; Lewis, Amitha Juanita

    2017-01-01

    Verrucous proliferation arising from odontogenic cysts is a rare entity. We report an unusual case of an infected odontogenic cyst with verrucous proliferation and melanin pigmentation in a 13-year-old male patient who presented with an intraoral swelling in relation to impacted teeth 26 and 27. The enucleated lesion was diagnosed as an odontogenic keratocyst and the patient died within two years of presentation due to multiple recurrences. The clinical, radiological, and microscopic features of the lesion are presented with an attempt to discuss the etiopathogenesis. The case hereby reported is uncommon with only eight cases reported in the literature. PMID:28409045

  8. The expression of cytokeratin in keratocystic odontogenic tumor, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst, dentigerous cyst, radicular cyst and dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kaname; Wato, Masahiro; Hayashi, Teruyoshi; Yasuda, Norihiro; Matsushita, Takumi; Ito, Tomohiko; Gamoh, Shoko; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Akio; Morita, Shosuke

    2014-09-01

    The epithelial lining of odontogenic keratocysts exhibits either parakeratosis or orthokeratosis. In 2005, the WHO classified odontogenic keratocysts with parakeratosis as keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT). Odontogenic keratocysts with orthokeratosis were not classified as odontogenic tumors, but instead referred to as orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOC). To clarify the difference between these two lesions, we investigated their biological characteristics using immunohistochemical studies for cytokeratins (CK) in KCOT and OOC as well as in dentigerous cysts (DC), radicular cysts (RC) and dermoid cysts (DMC). We examined twenty-five cases of KCOT, fifteen cases each of OOC, DC and RC, and ten cases of DMC. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of CK10, 13, 17 and 19. To evaluate the immunohistochemical staining pattern, we divided the epithelial lining of the lesions into three layers (surface layer: su, spinous layer: sp, basal layer: ba). For CK10, most OOC and DMC specimens of su and sp were positive. For CK13 and 19, most KCOT, DC and RC specimens of su and sp were positive. For CK17, most KCOT specimens of su and sp were positive. The percentages of total CK expression of su and sp, and ba of CK19 differed significantly between the lesions (P < 0.001). These results support the hypothesis that OOC originate from not the odontogenic apparatus, but the oral epithelial component.

  9. A Rare Presentation of Conjunctival Myxoma with Pain and Redness: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Po; Tsung, Swei Hsiung; Yet-Min Lin, Tommy

    2012-01-01

    Background Conjunctival myxoma is a type of rare, benign tumor of mesenchymal cells, with fewer than 30 reported cases in the English literature. It is mostly an isolated occurrence but can sometimes be associated with systemic diseases such as Carney complex or Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. It is necessary in clinical practice to differentiate it from other similar lesions, such as amelanotic nevus, lymphangioma, myxoid liposarcoma, spindle-cell lipoma, myxoid neurofibroma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. Case Presentation The usual presentation of conjunctival myxoma is a translucent, well-circumscribed, and painless conjunctival mass, but in this report we discuss an unusual case of conjunctival myxoma in a 47-year-old Taiwanese woman who presented initially with pain and redness. This atypical presentation complicated the diagnosis and the management at first. Surgical excision of the mass was performed. The mass was found to be a conjunctival myxoma. The patient subsequently underwent extensive evaluation but was found not to have any systemic diseases with known association with conjunctival myxoma. Conclusions In summary, we present a case of conjunctival myxoma in a 47-year-old Taiwanese woman. The initial presentation with pain and redness was atypical for conjunctival myxoma. The lesion was successfully managed with complete excisional biopsy. PMID:22649349

  10. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: I. Ameloblastoma and Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Sook

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs) are common epithelial tumors of odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are clinico-pathologically classified into solid/multicystic, unicystic, desmoplastic, and peripheral types, and also divided into follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular types, etc., based on their histological features. Craniopharyngiomas, derived from the remnants of Rathke's pouch or a misplaced enamel organ, are also comparable to the odontogenic tumors. The malignant transformation of ameloblastomas results in the formation of ameloblastic carcinomas and malignant ameloblastomas depending on cytological dysplasia and metastasis, respectively. AOTs are classified into follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral types. Ameloblastomas are common, have an aggressive behavior and recurrent course, and are rarely metastatic, while AOTs are hamartomatous benign lesions derived from the complex system of the dental lamina or its remnants. With advances in the elucidation of molecular signaling mechanisms in cells, the cytodifferentiation of epithelial tumor cells in ameloblastomas and AOTs can be identified using different biomarkers. Therefore, it is suggested that comprehensive pathological observation including molecular genetic information can provide a more reliable differential diagnosis for the propagation and prognosis of ameloblastomas and AOTs. This study aimed to review the current concepts of ameloblastomas and AOTs and to discuss their clinico-pathological features relevant to tumorigenesis and prognosis. PMID:23837011

  11. Acute myocardial infarction caused by left atrial myxoma: Role of intracoronary catheter aspiration.

    PubMed

    Al-Fakhouri, Ahmad; Janjua, Muhammad; DeGregori, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) caused by left atrial myxoma is very rare. Catheter-based approaches or thrombolytic therapy are mostly the first step in the management of STEMI with less time delay. We report a case of acute anterior/lateral STEMI caused by a left atrial myxoma. The patient was successfully treated by intracoronary aspiration with an Export aspiration catheter, with excellent distal coronary flow. Intracoronary catheter aspiration in acute myocardial infarction caused by a left atrial myxoma may help to salvage the infarcting myocardium with less time delay.

  12. Left atrial myxoma detected after an initial diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica.

    PubMed

    Mano, Yoshinori; Yoshizawa, Akihiro; Itabashi, Yuji; Ohki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Tatsuo; Mori, Mitsuharu; Shin, Hankei; Tanaka, Youichi

    2014-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 69-year-old woman with left atrial myxoma detected following treatment with glucocorticoids for an initial diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). The glucocorticoids markedly improved the patient's symptoms, and the tumor was excised after rapidly tapering the glucocorticoid dose. The PMR-like symptoms did not recur and the inflammatory marker levels returned to normal after surgery. The patient's clinical course indicated that the initial PMR-like symptoms were entirely caused by the left atrial myxoma. This case demonstrates that glucocorticoid treatment for suspected PMR can mask the symptoms of myxoma, leading to a delay in diagnosis.

  13. Right atrial myxoma arising from the Eustachian valve in a patient with colonic polyposis.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Pramod; Sachithanandan, Anand; Graham, Alastair N J; Richardson, S Geoffery; Gladstone, Dennis J

    2002-07-01

    Right atrial myxoma arising from the Eustachian valve is rare, with only two reported cases; moreover, any association with colonic polyps is uncommon, with only one such case documented. A case is described of a 68-year-old male who presented with chronic anemia; an initial investigation revealed colonic polyps, but anemia persisted after polypectomy. Further investigation revealed a right atrial myxoma arising from the Eustachian valve and prolapsing into the right ventricle through the tricuspid valve. After successful removal of the lesion, hematological indices returned to normal. In cases of persisting anemia, other rare causes such as atrial myxoma should be sought.

  14. Comparision of Immunohistochemical Expression of CD10 in Odontogenic Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Munisekhar, M.S.; Suri, Charu; Rajalbandi, Santosh Kumar; M.R., Pradeep; Gothe, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Expression of CD10 has been documented in various tumors like nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, odontogenic tumors. Aim: To evaluate and compare CD10 expression in odontogenic cysts like radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst (OKC). Materials and Methods: Total 60 cases were included in the study, comprising 20 cases each of radicular, dentigerous and odontogenic keratocyst. Each case was evaluated and compared for immunohistochemical expression of CD10. Results obtained were statistically analysed using ANOVA test followed by post hoc test Tukey-Kramer Multiple Comparisons Test for continuous variable and Chi-square test for discrete variable. Results: More number of cases showing sub-epithelial stromal CD10 expression were found in OKC among the cysts. Conclusion: CD10 expression was more in OKC compared to radicular and dentigerous cysts. PMID:25584313

  15. Bilateral orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst: A rare case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalkar, Rahul Devidas; Barpande, Suresh R; Bhavthankar, Jyoti D; Mandale, Mandakini S

    2014-01-01

    Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a developmental cyst of jaw and was initially considered by the World Health Organization (1992) as the uncommon orthokeratinized variant of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC). However, studies have shown that OOC has peculiar clinicopathologic aspects when compared with other developmental odontogenic cysts, especially OKC. So orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst now stands out to be a distinct entity. Clinically, it occurs as a single cyst, shows a predilection for males and is most often found in the second to the fifth decade. Its bilateral occurrence is extremely rare. The purpose of the article is to present a rare case of bilateral OOC arising in the mandible and review the literature on bilateral occurrence of this lesion. PMID:25328309

  16. Brain abscess potentially secondary to odontogenic infection: case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Joseph; Liu, Stanley Y; Hossaini-Zadeh, Mehran; Pogrel, M Anthony

    2014-02-01

    Odontogenic infections are rarely implicated in the causes of brain abscess formation. As such, there are very few reports of brain abscesses secondary to odontogenic infections in the literature. This is due partly to the relative rarity of brain abscesses but also to the difficulty in matching the causative organisms of a brain abscess to an odontogenic source. The authors report a case of a 50-year-old woman whose brain abscess may potentially have been secondary to an odontogenic infection. The patient's early diagnosis, supported by imaging and microbiologic assessment, along with early minicraniotomy and extraction of infected dentition followed by a course of cephalosporins and metronidazole, contributed to a successful outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Angiographic demonstration of blood supply of right atrial myxoma.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, N D; McLaughlin, P R; Bigelow, W G; Morch, J E

    1976-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman underwent cardiac catheterization for assessment of coronary arterial disease. An unexpected finding of a gradient between right atrium and right ventricle led to the discovery of an unsuspected right atrial myxoma. The diagnosis was established by the presence of a filling defect in the right atrial angiocardiogram and by the demonstration of "tumour vessels" by selective right coronary angiography. Selective coronary angiography can visualize the blood supply to an intracardiac tumour and thus confirm the diagnosis preoperatively. Images PMID:973902

  18. Radiologic Evaluation of Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Myxomas

    PubMed Central

    Lacey, Brent W.; Lin, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A 22-year-old man was referred for palpitations. On transthoracic echocardiography, he was found to have a right ventricular outflow tract mass. Further cardiac imaging was conducted by means of transesophageal echocardiography, computed tomography, and cardiac magnetic resonance. Complete surgical resection of the tumor was achieved, and pathologic examination revealed the lesion to be a myxoma. Cardiac tumors located in the right ventricular outflow tract are rare and can present unusual diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Cardiac computed tomography and magnetic resonance are becoming more widely available and can be useful adjuncts in the management of such tumors. PMID:23466872

  19. AN UNUSUAL ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC PATTERN OF A LEFT ATRIAL MYXOMA

    PubMed Central

    Mathurin, Jean-Robert; Adyanthaya, Ajit V.; Petrovich, Lawrence J.; Franco, Mauricio; Mattox, Kenneth L.; Alexander, James K.

    1977-01-01

    Unusual echocardiographic findings in a 58-year-old woman with a history of rheumatic fever and an angiographically demonstrated prolapsing left atrial myxoma are presented. With variations of gain and damping controls, it was possible to isolate a more distinct anterior mitral leaflet echo, or a more posterior linear echo, thought to represent the prolapsing tumor. The tumor, instead of presenting as a cloud of echoes behind the anterior mitral valve leaflet, demonstrated an alternate pattern of a single linear dense echo at this location. Echocardiography, though very useful in the diagnosis of left atrial tumors, can be fallible at times. Images PMID:15216092

  20. Follicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor in Mandible: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Belgaumi, UI; Parkar, MI; Malik, NA; Suresh, KV; Havewala, AM; Bhalinge, PM

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a relatively rare, benign, hamartomatous, and cystic odontogenic neoplasm that was first described more than a century ago. The lesion still continues to intrigue experts with its varied histomorphology and controversies regarding its development. The present article describes a case of cystic AOT with an unusual histomorphology associated with an impacted 44 in a 21-year-old male. PMID:27057389

  1. [Congenital piriform aperture stenosis and odontogenic disorders].

    PubMed

    Delforge, A; Raoul, G; Fayoux, P; Ferri, J

    2013-04-01

    We had for objective to assess odontogenic disorders associated to a congenital piriform aperture stenosis and to study their various presentations. Twelve patients presenting with a congenital piriform aperture stenosis, 1 week to 3 months of age, were retrospectively included from 1998 to 2008. All patients underwent an initial CT scan to evaluate the temporary dental germs. Deciduous dental germs were abnormal in 75% of the cases. Thirty-three percent had a single median maxillary central incisor. The concept of solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome makes for a more pathophysiological approach of this type of disease, with various clinical presentations, corresponding to various levels of severity of a same pathological process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Relationship between odontogenic infections and infective endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Jaime

    2012-03-24

    Revised guidelines for the prevention of infective endocarditis published by national and international associations in the last years do not support the indiscriminate use of antibiotic prophylaxis for dental procedures. However, some of them still recommend its use in high-risk patients before dental treatments likely to cause bleeding. Given the high prevalence of bacteremia of dental origin due to tooth-brushing, mastication or other daily activities, it appears unlikely that infective endocarditis from oral microorganisms can be completely prevented. A good oral health status and satisfactory level of oral hygiene are sufficient to control the consequences of the systemic spread of oral microorganisms in healthy individuals. However, caution is still needed and prophylactic antibiotics must be administered to susceptible or medically compromised patients. This review briefly outlines the current concepts of odontogenic bacteremia and antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing dental treatment.

  3. Nasolabial Cyst Associated with Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Eveline Claudia; Coppla, Fabiana Madalozzo; Campagnoli, Eduardo Bauml; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The nasolabial cyst or Klestadt cyst is a relatively uncommon nonodontogenic cyst that develops in the nasal alar region; it has uncertain pathogenesis. This lesion has slow growth and variable dimensions and is characterized clinically by a floating tumefaction in the nasolabial fold area around the bridge of the nose, causing an elevation of the upper lip and relative facial asymmetry. Diagnosis is primarily made clinically; if necessary, this is complemented by imaging. This paper reports the case of a 39-year-old male patient who complained of pain in the right upper premolar region and poor aesthetics due to a firm tumor in the right wing of the nose. Initially, this was thought to be due to an odontogenic abscess; however, the differential diagnosis was that a nasolabial cyst was communicating with the apex of teeth 14 and 15. Surgical treatment was carried out, followed by histopathological examination and concomitant endodontic treatment of the teeth involved. PMID:26904312

  4. Immunohistochemical expression of WNT5A and MMPs in odontogenic epithelial tumors and cysts.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Douglas Magno; Antunes, Daniella Moraes; Saturno, Juvani Lago; Massuda, Fabiola; Paiva, Katiúcia Batista da Silva; Nunes, Fabio Daumas

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was compare the expression of WNT5A and MMP2, 7 and 20, in frequent benign odontogenic tumors and odontogenic cysts, since these lesions have a different biological behavior. Eighty-one paraffin-embedded specimens of odontogenic tumors, including ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor, and thirty-two odontogenic cysts were used for immunohistochemical analysis. The expression of WNT5A in odontogenic tumors and inflammatory cyst was higher than in developmental odontogenic cyst. There was no statistical difference (p<0.05) in the expression of WNT5A when comparing the analyzed tumors. The expression of MMP7 was lower in RC with a statistical difference when compared with all tumors and cysts. Statistical differences also occurred when comparing glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) to keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KOT) and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT). MMP20 expression was higher in ameloblastoma when compared to adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), DC and GOC. The expression of MMP20 was lower in CCOT when compared to all tumors and cysts. The expression of WNT5A in a group of odontogenic lesions suggests the participation of a non-canonical WNT signaling pathway in the progression and maintenance of these lesions. These molecules are possibly involved in the biological differences between odontogenic tumors and cysts. Considering previous studies, WNT5A may help promote the calcification seen in AOT, CCOT and CEOT by activating MMP7. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Surviving catastrophic disintegration of a large left atrial myxoma: the importance of multi-disciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Habbab, Louay; Alfaraidi, Haifa; Lamy, Andre

    2014-09-12

    Atrial myxomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors, representing ∼50% of all benign cardiac tumors. Patients with a left atrial myxoma (LAM) generally present with symptoms of mechanical obstruction of blood flow, systemic emboli or constitutional symptoms. Embolic complications may occur any time with progression of the tumor; therefore, myxoma is usually considered an indication for urgent surgery. This report describes a patient with mobile large LAM who survived multiple emboli to the brain, spleen, kidneys, abdominal aorta and lower limbs during hospitalization for surgery, illustrating the critical nature of this finding and its possible catastrophic complications and demonstrating the importance of multi-disciplinary team in the decision-making process and the management of such complications and supporting the hypothesis that intravenous thrombolysis may be safely used in the treatment of embolic stroke due to cardiac myxoma.

  6. Left atrial myxoma in a patient with a biventricular pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Przywara-Chowaniec, Brygida; Czarnecki, Łukasz; Nowalny-Kozielska, Ewa; Opara, Mariusz; Puzio, Agata; Kawecki, Damian; Wesołowski, Bartosz

    2016-01-01

    Myxomas make up about 50% of benign cardiac neoplasms. The most common location is within the left atrium. At the initial stage they do not exhibit any specific clinical symptoms, so they are often diagnosed by accident or during examinations recommended for other reasons. Here we present a case of left atrium myxoma in a patient (a man, age 68 years) with a dual chamber pacemaker. The myxoma did not reveal any clinical symptoms and was discovered in echocardiography during routine diagnostic examination preceding pacemaker implantation. The literature search made by the authors showed that this is the first recorded case of myxoma in a patient after the implantation of a biventricular pacemaker. PMID:28096843

  7. Left atrial myxomas in childhood: Presentation with emboli—diagnosis by ultrasonics

    PubMed Central

    Pridie, Ronald B.

    1972-01-01

    Three children with left atrial myxomas are described. All suffered major arterial occlusion with consequent permanent morbidity before the diagnosis was made and the tumour removed. Each child had had previous small embolic phenomena. In two, the diagnosis was made by ultrasound. In any child who has had an arterial embolus without obvious cause, a left atrial myxoma should be considered and looked for by an ultrasonic mitral echogram. Images PMID:4647636

  8. Protection against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease with recombinant myxoma viruses expressing rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bertagnoli, S; Gelfi, J; Le Gall, G; Boilletot, E; Vautherot, J F; Rasschaert, D; Laurent, S; Petit, F; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Milon, A

    1996-01-01

    Two myxoma virus-rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) recombinant viruses were constructed with the SG33 strain of myxoma virus to protect rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease. These recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV capsid protein (VP60). The recombinant protein, which is 60 kDa in size, was antigenic, as revealed by its reaction in immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against RHDV. Both recombinant viruses induced high levels of RHDV- and myxoma virus-specific antibodies in rabbits after immunization. Inoculations by the intradermal route protected animals against virulent RHDV and myxoma virus challenges. PMID:8764013

  9. Protection against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease with recombinant myxoma viruses expressing rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Bertagnoli, S; Gelfi, J; Le Gall, G; Boilletot, E; Vautherot, J F; Rasschaert, D; Laurent, S; Petit, F; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Milon, A

    1996-08-01

    Two myxoma virus-rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) recombinant viruses were constructed with the SG33 strain of myxoma virus to protect rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease. These recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV capsid protein (VP60). The recombinant protein, which is 60 kDa in size, was antigenic, as revealed by its reaction in immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against RHDV. Both recombinant viruses induced high levels of RHDV- and myxoma virus-specific antibodies in rabbits after immunization. Inoculations by the intradermal route protected animals against virulent RHDV and myxoma virus challenges.

  10. Cytology of cardiac myxomas: presence of Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) lectin by immunoperoxidase staining.

    PubMed

    Iwa, N; Yutani, C

    1993-12-01

    Cytological findings are presented of seven cases of cardiac myxomas. Avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) method was employed to demonstrate Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) lectin in imprint smears as well as in paraffin-embedded tissue sections in cardiac myxomas. The cytology was characterized by tumor cells with polyhedral or stellate and mucinous background with lymphocytes, neutrophils, and hemosiderin-laden macrophages. In smears as well as tissue sections, UEA-I lectin was detected throughout the cytoplasm of myxoma cells. This study established the applicability of the immunoperoxidase staining for cardiac myxoma as an aid in cytopathological diagnosis.

  11. Association between herpes simplex virus Types 1 and 2 with cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Maryam Sotoudeh; Sabagh, Moud; Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza; Ziaei, Shayan; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Pourgholi, Leyla; Jenab, Yaser; Abbasi, Kyomars

    Most cases of atrial myxoma are sporadic, and the exact etiology is unknown. We examined if herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and HSV-2 antigens and/or DNA could be detected in a cohort of Iranian patients with cardiac myxomas. From July 2004 to June 2014, among a total of 36,703 patients undergoing open heart surgeries, consecutive patients with cardiac myxoma who were treated by surgical excision at our center included in this study. Of 73 patients studied, 56% were female with a mean age of 54 years (ranging from 23 to 77 years). Seventy-four myxomas were surgically removed from 73 patients, since one patient had two myxomas which were located on both the right atrium and right ventricle. The materials for this analysis were retrospectively gathered from extracted tumors that stored in a pathology bank of tissue paraffin blocks. The formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue samples were investigated for HSV genomic DNA by both immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. In all 74 cases there was no presence of HSV 1 and HSV 2 infection. This suggests that HSV may not play a role in sporadic cardiac myxomas; however, evidence for such association is currently lacking, and further studies are required to determine such a role.

  12. Intraosseous verrucous carcinoma arising from an orthokeratinized odontogenic keratocyst: A report of a rarest entity

    PubMed Central

    Kamarthi, Nagaraju; Palakshappa, Suhasini Gotur; Wadhwan, Vijay; Mohan, Raviprakash Sasankoti

    2016-01-01

    Intraosseous verrucous carcinomas (VCs) arising from odontogenic cysts are a rare entity. An unusual case of a VC arising from the orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst is described for the first time. The microscopic features of the lesion are presented. PMID:27630514

  13. Intraosseous verrucous carcinoma arising from an orthokeratinized odontogenic keratocyst: A report of a rarest entity.

    PubMed

    Kamarthi, Nagaraju; Palakshappa, Suhasini Gotur; Wadhwan, Vijay; Mohan, Raviprakash Sasankoti

    2016-01-01

    Intraosseous verrucous carcinomas (VCs) arising from odontogenic cysts are a rare entity. An unusual case of a VC arising from the orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst is described for the first time. The microscopic features of the lesion are presented.

  14. A case of odontogenic brain abscess arising from covert dental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Clifton, T C; Kalamchi, S

    2012-01-01

    Odontogenic infections can spread to any organ of the body and in some cases cause life threatening infections. We report a case of multiple odontogenic brain abscesses resulting from undetected tooth decay. Whereas most odontogenic brain abscesses occur following dental treatment, this report documents brain abscesses prior to dental treatment, signifying the dangers of covert dental infections. This case report updates the literature on the topic of odontogenic brain abscesses.

  15. Malignant changes developing from odontogenic cysts: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Borrás-Ferreres, Jordi; Sánchez-Torres, Alba

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review scientific literature in orderto describe the characteristics and prognosis of malignant entities developing from odontogenic cysts. A search in Pubmed (MEDLINE) and Cochrane databases was conducted. The inclusion criteria were articles published in English related to the malignisation of odontogenic cysts in humans. The exclusion criteria were articles that do not specify the type of odontogenic cyst, malignisation of parakeratinised keratocysts, the presence of an ameloblastic carcinoma and metastasis from distant primary tumours. The selected articles were classified according to Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criteria. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out using statistical package software SPSS version 22.0. From the 1,237 articles initially obtained, the authors included 3 case series and 45 case reports in the end. Descriptive analysis showed that men have a disposition for malignisation from odontogenic cysts and they frequently appear at the posterior mandible, with pain and swelling being the most frequent signs and symptoms. Follicular cysts were the entities that underwent the most malignant changes with well differentiated squamous cell carcinomas being the most prevalent type of malignancy. The real prognosis of this malignancy is not known because of the heterogeneity of available studies. Key words:Odontogenic cysts, squamous cell carcinoma, neoplastic cell transformation, oral cancer. PMID:27957281

  16. Malignant changes developing from odontogenic cysts: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Borrás-Ferreres, Jordi; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review scientific literature in orderto describe the characteristics and prognosis of malignant entities developing from odontogenic cysts. A search in Pubmed (MEDLINE) and Cochrane databases was conducted. The inclusion criteria were articles published in English related to the malignisation of odontogenic cysts in humans. The exclusion criteria were articles that do not specify the type of odontogenic cyst, malignisation of parakeratinised keratocysts, the presence of an ameloblastic carcinoma and metastasis from distant primary tumours. The selected articles were classified according to Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criteria. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out using statistical package software SPSS version 22.0. From the 1,237 articles initially obtained, the authors included 3 case series and 45 case reports in the end. Descriptive analysis showed that men have a disposition for malignisation from odontogenic cysts and they frequently appear at the posterior mandible, with pain and swelling being the most frequent signs and symptoms. Follicular cysts were the entities that underwent the most malignant changes with well differentiated squamous cell carcinomas being the most prevalent type of malignancy. The real prognosis of this malignancy is not known because of the heterogeneity of available studies. Key words:Odontogenic cysts, squamous cell carcinoma, neoplastic cell transformation, oral cancer.

  17. Unilateral anhidrosis: a rare presentation of atrial myxoma?

    PubMed

    Gould, Justin

    2012-12-10

    A 50-year-old Chinese woman, non-smoker, presented with a 6-month history of increased sweating on the right side of her face, exertional chest tightness and breathlessness. Although the patient presented with increased sweating on the right, further history and examination revealed unilateral, left-sided anhidrosis, left partial ptosis and miosis consistent with Horner's syndrome. The patient was subsequently investigated with thoracic CT to assess for an apical lung mass (Pancoast tumour). A CT chest ruled out a mediastinal tumour, however, it revealed a large 60×41 mm soft tissue mass arising from the left atrium, protruding across the mitral valve into the left ventricle, suspicious of an intracardiac tumour. The patient was referred urgently for cardiothoracic assessment at a tertiary referral centre and successful open resection was performed. Histology confirmed an atrial myxoma. The patient developed postoperative atrial fibrillation but otherwise made a full recovery.

  18. Left atrial myxoma associated with obstructive coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg Odebrecht Curi; Kaufman, Renato; Correa, Gabriel Angelo de Cata Preta; Nascimento, César; Weitzel, Luiz Henrique; Reis, José Oscar Brito; da Rocha, Antônio Sérgio Cordeiro; da Cunha, Ademir Batista

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of a 67 year-old patient with obstructive coronary artery disease that, in the preoperative survey for inguinal herniorraphy surgery, discovered, by a two-dimensional echocardiogram, a tumor in left atrium, mobile, non-obstructive. The patient underwent a cineangiocoronariography showing severe stenosis in the left anterior descending artery, moderate stenosis in the left circumflex artery, near the origin of the first marginal branch, and a non-obstructive plaque in the right coronary artery. There was also moderate left ventricular dysfunction. After that, the patient has gone coronary artery bypass surgery and resection of the left atrial tumor. The histological exam revealed that the tumor was, in fact, a myxoma.

  19. Nerve sheath myxoma of the dorsal paravertebral space

    PubMed Central

    Malkoc, Melih; Ormeci, Tugrul; Keskinbora, Mert; Yılmaz, Adem; Korkmaz, Ozgur; Tanik, Canan Besleyici

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Nerve sheath myxomas (NSM) are rare benign soft tissue tumors. The dorsal paravertebral placed NMS diagnosis can be difficult. PRESENTATION OF CASE This article presents clinical, radiological findings and treatment of the NSM of the dorsal paravertebral space in a 32-year-old man presented with a right shoulder and back pain for 4 years. DISCUSSION NSM is a rare and benign tumor and that most often occurs in the skin of the head, neck or upper limbs of younger patients. Rare locations such as intracranial, spinal canal, trunk, lower limb and oral cavity were also reported. The appropriate treatment of NSM is surgical excision. Diagnosis is difficult in an uncommon presentation. CONCLUSION Although the most presented case of NMS are dermal tumors, it may also be found extremely rare locations. We conclude that, the definitive treatment of NSM is surgical excision with safe margins even when it is possible. PMID:25462051

  20. Odontogenic calcificant cystic tumor: a report of two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Daniel; Villanueva, Julio; Espinosa, Sebastián; Cornejo, Marco

    2007-03-01

    Odontogenic Calcificant Cystic Tumor (OCCT) is an infrequent injury. It arises from odontogenic epithelial rests present in the maxilla, jaw or gum. Gorlin and col. described the OCCT for first time as an own pathological entity in 1962. Clinically, the OCCT represents 1% of the odontogenic injuries. It is possible to be found from the first decade to the eighth decade. It affects in same proportion the maxilla and the jaw, being the most common in the dented zones, with greater incidence in the first molar area. Two case reports of OCCT in two different ages, both in female individuals, one at 5 years old and the other at 35 years old are presented. Enucleation of the tumor was the treatment chosen. The purpose of this article is to present a review of the literature related to these two cases of OCCT and its treatment, putting an emphasis on its aetiology, biological behaviour and treatment.

  1. Glandular odontogenic cyst: absence of PTCH gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Barreto, D C; De Marco, L; Castro, W H; Gomez, R S

    2001-02-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare jawbone cyst of odontogenic origin. Human patched (PTCH) is a tumour suppressor gene that has been recently associated with signalling pathways during odontogenesis. Recently alterations of this gene were found on sporadic odontogenic keratocysts. This evidence, together with the biological behaviour similarities of both lesions, and the absence of reports on molecular analysis of GOC, led us to hypothesize that PTCH gene mutations may underlie the tumorigenesis of GOC. Therefore the aim of this study was to report one additional case of GOC and investigate the PTCH gene of the cyst. No mutations were found in the splicing and coding regions of the PTCH gene. In conclusion, the PTCH gene does not seem to be involved in GOC pathogenesis.

  2. Etiologies and Treatments of Odontogenic Maxillary Sinusitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Fahimeh; Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Safai, Pooria

    2015-01-01

    Context: Maxillary sinusitis is an important issue in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. This study aims to present a systematic review of etiologies and treatments of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic database search was performed based on related MeSH keywords. Articles published between January 2001 and December 2014 was selected according to the inclusion criteria. The information extracted from various studies was categorized in various tables. Results: The study selected 19 studies. In most studies, oroantral fistula (OAF) was the most common etiology of odontogenic sinusitis. Alpha-hemolytic streptococcus was the most common flora in sinusitis with dental origin. The literature shows that the Caldwell-Luc approach may be the best method for treating sinusitis in cases of displaced teeth. Conclusions: OAF is a common cause of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and may easily be treated by endoscopy and fistula closure. Maxillofacial surgeons and dentists should consider this problem to avoid misdiagnosis and prevent complications. PMID:26756016

  3. Orthokeratinizing odontogenic cyst of maxilla with complex odontoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Meena; Kheur, Supriya; Agrawal, Tripti; Ingle, Yashwant

    2013-01-01

    The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) and odontoma are the odontogenic cyst and tumor respectively that are minimally invasive neoplasms of head and neck region. OOC is a rare variant of odontogenic cyst characterized by the presence of excessive orthokeratin covering the cystic lining. Odontoma is a benign neoplasm/hamartoma often discovered accidently on panoramic radiographs. We came across a case of a 26-year-old male with swelling on his face along with difficulty in breathing. On the basis of radiographic and histopathological findings the final diagnosis of OOC associated with odontoma was given. However, there is no report in the English literature of the simultaneous occurrence of these two lesions and hence this case is very rare. It is unclear whether the two lesions were just coincidental or were actually related to each other. PMID:24574683

  4. Suspect Odontogenic Infection Etiology for Canine Lymphoplasmacytic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Stepaniuk, Kevin S; Gingerich, Wade

    2015-01-01

    The role of odontogenic infection as an etiology for lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis in dogs was evaluated. An association between odontogenic infection and inflammatory rhinitis was identified in 55% of cases evaluated. Odontogenic infection was unlikely or undetermined in 10% and 35% of the cases, respectively. Cases of lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis had roentgen signs associated with endodontic disease, periodontal disease, or retained tooth roots in 60%, 45%, and 25% of the cases, respectively. A collaborative team based approach assessing inflammatory nasal disease is recommended. Based on the history and signalment of the individual patient, diagnostic modalities should be chosen wisely. In some cases, oral examination and intraoral radiographs may be a more direct and cost effective approach for diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory rhinitis.

  5. Current Management of Atrial Myxoma with Emphasis on a New Diagnostic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Donahoo, James S.; Weiss, James L.; Gardner, Timothy J.; Fortuin, Nicholas J.; Brawley, Robert K.

    1979-01-01

    Sixteen patients aged 22-64 years have undergone removal of atrial myxoma at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The first two patients had myxomas removed by closed surgical approach, and both died. Fourteen consecutive patients have undergone operation with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass, and all survived. There has been one late death unrelated to myxoma. Current surgical approach is excision of the tumor and its stalk or base and resection of the portion of intra-atrial septum to ensure complete removal. Recently a new diagnostic technique of two-dimensional phased array real time echocardiography has been used in four patients, including a pregnant woman, to confirm the clinical diagnosis of atrial myxoma. This technique provides a two-dimensional view of both atria and ventricles in cross section or sagittal view. This noninvasive method is painless, is independent of cardiac function and carries no risk or radiation hazard. The two-dimensional echocardiogram is superior to the standard one-dimensional or M-mode echocardiogram for diagnosis of myxoma in that it can evaluate simultaneously both right and left atria, can detect smaller space-occupying lesions because of better resolution and can more readily determine the size of the lesion and its stalk, can evaluate the mobility of the tumor and can determine more accurately the extent of tumor obstruction. Because of these qualities, we have relied on two-dimensional echocardiography as the definitive diagnostic procedure for detection of atrial myxoma. Currently operation for atrial myxoma is performed without cardiac catheterization or angiocardiography. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:556184

  6. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst of the mandible: A rare case report with a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sarvaiya, Bhumi; Vadera, Hitesh; Sharma, Vimal; Bhad, Kaustubh; Patel, Zinal; Thakkar, Mimansa

    2014-01-01

    Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is an odontogenic cyst was initially termed as the uncommon orthokeratinized type of odontogenic keratocyst by the World Health Organization. It usually occurs in mandible. Various studies have shown that OOC has typical characteristic clinicopathologic features when compared to other developmental odontogenic lesions such as dentigerous cyst and the keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Rare recurrence was noted after surgical removal of the lesion. The purpose of this article is to present a case of OOC arising in the posterior mandible and emphasize on differentiating it from the KCOT and dentigerous cyst. PMID:24818100

  7. Fate of pulpectomized deciduous teeth: Bilateral odontogenic cyst?

    PubMed Central

    Sandhyarani, B.; Noorani, Hina; Shivaprakash, P. K.; Dayanand, A. Huddar

    2016-01-01

    Pulpectomy is preferably more conservative treatment option than the extraction of deciduous teeth despite few undesirable consequences of obturating materials of which odontogenic cysts are one. This article aims to report a case of an 11-year-old female child having bilateral odontogenic cysts, i.e., radicular and infected dentigerous cyst followed by pulpectomy of deciduous molars using zinc oxide eugenol which was surgically enucleated and followed up to 6 months until satisfactory healing of bone was observed. The article also emphasizes on the importance of regular follow-up of the pulpectomized tooth which can be harmful otherwise. PMID:27307677

  8. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma. A review.

    PubMed

    Hadj Saïd, M; Ordioni, U; Benat, G; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Chossegros, C; Catherine, J-H

    2017-08-30

    Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC) is described as an exceptional and hard to diagnose malignant tumor which was first reported by Hansen in 1985. The purpose of this review article is to show that CCOC is a not that rare entity and to discuss its various aspects in order to enhance the diagnosis. A search in the English language literature was performed using the Scopus, ScienceDirect, PubMed and Medline databases between 1985 and 2016. Data were collected on epidemiologic, clinical, radiographic, histological, immunohistochemistrical, cytogenetic, management, follow-up and prognosis features of CCOC. Sixty-five studies from which a total of 95 case reports were included in the review. CCOC was generally seen in the fifth decade and the most common site was mandibular. The most frequently found symptoms were swelling, tooth mobility and pain. Radiologically, the image was radiolucent and could look like a cyst or a periodontal lesion. In situ hybridization techniques frequently expressed a gene fission of EWSR1. The treatment was mostly a radical surgical excision of the tumor with or without adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy. CCOC showed high rates of recurrence and mortality related with the presence of distance metastasis. Fission of EWSR1 gene could be the main element it the diagnosis of CCOC. A multidisciplinary approach, including a radiologist, pathologist and an oral & maxillofacial surgeon may be helpful in the evaluation and management of these lesions. With 95 reports found in English literature, we cannot say that CCOC is extremely rare anymore. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferation in a radicular cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Molina, Vicente; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2013-01-01

    The squamous odontogenic tumour is a rare benign neoplasm whose aetiology remains unknown. It usually appears in the jaw and its origin could be related to the ephitelial remnants of Malassez. Histologically comprises numerous islets of squamous, non-keratinized, well-differentiated and rounded epithelial cells a fibrous stroma without signs of atypical cells. There is a non-neoplastic lesion with the same histological pattern than the squamous odontogenic tumour. This entity is characterized by squamous odontogenic tumour proliferations isolated into the cyst wall of an odontogenic cyst. It is rare and has a benign behavior. It has been suggested that these epithelial proliferations could be the former expression of the neoplastic form. It is very important to carry out clinical and radiological controls periodically. So far it has not been documented any change towards a squamous odontogenic tumour nor toward malignancy in a squamous odontogenic tumour like proliferation. Key words:Radicular cyst, squamous odontogenic tumour. PMID:24455099

  10. Squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferation in a radicular cyst: A case report.

    PubMed

    Sala-Pérez, Sergi; Marco-Molina, Vicente; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2013-12-01

    The squamous odontogenic tumour is a rare benign neoplasm whose aetiology remains unknown. It usually appears in the jaw and its origin could be related to the ephitelial remnants of Malassez. Histologically comprises numerous islets of squamous, non-keratinized, well-differentiated and rounded epithelial cells a fibrous stroma without signs of atypical cells. There is a non-neoplastic lesion with the same histological pattern than the squamous odontogenic tumour. This entity is characterized by squamous odontogenic tumour proliferations isolated into the cyst wall of an odontogenic cyst. It is rare and has a benign behavior. It has been suggested that these epithelial proliferations could be the former expression of the neoplastic form. It is very important to carry out clinical and radiological controls periodically. So far it has not been documented any change towards a squamous odontogenic tumour nor toward malignancy in a squamous odontogenic tumour like proliferation. Key words:Radicular cyst, squamous odontogenic tumour.

  11. Analysis of GNAS1 and PRKAR1A gene mutations in human cardiac myxomas not associated with multiple endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, G; Bondioni, S; Corbetta, S; Menicanti, L; Rubino, B; Peverelli, E; Labarile, P; Dall'Asta, C; Ambrosi, B; Beck-Peccoz, P; Lania, A G; Spada, A

    2009-06-01

    Cardiac myxomas are rare tumors that usually occur as sporadic lesions or,more rarely, in the familial form,mostly in the context of Carney complex (CNC). The molecular basis for the development of cardiac myxomas is unclear. However, somatic activating mutations in the GNAS1 gene (the gsp oncogene) are detected in the myocardium ofMcCune-Albright syndrome patients while germ-line mutations in the PRKAR1A gene are associated with CNC and familial myxomas. We investigated the presence of activating missense mutations in the GNAS1 gene as well as of inactivating mutations in PRKAR1A in 29 sporadically occurring cardiac myxomas. No gsp and no PRKAR1A mutations were found by direct sequencing of PCR products amplified from tumoral DNA. This is the first study including a large series of sporadic, isolated cardiac myxomas and showing that these cardiac neoplasms do not share the same mutations found in familial forms.

  12. Systemic therapy with oncolytic myxoma virus cures established residual multiple myeloma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartee, Eric; Bartee, Mee Y; Bogen, Bjarne; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignancy of plasma B-cells. Traditional chemotherapeutic regimes often induce initial tumor regression; however, virtually all patients eventually succumb to relapse caused by either reintroduction of disease during autologous transplant or expansion of chemotherapy resistant minimal residual disease. It has been previously demonstrated that an oncolytic virus known as myxoma can completely prevent myeloma relapse caused by reintroduction of malignant cells during autologous transplant. The ability of this virus to treat established residual disease in vivo, however, remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that intravenous administration of myxoma virus into mice bearing disseminated myeloma results in the elimination of 70–90% of malignant cells within 24 hours. This rapid debulking was dependent on direct contact of myxoma virus with residual myeloma and did not occur through destruction of the hematopoietic bone marrow niche. Importantly, systemic myxoma therapy also induced potent antimyeloma CD8+ T cell responses which localized to the bone marrow and were capable of completely eradicating established myeloma in some animals. These results demonstrate that oncolytic myxoma virus is not only effective at preventing relapse caused by reinfusion of tumor cells during stem cell transplant, but is also potentially curative for patients bearing established minimal residual disease. PMID:27933316

  13. Right atrial myxoma as a possible cause of hemorrhagic stroke and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Sabageh, Donatus; Odujoko, Oluwole Olaniyi; Komolafe, Akinwumi Oluwole

    2012-04-01

    Right atrial myxomas are rare primary tumors of the heart. They may remain asymptomatic or eventually cause constitutional signs and symptoms. Less frequently, obstruction of the tricuspid valve occurs, resulting in exertional dyspnea, syncope, or sudden death. Neurological manifestation as initial presentation of atrial myxomas is rarely, if ever, associated with right atrial myxomas and may be secondary to cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and, more rarely subarachnoid hemorrhage. We review the case of a previously unknown, middle-aged Nigerian man who presented to hospital with severe headache and sudden loss of consciousness. A clinical diagnosis of hypertensive hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident was made. The patient died suddenly a few hours after presentation. Post-mortem examination revealed a small intracerebral hemorrhage in the left superior temporal lobe as well as a large right atrial myxoma, a ventricular septal defect in the muscular septum, and right ventricular hypertrophy. The liver showed fatty change while the kidneys showed evidence of benign nephrosclerosis. Right atrial myxomas may, therefore, be remotely considered as a cause of intracranial hemorrhage, especially in the presence of predisposing cardiac anomalies such as a ventricular septal defect. Similarly, being a known cause of right heart failure, sudden death, and other constitutional derangements, it may contribute significantly to disease outcome. Hence, it should be given due consideration in the differential diagnosis of cerebrovascular accidents.

  14. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour mimicking a periapical cyst in pregnant woman.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Neha; Kothari, Mohit

    2010-06-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumours (AOT) are uncommon odontogenic lesions characterized histologi-cally by duct-like structures derived from the epithelial component of the lesion and can be distinctly classified into follicular, extrafollicular and extraosseous variants (Neville BW, Damm DD, Allen CM, et al. Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor. A Text Book for Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, 2(nd) edition, 621-3). Most of these tumours develop in the second or third decade of life and have a distinct predilection for women. The follicular variant accounts for 75% of reported cases (Curran AE, Miller EJ, Murrah VA. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor presenting as periapical disease. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 1997;84:557-60) and is associated with the crown of an impacted tooth, commonly the maxillary canine. We present a rare case of extrafollicular AOT mimicking a periapical cyst that originated in a woman in her first trimester of pregnancy and enlarged rapidly thereafter. The lesion was enucleated and sent for histopathology and immunohistochemistry, which revealed AOT with a cystic component with no dependence on oestrogen or progestrone for its growth. This case of AOT introduces us to the unique variation in its presentation and the difficulty in differentiation from periapical disease of inflammatory origin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A cross-sectional survey of prevalence of odontogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Ebenezer, Vijay; Ramalingam, Balakrishnan

    2010-12-01

    To analyze the relative frequency of different types of odontogenic tumors based on the WHO 2005 histopathological classification of odontogenic tumours and to compare the data with published literature. Data collected from seven different hospitals in the same region of the city (south Chennai) were systematically searched for all cases of odontogenic tumors operated on between the years 2005-2010. The histopathology slides of the tumours were reanalyzed for cross verification. The data were also checked for duplication and for recurrence cases. Age, gender and site prevalence were also studied. Of the 107 cases collected, with full records, 60 (56%) were odontomas. The second most common was ameloblastoma (14%), followed by Keratocystic odontogenic tumour (13%). The rest of the tumours formed 17% of the total. A comprehensive tumour database should be initiated so that cross referring of cases would be easier and the patients, surgeons and the pathologists would be able to safe guard the information about the tumour for future reference. Many private hospitals lack the facility to store and catalogue histopathological evidences for a prolonged period of time.

  16. Orthokeratinized Odontogenic Cyst: A Report of Three Clinical Cases

    PubMed Central

    González Galván, María del Carmen; García-García, Abel; Anitua-Aldecoa, Eduardo; Martinez-Conde Llamosas, Rafael; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst that has been considered as a variant of the keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) until Wright (1981) defined it as a different entity. Surgery is the usual treatment, and recurrence or association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has rarely been described. In this report, we presented three cases of this pathology, and we review the principal clinical, histological, radiological, and therapeutic aspects. Case 1. A 73-year-old female presents with a slight swelling on the right mandible, associated with an unilocular well-defined radiolucent lesion. Case 2. A 27-year-old female presents with a painful mandibular swelling associated with an unilocular radiolucent lesion posterior to the 4.8. Case 3. A 61-year-old male was casually detected presents with an unilocular radiolucent lesion distal to the 4.8. Conclusion. The OOC is a specific odontogenic clinicopathological entity that should be differentiated from the KCOT as it presents a completely different biological behaviour. PMID:24191203

  17. Odontogenic infection sources in patients scheduled for cardiac valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Krennmair, Gerald; Auer, Johann; Krainhöfner, Martin; Piehslinger, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Odontogenic infection sources represent a predisposing risk factor for patients with cardiac valvular disease (CVD) awaiting cardiac valve replacement procedures. The incidence and quality of odontogenic infection sources (foci) were evaluated on 152 consecutive patients (study group, SG) undergoing cardiac valve replacement and were compared to 150 age-, gender- and residence-matched non-cardiac patients (control group, CG). Clinical and radiographic examinations were used to evaluate the incidence of odontogenic infection sources, grouped into potential (high risk) and facultative foci (possible risk), and the presence/severity of periodontal disease (PD). Foci and PD were compared among the overall SG and the CG and also among a sophisticated subdivision of the study group, especially with respect to aortic valve (AVR) and mitral valve replacement (MVR). Overall, 218 potential and 116 facultative odontogenic foci were found in 87 (58.3%) and in 79 (51.9%) patients of the SG respectively. The overall incidence of odontogenic infection sources and the incidence and severity of PD did not differ between the SG and the CG. However, in comparison with the CG (48%), the incidence of potential odontogenic infection foci was significantly higher in patients scheduled for AVR than in those scheduled to undergo MVR (70.4% vs. 25.0%, p < 0.01). Additionally, in patients scheduled for AVR, a significantly higher number (p < 0.01) of individual potential dentogenic infection foci (1.7 vs. 0.8 foci/valve) and a higher prevalence of PD (60.2%) was seen than for patients scheduled for MVR (31.8%) or for patients without CVD (1.0 foci/valve; 39.3%; p < 0.05). Although the overall incidence of odontogenic infection sources did not differ between the patients with and without CVD, a sophisticated subdivison of CVD may be crucial, demonstrating that patients with AVR differ significantly from those with MVR and with the healthy CG. Cardiologists and cardiac surgeons play an

  18. An intraosseous sclerosing odontogenic tumor predominantly composed of epithelial cells: relation to (so-called) sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma and epithelial-rich central odontogenic fibroma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sze Hwa; Yeo, Jin Fei; Kheem Pang, Brendan Nghee; Petersson, Fredrik

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of an asymptomatic sclerosing odontogenic tumor in a 31-year-old woman. Radiologically, the tumor was well circumscribed, was predominantly radiolucent, and had a peripheral sclerotic margin. Histopathologically, the tumor showed small clusters, strands, and cords of small to medium-sized epithelial tumor cells in a sclerotic collagenous stroma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for broad-spectrum cytokeratins (CKs) (CK7, CK5/6, CK19, and CAM 5.2) and p63. Membranous staining for E-cadherin was present. There was weak to moderate nuclear expression of p16 in 30% of cells. Rare tumor cells were positive for p53. Progesterone receptors were expressed in about 60% of the tumor cells. The proliferative activity (Ki-67) was approximately 2%. A molecular genetic (fluorescence in situ hybridization) study showed no EWSR1 (EWS RNA-binding protein 1) gene rearrangement. No recurrence or metastatic events have been documented at 1-year follow-up. This tumor represents a classification dilemma mainly between epithelial-rich central odontogenic fibroma and the so-called sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma.

  19. A Large Left Ventricle Myxoma: Presenting with Epigastric Pain and Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas are the most common benign tumors found in the heart. They usually appear in the left atrium. Those originating from the left ventricle (LV) are rare. Although clinical presentation may vary, dyspnea and embolism are the most commonly reported symptoms. In the present case study, a 27-year-old woman with a large myxoma originating from the left ventricular free wall is studied. She had atypical complaints, mainly epigastric discomfort, nausea, vomiting, and anorexia. She was hospitalized for acute abdomen, but subsequent investigations revealed a large myxoma that fully filled the LV and severely compromised the flow of the aortic and mitral valves. After successful emergency tumor resection, all symptoms disappeared. The uncommon presentation caused by these tumors is discussed in this study. PMID:28090362

  20. Giant biatrial myxoma nearly obstructing the orifice of the inferior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas are the most common type of benign cardiac tumors and most of them occur in the left atrium but the biatrial myxoma is uncommon. We present a rare case of giant biatrial myxoma nearly obstructing the orifice of the inferior vena cava. A 58-year old woman presented with exertional dyspnea and intermittent chest discomfort. The non-pedunculated tumor involved most of the interatrial septum and extended from the orifice of the inferior vena cava to the displaced mitral annulus and the lower left pulmonary vein. The resected specimen weighed 76 gram and measured 80 × 40 × 30 mm. She did not complain of dyspnea or show any sign of recurrence by echocardiography during the 2-year follow-up period. PMID:23758983

  1. Genome sequence of SG33 strain and recombination between wild-type and vaccine myxoma viruses.

    PubMed

    Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle; Gretillat, Magalie; Py, Robert; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Guérin, Jean Luc; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2011-04-01

    Myxomatosis in Europe is the result of the release of a South America strain of myxoma virus in 1952. Several attenuated strains with origins in South America or California have since been used as vaccines in the rabbit industry. We sequenced the genome of the SG33 myxoma virus vaccine strain and compared it with those of other myxoma virus strains. We show that SG33 genome carries a large deletion in its right end. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that the virus isolate from which SG33 is derived results from an in vivo recombination between a wild-type South America (Lausanne) strain and a California MSD-derived strain. These findings raise questions about the use of insufficiently attenuated virus in vaccination.

  2. [Severe mitral regurgitation following resection of a giant atrial myxoma: Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Orozco Vinasco, D M; Abello Sánchez, M; Osorio Esquivel, J E

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of the competence of a mitral valve can often be impossible in the clinical setting of a giant atrial myxoma. A 50-year-old woman with severe mitral regurgitation in the post-bypass period following a myxoma resection was managed with a mitral valve replacement. The absence of mitral insufficiency in the preoperative examination should not be taken as a reliable predictor of normal valve function. So herein, we discuss the role of the intraoperative echocardiographic examination, the underlying mechanisms, and the proposed management of severe mitral regurgitation following the resection of an atrial myxoma. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitral valve regurgitation due to annular dilatation caused by a huge and floating left atrial myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Burak; Yeniterzi, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of mitral valve annular dilatation caused by a huge left atrial myxoma obstructing the mitral valve orifice. A 50-year-old man presenting with palpitation was found to have a huge left atrial myxoma protruding into the left ventricle during diastole, causing severe mitral regurgitation. The diagnosis was made with echocardiogram. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a solid mass of 75 × 55 mm. During operation, the myxoma was completely removed from its attachment in the atrium. We preferred to place a mechanical heart valve after an annuloplasty ring because of severely dilated mitral annulus and chordae elongation. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Our case suggests that immediate surgery, careful evaluation of mitral valve annulus preoperatively is recommended. PMID:26702283

  4. Mitral valve regurgitation due to annular dilatation caused by a huge and floating left atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mehmet; Ersoy, Burak; Yeniterzi, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    We describe a case of mitral valve annular dilatation caused by a huge left atrial myxoma obstructing the mitral valve orifice. A 50-year-old man presenting with palpitation was found to have a huge left atrial myxoma protruding into the left ventricle during diastole, causing severe mitral regurgitation. The diagnosis was made with echocardiogram. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a solid mass of 75 × 55 mm. During operation, the myxoma was completely removed from its attachment in the atrium. We preferred to place a mechanical heart valve after an annuloplasty ring because of severely dilated mitral annulus and chordae elongation. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Our case suggests that immediate surgery, careful evaluation of mitral valve annulus preoperatively is recommended.

  5. Computed tomographic characteristics of odontogenic neoplasms in dogs.

    PubMed

    Amory, Joseph T; Reetz, Jennifer A; Sánchez, Melissa D; Bradley, Charles W; Lewis, John R; Reiter, Alexander M; Mai, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic neoplasms are locally invasive oral tumors in dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe CT characteristics for varying histopathologic types of canine odontogenic neoplasms. A board-certified veterinary radiologist who was unaware of histologic findings reviewed and scored imaging studies. A total of 29 dogs were included in the study. Twenty-three of these dogs had concurrent dental radiographs. The most common CT characteristics for all tumor types were a direct association with or in the region of multiple teeth in 96.4% (27/28), contrast enhancement in 96.3% (26/27), alveolar bone lysis in 93.1% (27/29), and mass-associated tooth displacement in 85.2% (23/27). Mass-associated cyst-like structures were identified in 53.6% (15/28) and were only present in tumors containing odontogenic epithelium. Canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas (n = 15) appeared as extra-osseous (10/15) or intra-osseous (5/15) masses. Intra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas were more likely to have mass-associated cyst-like structures and were subjectively more aggressive when compared with extra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas. Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumors (n = 3) had subjectively uniform CT imaging characteristics and consisted of round soft tissue and mineral attenuating masses with multiple associated cyst-like structures. Fibromatous epulides of periodontal ligament origin (n = 4) were contrast enhancing extra-osseous masses that were rarely referred for CT examinations and 25% (1/4) were not visible with CT. Other odontogenic tumors were less represented or had more variable CT imaging characteristics. Mass-associated tooth destruction was appreciated more often with dental radiographs and extra-oral tumor extension was identified more often with CT.

  6. Cytokeratin 19 expression patterns of dentigerous cysts and odontogenic keratocysts.

    PubMed

    Kamath, K P; Vidya, M

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous investigators have studied the pattern of keratin expression in different odontogenic cysts, the results have been variable. The present study was conducted to determine the pattern of expression of cytokeratin 19 (CK 19) in the epithelial lining of odontogenic keratocysts and dentigerous cysts. The epithelial layers showing expression of the epithelial marker CK 19 was determined by immunohistochemical methods in 15 tissue specimens each of histopathologically confirmed cases of dentigerous cysts and odontogenic keratocysts. Statistical analysis was done to compare the CK 19 expression between dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst using the Chi-square test. P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. All specimens of dentigerous cysts were positive for CK 19 with 20% (3/15) of the specimens showing expression only in a single layer of the epithelium, 40% (6/15) of the specimens showing expression in more than one layer but not the entire thickness of the epithelium, and the remaining 40% (6/15) showing expression throughout the entire thickness of the epithelium. In the case of odontogenic keratocysts, 40% (6/15) of the specimens were negative for CK 19, 40% (6/15) of the specimens showed expression only in a single layer of the epithelium, and 20% (3/15) of the specimens showed expression in more than one layer, but not the entire thickness of the epithelium. The observed differences in CK 19 expression by the two lesions were statistically significant (P < 0.01). The differences in CK 19 expression by these cysts may be utilized as a diagnostic tool in differentiating between these two lesions.

  7. Central odontogenic fibroma of the mandible: A case report with diagnostic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Angela; Pannone, Giuseppe; Ramaglia, Luca; Bufo, Pantaleo; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Saviano, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Odontogenic fibroma (OF), a rare odontogenic tumor of mesodermal origin, has been thought to originate from either dental follicle, periodontal ligament, or dental papilla [1]. Different studies reported high variability in the incidence rate as being between 3 and 23% of all odontogenic tumors [2,3]. OF manifests a dual character at the histopathological examination showing odontogenic epithelial structures mimicking those observed in biopsy of ameloblastoma and, in addition, peculiar fragments of cellular stroma. The clinical and radiological features of OF are similar to other odontogenic and/or non-odontogenic tumours and the differential diagnosis may first occur at fine-needle aspiration biopsy. Presentation of case In the case reported, a young patient showed a localized gingival enlargement involving radiologically the superior margin of the right angle of the mandible and associated with an un-erupted tooth. The morphological characteristics together with clinical and radiologic findings confirmed the tumor to be a central odontogenic fibroma (COF) with secondary gingival involvement. Discussion and conclusion Benign odontogenic tumors may be distinguished from other odontogenic/non-odontogenic neoplasias and from malignant tumours through a cytologic differential diagnosis as treatment differs accordingly. PMID:26793312

  8. [Large mitral annulus myxoma presenting with syncope: Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Vega, Julián; Gabrielli, Luigi; Olivares, Gabriel; Córdova, Samuel; Méndez, Manuel; González, Rodrigo

    2016-12-01

    We report a 23-year-old woman, with three recent exertional syncopes. Transthoracic (TTE) and transesophageal (TEE) echocardiography found a large heterogeneous mass (38 x 35 mm) arising from the posterior mitral annulus, protruding in systole through the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT). Heart MRI confirmed the echocardiography findings, suggesting a cardiac myxoma. Cardiac surgery accomplished the complete resection of the lesion, confirming a mass arising from the posterior mitral annulus and preserving mitral anatomy and function. Pathology was positive for a myxoma. Uneventful evolution allowed the discharge of the patient at the fifth postoperative day. Control TTE discarded any complication.

  9. Bi-atrial myxomas presenting as recurrent pulmonary emboli in a girl.

    PubMed Central

    Hanly, J.; de Buitleir, M.; Shaw, K.; Maurer, B.; FitzGerald, M. X.

    1984-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl whose sole presenting features were symptoms of pulmonary embolism, was found to have bi-atrial myxomas. The diagnosis was made preoperatively, and the patient had a successful outcome following elective surgery. The absence of other features such as systemic embolism, atrioventricular valvular obstruction, fever and constitutional symptoms makes this a most unusual case. Right atrial myxoma should be considered in any patient presenting with pulmonary embolism for which there is no obvious source. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6709549

  10. Development and validation of a Myxoma virus real-time polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Albini, Sarah; Sigrist, Brigitte; Güttinger, Regula; Schelling, Claude; Hoop, Richard K; Vögtlin, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    To aid in the rapid diagnosis of myxomatosis in rabbits, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the specific detection of Myxoma virus is described. Primers and probe were designed to amplify a 147-bp fragment within the Serp2 gene. The assay was able to detect 23 copies of a synthesized oligo indicating a reliable sensitivity. In addition, the real-time PCR did not detect the Rabbit fibroma virus used in myxomatosis vaccines. The novel PCR was shown to be able to detect Myxoma virus in fresh and paraffin-embedded rabbit tissues originating from myxomatosis cases from various regions in Switzerland.

  11. Clarence Crafoord and the first successful resection of a cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, W R

    1992-11-01

    In 1954 Clarence Crafoord, the pioneer Swedish cardiovascular surgeon, removed an intraatrial myxoma for the first time. The patient was a 40-year-old woman with atypical symptoms of mitral stenosis. Follow-up 38 years later finds the patient alive and well. This case represents not only the first extirpation of a cardiac tumor on cardiopulmonary support but also the dawn of open cardiac surgery in Sweden. Others were soon to follow the lead of Crafoord and his team. However, their bold efforts prepared the way for the early diagnosis and facile extirpation of cardiac myxomas. Moreover, this group played an integral part in the development of safe, effective cardiopulmonary perfusion.

  12. Cardiac myxoma with glandular elements: a clinicopathological and immunohistochemical study of five new cases with an emphasis on differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minghui; Ding, Li; Liu, Yanhui; Xue, Ling

    2014-01-01

    This paper reported five new cases of cardiac myxoma with glandular components, known as glandular cardiac myxoma. The goals of this study were to analyze the clinicopathological features of this disease and to explore new features for differential diagnosis. The patient series included three women and two men. All tumors were located in the left atrium without invasion of the adjacent myocardium. Patients presented with cardiac-related or embolization symptoms. Histologically, neoplasms consisted of well-formed glandular structures and typical myxoma areas. No nuclear atypia, mitosis, or necrosis was identified in the glandular structures. Glandular lining cells were strongly positive for pan-cytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen, CAM5.2 and cytokeratin 7, but were negative for some organ-specific markers, such as thyroid transcription factor-1, calretinin, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, gross cystic disease fluid protein, prostate-specific antigen, prostate-specific acid phosphatase, cytokeratin 20 and caudal type homeobox 2. In conclusion, glandular cardiac myxoma is a rare disease which shows characteristics similar to those of classical cardiac myxoma. Because of its rarity, glandular cardiac myxoma must be distinguished from adenocarcinoma metastatic to the heart. The combination of histopathological features and immunohistochemical profiles should improve the diagnostic accuracy of glandular cardiac myxoma.

  13. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  14. Evolutionary History and Attenuation of Myxoma Virus on Two Continents

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Peter J.; Ghedin, Elodie; DePasse, Jay V.; Fitch, Adam; Cattadori, Isabella M.; Hudson, Peter J.; Tscharke, David C.; Read, Andrew F.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2012-01-01

    The attenuation of myxoma virus (MYXV) following its introduction as a biological control into the European rabbit populations of Australia and Europe is the canonical study of the evolution of virulence. However, the evolutionary genetics of this profound change in host-pathogen relationship is unknown. We describe the genome-scale evolution of MYXV covering a range of virulence grades sampled over 49 years from the parallel Australian and European epidemics, including the high-virulence progenitor strains released in the early 1950s. MYXV evolved rapidly over the sampling period, exhibiting one of the highest nucleotide substitution rates ever reported for a double-stranded DNA virus, and indicative of a relatively high mutation rate and/or a continually changing selective environment. Our comparative sequence data reveal that changes in virulence involved multiple genes, likely losses of gene function due to insertion-deletion events, and no mutations common to specific virulence grades. Hence, despite the similarity in selection pressures there are multiple genetic routes to attain either highly virulent or attenuated phenotypes in MYXV, resulting in convergence for phenotype but not genotype. PMID:23055928

  15. Evolutionary history and attenuation of myxoma virus on two continents.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Ghedin, Elodie; DePasse, Jay V; Fitch, Adam; Cattadori, Isabella M; Hudson, Peter J; Tscharke, David C; Read, Andrew F; Holmes, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    The attenuation of myxoma virus (MYXV) following its introduction as a biological control into the European rabbit populations of Australia and Europe is the canonical study of the evolution of virulence. However, the evolutionary genetics of this profound change in host-pathogen relationship is unknown. We describe the genome-scale evolution of MYXV covering a range of virulence grades sampled over 49 years from the parallel Australian and European epidemics, including the high-virulence progenitor strains released in the early 1950s. MYXV evolved rapidly over the sampling period, exhibiting one of the highest nucleotide substitution rates ever reported for a double-stranded DNA virus, and indicative of a relatively high mutation rate and/or a continually changing selective environment. Our comparative sequence data reveal that changes in virulence involved multiple genes, likely losses of gene function due to insertion-deletion events, and no mutations common to specific virulence grades. Hence, despite the similarity in selection pressures there are multiple genetic routes to attain either highly virulent or attenuated phenotypes in MYXV, resulting in convergence for phenotype but not genotype.

  16. [A case of cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebellar hemorrhages and elevation of interleukin-6 in the cerebrospinal fluid].

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Hiroshi; Murakami, Yasuo; Sengoku, Renpei; Sato, Hironori; Inoue, Kiyoharu

    2004-10-01

    We report a 25-year old man with cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebellar hemorrhages and elevation of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The patient was first admitted to our hospital because of cerebral infarctions at the age of 23. After systemic exploration he was diagnosed as cardiac myxoma. In this patient, the serum level of IL-6 was elevated. The cardiac myxoma was resected and the serum IL-6 level returned to normal. His neurological symptoms improved almost to normal and he was discharged. The patient had been well for two years until he developed headache at the age of 25. Brain MRI revealed multiple cerebellar hemorrhages that overlaid old infarctions. The hemorrhages enlarged in a three months period and his headache became worse, and then he was admitted again. The IL-6 value was normal in serum at that time, but it was elevated in the CSF. The CSF IgG index was also elevated. Cerebral angiograms showed no abnormal vessel in the infratentorium, while multiple fusiform aneurysms were found in both middle cerebral arteries. A transesophageal echocardiography revealed no recurrence of cardiac myxoma. Craniotomy was performed and intracerebellar hematomas were removed. Histopathological examination showed only old and recent bleedings; no metastatic myxoma tissue was found. Although no myxoma tissue was found in biopsy specimen, it seemed reasonable that an elevated level of IL-6 in the CSF was due to metastasized intracranial myxoma, which caused cerebellar embolism, and then invaded the vessel walls and continued to grow. In reviewing the literature we have found no reported case of cardiac myxoma with analysis of IL-6 value in the CSF. We speculate that the level of IL-6 in the CSF might be a good marker for the neurological manifestations of cardiac myxoma.

  17. Squamous cell carcinoma in a maxillary odontogenic keratocyst: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Maria, Anisha; Sharma, Yogesh; Chhabria, Amit

    2011-07-01

    Odontogenic cysts in the maxilla are common but a malignant change in an odontogenic cyst is a comparatively a rare occurrence; however, these entities present with clinical and radiographic features similar to benign, expansible, central, odontogenic tumor, or cyst of the jaws. A patient reporting with squamous cell carcinoma arising from an odontogenic keratocyst of right maxilla has been worked up clinically, radiographically, and pathologically. The case was surgically managed and followed up. A 54-year-old male patient with a compressible, rapidly growing swelling of right maxilla was clinically diagnosed to be a case of odontogenic cyst. On radiologic examination it appeared similar to a cystic lesion. An incisional biopsy obtained from the cyst wall showed it to be odontogenic keratocyst with histologic evidence of malignant transformation. The pathogenesis of the tumor, the biologic progression, and prognosis and overall clinical and histopathogical features of this rare malignancy is reported and discussed.

  18. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma in odontogenic keratocyst: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Chitrapriya; Aggarwal, Pooja; Wadhwan, Vijay; Bansal, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising from the wall of an odontogenic cyst (also known as primary intraosseous carcinoma) is a rare tumor which occurs only in jaw bones. This tumor was first described by Loos in 1913 as a central epidermoid carcinoma of the jaw. Primary intraosseous carcinomas (PIOC) may theoretically arise from the lining of an odontogenic cyst or de novo from presumed odontogenic cell rests. According to the new histological classification of tumors of the World Health Organization, odontogenic keratocyst is nowadays considered a specific odontogenic tumor and the PIOC derived from it is considered as a specific entity which is different from other PIOCs derived from the odontogenic cysts. The following report describes a case of such extremely rare entity that is primary intraosseous SCC of the mandible derived from an OKC in a 60-year-old male patient with brief review of literature. PMID:26980976

  19. Ghost cell odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma--report of two rare cases.

    PubMed

    Hogge, Maritzabel; Velez, Ines; Kaltman, Steven; Movahed, Reza; Yeh, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The ghost cell odontogenic tumor (GCOT) is a neoplastic/cystic lesion with a diverse histopathological and clinical behavior It was formerly known as calcified odontogenic cyst, but in 2005 the World Health Organization categorized this lesion as an odontogenic, benign tumor rather than a cyst; nominating this neoplasm as calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. A later comprehensive classification named it ghost cell odontogenic tumor because the most remarkable histopathologic characteristic is the presence of a mass of ghost cells embedded in the epithelium. We report two cases of a rare variant of a ghost cell odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma; to our knowledge, one is the youngest patient (four month old) reported in the English literature.

  20. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma in odontogenic keratocyst: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Chitrapriya; Aggarwal, Pooja; Wadhwan, Vijay; Bansal, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising from the wall of an odontogenic cyst (also known as primary intraosseous carcinoma) is a rare tumor which occurs only in jaw bones. This tumor was first described by Loos in 1913 as a central epidermoid carcinoma of the jaw. Primary intraosseous carcinomas (PIOC) may theoretically arise from the lining of an odontogenic cyst or de novo from presumed odontogenic cell rests. According to the new histological classification of tumors of the World Health Organization, odontogenic keratocyst is nowadays considered a specific odontogenic tumor and the PIOC derived from it is considered as a specific entity which is different from other PIOCs derived from the odontogenic cysts. The following report describes a case of such extremely rare entity that is primary intraosseous SCC of the mandible derived from an OKC in a 60-year-old male patient with brief review of literature.

  1. Large left atrial myxoma presented as fever of unknown origin: a challenging diagnosis and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gavrielatos, Gerasimos; Letsas, Konstantinos P; Pappas, Loukas K; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Sioras, Elias; Kardaras, Fotis

    2007-01-01

    Myxoma is the most common type of primary tumors of the heart in adults. The majority of patients with myxomas may experience symptoms due to central or peripheral embolism or intracardiac obstruction, while in some cases, they may be completely asymptomatic. Rarely, patients develop unusual symptoms that complicate the diagnostic evaluation. Herein, we describe the case of a 70-year-old patient with a long-lasting low-grade fever due to a large left atrial myxoma revealed during a transthoracic echocardiography.

  2. [Excision of a left atrial myxoma through right minithoracotomy in a patient with multiple myeloma; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yutaka; Goto, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Shinji; Baba, Hiroshi; Okawa, Yasuhide

    2014-12-01

    We present a case of a 63-year-old female who underwent an excision of a left atrial myxoma. Previously, she had been diagnosed with multiple myelomas and received radiation therapy and chemotherapy. A left atrial myxoma was found at an annual medical check-up. The myxoma was removed via a right minithoracotomy with peripheral cannulation to minimize bleeding complications and surgical site infection. She was transferred to the referring hospital on postoperative day 7 due to recurrence of multiple myelomas. She was doing well 14 months after the operation. Right minithoracotomy is a useful approach to minimizing the risks of bleeding and infection in patients with multiple myelomas.

  3. [A case of the calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg's tumor). Reported and literature review].

    PubMed

    Peña-Torres, Leandro Miguel; Monterrubio-Guerrero, Alejandro; Díaz de León-Sandoval, Laura Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor known as Pindborg's tumor, is a rare odontogenic neoplasm of the jaws. One of their characteristics is the cortical expansion and the relationship with a non erupted tooth. Since the original description in 1955, only 200 cases approximately have been described in the world literature. This article reviews the literature and describes a case of patient who presented calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor in the jaw undergoing surgical excision treatment with an evolution without complications.

  4. Squamous Odontogenic Tumor: Literature Review Focusing on the Radiographic Features and Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Nilson do Rosário; Gamba, Thiago de Oliveira; Flores, Isadora Luana; de Almeida, Solange Maria; Lopes, Sérgio Lúcio Pereira de Castro

    2015-01-01

    Since its first publication in 1975, the squamous odontogenic tumor remains the rarest odontogenic lesion, with around 50 cases in the English-language literature in which the microscopic characteristics are frequently very well demonstrated. However, articles which discuss the radiographic aspects are scarce, especially with emphasis on the differential diagnosis. The present treatise proposes an assessment of jaw lesions with the same radiographic characteristics of the squamous odontogenic tumor to clarify the main findings for dental clinicians during routine diagnosis. PMID:26140060

  5. Surgical management of peripheral variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: A rare case report with review

    PubMed Central

    Jindwani, Karuna; Paharia, Y. K.; Kushwah, Atul Pratap Singh

    2015-01-01

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) is a relatively uncommon lesion constituting around 3% of all odontogenic tumours and often misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst. It manifests as a beningn growth which affects young individuals, with a female predeliction usually in the second decade of life, exhibiting more often in the anterior region of maxilla. The current article enumerates the clinical, radiographic and histopathological features of a rare case of extraosseous AOT with its therapeutic consideration PMID:25684929

  6. Treatment of Maxillary Glandular Odontogenic Cyst Involving the Same Place of Previously Treated Traumatic Bone Cyst.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Emel; Baş, Burcu; Dinçer, Duygu; Günhan, Ömer

    2016-03-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst is a rare developmental odontogenic cysts of the jaws having an aggressive behavior. The most common site of occurrence is the anterior mandible, and it is widely seen in middle-aged people. It is suggested that trauma could be a precipitating factor for its occurrence. This article presents the diagnosis and treatment of a case of glandular odontogenic cyst at anterior maxilla that occurred at the same localization of a traumatic bone cyst, 5 years after its management.

  7. Glandular odontogenic cyst of the maxilla: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Nigel Roque; Dinkar, Ajit Dattatray; Khorate, Manisha Maruti

    2016-01-01

    Glandular Odontogenic Cyst is a relatively rare cyst of odontogenic origin, which shows glandular or salivary features that are thought to indicate the pluripotentiality of odontogenic epithelium. It is seen in middle-aged adults, and commonly involves the anterior region of the jaws, especially the mandible. It shows non-specific clinico-radiographic findings which may resemble other lesions, but has characteristic histopathologic features which help in its diagnosis. This paper reports an unusual presentation of a glandular odontogenic cyst which was diagnosed in a 64-year old female in the posterior maxilla, along with a literature review of this cyst, especially the cases reported in India in the past.

  8. A study of 1177 odontogenic lesions in a South Kerala population

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, PV; Beena, VT; Padmakumar, SK; Rajeev, R; Sivakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Context: A study on odontogenic cysts and tumors. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of odontogenic cysts and tumors and their distribution according to age, gender, site and histopathologic types of those reported over a period of 1998–2012 in a Tertiary Health Care Center at South Kerala. Settings and Design: The archives of Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects and Methods: Archival records were reviewed and all the cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors were retrieved from 1998 to 2012. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistical analysis was performed using the computer software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) IBM SPSS Software version 16. Results: Of 7117 oral biopsies, 4.29% were odontogenic tumors. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor comprising 50.2% of cases, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (24.3%). These tumors showed a male predilection (1.19: 1). Odontogenic tumors occurred in a mean age of 33.7 ± 16.8 years. Mandible was the most common jaw affected (76.07%). Odontogenic cysts constituted 12.25% of all oral biopsies. Radicular cyst comprised 75.11% of odontogenic cysts followed by dentigerous cyst (17.2%). Conclusions: This study showed similar as well as contradictory results compared to other studies, probably due to geographical and ethnic variations which is yet to be corroborated. PMID:27601809

  9. Central Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma: Primary Odontogenic or Osseous Neoplasm?

    PubMed

    Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Currently, central cemento-ossifying fibroma is classified by the World Health Organization as a primary bone-forming tumor of the jaws. However, histopathologically, it is often indistinguishable from cemento-osseous dysplasias in that it forms osteoid and cementicles (cementum droplets) in varying proportions. It is believed that pluripotent cells within the periodontal membrane can be stimulated to produce either osteoid or woven bone and cementicles when stimulated. If this is true, cemento-ossifying fibroma would be better classified as a primary odontogenic neoplasm arising from the periodontal ligament. Cemento-ossifying fibromas also do not occur in the long bones. The present report compares several entities that fall within the diagnostic realm of benign fibro-osseous lesions and reviews the evidence for reclassifying central cemento-ossifying fibroma as a primary odontogenic neoplasm. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Carnoy's solution in the mangement of odontogenic keratocyst

    PubMed Central

    Sivanmalai, Sivaraj; Kandhasamy, Kohila; Prabu, Neetika; Prince, Christo Naveen; Prabu, Chandrakala Shekarappa Annapurna Pannaikadu Somasundaram

    2012-01-01

    Carnoy's solution is a substance used as a complementary treatment after the conservative excision of odontogenic keratocyst. The application of Carnoy's solution promotes a superficial chemical necrosis and is intended to reduce recurrence rates. However, the inferior alveolar vascular–nervous plexus can occasionally be exposed after the removal of a lesion. The safety of the application of Carnoy's solution over this plexus has been reported, but to date, no clinical report has been made. The authors present a case that was given Carnoy's solution over the inferior alveolar vascular–nervous plexus as a complementary treatment for the keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Effective control of recurrence with low and transient neural morbidity was suggested with this technique. PMID:23066248

  11. Glandular Odontogenic Cyst: The Value of Intraepithelial Hemosiderin.

    PubMed

    AbdullGaffar, Badr; Koilelat, Mohamed

    2017-05-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a relatively rare but well-described clinicopathologic entity. Its rarity and unpredictable clinical behavior are challenging to managing clinicians. Its variable and overlapping histomorphologic features are also diagnostically challenging for pathologists. Other odontogenic cysts and oral cystic neoplasms can simulate GOC. There are specific histologic criteria that help distinguish GOC from other mimickers. To our knowledge, the phenomenon of hemosiderin pigments deposition within the lining glandular epithelium of GOC has not been covered in detail or specifically reported so far in the literature. We report a case of nontraumatized anterior mandibular GOC in a middle-aged male, which histologically showed hemosiderin pigments within the lining epithelium without stromal siderophages. This finding might reflect a nonspecific spontaneous intraluminal hemorrhage. However, intraepithelial hemosiderin in GOC may be an additional helpful diagnostic clue of GOC in challenging cases since this phenomenon has not been reported in other mimicker cystic lesions.

  12. Glandular odontogenic cyst: report of an unusual bilateral occurrence.

    PubMed

    Amberkar, Vikram S; Jahagirdar, Abhishek; Ahmed Mujib, B R

    2011-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a recently recognized rare developmental odontogenic cyst having an aggressive behavior and accounting for 0.012% to 1.3% of all jaw cysts. GOC usually presents as a painless, slow-growing swelling that tends to affect the anterior part of the jaws. It chiefly occurs in the fourth and fifth decades of life and presents as an expansion of jaws with or without pain or paresthesia. Aggressive nature of the lesion has been reported, as supported by the fact that 25 to 55% of cases recur following curettage. So far only just over 113 cases of GOC have been reported in the literature. Here, we report a case of bilateral GOC in the posterior region of the maxilla, in a 29-year-old male patient, which is unique, being the first case of bilateral GOC to be reported in the literature.

  13. Minor trauma triggering cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis from odontogenic abscess.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shraddha; Nagpure, Prakash S; Singh, Roohie; Garg, Deepika

    2008-07-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the face and neck is a very rare complication of dental infection. Otolaryngologists and dentists should be familiar with this condition because of its similarity to odontogenic deep neck space infection in the initial stages, its rapid spread, and its life-threatening potential. Trauma has been reported to be an important predisposing factor for NF of the face. In this paper, we describe the presentation and treatment of a 62-year-old man who developed NF of the face and neck following bilateral odontogenic deep neck space abscesses. The disease progressed rapidly, with necrosis of the skin, after the patient inflicted minor trauma in the form of application of heated medicinal leaves. The organism isolated in culture from pus was Acinetobacter sp. The comorbid conditions in our patient were anemia and chronic alcoholism. The patient was managed by immediate and repeated extensive debridements and split-skin grafting.

  14. Minor trauma triggering cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis from odontogenic abscess

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shraddha; Nagpure, Prakash S; Singh, Roohie; Garg, Deepika

    2008-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the face and neck is a very rare complication of dental infection. Otolaryngologists and dentists should be familiar with this condition because of its similarity to odontogenic deep neck space infection in the initial stages, its rapid spread, and its life-threatening potential. Trauma has been reported to be an important predisposing factor for NF of the face. In this paper, we describe the presentation and treatment of a 62-year-old man who developed NF of the face and neck following bilateral odontogenic deep neck space abscesses. The disease progressed rapidly, with necrosis of the skin, after the patient inflicted minor trauma in the form of application of heated medicinal leaves. The organism isolated in culture from pus was Acinetobacter sp. The comorbid conditions in our patient were anemia and chronic alcoholism. The patient was managed by immediate and repeated extensive debridements and split-skin grafting. PMID:19561990

  15. Calcifying odontogenic cyst with ameloblastic fibroma: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Chung-Ho; Lin, Li-Min; Chen, Yuk-Kwan; Wright, John M; Kessler, Harvey P; Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Ellis, Edward

    2004-10-01

    Although it is a rare event, odontogenic tumors such as ameloblastoma, ameloblastic fibroma (AF), ameloblastic fibro-odontoma, and odontoma have been reported associated with calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC). There are only four cases of COC with AF cited in the English literature. However, three of these four cases were either included in a review of a series of cases or reported as an abstract, and limited clinical and histological information was provided. We present three additional cases of COC with AF and discuss the management for this combined lesion. Because COC is known for its histologic diversity and variable clinical behavior, and the clinical significance of an association of COC with AF is still unknown, we think it is valuable to report COC with AF with detailed clinical and pathological documentation.

  16. Brain abscess due to odontogenic infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Yong; Suh, Dong Won; Park, Chul Min; Oh, Min Seok

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we describe a case of brain abscess due to odontogenic infection. A 53-year-old female who had been suffering from headache and trismus for two weeks visited the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the Sun Dental Hospital (Daejeon, Korea). Even after several routine tests, we still could not make a diagnosis. However, after the combined multidisciplinary efforts of oral surgeons and neurosurgeons, the patient was treated for odontogenic infection and made an uneventful recovery. Therefore, patients with infections in the head and neck region showing symptoms such as headache, changes in mental state, nausea, vomiting, seizures, hemiplegia, speech disturbance, and visual disturbance, a brain abscess should be included in the list of differential diagnoses. PMID:25045643

  17. MULTIPLE CALCIFIED RIGHT ATRIAL MYXOMAS ASSOCIATED WITH TRICUSPID INSUFFICIENCY IN A CHILD

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Manuel Jimenez; Franco, Eliud Hernandez; Avalos, Luis Lasso; Perez, Alejandro Martinez

    1979-01-01

    Multiple calcified myxomas of the right atrium were discovered in a 12-year-old girl and were associated with a dysplastic tricuspid valve that was grossly insufficient. Surgical resection of three pedunculated masses was performed, and the tricuspid valve was replaced with a biologic prosthesis. Images PMID:15216310

  18. [Clinical diagnosis of left auricular myxoma based on its echocardiographic and surgical verification].

    PubMed

    Muñoz Molina, R; Ochoa, A; Esquivel-Avila, J G; Díaz Alvárez, E; Pinotti, A; Alvárez, E

    1987-01-01

    We studied six patients with atrial myxoma, 5 occurred in left atrium and one in the right atrium, the diagnosis was verified with echocardiogram and surgery, we determined the clinical, electrocardiographic and radiological differences between the mitral stenosis and myxoma. We found that patients with atrial myxoma have no history of rheumatic fever, the dyspnea was less severe of shorter and duration, patient had paroxysmal dyspnea. In contrast dizziness, faintness, hemiparesis and/or angina were the more frequent symptoms. A diastolic mitral snap was a very frequent finding, less frequent was the diastolic rumble no patient had pre-systolic murmur. The left atrium was generally not dilated and the left atrial appendage as well as the pulmonary artery were not prominent in chest X-Rays. The P wave in lead II was not more than 0.11 sec and the ventricular complex in VI did not show tall R ware. With the previous elements it is possible to suspect the diagnosis of left atrial myxoma. The diagnosis should, of course, be confirmed by echocardiography.

  19. A case of large atrial myxoma presenting as an acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Praneet; Aung, Myo Myo; Awan, Muhammad Umer; Kososky, Charles; Barn, Kulpreet

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial myxomas are rare primary cardiac tumors. Their incidence is estimated to be about 0.1% of total cases. Neurological complications resulting from cardiac myxomas are seen in 20–35% of patients. Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is preferred over transthoracic echocardiogram for evaluation of left atrial myxoma. Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography ensures better visualization of intracardiac structures. It has been used prior to surgery for diagnostic support in the surgical treatment of cardiac masses. We present a case of a 46-year-old Hispanic male who developed acute ischemic stroke of left frontal lobe and was also found to have multiple ‘silent’ cerebral infarcts in the MRI of the brain. On further workup, he was found to have a left atrial myxoma on 3D TEE. This was resected with the assistance of intra-operative 3D TEE imaging. We present this case to increase awareness and to stress at early evaluation of secondary causes of ischemic cerebrovascular accident, outside the realm of hypercoagulability. This case also exhibits the need for basic cardiac workup in young individuals who present with symptoms of intermittent palpitations or chest pain to minimize significant morbidity or mortality. PMID:26908377

  20. The immunoregulatory properties of oncolytic myxoma virus and their implications in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; McFadden, Grant

    2010-12-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a poxvirus with a strict rabbit-specific host-tropism for pathogenesis. The immunoregulatory factors encoded by MYXV can suppress some functions of immune effectors from other species. We review their mechanisms of action, implications in therapeutics and the potential to improve MYXV as an oncolytic agent in humans.

  1. Clinico-pathological features of breast myxoma: report of a case with histogenetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Magro, Gaetano; Cavanaugh, Barbara; Palazzo, Juan

    2010-05-01

    We herein report the clinical, radiological, and pathological findings of a rare case of myxoma occurring in the breast parenchyma of a 75-year-old female. The tumor was incidentally detected at a mammographic screening and, ultrasonographically, presented as an ovoid mass. Histologically, an encapsulated hypocellular, myxoid tumor with low vascularization was evident. Neoplastic cells were round- to spindle/stellate-shaped and stained with vimentin and focally with calponin. We emphasize that morphology remains preeminent in the diagnosis of a breast myxoma, while immunohistochemistry may assist in ruling out other tumor entities. Differential diagnosis with all benign and malignant myxoid lesions, primarily occurring in the breast, is provided. The histogenesis of breast myxoma is unknown. The lack of expression of desmin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, CD34, CD99, CD10, bcl-2 protein, and estrogen/progesterone/androgen receptors, all markers characteristically expressed by "the benign spindle cell tumors of the mammary stroma," would suggest that breast myxoma does not fall into this tumor category and that its putative precursor mesenchymal cell resides in the interlobular stroma.

  2. [A case of cerebral embolism caused by atrial myxoma--superselective fibrinolytic therapy].

    PubMed

    Sugawara, T; Takahashi, A; So, K; Yoshimoto, T; Suzuki, J; Suzuki, Y; Horiuchi, T

    1987-12-01

    A 37-year-old man was admitted to our clinic 3 hours after the onset of cerebrovascular accident with right hemiparesis and total aphasia. On admission, we started combined administration of mannitol, vitamin E, phenytoin (Sendai Cocktail) and perfluorochemicals to protect ischemic brain. Left cerebral angiography revealed occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery involving its perforating arteries. Following the performance of angiography, vascular balloon catheter was introduced into the embolus, and fibrinolytic agent (urokinase) was continuously injected. Soon after the injection of 240,000 unit urokinase, recanalization of left middle cerebral artery was shown by repeated cerebral angiography performed 5.5 hours after the onset. On his clinical course, left hemiparesis and aphasia were improved step by step, and 1 week later, he could walk by himself with minor neurological deficits. Further examination revealed that myxoma was located on left atrium by echocardiography. Within 1 week, the patient was transferred to cardio-surgical unit, and myxoma was successfully removed. Now he is in good health and has returned to his job. Usually cerebral embolisms result from atrial myxoma cause severe cerebral infarction. Here we reported a case of cerebral embolism by myxoma and recanalized using fibrinolytic agent by balloon catheter injection. The damage will be reduced if the duration of occlusion is limited, so this method will be helpful to treat cerebral embolism.

  3. Severe odontogenic infection in pregnancy - A timely reminder.

    PubMed

    Tocaciu, Shreya; Robinson, Bruce W; Sambrook, Paul J

    2016-09-07

    Dental practitioners often treat patients who are pregnant. Understanding the altered physiology in the pregnant patient, especially changes in immune function, is vital in effective management of orofacial infections. We present a case of rapidly spreading odontogenic infection in a pregnant patient requiring surgical management. We also discuss the physiological changes of pregnancy relevant to dentistry, and the principles of managing such infections in the gravid patient. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting the Sonic Hedgehog Pathway in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor*

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changchun; Amm, Hope M.; DeVilliers, Patricia; Wu, Yixin; Deatherage, Joseph R.; Liu, Zhongyu; MacDougall, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) may occur sporadically or associated with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is a benign aggressive tumor of odontogenic epithelial origin with a high rate of recurrence. A primary human keratocystic odontogenic tumor cell population, KCOT-1, has been established from a tumor explant culture. The KCOT-1 cells were characterized by growth rate, gene expression profiles of major tooth enamel matrix proteins (EMPs), amelogenin (AMELX), enamelin (ENAM), ameloblastin (AMBN), amelotin (AMTN), tumor-related proteins enamelysin (MMP-20), kallikrein-4 (KLK-4), and odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Cytokeratin 14 (CK14) was examined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, expression of the members of the sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway, SHH, patched (PTCH-1), smoothened (SMO), GLI-1, and GLI-2 and of the NOTCH signaling pathway, NOTCH-1, NOTCH-2, NOTCH-3, JAG-2 (Jagged-2), and Delta-like-1 (DLL-1) were evaluated. KCOT-1 cells were treated with SMO antagonist cyclopamine. We found that cyclopamine significantly arrested the growth of KCOT-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner and that the effects of cyclopamine were abolished by adding SHH protein. The protein expression of the SHH pathway was down-regulated by cyclopamine, further confirming that cyclopamine inhibits the SHH signaling pathway; SHH down-regulation correlated with the down-regulation of the NOTCH signaling pathway as well. In conclusion, using an established KCOT-1 cell population, we characterized the gene expression profiles related to the EMPs, SHH, and NOTCH signaling pathway and confirmed that cyclopamine significantly arrested the growth of KCOT-1 cells and may be a viable agent as a novel therapeutic. PMID:22679015

  5. A case of tetanus secondary to an odontogenic infection.

    PubMed

    Darraj, Majid; Stone, James; Keynan, Yoav; Thompson, Kristjan; Snider, Carolyn

    2016-12-08

    Tetanus is a life-threatening clinical syndrome that commonly presents with muscular spasms, rigidity, and autonomic instability. It is considered rare in industrialized countries, and tetanus occurring secondary to dental abscesses, procedures, or infections has been infrequently reported. We describe the case of a patient inadequately immunized for tetanus, who presented to the emergency department with muscular spasms, rigidity, and autonomic instability in the setting of an odontogenic infection. A clinical diagnosis of tetanus was made and subsequently managed successfully.

  6. Classification of odontogenic cysts and tumors – Antecedents

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Aesha; Jayanthi, P; Tanveer, Shahela; Gobu, Sreeja C

    2016-01-01

    Pierre Paul Broca produced a monograph on tumor classification which also included the classification of odontogenic tumors (OTs). The terminology used to describe malignant epithelial OTs has varied since the World Health Organization published the initial consensus on the taxonomy of OTs. Minor changes were introduced in the second edition. It is only in the very recent years that additional knowledge has accumulated and refined the classification. This review emphasizes on reasons for modification by each author and the recent acceptance. PMID:27601821

  7. Immunolocalisation of laminin-1 in keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Silva Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo; Gonçalves Ramos, Eduardo Antônio; Araújo Melo, Leonardo; Brandi Schlaepfer, Caroline; de Souza, Renata Oliveira; Campos Oliveira, Márcio; dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2010-11-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOTs) are distinct odontogenic lesions frequently affecting the jawbones. They may be associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), and may exhibit disorders involving the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunolocalisation of laminin-1 in 20 cases of KOTs in order to contribute to the characterization of this protein, which is little studied in odontogenic tumors. Our results showed laminin-1 in all 20 KOTs studied; its labelling intensity was weak in three cases (15%), moderate in five (25%) and strong in 12 cases (60%). Laminin-1 immunolocalisation was predominantly continuous in 18 (90%) KOTs, including areas of acanthosis, subepithelial split and epithelial buds. Weak immunolabelling was observed in regions exhibiting an inflammatory process, especially in the case of intense inflammation. These findings suggest that laminin-1 does not participate in biological processes such as cystic epithelium-cystic wall separation or the formation of epithelial islands in KOTs. Furthermore, the discontinuous and weak labelling of this protein in the basement membrane of these tumors is probably a consequence of the inflammatory process in the tumor stroma.

  8. Myxoma virus and the Leporipoxviruses: an evolutionary paradigm.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Liu, June; Cattadori, Isabella; Ghedin, Elodie; Read, Andrew F; Holmes, Edward C

    2015-03-06

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is the type species of the Leporipoxviruses, a genus of Chordopoxvirinae, double stranded DNA viruses, whose members infect leporids and squirrels, inducing cutaneous fibromas from which virus is mechanically transmitted by biting arthropods. However, in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), MYXV causes the lethal disease myxomatosis. The release of MYXV as a biological control for the wild European rabbit population in Australia, initiated one of the great experiments in evolution. The subsequent coevolution of MYXV and rabbits is a classic example of natural selection acting on virulence as a pathogen adapts to a novel host species. Slightly attenuated mutants of the progenitor virus were more readily transmitted by the mosquito vector because the infected rabbit survived longer, while highly attenuated viruses could be controlled by the rabbit immune response. As a consequence, moderately attenuated viruses came to dominate. This evolution of the virus was accompanied by selection for genetic resistance in the wild rabbit population, which may have created an ongoing co-evolutionary dynamic between resistance and virulence for efficient transmission. This natural experiment was repeated on a continental scale with the release of a separate strain of MYXV in France and its subsequent spread throughout Europe. The selection of attenuated strains of virus and resistant rabbits mirrored the experience in Australia in a very different environment, albeit with somewhat different rates. Genome sequencing of the progenitor virus and the early radiation, as well as those from the 1990s in Australia and Europe, has shown that although MYXV evolved at high rates there was no conserved route to attenuation or back to virulence. In contrast, it seems that these relatively large viral genomes have the flexibility for multiple pathways that converge on a similar phenotype.

  9. Characterisation of immunosuppression in rabbits after infection with myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Jeklova, Edita; Leva, Lenka; Matiasovic, Jan; Kovarcik, Kamil; Kudlackova, Hana; Nevorankova, Zora; Psikal, Ivan; Faldyna, Martin

    2008-05-25

    Myxoma virus (MXV) causes the systemic disease myxomatosis in the European rabbit. Despite many in vitro studies on the function of MXV immunomodulatory proteins and detailed molecular knowledge of virus, little is known about the dynamics of interaction of the virus with the integrated host-immune system during infection. In this study changes in haematological profile, changes in lymphocyte subset distribution and non-specific proliferation activity of lymphocytes from different lymphoid compartments on the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 9th and 11th day after experimental infection of rabbits with MXV strain Lausanne was characterised. The relationship between alterations of immune parameters and dynamic of virus dissemination through the body was investigated. Haematological changes included moderate leucopenia with significant lymphopenia, neutrophilia, monocytosis and eosinopenia. A decrease of T cells including CD4+ and CD8+ and increase of CD79alpha+ were observed in draining popliteal lymph node 4 days after virus inoculation. From day 6, comparable changes were seen in collateral popliteal lymph node, spleen and peripheral blood. From day 9, the mentioned lymphocyte subsets tended to reach their original state in all of these lymphocyte compartments except draining popliteal lymph node. In thymus, MXV infection affected mainly CD4+CD8+ double positive thymocytes. On the other hand, proliferation activity of lymphocytes determined by the proliferation assay with plant-derived mitogens was significantly reduced from day 4 or 6 and remained reduced until the end of experiment in all observed lymphoid organs. Presence of MXV in respective lymphoid compartments preceded changes in lymphocyte subset distribution or lymphocyte activity.

  10. Myxoma and Vaccinia Viruses Bind Differentially to Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Winnie M.; Bartee, Eric C.; Moreb, Jan S.; Dower, Ken; Connor, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) and vaccinia virus (VACV), two distinct members of the family Poxviridae, are both currently being developed as oncolytic virotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have demonstrated that ex vivo treatment with MYXV can selectively recognize and kill contaminating cancerous cells from autologous bone marrow transplants without perturbing the engraftment of normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which MYXV specifically recognizes and eliminates the cancer cells in the autografts is not understood. While little is known about the cellular attachment factor(s) exploited by MYXV for entry into any target cells, VACV has been shown to utilize cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate (HS), the extracellular matrix protein laminin, and/or integrin β1. We have constructed MYXV and VACV virions tagged with the Venus fluorescent protein and compared their characteristics of binding to various human cancer cell lines as well as to primary human leukocytes. We report that the binding of MYXV or VACV to some adherent cell lines could be partially inhibited by heparin, but laminin blocked only VACV binding. In contrast to cultured fibroblasts, the binding of MYXV and VACV to a wide spectrum of primary human leukocytes could not be competed by either HS or laminin. Additionally, MYXV and VACV exhibited very different binding characteristics against certain select human leukocytes, suggesting that the two poxviruses utilize different cell surface determinants for the attachment to these cells. These results indicate that VACV and MYXV can exhibit very different oncolytic tropisms against some cancerous human leukocytes. PMID:23388707

  11. Myxoma Virus and the Leporipoxviruses: An Evolutionary Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Peter J.; Liu, June; Cattadori, Isabella; Ghedin, Elodie; Read, Andrew F.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2015-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is the type species of the Leporipoxviruses, a genus of Chordopoxvirinae, double stranded DNA viruses, whose members infect leporids and squirrels, inducing cutaneous fibromas from which virus is mechanically transmitted by biting arthropods. However, in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), MYXV causes the lethal disease myxomatosis. The release of MYXV as a biological control for the wild European rabbit population in Australia, initiated one of the great experiments in evolution. The subsequent coevolution of MYXV and rabbits is a classic example of natural selection acting on virulence as a pathogen adapts to a novel host species. Slightly attenuated mutants of the progenitor virus were more readily transmitted by the mosquito vector because the infected rabbit survived longer, while highly attenuated viruses could be controlled by the rabbit immune response. As a consequence, moderately attenuated viruses came to dominate. This evolution of the virus was accompanied by selection for genetic resistance in the wild rabbit population, which may have created an ongoing co-evolutionary dynamic between resistance and virulence for efficient transmission. This natural experiment was repeated on a continental scale with the release of a separate strain of MYXV in France and its subsequent spread throughout Europe. The selection of attenuated strains of virus and resistant rabbits mirrored the experience in Australia in a very different environment, albeit with somewhat different rates. Genome sequencing of the progenitor virus and the early radiation, as well as those from the 1990s in Australia and Europe, has shown that although MYXV evolved at high rates there was no conserved route to attenuation or back to virulence. In contrast, it seems that these relatively large viral genomes have the flexibility for multiple pathways that converge on a similar phenotype. PMID:25757062

  12. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses bind differentially to human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Winnie M; Bartee, Eric C; Moreb, Jan S; Dower, Ken; Connor, John H; McFadden, Grant

    2013-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) and vaccinia virus (VACV), two distinct members of the family Poxviridae, are both currently being developed as oncolytic virotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have demonstrated that ex vivo treatment with MYXV can selectively recognize and kill contaminating cancerous cells from autologous bone marrow transplants without perturbing the engraftment of normal CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which MYXV specifically recognizes and eliminates the cancer cells in the autografts is not understood. While little is known about the cellular attachment factor(s) exploited by MYXV for entry into any target cells, VACV has been shown to utilize cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate (HS), the extracellular matrix protein laminin, and/or integrin β1. We have constructed MYXV and VACV virions tagged with the Venus fluorescent protein and compared their characteristics of binding to various human cancer cell lines as well as to primary human leukocytes. We report that the binding of MYXV or VACV to some adherent cell lines could be partially inhibited by heparin, but laminin blocked only VACV binding. In contrast to cultured fibroblasts, the binding of MYXV and VACV to a wide spectrum of primary human leukocytes could not be competed by either HS or laminin. Additionally, MYXV and VACV exhibited very different binding characteristics against certain select human leukocytes, suggesting that the two poxviruses utilize different cell surface determinants for the attachment to these cells. These results indicate that VACV and MYXV can exhibit very different oncolytic tropisms against some cancerous human leukocytes.

  13. Biatrial Approach Provides Better Outcomes in the Surgical Treatment of Cardiac Myxomas

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Ahmet; Saba, Davit; Velioğlu, Yusuf; Ener, Serdar; Özkan, Hayati

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to present clinical features, surgical approaches, importance of surgical technique and long-term outcomes of our patients with cardiac myxoma who underwent surgery. Methods We retrospectively collected data of patients with cardiac myxoma who underwent surgical resection between February 1990 and November 2014. Biatrial approach is the preferred surgical method in a large proportion of patients that are operated due to left atrial myxoma because it provides wider exposure than the uniatrial approach. To prevent recurrence during surgical resection, a large excision is made so as to include at least 5 mm of normal area from clean tissue around the tumor. Moreover, special attention is paid to the excision that is made as a whole, without digesting the fragment of tumor with gentle dissections. Results Forty-three patients (20 males, mean age of 51.7±8.8 years) were included. Most common symptom was dyspnea (48.8%). Tumor was located in the left atrium in 37 (86%) patients. Resections were achieved via biatrial approach in 34 patients, uniatrial approach in 8 patients, and right atriotomy with right ventriculotomy in 1 patient. One patient died due to low cardiac output syndrome in the early postoperative period. Mean follow-up time was 102.3±66.5 months. Actuarial survival rates were 95%, 92% and 78% at five, 10 and 15 years, respectively. Recurrence was observed in none of the patients during follow-up. Conclusion Although myxomas are benign tumors, due to embolic complications and obstructive signs, they should be treated surgically as soon as possible after diagnosis. To prevent recurrence, especially in cardiac myxomas which are located in left atrium, preferred biatrial approach is suggested for wide resection of the tumor and to avoid residual tumor. PMID:27849304

  14. [Superselective fibrinolysis for a middle cerebral artery embolism caused by a left atrial myxoma: case report].

    PubMed

    Yamanome, T; Yoshida, K; Miura, K; Ogawa, A

    2000-07-01

    A case of successful treatment by local fibrinolysis of a middle cerebral artery embolism caused by a thrombus from a left atrial myxoma is reported. A 62-year-old woman using a pacemaker and suffering from sick sinus syndrome was admitted on December 29th 1996, complaining of transient restlessness. CT and cerebral angiography revealed no abnormal vascular lesions. Eighteen months after the initial episode, she suffered a sudden onset of left hemiparesis and loss of consciousness. CT scan performed during the second episode revealed no lesions and, in particular, no early CT infarction sign, but emergent cerebral angiography revealed a right middle cerebral artery embolic occlusion. Local fibrinolysis using a tissue plasminogen activator was performed within 3 hours after the beginning of the episode, and partial recanalization was obtained within one hour after initiation of the fibrinolytic therapy. On the first hospital day, though CT revealed a small low-density area in the right basal ganglia, motor deficits gradually improved. Considering the possibility of a cardiac source of the embolism, trans-esophageal echocardiography was performed and revealed a left atrial tumor suspected to be a myxoma. It was removed by surgery on the 34th hospital day. Histological examination proved it to be a myxoma. Nine months after local fibrinolytic therapy, the patient returned to work. The diagnosis of cerebral embolism caused by cardiac myxoma is difficult to make at the time when the patient is first examined after admission. It is also hard to discover during emergent cerebral angiography with fibrinolytic therapy. Therefore, in the case of patients with cerebral embolism for which local fibrinolysis is ineffective, it should be presumed that cardiac myxoma is the source of the embolus. Direct PTA alone may be effective for such tumoral embolism.

  15. [Serum/tissue interleukin-6 concentrations and constitutional abnormalities in 4 patients with cardiac myxoma].

    PubMed

    Saji, T; Matsuo, N; Shiono, N; Yokomuro, H; Watanabe, Y; Takanashi, Y; Komatsu, H

    1993-09-01

    Immunological features and the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in 4 patients with cardiac myxoma were studied. The patients' age ranged from 11 years old to 57 years old; all 4 patients were female. Case 1, an 11-year-old female patient with myxoma located in the right ventricle, was considered to be a familial case. Her mother had myxomas in the right and left atrium, and had undergone removal of both tumors 3 years before. Peripheral blood examination revealed various inflammatory parameters in all of these patients. White blood cell (WBC) count was over 8,000/cmm in 3 of the 4 patients, positive CRP was found in 2 patients, IgG was higher than 1,500 mg/dl in 3 patients, positive anti-nuclear antibody was seen in 1 patient, and positive rheumatoid factor was identified in 1 patient. The OKT 4/8 ratio of lymphocyte subpopulation was 4.65 in one patient. The lymphocyte mitogenic response to PHA was increased in 2 patients. Serum IL-6 increased in 3 of 4 patients, and returned to normal within 3 to 4 weeks after operation. The IL-6 concentration in the homogenized sample remarkably increased in all 4 patients. Tumors larger than 4 cm contained higher tissue IL-6 concentrations than those smaller than 2 cm. The cultured myxoma cells produced abundant IL-6 in the culture medium supernatant. We conclude that inflammatory signs and immunological abnormalities are common in patients with large cardiac myxoma, and, in addition, serum IL-6 levels may increase in such patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour (calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour) in the mandible of a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Kang, M-S; Park, M-S; Kwon, S-W; Ma, S-A; Cho, D-Y; Kim, D-Y; Kim, Y

    2006-01-01

    A 13-year-old male tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) had a marked mandibular swelling noticed 12 months earlier and associated with progressive anorexia and weight loss. Radiological and post-mortem examination revealed a mass (13x15 cm) which was firm and poorly defined, with destruction of the adjacent bone tissue. Histologically, the mass was poorly demarcated, with infiltrative growth, and composed of nests, cords and islands of epithelial cells with characteristic basal cell features. Also observed were extensive squamous metaplasia, ghost cells, stellate reticulum, and fibroblastic connective tissue stroma containing inflammatory cells. A prominent feature of this tumour consisted of abundant nodular deposits of congophilic amyloid-like material with partial mineralization (Liesegang rings). Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells and the amyloid-like material were positive for pancytokeratin and negative for vimentin. The findings supported the diagnosis of an amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour (APOT), also known as calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour in man and animals.

  17. Frequency of Non-Odontogenic Pain After Endodontic Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nixdorf, Donald R.; Moana-Filho, Estephan J.; Law, Alan S.; McGuire, Lisa A.; Hodges, James S.; John, Mike T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about ill-defined pain that persists following endodontic procedures, including an estimate of the problem’s magnitude. We conducted a systematic review of prospective studies that reported the frequency of non-odontogenic pain in patients who had undergone endodontic procedures. Methods Non-odontogenic pain was defined as dentoalveolar pain present for 6 months or more after endodontic treatment without evidence of dental pathology. Endodontic procedures reviewed were non-surgical root canal treatment, retreatment, and surgical root canal treatment. Studies were searched in four databases electronically, complemented by hand searching. A summary estimate of non-odontogenic tooth pain frequency was derived using random-effects meta-analysis. Results Of 770 articles retrieved and reviewed, 10 met inclusion criteria and 9 had data on both odontogenic and non-odontogenic causes of pain. A total of 3,343 teeth were included; 1,125 had follow-up information regarding pain status. We identified 48 teeth with non-odontogenic pain and estimated a 3.4% (95% CI: 1.4 to 5.5%) frequency of occurrence. In 9 articles containing data regarding both odontogenic and non-odontogenic causes of tooth pain, 56% (44/78) of all cases were thought to have a non-odontogenic cause. Conclusions Non-odontogenic pain is not an uncommon outcome following root canal therapy and may represent half of all cases of persistent tooth pain. These findings have implications for diagnosis and treatment of painful teeth that were previously root canal treated since therapy directed at the tooth in question would not be expected to resolve non-odontogenic pain. PMID:20728716

  18. Management of complex multi-space odontogenic infections.

    PubMed

    Bratton, Terrance A; Jackson, D Carl; Nkungula-Howlett, Tania; Williams, Charles W; Bennett, C Ray

    2002-01-01

    The successful management of multi-space orofacial odontogenic infections involves identification of the source of the infection, the anatomical spaces encountered, the predominant microorganisms that are found during the various stages of odontogenic fascial space infection, the impact of the infectious process on defense systems, the ability to use and interpret laboratory data and imaging studies, and a thorough understanding of contemporary antibiotic and supportive care. The therapeutic goals, when managing multi-space odontogenic infections, are to restore form and/or function while limiting patient disability and preventing recurrence. Odontogenic infections are commonly the result of pericoronitis, carious teeth with pulpal exposure, periodontitis, or complications of dental procedures. The second and third molars are frequently the etiology of these multi-space odontogenic infections. Of the two teeth, the third molar is the more frequent source of infection. Diagnostic imaging modalities are selected based on the patient's history, clinical presentation, physical findings and laboratory results. Periapical and panoramic x-rays are reliable initial screening instruments used in determining etiology. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are ideal imaging studies that permit assessment of the soft tissue involvement to include determining fluid collections, distinguishing abscess from cellulitis, and offering insight as to airway patency. Antibiotics are administered to assist the host immune system's effort to control and eliminate invading microorganisms. Early infections, first three (3) days of symptoms, are primarily caused by aerobic streptococci which are sensitive to penicillin. Amoxicillin is classified as an extended spectrum penicillin. The addition of clavulanic acid to amoxicillin (Augmentin) increases the spectrum to staphylococcus and other anaerobes by conferring beta-lactamase resistance. In late infections, more than three (3

  19. Microbial flora of odontogenic abscesses in pet guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Minarikova, A; Hauptman, K; Knotek, Z; Jekl, V

    2016-10-01

    Abscesses of odontogenic origin in guinea pigs pose a serious health problem and need to be treated with a combination of surgical and medical therapy. The aim of this prospective study was to describe the microbial flora of odontogenic abscesses associated with osteomyelitis in 24 pet guinea pigs, to perform antibiotic sensitivity testing, and to make recommendations for practitioners on the antibiotics of first choice. Inclusion criteria for the study included the animal being diagnosed with an odontogenic abscess which underwent surgery and was not pre-treated with an antibiotic. Inclusion criteria matched for 24 guinea pigs. Samples (pus, capsule and affected tooth/bone) for bacteriological examination were collected under sterile conditions during the surgical procedure. The most commonly isolated bacteria from abscesses of odontogenic origin were Bacteroides fragilis in 12.8 per cent (6/47) of cases, Pasteurella multocida in 10.6 per cent (5/47) and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius in 8.5 per cent (4/47). Aerobic bacterial species only were isolated in 29.2 per cent (7/24) of cases, anaerobic bacteria only were isolated in 33.3 per cent (8/24), and mixed infection with anaerobic and aerobic bacterial species was seen in 37.5 per cent (9/24). Aerobes (n=20) were sensitive to enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin in 100 per cent of samples, benzylpenicillin potassium (penicillin G, PNCG) in 90 per cent, cephalotin in 85 per cent, amoxicillin-clavulanate in 75 per cent, doxycycline in 70 per cent, gentamicin in 65 per cent and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in 55 per cent. Anaerobes (n=27) were sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanate in 100 per cent of cases, clindamycin in 96.3 per cent, metronidazole in 92.6 per cent, PNCG in 92.6 per cent and cephalotin in 74.1 per cent. As guinea pigs are strictly herbivorous animals, based on the results of this study the recommended antibiotic treatment for odontogenic abscesses is a combination of fluoroquinolones and metronidazole

  20. Odontogenic tumours in children and adolescents: a collaborative study of 431 cases.

    PubMed

    Servato, J P S; de Souza, P E A; Horta, M C R; Ribeiro, D C; de Aguiar, M C F; de Faria, P R; Cardoso, S V; Loyola, Adriano Mota

    2012-06-01

    This study describes the oral and maxillofacial pathological characteristics of a series of odontogenic tumours in children and adolescents from three Brazilian reference centres. The records were reviewed for all odontogenic tumours in patients up to 18 years old based on criteria proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2005. Data concerning sex, age, skin colour and tumour location were collected and plotted. Four hundred and thirty one odontogenic tumours in children and adolescents were found, accounting for 37.5% of the total number of odontogenic tumours diagnosed. Benign tumours were predominant (99.8% of the cases), and odontoma was the most frequent type (41.4%), followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumours (25.5%) and ameloblastoma (14.6%). Odontogenic tumours were rarely detected in early childhood, and their prevalence increased with age. An almost equal distribution was observed with respect to sex and the site of the lesions. This study is the largest reported retrospective analysis describing odontogenic tumours in children and adolescents to date. The authors detected some variation in the relative frequency of odontogenic tumours compared with similar reports. Additional studies should be conducted based on the new WHO classification and predetermined age parameters to enable comparative analysis among different worldwide populations.

  1. Odontogenic tumors: A retrospective study of four Brazilian diagnostic pathology centers

    PubMed Central

    da-Costa, Daniela O P.; Maurício, Almir S.; de-Faria, Paulo A S.; da-Silva, Licínio E.; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This article presents the results of a retrospective study of the frequency and classification of odontogenic tumors recorded at four centers of diagnostic pathology in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Study Design: All medical records and microscopic slides of odontogenic tumor specimens for the years 1997 to 2007 were retrieved from the files of four services of diagnostic pathology in Rio de Janeiro City. Diagnoses were re-evaluated and the tumors classified according to the latest (2005) World Health Organization Classification of Tumors. Results: A total of 201 odontogenic tumors were found among 15,758 oral biopsies (1.3%). The frequencies of these tumors at the four centers ranged from 0.5% at the National Cancer Institute to 3.3% in a private laboratory. Chi-square analysis revealed statistically significant differences (p<0.05) between the proportions of odontogenic tumors in the studied centers. Of these, 94.5% were benign and 5.5% were malignant. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (32.3%) was the most frequent lesion, followed by ameloblastoma (29.8%) and odontoma (18.4%). Conclusions: Odontogenic tumors are uncommon in Brazil. Different pathology laboratories reported divergent frequencies of odontogenic tumors, which may reflect institutional specializations and the patient populations served. Key words:Odontogenic tumors, jaw neoplasms, epidemiology, WHO classification. PMID:22143740

  2. [Revision of the 1992 edition of the WHO histological typing of odontogenic tumors. A suggestion].

    PubMed

    Reichart, P A; Philipsen, H P

    2003-03-01

    The WHO classification of odontogenic tumors (1992, OT) was revised. The following main changes were proposed: (1) OT are not only "related to" odontogenic tissues but are derived from these; (2) the stroma of the epithelial tumor group (1.1.1) is of a fibrous nature and does not contain any ectomesenchymal component; (3) subtypes of ameloblastomas have to be differentiated (intra-, extraosseous, desmoplastic, unicystic); (4) eponyms are no longer used in the revised classification; (5) the AOT is reclassified as an epithelial OT; (6) a neoplastic and non-neoplastic line of the ameloblastic fibroma and ameloblastic fibrodentinoma is proposed; (7) the calcifying ghost cell odontogenic tumor is included in the classification; (8) the simple and the WHO type of odontogenic fibroma are included in the classification; (9) the classification of malignant OT is adapted from Eversole (1999) with a few changes. In particular, ameloblastic carcinoma is differentiated from malignant ( metastasizing) ameloblastoma; (10) the term carcinoma in intraosseous (peripheral) ameloblastoma is introduced. Also, the malignant epithelial odontogenic ghost cell tumor is termed calcifying ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma; (11) the clear cell odontogenic tumor is termed clear cell odontogenic carcinoma; (12) the so-called pseudocysts are termed "cavities" (aneurysmal bone cavity, simple bone cavity, lingual and buccal mandibular bone cavity, focal marrow-containing jaw cavity).

  3. Familial odontogenic keratocysts. Report of 3 cases and review of Japanese dental literature.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Y; Narita, H; Yamamoto, T; Kameyama, Y; Maeda, H; Nakane, S

    1985-02-01

    Familial odontogenic keratocysts are described in this report. The Case 1 patient, who has 3 sisters, developed odontogenic keratocysts. The 2 younger sisters (Cases 2 and 3) also had odontogenic keratocysts, although the elder sister did not have any odontogenic cysts. The father of the patients had a history of removal of a jaw cyst, and the mother was found later to have malignant ameloblastoma. Besides the odontogenic keratocysts, the Case 1 patient had basal cell nevus, prominent frontal process, and ocular hypertelorism; the Case 2 patient had prominent frontal process; the Case 3 patient had prominent frontal process, ocular hypertelorism, and squint. All 3 sisters are suspected of being patients with the basal cell nevus syndrome. The Japanese dental literature concerning the basal cell nevus syndrome is reviewed.

  4. Er:YAG Laser Assisted Treatment of Central Odontogenic Fibroma of the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Luis Silva; Martins, Marco; Pacheco, José Júlio; Salazar, Filomena; Magalhães, João; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma is a very rare benign odontogenic tumour characterized by a fibrous mature stroma with variable strands or islands of inactive-looking odontogenic epithelium. Our aim is to report a case of a central odontogenic fibroma and describe the clinical usefulness of Er:YAG laser for the surgical treatment of this tumour. A 74-year-old woman presented with an expansive lesion located in a mandible with multilocular and mixed radiographic appearance. A conservative excision using Er:YAG laser was performed. Complete removal was obtained. There were no postoperative complications. The histopatologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of central odontogenic fibroma of rich-epithelium type. No recurrence was observed during follow-up. PMID:26457211

  5. Cholesterol Granuloma in Odontogenic Cyst: An Enigmatic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Anju; Gupta, Shruti

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol granuloma (CG) is the outcome of the foreign body type of response to the accumulation of cholesterol crystals and is frequently present in conjunction with chronic middle ear diseases. Recently, cases of CG in jaws have been reported, but still, very few cases have been found of CG in dental literature. This article presents three rare cases of CG in the wall of odontogenic cysts emphasizing on its possible role in expansion of the associated lesion and bone erosion. It also lays stress on the fact that more cases of CG should be reported so that its nature and pathogenesis in the oral cavity become more perceivable. PMID:28070428

  6. Ameloblastomatous calcifying odontogenic cyst: a rare histological variant

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Soumi; V, Sreelatha S; S, Venkatesh; Nair, Preeti P

    2013-01-01

    The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) occurs mainly as an intraosseous lesion in mandible or maxilla, but the peripheral variation of COC has also been reported. The confusion regarding its nature as cyst or tumour has not been resolved and a vast diversity has been noted in clinicopathological aspects of COC. We report a case of COCs with minimal mural ameloblastomatous proliferation in a 13-year-old girl, who presented with a painless swelling in the left jaw causing mild facial asymmetry. PMID:23696143

  7. Frequency of the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis extended to the anterior ethmoid sinus and response to surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Crovetto-Martínez, Rafael; Martin-Arregui, Francisco J.; Zabala-López-de-Maturana, Aitor; Tudela-Cabello, Kiara

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Odontogenic sinusitis usually affects the maxillary sinus but may extend to the anterior ethmoid sinuses. The purpose of this study is to determine the percentage of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis extended to the anterior ethmoid sinuses and determine also the surgical resolution differences between odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and odontogenic maxillary associated to anterior ethmoidal sinusitis. Study Design: This is a retrospective cohort study performed on 55 patients diagnosed of odontogenic sinusitis and treated surgically by functional endoscopic sinus surgery. Results: This study showed that 52.7% of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis spreads to anterior ethmoid, causing added anterior ethmoid sinusitis. We found that 92.3% of the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis (who underwent middle meatal antrostomy) and 96.5% of the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis extended to the anterior ethmoid (treated with middle meatal antrostomy and anterior ethmoidectomy) were cured. Conclusions: Ethmoid involvement is frequent in maxillary odontogenic sinusitis. The ethmoid involvement does not worsen the results of “functional endoscopic sinus surgery” applied to the odontogenic sinusitis. Key words:Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis, ethmoiditis, functional endoscopic sinus surgery. PMID:24608208

  8. Myxoma of the penis in an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris)

    PubMed Central

    TAKAMI, Yoshinori; YASUDA, Namie; UNE, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    A penile tumor (4 × 2.5 × 1 cm) was surgically removed from an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) aged 3 years and 5 months. The tumor was continuous with the dorsal fascia of the penile head. Histopathologically, tumor cells were pleomorphic (oval-, short spindle- and star-shaped cells) with low cell density. Abundant edematous stroma was weakly positive for Alcian blue staining and positive for colloidal iron reaction. Tumor cells displayed no cellular atypia or karyokinesis. Tumor cell cytoplasm was positive for vimentin antibody, while cytoplasm and nuclei were positive for S-100 protein antibody. Tumor cell ultrastructure matched that of fibroblasts, and the rough endoplasmic reticulum was enlarged. The tumor was diagnosed as myxoma. This represents the first report of myxoma in a hedgehog. PMID:27784859

  9. Intra-Arterial Treatment in a Child with Embolic Stroke Due to Atrial Myxoma

    PubMed Central

    van den Wijngaard, Ido; Wermer, Marieke; van Walderveen, Marianne; Wiendels, Natalie; Peeters-Scholte, Cacha; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Arterial ischaemic stroke is an important cause of morbidity in children. Timely diagnosis is necessary for acute stroke treatment but can be challenging in clinical practice. Due to a paucity of data there are no specific recommendations regarding the use of mechanical thrombectomy devices in current paediatric stroke guidelines. A 14-year-old boy presented with a severe acute left hemisphere stroke due to a proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion caused by emboli from an atrial myxoma. No clinical improvement was seen after administration of intravenous thrombolysis. Subsequent mechanical thrombectomy with a second-generation stent-based thrombectomy device resulted in successful recanalization and clinical improvement. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mechanical thrombectomy in a child with acute embolic stroke caused by atrial myxoma. PMID:24976098

  10. Radiological characteristics and management of intramuscular myxoma of the temporal muscle: case report.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 51-year-old male with a 3-year history of a slow-growing, asymptomatic, subcutaneous mass in the left temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-defined extracranial lesion with heterogeneous enhancement and without invasion of the skull. A variety of soft tissue tumors were included in the differential diagnosis. The patient underwent total resection of the tumor, and a diagnosis of intramuscular myxoma was confirmed histologically. There was no evidence of recurrence at 6-month follow-up. The present case is the first characterization of the radiological appearance of intramuscular myxoma in the temporal muscle. I emphasize that increased awareness of this rare lesion and a careful clinical and radiological preoperative assessment are crucial in determining an appropriate treatment strategy for patients with a soft tissue tumor of the head.

  11. Radiological Characteristics and Management of Intramuscular Myxoma of the Temporal Muscle: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HIGASHIDA, Tetsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 51-year-old male with a 3-year history of a slow-growing, asymptomatic, subcutaneous mass in the left temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-defined extracranial lesion with heterogeneous enhancement and without invasion of the skull. A variety of soft tissue tumors were included in the differential diagnosis. The patient underwent total resection of the tumor, and a diagnosis of intramuscular myxoma was confirmed histologically. There was no evidence of recurrence at 6-month follow-up. The present case is the first characterization of the radiological appearance of intramuscular myxoma in the temporal muscle. I emphasize that increased awareness of this rare lesion and a careful clinical and radiological preoperative assessment are crucial in determining an appropriate treatment strategy for patients with a soft tissue tumor of the head. PMID:24418787

  12. Partial sequencing of recent Portuguese myxoma virus field isolates exhibits a high degree of genetic stability.

    PubMed

    Muller, A; Silva, E; Abrantes, J; Esteves, P J; Ferreira, P G; Carvalheira, J C; Nowotny, N; Thompson, G

    2010-01-06

    To study genetic changes underlying myxoma virus evolution in its new host, the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), we sequenced selected genomic regions of nine recent virulent field strains and a live attenuated vaccine strain ("MAV", Germany). DNA was extracted from cell culture passaged myxoma virus. A total of 4863 bp (approximately 3% of the genome) of 10 regions spanning 12 genes of the myxoma viruses was sequenced and compared to the original virulent strain "Lausanne" and its attenuated field derivative strain "6918". The field strains displayed a maximum of three (strains C43, C95) and a minimum of one (strains CD01, CD05) nucleotide substitutions. These were distributed through all analysed coding regions, except gene M022L (major envelope protein), where all strains were identical to "Lausanne" and "6918". Two new single nucleotide insertions were observed in some of the field strains: within the intergenic region M014L/M015L and within gene M009L, where it leads to a frameshift. These insertions were located after homopolymeric regions. The vaccine strain displayed 37 nucleotide substitutions, predominantly (95%) located in genes M022L and M036L. Interestingly, regions M009L and M014L/M015L of the vaccine were not amplified successfully, suggesting major genomic changes that could account for its attenuated phenotype. Our results support a high degree of genetic stability of myxoma virus over the past five decades. None of the analysed genome regions by its own seems sufficient for the genetic characterisation of field strains.

  13. Ventricular tachycardia as a first manifestation of right ventricular myxoma--a case presentation.

    PubMed

    Badui, E; Cruz, H; Almazan, A; Enciso, R; Soberanis, N; Garcia, R

    1991-12-01

    The authors present a case of a thirty-nine-year-old white man in good health who developed episodes of ventricular tachycardia as a first manifestation of a right ventricular myxoma, which was diagnosed by two-dimensional echocardiogram and then resected with no complications and total disappearance of the cardiac arrhythmia. After reviewing the literature they consider the present case as a rare manifestation of an infrequent location of an uncommon disease.

  14. Tooth replacement and putative odontogenic stem cell niches in pharyngeal dentition of medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Abduweli, Dawud; Baba, Otto; Tabata, Makoto J; Higuchi, Kazunori; Mitani, Hiroshi; Takano, Yoshiro

    2014-04-01

    The small-sized teleost fish medaka, Oryzias latipes, has as many as 1000 pharyngeal teeth undergoing continuous replacement. In this study, we sought to identify the tooth-forming units and determine its replacement cycles, and further localize odontogenic stem cell niches in the pharyngeal dentition of medaka to gain insights into the mechanisms whereby continuous tooth replacement is maintained. Three-dimensional reconstruction of pharyngeal epithelium and sequential fluorochrome labeling of pharyngeal bones and teeth indicated that the individual functional teeth and their successional teeth were organized in families, each comprising up to five generations of teeth and successional tooth germs, and that the replacement cycle of functional teeth was approximately 4 weeks. BrdU label/chase experiments confirmed the existence of clusters of label-retaining epithelial cells at the posterior end of each tooth family where the expression of pluripotency marker Sox2 was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Label-retaining cells were also identified in the mesoderm immediately adjacent to the posterior end of each tooth family. These data suggest the importance of existence of slow-cycling dental epithelial cells and Sox2 expressions at the posterior end of each tooth family to maintain continuous tooth formation and replacement in the pharyngeal dentition of medaka.

  15. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin in a diabetic patient complicated by substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Camino Junior, Rubens; Naclerio-Homem, Maria G; Cabral, Lecy Marcondes; Luz, João Gualberto C

    2014-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) is an uncommon, potentially fatal soft tissue infection with rapid progression characterized by necrosis in the subcutaneous tissue and fascia. A case of CNF of odontogenic origin in a diabetic patient, complicated by alcohol dependence and tobacco abuse, is presented with a literature review. The emergency procedure comprised hydration, colloid administration, glycemic control and broad spectrum antibiotic therapy, followed by aggressive surgical debridement. Necrosis in the platysma muscle was verified by histopathologic analysis. Reconstructive surgery was performed after suppressing the infection, and the wound was closed with an autologous skin graft. The patient had a long hospital stay, in part because the substance abuse led to a difficult recovery. The principles of early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement, broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and intensive supportive care in the treatment of CNF were confirmed in the present case. It was concluded that given the occurrence of CNF in the presence of diabetes mellitus and abuse of substances such as alcohol and tobacco, the health care professional should consider a stronger response to treatment and longer hospitalization.

  16. The role of computed tomography in detecting splenic arteriovenous fistula and concomitant atrial myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Rroji, Arben; Bilaj, Fatmir; Qirinxhi, Denis; Vucini, Ortencia; Hasimi, Endri; Goda, Artan

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 45 Final Diagnosis: Arterio-venous fistula of the splean Symptoms: Lef-side abdominal pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Splenic arterial-venous fistula and atrial myxoma are not rare cases but the co-existence of both lesions in the same patient is unpublished so far. Case Report: A 45- year-old woman presented with vague left flank pain. She was initially scanned by B-dimensional echography, which revealed multiple enlarged hypo-echoic lesions in the splenic hilum. To further characterize the lesion, we performed computed tomography angiography (CTA). CTA showed dilatation of the splenic artery, and aneurismal dilatation of the splenic vein, associated with early opacification of the portal system. CTA showed also an intrasplenic venous aneurism, which was presumed to be the site of fistulous communication. Celiac arteriography confirmed the CTA findings. A left atrial mass was detected by cardiac echography, which was evaluated better by CTA, and was consistent with atrial myxoma. The patient underwent open surgery in different stage with resection of the atrial mass and spleen. The postoperative period was uneventful. Conclusions: This is a unique case in the literature, showing the coexistence of a dual-pathology splenic arterial venous fistula and atrial myxoma. PMID:24803978

  17. [A case of multiple cerebral aneurysm which showed rapid growth caused by left atrial myxoma].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, S; Takahashi, H; Shimura, T; Nakazawa, S

    1995-11-01

    A 24-year-old woman was admitted complaining of right hemiparesis and episodes of syncope. Computed tomography demonstrated a low density area in the left putaminal region. Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) showed two aneurysms in the distal segment of the right middle cerebral artery. Cerebral emboli from a cardiac source was suspected, and cardioechography was performed. Myxoma was located in the left atrium. The patient was transferred to a cardio surgical unit, and the myxoma was successfully removed. After removal by operation of the cardiac tumor, follow-up third IVDSA was performed. One aneurysm of the distal segment of the right middle cerebral artery had grown larger. On the other hand, the other aneurysm had disappeared. Clipping of the enlarged aneurysm was performed. After the clipping operation of the enlarged aneurysm, a follow-up 4th IVDSA was performed. A new aneurysm of the proximal segment of the left cerebral artery was observed. A follow-up 5th IVDSA was performed, revealing that the new aneurysm was enlarging. No operation was performed, because the aneurysm was the fusiform type. At present, the patient is complaining of slight right hemiparesis and has returned to her job. Here we reported a case of cerebral aneurysm caused by left atrial myxoma.

  18. Tumor angiogenesis: role in locally aggressive biological behavior of ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Gadbail, Amol Ramchandra; Mankar Gadbail, Mugdha P; Hande, Alka; Chaudhary, Minal S; Gondivkar, Shailesh M; Korde, Sheetal; Gawande, Madhuri N; Patil, Swati; Tekade, Satyjitraje; Sharma, Aparna

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and compare angiogenesis in ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumors, dentigerous cysts, and normal oral mucosa. Angiogenesis was assessed in 28 ameloblastoma-36 keratocystic odontogenic tumors, 28 dentigerous cysts, and 19 normal oral mucosa by measuring the mean vascular density (MVD), total vascular area (TVA) and mean vascular area (MVA). Immunohistochemistry was carried out by using CD105. The nonsignificant difference of MVD was noted between ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumors (p = .174). TVA and MVA were significantly higher in ameloblastoma than keratocystic odontogenic tumors, normal oral mucosa, and dentigerous cysts (p < .001). MVD, TVA, and MVA were significantly higher in keratocystic odontogenic tumors than normal oral mucosa and dentigerous cysts (p < .001). The results suggest that tumor angiogenesis may play an important role in locally invasive aggressive biologic behavior of ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor. The angiogenesis could be a potent target for developing antiangiogenic therapeutic strategies, particularly in recurrent cases of odontogenic tumors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Role of carnoy’s solution in the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Belenguer, Álvaro; Sánchez-Torres, Alba

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Objective The keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign but aggressive neoplasm. As enucleation alone obtains high recurrence rates, some adjuvant treatments such as Carnoy’s solution have been proposed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the reduction of recurrences with the use of Carnoy’s solution as adjuvant in the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Material and Methods An electronic search in Pubmed (MEDLINE), ScienceDirect and Cochrane databases was conducted with the key words “odontogenic keratocyst”, “keratocystic odontogenic tumor”, “carnoy’s solution”, “treatment” and “enucleation”. The inclusion criteria were clinical studies using Carnoy’s solution as adjuvant for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, published in English, including at least 10 patients. Articles with an unclear reporting of the treatment applied, nonhuman studies, case reports and lesions associated to Gorlin-Goltz syndrome were excluded. Results All the studies included were case series. The recurrence rate of enucleation ranged from 0% to 58.8%. With the only use of Carnoy’s solution as adjuvant treatment to the enucleation, recurrences varied from 0% to 100%. The use of ≥ 2 adjuvant treatments reduced the range between 0% and 7.9%. Conclusions The use of Carnoy’s solution as adjuvant therapy for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumor has a grade C recommendation. Key words:Carnoy’s solution, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, treatment, recurrence. PMID:27475699

  20. Disseminated necrotic mediastinitis spread from odontogenic abscess: our experience

    PubMed Central

    Filiaci, Fabio; Riccardi, Emiliano; Mitro, Valeria; Piombino, Pasquale; Rinna, Claudio; Agrillo, Alessandro; Ungari, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aims Deep neck infections are rare but potentially fatal complication of pulpal abscess of the teeth. If an infection can progress rapidly from a toothache to a life threatening infection, then it is critical that dentists be able to recognize the danger signs and identify the patients who are at risk. Mediastinitis is a severe inflammatory process involving the connective tissues that fills the intracellular spaces and surrounds the organs in the middle of the chest. This pathology has both an acute and a chronic form and, in most cases, it has an infectious etiology. This study want to expose the experience acquired in the Oral and Maxillo-facial Sciences Department, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, regarding two clinical cases of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis starting from an odontogenic abscess. Methods We report two clinical cases of disseminated necrotic mediastinitis with two different medical and surgical approaches. The radiographic and photographic documentation of the patients was collected in the pre-and post-operatively. All patients underwent a CT scan and MRI. Results Mediastinitis can result from a serious odontogenic abscess, and the extent of its inflammation process must be never underestimated. Dental surgeons play a key role as a correct diagnosis can prevent further increasing of the inflammation process. Conclusions A late diagnosis and an inadequate draining represent the major causes of the elevated mortality rate of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis. PMID:26330907

  1. Retrospective study of 289 odontogenic tumors in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Serpa, Marianna-Sampaio; Tenório, Jefferson-da-Rocha; do Nascimento, George-João-Ferreira; de Souza-Andrade, Emanuel-Sávio; Veras-Sobral, Ana-Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are considered important among oral lesions because of their clinicopathological heterogeneity, and variable biological behavior. This paper aims to determine the frequency and distribution of OTs, over a period of 10 years, at a public university in Northeastern Brazil and compare this data with previous reports. Material and Methods We reviewed all cases of OTs from oral pathology laboratory of University of Pernambuco (UPE), from 2004 to 2014. Diagnoses were re-evaluated and the tumors were classified according to the latest (2005) World Health Organization Classification of Tumors. In addition, we searched in the English-language literature retrospective studies on OTs that used the same classification. Results Data was obtained allowing the analysis of the tissue hemodynamics. We were able to map the vascularization of the face and it was possible to access three arteries of small diameter (0,60mm angular artery; 0,55mm greater palatine artery; 0,45mm infraorbital artery). Conclusions OTs are uncommon neoplasms with geographic variation. Our clinicopathological features are according to literature. In the present study, KCOT was the most frequent one, showing that the new classification of OTs altered the distribution of these lesions and possibly made KCOT the most common OT observed in diagnostic services worldwide. Key words:Odontogenic tumors, jaw neoplasms, epidemiology, oral pathology. PMID:26827068

  2. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis: an unusual sequel of odontogenic infection.

    PubMed

    Subhashraj, Krishnaraj; Jayakumar, Naveen; Ravindran, Chinnasamy

    2008-12-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection of the fascial planes, which is less common in head and neck, because of the rarity and higher vascularity in the region. We reviewed five patients with cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic infection managed at a teaching hospital at Chennai, India. There were four men and one woman, of whom four patients were diabetic and hypertensive, with a mean age of 53 years. Mandibular molars (periapical or pericoronal abscess) were found to be the source of infection in all of the cases. The treatment involved incision and drainage and debridement. Anti-microbial drugs were given for all the patients, which included cephalosporins, metronidazole and gentamycin. In four patients the wound healed by contracture and one patient required split skin grafting. Due to the smaller extent of the necrosis, better control of the systemic disease and small size of the sample, there was neither a major complication nor death. This paper reminds us that cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) remains one of the potential complications of long standing odontogenic infections in patients with immune-compromised status, particularly in lower dentition.

  3. Odontogenic Tumors: A Review of 675 Cases in Eastern Libya

    PubMed Central

    Goteti, Saravana HL

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in an Eastern Libyan population based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO) classification, and also to compare the actual data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: We retrieved and analyzed 85 OTs from a total of 675 tumors and tumor-like lesions of the oral and perioral structures, for gender, age, tumor site, and frequency. The diagnosis was based on the most recent WHO (2005) classification of OTs. Results: OTs constituted 12.6% of all oral/jaw tumors and tumor-like lesions. Ameloblastoma (28.2%) was the most common type, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (25.2%) and odontoma (19.9%). The male: female ratio was 1.2:1, and maxilla: mandible ratio 1:2. The mean age of occurrence of tumors was 29 years with a peak incidence between 10 and 40 years. Conclusions: OTs are relatively common lesion in this Libyan Population, but the incidence of tumors is neither similar to Caucasians nor Sub-Saharan population. PMID:27013857

  4. [Management of odontogenic infections in Primary Care: Antibiotic?

    PubMed

    Robles Raya, Purificación; Javierre Miranda, Ana Pilar; Moreno Millán, Nemesio; Mas Casals, Ariadna; de Frutos Echániz, Elena; Morató Agustí, M Luisa

    2017-07-25

    Our aim is to contribute to the rational use of antibiotics prescribed by family doctors when a patient consults for a dental problem. Nowadays we should not ask which antibiotic to give. The question has to be if we need to prescribe antibiotics in front of the most common odontogenic infections seen in our practice. We review the main dental infections, which should be their appropriate management and the role of prevention. We need to know the complexity of the oral microbiome because it?ll depend on the appropriateness of the antibiotherapy, the evolution towards cure or progression of some odontogenic infections. The bacterial plaque, formed by the biofilm, behaves as a barrier to the action of antimicrobials. It?s in the prevention of its development as well as in it mechanical elimination once shaped, in what the family doctor should insist. We must transmit antibiotics don?t heal dental pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Remission for Loss of Odontogenic Potential in a New Micromilieu In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yunfei; Cai, Jinglei; Hutchins, Andrew Paul; Jia, Lingfei; Liu, Pengfei; Yang, Dandan; Chen, Shubin; Ge, Lihong; Pei, Duanqing; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic organogenesis, the odontogenic potential resides in dental mesenchyme from the bud stage until birth. Mouse dental mesenchymal cells (mDMCs) isolated from the inductive dental mesenchyme of developing molars are frequently used in the context of tooth development and regeneration. We wondered if and how the odontogenic potential could be retained when mDMCs were cultured in vitro. In the present study, we undertook to test the odontogenic potential of cultured mDMCs and attempted to maintain the potential during culturing. We found that cultured mDMCs could retain the odontogenic potential for 24 h with a ratio of 60% for tooth formation, but mDMCs were incapable of supporting tooth formation after more than 24 h in culture. This loss of odontogenic potential was accompanied by widespread transcriptomic alteration and, specifically, the downregulation of some dental mesenchyme-specific genes, such as Pax9, Msx1, and Pdgfrα. To prolong the odontogenic potential of mDMCs in vitro, we then cultured mDMCs in a serum-free medium with Knockout Serum Replacement (KSR) and growth factors (fibroblastic growth factor 2 and epidermal growth factor). In this new micromilieu, mDMCs could maintain the odontogenic potential for 48 h with tooth formation ratio of 50%. Moreover, mDMCs cultured in KSR-supplemented medium gave rise to tooth-like structures when recombined with non-dental second-arch epithelium. Among the supplements, KSR is essential for the survival and adhesion of mDMCs, and both Egf and Fgf2 induced the expression of certain dental mesenchyme-related genes. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the transcriptomic changes responded to the alteration of odontogenic potential in cultured mDMCs and a new micromilieu partly retained this potential in vitro, providing insight into the long-term maintenance of odontogenic potential in mDMCs. PMID:27050091

  6. Myxoma virus M063R is a host range gene essential for virus replication in rabbit cells.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John W; Shun Chang, Chew; Wang, Gen; Werden, Steven J; Shao, Zhuhong; Barrett, Catherine; Gao, Xiujuan; Belsito, Tara A; Villenevue, Danielle; McFadden, Grant

    2007-04-25

    The myxoma virus M063R gene product exhibits some sequence similarity to the poxvirus host range gene, C7L, of vaccinia virus. To address the potential host range function of the M063R gene product in rabbits, a deletion mutant of myxoma virus (vMyx63KO) was generated and characterized. vMyx63KO replicated to normal titre levels and produced foci that were indistinguishable from those produced by MV in vitro in a monkey kidney cell line (BGMK) that are permissive for wild type MV. However, vMyx63KO failed to replicate in all rabbit cell lines tested, including both primary and established cells lines, as well as cells derived from a variety of tissues. M063R expression was not required for myxoma virus binding, entry or early gene expression, whereas DNA replication was aborted and late genes were not expressed in vMyx63KO infected rabbit cells. Thus, the replication block for vMyx63KO in rabbit cells preceded the stage of late gene expression and DNA replication. Finally, an in vivo pathogenesis study indicated that vMyx63KO failed to cause any signs of classic myxomatosis in infected rabbits, but functioned as a non-replicating vaccine and provided protection for subsequent challenge by wild type myxoma virus. Altogether, these observations demonstrate that M063R plays a critical role in determining the host specificity of myxoma virus in rabbit cells.

  7. Intramuscular myxoma associated with an increased carbohydrate antigen 19.9 level in a woman: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Intramuscular myxoma is a rare benign soft tissue tumor. The lack of specific symptoms and widely used laboratory tests makes the diagnosis quite difficult. We present a case of an Intramuscular myxoma associated with an increased carbohydrate antigen 19.9 level. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been any reported cases of an association of Intramuscular myxoma with tumor markers in the literature. Case presentation A 45-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our department for resection of a mass in her left groin area, discovered incidentally on a triplex ultrasonography of her lower extremities. The diagnosis of Intramuscular myxoma was confirmed on histopathology after the complete surgical excision of the tumor. On laboratory examination, the serum level of carbohydrate antigen 19.9 was found to be elevated, but it returned to normal six months after resection of the mass. Conclusion Carbohydrate antigen 19.9 is a tumor marker that increases in a variety of malignant and benign conditions. After the exclusion of all other possible reasons for carbohydrate antigen 19.9 elevation, we assumed a possible connection of carbohydrate antigen 19.9 elevation and Intramuscular myxoma, an issue that requires needs further investigation. PMID:21569608

  8. Evaluation of microbial flora in orofacial space infections of odontogenic origin

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Amod; Dugal, Arun; Kshirsagar, Rajesh; Hariram; Singh, Vikram; Mishra, Akshay

    2014-01-01

    Background: The microbiology of acute dental infections has been in the midst of many researches. Various bacteriological studies show variations in their conclusion. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the microbial flora in orofacial space infections of odontogenic origin, which is essential for appropriate antibiotic selection. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with odontogenic infection causing fascial space involvement were included. Aspirated specimen was transported in nutrient broth and thyoglycollate media within an hour for further culture and sensitivity testing. Result and Conclusion: This study indicates that orofacial odontogenic infections are usually polymicrobial, consisting of a complex mixture of both anaerobes and aerobes. PMID:25937727

  9. Spread of odontogenic infections in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akinbami, Babatunde Olayemi; Akadiri, Oladimeji; Gbujie, Daniel C

    2010-10-01

    Odontogenic infections constitute a substantial portion of diseases encountered by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Infections start from dental tissues and sometimes rapidly spread to contiguous spaces. The consequence is a fulminant disease with significant morbidity and mortality. The study was aimed at studying the pattern of spread, approach to management, and outcome of these infections at a Nigerian teaching hospital. A retrospective study of all patients with orofacial infections who presented to our center over an 18-month period was carried out. The medical records were reviewed to retrieve the following: age, gender, source of infection, anatomic fascial spaces involved, associated medical conditions, various treatment modalities, types of antibiotics administered, causative micro-organisms, length of stay in the hospital, and any complications encountered. Infections were classified into 2 categories: those that are confined to the dentoalveolar tissues belong to category I, and those that have spread into the local/regional soft tissue spaces and beyond belong to category II. Odontogenic infections constituted 11.3% of the total oral and maxillofacial surgery cases. A total of 261 patients were treated for odontogenic infections. There were 146 female patients (59.8%) and 98 male patients (40.2%) in the first category, whereas the second category comprised 10 male patients (58.8%) and 7 female patients (41.2%). The fascial spaces involved, in descending order, were submasseteric in 10 (22.7%), submandibular in 9 (20.5%), and sublingual in 6 (13.6%). The causative micro-organisms commonly found were Klebsiella and Streptococcus spp. Incision and drainage were performed in the 17 cases with spreading infection. Amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, and metronidazole were the most routinely administered antibiotics. Our experience shows that delay in presentation, self-medication, aging, male gender, and unusual causative agents are some of the factors

  10. The central odontogenic fibroma: How difficult can be making a preliminary diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pippi, Roberto; Santoro, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign odontogenic tumor derived from the dental ectomesenchymal tissues. A 16-year-old Caucasian female patient was referred by her dentist for a radiolucent asymptomatic area associated with the crown of the impacted lower right third molar. A preliminary diagnosis of a follicular cyst was supposed. The lesion was surgically removed under general anesthesia together with the impacted tooth. The microscopic diagnosis of the excised tissue revealed an odontogenic fibroma. No clinical or radiographic signs of recurrence were found five years after surgical excision. Despite the various differential diagnoses of homogeneous unilocular and well delimited radiolucencies of the jaws, enucleation with peripheral curettage, without any other pre-operative imaging exams or biopsies, can be considered as the treatment of choice. Key words:Differential diagnosis, impacted third molar, radiographic imaging, microscopic diagnosis, odontogenic fibroma. PMID:27034766

  11. Ameloblastic carcinoma with features of ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma in a patient with suspected Gardner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, S G; Hirsch, S A; Listinsky, C M; Lyu, D J-H; Baur, D A

    2015-04-01

    Ameloblastic carcinoma and ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma are rare malignancies arising in odontogenic epithelium within the jaws. Gardner syndrome is a multifaceted autosomal dominant condition, which results in multiple dentofacial anomalies along with premalignant colon polyp formation and tumor formation in the skin and other organs. We report a case of ameloblastic carcinoma with features of ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma and extensive clear cell change and melanin pigmentation in a patient with clinical features of Gardner syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, odontogenic carcinoma arising in a patient with features of Gardner syndrome has not been reported previously. The clinical, radiographic, and histologic features of the case are discussed along with a review of the relevant literature.

  12. Glandular odontogenic cyst of the maxilla: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Nigel Roque; Dinkar, Ajit Dattatray; Khorate, Manisha Maruti

    2016-01-01

    Glandular Odontogenic Cyst is a relatively rare cyst of odontogenic origin, which shows glandular or salivary features that are thought to indicate the pluripotentiality of odontogenic epithelium. It is seen in middle-aged adults, and commonly involves the anterior region of the jaws, especially the mandible. It shows non-specific clinico-radiographic findings which may resemble other lesions, but has characteristic histopathologic features which help in its diagnosis. This paper reports an unusual presentation of a glandular odontogenic cyst which was diagnosed in a 64-year old female in the posterior maxilla, along with a literature review of this cyst, especially the cases reported in India in the past. PMID:28292079

  13. A Rare Simultaneous Occurrence of Odontogenic Keratocyst and Unicystic Ameloblastoma in Mandible: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Arun Govind; Pawar, Sudhir Ramlal; Khandelwal, Saurabh Girish; Iyengar, Apoorva

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC) and Ameloblastomas are slow growing benign odontogenic lesions that primarily occur in the molar region of the mandible. Clinically and radiographically both ameloblastoma, especially the Unicystic ameloblastoma and OKC are indistinguishable due to the similar location of occurrence and the age of patients. It is very rare for these lesions to arise simultaneously in a patient’s jaw. The co-occurrence of Ameloblastomas with odontogenic cysts or other odontogenic lesions (histologically in a single lesion)have already been described as combined or hybrid lesions. There are very few reported cases in the English literature for simultaneous occurrence of Unicystic Ameloblastoma and OKC as completely distinct lesions. Here we present such a rare case of the simultaneous occurrence of OKC and ameloblastoma in the posterior region of the mandible of a 22-year-old male in close relation. PMID:27656574

  14. Differential expression of Cyclin D1 in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    Objetives: The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression levels of Cyclin D1 (CCD1), a nuclear protein that plays a crucial role in cell cycle progression, in a series of keratin-producing odontogenic cysts. Study Design: A total of 58 keratin-producing odontogenic cysts, diagnosed over ten years and classified according to the WHO 2005 criteria, were immunohistochemically analyzed in terms of CCD1 expression, which was quantified in the basal, suprabasal and intermediate/superficial epithelial compartments. The extent of immunostaining was measured as a proportion of total epithelial thickness. Quantified immunohistochemical data were correlated with clinicopathological features and clinical recurrence. Results: Keratin-producing odontogenic cysts were classified as 6 syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors (S-KCOT), 40 sporadic or non-syndromic KCOT (NS-KCOT) and 12 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOC). Immunohistochemically, CCD1 staining was evident predominantly in the parabasal region of all cystic lesions, but among-lesion differences were apparent, showing a clear expansion of parabasal compartment especially in the S-KCOT, followed to a lesser extent in the NS-KCOT, and being much more reduced in the OOC, which had the greatest average epithelial thickness. Conclusions: The differential expression of CCD1 noted in the present study suggests that dysregulation of cell cycle progression from G1 to the S phase contributes to the different aggressiveness of these lesions. However, CCD1 expression levels did not predict NS-KCOT recurrence, which is likely influenced by factors unrelated to lesion biology. Key words:Keratin-producing odontogenic cyst, keratocyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst, cyclin D1, immunohistochemistry. PMID:25475773

  15. Odontogenic keratocyst: The role of the orthodontist in the diagnosis of initial lesions.

    PubMed

    Leandro Santos, Raphaela Silva; Ramos-Perez, Flávia Maria de Moraes; Silva, Gleyson Kleber do Amaral; Rocha, André Caroli; Prado, José Divaldo; Perez, Danyel Elias da Cruz

    2017-10-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are locally infiltrative odontogenic cysts that are usually diagnosed during routine radiographic examinations. Therefore, it is critical that dental practitioners, in particular orthodontists, recognize and diagnose OKCs to recommend appropriate treatment. This report describes a patient whose OKC was not initially identified during orthodontic pretreatment. In addition, this report discusses the clinical and radiographic features of OKCs, as well as the differential diagnoses of these lesions. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinico-pathologic study of odontogenic cysts in a Mexican sample population.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Montes, C; Hernández-Guerrero, J C; Garcés-Ortíz, M

    2000-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts are uncommon lesions that frequently behave agressively and attain a large size. Unfortunately, information on the relative incidence of these cysts from different populations is not abundant. In Mexico, for example, only a few examples have been reported. The aim of this study was to ascertain the frequency of odontogenic cysts in a Mexican sample and to compare these data with previously reported studies from other countries. The files of the Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Diagnosis Service at the School of Dentistry at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) were reviewed and all accessions of odontogenic cysts were listed. Clinical and radiographic data were recorded and microscopic slides evaluated according to the most recent World Health Organization (WHO) classification (1992). Three hundred and four cases of odontogenic cysts (55.9% male predominance) were found. The most frequent odontogenic cysts were the following: periapical cyst (38. 8%); dentigerous cyst (35.5%), and odontogenic keratocyst (18.8%). Periapical cyst was more frequent in females, and maxillary anterior teeth were most commonly involved. Dentigerous cysts appeared in males at a rate of 64.8%, this cyst found more frequently between the 1st and 2nd decades of life and in the molar zone. Odontogenic keratocyst was more frequent in males (59.6%), between the 2nd and 4th decades of life and more common in the molar zone. More than 50% of the sample were aggressive cysts (dentigerous and keratocyst). Our results suggest that Mexican patients develop aggressive odontogenic cysts more commonly than other populations. Our figures point to the need for a precise diagnosis in order to institute the correct surgical procedure, prevent recurrence, and forestall more extensive tissue destruction.

  17. Bimaxillary keratocystic odontogenic tumour: a case of diagnostic and therapeutic difficulty.

    PubMed

    Okoje-Adesomoju, Victoria Nwebuni; Adisa, Akinyele Olumuyiwa; Gbolahan, Olalere Omoyosola; Olajide, Mofoluwaso Abimbola

    2014-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) is a benign cystic intraosseous tumour of odontogenic origin that is usually solitary except when syndromic. It rarely occurs in the maxilla; therefore a rapidly progressive, nonsyndromic bimaxillary KCOT with locoregional extension poses significant diagnostic and management challenges. To the best of the authors' knowledge, documentation of a nonsyndromic bimaxillary KCOT is nonexistent in the English literature. We therefore present the case of an extensive bimaxillary KCOT in a 38-year-old Nigerian male.

  18. Bimaxillary Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour: A Case of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Okoje-Adesomoju, Victoria Nwebuni; Adisa, Akinyele Olumuyiwa; Gbolahan, Olalere Omoyosola; Olajide, Mofoluwaso Abimbola

    2014-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) is a benign cystic intraosseous tumour of odontogenic origin that is usually solitary except when syndromic. It rarely occurs in the maxilla; therefore a rapidly progressive, nonsyndromic bimaxillary KCOT with locoregional extension poses significant diagnostic and management challenges. To the best of the authors' knowledge, documentation of a nonsyndromic bimaxillary KCOT is nonexistent in the English literature. We therefore present the case of an extensive bimaxillary KCOT in a 38-year-old Nigerian male. PMID:24790606

  19. Odontogenic potential of post-natal oral mucosal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, E; Itoh, T; Yoshie, H; Satokata, I

    2009-03-01

    A bioengineered tooth would provide a powerful alternative to currently available clinical treatments. Previous experiments have succeeded in bioengineering teeth using tooth germs from animal embryos. However, the ultimate goal is to develop a technology which enables teeth to be regenerated with the use of autologous cells. To pursue this goal, we re-associated the palatal epithelium from young mice with the odontogenic dental mesenchyme and transplanted the re-associated tissues into mouse kidney capsules. Morphologically defined teeth were formed from the re-associated cultured palatal epithelial cell sheets from mice aged up to 4 wks, but no tooth was formed when the palatal epithelium from mice after 2 days of age was directly re-associated. Our results demonstrated that post-natal non-dental oral mucosal epithelium can be used as a substitute for dental epithelium, and that epithelial cell sheet improves the ability of the oral epithelium of older mice to differentiate into dental epithelium.

  20. Current Role of Carnoy's Solution in Treating Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Jordan; Horst, Rutger Ter; Koslovsky, David

    2016-02-01

    To understand the frequency of use of Carnoy's solution, as a means of chemical curettage, for treating the keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). A Web-based survey was distributed by e-mail to 6,880 members listed in the 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons directory. Eight hundred nine participants across the United States responded to the survey (12% response rate). The most common procedures performed to definitively treat a KCOT were enucleation plus mechanical curettage (curette with or without peripheral ostectomy; 66%). Of the survey participants, 198 (25%) currently use Carnoy's solution, 111 (56%) of whom are using the solution with chloroform and 83 (42%) are using it without chloroform. Carnoy's solution remains a common method of chemical curettage for the definitive treatment of the KCOT. Carnoy's solution with and without chloroform is being used for chemical cautery. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Carcinoma of Maxillary Sinus Masquerading as Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramachamparambathu, Ashir Kolikkal; Vengal, Manoj; Siyo, Nizaro; Ahmed, Anis

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumours of maxillary sinus are rare. They are usually diagnosed in the late stages when they perforate the sinus walls. The presence of large air space in the maxillary sinus facilitates asymptomatic growth of the sinus malignancy. The clinical presentation of these tumours depends on the sinus wall involved by the disease. The medial wall is usually the first to become eroded, leading to nasal obstruction, epistaxis or discharge. Rarely, symptoms of maxillary sinus carcinoma can resemble dental infection and the affected patients may visit dental clinic seeking treatment. This report presents a case of carcinoma of maxillary sinus mimicking odontogenic infection. Computed tomographic findings explained the reason for the present lesion to masquerade as an inflammatory condition. The importance of advanced imaging modalities for prompt identification of such lesions is discussed. PMID:27790593

  2. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor: a clinico-radio-pathological dilemma.

    PubMed

    Hada, M S; Sable, M; Kane, S V; Pai, Prathamesh S; Juvekar, S L

    2014-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign neoplasm of mandible in adults. The presentation of this entity is varied and often confused with a variety of mucosal and jaw lesions and clinical, radiological, and pathological feature of CEOT often-mimic malignancy. The objective of this report is to highlight the clinical features and radiological findings which should arouse suspicion of a benign lesion and importance of providing adequate clinical information to the pathologist to attain accurate diagnosis.We discussed two cases with tumors located in the maxilla. Both presented as expansile lesions with one biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma. Both were pursued with clinico-radiological suspicion of benign lesions and confirmed with pathological correlation of histology and immunohistochemistry as CEOT. Therefore a High index of suspicion and clinico-radiological information are the key feature for diagnosis of this rare tumor.

  3. Nasal Sinus Tract of Odontogenic Origin: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Sagar; Pathak, Anjani Kumar; Purwar, Parth; Dixit, Jaya; Singhal, Divya; Sajjanhar, Isha; Goel, Kopal; Gupta, Vaibhav Sheel

    2015-01-01

    Extraoral sinus tract often poses a diagnostic challenge to the clinician owing to its rare occurrence and absence of symptoms. The accurate diagnosis and comprehensive management are inevitable as the aetiology of such lesions is often masked and requires holistic approach. The present case report encompasses the management of an extraoral discharging sinus tract at the base of the right nostril in a chronic smoker. The lesion which was earlier diagnosed to be of nonodontogenic origin persisted even after erratic treatment modalities. Our investigations showed the aetiology of sinus tract to be odontogenic. Initially, a five-step program as recommended by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality was used for smoking cessation followed by root canal therapy (RCT) and surgical management of the sinus tract. The patient has been under stringent follow-up and no reoccurrence has been noted. PMID:26649208

  4. Immunohistochemical evaluation of podoplanin in odontogenic tumours & cysts using anti-human podoplanin antibody.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Namrata; Khanduri, Nitin; Kurup, Deepak; Gupta, Brijesh; Mitra, Pranjan; Chawla, Roshani

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenic Cysts & tumors originate through some aberration from the normal pattern of odontogenesis. Ameloblastoma is one of the most frequent intraosseous odontogenic tumors. However it is no longer appropriate to use the diagnosis of ameloblastoma without specifying the type. Varied-clinical entities of ameloblastoma differ in their biologic behaviour. Odontogenic cysts like dentigerous and radicular cysts are less aggressive in nature than odontogenic tumors. Recently, podoplanin commonly used as a lymphatic endothelial marker in cancers has recently been found to play a possible role in odontogenic tumorigenesis also. Therefore the purpose of this study was to immunohistochemically analyse the expression of podoplanin in ameloblastomas, KCOTs, dentigerous cysts, radicular cysts & dental follicles. Paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of 15 Ameloblastomas (7 follicular, 6 unicystic, 2 desmoplastic),10KCOTs, 5 dentigerous cysts, 5 radicular cysts & 5 dental follicles were immunohistochemically examined using antibody against podoplanin. All ameloblastomas displayed podoplanin expression in ameloblast-like cells of the epithelial islands while the stellate-reticulum like cells exhibited no or weak immunostaining. Expression of podoplanin in KCOTs was strongly positive in the cells of the basal and suprabasal layers & odontogenic epithelial nests. Positive immunoreaction for podoplanin was observed in the inflammatory radicular cysts and inflamed dentigerous cyst only and negative or weak expression in the lining epithelium of uninflamed dentigerous cysts and dental follicles. Our results suggest that podoplanin can be used as a potential proliferative marker to observe the aggressive behaviour of ameloblastomas and KCOTs.

  5. The relative frequency of odontogenic tumors: A study of 376 cases in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Verde-Osterne, Rafael; Turatti, Eveline; Cordeiro-Teixeira, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Background Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are rare lesions, exclusive of the jaws, that are derived from epithelial and/or ectomesenchymal elements of the tooth-forming apparatus. Their biological behavior is heterogeneous, including hamartomatous tissue proliferation, benign nonaggressive and aggressive neoplasms, and malignant tumors with metastatic capacity. The aim of this study was to describe the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors in a Brazilian population. In addition, a review of the literature identified studies on odontogenic tumors that follow the 2005 World Health Organization. Material and Methods A total of 376 cases of odontogenic tumors from an oral pathology service were reviewed about age, gender, anatomic site and histologic diagnosis. Results Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (31.6%) were the most common, followed by ameloblastoma (28.5%), and odontoma (22.6%). The mean age was 32.2 years, and more than half the patients (52.1%) were in the second and third decades of life. The male to female ratio was 1:1.37, with a maxilla to mandible ratio of 1:2.08. Conclusions The variation in relative frequency of tumors observed among the several series, including the present study, is probably due in part to cultural differences between geographic areas but also to the study design. Key words:Pathology, epidemiology, odontogenic tumors. PMID:28160576

  6. Rare and massive odontogenic parakeratotic cyst treated by endoscopic sinus surgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Keratocystic odontogenic tumors are benign neoplasms of odontogenic origin with a potential for aggressive and infiltrative behavior. Many different treatments for this type of lesion have been reported. However, no common consensus has emerged to date regarding the most effective therapeutic approach. Cases of maxillary sinus giant keratocystic odontogenic tumors completely excised by enucleation or marsupialization via endoscopic sinus surgery are extremely rare, and, to the best of our knowledge, only one case has been described in the literature since 2005. Case presentation We report a case of a 24-year-old Italian man who came to our department with maxillary sinus region swelling, pain and left nasal obstruction. A massive keratocystic odontogenic tumor involving the right maxillary sinus and causing focal erosions of the bony walls was diagnosed. The keratocystic odontogenic tumor was removed as much as possible by a transnasal approach using endoscopic sinus surgery, which produced optimal surgical and prognostic outcomes. Follow-up is reported for an 8-year period. Conclusion Conservative management in this case demonstrated good therapeutic efficacy with a low risk of recurrence. For injuries involving the maxillary sinus, the possibility of decompression or marsupialization by endoscopic sinus surgery should always be considered because it demonstrated the potential to lead to excellent results even after 8 years of follow-up in our patient. To our knowledge, no case report has described follow-up longer than 8 years for a maxillary sinus keratocystic odontogenic tumor treated with endoscopic sinus surgery. PMID:25193270

  7. A pox on thee! Manipulation of the host immune system by myxoma virus and implications for viral-host co-adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Martha C

    2002-09-01

    The poxviruses have evolved a diverse array of proteins which serve to subvert innate and adaptive host responses that abort or at least limit viral infections. Myxoma virus and its rabbit host are considered to represent an ideal poxvirus-host system in which to study the effects of these immunomodulatory proteins. Studies of laboratory rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) infected with gene knockout variants of myxoma virus have provided compelling evidence that several myxoma virus gene products contribute to the pathogenic condition known as myxomatosis. However, myxomatosis, which is characterized by skin lesions, systemic immunosuppression, and a high mortality rate, does not occur in the virus' natural South American host, Sylvilogus brasiliensis. Moreover, in Australia where myxoma virus was willfully introduced to control populations of O. cuniculus, myxomatosis-resistant rabbits emerged within a year of myxoma virus introduction into the field. In this review I discuss the characterized immunomodulatory proteins of myxoma virus, their biochemical properties, their pathogenic effects in laboratory rabbits, the role of the host immune system in the susceptibility or resistance to myxomatosis, and the evidence that immunomodulatory genes may have been attenuated during the co-adaptation of myxoma virus and O. cuniculus in Australia.

  8. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with peripheral cemento-osseous reactive proliferation: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Aparna; Slater, Lee J; Hamao-Sakamoto, Aya; Waters, Patrick; Kessler, Harvey P; Wright, John M

    2016-09-01

    Two cases of a rare variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor encompassed by a prominent reactive cemento-osseous proliferation are reported. This unique variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor has only been seen twice in the authors' collective experience. Literature documenting the histopathologic patterns of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and the occurrence of other combined lesions other is reviewed and discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Rare Case of Extrafollicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour in the Posterior Region of the Mandible: Misdiagnosed as Residual Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Shivali, Vaid; Pandey, Anil; Khanna, Vidhi D; Khanna, Prateek; Singh, Ashish; Ahuja, Tarun

    2013-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is a relatively uncommon distinct odontogenic neoplasm. It is an uncommon tumor of odontogenic origin with varying number of ductlike structures and inductive changes in the stroma. It is a benign and slow growing epithelial tumor and represents 3% of all odontogenic tumors. Its occurrence is more common in anterior region of the maxilla than mandible. Most of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumors occur intra-osseously but few peripheral variant have been reported which are attached to the gingival structures. The intra-osseous Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor may be related to unerrupted tooth (follicular varient) or may not (extrafollicular varient) be related to unerrupted tooth. This paper is to present a rare case of an extrafollicular Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor occurring in the body of the mandible in a male patient which is distinct and secondly it was clinically and radiographically diagnosed as residual cyst. The diagnosis of Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor was confirmed by Histopathological investigation. How to cite this article: Shivali V, Khanna VD, Khanna P, Singh A, Pandey A, Ahuja T. A Rare Case of Extrafollicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour in the Posterior Region of the Mandible: Misdiagnosed as Residual Cyst. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):124-8. PMID:24324316

  10. A Case of Sudden Death in Decameron IV.6: Aortic Dissection or Atrial Myxoma?

    PubMed

    Toscano, Fabrizio; Spani, Giovanni; Papio, Michael; Rühli, Frank J; Galassi, Francesco M

    2016-07-08

    Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron contains a novella that details the sudden death of a young man called Gabriotto, including a portrayal of the discomfort that the protagonist experienced and a rudimentary autopsy performed by local physicians. The intriguing description of symptoms and pathologies has made it possible to read a 7-century-old case through the modern clinical lens. Thanks to the medical and philological analysis of the text-despite the vast difference between modern and medieval medicine-2 hypothetical diagnoses have emerged: either an aortic dissection or an atrial myxoma. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Central Myxoma / Myxofibroma of the Jaws: A Clinico-Epidemiologic Review

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Agbara; Benjamin, Fomete; Athanasius-Chukwudi, Obiadazie; Uchenna-Kevin, Omeje; Modupeola-Omotara, Samaila

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Myxomas are a group of benign rare tumors of connective-tissue origin that occur in both hard (central) and soft tissues of the body. The aim of this study is to highlight our experience in the management of central myxoma of the jaw, with emphasis on its clinic-epidemiologic features as seen in our environment. Materials and Methods: All patients who were managed for central myxoma of the jaw at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery department of a regional University Teaching Hospital between September 1997 and October 2015 were retrospectively studied. Details sourced included age, sex, site of tumor, duration, signs/symptoms, treatment given, and complications. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) and Microsoft Excel 2007 (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA). Results from descriptive statistics were represented in the form of tables and charts, with a test for significance (ρ) using Pearson Chi-square (χ2) set at 0.05. Results: A total of 16 patients were managed within the period reviewed, consisting of 10 (62.5%) females and six (37.5%) males, giving a male-to-female ratio of 1:1.7. The ages of patients ranged from 5 to 70 years, with a mean of 27.06±15.45 years. The mandible accounted for nine (56.3%) cases and the maxilla for six (37.5%) cases, while a combination of the maxilla and the zygoma were involved in one (6.3%) case. Bucco-lingual or bucco-palatal expansion were the most common presentation (six [46.2%] cases each). Histological assessment of tissue specimens showed that fibromyxoma accounted for seven (43.8%) cases, while the remaining nine (56.3%) cases were diagnosed as myxoma. All patients had jaw resections, and these consisted of mandibulectomies in nine (60.0%) patients and maxillectomies in six (40.0%) patients. The duration of hospital stay ranged from 5 to 29 days, with a mean of 17.86±7.68 days. Complications were noted in three patients, and all were

  12. Prevalence and distribution of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts in a Turkish Population

    PubMed Central

    Uzun-Bulut, Emel; Özden, Bora; Gündüz, Kaan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relative frequency and distribution of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts in a large Turkish population. Study Design A retrospective survey of jaw cysts was undertaken at the Oral Diagnosis and Radiology and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Ondokuz Mayıs University Dental School, Samsun, Turkey. Data were retrieved from clinical files, imaging, and histopathology reports from 2000 to 2008; a total of 12,350 patients were included. In each case, we analyzed age, gender, type and number of cysts, and cyst location. Imaging patterns and pathologies associated with cystic lesions were also determined. Results: The prevalence of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts was 3.51%; males were affected more frequently than females. There were 452 odontogenic cysts (98.5%) and seven nonodontogenic cysts (1.5%). The most frequent odontogenic cyst was radicular (54.7%), followed by dentigerous (26.6%), residual (13.7%), odontogenic keratocyst (3.3%), and lateral periodontal cyst (0.2%). Nasopalatine duct cyst (1.5%) was the only nonodontogenic cyst. By age, cysts peaked in the third decade (24.2%). Concerning location, no statistically significant difference was found between the maxilla and mandible (p>0.05). The most frequent radiological feature of these lesions was unilocular cyst (93.7%). Pathologies associated with cystic lesions occurred in 14.7%. Conclusion: The prevalence of both odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts were lower than that reported in many other studies. In our study population, cysts were mainly inflammatory in origin. Key words: Prevalence, odontogenic, nonodontogenic, cysts. PMID:21743428

  13. Cardiac myxoma: preoperative diagnosis using a multimodal imaging approach and surgical outcome in a large contemporary series.

    PubMed

    Rahmanian, Parwis B; Castillo, Javier G; Sanz, Javier; Adams, David H; Filsoufi, Farzan

    2007-08-01

    Diagnosis of cardiac myxoma is typically suggested in the presence of symptoms and echocardiographic findings of an intracardiac mass and confirmed histologically. Coronary angiography (CA) and cardiac magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) may provide specific additional information which could lead to a precise preoperative diagnosis. Herein we report a series of 28 patients who underwent excision of myxoma between 1998 and 2005. Data analysis included patient demographics, clinical presentation, imaging modalities, and operative outcome. Echocardiography revealed an intra-atrial mass in all patients but did not differentiate between myxoma and other formations such as thrombi. CA showed neovascularization suggestive of cardiac tumor in 12 (53%) patients. MRI demonstrated specific characteristics of myxomatous tissue in all cases. Surgical removal was performed with no hospital mortality or major complications. Mid-term survival was similar to that of the general population. In patients with a cardiac mass, echocardiography remains the first diagnostic imaging modality but does not allow definite discrimination between cardiac tumors and thrombi. CA shows neovascularization in 50% and has, therefore, a low sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing the nature of the mass. MRI shows specific tissue characteristics facilitating the diagnosis of myxoma preoperatively. Surgery should be performed promptly and this can provide excellent early and mid-term results.

  14. The role of interleukin-6 in cases of cardiac myxoma. Clinical features, immunologic abnormalities, and a possible role in recurrence.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, C E; Rosado, M F; Bernal, L

    2001-01-01

    We performed this prospective study to evaluate the correlation of interleukin-6 serum levels with preoperative constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities, and the possible role played by this cytokine in tumor recurrence. Eight patients with atrial myxoma were evaluated at our institution from July 1993 to November 1998. We measured their interleukin-6 serum levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method preoperatively and 1 and 6 months after surgery. Two of the cases involved recurrent tumor, 1 patient had undergone his 1st surgery at a different institution and died during the 2nd procedure, so his data were incomplete. Preoperatively the whole group of patients had elevated interleukin-6 serum levels. Although patients with a 1st occurrence of tumor demonstrated a positive correlation between interleukin-6 serum level and tumor size, the 2 patients with recurrent tumors appeared to have higher interleukin-6 levels regardless of tumor size. Once the tumor was surgically removed, interleukin-6 levels returned to normal values, and this was associated with regression of clinical manifestations and immunologic features. According to our study, the overproduction of interleukin-6 by cardiac myxomas is responsible for the constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities observed in patients with such tumors and might also play a role as a marker of recurrence. This study also suggests that recurrent cardiac myxomas form a subgroup of cardiac myxomas with a highly intrinsic aggressiveness, as implied by their greater interleukin-6 production despite their smaller size. Further studies are needed to confirm these results.

  15. The Role of Interleukin-6 in Cases of Cardiac Myxoma: Clinical Features, Immunologic Abnormalities, and a Possible Role in Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Cesar Emilio; Rosado, Manuel Francisco; Bernal, Leon

    2001-01-01

    We performed this prospective study to evaluate the correlation of interleukin-6 serum levels with preoperative constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities, and the possible role played by this cytokine in tumor recurrence. Eight patients with atrial myxoma were evaluated at our institution from July 1993 to November 1998. We measured their interleukin-6 serum levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method preoperatively and 1 and 6 months after surgery. Two of the cases involved recurrent tumor; 1 patient had undergone his 1st surgery at a different institution and died during the 2nd procedure, so his data were incomplete. Preoperatively, the whole group of patients had elevated interleukin-6 serum levels. Although patients with a 1st occurrence of tumor demonstrated a positive correlation between interleukin-6 serum level and tumor size, the 2 patients with recurrent tumors appeared to have higher interleukin-6 levels regardless of tumor size. Once the tumor was surgically removed, interleukin-6 levels returned to normal values, and this was associated with regression of clinical manifestations and immunologic features. According to our study, the overproduction of interleukin-6 by cardiac myxomas is responsible for the constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities observed in patients with such tumors and might also play a role as a marker of recurrence. This study also suggests that recurrent cardiac myxomas form a subgroup of cardiac myxomas with a highly intrinsic aggressiveness, as implied by their greater interleukin-6 production despite their smaller size. Further studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:11330738

  16. A pathogenic myxoma virus in vaccinated and non-vaccinated commercial rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kritas, S K; Dovas, C; Fortomaris, P; Petridou, E; Farsang, A; Koptopoulos, G

    2008-12-01

    A case of a myxoma virus strain in vaccinated and non-vaccinated rabbits is described, and genetic identification of that strain was performed in this study. In two commercial farms being 150km apart, myxomatosis has been occurred after the import of animals from a common supplier. The disease was manifested firstly in the existing non-immune population of does and fatteners, and later in all vaccinated animals, being 2-3 months immune at the time of first symptoms. Morbidity was almost 100% with nasal discharge, listlessness, fever, eyelid swelling, eye and nasal purulent discharge, papules in the ears, facial oedema, and swelling of the anagenital region, with result always the death of the animals. Examination by PCR had shown the presence of a 492-bp specific product in all the symptomatic animals tested from both farms, having 100% nucleotide sequence identity with the homologous region of the myxoma virus Lausanne strain. The simultaneous occurrence of myxomatosis in the vaccinated and non-vaccinated rabbits of both farms, suggests that the supplier was possibly the source of a viral isolate with increased virulence.

  17. [Evaluation of superior transseptal approach for the removal of left atrial myxoma].

    PubMed

    Kunitomo, R; Okamoto, K; Utoh, J; Nishimura, K; Muranaka, T; Tsurusaki, S; Hagio, K; Kitamura, N

    2001-03-01

    We compared the operative outcomes among 14 patients who underwent the removal of left atrial myxoma with four different approaches; right lateral (n = 2), transseptal bi-atrial (Dubost, n = 4), conventional transseptal (n = 4) and superior transseptal approach (STA, n = 4). Concomitant operations were performed in 4 cases (CABG, two; aortic valvuloplasty, one; mitral valve replacement, one), and two out of 4 cases were in the STA group. The mean operation, cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times were shorter in the STA group compared to the other three group. The total amount of postoperative drain discharge and the peak value of creatine kinase were also lower in the STA group compared to the other three groups. Among the patients in sinus rhythm before operation, the use of STA was associated with a greater incidence (100%) of postoperative atrial fibrillation or junctional rhythm. These rhythm disturbances were temporary, and all returned to sinus rhythms during hospital stay. We conclude that STA is an excellent approach with a nice surgical view to expose and remove the left atrial myxoma.

  18. Myxomatosis: the virulence of field strains of myxoma virus in a population of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.) with high resistance to myxomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, J. W.; Nolan, I. F.; Shepherd, R. C.; Gocs, A.

    1975-01-01

    The virulence of field strains of myxoma virus is increasing in the Mallee region of Victoria where the resistance of the rabbit to myxomatosis is high. This suggests that the climax association will be a moderately severe disease. PMID:1056963

  19. Myxomatosis: the virulence of field strains of myxoma virus in a population of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.) with high resistance to myxomatosis.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, J W; Nolan, I F; Shepherd, R C; Gocs, A

    1975-06-01

    The virulence of field strains of myxoma virus is increasing in the Mallee region of Victoria where the resistance of the rabbit to myxomatosis is high. This suggests that the climax association will be a moderately severe disease.

  20. The role of PIN1 on odontogenic and adipogenic differentiation in human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Man; Shin, Seung-Yun; Jue, Seong-Suk; Kwon, Il-Keun; Cho, Eun-Hee; Cho, Eui-Sic; Park, Sang-Hyuk; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2014-03-15

    Recently, the involvement of PIN1, a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, has been reported in age-related bone homeostasis and adipogenesis. However, the role of PIN1 during odontogenic and adipogenic differentiation remains to be fully understood, particularly regarding human dental pulp stem cells (HDPSCs). Thus, in the present study, we have investigated the role of PIN1 in odontogenic and adipogenic differentiation of HDPSCs and signaling pathways possibly involved. PIN1 mRNA and protein level were upregulated in a time-dependent manner during adipogenic differentiation, increasing until 1 day of odontogenic induction and then steadily declined during odontogenic differentiation. Treatment of a known PIN1 inhibitor, juglone, significantly increased odontogenic differentiation as confirmed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium deposition, and mRNAs induction of odontogenic markers [ALP, osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OCN), dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1)]. On the contrary, adipogenic differentiation was dramatically reduced upon juglone treatment, with concomitant downregulation of lipid droplet accumulation and adipogenic marker genes [peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (AP2)]. In contrast to PIN1 inhibition, the overexpression of PIN1 via adenoviral infection (Ad-PIN1) in HDPSCs inhibited odontogenic differentiation but increased adipogenic differentiation, in which stem cell property markers such as stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4) and STRO-1 were upregulated during odontogenic differentiation but downregulated in adiopogenic differentiation. Consistently, juglone-mediated inhibition of PIN1 augmented the osteogenic medium (OM)-induced activation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Wnt/β-catenin, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF

  1. Calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with complex odontoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gallana-Alvarez, Silvia; Mayorga-Jimenez, Francisco; Torres-Gómez, Francisco Javier; Avellá-Vecino, Francisco Javier; Salazar-Fernandez, Clara

    2005-01-01

    We report a calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with odontoma (COCaO) and an included permanent canine in the superior maxilla, in a 19 year-old-man. The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) was first described as a distinct entity by Gorlin et al in 1962. The lesion is a mixed odontogenic benign tumor, and although most of the cases present cystic characteristics, a few are of the solid type (15%), and its rare malignant transformation is well documented. The COC may occur in association with other odontogenic tumors, the most common is the odontoma, occurring in about 24% of the cases. For this association the term Odontocalcifying odontogenic cyst has been suggested. Radiographically is a well defined mixed lesion and histologically consists of a large cyst. In the central area of the cyst enamel and dentin deposits can be found, irregularly distributed in areas and in other parts it takes on a well defined organoid aspect. A thorough review of literature takes place and the pathogenesis is discussed.

  2. Comparison of the Odontogenic Differentiation Potential of Dental Follicle, Dental Papilla, and Cranial Neural Crest Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Sun, Qince; Xie, Li; Jiang, Zongting; Feng, Lian; Yu, Mei; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2015-07-01

    During tooth development, cells originating from the neural crest serve as precursors to the cells in the dental follicle and dental papilla. Therefore, the current study aimed to understand the associations of cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs), dental follicle cells (DFCs), and dental papilla cells (DPCs) by performing a parallel comparison to evaluate their odontogenic differentiation capacities. In this study, we harvested the 3 cells from C57/green fluorescent protein-positive mice or embryos and compared the cell morphology, surface antigens, microstructures, and gene and protein expression. Under the odontogenic microenvironments provided by treated dentin matrix, the odontogenic differentiations of the 3 cells were further compared in vitro and in vivo. The gene levels of DFCs in neurofilament, tubulin, and nestin were close to the DPCs, and in alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, dentin matrix protein 1, and dentin sialophosphoprotein were the lowest in the 3 cells. However, Western blot results showed that DFCs possessed more similar protein profiles to CNCCs than DPCs, including collagen 1, transforming growth factor beta 1, osteopontin, neurofilament, and dentin matrix protein 1. Meanwhile, DFCs as 1 source of dental stem cells possessed high potency in odontogenic differentiation in vitro. Moreover, similar dentinlike tissues were observed in all 3 groups in vivo. CNCCs, DFCs, and DPCs possessed different biological characteristics in odontogenic differentiation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of osteopontin and CD44v6 expression in odontogenic cystic lesions by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Salehinejad, Jahanshah; Saghafi, Shadi; Sharifi, Nourieh; Zare-Mahmoodabadi, Reza; Saghravanian, Nasrollah; Ghazi, Narges; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-07-15

    Odontogenic cysts are common lesions with different biological behavior. Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) and calcifying odontogenic cysts (COCs) with ameloblastoma-like epithelium are more aggressive than dentigerous cysts (DCs) and radicular cysts (RCs). Therefore, they were included in the list of odontogenic tumors by WHO. Osteopontin (OPN) is a calcium-binding glycoprotein present in many normal tissues. It plays a role in the migration and invasion of transformed epithelial cells. Binding of OPN to its receptor CD44v6 can enhance cell motility and migration. The purpose of this study was to compare the expression of these markers between odontogenic cysts of varying biological behavior. We examined OPN and CD44v6 expression in tissue sections of 14OKCs, 14COCs, 14RCs and 14DCs by immunohistochemistry. OPN and CD44v6 immunostaining was observed in all lining epithelial cells of the studied lesions with different degrees. The highest level of OPN and CD44v6 expression was found in OKCs, followed by COCs, RCs and DCs. Comparison of both markers among four groups revealed significant differences (P<0.001). Our findings suggest that higher level of OPN and CD44v6 expression in epithelial cells of some lesions such as OKC and COC can explain the local aggressive behavior of them.

  4. Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma: A rare case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Alberola-Ferranti, Margarita; Hueto-Madrid, Juan Antonio; Bescós-Atín, Coro

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma is a rare condition characterized by ameloblastic-like islands of epithelial cells with aberrant keratinitation in the form of Ghost cell with varying amounts of dysplastic dentina. Material and Methods: We report a case of a 70 year-old woman with a rapid onset of painful swelling right maxillary tumor. Magnetic resonance showed a huge tumor dependent on the right half of the right hard palate with invasion of the pterygoid process and focally to the second branch of the trigeminal. Radiological stage was T4N0. The patient underwent a right subtotal maxillectomy with clear margins. Adjuvant radiotherapy was given. The patient was free of residual or recurrent disease 12 months after surgery. Results: The tumor was 3,9cm in diameter. It was spongy and whitish gray. Microscopically the tumor was arranged in nets and trabeculae, occasionally forming palisade. Tumoral cells had clear cytoplasm with vesicular nuclei. There was atipia and mitosi with vascular and perineural invasion. The excised tumor was diagnosed as a GCOC. Conclusions: Ghost cell carcinoma is a rare odontogenic carcinoma. Its course is unpredictable, ranging from locally invasive tumors of slow growth to highly aggressive and infiltrative ones. Wide surgical excision with clean margins is the treatment of choice although its combination with postoperative radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy, remains controversial. Key words:Ameloblastic carcinoma, calcifying odontogenic cyst, Ghost cell carcinoma, keratinizing epithelial odontogenic cyst, maxillary tumor, odontogenic carcinoma. PMID:25674335

  5. Odontogenic epithelial proliferation is correlated with COX-2 expression in dentigerous cyst and ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Alsaegh, Mohammed Amjed; Miyashita, Hitoshi; Taniguchi, Takahiro; Zhu, Sheng Rong

    2017-01-01

    Investigation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in dentigerous cyst and ameloblastoma may help to improve understanding of the nature and behavior of odontogenic cysts and tumors, and in addition may eventually represent a definitive target for a pharmacological approach in the management of these lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate COX-2 expression and its correlation with the proliferation of odontogenic epithelium in these lesions. Dentigerous cysts (n=16) and ameloblastomas (n=17) were evaluated. Detection of Ki-67 and COX-2 protein expression was conducted by immunohistochemistry. Data were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. No significant differences were found in the expression of Ki-67 and COX-2 between dentigerous cysts and ameloblastomas (P>0.05). A significant positive correlation (P=0.018) and highly significant positive correlation (P=0.004) were found between Ki-67 and COX-2 expression in the odontogenic epithelium of dentigerous cyst and ameloblastoma, respectively. COX-2 was expressed in the odontogenic epithelium of dentigerous cyst and ameloblastoma. It may contribute to local extension of these lesions by increasing the proliferation of their odontogenic epithelial cells. PMID:28123497

  6. Odontogenic myxofibroma: A concise review of the literature with emphasis on the surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Giovannacci, Ilaria; Corradi, Domenico; Manfredi, Maddalena; Merigo, Elisabetta; Bonanini, Mauro; Vescovi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to report a review of the literature concerning epidemiology, clinical and radiographic features as well as treatment of odontogenic myxofibroma (MF). Methods: The PubMed database was searched using the following keywords: “odontogenic myxofibroma”, “odontogenic fibromyxoma”, “myxofibroma of the jaw” and “fibromyxoma of the jaw”. Results: Fifteen articles reporting the experience with 24 patients were identified. Male/female ratio was 1:1.4 and the average age was 29.5 years. The most frequent location was the mandible. In 66.7% of the cases the radiographic appearance was a multilocular radiolucency. Swelling was observed in 13 patients (92.86%), varying degrees of pain in 5 (35.71%) and paresthesia in only one patient (7.14%). Six out of 24 patients (26.09%) were treated with radical surgery and 17 (73.91%) with a conservative approach. In two out of 21 cases (9.52%) a recurrence was reported. Conclusions: MF is an extremely rare tumor and no agreement exists on the causes of its development. According to the present review, the choice of treatment should depend on variables such as localization, presence of a primary or of a recurrent lesion, age, general medical conditions and aesthetic needs of the patient. Key words:Odontogenic myxofibroma, myxofibroma of the jaw, odontogenic tumors, oral surgery, oral pathology. PMID:25129249

  7. Odontogenic infections: an 8-year epidemiologic analysis in a dental emergency outpatient care unit.

    PubMed

    Cachovan, Georg; Phark, Jin-Ho; Schön, Gerhard; Pohlenz, Philipp; Platzer, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyze epidemiological patterns, clinical features and the management of odontogenic infections in patients undergoing treatment in a dental emergency outpatient care unit. A retrospective analysis of 58 161 case records of patients presenting to an emergency outpatient unit in Hamburg, Germany between 2000-2007 was performed. From this pool, patients with odontogenic infections were identified using an ICD-10 code, analyzing age, gender, medical co-morbidities, duration of pain, ratio of infiltrates/abscesses, affected teeth, management of infection and administered antibiotics. Of the 58 161 patients, 5357 (9.2%) were identified as having odontogenic infections, with 2689 (50.2%) inflammatory infiltrates and 2668 (49.8%) abscesses. Mean age was 34.8 ± 16.8 years. As the primary site of odontogenic infection, the most significantly affected teeth were the maxillary and mandibular first molars. Patients in age-group 20-29 years (25.1%) utilized the emergency care unit more frequently than other age groups. Clindamycin was the most frequently administered antibiotic. Early recognition, diagnosis and management of odontogenic infections are requisite for avoiding or minimizing the development of potential complications. Strategies and evidence-based protocols should be developed within the dental ambulatory care sector, advancing interdisciplinary cooperation between general dentists and oral or maxillofacial surgeons.

  8. Differential expression of cyclin D1 in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo; Vera-Sempere, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression levels of Cyclin D1 (CCD1), a nuclear protein that plays a crucial role in cell cycle progression, in a series of keratin-producing odontogenic cysts. A total of 58 keratin-producing odontogenic cysts, diagnosed over ten years and classified according to the WHO 2005 criteria, were immunohistochemically analyzed in terms of CCD1 expression, which was quantified in the basal, suprabasal and intermediate/superficial epithelial compartments. The extent of immunostaining was measured as a proportion of total epithelial thickness. Quantified immunohistochemical data were correlated with clinicopathological features and clinical recurrence. Keratin-producing odontogenic cysts were classified as 6 syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors (S-KCOT), 40 sporadic or non-syndromic KCOT (NS-KCOT) and 12 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOC). Immunohistochemically, CCD1 staining was evident predominantly in the parabasal region of all cystic lesions, but among-lesion differences were apparent, showing a clear expansion of parabasal compartment especially in the S-KCOT, followed to a lesser extent in the NS-KCOT, and being much more reduced in the OOC, which had the greatest average epithelial thickness. The differential expression of CCD1 noted in the present study suggests that dysregulation of cell cycle progression from G1 to the S phase contributes to the different aggressiveness of these lesions. However, CCD1 expression levels did not predict NS-KCOT recurrence, which is likely influenced by factors unrelated to lesion biology.

  9. Myxomatosis: passive immunity in the offspring of immune rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) infested with fleas (Spilopsyllus cuniculi Dale) and exposed to myxoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sobey, W. R.; Conolly, D.

    1975-01-01

    Kittens with maternal antibodies to myxoma virus, the offspring of rabbits which had recovered from myxomatosis, were exposed to fleas contaminated with myxoma virus and/or contact with infected rabbits from birth. All kittens died or became infected before 8 weeks of age. When compared with adult animals similarly infected the kittens showed no advantage in terms of survival time or recovery rate attributable to maternal antibodies. Flea transmission of virus was found more effective than contact transmissions. PMID:1054058

  10. Myxomatosis: passive immunity in the offspring of immune rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) infested with fleas (Spilopsyllus cuniculi Dale) and exposed to myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Sobey, W R; Conolly, D

    1975-02-01

    Kittens with maternal antibodies to myxoma virus, the offspring of rabbits which had recovered from myxomatosis, were exposed to fleas contaminated with myxoma virus and/or contact with infected rabbits from birth. All kittens died or became infected before 8 weeks of age. When compared with adult animals similarly infected the kittens showed no advantage in terms of survival time or recovery rate attributable to maternal antibodies. Flea transmission of virus was found more effective than contact transmissions.

  11. Cellular/intramuscular myxoma and grade I myxofibrosarcoma are characterized by distinct genetic alterations and specific composition of their extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Stefan M; Mohseny, Alex B; Balog, Crina; Sewrajsing, Raj; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge H; Knijnenburg, Jeroen; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Sciot, Raf; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Deelder, André M; Szuhai, Karoly; Hensbergen, Paul J; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W

    2009-01-01

    Cellular myxoma and grade I myxofibrosarcoma are mesenchymal tumours that are characterized by their abundant myxoid extracellular matrix (ECM). Despite their histological overlap, they differ clinically. Diagnosis is therefore difficult though important. We investigated their (cyto) genetics and ECM. GNAS1-activating mutations have been described in intramuscular myxoma, and lead to downstream activation of cFos. KRAS and TP53 mutations are commonly involved in sarcomagenesis whereby KRAS subsequently activates c-Fos. A well-documented series of intramuscular myxoma (three typical cases and seven cases of the more challenging cellular variant) and grade I myxofibrosarcoma (n= 10) cases were karyotyped, analyzed for GNAS1, KRAS and TP53 mutations and downstream activation of c-Fos mRNA and protein expression. ECM was studied by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and expression of proteins identified was validated by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. Grade I myxofibrosarcoma showed variable, non-specific cyto-genetic aberrations in 83,5% of cases (n= 6) whereas karyotypes of intramuscular myxoma were all normal (n= 7). GNAS1-activating mutations were exclusively found in 50% of intramuscular myxoma. Both tumour types showed over-expression of c-Fos mRNA and protein. No mutations in KRAS codon 12/13 or in TP53 were detected. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry revealed structural proteins (collagen types I, VI, XII, XIV and decorin) in grade I myxofibrosarcoma lacking in intramuscular myxoma. This was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. Intramuscular/cellular myxoma and grade I myxofibrosarcoma show different molecular genetic aberrations and different composition of their ECM that probably contribute to their diverse clinical behaviour. GNAS1 mutation analysis can be helpful to distinguish intramuscular myxoma from grade I myxofibrosarcoma in selected cases. PMID:19320777

  12. Pediatric odontogenic tumor of the jaw - a case report.

    PubMed

    Muddana, Keerthi; Pasupula, Ajay Prakash; Dorankula, Shyam Prasad Reddy; Thokala, Madhusudan Rao; Muppallai, Jaya Nagendra Krishna

    2014-02-01

    Central jaw tumors (intra osseous) in children occur infrequently and few oral pathologists have had the opportunity or experience in diagnosing these lesions and predicting their biological behavior. Some children are not diagnosed correctly at the initial stages as having a neoplasm and are wrongly treated for infections by antibiotic administration. Subsequent to an unresponsive antibiotic therapy radiographs are taken to reveal a radiolucent or radio dense lesion in the jaws. Finally a tissue diagnosis becomes necessary in order to diagnose and initiate proper therapy. One among the central jaw tumors that occur infrequently in children is Ameloblastoma. It is often aggressive and destructive, with the capacity to attain great size, erode bone and invade adjacent structures. Ameloblastoma not only accounts for 1% of all tumors of maxilla and mandible but also 11% of all odontogenic tumors. It has a high percentage of local recurrence rate and possible malignant development when treated inadequately. Here we present a central jaw tumor in an 8-year-old child which was a case of unusually large plexiform ameloblastoma involving entire ramus up to the condyle, and part of body of the mandible.

  13. Microbiology of intracranial abscesses associated with sinusitis of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2006-12-01

    The unique microbiology of sinusitis of dental origin that is associated with intracranial abscesses (IAs) and the correlation between the organisms at the two sites has not been reported before. This report describes the author's experience during a 30-year period in studying the microbiology of 8 IAs and their corresponding sinusitis of dental origin. Aspirates of pus from 8 infected sinuses associated with odontogenic infections and their corresponding IAs were studied for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Polymicrobial flora was found in all 8 sinuses and 7 IAs, and the number of isolates varied from 1 to 5. Anaerobic bacteria were isolated from all sinuses and IAs. A total of 28 isolates (3.5 isolates per site; 25 strict anaerobic, 1 aerobic or facultative, and 2 microaerophilic) were recovered from the sinuses, and 20 isolates (2.5 isolates per site; 16 strict anaerobic, 1 aerobic or facultative, and 3 microaerophilic) were found in the IAs. The bacterial isolates were Fusobacterium spp (14), Prevotella spp (11), Peptostreptococcus spp (13), microaerophilic streptococci (5), Veillonella parvula (3), and beta-hemolytic streptococci group F(2). Concordance in the microbiological findings between the sinus and the IA was found in all instances; however, certain organisms were only present at one site. These data illustrate the concordance in the organisms recovered from sinusitis of dental origin and their associated IAs and confirm the importance of anaerobic bacteria in sinusitis and IAs of dental origin.

  14. A Case of Odontogenic Orbital Cellulitis Causing Blindness by Severe Tension Orbit

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang Hyun; Jee, Dong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    We report a very rare case of odontogenic orbital cellulitis causing blindness by severe tension orbit. A 41-yr old male patient had visited the hospital due to severe periorbital swelling and nasal stuffiness while he was treated for a periodontal abscess. He was diagnosed with odontogenic sinusitis and orbital cellulitis, and treated with antibiotics. The symptoms were aggravated and emergency sinus drainage was performed. On the next day, a sudden decrease in vision occurred with findings of ischemic optic neuropathy and central retinal artery occlusion. Deformation of the eyeball posterior pole into a cone shape was found from the orbital CT. A high-dose steroid was administered immediately resulting in improvements of periorbital swelling, but the patient's vision had not recovered. Odontogenic orbital cellulitis is relatively rare, but can cause blindness via rapidly progressing tension orbit. Therefore even the simplest of dental problems requires careful attention. PMID:23400303

  15. Case Presentation of Concomitant and Contiguous Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor and Focal Cemento-Ossifying Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Gita; Donoghue, Mandana; Reichart, Peter A; Pazuhi, Neda

    2015-01-01

    A 24 year-old male was presented for the diagnosis of an asymptomatic bony expansion in relation to the right maxillary canine and first premolar. The unilocular radiolucent lesion with central foci of calcification had caused divergence of canine and first premolar roots without any resorption. This case report details a diagnosis of two distinct disease processes of different cellular origin namely, focal cemento-ossifying dysplasia and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in a previously unreported concomitant and contiguous relationship. The diagnosis was determined by a combination of clinical, radiographic, histopathological and surgical evidence. This case highlights two points, first the need to examine all mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesions with advanced imaging techniques to assess the number and extent of the lesions prior to treatment planning. Second a likely role of periodontal ligament as the tissue source for odontogenic epithelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells required for the development of odontogenic tumors and cemento-osseous dysplasias.

  16. Case Presentation of Concomitant and Contiguous Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor and Focal Cemento-Ossifying Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Gita; Donoghue, Mandana; Reichart, Peter A; Pazuhi, Neda

    2015-01-01

    A 24 year-old male was presented for the diagnosis of an asymptomatic bony expansion in relation to the right maxillary canine and first premolar. The unilocular radiolucent lesion with central foci of calcification had caused divergence of canine and first premolar roots without any resorption. This case report details a diagnosis of two distinct disease processes of different cellular origin namely, focal cemento-ossifying dysplasia and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in a previously unreported concomitant and contiguous relationship. The diagnosis was determined by a combination of clinical, radiographic, histopathological and surgical evidence. This case highlights two points, first the need to examine all mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesions with advanced imaging techniques to assess the number and extent of the lesions prior to treatment planning. Second a likely role of periodontal ligament as the tissue source for odontogenic epithelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells required for the development of odontogenic tumors and cemento-osseous dysplasias. PMID:26464605

  17. Peripheral Odontogenic Fibroma: A Rare Tumor mimicking a Gingival Reactive Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Khot, Komal; Bagri-Manjrekar, Kriti; Khot, Paresh

    2017-01-01

    Gingival growths are one of the most frequently encountered lesions in the oral cavity. A plethora of lesions can be seen having similar clinical presentation, making diagnosis a dilemma. Peripheral odontogenic tumors are rare neoplasms to occur on gingiva, the most common among them being the peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POdF). The POdF is a benign, slow-growing, exophytic lesion. Although considered to have a recurrence potential after excision, the actual recurrence rate is not known due to paucity of reported cases. Presented here is a case of a rare neoplasm mimicking an inflammatory gingival lesion with review of the available literature. How to cite this article Khot K, Deshmane S, Bagri-Manjrekar K, Khot P. Peripheral Odontogenic Fibroma: A Rare Tumor mimicking a Gingival Reactive Lesion. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(1):103-106. PMID:28377665

  18. Bilateral Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour of Mandible: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Pragun; Mhapuskar, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a relatively rare lesion of oral and maxillofacial region and forms only 2% of all odontogenic tumours. It was previously known as Calcifying odontogenic cyst and only recently has been classified as a tumour by WHO. The controversy regarding its origin can be owed to its diverse clinical and histopathological presentation and variation in reported malignant potential. It was first reported by Gorlin in 1962 and since then conundrum regarding its true nature has persisted. It is seen in association with other lesions like odontoma, ameloblastoma and ameloblastic fibroma. Both intra-osseous and extra-osseous forms of CCOT have been reported. It commnoly occurs in anterior region with equal preponderance in maxilla and mandible. Here we present a rare case of bilateral CCOT in the posterior mandible of a 16-year-old male patient which was discovered incidentally during a radiographic examination. PMID:26673837

  19. Glandular odontogenic cyst: a rare entity revealed and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Anchlia, Sonal; Bahl, Sumit; Shah, Vandana; Vyas, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    A glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a developmental cyst that is a clinically rare and histopathologically unusual type of odontogenic cyst. GOCs are now relatively well-known entities; their importance relates to the fact that they exhibit a propensity for recurrence rates from 21% to 55%, similar to odontogenic keratocysts, and may be confused microscopically with central mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Furthermore, some microscopic features of GOCs may also be found in dentigerous, botryoid, radicular and surgical ciliated cysts. The present case report aims to describe a typical case of GOC, throwing light on its epidemiology and origin, as well as on its clinical, radiographic and microscopic features, which may be helpful for diagnosis in problematic cases, long-term follow-up and to determine the most appropriate treatment. PMID:26297768

  20. A case of odontogenic orbital cellulitis causing blindness by severe tension orbit.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Hyun; Jee, Dong Hyun; La, Tae Yoon

    2013-02-01

    We report a very rare case of odontogenic orbital cellulitis causing blindness by severe tension orbit. A 41-yr old male patient had visited the hospital due to severe periorbital swelling and nasal stuffiness while he was treated for a periodontal abscess. He was diagnosed with odontogenic sinusitis and orbital cellulitis, and treated with antibiotics. The symptoms were aggravated and emergency sinus drainage was performed. On the next day, a sudden decrease in vision occurred with findings of ischemic optic neuropathy and central retinal artery occlusion. Deformation of the eyeball posterior pole into a cone shape was found from the orbital CT. A high-dose steroid was administered immediately resulting in improvements of periorbital swelling, but the patient's vision had not recovered. Odontogenic orbital cellulitis is relatively rare, but can cause blindness via rapidly progressing tension orbit. Therefore even the simplest of dental problems requires careful attention.

  1. Immunohistochemical features of proliferative marker and basement membrane components of two feline inductive odontogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroki; Mori, Takashi; Iida, Tsuneyoshi; Tokuma, Yanai; Maruo, Kouji; Masegi, Toshiaki

    2008-07-01

    Feline inductive odontogenic tumour (FIOT) is a rare and interesting odontogenic neoplasm in which the odontogenic epithelium has inductive potential to form aggregated foci of dental pulp-like mesenchymal cells. Two male cats aged 11 and 10 months presented with nasal swelling and a left maxillary mass. Histopathologically, the masses consisted of non-encapsulated invasive neoplasms exhibiting proliferation of epithelial and mesenchymal components with local infiltration into the maxillary bone in both cases. The epithelial component formed islands, anastomosing strands, and solid sheets of polygonal epithelial cells. Occasionally, these cells formed circular aggregates, resembling the cap stage of odontogenesis. Type IV collagen and laminin were constantly positive around the foci of epithelial cells, and Ki-67 positive indices were extremely low; therefore, these findings consistent with the benign clinical presentation of FIOT.

  2. Kallikrein 4 and matrix metalloproteinase-20 immunoexpression in malignant, benign and infiltrative odontogenic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crivelini, Marcelo Macedo; Oliveira, Denise Tostes; de Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; de Sousa, Suzana Cantanhede Orsini Machado; Loyola, Adriano Motta

    2016-01-01

    Context: Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP20) (enamelysin) and kallikrein 4 (KLK4) are enzymes secreted by ameloblasts that play an important role in enamel matrix degradation during amelogenesis. However, studies have shown that neoplastic cells can produce such enzymes, which may affect the tumor infiltrative and metastatic behaviors. Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the biological role of MMP20 and KLK4 in odontogenic tumors. Materials and Methods: The enzymes were analyzed immunohistochemically in ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, keratocystic odontogenic tumor with or without recurrence and odontogenic carcinoma. Statistical Analysis Used: Clinicopathological parameters were statistically correlated with protein expression using the Fisher's exact test. Kruskal–Wallis and Wilcoxon-independent methods were used to evaluate the differences in median values. Results: Positive Immunoexpression was detected in all benign lesions, with a prevalence of 75–100% immunolabeled cells. Patients were predominantly young, Caucasian, female, with slow-growing tumors located in the mandible causing asymptomatic swelling. No KLK4 expression was seen in carcinomas, and the amount of MMP20-positive cells varied between 20% and 80%. Rapid evolution, recurrence and age >60 years characterized the malignant nature of these lesions. Conclusions: Data showed that KLK4 and MMP20 enzymes may not be crucial to tumoral infiltrative capacity, especially in malignant tumors, considering the diversity and peculiarity of these lesions. The significant immunoexpression in benign lesions, remarkably in AOT, is likely associated with differentiated tumor cells that can produce and degrade enamel matrix-like substances. This would be expected since the histogenesis of odontogenic tumors commonly comes from epithelium that recently performed a secretory activity in tooth formation. PMID:27601817

  3. Evaluation of mast cells in periapical cysts, dentigerous cysts, and keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    de Noronha Santos Netto, Juliana; Pires, Fábio Ramôa; da Fonseca, Eliene Carvalho; Silva, Licínio Esmeraldo; de Queiroz Chaves Lourenço, Simone

    2012-09-01

    Several cell types are associated with the development of cystic and tumoral odontogenic lesions. Among inflammatory cells, mast cells can be associated with their pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze mast cells in periapical cysts, dentigerous cysts, and keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Tissue sections were submitted to toluidine blue staining and immunohistochemistry with antibody anti-tryptase (clone G3). Mast cells were quantitated using Image-Pro Plus software to obtain the mean number of mast cells in three regions: epithelial, superficial portion of the fibrous wall and deep portion of the fibrous wall from 20 periapical cysts, 20 dentigerous cysts (six non-inflamed and 14 inflamed) and 20 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (four non-inflamed and 16 inflamed). The mean number of mast cells detected per lesion by immunohistochemistry (4.1) was higher than by histochemistry (1.5) (P<0.0001). Inflamed dentigerous cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumors showed a higher mean number of mast cells than non-inflamed lesions in all regions. The deep region from all cysts showed the highest mean number of degranulated mast cells, except for non-inflamed keratocystic odontogenic tumors analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemical staining detected higher number of mast cells than histochemistry. The higher number of mast cells observed in inflamed lesions could indicate the participation of these cells in the inflammatory response in odontogenic lesions. The prevalence of degranulated mast cells in the deep region suggests intense activity of these cells, possibly related to growth of cystic lesions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Collagen and Its Role in predicting the Biological Behavior of Odontogenic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Pavan G; Kumari, M Aruna; Jahagirdar, Abhishek; Nandan, Srk; Reddy D, Shyam Prasad; Keerthi, M

    2017-02-01

    Odontogenic cysts and tumors have variable recurrence rates. Recurrence rate is mainly due to the activity of the epithelium. The epithelium of these lesions has been investigated extensively in regard to their role in proliferative and aggressive behavior of the lesions. However, the role of the connective tissue wall in their behavior has not been studied as extensively. Collagen is an essential part of the connective tissue as a whole and fibrous wall of cystic lesions especially. It is demonstrated by picrosirius red dye staining combined with polarization microscopy. This method permits the evaluation of the nature of the collagen fibers in addition to their thickness. A total of 56 histopathologically diagnosed cases comprising odontogenic follicle, dentigerous cyst, unicystic ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), multicystic/solid ameloblastoma, and ameloblastic carcinoma were taken and stained using picrosirius red stain and evaluated using a polarizing microscope. Collagen fibers in odontogenic follicles and dentiger-ous cysts showed predominant orange-red birefringence; fibers in unicystic ameloblastoma and KCOT showed both orange red and greenish-yellow birefringence; and fibers of multicystic/ solid ameloblastoma showed predominant greenish-yellow birefringence and ameloblastic carcinoma that showed almost complete greenish birefringence. As the biological behavior of the lesions in the spectrum studied progress toward aggressive nature, increase in immature collagen fibers is noticed. This study suggests that the nature of collagen fibers plays a pivotal role in predicting the biological behavior of odontogenic lesions. Aggressive nature of the odontogenic lesions is determined by both the epithelium and the connective tissue components (collagen). Studying the nature and type of collagen helps in predicting its biological behavior.

  5. Hemimaxillectomy for desmoplastic ameloblastoma with immediate temporalis flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Elo, Jeffrey A; Tandon, Rahul; Allen, Chad N; Murray, Matthew D

    2014-08-01

    Ameloblastoma is one of the most common odontogenic tumors encountered, occurring more frequently than all other tumors combined, if one excludes the keratocystic odontogenic tumor. These tumors can cause severe expansion of the cortical bones and gross anatomic deformities. They can affect the dentition, causing tooth mobility and displacement. Fortunately, morbidity can be minimized with recognition on routine radiographic examination. The tissue may be unilocular or multilocular and has been described as having a "soap-bubble" appearance. Nevertheless, its radiographic appearance is insufficient to make a definitive diagnosis, because other tumors have similar appearance. Although the anatomic distribution and progression of ameloblastoma remain fairly consistent, alternative manifestations follow an atypical clinical course. One such variant is the desmoplastic ameloblastoma. We present a case of maxillary desmoplastic ameloblastoma treated with hemimaxillectomy and immediate reconstruction with temporalis flap that was recurrence-free at 36 months. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma: a case report and critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Castro, Wagner Henriques; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Loyola, Adriano Mota

    2013-08-09

    We describe a case of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) associated with odontoma occurring in the posterior mandible of a 32-year-old man. Although calcifications are commonly found in the AOT, the presence of rudimentary dental structures is a very rare phenomenon. Cases with similar aspects have been described as ameloblastic dentinoma, ameloblastic odontoma, adenoameloblastic odontoma and AOT associated with odontoma. After a careful analysis of the literature we describe the clinical aspects of this tumor. Further case reports and surveys of odontogenic tumors are necessary to define whether AOT associated with odontoma is a variant of AOT or a distinct clinicopathologic condition.

  7. Peripheral Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumour Mimicking a Gingival Inflammation: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Danielle Lima Corrêa; do Canto, Alan Motta; Eduardo, Fernanda de Paula; Bezinelli, Letícia Mello; Costa, André Luiz Ferreira; Braz-Silva, Paulo Henrique

    2016-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT) is an extremely rare benign neoplasia, accounting for approximately 1% of all odontogenic tumours. CEOT can have two clinical manifestations: central or intraosseous (94% of the cases) and peripheral or extraosseous (6% of the cases). Although the latter is less common, the peripheral variant has been described as an insidious lesion, since it is usually asymptomatic and may be erroneously mistaken with gingival hyperplasia, hamartomas, or even metastasis of malignant neoplasia. We report a case of a young male patient presenting with a peripheral CEOT in the mandibular posterior region, mimicking a located gingival inflammation.

  8. Peripheral Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumour Mimicking a Gingival Inflammation: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Danielle Lima Corrêa; do Canto, Alan Motta; Eduardo, Fernanda de Paula; Bezinelli, Letícia Mello

    2016-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT) is an extremely rare benign neoplasia, accounting for approximately 1% of all odontogenic tumours. CEOT can have two clinical manifestations: central or intraosseous (94% of the cases) and peripheral or extraosseous (6% of the cases). Although the latter is less common, the peripheral variant has been described as an insidious lesion, since it is usually asymptomatic and may be erroneously mistaken with gingival hyperplasia, hamartomas, or even metastasis of malignant neoplasia. We report a case of a young male patient presenting with a peripheral CEOT in the mandibular posterior region, mimicking a located gingival inflammation. PMID:27807486

  9. Mural Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour as Anterior Mandibular Swelling: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Reena Bhola; Grewal, Jessica; Grewal, Ripin; Bansal, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour is an uncommon, benign, hamartomatous lesion that commonly affects the anterior maxilla and has two radiographic variants, follicular and extrafollicular where the former is more common than the latter. Here, we report a case of 15-year-old female with midline swelling of the mandible. Radiographically, impacted right permanent mandibular canine was associated with the radiolucent lesion. Dentigerous cyst was given as provisional diagnosis. However, histologically the lesion represented the features of cystic variant of Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour. PMID:25121073

  10. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with an unerupted mandibular lateral incisor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare, benign odontogenic tumor that predominantly appears in the second decade of life in female patients. Most AOTs occur in the anterior part of the maxilla and are usually associated with impacted anterior teeth. There are three types of AOT, follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral, which are classified based on the location of the lesion and its association with the impacted tooth. We report a rare case of AOT associated with an impacted right mandibular lateral incisor in an 11-year-old female patient. PMID:26734563

  11. Central Granular Cell Odontogenic Tumor: Report of a Case with CBCT Features

    PubMed Central

    Anbiaee, Najmeh; Saghafi, Shadi; Mohammadzadeh Rezaei, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Central granular cell odontogenic tumor) CGCOT) of the jaw is an exceedingly rare benign odontogenic neoplasm with 35 reported cases in the literature. Among these, very few studies have focused on the cone-beam CT features of CGCOT. Here, we report a case of an asymptomatic CGCOT in a 16-year-old girl and focus on the cone-beam CT features. Only 36 cases of this lesion, including this one, have been reported so far. The case presented is of special importance due to the young age of the patient, the posterior location of the lesion and the multilocular pattern in the cone beam CT images PMID:25628673

  12. Peripheral odontogenic fibroma: a rare gingival neoplasm with clinico-pathological differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jaiswal, Shradha; Sharma, Aanchal; Andhare, Vinod; Sabir, Husain

    2015-01-01

    The peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POdF) is a rare gingival neoplasm, characterised by relatively mature collagenous fibrous tissue and varying amounts of odontogenic epithelium. It can be described as a slow growing, firmly attached, solid and smooth gingival mass which may be present asymptomatically for years, which may cause displacement of adjacent teeth. The purpose of this article is to discuss a case of POdF, occurring in the maxillary anterior region, with detailed clinico-pathological differential diagnosis to clarify characteristic features of various gingival overgrowths to enhance easy identification.

  13. Central Granular Cell Odontogenic Tumor: Report of a Case with CBCT Features.

    PubMed

    Anbiaee, Najmeh; Saghafi, Shadi; Mohammadzadeh Rezaei, Maryam

    2014-05-01

    Central granular cell odontogenic tumor) CGCOT) of the jaw is an exceedingly rare benign odontogenic neoplasm with 35 reported cases in the literature. Among these, very few studies have focused on the cone-beam CT features of CGCOT. Here, we report a case of an asymptomatic CGCOT in a 16-year-old girl and focus on the cone-beam CT features. Only 36 cases of this lesion, including this one, have been reported so far. The case presented is of special importance due to the young age of the patient, the posterior location of the lesion and the multilocular pattern in the cone beam CT images.

  14. An unusual case presentation of follicular odontogenic keratocyst with an impacted mesiodens.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sunil; Verma, Ajay; Sheorain, Anil; Sharma, Arun

    2013-05-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is one of the most aggressive odontogenic cysts known for its high recurrence rate and its tendency to invade adjacent tissues. Radiographically, OKCs can be of different varieties-follicular, envelopmental, replacemental, extraneous, and collateral. Its characteristic clinical and biological behavior, therapeutic approaches, prognosis, and recurrence vary in different studies. Generally, OKCs are found to be associated with impacted lower third molar. Here we present an unusual case of follicular OKC associated with an impacted mesiodens (supernumerary tooth) in a 21-year-old male patient.

  15. Cardiac myxoma: clinical characteristics, surgical intervention, intra-operative challenges and outcome.

    PubMed

    Abu Abeeleh, Mahmoud; Saleh, Suhayl; Alhaddad, Emad; Alsmady, Moaath; Alshehabat, Musa; Bani Ismail, Zuhair; Massad, Islam; Bani Hani, Amjad; Abu Halaweh, Sami

    2017-07-01

    The objectives of this retrospective study were to characterize the clinical presentation, diagnostic findings, surgical approaches, intra-operative challenges and complications following the surgical treatment of cardiac myxoma in two of the largest referral hospitals in Jordan. Medical records of all patients presented to the cardiology department during the period between 1984 and 2016 were reviewed. Criteria for inclusion in the study were: (1) patients who were presented for cardiac evaluation due to symptoms suggestive of a primary cardiac problem, (2) completed medical records, including results of echocardiography suggestive of intra-cardiac occupying mass, (3) the surgical operation was undertaken and intra-operative data was available, (4) a histological diagnosis of myxoma was available and (5) the discharge status and follow-up data were available for at least 2 years after initial surgery. A total of 27 patients fulfilled the criteria for inclusion in the study. The average age was 42 years. Thirteen of the patients were females and 14 patients were males. The most common clinical presentations were dyspnea (29.6%) and murmurs (22.2%). Non-specific signs, such as weight loss, fever, fatigue, arthralgia and anemia, were reported in 10 (37%) patients. Signs related to systemic embolization were reported in 9 (33.3%) of the patients, involving the upper and lower extremities (55.6%), brain ischemia and vision loss (54.4%). Tumors in all patients were successfully resected under cardiopulmonary bypass support. The tumor was pedunculated in 17 (62.9%) of the patients and the size of the tumors varied from 1 to 7 centimeters in diameter. The tumor was located in the left atrium in 21 patients (77.7%), in the right atrium in 4 patients (14.8%), in the right ventricular side of the septum in 1 patient (3.7%) and involving the tricuspid valve in 1 patient (3.7%). The left atrial approach was used in 3 patients, a right atrial approach in 4 patients and a bi

  16. Serp2, an Inhibitor of the Interleukin-1β-Converting Enzyme, Is Critical in the Pathobiology of Myxoma Virus

    PubMed Central

    Messud-Petit, Frederique; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Delverdier, Maxence; Amardeilh, Marie-France; Py, Robert; Sutter, Gerd; Bertagnoli, Stephane

    1998-01-01

    Recently, myxoma virus was shown to encode an additional member of the serpin superfamily. The viral gene, called serp2, was cloned, and the Serp2 protein was shown to specifically bind to interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-converting enzyme (ICE), thus inhibiting the cleavage of pro-IL-1β by the protease (F. Petit, S. Bertagnoli, J. Gelfi, F. Fassy, C. Boucraut-Baralon, and A. Milon, J. Virol. 70:5860–5866, 1996). Here, we address the role of Serp2 in the development of myxomatosis, a lethal infectious disease of the European rabbit. A Serp2 mutant myxoma virus was constructed by disruption of the single-copy serp2 gene and insertion of the Escherichia coli gpt gene serving as the selectable marker. A revertant virus was obtained by replacing the E. coli gpt gene by the intact serp2 open reading frame. The Serp2− mutant virus replicated with wild-type kinetics both in rabbit fibroblasts and a rabbit CD4+ T-cell line (RL5). Moderate reduction of cell surface levels of major histocompatibility complex I was observed after infection with wild-type or Serp2− mutant myxoma virus, and both produced white pocks on the chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. After the infection of European rabbits, the Serp2− mutant virus proved to be highly attenuated compared to wild-type myxoma virus, as demonstrated by the clinical course of myxomatosis and the survival rates of infected animals. Pathohistological examinations revealed that infection with wild-type myxoma virus resulted in a blockade of the inflammatory response at the vascular level. In contrast, rapid inflammatory reactions occurred upon infection with the Serp2− mutant virus. Furthermore, lymphocytes in lymph nodes derived from animals inoculated with Serp2 mutant virus were shown to rapidly undergo apoptosis. We postulate that the virulence of myxoma virus in the European rabbit can be partially attributed to an impairment of host inflammatory processes and to the prevention of apoptosis in lymphocytes. The

  17. Odontogenic and rhinogenic chronic sinusitis: a modern microbiological comparison.

    PubMed

    Saibene, Alberto Maria; Vassena, Christian; Pipolo, Carlotta; Trimboli, Mariele; De Vecchi, Elena; Felisati, Giovanni; Drago, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic sinusitis and sinonasal complications of dental disease or treatment (SCDDT) play a relevant, often underappreciated role in paranasal sinus infections. Treating SCDDT patients requires tailored medical and surgical approaches in order to achieve acceptable success rates. These approaches differ from common rhinogenic sinusitis treatment protocols mostly because of the different etiopathogenesis. Our study comprehensively evaluated microbiology and antibiotic resistance in SCDDT patients and compared findings with a control group of patients affected by rhinogenic sinusitis. We performed microbiological sampling during surgery on 28 patients with SCDDT and 16 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Colonies were isolated, Gram-stained, and the species identified using classic biochemical methods. These results were confirmed by DNA pyrosequencing, and then the resistance profile of each SCDDT isolate to various antibiotics was tested. Microbial growth was observed in all SCDDT patients, whereas samples from 60% of patients in the control group failed to yield any bacterial growth (p < 0.001). Anaerobes grew in 14% of SCDDT patients as compared to 7% of CRSwNP patients (p = 0.42). Of the isolates from SCDDT patients, 70% were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanate, whereas all isolates were susceptible to levofloxacin, teicoplanin, and vancomycin. Of the staphylococci identified, 80% were capable of producing beta-lactamase. Given the extent of microbiological contamination within the maxillary sinus of SCDDT patients, these infections should be regarded as a different class of conditions from rhinogenic sinusitis. Our findings support the need for different approaches in the treatment of SCDDT patients. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  18. Huge Left Atrial Myxoma and Concomitant Silent Coronary Artery Disease in a Young Man.

    PubMed

    Gennari, Marco; Rubino, Mara; Andreini, Daniele; Polvani, Gianluca; Agrifoglio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Severe but silent coronary artery disease may rarely exist in young patients with a low-risk profile but with a family history of coronary artery disease. We describe the case of a 33-year-old Caucasian male with progressive shortness of breath caused by a huge left atrial myxoma who was diagnosed to have significant coronary artery disease in the preoperative assessment. After investigations, the patient underwent resection of the left atrial tumor and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with a successful outcome. Even in the case of a young male, it may be prudent to investigate silent coronary artery disease in the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and family history of coronary artery disease. The learning objective of this case is to debate about the usefulness of a preoperative coronary study even in the young population with cardiac nonischemic pathologies (ie, valve pathology, cardiac tumors, etc.).

  19. Right coronary artery fistula misdiagnosed as right atrial cardiac myxoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bing; Yang, Junya; Jiao, Zhouyang; Fu, Guowei; Zhao, Wenzeng

    2016-06-01

    The current study describes a case of right coronary artery fistula (CAF) misdiagnosed as right atrial myxoma (RAM). A 33-year-old man presented with a 13-year history of intermittent chest pain, and aggravation for 3 days. Echocardiography revealed an occupying lesion in the right atrium producing a partial dynamic tricuspid obstruction. The initial diagnosis was RAM, which causes partial right ventricular inflow tract obstruction. During cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, a giant mass was detected in the anterior wall of the right ventricle and an abnormal vascular fistula was observed at the bottom of the mass. Successful excision of the mass and closure of the fistula completely relieved the patient's presenting symptoms. The disease was subsequently diagnosed as right CAF draining to the myocardial void. The surgical management and misdiagnosis of the case are discussed herein.

  20. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Barrett, John W.; McFadden, Grant

    2010-06-05

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1 - low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2 - the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3 - knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  1. Myxoma virus expressing human interleukin-12 does not induce myxomatosis in European rabbits.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Marianne M; Barrett, John W; Gilbert, Philippe-Alexandre; Bankert, Richard; McFadden, Grant

    2007-11-01

    Myxoma virus (MV) is a candidate for oncolytic virotherapy due to its ability to selectively infect and kill tumor cells, yet MV is a species-specific pathogen that causes disease only in European rabbits. To assess the ability of MV to deliver cytokines to tumors, we created an MV (vMyxIL-12) that expresses human interleukin-12 (IL-12). vMyxIL-12 replicates similarly to wild-type MV, and virus-infected cells secrete bioactive IL-12. Yet, vMyxIL-12 does not cause myxomatosis, despite expressing the complete repertoire of MV proteins. Thus, vMyxIL-12 exhibits promise as an oncolytic candidate and is safe in all known vertebrate hosts, including lagomorphs.

  2. Myxoma Virus Expressing Interleukin-15 Fails To Cause Lethal Myxomatosis in European Rabbits▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Reinhard, Mary; Roy, Edward; MacNeill, Amy; McFadden, Grant

    2009-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a poxvirus pathogenic only for European rabbits, but its permissiveness in human cancer cells gives it potential as an oncolytic virus. A recombinant MYXV expressing both the tdTomato red fluorescent protein and interleukin-15 (IL-15) (vMyx-IL-15-tdTr) was constructed. Cells infected with vMyx-IL-15-tdTr secreted bioactive IL-15 and had in vitro replication kinetics similar to that of wild-type MYXV. To determine the safety of this virus for future oncolytic studies, we tested its pathogenesis in European rabbits. In vivo, vMyx-IL-15-tdTr no longer causes lethal myxomatosis. Thus, ectopic IL-15 functions as an antiviral cytokine in vivo, and vMyx-IL-15-tdTr is a safe candidate for animal studies of oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:19279088

  3. Myxoma virus in the European rabbit: interactions between the virus and its susceptible host.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Marianne M; Werden, Steven J; McFadden, Grant

    2007-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MV) is a poxvirus that evolved in Sylvilagus lagomorphs, and is the causative agent of myxomatosis in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). This virus is not a natural pathogen of O. cuniculus, yet is able to subvert the host rabbit immune system defenses and cause a highly lethal systemic infection. The interaction of MV proteins and the rabbit immune system has been an ideal model to help elucidate host/poxvirus interactions, and has led to a greater understanding of how other poxvirus pathogens are able to cause disease in their respective hosts. This review will examine how MV causes myxomatosis, by examining a selection of the identified immunomodulatory proteins that this virus expresses to subvert the immune and inflammatory pathways of infected rabbit hosts.

  4. Horizontal Transmissible Protection against Myxomatosis and Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease by Using a Recombinant Myxoma Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Juan; Morales, Mónica; Vázquez, Belén; Boga, José A.; Parra, Francisco; Lucientes, Javier; Pagès-Manté, Albert; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José M.; Blasco, Rafael; Torres, Juan M.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a new strategy for immunization of wild rabbit populations against myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD) that uses recombinant viruses based on a naturally attenuated field strain of myxoma virus (MV). The recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV major capsid protein (VP60) including a linear epitope tag from the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) nucleoprotein. Following inoculation, the recombinant viruses induced specific antibody responses against MV, RHDV, and the TGEV tag. Immunization of wild rabbits by the subcutaneous and oral routes conferred protection against virulent RHDV and MV challenges. The recombinant viruses showed a limited horizontal transmission capacity, either by direct contact or in a flea-mediated process, promoting immunization of contact uninoculated animals. PMID:10627521

  5. Horizontal transmissible protection against myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease by using a recombinant myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Bárcena, J; Morales, M; Vázquez, B; Boga, J A; Parra, F; Lucientes, J; Pagès-Manté, A; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Blasco, R; Torres, J M

    2000-02-01

    We have developed a new strategy for immunization of wild rabbit populations against myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD) that uses recombinant viruses based on a naturally attenuated field strain of myxoma virus (MV). The recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV major capsid protein (VP60) including a linear epitope tag from the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) nucleoprotein. Following inoculation, the recombinant viruses induced specific antibody responses against MV, RHDV, and the TGEV tag. Immunization of wild rabbits by the subcutaneous and oral routes conferred protection against virulent RHDV and MV challenges. The recombinant viruses showed a limited horizontal transmission capacity, either by direct contact or in a flea-mediated process, promoting immunization of contact uninoculated animals.

  6. Myxoma virus expressing interleukin-15 fails to cause lethal myxomatosis in European rabbits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Reinhard, Mary; Roy, Edward; MacNeill, Amy; McFadden, Grant

    2009-06-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a poxvirus pathogenic only for European rabbits, but its permissiveness in human cancer cells gives it potential as an oncolytic virus. A recombinant MYXV expressing both the tdTomato red fluorescent protein and interleukin-15 (IL-15) (vMyx-IL-15-tdTr) was constructed. Cells infected with vMyx-IL-15-tdTr secreted bioactive IL-15 and had in vitro replication kinetics similar to that of wild-type MYXV. To determine the safety of this virus for future oncolytic studies, we tested its pathogenesis in European rabbits. In vivo, vMyx-IL-15-tdTr no longer causes lethal myxomatosis. Thus, ectopic IL-15 functions as an antiviral cytokine in vivo, and vMyx-IL-15-tdTr is a safe candidate for animal studies of oncolytic virotherapy.

  7. Myxoma Virus Expressing Human Interleukin-12 Does Not Induce Myxomatosis in European Rabbits▿

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Marianne M.; Barrett, John W.; Gilbert, Philippe-Alexandre; Bankert, Richard; McFadden, Grant

    2007-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MV) is a candidate for oncolytic virotherapy due to its ability to selectively infect and kill tumor cells, yet MV is a species-specific pathogen that causes disease only in European rabbits. To assess the ability of MV to deliver cytokines to tumors, we created an MV (vMyxIL-12) that expresses human interleukin-12 (IL-12). vMyxIL-12 replicates similarly to wild-type MV, and virus-infected cells secrete bioactive IL-12. Yet, vMyxIL-12 does not cause myxomatosis, despite expressing the complete repertoire of MV proteins. Thus, vMyxIL-12 exhibits promise as an oncolytic candidate and is safe in all known vertebrate hosts, including lagomorphs. PMID:17728229

  8. Huge Left Atrial Myxoma and Concomitant Silent Coronary Artery Disease in a Young Man

    PubMed Central

    Gennari, Marco; Rubino, Mara; Andreini, Daniele; Polvani, Gianluca; Agrifoglio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Severe but silent coronary artery disease may rarely exist in young patients with a low-risk profile but with a family history of coronary artery disease. We describe the case of a 33-year-old Caucasian male with progressive shortness of breath caused by a huge left atrial myxoma who was diagnosed to have significant coronary artery disease in the preoperative assessment. After investigations, the patient underwent resection of the left atrial tumor and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with a successful outcome. Even in the case of a young male, it may be prudent to investigate silent coronary artery disease in the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and family history of coronary artery disease. The learning objective of this case is to debate about the usefulness of a preoperative coronary study even in the young population with cardiac nonischemic pathologies (ie, valve pathology, cardiac tumors, etc.). PMID:28096692

  9. In vitro permissivity of bovine cells for wild-type and vaccinal myxoma virus strains.

    PubMed

    Pignolet, Béatrice; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Allemandou, Aude; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Foucras, Gilles; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2007-09-27

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a leporide-specific poxvirus, represents an attractive candidate for the generation of safe, non-replicative vaccine vector for non-host species. However, there is very little information concerning infection of non-laboratory animals species cells with MYXV. In this study, we investigated interactions between bovine cells and respectively a wild type strain (T1) and a vaccinal strain (SG33) of MYXV. We showed that bovine KOP-R, BT and MDBK cell lines do not support MYXV production. Electron microscopy observations of BT-infected cells revealed the low efficiency of viral entry and the production of defective virions. In addition, infection of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) occurred at a very low level, even following non-specific activation, and was always abortive. We did not observe significant differences between the wild type strain and the vaccinal strain of MYXV, indicating that SG33 could be used for new bovine vaccination strategies.

  10. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Villa, Nancy Y; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R; Rahman, Masmudur M; Barrett, John W; McFadden, Grant

    2010-06-05

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1--low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2--the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3--knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  11. Production of Myxoma virus gateway entry and expression libraries and validation of viral protein expression.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Sherin E; Rahman, Masmudur M; Werden, Steven J; Martino, Maria Fernanda; McFadden, Grant

    2011-05-01

    Invitrogen's Gateway technology is a recombination-based cloning method that allows for rapid transfer of numerous open reading frames (ORFs) into multiple plasmid vectors, making it useful for diverse high-throughput applications. Gateway technology has been utilized to create an ORF library for Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family of DNA viruses. MYXV is the prototype virus for the genus Leporipoxvirus, and is pathogenic only in European rabbits. MYXV replicates exclusively in the host cell cytoplasm, and its genome encodes 171 ORFs. A number of these ORFs encode proteins that interfere with or modulate host defense mechanisms, particularly the inflammatory responses. Furthermore, MYXV is able to productively infect a variety of human cancer cell lines and is being developed as an oncolytic virus for treating human cancers. MYXV is therefore an excellent model for studying poxvirus biology, pathogenesis, and host tropism, and a good candidate for ORFeome development.

  12. Safety and immunogenicity of myxoma virus as a new viral vector for small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Pignolet, Béatrice; Boullier, Séverine; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Bozzetti, Marjorie; Russo, Pierre; Foulon, Eliane; Meyer, Gilles; Delverdier, Maxence; Foucras, Gilles; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2008-06-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a leporide-specific poxvirus, represents an attractive candidate for the generation of safe and non-replicative vaccine vectors for other species. With the aim of developing new recombinant vaccines for ruminants, we evaluated the safety and the immunogenicity of recombinant MYXV in sheep. In vitro studies indicated that ovine primary fibroblasts were not permissive for MYXV and that infection of ovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells occurred at a low rate. Although non-specific activation significantly improved the susceptibility of lymphocytes, MYXV infection remained abortive. Histological and immunohistochemical examination at the inoculation sites revealed the development of an inflammatory process and allowed the detection of sparse infected cells in the dermis. In addition, inoculated sheep developed an antibody response directed against MYXV and the product of the transgene. Overall, these results provide the first line of evidence on the potential of MYXV as a viral vector for ruminants.

  13. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Uptake in Intramuscular Myxoma Imitates Prostate Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zacho, Helle D; Nielsen, Julie B; Dettmann, Katja; Hjulskov, Sonja H; Petersen, Lars J

    2017-03-31

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is becoming the most promising imaging modality for detecting recurrent prostate cancer. The modality has the advantage of being able to detect recurrent disease, even at very low prostate-specific antigen levels. However, several studies report Ga-PSMA uptake in tissue unrelated to prostate cancer. We present a 74-year-old man who underwent Ga-PSMA PET/CT for recurrent prostate cancer 5 years after radical prostatectomy. The Ga-PSMA PET/CT showed an intramuscular lesion with increased PSMA uptake in the left vastus medialis muscle. The lesion was surgically removed, and histopathology found it to be an intramuscular myxoma that showed immunohistochemical PSMA expression.

  14. Intraventricular injection of myxoma virus results in transient expression of viral protein in mouse brain ependymal and subventricular cells.

    PubMed

    France, Megan R; Thomas, Diana L; Liu, Jia; McFadden, Grant; MacNeill, Amy L; Roy, Edward J

    2011-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses that selectively infect and lyse cancer cells have potential as therapeutic agents. Myxoma virus, a poxvirus that is known to be pathogenic only in rabbits, has not been reported to infect normal tissues in humans or mice. We observed that when recombinant virus was injected directly into the lateral ventricle of the mouse brain, virally encoded red fluorescent protein was expressed in ependymal and subventricular cells. Cells were positive for nestin, a marker of neural stem cells. Rapamycin increased the number of cells expressing the virally encoded protein. However, protein expression was transient. Cells expressing the virally encoded protein did not undergo apoptosis and the ependymal lining remained intact. Myxoma virus appears to be safe when injected into the brain despite the transient expression of virally derived protein in a small population of periventricular cells.

  15. Safety evaluation of a recombinant myxoma-RHDV virus inducing horizontal transmissible protection against myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, J M; Ramírez, M A; Morales, M; Bárcena, J; Vázquez, B; Espuña, E; Pagès-Manté, A; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2000-09-15

    We have recently developed a transmissible vaccine to immunize rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease based on a recombinant myxoma virus (MV) expressing the rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) capsid protein [Bárcena et al. Horizontal transmissible protection against myxomatosis and rabbit haemorragic disease using a recombinant myxoma virus. J. Virol. 2000;74:1114-23]. Administration of the recombinant virus protects rabbits against lethal RHDV and MV challenges. Furthermore, the recombinant virus is capable of horizontal spreading promoting protection of contact animals, thus providing the opportunity to immunize wild rabbit populations. However, potential risks must be extensively evaluated before considering its field use. In this study several safety issues concerning the proposed vaccine have been evaluated under laboratory conditions. Results indicated that vaccine administration is safe even at a 100-fold overdose. No undesirable effects were detected upon administration to immunosuppressed or pregnant rabbits. The recombinant virus maintained its attenuated phenotype after 10 passages in vivo.

  16. CD166 expression in dentigerous cyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gorgizadeh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background CD166 is a glycoprotein of an immunoglobulin super family of adhesion molecules that has been associated with aggressive characteristics and high recurrence rate of tumors. Different odontogenic lesions exhibit considerable histological variation and different clinical behavior. In an attempt to clarify the mechanisms underlying this different behavior, the present study investigates the immunohistochemical expression of CD166 in these lesions. Material and Methods In this study 69 formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissue blocks of odontogenic lesion consist of 15 unicystic ameloblastoma (UA), 17 solid ameloblastoma (SA), 18 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT), and 19 dentigerous cysts (DC) were reviewed by immunohistochemistry for CD166 staining. Results In this study, CD166 immune staining was evident in all specimen groups except dentigerous cyst. In positive cases, protein localization was cytoplasmic and/or membranous. CD166 expression was seen in76.5% (13) of SA, 73.5% (11) of UA, and 66.7% (12) of KCOTs. Statistical analysis showed that CD166 expression levels were significantly higher in ameloblastoma (SA and UA) and KCOTs than dentigerous cyst (P <0.001), but there was no statistically significant difference between CD166 expression in the other groups (P>0.05). Conclusions This data demonstrates that overexpression of CD166 may have a role in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma and KCOT. Key words:CD166, ameloblastoma, dentigerous cyst, odontogenic keratocyst. PMID:27398171

  17. Radiological challenges in distinguishing keratocystic odontogenic tumor from ameloblastoma: an extraordinary occurrence in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Moubayed, Sami P; Khorsandi, Azita; Urken, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study are to describe the radiological appearance of two common odontogenic lesions (keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma) arising in the same patient simultaneously with their radiological differences and histological correlates, and to describe challenges in radiological diagnosis. Single case report. Tertiary referral center. Forty-one year-old African-American male patient. Lesion appearance on computed tomography (CT) scan and pathological correlates. A 41year-old African-American male presented with asymptomatic right maxillary swelling. A CT scan of the maxillofacial skeleton showed and expansile and cystic lesion of the right hemimaxilla with trabecular osseous expansion, and a left cystic lesion in the left hemimaxilla expanding into the pterygopalatine fossa. Biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnoses of right ameloblastoma and left keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Although they are among the most common odontogenic tumors, the presence of concurrent ameloblastoma and KOT is an exceedingly rare occurrence in the same patient. The appearance on CT scan may help in distinguishing ameloblastoma from KOT by looking at bone expansion and high density areas, although the gold standard diagnostic test remains open biopsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression of cell cycle and apoptosis-related proteins in ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Metgud, Rashmi; Gupta, Kanupriya

    2013-12-01

    Tumors arising from epithelium of the odontogenic apparatus or from its derivatives or remnants exhibit considerable histologic variation and are classified into several benign and malignant entities. A high proliferative activity of the odontogenic epithelium in ameloblastoma (AM) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) has been demonstrated in some studies individually. However, very few previous studies have simultaneously evaluated cell proliferation and apoptotic indexes in AM and KCOT, comparing both lesions. The aim of this study was to assess and compare cell proliferation and apoptotic rates between these two tumors. Specimens of 15 solid AM and 15 KCOT were evaluated. The proliferation index (PI) was assessed by immunohistochemical detection of Ki-67 and the apoptotic index (AI) by methyl green-pyronin stain. KCOT presented a higher PI than AM (P < .05). No statistically significant difference was found in the AI between AM and KCOT. PI and AI were higher in the peripheral cells of AM and respectively in the suprabasal and superficial layers of KCOT. In conclusion, KCOT showed a higher cell proliferation than AM and the AI was similar between these tumors. These findings reinforce the classification of KCOT as an odontogenic tumor and should contribute to its aggressive clinical behavior. © 2013.

  19. A case of primordial odontogenic tumor: A new entity in the latest WHO classification (2017).

    PubMed

    Ando, Toshinori; Shrestha, Madhu; Nakamoto, Takashi; Uchisako, Kaori; Yamasaki, Sachiko; Koizumi, Koichi; Ogawa, Ikuko; Miyauchi, Mutsumi; Takata, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    Primordial odontogenic tumor (POT) is a rare lesion in the jaw which has been included as a new entity of benign mixed epithelial and mesenchymal odontogenic tumour in the latest World Health Organization (WHO) classification (2017). Only seven cases have been reported. It typically occurs in the posterior mandible. We report an additional case of POT in the maxilla of an 8-year-old girl presenting with an asymptomatic buccal enlargement. A well-defined, unilocular, radiolucent lesion was observed radiographically. Histologically, the tumor was mostly composed of loose fibrous connective tissue resembling dental papilla and a single layer of columnar epithelium covering the periphery of the tumor. In part, cords or nests of epithelium were present in the mesenchyme close to the periphery. Nestin, a marker of odontogenic ectomesenchyme, was positive in the mesenchymal tumor cells. We finally diagnosed the lesion as POT considering the possibility of other odontogenic tumors like ameloblastic fibroma or developing odontoma as a differential diagnosis. The patient shows no recurrence after 16 months. This case is the first report from Japan using this novel diagnosis POT after it was recognized and defined in the latest WHO classification. © 2017 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Collagen and Elastic Fibers in Odontogenic Entities: Analysis Using Light and Confocal Laser Microscopic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Moure, Sabrina P; Carrard, Vinicius C; Lauxen, Isabel S; Manso, Pedro Paulo A; Oliveira, Marcia G; Martins, Manoela D; Sant´Ana Filho, Manoel

    2011-01-01

    Dentigerous cyst (DC) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT) are odontogenic lesions arising from epithelial elements, such as those observed in dental follicles (DF), that have been part of the tooth forming apparatus. These lesions show different clinical and histological characteristics, as well as distinct biological behavior. This study aimed to qualify and quantify collagen and elastic fibers by means of histochemical techniques with light and confocal laser microscopic methods in three odontogenic entities. Eleven DF, 13 DC (n=10 with inflammation, n=3 without inflammation) and 13 KOT were processed to the following techniques: Hematoxylin and Eosin, Masson’s Trichrome, Picrosirius, Direct Blue, and Orcein. DF and DC without inflammation exhibited collagen with similar characteristics: no parallel pattern of fiber orientation, thick fibers with dense arrangement, and absence of distinct layers. A comparison between DC with inflammation and KOT revealed similar collagen organization, showing distinct layers: thin collagen fibers with loose arrangement near the epithelium and thick fibers with dense arrangement in distant areas. The only difference found was that KOT exhibited a parallel collagen orientation in relation to the odontogenic epithelia. It may be suggested that the connective tissue of DC is a reactive tissue, inducing an expansive growth associated with fluid accumulation and inflammatory process, which in turn may be present as part of the lesion itself. In KOT, loosely arranged collagen may be associated with the behavior of the neoplastic epithelium. PMID:21760864

  1. Mechanical Changes in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells during Early Odontogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Taneka D.; Naimipour, Hamed; Sun, Shan; Cho, Michael; Alapati, Satish B.

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration in bioactive scaffolds require actin cytoskeleton remodeling and focal adhesion formation. Additionally, human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) undergo several changes in their mechanical properties during odontogenic differentiation. The effect of factors essential for odontogenesis on the actin stress fiber elasticity and focal adhesion formation is not known. Methods Live hDPSCs cultured in odontogenic media were imaged for cytoskeleton changes using an atomic force microscope. The Young’s modulus (kPa) of the cytoskeleton was recorded as a function of culture medium for 10 days. Focal adhesion formation was assessed using immunofluorescence. Cultured hDPSCs were incubated with a monoclonal vinculin antibody and filamentous actins were visualized using 0.5 µM phalloidin. Results Cytoskeletal elasticity significantly increased in response to odontogenic media. Both the number and physical size of focal adhesions in hDPSCs also increased. Up-regulation of vinculin expression was evident. The increase in the formation of focal adhesions was consistent with actin remodeling to stress fibers. Conclusions Our findings suggest that hDPSCs firmly attach to the glass substrate in response to odontogenic media. Successful regeneration of pulp-dentin tissue using biomimetic scaffolds will likely require cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions influenced by biochemical induction factors. PMID:25241024

  2. Mechanical changes in human dental pulp stem cells during early odontogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Taneka D; Naimipour, Hamed; Sun, Shan; Cho, Michael; Alapati, Satish B

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration in bioactive scaffolds require actin cytoskeleton remodeling and focal adhesion formation. Additionally, human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) undergo several changes in their mechanical properties during odontogenic differentiation. The effect of factors essential for odontogenesis on actin stress fiber elasticity and focal adhesion formation is not known. Live hDPSCs cultured in odontogenic media were imaged for cytoskeleton changes using an atomic force microscope. The Young's modulus (kPa) of the cytoskeleton was recorded as a function of culture medium for 10 days. Focal adhesion formation was assessed using immunofluorescence. Cultured hDPSCs were incubated with a monoclonal vinculin antibody, and filamentous actins were visualized using 0.5 μmol/L phalloidin. Cytoskeletal elasticity significantly increased in response to odontogenic media. Both the number and physical size of focal adhesions in hDPSCs also increased. Up-regulation of vinculin expression was evident. The increase in the formation of focal adhesions was consistent with actin remodeling to stress fibers. Our findings suggest that hDPSCs firmly attach to the glass substrate in response to odontogenic media. Successful regeneration of pulp-dentin tissue using biomimetic scaffolds will likely require cell-extracellular matrix interactions influenced by biochemical induction factors. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Sinus lift and dental implantation after endosurgical treatment of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Sysoliatin, S P; Sysoliatin, P G; Palkina, M O; Solop, M V

    2013-01-01

    The long-term results of dental implant placement in patients with the history of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis are assessed in retrospective study. Maxillary sinusotomy and endoscopic surgery procedures are compared in regard to complications risks after subsequent sinus lift and dental implantation, the latter proving to be method of choice in such cases.

  4. [Electroconductivity of acupuncture points of the face in odontogenic lesions of the trigeminal nerve system].

    PubMed

    Puzin, M N; Grechko, V E

    1986-01-01

    Differential diagnostic criteria of trigeminal neuralgia predominantly of the central genesis and of odontogenic affections of the trigeminal nerve system have been worked out on the basis of studies of electric conductivity of acupuncture points of the face in 85 patients with affections of the trigeminal nerve system.

  5. Zygomycosis originating from an odontogenic infection in a pediatric oncology patient

    PubMed Central

    Adderson, Elisabeth E.; Rowland, Christopher; McGregor, Lisa M.; Santana, Victor M.

    2011-01-01

    The Zygomyces are an increasingly frequent cause of invasive mould infection in immunocompromised patients. Here we describe the first well-documented case of Rhizopus infection of odontogenic origin, which presented as a rapidly progressive soft tissue infection in a neutropenic child. The infection resolved with limited surgical debridement and antifungal therapy. PMID:20227220

  6. Characteristics of pyogenic odontogenic infection in patients attending Mulago Hospital, Uganda: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kityamuwesi, Richard; Muwaz, Louis; Kasangaki, Arabat; Kajumbula, Henry; Rwenyonyi, Charles Mugisha

    2015-02-25

    Predisposing factors of pyogenic odontogenic infection include dental caries, pericoronitis, periodontitis, trauma to the dentition and the supporting structures or complications of dental procedures. The infections are usually polymicrobial involving normal endogenous flora. We characterised pyogenic odontogenic infection in patients attending Mulago Hospital, Uganda. Of the 130 patients, 62 (47.7%) were female. The most frequently involved fascial spaces were: the buccal, 52 (25.4%); submasseteric, 46 (22.4%) and the submandibular space, 36 (17.5%). Dental caries was the most prevalent predisposing factor, particularly of the lower third molar teeth. Viridans Streptococci Group and Staphylococcus aureus were the most frequent bacterial isolates: 23.5% and 19.4%, respectively. All Viridans Streptococci isolates were resistant to penicillin G, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (cotrimoxazole), ampicillin and tetracycline, but susceptible to vancomycin. All Staphylococcus aureus strains were resistant to cotrimoxazole and ampicillin while retaining susceptibility to vancomycin, cefotaxime, linezolid, moxifloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanate. Thirty five (26.9%) patients were HIV infected and the HIV status did not significantly influence the pattern of odontogenic infection. Dental caries was the most prevalent predisposing factor for pyogenic odontogenic infection. High prevalence of bacterial resistance to ampicillin and cotrimoxazole suggests the need for regular antibiotic susceptibility tests of isolates and rational use of antibiotics in the management of these infections. Prevention requires strengthening of oral health in the community.

  7. Diagnostically Challenging Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: A Selective Review of 7 Jawbone Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Kenji; Saito, Ichiro; Kusama, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    Considerable variation in the clinicopathologic presentation of epithelial odontogenic tumors can sometimes be confusing and increase the chance of misdiagnosis. Seven diagnostically challenging jawbone lesions are described. There were 2 cases of mistaken identity in our ameloblastoma file. One unicystic type, initially diagnosed and treated as a lateral periodontal cyst, showed destructive recurrence 6 years postoperatively. The other globulomaxillary lesion was managed under the erroneous diagnosis of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and recurred 4 times over an 11-year period. This tumor was found in retrospect to be consistent with an adenoid ameloblastoma with dentinoid. The diagnosis of cystic squamous odontogenic tumor (SOT) occurring as a radicular lesion of an impacted lower third molar was one of exclusion. Of two unsuspected keratocystic odontogenic tumors, one depicted deceptive features of pericoronitis, while the other case has long been in our files with the diagnosis of globulomaxillary SOT. Two cases of primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma appeared benign clinically and exhibited unexpected findings; an impacted third molar began to erupt in association with the growth of carcinoma and another periradicular carcinoma showed dentinoid formation. Cases selectively reviewed in this article present challenging problems which require clinical and radiographic correlation to avoid potential diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:20596984

  8. Immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine Motility Factor Receptor in Odontogenic Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sneha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR) is a tumour motility stimulating protein secreted by tumour cells. The protein encoded by this gene is a glycosylated transmembrane protein and a receptor for autocrine motility factor. It has been known to play a role in progression of neoplastic lesions. Basement membranes are specialized extracellular matrices that serve as structural barriers as well as substrates for cellular interactions. The network of type IV collagen is thought to define the scaffold integrating other components such as laminins and perlecan into highly organized supramolecular architecture. The aim of this study was to determine and evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine motility factor receptor in odontogenic lesions. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine motility factor receptor was evaluated in 31 odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma, multicystic ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumour and ameloblastic carcinoma. Normal follicular tissue formed the control. Results: Maximum expression for Type IV Collagen was seen in multicystic ameloblastoma and minimum expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumour. The maximum expression of AMFR was seen in ameloblastic carcinoma and minimum expression in multicystic ameloblastoma. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested an association of loss of expression of type IV Collagen with progression of lesion. AMFR expression was found to be associated with the aggressive potential of tumours. PMID:25478440

  9. Long noncoding RNAs related to the odontogenic potential of dental mesenchymal cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunfei; Jia, Lingfei

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the lncRNAs that are associated with the odontogenic potential in mouse dental mesenchymal cells. The odontogenic potential of dental mesenchymal cells was found to be lost in the course of in vitro culture, so the lncRNA profiles were subsequently compared between freshly-isolated and cultured dental mesenchymal cells using RNA-sequencing. A co-expression analysis of differentially expressed lncRNAs and coding RNAs was performed to understand their potential functions. The expression of several selected lncRNAs was also examined in developing tooth germs. Compared with cultured dental mesenchymal cells, 108 lncRNAs were upregulated and 36 lncRNAs were downregulated in freshly-isolated dental mesenchymal cells. Coding genes correlated with the lncRNAs were mainly associated with DNA and protein metabolic processes and cytoskeletal anchorage. Meg3, Malat1, Xist, and Dlx1as were significantly downregulated in cultured dental mesenchymal cells but were upregulated in odontogenic dental mesenchymal tissues. Moreover, the levels of Dlx1as were negatively correlated with that of Dlx1 in dental mesenchymal cells and dental mesenchymal tissues. The lncRNA profiles of dental mesenchymal cells are significantly changed during culturing, and the dysregulation of lncRNAs is associated with the loss of odontogenic potential. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The World Health Organization Classification of Odontogenic Lesions: A Summary of the Changes of the 2017 (4th) Edition.

    PubMed

    Soluk-Tekkeşin, Merva; Wright, John M

    2017-10-06

    The 4 < sup > th < /sup > edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) Classification of Head and Neck Tumors was published in January 2017. The edition serves to provide an updated classification scheme, and extended genetic and molecular data that are useful as diagnostic tools for the lesions of the head and neck region. This review focuses on the most current update of odontogenic cysts and tumors based on the 2017 WHO edition. The updated classification has some important differences from the 3 < sup > rd < /sup > edition (2005), including a new classification of odontogenic cysts, 'reclassified' odontogenic tumors, and some new entities.

  11. Eruption of an impacted canine in an adenomatid odontogenic tumor treated with combined orthodontic and surgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Erdur, Emire Aybuke; Ileri, Zehra; Ugurluoglu, Ceyhan; Cakir, Mustafa; Dolanmaz, Dogan

    2016-06-01

    An adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is an uncommon asymptomatic lesion that is often misdiagnosed as a dentigerous cyst. It originates from the odontogenic epithelium. Enucleation and curettage is the usual treatment of choice. Marsupialization may be attempted instead of extraction of the impacted tooth, since it provides an opportunity for tooth eruption. This case report is the first to report on the eruption of an impacted canine in an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor treated with combined orthodontics and marsupialization. The impacted canine erupted uneventfully, with no evidence of recurrence 3 years after the treatment.

  12. Coccidian and nematode infections influence prevalence of antibody to myxoma and rabbit hemorrhagic disease viruses in European rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bertó-Moran, Alejandro; Pacios, Isabel; Serrano, Emmanuel; Moreno, Sacramento; Rouco, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The interaction among several parasites in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is crucial to host fitness and to the epidemiology of myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease. These diseases have caused significant reductions in rabbit populations on the Iberian Peninsula. Most studies have focused on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of these viruses individually, and little is known about interactions between these viruses and other parasites. Taking advantage of an experimental restocking program in Spain, the effects of coccidian and nematode infections on the probability of having detectable antibody to myxoma and rabbit hemorrhagic disease viruses were tested in European wild rabbits. For 14 mo, we monitored rabbit abundance and parasite loads (coccidia and nematodes) in three reintroduced rabbit populations. While coccidian and nematode loads explained seasonal antibody prevalences to myxoma virus, the pattern was less clear for rabbit hemorrhagic disease. Contrary to expectations, prevalence of antibody to myxoma virus was inversely proportional to coccidian load, while nematode load seemed to play a minor role. These results have implications for viral disease epidemiology and for disease management intended to increase rabbit populations in areas where they are important for ecosystem conservation.

  13. Experimental infection of specific pathogen-free New Zealand White rabbits with five strains of amyxomatous myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Marlier, D; Cassart, D; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Coignoul, F; Vindevogel, H

    1999-11-01

    Myxomatosis is a specific disease of the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) due to a virus belonging to the genus Leporipoxvirus. Forty-seven years after its deliberate introduction into Europe, the clinical aspects and the epizootiology of myxomatosis have changed. Two forms (nodular and amyxomatous) of the disease have been identified to date. A comparative study was made of the clinical signs, pathogenesis and gross lesions observed in male specific pathogen-free New Zealand White rabbits inoculated with five strains of amyxomatous myxoma virus. All five strains induced the characteristic amyxomatous myxomatosis clinical syndrome with clinical signs that differed only in intensity. The varying clinical intensity, together with the results of virological examination question the virulence of at least three of the five strains. Genomic analysis confirmed that the five strains came from the Lausanne strain introduced in 1952 in France and not from an unnoticed introduction of a Californian strain of myxoma virus. No link was found between the amyxomatous myxoma virus strains and the SG33 vaccine strain. 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  14. Selective purging of human multiple myeloma cells from autologous stem cell transplant grafts using oncolytic myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Bartee, Eric; Chan, Winnie S.; Moreb, Jan S.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and novel therapies have improved overall survival of patients with multiple myeloma; however, most patients relapse and eventually succumb to their disease. Evidence indicates that residual cancer cells contaminate autologous grafts and may contribute to early relapses after ASCT. Here, we demonstrate that ex vivo treatment with an oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus results in specific elimination of human myeloma cells by inducing rapid cellular apoptosis while fully sparing normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The specificity of this elimination is based on strong binding of the virus to myeloma cells coupled with an inability of the virus to bind or infect CD34+ HSPCs. These two features allow myxoma to readily identify and distinguish even low levels of myeloma cells in complex mixtures. This ex vivo MYXV treatment also effectively inhibits systemic in vivo engraftment of human myeloma cells into immunodeficient mice and results in efficient elimination of primary CD138+ myeloma cells contaminating patient hematopoietic cell products. We conclude that ex vivo myxoma treatment represents a safe and effective method to selectively eliminate myeloma cells from hematopoietic autografts prior to reinfusion. PMID:22516053

  15. [Myxoma of the mitral valve with embolization of the posterior circulation. A case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Remes Troche, J M; Zuñiga, J; Rebollar, V; Hernández, P; Narváez, R; Téllez Zenteno, J F; García Ramos, G

    Although cardiac tumours are infrequent, over half are myxomas. Most are situated in the cavities of the heart and exceptionally on the valves. Embolism towards the arteries of the anterior circulation of the central nervous system is the commonest neurological finding, but rarely involves the posterior circulation. A 79 year old woman who one year before admission had had a right hemiparesia of the face and body, from which she had made a complete recovery. Three months later she had a sudden onset of unsteady gait which was deviated towards the right and vertigo. She attended our institution where magnetic resonance (MR) studies showed that there were infarcts in the territory of the right anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries. Four months later she had a further episode of unsteady gait, vertigo and right hemiparesia of face and body for which she was admitted to hospital. On physical examination there was dysmetry, dysdiadokokinesia and involvement of the third cranial nerve. Further MR studies showed the previous lesions and also a new ischaemic lesion of the mesencephalum. A transoesophagic echocardiogram showed a tumour of approximately 18 x 20 mm, implanted in the mitral valve. Study of the resected tumour showed it to be a myxoma. Six months later the patient was asymptomatic and had not relapsed. Although the association of vascular events of the posterior circulation with myxomas of the mitral valve is rare, its clinical importance cannot be overlooked.

  16. Insight into the maintenance of odontogenic potential in mouse dental mesenchymal cells based on transcriptomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Yang, Dandan; Hu, Waner; Chen, Shubin; Zhao, Yuming; Cai, Jinglei; Pei, Duanqing

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mouse dental mesenchymal cells (mDMCs) from tooth germs of cap or later stages are frequently used in the context of developmental biology or whole-tooth regeneration due to their odontogenic potential. In vitro-expanded mDMCs serve as an alternative cell source considering the difficulty in obtaining primary mDMCs; however, cultured mDMCs fail to support tooth development as a result of functional failures of specific genes or pathways. The goal of this study was to identify the genes that maintain the odontogenic potential of mDMCs in culture. Methods. We examined the odontogenic potential of freshly isolated versus cultured mDMCs from the lower first molars of embryonic day 14.5 mice. The transcriptome of mDMCs was detected using RNA sequencing and the data were validated by qRT-PCR. Differential expression analysis and pathway analysis were conducted to identify the genes that contribute to the loss of odontogenic potential. Results. Cultured mDMCs failed to develop into well-structured tooth when they were recombined with dental epithelium. Compared with freshly isolated mDMCs, we found that 1,004 genes were upregulated and 948 were downregulated in cultured mDMCs. The differentially expressed genes were clustered in the biological processes and signaling pathways associated with tooth development. Following in vitro culture, genes encoding a wide array of components of MAPK, TGF-β/BMP, and Wnt pathways were significantly downregulated. Moreover, the activities of Bdnf, Vegfα, Bmp2, and Bmp7 were significantly inhibited in cultured mDMCs. Supplementation of VEGFα, BMP2, and BMP7 restored the expression of a subset of downregulated genes and induced mDMCs to form dentin-like structures in vivo. Conclusions. Vegfα, Bmp2, and Bmp7 play a role in the maintenance of odontogenic potential in mDMCs. PMID:26925321

  17. The Role of ORAI1 in the Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sohn, S; Park, Y; Srikanth, S; Arai, A; Song, M; Yu, B; Shin, K-H; Kang, M K; Wang, C; Gwack, Y; Park, N-H; Kim, R H

    2015-11-01

    Pulp capping, or placing dental materials directly onto the vital pulp tissues of affected teeth, is a dental procedure that aims to regenerate reparative dentin. Several pulp capping materials are clinically being used, and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) released from these materials is known to mediate reparative dentin formation. ORAI1 is an essential pore subunit of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), which is a major Ca(2+) influx pathway in most nonexcitable cells. Here, we evaluated the role of ORAI1 in mediating the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). During the odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs, the expression of ORAI1 increased in a time-dependent manner. DPSCs knocked down with ORAI1 shRNA (DPSC/ORAI1sh) or overexpressed with dominant negative mutant ORAI1(E106Q) (DPSC/E106Q) exhibited the inhibition of Ca(2+) influx and suppression of odontogenic differentiation and mineralization as demonstrated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity/staining as well as alizarin red S staining when compared with DPSCs of their respective control groups (DPSC/CTLsh and DPSC/CTL). The gene expression for odontogenic differentiation markers such as osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) was also suppressed. When DPSC/CTL or DPSC/E106Q cells were subcutaneously transplanted into nude mice, DPSC/CTL cells induced mineralized tissue formation with significant increases in ALP and DMP1 staining in vivo, whereas DPSC/E106Q cells did not. Collectively, our data showed that ORAI1 plays critical roles in the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization of DPSCs by regulating Ca(2+) influx and that ORAI1 may be a therapeutic target to enhance reparative dentin formation. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  18. Knock-down of p300 decreases the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation potentiality of HDPCs.

    PubMed

    Liu, H J; Wang, T; Li, Q M; Guan, X Y; Xu, Q

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the role of p300 in the regulation of proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). The recombinant lentiviral vector pshRNA-copGFP was used to knock-down p300 expression in HDPCs. Protein level of acetylated H3 was detected. The proliferation of HDPCs was measured using the CCK8 assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis were analysed using flow cytometry and TUNEL staining, respectively. The expression levels of Cdc25A, p21(waf1) and the cleaved products of caspase 3 and caspase 7 were determined utilizing real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was measured, and the formation of mineralized nodules was assessed using alizarin red staining after the induction of odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs. The expression levels of the odontogenic differentiation markers DMP-1, DSPP and DSP were detected utilizing real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis. After p300 was knocked down in HDPCs, p300 was significantly down-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels, and histone H3 acetylation was reduced. The proliferation capacity of HDPCs was suppressed in p300 knock-down groups. The cells were arrested in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, and cell apoptosis was triggered. ALP activity, the formation of mineralized nodules and the expression levels of DMP-1, DSPP and DSP were all decreased in p300-knock-down HDPCs undergoing odontogenic differentiation. Knocking down p300 restrains the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation potentiality of HDPCs. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A biopsy service’s experience with 104 solitary, multiple and recurrent lesions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a clinically significant cystic lesion of odontogenic origin. This study aimed to retrospectively review and describe the clinicopathologic features of KCOT and to objectively compare the clinical and histological features of solitary, multiple and recurrent KCOT in a Saudi Arabian population. Material and Methods Biopsy request forms, pathology records and archival materials (all histological slides) of 104 cases of KCOT from 75 patients were retrieved. Demographic and clinical details as well as histological evaluation were analyzed and compared between the 3 groups using chi-squared or Mann-Whitney tests of association as appropriate. Results Significant differences were noted in the age of presentation, location and association with impaction between multiple and solitary cases. Histologically, there was a difference in the mitotic count, presence of satellite cysts and proliferating odontogenic epithelium between solitary and multiple lesions. There was no difference between the KCOT that later recurred and solitary lesion which did not recur even when matched clinically for age, sex and location. There were differences when solitary KCOT that later recurred or recurrent KCOT were compared with multiple lesions. Multiple lesions still had more significant proliferative activity parameters than solitary recurrence-related KCOT. Conclusions KCOTs in Saudi Arabians are not different from those reported from other parts of the world. Clinical and histological analyses showed multiple KCOT is different from its solitary recurrent or non-recurrent counterparts and has a higher proliferative activity than both. Clinicohistologic features alone cannot wholly explain the behavior of KCOT. Key words:Descriptive study, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontogenic keratocyst, solitary, multiple, recurrent. PMID:27475695

  20. Cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins, proliferative markers, cell signaling molecules, CD209, and decorin immunoreactivity in low-grade myxofibrosarcoma and myxoma.

    PubMed

    Cates, Justin M M; Memoli, Vincent A; Gonzalez, Raul S

    2015-08-01

    The histologic differential diagnosis between intramuscular myxoma and low-grade myxofibrosarcoma can be quite difficult in some cases. To identify a diagnostic immunohistochemical marker, we compared the staining profiles of 19 different antigens, including cell cycle proteins, apoptosis proteins, and proliferative markers, and selected other signaling and structural proteins in these two tumors. Ten cases each of intramuscular myxoma and low-grade myxofibrosarcoma were stained with antibodies directed against apoptosis regulatory proteins (Bcl2, activated caspase-3, phospho-H2A.X, and cleaved PARP), cell cycle regulatory proteins (Rb1, Cyclin-A, CDKN1B, and Cdt1), proliferative markers (KI67, MCM2, phospho-histone H3, and geminin), cell signalling molecules (c-Myc, EGF, EGFR, PLA2G4A, and HSP90), a dendritic cell marker (CD209), and the extracellular matrix proteoglycan decorin. Staining patterns of myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma were compared using Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney test. For each potential diagnostic marker studied, the proportions of cases scored as positive on both dichotomous or ordinal scales were not significantly different between myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma. Myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma share a common immunophenotype for each of the markers studied. Distinction between these tumors is still predominantly based on morphologic criteria.

  1. Virulence and pathogenesis of the MSW and MSD strains of Californian myxoma virus in European rabbits with genetic resistance to myxomatosis compared to rabbits with no genetic resistance.

    PubMed

    Silvers, L; Inglis, B; Labudovic, A; Janssens, P A; van Leeuwen, B H; Kerr, P J

    2006-04-25

    The pathogenesis of two Californian strains of myxoma virus (MSW and MSD) was examined in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) that were either susceptible to myxomatosis (laboratory rabbits) or had undergone natural selection for genetic resistance to myxomatosis (Australian wild rabbits). MSW was highly lethal for both types of rabbits with average survival times of 7.3 and 9.4 days, respectively, and 100% mortality. Classical clinical signs of myxomatosis were not present except in one rabbit that survived for 13 days following infection. Previously described clinical signs of trembling and shaking were observed in laboratory but not wild rabbits. Despite the high resistance of wild rabbits to myxomatosis caused by South American strains of myxoma virus, the MSW strain was of such high virulence that it was able to overcome resistance. The acute nature of the infection, relatively low viral titers in the tissues and destruction of lymphoid tissues, suggested that death was probably due to an acute and overwhelming immunopathological response to the virus. No virus was found in the brain. The MSD strain was attenuated compared to previously published descriptions and therefore was only characterized in laboratory rabbits. It is concluded that Californian MSW strain of myxoma virus is at the extreme end of a continuum of myxoma virus virulence but that the basic pathophysiology of the disease induced is not broadly different to other strains of myxoma virus.

  2. Myxoma virus attenuates expression of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) which has implications for the treatment of proteasome inhibitor–resistant multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Katherine M; Bartee, Mee Y; Bartee, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of chemotherapeutic proteasome inhibitors, such as bortezomib, has improved the outcomes of patients suffering from the plasma cell malignancy multiple myeloma. Unfortunately, many patients treated with these drugs still suffer relapsing disease due to treatment-induced upregulation of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl1. We have recently demonstrated that an oncolytic poxvirus, known as myxoma, can rapidly eliminate primary myeloma cells by inducing cellular apoptosis. The efficacy of myxoma treatment on proteasome inhibitor–relapsed or –refractory myeloma, however, remains unknown. We now demonstrate that myxoma-based elimination of myeloma is not affected by cellular resistance to proteasome inhibitors. Additionally, myxoma virus infection specifically prevents expression of Mcl1 following induction of the unfolded protein response, by blocking translation of the unfolded protein response activating transcription factor (ATF)4. These results suggest that myxoma-based oncolytic therapy represents an attractive option for myeloma patients whose disease is refractory to chemotherapeutic proteasome inhibitors due to upregulation of Mcl1. PMID:27512665

  3. Transforming growth factor alpha, Shope fibroma growth factor, and vaccinia growth factor can replace myxoma growth factor in the induction of myxomatosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Opgenorth, A; Nation, N; Graham, K; McFadden, G

    1993-02-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) homologues encoded by vaccinia virus, myxoma virus, and malignant rabbit fibroma virus have been shown to contribute to the pathogenicity of virus infection upon inoculation of susceptible hosts. However, since the primary structures of these growth factors and the disease profiles induced by different poxvirus genera vary substantially, the degree to which the various EGF homologues perform similar roles in viral pathogenesis remains unclear. In order to determine whether different EGF-like growth factors can perform qualitatively similar functions in the induction of myxomatosis in rabbits, we created recombinant myxoma virus variants in which the native growth factor, myxoma growth factor (MGF), was disrupted and replaced with either vaccinia virus growth factor, Shope fibroma growth factor, or rat transforming growth factor alpha. Unlike the control virus containing an inactivated MGF gene, which caused marked attenuation of the disease syndrome and substantially less proliferation of the epithelial cell layers in the conjunctiva and respiratory tract, the recombinant myxoma virus strains expressing heterologous growth factors produced infections which were both clinically and histopathologically indistinguishable from wild-type myxomatosis. We conclude that these poxviral and cellular EGF-like growth factors, which are diverse with respect to primary structure and origin, have similar biological functions in the context of myxoma virus pathogenesis and are mitogenic for the same target cells.

  4. Odontogenic keratocyst in a 5-year-old child: a rare cause of maxillary swelling in children.

    PubMed

    Smith, I M; Harvey, N; Logan, R M; David, D J; Anderson, P J

    2008-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts in children are uncommon. They are cysts of the jaws that have a tendency for recurrence and are usually seen in adults. We report an exceptionally rare case in a young child and discuss its management.

  5. Concomitant occurrence of cemento-ossifying fibroma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with bilateral impacted permanent canines in the mandible.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A Ravi; Reddy, P Sreenivas; Bavle, Radhika M

    2012-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is an uncommon, benign and slow growing odontogenic tumor, which is usually located in an anterior region of the maxilla without pain. Cemento-ossifying fibroma (COF) is a relatively rare benign tumor of the jaw. Here we present 2 lesions presenting in unusual forms, follicular variant of AOT in the mandible and COF associated with impacted canine in the mandible, occurring concomitantly in the same patient. Both lesions presented classic histopathologic features.

  6. Decompression Device Using a Stainless Steel Tube and Wire for Treatment of Odontogenic Cystic Lesions: A Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun-Joo; Baek, Jin-A; Leem, Dae-Ho

    2014-11-01

    Decompression is considered an effective treatment for odontogenic cystic lesions in the jaw. A variety of decompression devices are successfully used for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts, and ameloblastoma. The purpose of these devices is to keep an opening between the cystic lesion and the oral environment during treatment. The aim of this report is to describe an effective decompression tube using a stainless steel tube and wire for treatment of jaw cystic lesions.

  7. Atrial myxoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Lenihan DJ, Yusuf SW. Tumors affecting the cardiovascular system. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  8. Myxofibroma of the maxilla. Reconstruction with iliac crest graft and dental implants after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossío, Pedro; Martínez-de-Fuentes, Rafael; García-Perla-García, Alberto; Jiménez-Castellanos, Emilio; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes

    2011-07-01

    Odontogenic fibromyxomas are benign odontogenic tumors of mesenchymal origin of rare presentation in the oral cavity, which exhibit locally aggressive behavior and are prone to local recurrence. The controversy has mainly been on therapeutic management with recommendations varying, depending on the clinical cases, from simple curettage of lesion to segmental bone resection. We present a case report describing the reconstruction of an osseous defect in the maxilla and the restoration with dental implants in a 32 year old female patient after radical surgical excision due to an odontogenic fibromyxoma with locally aggressive behavior. The primary reconstruction of maxillary discontinuity defect was carried out by an immediate non-vascularized cortico-cancellous iliac crest graft. Using a computer-guided system for the implant treatment-planning, three dental implants were secondary placed in the bone graft by means of flapless implant surgery. The patient was subsequently restored with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis that has remained in continuous function for a period of three years. The surgical, reconstructive and restorative treatment sequence and techniques are discussed.

  9. Immunohistochemical Assessment of Mast Cells and Small Blood Vessels in Dentigerous Cyst, Odontogenic Keratocyst, and Periapical Cyst.

    PubMed

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Moradzadeh Khiavi, Monir; Jamali, Golshan; Farnia, Samira

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the density of mast cells (MCs) and microvessels in odontogenic cysts. Furthermore, the correlation between MCs and microvessels was evaluated to assess the contribution of MCs to angiogenesis and growth of odontogenic cysts. This approach may be a basis for the development of future pharmaceuticals addressed to MCs performance to manage odontogenic cysts. To our knowledge, no study investigating the correlation between MCs and microvessels has been performed to date. 60 cases of odontogenic cysts consisting of 20 radicular cysts (RCs), 20 odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) and 20 dentigerous cysts (DCs) were included in this study. Five high power fields in superficial connective tissue and five high power fields in deep connective tissue were counted for each sample. Moreover, a total mean of ten fields was calculated. RC showed the highest mean numbers of MCs and microvessels (p<0.05). The subepithelial zones of all cysts contained more MCs and microvessels compared to the deeper zones. A statistically significant correlation between the numbers of MCs and microvessels was not observed (r=0.00, p=0.49). Although the number of MCs was not significantly associated with microvessels, these cells may be related to the growth of odontogenic lesions, particularly RCs. Further studies on the in vivo functions of MCs will make the concept more clear.

  10. Oral pulse granuloma associated with keratocystic odontogenic tumor: Report of a case and review on etiopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S.; Angadi, Punnya V.; Mane, Deepa R.; Hallikerimath, Seema R.

    2011-01-01

    Pulse granuloma is a distinct oral entity characterized as a foreign body reaction occurring either centrally or peripherally. It is usually seen in the periapical or in the sulcus area. Occasionally the lesions occur in the wall of the cyst, commonest being the inflammatory odontogenic cyst. Histologically, they present as eosinophilic hyaline mass with giant cell inclusions and inflammatory cells. They may show different histological characteristics, possibly related to the length of time in the tissue. Adequate recognition is important to avoid misdiagnosis. Many authors suggest that pulse granuloma results due to implantation of food particles of plant or vegetable origin into the tissue following tooth extraction. This paper aims to report a case of pulse granuloma associated with keratocystic odontogenic tumor with its histochemical and polarizing microscopic features and discuss on etiopathogenesis of pulse granuloma. PMID:23482677

  11. Expression of cytokeratin in the epithelium of dentigerous cysts and odontogenic keratocysts: an aid to diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, A W; Fletcher, A

    1989-01-01

    Sections of tissue embedded in paraffin wax from 18 selected odontogenic cysts were studied both histologically and immunohistochemically with antibodies to cytokeratins using the indirect peroxidase technique. The cysts were divided on a clinical and histological basis into two equal groups comprising dentigerous cysts and odontogenic keratocysts. It was possible to differentiate the two cyst types in every case by the pattern of staining using the monoclonal antibody LP34 for cytokeratins of intermediate molecular weight. The monoclonal antibody CAM 5.2 for cytokeratins of low molecular weight was not discriminatory. Such a clear distinction may prove useful diagnostically in distinguishing between two cysts of similar appearance but very different behaviour. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:2474580

  12. [Isolation of Pseudomonas stutzeri from an odontogenic inflammatory cyst: Diagnostic relevance].

    PubMed

    Molgatini, Susana; Rey, Eduardo; Basilaki, Jorge; Mosca, Christian; Galante, Rafael; Gliosca, Laura

    Pseudomonas stutzeri is distributed widely in the environment, and occupies different ecological niches. However, it is found in clinically relevant infections as an opportunistic pathogen. Isolation of P. stutzeri from an odontogenic inflammatory cyst is an uncommon microbiological finding that has not been reported to date. In the case presented here, the bacterium was isolated from surgical material obtained from excision of an inflammatory odontogenic cyst located in the tooth 1.2, and presenting with concomitant pulp necrosis. Complementary techniques such as radiographs, CAT scans, and histopathological and microbiological studies were used to establish definitive diagnosis. The obtained results allowed classifying the process as an inflammatory cyst infected by P. stutzeri. Biotyping and characterization of the susceptibility profile of the isolated strain allowed adjusting the antibiotic therapy more specifically. The microbiological studies allowed establishing the etiology of the infectious process, adjusting the treatment plan, and re-establishing tissue integrity.

  13. Obstruction of the eruption pathway by peripheral odontogenic fibroma: report of a patient.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Giulio Alessandri; Marini, Ida; Zucchelli, Giovanni; Checchi, Luigi

    2008-02-01

    The diagnostic process and interdisciplinary treatment of a healthy 12-year-old boy with impactions due to a localized peripheral odontogenic fibroma are presented. The treatment consisted of the surgical excision of the peripheral odontogenic fibroma and interceptive orthodontic treatment with an activator appliance to allow the passive eruption of the impacted teeth. Complete orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances was used later to level and coordinate the arches. This report illustrates the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of tooth impactions associated with diffuse gingival enlargement. The cooperation of various specialists in making a differential diagnosis, developing a comprehensive plan for conservative treatment, and delivering excellent care led to a successful result for this patient.

  14. Very Large Inflammatory Odontogenic Cyst with Origin on a Single Long Time Traumatized Lower Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Filipe; Andre, Saudade; Moreira, Andre; Carames, Joao

    2015-01-01

    One of the consequences of traumatic injuries is the chance of aseptic pulp necrosis to occur which in time may became infected and give origin to periapical pathosis. Although the apical granulomas and cysts are a common condition, there appearance as an extremely large radiolucent image is a rare finding. Differential diagnosis with other radiographic-like pathologies, such as keratocystic odontogenic tumour or unicystic ameloblastoma, is mandatory. The purpose of this paper is to report a very large radicular cyst caused by a single mandibular incisor traumatized long back, in a 60-year-old male. Medical and clinical histories were obtained, radiographic and cone beam CT examinations performed and an initial incisional biopsy was done. The final decision was to perform a surgical enucleation of a lesion, 51.4 mm in length. The enucleated tissue biopsy analysis was able to render the diagnosis as an inflammatory odontogenic cyst. A 2 year follow-up showed complete bone recovery. PMID:26393219

  15. Amyloid-Producing Odontogenic Tumors of the Facial Skin in Three Cats.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, K; Endoh, C; Kagawa, Y; Ohmachi, T; Yamagami, T; Nomura, K; Matsuda, K; Okamoto, M; Taniyama, H

    2017-03-01

    Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumors (APOTs) of the facial skin were diagnosed in 3 domestic cats. The neoplasms had the histopathological characteristics of the odontogenic tumor. The neoplastic cells were present in irregular islands, strands, and sheets. The peripheral neoplastic cells of the islands and strands were arranged in a palisading fashion, while the central cells were polyhedral to stellate and randomly arranged. Multiple spherules of homogeneous eosinophilic material were closely apposed to the neoplastic epithelial cells. The spherules stained with Congo red and produced an apple green birefringence under polarization microscopy, indicative of amyloid. Immunohistochemically, amyloid materials of the neoplasms reacted with polyclonal antibodies for ameloblastin, amelogenin, and sheathlin antibodies. Neoplastic epithelial cells also reacted with antiameloblastin, amelogenin, and sheathlin antibodies, with varied intensity. The histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of dermal neoplasms of the 3 cats were analogous to those of APOTs reported in the dog and the cat.

  16. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth.

    PubMed

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-05-02

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period.

  17. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Findings in Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor Associated with Odontome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Phulambrikar, Tushar; Vilas Kant, Sanchita; Kode, Manasi; Magar, Shaliputra

    2015-01-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is a rare cystic odontogenic neoplasm frequently found in association with odontome. This report documents a case of CCOT associated with an odontome arising in the anterior maxilla in a 28-year-old man. Conventional radiographs showed internal calcification within the lesion but were unable to visualize its relation with the adjacent structures and its accurate extent. In this case cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could accurately reveal the extent and the internal structure of the lesion which aided the presumptive diagnosis of the lesion as CCOT. This advanced imaging technique proved to be extremely useful in the radiographic assessment and management of this neoplasm of the maxilla. PMID:26636128

  18. Surgical resection of peripheral odontogenic fibromas in African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris): a case study.

    PubMed

    Wozniak-Biel, Anna; Janeczek, Maciej; Janus, Izabela; Nowak, Marcin

    2015-07-04

    Neoplastic lesions of the mammary gland, lymph nodes, or oral cavity in African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) are common in captive animals. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy protocols have not yet been established for the African pygmy hedgehog. Thus, surgical resection is the current treatment of choice in this species. A 5-year-old male African pygmy hedgehog showed multiple erythematous, round small tumors located in the oral cavity, on both sides of maxilla. The treatment of choice was surgical resection of tumors using a surgical knife under general anesthesia. Excised neoplastic lesions were diagnosed as peripheral odontogenic fibroma by histopathology. Six months after surgery relapse of tumors in the oral cavity was not observed. The treatment adopted in this case report is safe for the patient and provides the best solution for mild proliferative lesions of the oral cavity. To our knowledge this is the first report of surgical resection of oral tumors (peripheral odontogenic fibroma) in the African pygmy hedgehog.

  19. Multicentric Squamous Odontogenic Tumor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Elmuradi, Sophia; Mair, Yasmin; Suresh, Lakshmanan; DeSantis, James; Neiders, Mirdza; Aguirre, Alfredo

    2016-09-08

    Squamous odontogenic tumor (SOT) is a rare benign epithelial odontogenic neoplasm of the jaws. Both intraosseous and peripheral SOTs have been described in the English language literature. While most intraosseous SOTs occur as solitary lesions, a multicentric variant has also been previously described. Although the radiographic and microscopic features are identical for both solitary and multicentric clinical presentations, there are three significant differences between them. More specifically, multicentric SOT presents at an earlier age (third decade of life), has a slightly higher male to female ratio than the solitary type and has a marked predilection for African-Americans. Here we document the eighth reported case of multicentric SOT, which was diagnosed in a 43-year-old African-American male. In addition, we feature focal sebaceous metaplasia, a heretofore unknown microscopic feature of SOT. Clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings are discussed. The differential diagnosis, biological behavior and management modalities for SOT are also addressed.

  20. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth

    PubMed Central

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-01-01

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period. PMID:24785116

  1. Conservative approach to recurrent calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor occupying the maxillary sinus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is an uncommon benign cystic neoplasm of the jaw that develops from the odontogenic epithelium. Invasion into the maxillary sinus by a CCOT is not a typical, and the recurrence of the cystic variant of CCOT in the posterior maxilla is rare. This report describes a recurrent CCOT occupying most of the maxillary sinus of a 24-year-old male patient. As a treatment, marsupialization was carried out as a means of decompression, and the involved teeth were all endodontically treated. Afterward, surgical enucleation was performed. The size of the lesion continued to shrink after marsupialization, and the maxillary sinus restored its volume. This patient has been followed-up for 3 years after the surgery, and there have not been any signs of recurrence. PMID:27847742

  2. Porcine tooth germ cell conditioned medium can induce odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Xiong; Ma, Zhao-Feng; Huo, Na; Tang, Liang; Han, Chun; Duan, Yin-Zhong; Jin, Yan

    2011-05-01

    It is suggested that the differentiation of tooth-derived stem cells is modulated by the local microenvironment in which they reside. Previous studies have indicated that tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (TGC-CM) holds the potential to induce dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to differentiate into the odontogenic lineage. Nevertheless, human TGC-CM (hTGC-CM) is not feasible in practical application, so we conjectured that xenogenic TGC-CM might exert a similar influence on human dental stem cells. In this study, we chose swine as the xenogenic origin and compared the effect of porcine tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (pTGC-CM) with its human counterpart on human DPSCs. Morphological appearance, colony-forming assay, in vitro multipotential ability, protein and gene expression of the odontogenic phenotype and the in vivo differentiation capacity of DPSCs were evaluated. The results showed that pTGC-CM exerted a similar effect to hTGC-CM in inducing human DPSCs to present odontogenic changes, which were indicated by remarkable morphological changes, higher multipotential capability and the expression of some odontogenic markers in gene and protein levels. Besides, the in vivo results showed that pTGC-CM-treated DPSCs, similar to hTGC-CM-treated DPSCs, could form a more regular dentine-pulp complex. Our data provided the first evidence that pTGC-CM is able to exert almost the same effect on DPSCs with hTGC-CM. The observations suggest that the application of xenogenic TGC-CM may facilitate generating bioengineered teeth from tooth-derived stem cells in future.

  3. Antibiotic prescription in the treatment of odontogenic infection by health professionals: A factor to consensus

    PubMed Central

    González-Martínez, Raquel; Cortell-Ballester, Isidoro; Herráez-Vilas, José M.; Arnau-de Bolós, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe the attitude of dentists and family doctors in prescribing antibiotics for the treatment of dental infections. Study Design: A poll was performed to determine the differences in the prescription of antibiotics for the treatment of odontogenic infection by dentists and family doctors of the primary care department of the Catalan Health Care Service. Results: A hundred polls were distributed among family doctors, and another 100 ones among primary care dentists assigned to the Catalan Health Care Service of the Generalitat de Catalunya. Of the total of questionnaires distributed, 63 were retuned and answered from dentists and 71 from family doctors. Eighty-one percent of dentists included in the opinion poll considered amoxicillin as the first antibiotic choice for the treatment of odontogenic infections, while 73.2% of family doctors preferred the combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. With regard to antibiotics of choice in patients allergic to penicillin, 67.7% of family doctors preferred macrolides (25.4% opted for clarithromycin, 25.4% for erythromycin and 16.9% for spiramycin). However, clindamycin was the antibiotic most frequently prescribed by dentists (66.7%), followed by erythromycin (28.6%). Conclusions: The results of this study show a large discrepancy in the criteria for the treatment of odontogenic infections on the part of leading professionals involved in the management of this condition. Although the most common prescription involved beta-lactam antibiotics in both groups, several significant differences have been detected with regard to the second antibiotic choice. Key words:Odontogenic infections, antibiotics, antimicrobials. PMID:22143715

  4. Central odontogenic fibroma: a case report with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Brazão-Silva, Marco T; Fernandes, Alexandre V; Durighetto-Júnior, Antônio F; Cardoso, Sérgio V; Loyola, Adriano M

    2010-08-13

    An osteolytic tumour of the mandible with prominent expansive growth on the alveolar ridge and displacement of the involved teeth is described in a 28-year-old man. The lesion was diagnosed as a central odontogenic fibroma, an uncommon benign neoplasm derived from dental apparatus, and was removed by curettage. The patient remains asymptomatic after thirteen years of follow-up, which supports the claimed indolent behavior of this poorly documented disease and the adequacy of a conservative surgical treatment.

  5. Prevalence and distribution of odontogenic cysts in a Mexican sample. A 753 cases study

    PubMed Central

    Villasis-Sarmiento, Luis; Melendez-Ocampo, Arcelia; Gaitan-Cepeda, Luis-Alberto; Leyva-Huerta, Elba-Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Background Odontogenic cysts (OC) are the most frequent lesions of the jaws and their constant epidemiological update is necessary and indispensable. Therefore the principal objective of this report was To determine prevalence and clinical-demographical characteristics of OC in a Mexican sample. Material and Methods 753 cases of OC coming from the archive of a head and neck histopathological teaching service, from January 2000 to December 2013, were included. OC cases were re-assessed according 2005 WHO classification. Chi square test was used to establish possible associations (p<0.05IC95%). Results From 753 OC, 369 were female and 384 male; 52.9% of them were in their 2nd- 4th decade of life. The most common location (41%) was the mandibular posterior area. Radicular cysts were more frequent in maxillary anterior zone of females (p 0.0002) at their fourth decade of life. Dentigerous cysts were more frequent in the mandibular posterior zone of males (p 0.0000) in their second decade of life. Six cases of periodontal lateral cyst; 4 cases of paradental cysts; 4 eruption cysts and 4 cases of adult gingival cyst, as well were identified. Conclusions Radicular cyst and dentigerous cyst are the most prevalent odontogenic cyst in this Mexican sample. Due to their etiology, dental pulpar necrosis and impacted teeth, radicular cyst and dentigerous cyst could be prevenible. Therefore, it is necessary to establish preventive strategies to diminish dental decay and programs of prophylactic extractions of impacted teeth, to in consequence decrease the prevalence of odontogenic cysts. Key words:Cyst, dentigerous cyst, mexican, odontogenic cyst, radicular cyst. PMID:28469818

  6. Central odontogenic fibroma: a case report with long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An osteolytic tumour of the mandible with prominent expansive growth on the alveolar ridge and displacement of the involved teeth is described in a 28-year-old man. The lesion was diagnosed as a central odontogenic fibroma, an uncommon benign neoplasm derived from dental apparatus, and was removed by curettage. The patient remains asymptomatic after thirteen years of follow-up, which supports the claimed indolent behavior of this poorly documented disease and the adequacy of a conservative surgical treatment. PMID:20707924

  7. Expression of CK14 and vimentin in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and dentigerous cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sudhakara, Muniswamappa; Rudrayya, S Puranik; Vanaki, Srineevas S; Bhullar, RamanPreet Kaur; Shivakumar, MS; Hosur, Mahadevi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Origin of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) has long been a controversy, and the issue of it being a neoplasm or hamartoma was a subject of debate for a long time. Earlier it was grouped under a mixed group of odontogenic tumors considering the varying degrees of inductive changes. Recently, the WHO classification states that the presence of hard tissue within AOT was not due to induction but was rather a metaplastically produced mineralization and hence the tumor was reclassified under a group of tumors arising from odontogenic epithelium. This study is an attempt to identify if both epithelial (cytokeratin 14 [CK14]) and mesenchymal (vimentin) markers are expressed in the follicular and extrafollicular variants of AOT and to compare the expression with dentigerous cyst (DC) as this cyst is known to arise from reduced enamel epithelium which expressed CK14. This is done to possibly relate the origin of AOT with reduced enamel epithelium. Aims and Objectives: To study, analyze and correlate the expression of CK14 and vimentin in AOT and DC. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study on paraffin embedded tissues. Sixteen cases of AOT and 15 cases of DC were retrieved from the departmental archives and subjected to CK14 and vimentin immunostaining. Statistical Methods: Measures of central tendency was used to analyze the results. Results and Observations: Ninety percent of cases of follicular AOT (FAOT) and 100% cases of extra-follicular AOTs (EAOTs) showed positivity for CK14 and all cases of DC showed positivity for CK14. Vimentin was positive in 44% and negative in 56% cases of both FAOT and EAOT taken together. Conclusion: The CK14 expression profile in AOT and DC supports its odontogenic epithelial specific nature. The possible role of reduced enamel epithelium and dental lamina in histogenesis of AOT and DC is strongly evident by their CK14 expression pattern. PMID:27721599

  8. Dentigerous Cyst or Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor: Clinical Radiological and Histopathological Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Shivesh; Goyal, Ashima; Rattan, Vidya; Vaiphei, Kim; Kaur Bhatia, Sarabjot

    2014-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a well-recognised slow growing benign tumor derived from complex system of dental lamina or its remnants. This lesion is categorised into three variants of which the more common variant is follicular type which is often mistaken for dentigerous cyst. We present a case of AOT in a 14-year-old male who was misdiagnosed as dentigerous cyst. Clinical radiological and therapeutic characteristics of the case are commented on in detail. PMID:25097553

  9. p53, p63 and p73 expression and angiogenesis in keratocystic odontogenic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chandrangsu, Soranun

    2016-01-01

    Background Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTSs) are odontogenic tumors previously referred to as odontogenic keratocysts. Several studies have reported that KCOT behavior is more like that of a benign neoplasm than a cyst. KCOTs are locally destructive and exhibit a high recurrence rate. The objective of this study is to characterize the expression of p53, p63 and p73 in KCOTs together with the relationship between their expression and KCOT angiogenesis and recurrence. Material and Methods Standard indirect immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies specific to human p53, p63, p73 and CD105 was performed in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 39 KCOT samples. Grading of p53, p63 and p73 immunohistochemical staining was divided into three groups, whereas microvessel density (MVD) was presented as the mean +/- standard deviation. Associations between p53, p63 and p73 expression and clinical-pathological parameters were analyzed by Fisher’s exact test, whereas associations among MVD levels, clinical and pathological parameters and p53, p63 and p73 expression were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U test. Correlations among p53, p63, p73 and MVD levels were analyzed using Spearman’s correlation coefficients. For all analyses, p< 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. Results p53, p63 and p73 expression was noted in 23, 32 and 26 of 39 KCOT cases, respectively. The mean MVD was 26.7 ± 15.8 per high-power field. In addition, correlations between the expression levels of p53, p63, p73 and MVD in KCOT were examined. Statistically significant positive relationships were noted for all proteins (p<0.001). Conclusions Three members of the p53 protein family are expressed in KCOTs, and their expression relates to angiogenesis in these tumors. Key words:p53, p63, p73, angiogenesis, keratocystic odontogenic tumors. PMID:27957261

  10. Advanced diagnostic imaging and surgical treatment of an odontogenic retromasseteric abscess in a guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Capello, V; Lennox, A

    2015-02-01

    A two-year-old guinea pig presented for difficulty chewing. Examination and diagnostic imaging, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance, revealed an odontogenic retromasseteric abscess associated with a mandibular cheek tooth. Treatment included removal of the abscess and marsupialisation of the surgical site for repeated debridement and healing by second intention. Unique features of this case included the use of advanced diagnostic imaging and utilisation of marsupialisation for surgical correction.

  11. Cardiac myxoma in Iceland: a case series with an estimation of population incidence.

    PubMed

    Sigurjonsson, Hannes; Andersen, Karl; Gardarsdottir, Marianna; Petursdottir, Vigdis; Klemenzson, Gudmundur; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Danielsen, Ragnar; Gudbjartsson, Tomas

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac myxoma (CM) is the most common primary benign tumor of the heart, but the true age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) has remained unknown. We therefore used nationwide registries in Iceland to study CM and establish its incidence rate. This was a retrospective study involving all patients diagnosed with CM in Iceland between 1986 and 2010. Cases were identified through three different registries, and hospital charts and histology results reviewed. An ASR was estimated based on a world standard population (w). Nine cases of CM (six women) were identified with a mean age of 62.8 years (range: 37-85), giving an ASR of 0.11 (95% CI: 0.05-0.22) per 100,000. The mean tumor size was 4.4 cm (range: 1.5-8.0) with all the tumors located in the left atrium. Dyspnea (n = 6) and ischemic stroke (n = 2) were the most common symptoms. All patients underwent complete resection of the tumor and there were no postoperative deaths or CM-related deaths at follow-up (mean 85 months). The ASR of CM in Iceland was 0.11 per 100,000. To our knowledge, this is the first study to determine the incidence of CM in an entire population. In Iceland, the presenting symptoms and mode of detection of CM are similar to those in other series.

  12. Myxoma virus M130R is a novel virulence factor required for lethal myxomatosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John W; Werden, Steven J; Wang, Fuan; McKillop, William M; Jimenez, June; Villeneuve, Danielle; McFadden, Grant; Dekaban, Gregory A

    2009-09-01

    Myxoma virus (MV) is a highly lethal, rabbit-specific poxvirus that induces a disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits. In an effort to understand the function of predicted immunomodulatory genes we have deleted various viral genes from MV and tested the ability of these knockout viruses to induce lethal myxomatosis. MV encodes a unique 15 kD cytoplasmic protein (M130R) that is expressed late (12h post infection) during infection. M130R is a non-essential gene for MV replication in rabbit, monkey or human cell lines. Construction of a targeted gene knockout virus (vMyx130KO) and infection of susceptible rabbits demonstrate that the M130R knockout virus is attenuated and that loss of M130R expression allows the rabbit host immune system to effectively respond to and control the lethal effects of MV. M130R expression is a bona fide poxviral virulence factor necessary for full and lethal development of myxomatosis.

  13. The current status and future directions of myxoma virus, a master in immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Spiesschaert, Bart; McFadden, Grant; Hermans, Katleen; Nauwynck, Hans; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2011-06-09

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) gained importance throughout the twentieth century because of the use of the highly virulent Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS) by the Australian government in the attempt to control the feral Australian population of Oryctolagus cuniculus (European rabbit) and the subsequent illegal release of MYXV in Europe. In the European rabbit, MYXV causes a disease with an exceedingly high mortality rate, named myxomatosis, which is passively transmitted by biting arthropod vectors. MYXV still has a great impact on European rabbit populations around the world. In contrast, only a single cutaneous lesion, restricted to the point of inoculation, is seen in its natural long-term host, the South-American Sylvilagus brasiliensis and the North-American S. Bachmani. Apart from being detrimental for European rabbits, however, MYXV has also become of interest in human medicine in the last two decades for two reasons. Firstly, due to the strong immune suppressing effects of certain MYXV proteins, several secreted virus-encoded immunomodulators (e.g. Serp-1) are being developed to treat systemic inflammatory syndromes such as cardiovascular disease in humans. Secondly, due to the inherent ability of MYXV to infect a broad spectrum of human cancer cells, the live virus is also being developed as an oncolytic virotherapeutic to treat human cancer. In this review, an update will be given on the current status of MYXV in rabbits as well as its potential in human medicine in the twenty-first century.

  14. Monitored anesthesia care in a case of pheochromocytoma and atrial myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Manvikar, Laxmi P.; Adhye, Bharati A.

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia for a patient with pheochromocytoma is challenging; irrespective of whether it is a diagnosed case for planned surgery or an occult case, it can be a nightmare. The patient may be given anesthesia for removal of the primary tumor or for surgery other than for the removal of the primary tumor. Hemodynamic derangements like hypertension and arrhythmia can be catastrophic. Monitored anesthesia care, though used for many cases, is unusual for a patient with diagnosed pheochromocytoma, with vertebral metastasis leading to paraplegia and atrial myxoma. In the case described below, the patient was operated for closed reduction, internal fixation with interlock nail femur, for pathological fracture. Surgery was done under monitored anesthesia care as there was no need for regional, spinal, or general anesthesia because of coexisting paraplegia. Surgery was uneventful and the postoperative period was smooth. This case is presented for its uniqueness of multiple diseases and uneventful recovery without any complications of anesthesia. The nightmare of pheochromocytoma eased without any morbidity for the patient, but this may not always be the case. PMID:25885632

  15. Oncolytic viral purging of leukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with Myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Masmudur M.; Madlambayan, Gerard J.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and radiation followed by autologous blood and marrow transplantation (ABMT) has been extensively used for the treatment of certain cancers that are refractory to standard therapeutic regimes. However, a major challenge with ABMT for patients with hematologic malignancies is disease relapse, mainly due to either contamination with cancerous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within the autograft or the persistence of residual therapy-resistant disease niches within the patient. Oncolytic viruses represent a promising therapeutic approach to prevent cancer relapse by eliminating tumor-initiating cells that contaminate the autograft. Here we summarize an ex vivo “purging” strategy with oncolytic myxoma virus (MYXV) to remove cancer-initiating cells from patient autografts prior to transplantation. MYXV, a novel oncolytic poxvirus with potent anti-cancer properties in a variety of in vivo tumor models, can specifically eliminate cancerous stem and progenitor cells from samples obtained from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients, while sparing normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells capable of rescuing hematopoiesis following high dose conditioning. We propose that a broader subset of patients with intractable hematologic malignancies who have failed standard therapy could become eligible for ABMT when the treatment schema is coupled with ex vivo oncolytic therapy. PMID:20211576

  16. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Meacham, Amy M.; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R.; McFadden, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens. PMID:25904246

  17. Ex Vivo Virotherapy With Myxoma Virus Does Not Impair Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Bais, Swarna; Meacham, Amy M.; Wise, Elizabeth; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Moreb, Jan S; Rosenau, Emma H.; Wingard, John R.; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Relapsing disease is a major challenge after hematopoietic cell transplant for hematological malignancies. Myxoma virus (MYXV) is an oncolytic virus that can target and eliminate contaminating cancer cells from auto-transplant grafts. The aims of this study were to examine the impact of MYXV on normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and define the optimal treatment conditions for ex vivo virotherapy. Methods Bone marrow (BM) and mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (mPBSCs) from patients with hematological malignancies were treated with MYXV at various time, temperature and incubation media conditions. Treated BM cells from healthy normal donors were evaluated by flow cytometry for MYXV infection, LTC-IC assay, and CFC assay. Results MYXV initiated infection in up to 45% of antigen presenting monocytes, B cells and natural killer cells; however, these infections were uniformly aborted in > 95% of all cells. Fresh graft sources showed higher levels of MYXV infection initiation than cryopreserved specimens but all cases, less than 10% of CD34+ cells could be infected after ex vivo MYXV treatment. MYXV did not impair LTC-IC colony numbers compared to mock treatment. CFC colony types and numbers were also not impaired by MYXV treatment. MYXV incubation time, temperature or culture media did not significantly change percentage of infected cells, LTC-IC colony formation or CFC colony formation. Conclusions Human hematopoietic cells are non-permissive for MYXV. Human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells were not infected and thus unaffected by MYXV ex vivo treatment. PMID:26857235

  18. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Villa, Nancy Y; Wasserfall, Clive H; Meacham, Amy M; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2015-06-11

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens.

  19. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Zemp, Franz J; McKenzie, Brienne A; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V Wee; Forsyth, Peter A

    2014-12-15

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the immune response of the patient to the virus infection limits the utility of the therapy, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using nonspecific pharmacologic inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumors, and robust monocyte, T-, and NK cell infiltration 3 days after MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumor-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumor-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of cyclophosphamide-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multifaceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with cyclophosphamide-mediated lymphoablation.

  20. Oncolytic viral purging of leukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with Myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and radiation followed by autologous blood and marrow transplantation (ABMT) has been used for the treatment of certain cancers that are refractory to standard therapeutic regimes. However, a major challenge with ABMT for patients with hematologic malignancies is disease relapse, mainly due to either contamination with cancerous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within the autograft or the persistence of residual therapy-resistant disease niches within the patient. Oncolytic viruses represent a promising therapeutic approach to prevent cancer relapse by eliminating tumor-initiating cells that contaminate the autograft. Here we summarize an ex vivo "purging" strategy with oncolytic Myxoma virus (MYXV) to remove cancer-initiating cells from patient autografts prior to transplantation. MYXV, a novel oncolytic poxvirus with potent anti-cancer properties in a variety of in vivo tumor models, can specifically eliminate cancerous stem and progenitor cells from samples obtained from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients, while sparing normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells capable of rescuing hematopoiesis following high dose conditioning. We propose that a broader subset of patients with intractable hematologic malignancies who have failed standard therapy could become eligible for ABMT when the treatment schema is coupled with ex vivo oncolytic therapy.

  1. Myxoma virus virotherapy for glioma in immunocompetent animal models: optimizing administration routes and synergy with rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Lun, XueQing; Alain, Tommy; Zemp, Franz J; Zhou, Hongyuan; Rahman, Masmudur M; Hamilton, Mark G; McFadden, Grant; Bell, John; Senger, Donna L; Forsyth, Peter A

    2010-01-15

    Oncolytic myxoma virus (MYXV) is being developed as a novel virotherapeutic against human brain cancer and has promising activity against human brain tumor models in immunocompromised hosts. Because an intact immune system could reduce its efficacy, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the oncolytic potential of MYXV in immunocompetent racine glioma models. Here, we report that MYXV infects and kills all racine cell glioma lines and that its effects are enhanced by rapamycin. Intratumoral administration of MYXV with rapamycin improved viral replication in the tumor and significantly prolonged host survival. Similarly, coadministration via a method of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) enhanced viral replication and efficacy in vivo. Mechanisms by which rapamycin improved MYXV oncolysis included an inhibition of type I IFN production in vitro and a reduction of intratumoral infiltration of CD68(+) microglia/macrophages and CD163(+) macrophages in vivo. Our findings define a method to improve MYXV efficacy against gliomas by rapamycin coadministration, which acts to promote immune responses engaged by viral delivery.

  2. Inhibition of macrophage activation by the myxoma virus M141 protein (vCD200).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leiliang; Stanford, Marianne; Liu, Jia; Barrett, Catherine; Jiang, Lei; Barclay, A Neil; McFadden, Grant

    2009-09-01

    The M141 protein of myxoma virus (MYXV) is a viral CD200 homolog (also called vOX-2) that inhibits macrophage activation in infected rabbits. Here, we show that murine myeloid RAW 264.7 cells became activated when infected with MYXV in which the M141 gene was deleted (vMyx-M141KO) but not with the parental wild-type MYXV. Moreover, transcript and protein levels of tumor necrosis factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were rapidly upregulated in an NF-kappaB-dependent fashion in the RAW 264.7 cells infected with vMyx-M141KO. M141 protein is present in the virion and counteracts this NF-kappaB activation pathway upon infection with the wild-type MYXV. Our data suggest that upregulation of these classic macrophage-related proinflammatory cytokine markers following infection of myeloid cells with the M141-knockout MYXV is mediated via the rapid activation of the cellular NF-kappaB pathway.

  3. Genome Scale Evolution of Myxoma Virus Reveals Host-Pathogen Adaptation and Rapid Geographic Spread

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Peter J.; Rogers, Matthew B.; Fitch, Adam; DePasse, Jay V.; Cattadori, Isabella M.; Twaddle, Alan C.; Hudson, Peter J.; Tscharke, David C.; Read, Andrew F.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary interplay between myxoma virus (MYXV) and the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) following release of the virus in Australia in 1950 as a biological control is a classic example of host-pathogen coevolution. We present a detailed genomic and phylogeographic analysis of 30 strains of MYXV, including the Australian progenitor strain Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS), 24 Australian viruses isolated from 1951 to 1999, and three isolates from the early radiation in Britain from 1954 and 1955. We show that in Australia MYXV has spread rapidly on a spatial scale, with multiple lineages cocirculating within individual localities, and that both highly virulent and attenuated viruses were still present in the field through the 1990s. In addition, the detection of closely related virus lineages at sites 1,000 km apart suggests that MYXV moves freely in geographic space, with mosquitoes, fleas, and rabbit migration all providing means of transport. Strikingly, despite multiple introductions, all modern viruses appear to be ultimately derived from the original introductions of SLS. The rapidity of MYXV evolution was also apparent at the genomic scale, with gene duplications documented in a number of viruses. Duplication of potential virulence genes may be important in increasing the expression of virulence proteins and provides the basis for the evolution of novel functions. Mutations leading to loss of open reading frames were surprisingly frequent and in some cases may explain attenuation, but no common mutations that correlated with virulence or attenuation were identified. PMID:24067966

  4. Genome scale evolution of myxoma virus reveals host-pathogen adaptation and rapid geographic spread.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Rogers, Matthew B; Fitch, Adam; Depasse, Jay V; Cattadori, Isabella M; Twaddle, Alan C; Hudson, Peter J; Tscharke, David C; Read, Andrew F; Holmes, Edward C; Ghedin, Elodie

    2013-12-01

    The evolutionary interplay between myxoma virus (MYXV) and the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) following release of the virus in Australia in 1950 as a biological control is a classic example of host-pathogen coevolution. We present a detailed genomic and phylogeographic analysis of 30 strains of MYXV, including the Australian progenitor strain Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS), 24 Australian viruses isolated from 1951 to 1999, and three isolates from the early radiation in Britain from 1954 and 1955. We show that in Australia MYXV has spread rapidly on a spatial scale, with multiple lineages cocirculating within individual localities, and that both highly virulent and attenuated viruses were still present in the field through the 1990s. In addition, the detection of closely related virus lineages at sites 1,000 km apart suggests that MYXV moves freely in geographic space, with mosquitoes, fleas, and rabbit migration all providing means of transport. Strikingly, despite multiple introductions, all modern viruses appear to be ultimately derived from the original introductions of SLS. The rapidity of MYXV evolution was also apparent at the genomic scale, with gene duplications documented in a number of viruses. Duplication of potential virulence genes may be important in increasing the expression of virulence proteins and provides the basis for the evolution of novel functions. Mutations leading to loss of open reading frames were surprisingly frequent and in some cases may explain attenuation, but no common mutations that correlated with virulence or attenuation were identified.

  5. Intramuscular myxoma of the hyoglossus muscle: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    LI, GUIQI; JIANG, WEN; LI, WEI; LI, JUNCHUAN

    2014-01-01

    Intramuscular myxoma (IM) is a benign intramuscular neoplasm composed of fibroblasts and abundant myxoid stroma. IMs most commonly affect larger skeletal muscles, while those affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions are rare, with a small number of documented cases in the available literature. The aim of the present study was to describe a highly rare case of an IM within the hyoglossus muscle of the tongue in a 74-year-old male. The patient presented with a painless mass in the submental space that had been growing slowly for more than five years. A computed tomography scan revealed a hypodense lesion located in the root of the tongue. The mass was easily excised with thin margins, including only a small amount of the adjacent muscle tissue. The pathological diagnosis of the mass was an IM. The patient made an excellent recovery following the surgery and the follow-up three years later revealed no local recurrence. IMs of the hyoglossus muscle are highly rare, however must be considered in the differential diagnosis of swellings in the root of the tongue region. PMID:24765200

  6. Suppression of collagen-induced arthritis with a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) derived from myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Brahn, Ernest; Lee, Sarah; Lucas, Alexandra; McFadden, Grant; Macaulay, Colin

    2014-08-01

    Many viruses encode virulence factors to facilitate their own survival by modulating a host's inflammatory response. One of these factors, secreted from cells infected with myxoma virus, is the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) Serp-1. Because Serp-1 had demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in arterial injury models and viral infections, it was cloned and evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Clinical severity was significantly lower in the Serp-1 protocols (p<0.0001) and blinded radiographs indicated that the Serp-1 group had significantly less erosions than the controls (p<0.01). Delayed-type hypersensitivity was lower in the Serp-1 group but antibody titers to type II collagen were not significantly altered. Recipients had minimal histopathologic synovial changes and did not develop neutralizing antibodies to Serp-1. These results indicate that Serp-1 impedes the pathogenesis of CIA and suggests that the therapeutic potential of serine proteinase inhibitors in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, should be investigated further.

  7. Evidence of loss of heterozygosity of the PTCH gene in orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Galvão, Clarice Ferreira; Macedo, Paula Serelle; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2011-03-01

    The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is an odontogenic cyst of unknown etiology. Clinical, histological, and biological differences are reported between keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT) and OOC. PTCH is a tumor suppressor gene related to sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway important in embryological development. Considering that alterations in this pathway have been described in sporadic and nevoid basal cell syndrome-associated KOT, we tested the hypothesis that OOC is also associated with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the PTCH gene. Seven samples of OOC and seven of KOT were included in the study. D9S287, D9S196, and D9S127 microsatellite markers located in the region of PTCH gene, at chromosome 9q, were investigated for LOH. There was loss in at least one locus in 5/7 KOT and in 4/7 OOC samples. The present finding demonstrates that, despite the existence of clinical, morphological, immunohistochemical, and biological behavior differences between OOC and KOT, both harbor similar genetic alterations at 9q.

  8. Nanofibrous spongy microspheres enhance odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Rong; Zhang, Zhanpeng; Jin, Xiaobing; Hu, Jiang; Gupte, Melanie J; Ni, Longxing; Ma, Peter X

    2015-09-16

    Dentin regeneration is challenging due to its complicated anatomical structure and the shortage of odontoblasts. In this study, a novel injectable cell carrier, nanofibrous spongy microspheres (NF-SMS), is developed for dentin regeneration. Biodegradable and biocompatible poly(l-lactic acid)-block-poly(l-lysine) are synthesized and fabricated into NF-SMS using self-assembly and thermally induced phase separation techniques. It is hypothesized that NF-SMS with interconnected pores and nanofibers can enhance the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), compared to nanofibrous microspheres (NF-MS) without pore structure and conventional solid microspheres (S-MS) with neither nanofibers nor pore structure. During the first 9 d in culture, hDPSCs proliferate significantly faster on NF-SMS than on NF-MS or S-MS (p < 0.05). Following in vitro odontogenic induction, all the examined odontogenic genes (alkaline phosphatase content, osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, collagen 1, dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP)), calcium content, and DSPP protein content are found significantly higher in the NF-SMS group than in the control groups. Furthermore, 6 weeks after subcutaneous injection of hDPSCs and microspheres into nude mice, histological analysis shows that NF-SMS support superior dentin-like tissue formation compared to NF-MS or S-MS. Taken together, NF-SMS have great potential as an injectable cell carrier for dentin regeneration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Lemierre's syndrome from odontogenic infection: Review of the literature and case description

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Dani; Rachmiel, Adi; Levy-Faber, Dan; Emodi, Omri

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome (LS) is a rare potentially fatal sequel of head and neck infection, classically described as thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) with cervical space infection extending into the thorax. Our objective was to answer the clinical question: “Does Lemierre syndrome (LS) from odontogenic infection differ from nonodontogenic LS in regard to clinical sequence, treatment, and survival.” We reviewed the literature on the management of LS over the last two decades, with a focus on LS from odontogenic infection. Such a case is presented in order to portray the clinical sequence. Only 10 cases met the inclusion criteria (including the case presented). The recorded data were analyzed in comparison to large case series reviewing LS. Our data reflect the moderate differences in regard to IJV thrombosis and bacteriogram. There is an overall rise in published LS cases in the last 20 years. Odontogenic infection leading to LS is scarce, yet with survival rates similar to nonodontogenic LS. Repeated surgical interventions and aggressive wide spectrum antibiotic therapy remain the treatment of choice. PMID:26981474

  10. Evaluation and comparison of expression of p63 in odontogenic keratocyst, solid ameloblastoma and unicystic ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Varsha, BK; Gharat, A Leena; Nagamalini, BR; Jyothsna, M; Mothkur, Sahana T; Swaminathan, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The behavior of odontogenic lesions varies with some tumors behaving like a cyst and some cysts behaving like tumors. p63, a member of the p53 family of tumor suppressor genes has recently come into light in view of its role as an oncogene. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of p63 protein in OKC, Solid ameloblastoma, Unicystic Ameloblastoma and Follicular tissue. Materials and Methods: p63 expression was compared in 12 cases of OKC, 12 Solid Ameloblastoma, 14 cases of Unicystic ameloblastoma and 10 cases of Follicular tissue using immunohistochemical technique. All 48 cases were subjected to heat-induced antigen retrieval method using citrate buffer in a pressure cooker. Then the sections were stained with anti-p63 polyclonal antibody and visualized using super sensitive polymer HRP detection system. In each case, number of cells showing p63 positivity were assessed in two compartments - basal and suprabasal and compared. Results: Statistical analysis showed that p63 expression in the suprabasal compartment in Odontogenic keratocysts was equivalent to that of central neoplastic cells of Solid Ameloblastoma and Unicystic Ameloblastoma type 3. Statistically significant difference in the expression of p63 was observed between OKC and Unicystic Ameloblastoma Type 1 and Solid Ameloblastoma and Unicystic Ameloblastoma Type 1. Conclusion: We conclude that the higher expression of p63 in these odontogenic lesions correlates well with their aggressive behavior and thereby suggesting alterations in treatment modalities. PMID:25328303

  11. Alteration of microRNA expression of human dental pulp cells during odontogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qimei; Wang, Runfu; Jiang, Hongwei; Lin, Zhengmei; Ling, Junqi

    2012-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play momentous roles in various biological processes including cell differentiation. However, little is known about the role of miRNAs in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) during odontogenic differentiation. The aims of this study were to investigate the expression of miRNAs in the primary culture of hDPCs when incubated in odontogenic medium. The potential characteristics of hDPCs were investigated by miRNA microarray and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Bioinformatics (ie, target prediction, Gene Ontology analysis, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes mapping tools) were applied for predicting the complementary target genes of miRNAs and their biological functions. A total of 22 miRNAs were differentially expressed in which 12 miRNAs up-regulated and 10 miRNAs down-regulated in differentiated hDPCs compared with the control. The target genes of differential miRNAs were predicted to associate with several biological functions and signaling pathways including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the Wnt signaling pathway. The differential expression miRNAs may be involved in governing hDPC odontogenic differentiation, thus contributing to the future investigations of regulatory mechanisms in reparative dentin formation and dental pulp regeneration. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunoexpression of integrins in ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, and human tooth germs.

    PubMed

    de Souza Andrade, Emanuel Sávio; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa; de Almeida Freitas, Roseana; Pereira Pinto, Leão; Batista de Souza, Lélia

    2008-07-01

    The expression of integrins alpha2beta1, alpha3beta1, and alpha5beta1 in 30 ameloblastomas (20 solid and 10 unicystic tumors), 12 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs), and 5 human tooth germs in different stages of odontogenesis was analyzed. The distribution, location, pattern, and intensity of immunohistochemical expression were evaluated. Intensity was analyzed using scores (0 = absence, 1 = weak staining, and 2 = strong staining). No difference in the immunoexpression of the integrins was observed between solid and unicystic ameloblastomas. When these two ameloblastoma types were pooled into a single group, the following significant differences were found: immunoexpression of integrin alpha2beta1 was stronger in ameloblastomas than in AOTs and tooth germs, and the expression of integrin alpha5beta1 was stronger in ameloblastomas than in AOTs. The lack of detection of integrin alpha3beta1 in tooth germs and its detection in the odontogenic tumors studied suggest that this integrin might be used as a marker of neoplastic transformation in odontogenic tissues.

  13. The early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions: from Thoma to Gorlin.

    PubMed

    Ide, Fumio; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kusama, Kaoru; Saito, Ichiro; Muramatsu, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    To reappraise the early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions (OGCL), the extensive world literature published from 1838 to 1962 was reviewed. In light of the long history of OGCL, the term "calcifying epithelioma of Malherbe" first appeared in a 1931 French report, and the term "ghost cells" had its origin in two American seminal articles by Thoma and Goldman in 1946. Although Gorlin et al. coined the term "calcifying odontogenic cyst" (COC) in 1962, this type of cyst was initially reported three decades earlier by Rywkind in Russia, and almost concurrently by Blood good in the United States and Sato in Japan. In 1948, Willis provided the initial histological evidence of a peripheral COC in his British pathology textbook. Credit for the earliest clinical presentation of odontoma associated calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor belongs to the American radiology textbook by Thoma in 1917. A Scandinavian journal report published in 1953 by Husted and Pindborg was the first to address a dentinogenic ghost cell tumor, and its peripheral counterpart was originally reported in the Swiss literature 7 years later. The current concept of COC was undoubtedly established by Gorlin et al. but the history of OGCL really started with Thoma's pioneering work about a century ago.

  14. Localized gingival enlargement associated with alveolar process expansion: peripheral ossifying fibroma coincident with central odontogenic fibroma.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cléverson O; Sallum, Antônio Wilson; do Couto-Filho, Carlos Eduardo Gomes; Costa Pereira, Alessandro Antônio; Hanemann, João Adolfo Costa; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2007-07-01

    Despite the common occurrence of localized gingival enlargements, which often represent reactive lesions, the temporal and spatial association of such a lesion with a central jaw lesion has not been reported. The purpose of this case report is to present the exceptional combination of a peripheral ossifying fibroma and a central odontogenic fibroma. The differential diagnosis and management of each lesion is reviewed. A 45-year-old black female presented with a chief complaint of a painless protuberance in the left mandible of 1-year duration. Clinical and radiographic examination revealed a gingival enlargement localized between teeth #21 and #23 and a multilocular radiolucent lesion with radiopaque foci in the same area. Excisional biopsy of the gingival lesion and incisional biopsy of the central lesion were performed, and specimens were submitted for histopathological analysis. Biopsy of the gingival lesion revealed stratified squamous epithelium and highly cellular fibroblastic component presenting central areas of calcification, features consistent with a diagnosis of peripheral ossifying fibroma. The central lesion was characterized by cellular fibrous tissue admixed with rests of odontogenic epithelium and few calcification areas, features consistent with a diagnosis of central odontogenic fibroma/World Health Organization type. Subsequently, the central lesion was enucleated. After 1-year follow-up, no recurrence has been observed. The combination of a rare central lesion with a common gingival lesion may present unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Clinician awareness regarding the possibility of such a combined presentation and its implications will help to ensure optimal treatment outcomes.

  15. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Blanié, Sophie; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle

    2010-03-08

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-kappaB in the nucleus of TNFalpha-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein.

  16. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-κB in the nucleus of TNFα-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein. PMID:20211013

  17. Characteristics, length of stay, and hospital bills associated with severe odontogenic infections in Houston, TX.

    PubMed

    Gams, Kevin; Shewale, Jitesh; Demian, Nagi; Khalil, Kamal; Banki, Farzaneh

    2017-04-01

    There were 2 main purposes of this retrospective chart review study. The first was to describe the demographic, social, and financial characteristics of patients with severe odontogenic infections. The second was to assess the relationships among several demographic, social, and treatment variables and length of stay (LOS) in the hospital and hospital bill (charges). The authors conducted a retrospective chart review for patients admitted to the hospital and taken to the operating room for treatment of severe odontogenic infections at 3 hospitals in Houston, TX (Ben Taub, Memorial Hermann Hospital, and Lyndon B. Johnson) from January 2010 through January 2015. The authors included data from severe odontogenic infections in 298 patients (55% male; mean age, 38.9 years) in this study. In this population, 45% required admission to the intensive care unit, and the mean LOS was 5.5 days. Most patients (66.6%) were uninsured. The average cost of hospitalization for this patient population was $13,058, and the average hospital bill was $48,351. At multivariable analysis, age (P = .011), preadmission antibiotic use (P = .012), diabetes mellitus (P = .004), and higher odontogenic infection severity score (P < .001) were associated with increased LOS. Higher odontogenic infection severity score, diabetes mellitus, and an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or more were associated with an increased charge of hospitalization. Severe odontogenic infections were associated with substantial morbidity and cost in this largely unsponsored patient population. The authors identified variables associated with increased LOS and charge of hospitalization. Clinicians should consider these findings in their decision-making processes and prioritize early treatment of odontogenic infections potentially to decrease the number of patients admitted to the hospital, LOS, and overall costs of treatment for these infections. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association

  18. Primordial Odontogenic Cyst with Induction Phenomenon (Zonal Fibroblastic Hypercellularity) and Dentinoid Material Versus Archegonous Cystic Odontoma: You Choose!

    PubMed

    Argyris, Prokopios P; Wetzel, Stephanie L; Pambuccian, Stefan E; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Koutlas, Ioannis G

    2016-06-01

    The most recent A.F.I.P. fascicle defines primordial odontogenic cyst (POC) as a distinct, nonkeratinized, odontogenic cyst of "undetermined origin" forming in the place of a developing normal or supernumerary tooth. However, the majority of examples reported in the literature under this term represent odontogenic keratocysts (keratocystic odontogenic tumors). In addition, there are rare reported cases of cystic odontomas. An 18-year-old Caucasian male presented with a unilocular mandibular radiolucent lesion in the place of a congenitally missing molar. Histologically, it featured nonkeratinizing, thin stratified squamous epithelial lining with areas of spongiosis and foci of vacuolization of individual basal cells without significant nuclear palisading. Focally, budding of the basal cell layer was identified. A zone of increased cellularity featuring induction-type fibroblasts was present subepithelially as well as dentinoid deposits with odontogenic epithelial nests. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial lining was negative for calretinin and the induction-like zone negative for S100 protein, smooth muscle actin, and CD34. The case was externally reviewed by five oral pathologists who provided various diagnostic interpretations including primordial cyst, odontogenic cyst not otherwise specified (NOS), cyst with ameloblastic changes, and unicystic ameloblastoma. At that time, a final diagnosis of odontogenic cyst NOS was rendered with a comment that it may represent a true example of POC or a cystic odontoma. The lesion has not recurred within a 13 year follow-up period after initial excision. An unusual cystic lesion is presented that may represent a true example of POC with dentinoid formation or an archegonous cystic odontoma.

  19. Intramuscular myxoma presenting as a rare posterior neck mass in a young child: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ishoo, Edwin

    2007-04-01

    Intramuscular myxoma (IMM) is an uncommon benign tumor that presents as a slow-growing, deep-seated mass confined to the skeletal muscle. Histologically, these lesions most resemble umbilical cord tissue. They are generally found in the proximal thigh, gluteal region, or shoulder girdle and are exceedingly rare neck masses in the pediatric population. These tumors most often present as painless, deep-seated intramuscular masses that may exhibit symptoms of compression of surrounding structures.(1) I report a case of a 22-month-old girl with an IMM in the posterior cervical triangle.

  20. New tumour entities in the 4th edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck tumours: odontogenic and maxillofacial bone tumours.

    PubMed

    Speight, Paul M; Takata, Takashi

    2017-07-03

    The latest (4th) edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck tumours has recently been published with a number of significant changes across all tumour sites. In particular, there has been a major attempt to simplify classifications and to use defining criteria which can be used globally in all situations, avoiding wherever possible the use of complex molecular techniques which may not be affordable or widely available. This review summarises the changes in Chapter 8: Odontogenic and maxillofacial bone lesions. The most significant change is the re-introduction of the classification of the odontogenic cysts, restoring this books status as the only text which classifies and defines the full range of lesions of the odontogenic tissues. The consensus group considered carefully the terminology of lesions and were concerned to ensure that the names used properly reflected the best evidence regarding the true nature of specific entities. For this reason, this new edition restores the odontogenic keratocyst and calcifying odontogenic cyst to the classification of odontogenic cysts and rejects the previous terminology (keratocystic odontogenic tumour and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour) which were intended to suggest that they are true neoplasms. New entities which have been introduced include the sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma and primordial odontogenic tumour. In addition, some previously poorly defined lesions have been removed, including the ameloblastic fibrodentinoma, ameloblastic fibro-odontoma, which are probably developing odontomas, and the odontoameloblastoma, which is not regarded as an entity. Finally, the terminology "cemento" has been restored to cemento-ossifying fibroma and cemento-osseous dysplasias, to properly reflect that they are of odontogenic origin and are found in the tooth-bearing areas of the jaws.

  1. The current status and future directions of myxoma virus, a master in immune evasion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) gained importance throughout the twentieth century because of the use of the highly virulent Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS) by the Australian government in the attempt to control the feral Australian population of Oryctolagus cuniculus (European rabbit) and the subsequent illegal release of MYXV in Europe. In the European rabbit, MYXV causes a disease with an exceedingly high mortality rate, named myxomatosis, which is passively transmitted by biting arthropod vectors. MYXV still has a great impact on European rabbit populations around the world. In contrast, only a single cutaneous lesion, restricted to the point of inoculation, is seen in its natural long-term host, the South-American Sylvilagus brasiliensis and the North-American S. Bachmani. Apart from being detrimental for European rabbits, however, MYXV has also become of interest in human medicine in the last two decades for two reasons. Firstly, due to the strong immune suppressing effects of certain MYXV proteins, several secreted virus-encoded immunomodulators (e.g. Serp-1) are being developed to treat systemic inflammatory syndromes such as cardiovascular disease in humans. Secondly, due to the inherent ability of MYXV to infect a broad spectrum of human cancer cells, the live virus is also being developed as an oncolytic virotherapeutic to treat human cancer. In this review, an update will be given on the current status of MYXV in rabbits as well as its potential in human medicine in the twenty-first century. Table of contents Abstract 1. The virus 2. History 3. Pathogenesis and disease symptoms 4. Immunomodulatory proteins of MYXV 4.1. MYXV proteins with anti-apoptotic functions 4.1.1. Inhibition of pro-apoptotic molecules 4.1.2. Inhibition by protein-protein interactions by ankyrin repeat viral proteins 4.1.3. Inhibition of apoptosis by enhancing the degradation of cellular proteins 4.1.4. Inhibition of apoptosis by blocking host Protein Kinase R (PKR) 4.2. MYXV proteins

  2. Treating brain tumor–initiating cells using a combination of myxoma virus and rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Franz J.; Lun, Xueqing; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Zhou, Hongyuan; Maxwell, Lori; Sun, Beichen; Kelly, John J.P.; Stechishin, Owen; Luchman, Artee; Weiss, Samuel; Cairncross, J. Gregory; Hamilton, Mark G.; Rabinovich, Brian A.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Smallwood, Sherin; Senger, Donna L.; Bell, John; McFadden, Grant; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intratumoral heterogeneity in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) poses a significant barrier to therapy in certain subpopulation such as the tumor-initiating cell population, being shown to be refractory to conventional therapies. Oncolytic virotherapy has the potential to target multiple compartments within the tumor and thus circumvent some of the barriers facing conventional therapies. In this study, we investigate the oncolytic potential of myxoma virus (MYXV) alone and in combination with rapamycin in vitro and in vivo using human brain tumor–initiating cells (BTICs). Methods We cultured fresh GBM specimens as neurospheres and assayed their growth characteristics in vivo. We then tested the susceptibility of BTICs to MYXV infection with or without rapamycin in vitro and assessed viral biodistribution/survival in vivo in orthotopic xenografts. Results The cultured neurospheres were found to retain stem cell markers in vivo, and they closely resembled human infiltrative GBM. In this study we determined that (i) all patient-derived BTICs tested, including those resistant to temozolomide, were susceptible to MYXV replication and killing in vitro; (ii) MYXV replicated within BTICs in vivo, and intratumoral administration of MYXV significantly prolonged survival of BTIC-bearing mice; (iii) combination therapy with MYXV and rapamycin improved antitumor activity, even in mice bearing “advanced” BTIC tumors; (iv) MYXV treatment decreased expression of stem cell markers in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions Our study suggests that MYXV in combination with rapamycin infects and kills both the BTICs and the differentiated compartments of GBM and may be an effective treatment even in TMZ-resistant patients. PMID:23585629

  3. Myxoma virus therapy for human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in a nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kinn, Veronica G; Hilgenberg, Valerie A; MacNeill, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a devastating tumor of young people that is difficult to cure. To determine if oncolytic virus therapy can improve outcomes in individuals with RMS, myxoma virus expressing a red fluorescent protein (MYXV-red) was evaluated for antitumoral effects using a murine model of RMS. Fluorescent protein was expressed in four RMS cell lines inoculated with MYXV-red, indicating that these cells were semipermissive to MYXV infection. MYXV-red replication and cytopathic effects were further evaluated using human embryonal RMS (CCL-136) cells. Logarithmic growth of MYXV-red and significant cell death were observed 72 hours after inoculation with MYXV. The oncolytic effects of MYXV-red were then studied in nude mice that were injected subcutaneously with CCL-136 cells to establish RMS xenografts. Once tumors measured 5 mm in diameter, mice were treated with multiple intratumoral injections of MXYV-red or saline. The average final tumor volume and rate of tumor growth were significantly decreased, and median survival time was significantly increased in MYXV-red-treated mice (P-values =0.0416, 0.0037, and 0.0004, respectively). Histologic sections of MYXV-red-treated tumors showed increased inflammation compared to saline-treated tumors (P-value =0.0002). In conclusion, MXYV-red treatment of RMS tumors was successful in individual mice as it resulted in decreased tumor burden in eight of eleven mice with nearly complete tumor remission in five of eleven mice. These data hold promise that MYXV-red treatment may be beneficial for people suffering from RMS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of RMS tumors using an oncolytic poxvirus.

  4. A whole-genome RNA interference screen for human cell factors affecting myxoma virus replication.

    PubMed

    Teferi, Wondimagegnehu M; Dodd, Kristopher; Maranchuk, Rob; Favis, Nicole; Evans, David H

    2013-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) provides an important model for investigating host-pathogen interactions. Recent studies have also highlighted how mutations in transformed human cells can expand the host range of this rabbit virus. Although virus growth depends upon interactions between virus and host proteins, the nature of these interactions is poorly understood. To address this matter, we performed small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens for genes affecting MYXV growth in human MDA-MB-231 cells. By using siRNAs targeting the whole human genome (21,585 genes), a subset of human phosphatases and kinases (986 genes), and also a custom siRNA library targeting selected statistically significant genes ("hits") and nonsignificant genes ("nonhits") of the whole human genome screens (88 genes), we identified 711 siRNA pools that promoted MYXV growth and 333 that were inhibitory. Another 32 siRNA pools (mostly targeting the proteasome) were toxic. The overall overlap in the results was about 25% for the hits and 75% for the nonhits. These pro- and antiviral genes can be clustered into pathways and related groups, including well-established inflammatory and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, as well as clusters relating to β-catenin and the Wnt signaling cascade, the cell cycle, and cellular metabolism. The validity of a subset of these hits was independently confirmed. For example, treating cells with siRNAs that might stabilize cells in G(1), or inhibit passage into S phase, stimulated MYXV growth, and these effects were reproduced by trapping cells at the G(1)/S boundary with an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6. By using 2-deoxy-D-glucose and plasmids carrying the gene for phosphofructokinase, we also confirmed that infection is favored by aerobic glycolytic metabolism. These studies provide insights into how the growth state and structure of cells affect MYXV growth and how these factors might be manipulated to advantage in oncolytic virus therapy.

  5. Modulation of the Myxoma Virus Plaque Phenotype by Vaccinia Virus Protein F11

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Chad R.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) produces large plaques consisting of a rapidly expanding ring of infected cells surrounding a lytic core, whereas myxoma virus (MYXV) produces small plaques that resemble a focus of transformed cells. This is odd, because bioinformatics suggests that MYXV carries homologs of nearly all of the genes regulating Orthopoxvirus attachment, entry, and exit. So why does MYXV produce foci? One notable difference is that MYXV-infected cells produce few of the actin microfilaments that promote VACV exit and spread. This suggested that although MYXV carries homologs of the required genes (A33R, A34R, A36R, and B5R), they are dysfunctional. To test this, we produced MYXV recombinants expressing these genes, but we could not enhance actin projectile formation even in cells expressing all four VACV proteins. Another notable difference between these viruses is that MYXV lacks a homolog of the F11L gene. F11 inhibits the RhoA-mDia signaling that maintains the integrity of the cortical actin layer. We constructed an MYXV strain encoding F11L and observed that, unlike wild-type MYXV, the recombinant virus disrupted actin stress fibers and produced plaques up to 4-fold larger than those of controls, and these plaques expanded ∼6-fold faster. These viruses also grew to higher titers in multistep growth conditions, produced higher levels of actin projectiles, and promoted infected cell movement, although neither process was to the extent of that observed in VACV-infected cells. Thus, one reason for why MYXV produces small plaques is that it cannot spread via actin filaments, although the reason for this deficiency remains obscure. A second reason is that leporipoxviruses lack vaccinia's capacity to disrupt cortical actin. PMID:22514354

  6. Myxoma virus oncolytic efficiency can be enhanced through chemical or genetic disruption of the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Chad R; Favis, Nicole A; Agopsowicz, Kate C; Hitt, Mary M; Evans, David H

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV), MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L(+)) MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L(+) MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2). These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies.

  7. Histological evaluation of intratumoral myxoma virus treatment in an immunocompetent mouse model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Rosalinda A; Liu, Jia; McFadden, Grant; Roy, Edward J; MacNeill, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    Two recombinant myxoma viruses (MYXV expressing a fluorescent protein [MYXV-Tred] and MYXV-Tred encoding murine interleukin-15 [MYXV-IL15]) were evaluated for therapeutic effects in an aggressive B16F10 melanoma model in immunocompetent mice. It was hypothesized that continuous expression of IL-15 within a tumor would recruit cytotoxic effector cells to induce an antitumor immune response and improve treatment efficacy. Weekly intratumoral injections were given to evaluate the effect of treatment on the median survival time of C57BL/6 mice bearing established B16F10 melanomas. Mice that received MYXV-Tred or MYXV-IL15 lived significantly longer than mice given treatment controls. Unexpectedly, the median survival time of MYXV-IL15-treated mice was similar to that of MYXV-treated mice. At 1, 2, and 4 days postinoculation, viral plaque assays detected replicating MYXV-Tred and MYXV-IL15 within treated tumors. At these time points in MYXV-IL15-treated tumors, IL-15 concentration, lymphocyte grades, and cluster of differentiation-3+ cell counts were significantly increased when compared to other treatment groups. However, viral titers, recombinant protein expression, and lymphocyte numbers within the tumors diminished rapidly at 7 days postinoculation. These data indicate that treatment with recombinant MYXV should be repeated at least every 4 days to maintain recombinant protein expression within a murine tumor. Additionally, neutrophilic inflammation was significantly increased in MYXV-Tred- and MYXV-IL15-treated tumors at early time points. It is speculated that neutrophilic inflammation induced by intratumoral replication of recombinant MXYV contributes to the antitumoral effect of MYXV treatment in this melanoma model. These findings support the inclusion of neutrophil chemotaxins in recombinant poxvirus oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:25866742

  8. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic Myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Franz J.; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M.; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V. Wee; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the patient's immune response to the virus infection limits the therapy's utility, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using non-specific pharmacological inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumours, and robust monocyte, T and NK cell infiltration 3 days following MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumour-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumour-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of CPA-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multi-faceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with CPA-mediated lymphoablation. PMID:25336188

  9. Modulation of the myxoma virus plaque phenotype by vaccinia virus protein F11.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Chad R; Evans, David H

    2012-07-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) produces large plaques consisting of a rapidly expanding ring of infected cells surrounding a lytic core, whereas myxoma virus (MYXV) produces small plaques that resemble a focus of transformed cells. This is odd, because bioinformatics suggests that MYXV carries homologs of nearly all of the genes regulating Orthopoxvirus attachment, entry, and exit. So why does MYXV produce foci? One notable difference is that MYXV-infected cells produce few of the actin microfilaments that promote VACV exit and spread. This suggested that although MYXV carries homologs of the required genes (A33R, A34R, A36R, and B5R), they are dysfunctional. To test this, we produced MYXV recombinants expressing these genes, but we could not enhance actin projectile formation even in cells expressing all four VACV proteins. Another notable difference between these viruses is that MYXV lacks a homolog of the F11L gene. F11 inhibits the RhoA-mDia signaling that maintains the integrity of the cortical actin layer. We constructed an MYXV strain encoding F11L and observed that, unlike wild-type MYXV, the recombinant virus disrupted actin stress fibers and produced plaques up to 4-fold larger than those of controls, and these plaques expanded ∼6-fold faster. These viruses also grew to higher titers in multistep growth conditions, produced higher levels of actin projectiles, and promoted infected cell movement, although neither process was to the extent of that observed in VACV-infected cells. Thus, one reason for why MYXV produces small plaques is that it cannot spread via actin filaments, although the reason for this deficiency remains obscure. A second reason is that leporipoxviruses lack vaccinia's capacity to disrupt cortical actin.

  10. Myxoma Virus Infection Promotes NK Lysis of Malignant Gliomas In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ogbomo, Henry; Zemp, Franz J.; Lun, Xueqing; Zhang, Jiqing; Stack, Danuta; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Mcfadden, Grant; Mody, Christopher H.; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a well-established oncolytic agent against different types of tumors. MYXV is also known for its immunomodulatory properties in down-regulating major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I surface expression (via the M153R gene product, a viral E3-ubiquitin ligase) and suppressing T cell killing of infected target cells. MHC I down-regulation, however, favors NK cell activation. Brain tumors including gliomas are characterized by high MHC I expression with impaired NK activity. We thus hypothesized that MYXV infection of glioma cells will promote NK cell-mediated recognition and killing of gliomas. We infected human gliomas with MYXV and evaluated their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. MYXV enhanced NK cell-mediated killing of glioma cells (U87 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 51.73% vs. 28.63%, P = .0001, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 40.4% vs. 20.03%, P .0007, t test). Using MYXV M153R targeted knockout (designated vMyx-M153KO) to infect gliomas, we demonstrate that M153R was responsible for reduced expression of MHC I on gliomas and enhanced NK cell-mediated antiglioma activity (U87 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 51.73% vs. 25.17%, P = .0002, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 40.4% vs. 19.27, P = .0013, t test). Consequently, NK cell-mediated lysis of established human glioma tumors in CB-17 SCID mice was accelerated with improved mouse survival (log-rank P = .0072). These results demonstrate the potential for combining MYXV with NK cells to effectively kill malignant gliomas. PMID:23762498

  11. Histological evaluation of intratumoral myxoma virus treatment in an immunocompetent mouse model of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Doty, Rosalinda A; Liu, Jia; McFadden, Grant; Roy, Edward J; MacNeill, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    Two recombinant myxoma viruses (MYXV expressing a fluorescent protein [MYXV-Tred] and MYXV-Tred encoding murine interleukin-15 [MYXV-IL15]) were evaluated for therapeutic effects in an aggressive B16F10 melanoma model in immunocompetent mice. It was hypothesized that continuous expression of IL-15 within a tumor would recruit cytotoxic effector cells to induce an antitumor immune response and improve treatment efficacy. Weekly intratumoral injections were given to evaluate the effect of treatment on the median survival time of C57BL/6 mice bearing established B16F10 melanomas. Mice that received MYXV-Tred or MYXV-IL15 lived significantly longer than mice given treatment controls. Unexpectedly, the median survival time of MYXV-IL15-treated mice was similar to that of MYXV-treated mice. At 1, 2, and 4 days postinoculation, viral plaque assays detected replicating MYXV-Tred and MYXV-IL15 within treated tumors. At these time points in MYXV-IL15-treated tumors, IL-15 concentration, lymphocyte grades, and cluster of differentiation-3+ cell counts were significantly increased when compared to other treatment groups. However, viral titers, recombinant protein expression, and lymphocyte numbers within the tumors diminished rapidly at 7 days postinoculation. These data indicate that treatment with recombinant MYXV should be repeated at least every 4 days to maintain recombinant protein expression within a murine tumor. Additionally, neutrophilic inflammation was significantly increased in MYXV-Tred- and MYXV-IL15-treated tumors at early time points. It is speculated that neutrophilic inflammation induced by intratumoral replication of recombinant MXYV contributes to the antitumoral effect of MYXV treatment in this melanoma model. These findings support the inclusion of neutrophil chemotaxins in recombinant poxvirus oncolytic virotherapy.

  12. Myxoma Virus Oncolytic Efficiency Can Be Enhanced Through Chemical or Genetic Disruption of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Chad R.; Favis, Nicole A.; Agopsowicz, Kate C.; Hitt, Mary M.; Evans, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV), MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L+) MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L+ MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2). These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies. PMID:24391902

  13. Myxoma virus infection promotes NK lysis of malignant gliomas in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ogbomo, Henry; Zemp, Franz J; Lun, Xueqing; Zhang, Jiqing; Stack, Danuta; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant; Mody, Christopher H; Forsyth, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a well-established oncolytic agent against different types of tumors. MYXV is also known for its immunomodulatory properties in down-regulating major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I surface expression (via the M153R gene product, a viral E3-ubiquitin ligase) and suppressing T cell killing of infected target cells. MHC I down-regulation, however, favors NK cell activation. Brain tumors including gliomas are characterized by high MHC I expression with impaired NK activity. We thus hypothesized that MYXV infection of glioma cells will promote NK cell-mediated recognition and killing of gliomas. We infected human gliomas with MYXV and evaluated their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. MYXV enhanced NK cell-mediated killing of glioma cells (U87 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 51.73% vs. 28.63%, P = .0001, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 40.4% vs. 20.03%, P .0007, t test). Using MYXV M153R targeted knockout (designated vMyx-M153KO) to infect gliomas, we demonstrate that M153R was responsible for reduced expression of MHC I on gliomas and enhanced NK cell-mediated antiglioma activity (U87 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 51.73% vs. 25.17%, P = .0002, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 40.4% vs. 19.27, P = .0013, t test). Consequently, NK cell-mediated lysis of established human glioma tumors in CB-17 SCID mice was accelerated with improved mouse survival (log-rank P = .0072). These results demonstrate the potential for combining MYXV with NK cells to effectively kill malignant gliomas.

  14. Myxoma virus therapy for human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in a nude mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kinn, Veronica G; Hilgenberg, Valerie A; MacNeill, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a devastating tumor of young people that is difficult to cure. To determine if oncolytic virus therapy can improve outcomes in individuals with RMS, myxoma virus expressing a red fluorescent protein (MYXV-red) was evaluated for antitumoral effects using a murine model of RMS. Fluorescent protein was expressed in four RMS cell lines inoculated with MYXV-red, indicating that these cells were semipermissive to MYXV infection. MYXV-red replication and cytopathic effects were further evaluated using human embryonal RMS (CCL-136) cells. Logarithmic growth of MYXV-red and significant cell death were observed 72 hours after inoculation with MYXV. The oncolytic effects of MYXV-red were then studied in nude mice that were injected subcutaneously with CCL-136 cells to establish RMS xenografts. Once tumors measured 5 mm in diameter, mice were treated with multiple intratumoral injections of MXYV-red or saline. The average final tumor volume and rate of tumor growth were significantly decreased, and median survival time was significantly increased in MYXV-red-treated mice (P-values =0.0416, 0.0037, and 0.0004, respectively). Histologic sections of MYXV-red-treated tumors showed increased inflammation compared to saline-treated tumors (P-value =0.0002). In conclusion, MXYV-red treatment of RMS tumors was successful in individual mice as it resulted in decreased tumor burden in eight of eleven mice with nearly complete tumor remission in five of eleven mice. These data hold promise that MYXV-red treatment may be beneficial for people suffering from RMS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of RMS tumors using an oncolytic poxvirus. PMID:27579297

  15. A virulence factor of myxoma virus colocalizes with NF-kappaB in the nucleus and interferes with inflammation.

    PubMed

    Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle; Fiette, Laurence; Bouchiha, Sophie; Pignolet, Béatrice; Counor, Dorian; Filipe, Cédric; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Messud-Petit, Frédérique

    2004-03-01

    NF-kappaB is one of the most important elements that coordinate stress-induced, immune, and inflammatory responses. Myxoma virus, a member of the Poxviridae family responsible for rabbit myxomatosis, codes for several factors that help its survival in the host. In this study, we focused on the product of the M150R gene. We show that the protein has nine ankyrin repeats (ANKs), with the eighth having a close similarity with the nuclear localization signal-containing ANK of I-kappaBalpha, which regulates NF-kappaB activity by sequestering it in the cytosol. Because the viral protein is targeted to the nucleus, it was named MNF, for myxoma nuclear factor. This localization was lost when the eighth ANK was removed. In tumor necrosis factor alpha-treated cells, MNF and NF-kappaB colocalized as dotted spots in the nucleus. In vivo experiments with a knockout virus showed that MNF is a critical virulence factor, with its deletion generating an almost apathogenic virus. Detailed histological examinations revealed an increase in the inflammatory process in the absence of MNF, consistent with the interference of MNF with the NF-kappaB-induced proinflammatory pathway. Because MNF has homologs in other poxviruses, such as vaccinia, cowpox, and variola viruses, this protein is probably part of a key mechanism that contributes to the immunogenic and pathogenic properties of these viruses.

  16. Breast Reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... rebuild the shape of the breast. Instead of breast reconstruction, you could choose to wear a breast form ... one woman may not be right for another. Breast reconstruction may be done at the same time as ...

  17. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma of the mandible arising from an infected odontogenic cyst: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Grisar, Koenraad; Schol, Matthias; Hauben, Esther; Schoenaers, Joseph; Politis, Constantinus

    2016-01-01

    Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma (PIOSCC) derived from a odontogenic cyst is a rare form of odontogenic carcinoma. The incidence of carcinomas arising from odontogenic cysts is particularly uncommon and is reported to occur in 1–2 individuals for every 1,000 cases. The present case describes a 25-year-old man who was initially diagnosed with a chronically infected odontogenic cyst of the mandible. Biopsy and subsequent histology revealed the presence of squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, neck dissection and hemimandibulectomy were performed. Ultimately, the situation in the mouth healed, though with a severe amount of scarring. Although the development of PIOSCC from an odontogenic cyst is rare, it should be included in the differential diagnosis for jaw bone radiolucency. PMID:28105241

  18. Hybrid ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: report of a case and review of hybrid variations in the literature.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Manabu; Maruyama, Satoshi; Abé, Tatsuya; Babkair, Hamzah; Fujita, Hajime; Takagi, Ritsuo; Koyama, Jun-Ichi; Hayashi, Takafumi; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Hybrid odontogenic tumors including 2 or more different histologic types have been documented, but their occurrences are not very common. We present a case of hybrid odontogenic tumor composed of ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) arising in the mandibular molar region of a 31-year-old Japanese woman who had a history of familial adenomatous polyposis. The tumor, measuring 10 mm in diameter, was surgically removed from the alveolar bone. Histopathologically, the tumor consisted of both follicular and plexiform types of ameloblastoma in which multiple and smaller foci of AOT were intermingled. There have been 3 reported cases of hybrid ameloblastoma and AOT, all of which presented unicystic types as ameloblastoma components. This, however, is the first report of a hybrid tumor containing an authentic solid-type ameloblastoma compartment and an AOT compartment in a patient with a background of familial adenomatous polyposis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor distribution in pericoronal follicles: relationship with the origin of odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    PubMed

    da Silva Baumgart, Cristina; da Silva Lauxen, Isabel; Filho, Manoel Sant'Anna; de Quadros, Onofre Francisco

    2007-02-01

    Investigate the distribution of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in pericoronal follicles as a predictor of progression to odontogenic cysts and tumors. Immunohistochemical EGFR staining patterns (membrane-only, cytoplasm-only, or combined membrane and cytoplasmic staining) in the reduced enamel epithelium and nests of odontogenic epithelium associated with follicles of impacted molar teeth were evaluated. The staining pattern of 20 specimens of pericoronal follicle was compared with that of 16 normal oral mucosa samples and to squamous cell carcinoma samples. Combined membrane and cytoplasmic staining was observed for normal oral mucosa mostly in proliferating layers (basal and suprabasal), decreasing in intensity toward the surface. Seven epithelial nests presented membrane-only staining, and the majority presented either a cytoplasm-only or a combined staining pattern. The staining patterns observed in reduced enamel epithelium were cytoplasm-only and combined. EGFR membrane-only staining may be an indicator of increased potential for epithelial nests to become odontogenic cysts or tumors.

  20. Novel PTCH1 Mutations in Patients with Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors Screened for Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma (NBCC) Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Lorenza; Pollio, Annamaria; Pellacani, Giovanni; Guarneri, Carmelo; Ghiorzo, Paola; Longo, Caterina; Bruno, William; Giusti, Francesca; Bassoli, Sara; Bianchi-Scarrà, Giovanna; Ruini, Cristel; Seidenari, Stefania; Tomasi, Aldo; Ponti, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are cystic tumors that arise sporadically or associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disease mainly characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, KCOTs of the jaws and a variety of other tumors. PTCH1 mutation can be found both in sporadic or NBCCS associated KCOTs. The aim of the current study was to assess whether a combined clinical and bio-molecular approach could be suitable for the detection of NBCCS among patients with a diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs). The authors collected keratocystic odontogenic tumors recorded in the database of the Pathology Department of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia during the period 1991–2011. Through interviews and examinations, family pedigrees were drawn for all patients affected by these odontogenic lesions. We found out that 18 of the 70 patients with KCOTs and/or multiple basal cell carcinomas actually met the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of NBCCS. A wide inter- and intra-familial phenotypic variability was evident in the families. Ameloblastomas (AMLs) were reported in two probands that are also carriers of the PCTH1 germline mutations. Nine germline mutations in the PTCH1 gene, 5 of them novel, were evident in 14 tested probands. The clinical evaluation of the keratocystic odontogenic tumors can be used as screening for the detection of families at risk of NBCCS. Keratocystic odontogenic lesions are uncommon, and their discovery deserves the search for associated cutaneous basal cell carcinomas and other benign and malignant tumors related to NBCCS. PMID:22952776