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Sample records for oestrogen modulates human

  1. Clinically used selective oestrogen receptor modulators increase LDL receptor activity in primary human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, F; Fernández-Suárez, M E; Alonso, R; Alonso, M; Vázquez, C; Pastor, O; Mata, P; Lasunción, M A; Gómez-Coronado, D

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Treatment with selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. We assessed the effect of tamoxifen, raloxifene and toremifene and their combinations with lovastatin on LDL receptor activity in lymphocytes from normolipidaemic and familial hypercholesterolaemic (FH) subjects, and human HepG2 hepatocytes and MOLT-4 lymphoblasts. Experimental Approach Lymphocytes were isolated from peripheral blood, treated with different compounds, and 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labelled LDL uptake was analysed by flow cytometry. Key Results Tamoxifen, toremifene and raloxifene, in this order, stimulated DiI-LDL uptake by lymphocytes by inhibiting LDL-derived cholesterol trafficking and subsequent down-regulation of LDL receptor expression. Differently to what occurred in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells, only tamoxifen consistently displayed a potentiating effect with lovastatin in primary lymphocytes. The SERM-mediated increase in LDL receptor activity was not altered by the anti-oestrogen ICI 182 780 nor was it reproduced by 17β-oestradiol. However, the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen was equally effective as tamoxifen. The SERMs produced similar effects on LDL receptor activity in heterozygous FH lymphocytes as in normal lymphocytes, although none of them had a potentiating effect with lovastatin in heterozygous FH lymphocytes. The SERMs had no effect in homozygous FH lymphocytes. Conclusions and Implications Clinically used SERMs up-regulate LDL receptors in primary human lymphocytes. There is a mild enhancement between SERMs and lovastatin of lymphocyte LDLR activity, the potentiation being greater in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells. The effect of SERMs is independent of oestrogen receptors but is preserved in the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen. This mechanism may contribute to the cholesterol-lowering action of SERMs. PMID:25395200

  2. Tartrazine and sunset yellow are xenoestrogens in a new screening assay to identify modulators of human oestrogen receptor transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Axon, Andrew; May, Felicity E B; Gaughan, Luke E; Williams, Faith M; Blain, Peter G; Wright, Matthew C

    2012-08-16

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a cholestatic liver disease of unknown cause that occurs most frequently in post-menopausal women. Since the female sex hormone oestrogen can be cholestatic, we hypothesised that PBC may be triggered in part by chronic exposure to xenoestrogens (which may be more active on a background of low endogenous oestrogen levels seen in post-menopausal women). A reporter gene construct employing a synthetic oestrogen response element predicted to specifically interact with oestrogen receptors (ER) was constructed. Co-transfection of this reporter into an ER null cell line with a variety of nuclear receptor expression constructs indicated that the reporter gene was trans-activated by ERα and ERβ, but not by the androgen, thyroid, progesterone, glucocorticoid or vitamin D receptors. Chemicals linked to PBC were then screened for xenoestrogen activity in the human ERα-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Using this assay, the coal-derived food and cosmetic colourings--sunset yellow and tartrazine--were identified as novel human ERα activators, activating the human ER with an EC(50%) concentration of 220 and 160 nM, respectively.

  3. Primate-specific oestrogen-responsive long non-coding RNAs regulate proliferation and viability of human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chin-Yo; Dachet, Fabien; Cai, Juan; Ju, Donghong; Goldstone, Amanda; Wood, Emily J.; Liu, Ka; Jia, Hui; Kosir, Mary A.; Thepsuwan, Pattaraporn

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcripts of a recently discovered class of genes which do not code for proteins. LncRNA genes are approximately as numerous as protein-coding genes in the human genome. However, comparatively little remains known about lncRNA functions. We globally interrogated changes in the lncRNA transcriptome of oestrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells following treatment with oestrogen, and identified 127 oestrogen-responsive lncRNAs. Consistent with the emerging evidence that most human lncRNA genes lack homologues outside of primates, our evolutionary analysis revealed primate-specific lncRNAs downstream of oestrogen signalling. We demonstrate, using multiple functional assays to probe gain- and loss-of-function phenotypes in two oestrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cell lines, that two primate-specific oestrogen-responsive lncRNAs identified in this study (the oestrogen-repressed lncRNA BC041455, which reduces cell viability, and the oestrogen-induced lncRNA CR593775, which increases cell viability) exert previously unrecognized functions in cell proliferation and growth factor signalling pathways. The results suggest that oestrogen-responsive lncRNAs are capable of altering the proliferation and viability of human breast cancer cells. No effects on cellular phenotypes were associated with control transfections. As heretofore unappreciated components of key signalling pathways in cancers, including the MAP kinase pathway, lncRNAs hence represent a novel mechanism of action for oestrogen effects on cellular proliferation and viability phenotypes. This finding warrants further investigation in basic and translational studies of breast and potentially other types of cancers, has broad relevance to lncRNAs in other nuclear hormone receptor pathways, and should facilitate exploiting and targeting these cell viability modulating lncRNAs in post-genomic therapeutics. PMID:28003470

  4. Different methylation of oestrogen receptor DNA in human breast carcinomas with and without oestrogen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Piva, R.; Rimondi, A. P.; Hanau, S.; Maestri, I.; Alvisi, A.; Kumar, V. L.; del Senno, L.

    1990-01-01

    The methylation of the human oestrogen receptor (ER) gene was analysed by restriction enzymes in normal and neoplastic human breast tissues and cell lines. CCGG sequences in regions inside the gene, which are methylated both in normal breast and in tissues that are not the target of the oestrogen, are hypomethylated in 30% of tumours, both ER+ and ER- carcinomas. Moreover, 5' sequences of the gene, which are hypomethylated in normal breast and not in tissues not the target of oestrogen, are methylated to a lower degree in ER+ carcinomas, whereas they are methylated to a greater degree in ER- carcinomas. However, the same region is equally hypomethylated in both ER+ and ER- cancer cell lines. Our results indicate that in breast carcinomas ER DNA methylation is deranged, and in cancer cell lines is different from that observed in primary tumours. Furthermore, the abnormal methylation in the 5' end seems to be related to abnormal expression, namely diffuse hypomethylation in carcinomas with high ER content and hypermethylation in carcinomas without ER. These findings support our previous hypothesis that DNA methylation could be involved in the control of ER gene expression and demonstrate that abnormal ER gene methylation is a typical feature of breast cancers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2155643

  5. Oestrogen Modulates Hypothalamic Control of Energy Homeostasis Through Multiple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Roepke, Troy A.

    2009-01-01

    The control of energy homeostasis in women is correlated with the anorectic effects of oestrogen, which can attenuate body weight gain and reduce food intake in rodent models. This review will investigate the multiple signalling pathways and cellular targets that oestrogen utilises to control energy homeostasis in the hypothalamus. Oestrogen affects all of the hypothalamic nuclei that control energy homeostasis. Oestrogen controls the activity of hypothalamic neurones through gene regulation and neuronal excitability. Oestrogen’s primary cellular pathway is the control of gene transcription through the classical ERs (ERα and ERβ) with ERα having the primary role in energy homeostasis. Oestrogen also controls energy homeostasis through membrane-mediated events via membrane-associated ERs or a novel, putative membrane ER that is coupled to G-proteins. Therefore, oestrogen has at least two receptors with multiple signalling and transcriptional pathways to activate during immediate and long-term anorectic effects. Ultimately, it is the interactions of all the receptor-mediated processes in hypothalamus and other areas of the CNS that will determine the anorectic effects of oestrogen and its control of energy homeostasis. PMID:19076267

  6. Type II oestrogen binding sites in human colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Piantelli, M; Ricci, R; Larocca, L M; Rinelli, A; Capelli, A; Rizzo, S; Scambia, G; Ranelletti, F O

    1990-01-01

    Seven cases of colorectal adenocarcinomas were investigated for the presence of oestrogen receptors and progesterone receptors. The tumours specifically bound oestradiol. This binding almost exclusively resulted from the presence of high numbers of type II oestrogen binding sites. Oestrogen receptors were absent or present at very low concentrations. Immunohistochemical investigation of nuclear oestrogen receptors gave negative results. This indicates that antioestrogen receptor antibodies recognise oestrogen receptors but not type II oestrogen binding sites. The presence of specific type II oestrogen binding sites and progesterone binding offers further evidence for a potential role for these steroids and their receptors in colorectal carcinoma. PMID:2266171

  7. The role of oestrogen in the control of ciliated cells of the human endometrium.

    PubMed

    More, I A; Masterton, R G

    1976-05-01

    The incidence of ciliated cells in the human endometrium was determined. Conditions associated with an excess of oestrogenic activity were characterized by an increased incidence of ciliated cells, whilst oestrogen deficiency was associated with decreased numbers. When endometrium was cultured, addition of oestradiol-17 beta caused an increase in the ciliated cell population.

  8. Antiresorptive drugs beyond bisphosphonates and selective oestrogen receptor modulators for the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Reginster, J Y; Neuprez, A; Beaudart, C; Lecart, M P; Sarlet, N; Bernard, D; Disteche, S; Bruyere, O

    2014-06-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are a major cause of morbidity in the elderly population. Since postmenopausal osteoporosis is related to an increase in osteoclastic activity at the time of menopause, inhibitors of bone resorption have genuinely been considered an adequate strategy for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates and selective oestrogen receptor modulators are widely prescribed to treat osteoporosis. However, other antiresorptive drugs have been developed for the management of osteoporosis, with the objective of providing a substantial reduction in osteoporotic fractures at all skeletal sites, combined with an acceptable long-term skeletal and systemic safety profile. Denosumab, a human monoclonal antibody to receptor activator for nuclear factor kappa B ligand, has shown efficacy against vertebral, nonvertebral and hip fractures. Its administration every 6 months as a subcutaneous formulation might significantly influence compliance and persistence to therapy. Additional results regarding long-term skeletal safety (i.e. osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical diaphyseal femoral fracture) are needed. Odanacatib, a selective cathepsin K inhibitor, is a promising new approach to the inhibition of osteoclastic resorption, with the potential to uncouple bone formation from bone resorption. Results regarding its anti-fracture efficacy are expected in the coming months.

  9. Comparative assessment of endocrine modulators with oestrogenic activity: I. Definition of a hygiene-based margin of safety (HBMOS) for xeno-oestrogens against the background of European developments.

    PubMed

    Bolt, H M; Janning, P; Michna, H; Degen, G H

    2001-01-01

    A novel concept - the hygiene-based margin of safety (HBMOS) - is suggested for the assessment of the impact of potential endocrine modulators. It integrates exposure scenarios and potency data for industrial chemicals and naturally occurring dietary compounds with oestrogenic activity. An HBMOS is defined as a quotient of estimated daily intakes weighted by the relative in vivo potencies of these compounds. The Existing Chemicals Programme of the European Union provides Human and Environmental Risk Assessments of Existing Chemicals which include human exposure scenarios. Such exposure scenarios, along with potency estimates for endocrine activities, may provide a basis for a quantitative comparison of the potential endocrine-modulating effects of industrial chemicals with endocrine modulators as natural constituents of human diet. Natural phyto-oestrogens exhibit oestrogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. Important phyto-oestrogens for humans are isoflavones (daidzein, genistein) and lignans, with the highest quantities found in soybeans and flaxseed, respectively. Daily isoflavone exposures calculated for infants on soy-based formulae were in the ranges of 4.5-8 mg/kg body wt.; estimates for adults range up to 1 mg/kg body wt. The Senate Commission on the Evaluation of Food Safety (SKLM) of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft has also indicated a wide range of dietary exposures. For matters of risk assessment, the SKLM has based recommendations on dietary exposure scenarios, implying a daily intake of phyto-oestrogens in the order of 1 mg/kg body wt. On the basis of information compiled within the Existing Chemicals Programme of the EU, it appears that a daily human exposure to nonylphenol of 2 microg/kg body wt. may be a worst-case assumption, but which is based on valid scenarios. The intake of octylphenol is much lower, due to a different use pattern and applications, and may be neglected. Data from migration studies led to estimations of the daily human

  10. Bisphenol A modulates the metabolic regulator oestrogen-related receptor-α in T-cells.

    PubMed

    Cipelli, Riccardo; Harries, Lorna; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Yoshihara, Shin'ichi; Melzer, David; Galloway, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used plastics constituent that has been associated with endocrine, immune and metabolic effects. Evidence for how BPA exerts significant biological effects at chronic low levels of exposure has remained elusive. In adult men, exposure to BPA has been associated with higher expression of two nuclear receptors, oestrogen receptor-β (ERβ) and oestrogen-related-receptor-α (ERRα), in peripheral white blood cells in vivo. In this study, we explore the expression of ESR2 (ERβ) and ESRRA (ERRα) in human leukaemic T-cell lymphoblasts (Jurkat cells) exposed to BPA in vitro. We show that exposure to BPA led to enhanced expression of ESRRA within 6 h of exposure (mean±s.e.m.: 1.43±0.08-fold increase compared with the control, P<0.05). After 72 h, expression of ESRRA remained significantly enhanced at concentrations of BPA ≥1 nM. Oxidative metabolism of BPA by rat liver S9 fractions yields the potent oestrogenic metabolite, 4-methyl-2,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)pent-1-ene (MBP). Exposure of cells to 1-100 nM MBP increased the expression of both ESRRA (significantly induced, P<0.05, at 1, 10, 100 nM) and ESR2 (1.32±0.07-fold increase at 100 nM exposure, P<0.01). ERRα is a major control point for oxidative metabolism in many cell types, including T-cells. Following exposure to both BPA and MBP, we found that cells showed a decrease in cell proliferation rate. Taken together, these results confirm the bioactivity of BPA against putative T-cell targets in vitro at concentrations relevant to general human exposure.

  11. Oestrogens and spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carreau, Serge; Hess, Rex A.

    2010-01-01

    The role of oestrogens in male reproductive tract physiology has for a long time been a subject of debate. The testis produces significant amounts of oestrogenic hormones, via aromatase, and oestrogen receptors (ERs)α (ESR1) and ERβ (ESR2) are selectively expressed in cells of the testis as well as the epididymal epithelium, depending upon species. This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the presence and activity of aromatase and ERs in testis and sperm and the potential roles that oestrogens may have in mammalian spermatogenesis. Data show that physiology of the male gonad is in part under the control of a balance of androgens and oestrogens, with aromatase serving as a modulator. PMID:20403867

  12. Transdermal flux predictions for selected selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs): comparison with experimental results.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Sevgi; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Masini-Etévé, Valérie; Potts, Russell O; Guy, Richard H

    2013-12-28

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering transdermally a series of highly lipophilic compounds (log P ~4-7), comprising several selective oestrogen receptor modulators and a modified testosterone (danazol). The maximum fluxes of the drugs were predicted theoretically using the modified Potts & Guy algorithm (to determine the permeability coefficient (kp) from water) and the calculated aqueous solubilities. The correction provided by Cleek & Bunge took into account the contribution of the viable epidermal barrier to the skin permeation of highly lipophilic compounds. Experimental measurements of drug fluxes from saturated hydroalcoholic solutions were determined in vitro through excised pig skin. Overall, the predicted fluxes were in good general agreement (within a factor of 10) with the experimental results. Most of the experimental fluxes were greater than those predicted theoretically suggesting that the 70:30 v/v ethanol-water vehicle employed may have had a modest skin penetration enhancement effect. This investigation shows that the transdermal fluxes of highly lipophilic compounds can be reasonably predicted from first principles provided that the viable epidermis, underlying the stratum corneum, is included as a potentially important contributor to the skin's overall barrier function. Furthermore, the absolute values of the measured fluxes, when considered in parallel with previous clinical studies, indicate that it might be feasible to topically deliver a therapeutically useful amount of some of the compounds considered to treat cancerous breast tissue.

  13. Effects of Tamoxifen and oestrogen on histology and radiographic density in high and low mammographic density human breast tissues maintained in murine tissue engineering chambers.

    PubMed

    Chew, G L; Huo, C W; Huang, D; Blick, T; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Frazer, H; Southey, M C; Hopper, J L; Britt, K; Henderson, M A; Haviv, I; Thompson, E W

    2014-11-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. It is altered by exogenous endocrine treatments, including hormone replacement therapy and Tamoxifen. Such agents also modify breast cancer (BC) risk. However, the biomolecular basis of how systemic endocrine therapy modifies MD and MD-associated BC risk is poorly understood. This study aims to determine whether our xenograft biochamber model can be used to study the effectiveness of therapies aimed at modulating MD, by examine the effects of Tamoxifen and oestrogen on histologic and radiographic changes in high and low MD tissues maintained within the biochamber model. High and low MD human tissues were precisely sampled under radiographic guidance from prophylactic mastectomy fresh specimens of high-risk women, then inserted into separate vascularized murine biochambers. The murine hosts were concurrently implanted with Tamoxifen, oestrogen or placebo pellets, and the high and low MD biochamber tissues maintained in the murine host environment for 3 months, before the high and low MD biochamber tissues were harvested for histologic and radiographic analyses. The radiographic density of high MD tissue maintained in murine biochambers was decreased in Tamoxifen-treated mice compared to oestrogen-treated mice (p = 0.02). Tamoxifen treatment of high MD tissue in SCID mice led to a decrease in stromal (p = 0.009), and an increase in adipose (p = 0.023) percent areas, compared to placebo-treated mice. No histologic or radiographic differences were observed in low MD biochamber tissue with any treatment. High MD biochamber tissues maintained in mice implanted with Tamoxifen, oestrogen or placebo pellets had dynamic and measurable histologic compositional and radiographic changes. This further validates the dynamic nature of the MD xenograft model, and suggests the biochamber model may be useful for assessing the underlying molecular pathways of Tamoxifen-reduced MD, and in testing of other

  14. Interactions of ATP, oestradiol, genistein and the anti-oestrogens, faslodex (ICI 182780) and tamoxifen, with the human erythrocyte glucose transporter, GLUT1.

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Iram; Cunningham, Philip; Naftalin, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    17 beta-Oestradiol (ED when subscript to K) and the phytoestrogen isoflavone genistein (GEN) inhibit glucose transport in human erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts. The selective oestrogen receptor modulators or anti-oestrogens, faslodex (ICI 182780) (FAS) and tamoxifen (TAM), competitively antagonize oestradiol inhibition of glucose exit from erythrocytes (K(i(ED/FAS))=2.84+/-0.16 microM and K(i(ED/TAM))=100+/-2 nM). Faslodex has no significant inhibitory effect on glucose exit, but tamoxifen alone inhibits glucose exit (K(i(TAM))=300+/-100 nM). In ghosts, ATP (1-4 mM) competitively antagonizes oestradiol, genistein and cytochalasin B (CB)-dependent inhibitions of glucose exit, (K(i(ATP/ED))=2.5+/-0.23 mM, K(i(ATP/GEN))=0.99+/-0.17 mM and K(i(ATP/CB))=0.76+/-0.08 mM). Tamoxifen and faslodex reverse oestradiol-dependent inhibition of glucose exit with ATP>1 mM (K(i(ED/TAM))=130+/-5 nM and K(i(ED/FAS))=2.7+/-0.9 microM). The cytoplasmic surface of the glucose transporter (GLUT)1 contains four sequences with close homologies to sequences in the ligand-binding domain of human oestrogen receptor beta (hesr-2). One homology is adjacent to the Walker ATP-binding motif II (GLUT1, residues 225-229) in the large cytoplasmic segment linking transmembrane helices 6 and 7; another GLUT (residues 421-423) contains the Walker ATP-binding motif III. Mapping of these regions on to a three-dimensional template of GLUT indicates that a possible oestrogen-binding site lies between His(337), Arg(349) and Glu(249) at the cytoplasmic entrance to the hydrophilic pore spanning GLUT, which have a similar topology to His(475), Glu(305) and Arg(346) in hesr-2 that anchor the head and tail hydroxy groups of oestradiol and genistein, and thus are suitably placed to provide an ATP-sensitive oestrogen binding site that could modulate glucose export. PMID:12133004

  15. Structural basis for androgen specificity and oestrogen synthesis in human aromatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Debashis; Griswold, Jennifer; Erman, Mary; Pangborn, Walter

    2009-03-06

    Aromatase cytochrome P450 is the only enzyme in vertebrates known to catalyse the biosynthesis of all oestrogens from androgens. Aromatase inhibitors therefore constitute a frontline therapy for oestrogen-dependent breast cancer. In a three-step process, each step requiring 1 mol of O{sub 2}, 1 mol of NADPH, and coupling with its redox partner cytochrome P450 reductase, aromatase converts androstenedione, testosterone and 16{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone to oestrone, 17{beta}-oestradiol and 17{beta},16{alpha}-oestriol, respectively. The first two steps are C19-methyl hydroxylation steps, and the third involves the aromatization of the steroid A-ring, unique to aromatase. Whereas most P450s are not highly substrate selective, it is the hallmark androgenic specificity that sets aromatase apart. The structure of this enzyme of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane has remained unknown for decades, hindering elucidation of the biochemical mechanism. Here we present the crystal structure of human placental aromatase, the only natural mammalian, full-length P450 and P450 in hormone biosynthetic pathways to be crystallized so far. Unlike the active sites of many microsomal P450s that metabolize drugs and xenobiotics, aromatase has an androgen-specific cleft that binds the androstenedione molecule snugly. Hydrophobic and polar residues exquisitely complement the steroid backbone. The locations of catalytically important residues shed light on the reaction mechanism. The relative juxtaposition of the hydrophobic amino-terminal region and the opening to the catalytic cleft shows why membrane anchoring is necessary for the lipophilic substrates to gain access to the active site. The molecular basis for the enzyme's androgenic specificity and unique catalytic mechanism can be used for developing next-generation aromatase inhibitors.

  16. Structural basis for androgen specificity and oestrogen synthesis in human aromatase.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debashis; Griswold, Jennifer; Erman, Mary; Pangborn, Walter

    2009-01-08

    Aromatase cytochrome P450 is the only enzyme in vertebrates known to catalyse the biosynthesis of all oestrogens from androgens. Aromatase inhibitors therefore constitute a frontline therapy for oestrogen-dependent breast cancer. In a three-step process, each step requiring 1 mol of O(2), 1 mol of NADPH, and coupling with its redox partner cytochrome P450 reductase, aromatase converts androstenedione, testosterone and 16alpha-hydroxytestosterone to oestrone, 17beta-oestradiol and 17beta,16alpha-oestriol, respectively. The first two steps are C19-methyl hydroxylation steps, and the third involves the aromatization of the steroid A-ring, unique to aromatase. Whereas most P450s are not highly substrate selective, it is the hallmark androgenic specificity that sets aromatase apart. The structure of this enzyme of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane has remained unknown for decades, hindering elucidation of the biochemical mechanism. Here we present the crystal structure of human placental aromatase, the only natural mammalian, full-length P450 and P450 in hormone biosynthetic pathways to be crystallized so far. Unlike the active sites of many microsomal P450s that metabolize drugs and xenobiotics, aromatase has an androgen-specific cleft that binds the androstenedione molecule snugly. Hydrophobic and polar residues exquisitely complement the steroid backbone. The locations of catalytically important residues shed light on the reaction mechanism. The relative juxtaposition of the hydrophobic amino-terminal region and the opening to the catalytic cleft shows why membrane anchoring is necessary for the lipophilic substrates to gain access to the active site. The molecular basis for the enzyme's androgenic specificity and unique catalytic mechanism can be used for developing next-generation aromatase inhibitors.

  17. Proliferative effect of whey from cows' milk varying in phyto-oestrogens in human breast and prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Tina S; Höjer, Annika; Gustavsson, Anne-Maj; Hansen-Møller, Jens; Purup, Stig

    2012-05-01

    Intake of dietary phyto-oestrogens has received a great deal of attention owing to their potential influence on hormone-sensitive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer. Cows' milk contains phyto-oestrogens and the content varies according to the composition of the feed and the type and amount of legumes used. In this study we evaluated the proliferative effect of milk (whey) with different phyto-oestrogen content in human breast (MCF-7) and prostate cancer cells (PC-3). Milk was obtained from cows fed either a birdsfoot trefoil-timothy silage based ration (B1) or two different red clover silage based diets (R1 and R2) resulting in total phyto-oestrogen contents of 403, 1659 and 1434 ng/ml for the B1, R1 and R2 diets, respectively. Whey was produced from the milk and added to cell culture medium in concentrations up to 10% for MCF-7 cells and 5% for PC-3 cells. Cell proliferation was measured fluorometrically after 7 d for MCF-7 cells and 5 d for PC-3 cells. There was no significant difference in the proliferative effect of whey from the different dietary treatments at any of the whey concentrations tested. An anti-proliferative effect (P<0·01) of 5 and 10% whey was seen when tested in the presence of 10 pM oestradiol in the medium. This effect was independent of dietary treatment of cows. Whey induced a significant (P<0·01) proliferative response in PC-3 cells independent of dietary treatment. Purified equol in concentrations similar to equol concentrations in milk decreased PC-3 cell proliferation, and therefore the stimulatory effect of whey in PC-3 cells is believed to be mediated by other bioactives than equol. In conclusion, our results suggest that using whey in these proliferation assays, it was not possible to discriminate between milk with high or low levels of phyto-oestrogens.

  18. Phyto-oestrogens and breast cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Limer, Jane L; Speirs, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenol compounds of plant origin that exhibit a structural similarity to the mammalian steroid hormone 17β-oestradiol. In Asian nations the staple consumption of phyto-oestrogen-rich foodstuffs correlates with a reduced incidence of breast cancer. Human dietary intervention trials have noted a direct relationship between phyto-oestrogen ingestion and a favourable hormonal profile associated with decreased breast cancer risk. However, these studies failed to ascertain the precise effect of dietary phyto-oestrogens on the proliferation of mammary tissue. Epidemiological and rodent studies crucially suggest that breast cancer chemoprevention by dietary phyto-oestrogen compounds is dependent on ingestion before puberty, when the mammary gland is relatively immature. Phyto-oestrogen supplements are commercially marketed for use by postmenopausal women as natural and safe alternatives to hormone replacement therapy. Of current concern is the effect of phyto-oestrogen compounds on the growth of pre-existing breast tumours. Data are contradictory, with cell culture studies reporting both the oestrogenic stimulation of oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell lines and the antagonism of tamoxifen activity at physiological phyto-oestrogen concentrations. Conversely, phyto-oestrogen ingestion by rodents is associated with the development of less aggressive breast tumours with reduced metastatic potential. Despite the present ambiguity, current data do suggest a potential benefit from use of phyto-oestrogens in breast cancer chemoprevention and therapy. These aspects are discussed. PMID:15084232

  19. Relationship between oestrogen-receptor content and histological grade in human primary breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, P. V.; Davies, C. J.; Blamey, R. W.; Elston, C. W.; Johnson, J.; Griffiths, K.

    1978-01-01

    A series of 300 patients presenting consecutively with primary operable breast cancer has been studied. A significant correlation was found between oestrogen-receptor (ER) content and histological grade: the better-differentiated tumours rarely lacked receptor. This correlation was significant only in women defined as post-menopausal. Data on early recurrence of disease indicate a worse prognosis for women in whom primary tumours are ER-. PMID:743491

  20. Steroid sulphatase and oestrogen sulphotransferase in human non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Iida, S; Kakinuma, H; Miki, Y; Abe, K; Sakurai, M; Suzuki, S; Niikawa, H; Akahira, J; Suzuki, T; Sasano, H

    2013-01-01

    Background: Steroid sulphatase (STS) is one of the steroid-metabolising enzymes involved in desulphating inactive steroid sulphates and oestrogen sulphotransferase (EST) sulphates active oestrogen. The roles of both STS and EST have not been examined in oestrogen-dependent non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: We evaluated the immunoreactivity of STS and EST in NSCLC cases using immunohistochemistry. The function of STS and EST was further demonstrated using NSCLC cell lines. Results: The immunoreactivity of STS and EST was detected in 49.5% and 27.8% of NSCLC cases, respectively. The immunoreactivity of STS was significantly higher in female adenocarcinoma cases. The STS-positive NSCLCs were also significantly correlated in an inversed manner with tumour size and cell proliferation and tended to be associated with better clinical outcome. However, the immunoreactivity of EST was significantly correlated with intracellular oestradiol concentration. Results of in vitro analysis demonstrated that oestrone sulphate (E1-S) induced and pregnenolone sulphate (Preg-S) inhibited the proliferation in STS-expressing cell lines. The inhibition by Preg-S was reversed by a specific progesterone receptor blocker. Simultaneous addition of E1-S and Preg-S significantly suppressed the proliferation. Conclusion: In NSCLC patients, STS is considered a good prognostic factor. Results of our present study also indicated the benefits of potential progesterone therapy for NSCLC patients. PMID:23531699

  1. Topical oestrogen keratinises the human foreskin and may help prevent HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Pask, Andrew J; McInnes, Kerry J; Webb, David R; Short, Roger V

    2008-06-04

    With the growing incidence of HIV, there is a desperate need to develop simple, cheap and effective new ways of preventing HIV infection. Male circumcision reduces the risk of infection by about 60%, probably because of the removal of the Langerhans cells which are abundant in the inner foreskin and are the primary route by which HIV enters the penis. Langerhans cells form a vital part of the body's natural defence against HIV and only cause infection when they are exposed to high levels of HIV virions. Rather than removing this natural defence mechanism by circumcision, it may be better to enhance it by thickening the layer of keratin overlying the Langerhans cells, thereby reducing the viral load to which they are exposed. We have investigated the ability of topically administered oestrogen to induce keratinization of the epithelium of the inner foreskin. Histochemically, the whole of the foreskin is richly supplied with oestrogen receptors. The epithelium of the inner foreskin, like the vagina, responds within 24 hours to the topical administration of oestriol by keratinization, and the response persists for at least 5 days after the cessation of the treatment. Oestriol, a cheap, readily available natural oestrogen metabolite, rapidly keratinizes the inner foreskin, the site of HIV entry into the penis. This thickening of the overlying protective layer of keratin should reduce the exposure of the underlying Langerhans cells to HIV virions. This simple treatment could become an adjunct or alternative to surgical circumcision for reducing the incidence of HIV infection in men.

  2. Inverse antagonist activities of parabens on human oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ): In vitro and in silico studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhaobin; Sun, Libei; Hu, Ying; Jiao, Jian; Hu, Jianying

    2013-07-01

    Parabens are p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters that have been used extensively as preservatives in foods, cosmetics, drugs and toiletries. These intact esters are commonly detected in human breast cancer tissues and other human samples, thus arousing concern about the involvement of parabens in human breast cancer. In this study, an in vitro nuclear receptor coactivator recruiting assay was developed and used to evaluate the binding activities of parabens, salicylates and benzoates via antagonist competitive binding on the human oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ), which is known as both a diagnostic biomarker and a treatment target of breast cancer. The results showed that all of the test parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl- and benzylparaben) possessed clear inverse antagonist activities on ERRγ, with a lowest observed effect level (LOEL) of 10{sup −7} M and the 50% relative effective concentrations (REC50) varying from 3.09 × 10{sup −7} to 5.88 × 10{sup −7} M, whereas the salicylates possessed much lower activities and the benzoates showed no obvious activity. In silico molecular docking analyses showed that parabens fitted well into the active site of ERRγ, with hydrogen bonds forming between the p-hydroxyl group of parabens and the Glu275/Arg316 of ERRγ. As the paraben levels reported in breast cancer tissues are commonly higher than the LOELs observed in this study, parabens may play some role via ERRγ in the carcinogenesis of human breast cancer. In addition, parabens may have significant effects on breast cancer patients who are taking tamoxifen, as ERRγ is regarded as a treatment target for tamoxifen. - Highlights: • An oestrogen-related receptor γ coactivator recruiting assay was developed. • Strong binding activities of parabens with oestrogen-related receptor γ were found. • The paraben levels reported in breast cancer tissues were higher than their LOELs. • Parabens may play some role via ERRγ in the carcinogenesis of human

  3. Synergic hypocholesterolaemic effect of n-3 PUFA and oestrogen by modulation of hepatic cholesterol metabolism in female rats.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yuna; Jin, Youri; Park, Yongsoon

    2015-12-14

    n-3 PUFA such as EPA and DHA as well as oestrogen have been reported to decrease blood levels of cholesterol, but their underlying mechanism is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the combination of n-3 PUFA supplementation and oestrogen injection on hepatic cholesterol metabolism. Rats were fed a modified AIN-93G diet with 0, 1 or 2 % n-3 PUFA (EPA+DHA) relative to the total energy intake for 12 weeks. Rats were surgically ovariectomised at week 8, and, after 1-week recovery, rats were injected with 17β-oestradiol-3-benzoate (E2) or maize oil for the last 3 weeks. Supplementation with n-3 PUFA and E2 injection significantly increased the ratio of the hepatic expression of phosphorylated AMP activated protein kinase (p-AMPK):AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and decreased sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. Supplementation with n-3 PUFA increased hepatic expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), sterol 12α-hydroxylase (CYP8B1) and sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1); however, E2 injection decreased CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 but not CYP27A1. Additionally, E2 injection increased hepatic expression of oestrogen receptor-α and β. In conclusion, n-3 PUFA supplementation and E2 injection had synergic hypocholesterolaemic effects by down-regulating hepatic cholesterol synthesis (n-3 PUFA and oestrogen) and up-regulating bile acid synthesis (n-3 PUFA) in ovariectomised rats.

  4. A role for the androgen metabolite, 5alpha-androstane-3beta,17beta-diol, in modulating oestrogen receptor beta-mediated regulation of hormonal stress reactivity.

    PubMed

    Handa, R J; Weiser, M J; Zuloaga, D G

    2009-03-01

    Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a basic response of animals to environmental perturbations that threaten homeostasis. These responses are regulated by neurones in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) that synthesise and secrete corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH). Other PVN neuropeptides, such as arginine vasopressin and oxytocin, can also modulate activity of CRH neurones in the PVN and enhance CRH secretagogue activity of the anterior pituitary gland. In rodents, sex differences in HPA reactivity are well established; females exhibit a more robust activation of the HPA axis after stress than do males. These sex differences primarily result from opposing actions of sex steroids, testosterone and oestrogen, on HPA function. Ostreogen enhances stress activated adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) secretion, whereas testosterone decreases the gain of the HPA axis and inhibits ACTH and CORT responses to stress. Data show that androgens can act directly on PVN neurones in the male rat through a novel pathway involving oestrogen receptor (ER)beta, whereas oestrogen acts predominantly through ERalpha. Thus, we examined the hypothesis that, in males, testosterone suppresses HPA function via an androgen metabolite that binds ERbeta. Clues to the neurobiological mechanisms underlying such a novel action can be gleaned from studies showing extensive colocalisation of ERbeta in oxytocin-containing cells of the PVN. Hence, in this review, we address the possibility that testosterone inhibits HPA reactivity by metabolising to 5alpha-androstane-3beta,17beta-diol, a compound that binds ERbeta and regulates oxytocin containing neurones of the PVN. These findings suggest a re-evaluation of studies examining pathways for androgen receptor signalling.

  5. In vivo oestrogenic modulation of Egr1 and Pitx1 gene expression in female rat pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, Alina; Herman, Andrzej P; Wolińska-Witort, Ewa; Kochman, Kazimierz; Zwierzchowski, Lech

    2014-12-01

    EGR1 and PITX1 are transcription factors required for gonadotroph cell Lhb promoter activation. To determine changes in Egr1 and Pitx1 mRNA levels in central and peripheral pituitary stimulations, an in vivo model based on i.c.v. pulsatile (1 pulse/0.5 h over 2 h) GnRH agonist (1.5 nM buserelin) or antagonist (2 nM antide) microinjections was used. The microinjections were given to ovariectomised and 17β-oestradiol (E2) (3×20 μg), ERA (ESR1) agonist propyl pyrazole triol (PPT) (3×0.5 mg), ERB (ESR2) agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) (3×0.5 mg) s.c. pre-treated rats 30 min after last pulse anterior pituitaries were excised. Relative mRNA expression was determined by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Results revealed a gene-specific response for GnRH and/or oestrogenic stimulations in vivo. Buserelin pulses enhanced Egr1 expression by 66% in ovariectomised rats, whereas the oestradiol-supplemented+i.c.v. NaCl-microinjected group showed a 50% increase in Egr1 mRNA expression. The oestrogenic signal was transmitted via ERA (ESR1) and ERB (ESR2) activation as administration of PPT and DPN resulted in 97 and 62%, respectively, elevation in Egr1 mRNA expression. A synergistic action of GnRH agonist and 17β-oestradiol (E2) stimulation of the Egr1 gene transcription in vivo were found. GnRHR activity did not affect Pitx1 mRNA expression; regardless of NaCl, buserelin or antide i.c.v. pulses, s.c. oestrogenic supplementation (with E2, PPT or DPN) consistently decreased (by -46, -48 and -41% respectively) the Pitx1 mRNA in the anterior pituitary gland. Orchestrated Egr1 and Pitx1 activities depending on specific central and peripheral regulatory inputs could be responsible for physiologically variable Lhb gene promoter activation in vivo.

  6. Inverse antagonist activities of parabens on human oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ): in vitro and in silico studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaobin; Sun, Libei; Hu, Ying; Jiao, Jian; Hu, Jianying

    2013-07-01

    Parabens are p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters that have been used extensively as preservatives in foods, cosmetics, drugs and toiletries. These intact esters are commonly detected in human breast cancer tissues and other human samples, thus arousing concern about the involvement of parabens in human breast cancer. In this study, an in vitro nuclear receptor coactivator recruiting assay was developed and used to evaluate the binding activities of parabens, salicylates and benzoates via antagonist competitive binding on the human oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ), which is known as both a diagnostic biomarker and a treatment target of breast cancer. The results showed that all of the test parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl- and benzylparaben) possessed clear inverse antagonist activities on ERRγ, with a lowest observed effect level (LOEL) of 10(-7)M and the 50% relative effective concentrations (REC50) varying from 3.09×10(-7) to 5.88×10(-7)M, whereas the salicylates possessed much lower activities and the benzoates showed no obvious activity. In silico molecular docking analyses showed that parabens fitted well into the active site of ERRγ, with hydrogen bonds forming between the p-hydroxyl group of parabens and the Glu275/Arg316 of ERRγ. As the paraben levels reported in breast cancer tissues are commonly higher than the LOELs observed in this study, parabens may play some role via ERRγ in the carcinogenesis of human breast cancer. In addition, parabens may have significant effects on breast cancer patients who are taking tamoxifen, as ERRγ is regarded as a treatment target for tamoxifen.

  7. Steroid hormone receptor gene expression in human breast cancer cells: inverse relationship between oestrogen and glucocorticoid receptor messenger RNA levels.

    PubMed

    Hall, R E; Lee, C S; Alexander, I E; Shine, J; Clarke, C L; Sutherland, R L

    1990-12-15

    The relative expression in human breast cancer cells of messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNA) encoding different steroid hormone receptors is unknown. Accordingly, mRNA levels in total RNA extracted from 13 human breast cancer cell lines were measured by Northern analysis employing complementary DNA probes for the human oestrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), androgen (AR), vitamin D3 (VDR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR). The 7 ER+ lines expressed a single 6.4 kilobases (kb) ER mRNA. Interestingly, low concentrations of ER mRNA were detected in the ER- cell lines, MDA-MB-330 and BT 20. PR mRNA, predominantly a 13.5 kb species, was expressed in the 6 lines known to be ER+, PR+ by radioligand binding; however, one ER+ cell line, MDA-MB-134, failed to express PR mRNA. A 10.5 kb AR mRNA was expressed at significantly higher levels in ER+ than ER- cell lines. All cell lines expressed a single 4.6 kb mRNA for VDR and a single 7.4 kb mRNA for GR. ER and PR mRNA levels were positively correlated (p = 0.011) and each was positively correlated with androgen receptor (AR) mRNA levels (p less than or equal to 0.009). ER, PR and AR mRNAs were negatively associated with GR levels (p less than or equal to 0.012), while ER and AR mRNA levels were negatively correlated with mRNA for the epidermal growth factor receptor. In contrast, levels of VDR mRNA were unrelated to the concentration of any other steroid receptor mRNA. Our data demonstrate the coordinate expression of ER, PR and AR genes, and an inverse relationship between sex steroid hormone receptor and GR gene expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

  8. Human Development Student Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This set of 61 student learning modules deals with various topics pertaining to human development. The modules, which are designed for use in performance-based vocational education programs, each contain the following components: an introduction for the student, a performance objective, a variety of learning activities, content information, a…

  9. Genistein modulates the effects of parathyroid hormone in human osteoblastic SaOS-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Fang; Wong, Man-Sau

    2006-06-01

    Genistein and parathyroid hormone (PTH) are anabolic agents that stimulate bone formation through their direct actions in osteoblastic cells. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether genistein modulates the actions of PTH in human osteoblastic SaOS-2 cells in an oestrogen-depleted condition. The present results showed that genistein (10(-8) to 10(-6) m) induced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteoprotegrin (OPG) expression in SaOS-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These effects could be completely abolished by co-treatment with oestrogen antagonist ICI 182780 (7alpha-[9-[(4,4,5,5,5-pentafluoropentyl)sulfonyl]nonyl]-estra-1,3,5(10)-triene-3,17beta-diol). Genistein (at 1 microM) could stimulate the mRNA expression of receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). As OPG and RANKL are known to modulate osteoclastogenesis, the ability of genistein to modulate OPG and RANKL expression in SaOS-2 cells suggested that it might modulate osteoclastogenesis through its direct actions on osteoblastic cells. PTH (at 10 nM) stimulated ALP activity, induced RANKL mRNA expression and suppressed OPG mRNA expression in SaOS-2 cells, confirming its bi-directional effects on osteoblastic cells. Pre-treatment of SaOS-2 cells with genistein and oestrogen not only enhanced PTH-induced ALP activity, but also attenuated PTH up regulation of RANKL mRNA expression and PTH down regulation of OPG mRNA expression. Taken together, the present study provides the first evidence that genistein could modulate the actions of PTH in human osteoblastic SaOS-2 cells in an oestrogen-depleted condition.

  10. Oestrogen, ocular function and low-level vision: a review.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Claire V; Walker, James A; Davidson, Colin

    2014-11-01

    Over the past 10 years, a literature has emerged concerning the sex steroid hormone oestrogen and its role in human vision. Herein, we review evidence that oestrogen (oestradiol) levels may significantly affect ocular function and low-level vision, particularly in older females. In doing so, we have examined a number of vision-related disorders including dry eye, cataract, increased intraocular pressure, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. In each case, we have found oestrogen, or lack thereof, to have a role. We have also included discussion of how oestrogen-related pharmacological treatments for menopause and breast cancer can impact the pathology of the eye and a number of psychophysical aspects of vision. Finally, we have reviewed oestrogen's pharmacology and suggest potential mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects, with particular emphasis on anti-apoptotic and vascular effects.

  11. Oestrogen deficiency after tubal ligation.

    PubMed

    Cattanach, J

    1985-04-13

    4 of 7 women who had undergone tubal ligation within the past seven years were found to have oestrogen excretion concentrations at ovulation below the tenth percentile. A disturbance in the oestrogen/progesterone ratio as a consequence of localised hypertension at the ovary, when the utero-ovarian arterial loop is occluded at tubal ligation, is proposed as a possible cause of oestrogen deficiency syndrome, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, and menorrhagia after tubal ligation. Similar pathophysiology may occur after hysterectomy with ovarian conservation.

  12. Anti-oestrogens but not oestrogen deprivation promote cellular invasion in intercellular adhesion-deficient breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Borley, Annabel C; Hiscox, Stephen; Gee, Julia; Smith, Chris; Shaw, Victoria; Barrett-Lee, Peter; Nicholson, Robert I

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Anti-oestrogens have been the mainstay of therapy in patients with oestrogen-receptor (ER) positive breast cancer and have provided significant improvements in survival. However, their benefits are limited by tumour recurrence in a significant proportion of initially drug-responsive breast cancer patients because of acquired anti-oestrogen resistance. Relapse on such therapies clinically presents as local and/or regional recurrences, frequently with distant metastases, and the prognosis for these patients is poor. The selective ER modulator, tamoxifen, classically exerts gene inhibitory effects during the drug-responsive phase in ER-positive breast cancer cells. Paradoxically, this drug is also able to induce the expression of genes, which in the appropriate cell context may contribute to an adverse cell phenotype. Here we have investigated the effects of tamoxifen and fulvestrant treatment on invasive signalling and compared this with the direct effects of oestrogen withdrawal to mimic the action of aromatase inhibitors. Methods The effect of oestrogen and 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen on the invasive capacity of endocrine-sensitive MCF-7 cells, in the presence or absence of functional E-cadherin, was determined by Matrigel invasion assays. Studies also monitored the impact of oestrogen withdrawal or treatment with fulvestrant on cell invasion. Western blotting using phospho-specific antibodies was performed to ascertain changes in invasive signalling in response to the two anti-oestrogens versus both oestradiol treatment and withdrawal. Results To the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time that tamoxifen can promote an invasive phenotype in ER-positive breast cancer cells under conditions of poor cell-cell contact and suggest a role for Src kinase and associated pro-invasive genes in this process. Our studies revealed that although this adverse effect is also apparent for further classes of anti-oestrogens, exemplified by the steroidal agent

  13. Development of a transient expression assay for detecting environmental oestrogens in zebrafish and medaka embryos

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oestrogenic contaminants are widespread in the aquatic environment and have been shown to induce adverse effects in both wildlife (most notably in fish) and humans, raising international concern. Available detecting and testing systems are limited in their capacity to elucidate oestrogen signalling pathways and physiological impacts. Here we developed a transient expression assay to investigate the effects of oestrogenic chemicals in fish early life stages and to identify target organs for oestrogenic effects. To enhance the response sensitivity to oestrogen, we adopted the use of multiple tandem oestrogen responsive elements (EREc38) in a Tol2 transposon mediated Gal4ff-UAS system. The plasmid constructed (pTol2_ERE-TATA-Gal4ff), contains three copies of oestrogen response elements (3ERE) that on exposure to oestrogen induces expression of Gal4ff which this in turn binds Gal4-responsive Upstream Activated Sequence (UAS) elements, driving the expression of a second reporter gene, EGFP (Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein). Results The response of our construct to oestrogen exposure in zebrafish embryos was examined using a transient expression assay. The two plasmids were injected into 1–2 cell staged zebrafish embryos, and the embryos were exposed to various oestrogens including the natural steroid oestrogen 17ß-oestradiol (E2), the synthetic oestrogen 17α- ethinyloestradiol (EE2), and the relatively weak environmental oestrogen nonylphenol (NP), and GFP expression was examined in the subsequent embryos using fluorescent microscopy. There was no GFP expression detected in unexposed embryos, but specific and mosaic expression of GFP was detected in the liver, heart, somite muscle and some other tissue cells for exposures to steroid oestrogen treatments (EE2; 10 ng/L, E2; 100 ng/L, after 72 h exposures). For the NP exposures, GFP expression was observed at 10 μg NP/L after 72 h (100 μg NP/L was toxic to the fish). We also demonstrate that

  14. Sex, the brain and hypertension: brain oestrogen receptors and high blood pressure risk factors.

    PubMed

    Hay, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major contributor to worldwide morbidity and mortality rates related to cardiovascular disease. There are important sex differences in the onset and rate of hypertension in humans. Compared with age-matched men, premenopausal women are less likely to develop hypertension. However, after age 60, the incidence of hypertension increases in women and even surpasses that seen in older men. It is thought that changes in levels of circulating ovarian hormones as women age may be involved in the increase in hypertension in older women. One of the key mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension in both men and women is an increase in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Brain regions important for the regulation of SNA, such as the subfornical organ, the paraventricular nucleus and the rostral ventral lateral medulla, also express specific subtypes of oestrogen receptors. Each of these brain regions has also been implicated in mechanisms underlying risk factors for hypertension such as obesity, stress and inflammation. The present review brings together evidence that links actions of oestrogen at these receptors to modulate some of the common brain mechanisms involved in the ability of hypertensive risk factors to increase SNA and blood pressure. Understanding the mechanisms by which oestrogen acts at key sites in the brain for the regulation of SNA is important for the development of novel, sex-specific therapies for treating hypertension.

  15. Oestrogen synthesis, oestrogen metabolism and functional oestrogen receptors in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bayard, F; Clamens, S; Delsol, G; Blaes, N; Maret, A; Faye, J C

    1995-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanisms by which oestrogenic hormones influence the vascular system, we have studied their metabolism and the functioning of oestrogen receptors in bovine aortic endothelial cells from primo-secondary cultures, a widely studied model of vascular pathophysiology. We have demonstrated the enzymic activity of oestradiol-17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17-ketoreductase and aromatase in these cells. Immunocytochemical analyses, using two different monoclonal antibodies that recognize epitopes in the A/B domain of the oestrogen receptor, showed that this molecule has a predominantly cytoplasmic localization even after the addition of oestrogen to the culture medium. We showed that the hormone-receptor complexes were functional by demonstrating their transactivating ability in transfection experiments using the luciferase gene reporter and an oestrogen-responsive element transcriptional enhancer, although the amplitude of the response was in the range of only 140-150%: this was not a consequence of the presence of a specific limiting factor, but instead might be related to the peculiar subcellular localization of the oestrogen receptor.

  16. Concordance between core needle biopsy and surgical specimen for oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asogan, Aravind Barathi; Hong, Ga Sze; Prabhakaran, Subash Kumar Arni

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to analyse the concordance rate, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value of core needle biopsy (CNB) and subsequent surgical specimen (SS) in assessing levels of oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu). It also evaluated the revised American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists (ASCO/CAP) guidelines for ER/PgR positivity. METHODS We analysed the breast cancer database of KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore, from 1 June 2005 to 30 December 2012. Invasive breast cancer patients who had CNB and subsequent SS were included. RESULTS A total of 560 patients were included. The concordance of ER, PgR and HER2/neu positivity between CNB and SS was 96.1%, 89.1% and 96.8%, respectively. When the ‘ER ≥ 10% positive’ group was compared with the ‘ER ≥ 1% positive’ group, specificity increased from 79.7% to 92.5% and PPV increased from 93.9% to 97.5%. When the ‘PgR ≥ 10% positive’ group was compared with the ‘PgR ≥ 1% positive’ group, specificity increased from 84.2% to 89.3% and PPV improved from 89.7% to 92.9%. The revised ASCO/CAP guidelines decreased discordant results by > 50% for ER and by 18.2% for PgR. CONCLUSION CNB has high concordance with SS in the evaluation of the molecular profile of invasive breast cancer. Thus, molecular evaluation does not need to be repeated with SS except for ER-, PgR- and HER2/neu-negative CNB results. The revised ASCO/CAP guidelines resulted in more precise ER and PgR status on CNB. PMID:27029805

  17. Exploiting the apoptotic actions of oestrogen to reverse antihormonal drug resistance in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, V. Craig; Lewis-Wambi, Joan; Kim, Helen; Cunliffe, Heather; Ariazi, Eric; Sharma, Catherine G. N.; Shupp, Heather A.; Swaby, Ramona

    2009-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitous application of selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer has created a significant advance in patient care. However, the consequence of prolonged treatment with antihormonal therapy is the development of drug resistance. Nevertheless, the systematic description of models of drug resistance to SERMs and aromatase inhibitors has resulted in the discovery of a vulnerability in tumour homeostasis that can be exploited to improve patient care. Drug resistance to antihormones evolves, so that eventually the cells change to create novel signal transduction pathways for enhanced oestrogen (GPR30 + OER) sensitivity, a reduction in progesterone receptor production and an increased metastatic potential. Most importantly, antihormone resistant breast cancer cells adapt with an ability to undergo apoptosis with low concentrations of oestrogen. The oestrogen destroys antihormone resistant cells and reactivates sensitivity to prolonged antihormonal therapy. We have initiated a major collaborative program of genomics and proteomics to use our laboratory models to map the mechanism of subcellular survival and apoptosis in breast cancer. The laboratory program is integrated with a clinical program that seeks to determine the minimum dose of oestrogen necessary to create objective responses in patients who have succeeded and failed two consecutive antihormonal therapies. Once our program is complete, the new knowledge will be available to translate to clinical care for the long-term maintenance of patients on antihormone therapy. PMID:17719781

  18. New Hypotheses and Opportunities in Endocrine Therapy: Amplification of Oestrogen-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, V. Craig; Lewis-Wambi, Joan S.; Patel, Roshani R.; Kim, Helen; Ariazi, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    Aims To outline the progress being made in the understanding of acquired resistance to long term therapy with the selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs, tamoxifen and raloxifene) and aromatase inhibitors. The question to be addressed is how we can amplify the new biology of oestrogen-induced apoptosis to create more complete responses in exhaustively antihormone treated metastatic breast cancer. Methods and Results Three questions are posed and addressed. 1.) Do we know how oestrogen works? 2.) Can we improve adjuvant antihormonal therapy? 3.) Can we enhance oestrogen-induced apoptosis? The new player in oestrogen action is GPR30 and there are new drugs specific for this target to trigger apoptosis. Similarly, anti-angiogenic drugs can be integrated into adjuvant antihormone therapy or to enhance oestrogen-induced apoptosis in Phase II antihormone resistant breast cancer. The goal is to reduce the development of acquired antihormone resistance or undermine the ability of breast cancer cells to undergo apoptosis with oestrogen respectively. Finally, drugs to reduce the synthesis of glutathione, a subcellular molecule compound associated with drug resistance, can enhance oestradiol-induced apoptosis. Conclusions We propose an integrated approach for the rapid testing of agents to blunt survival pathways and amplify oestrogen-induced apoptosis and tumour regression in Phase II resistant metastatic breast cancer. This Pharma platform will provide rapid clinical results to predict efficacy in large scale clinical trials. PMID:19914527

  19. Clinical use of oestrogens and progestogens.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, C

    1990-09-01

    Oestrogens cure climacteric complaints and prevent the late sequelae of oestrogen deficiency. Prevention of myocardial infarction and of osteoporosis is now the main argument for long-term substitution of oestrogens and progestogens in the post-menopause and leads to a reduction of overall morbidity and mortality in users. Indications, contraindications, some side effects, risk-benefit and cost-benefit considerations are discussed and practical advice for oestrogen medication with regard to doses, preparations and the addition of progestogens is given.

  20. Oestrogens ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carla; Montopoli, Monica; Perli, Elena; Orlandi, Maurizia; Fantin, Marianna; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Caparrotta, Laura; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ghelli, Anna; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, the most frequent mitochondrial disease due to mitochondrial DNA point mutations in complex I, is characterized by the selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells, leading to optic atrophy and loss of central vision prevalently in young males. The current study investigated the reasons for the higher prevalence of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in males, exploring the potential compensatory effects of oestrogens on mutant cell metabolism. Control and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy osteosarcoma-derived cybrids (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6) were grown in glucose or glucose-free, galactose-supplemented medium. After having shown the nuclear and mitochondrial localization of oestrogen receptors in cybrids, experiments were carried out by adding 100 nM of 17β-oestradiol. In a set of experiments, cells were pre-incubated with the oestrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy cybrids in galactose medium presented overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which led to decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increased apoptotic rate, loss of cell viability and hyper-fragmented mitochondrial morphology compared with control cybrids. Treatment with 17β-oestradiol significantly rescued these pathological features and led to the activation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2. In addition, 17β-oestradiol induced a general activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and a small although significant improvement in energetic competence. All these effects were oestrogen receptor mediated. Finally, we showed that the oestrogen receptor β localizes to the mitochondrial network of human retinal ganglion cells. Our results strongly support a metabolic basis for the unexplained male prevalence in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hold promises for a therapeutic use for oestrogen-like molecules.

  1. Oestrogenic action of neonatal tamoxifen on the hypothalamus and reproductive system in female mice.

    PubMed

    Parandin, Rahmatollah; Behnam-Rassouli, Morteza; Mahdavi-Shahri, Nasser

    2016-04-11

    Tamoxifen, a selective oestrogen receptor modulator, is widely used for both the treatment and prevention of breast cancer in women; however, it is known to have adverse effects in the female reproductive system. Growing evidence suggests that oestrogen-sensitive neuron populations of the anteroventral periventricular (AVPV) nucleus and arcuate (ARC) nucleus, especially kisspeptin neurons, play a pivotal role in the timing of puberty onset and reproductive function. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether neonatal exposure to tamoxifen affects oestrogenic actions in the brain and reproductive function in mice. On 1 to 5 postnatal days, female pups were injected subcutaneously with sesame oil (sham), oestradiol benzoate (EB; 20 µg kg-1), tamoxifen (0.4 mg kg-1) or EB+tamoxifen. Control mice received no treatment. Mice in the EB, tamoxifen and tamoxifen+EB groups exhibited advanced vaginal opening, disrupted oestrous cycles and a decreased follicular pool. Conversely, in these groups, there was a reduction in kisspeptin (Kiss1) mRNA expression, the neuronal density of AVPV and ARC nuclei and LH and oestradiol concentrations in the serum. The results of the present study confirm oestrogenic actions of tamoxifen in the brain and reproductive system. In addition, we show, for the first time, that tamoxifen has oestrogenic effects on the oestrogen-sensitive hypothalamic AVPV and ARC nuclei controlling the reproductive axis in female mice.

  2. Oestrogen-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of endometrial epithelial cells contributes to the development of adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Jen; Li, Hsin-Yang; Huang, Chi-Hung; Twu, Nae-Fang; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Wang, Peng-Hui; Chou, Teh-Ying; Liu, Yen-Ni; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Yang, Muh-Hwa

    2010-11-01

    Adenomyosis is an oestrogen-dependent disease caused by a downward extension of the endometrium into the uterine myometrium. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) endows cells with migratory and invasive properties and can be induced by oestrogen. We hypothesized that oestrogen-induced EMT is critical in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. We first investigated whether EMT occurred in adenomyotic lesions and whether it correlated with serum 17β-oestradiol (E2) levels. Immunohistochemistry was performed on adenomyotic lesions and corresponding eutopic endometrium samples from women with adenomyosis. Endometria from women without endometrial disorders were used as a control. In the epithelial component of adenomyotic lesions, vimentin expression was up-regulated and E-cadherin expression was down-regulated compared to the eutopic endometrium, suggesting that EMT occurs in adenomyosis. In adenomyosis, the serum E2 level was negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression in the epithelial components of the eutopic endometrium and adenomyotic lesions, suggesting the involvement of oestrogen-induced EMT in endometrial cells. In oestrogen receptor-positive Ishikawa endometrial epithelial cells, oestrogen induced a morphological change to a fibroblast-like phenotype, a shift from epithelial marker expression to mesenchymal marker expression, increased migration and invasion, and up-regulation of the EMT regulator Slug. Raloxifene, a selective oestrogen receptor modulator, abrogated these effects. To determine the role of oestrogen-induced EMT in the implantation of ectopic endometrium, we xenotransplanted eutopic endometrium or adenomyotic lesions from adenomyosis patients into ovariectomized SCID mice. The implantation of endometrium was oestrogen-dependent and was suppressed by raloxifene. Collectively, these data highlight the crucial role of oestrogen-induced EMT in the development of adenomyosis and suggest that raloxifene may be a potential therapeutic agent for

  3. The mystery of male dominance in oesophageal cancer and the potential protective role of oestrogen.

    PubMed

    Chandanos, Evangelos; Lagergren, Jesper

    2009-12-01

    Oesophageal cancer is the sixth most common form of cancer death globally with almost 400,000 deaths annually. More than 90% of all cases are either adenocarcinomas (OAC) or squamous-cell carcinomas (OSCC). There is a strong male predominance with up to 8 and 3 men for every woman affected with OAC and OSCC, respectively. It has been hypothesised that sex hormonal factors may play a role in the development of oesophageal cancer or more specifically that oestrogen prevents such development. This article reviews the available literature on this topic. Basic science studies suggest an inhibitory effect of oestrogen in the growth of oesophageal cancer cells, and a possible mechanism of any oestrogen protection might be mediated through oestrogen receptors. But from the few epidemiological studies in which the hypothesis of oestrogen protection has been tested, no firm conclusions can yet be drawn of the role of oestrogen in human oesophageal cancer aetiology. More evidence from valid and large human studies is needed before any conclusions can be drawn.

  4. The different role of sex hormones on female cardiovascular physiology and function: not only oestrogens.

    PubMed

    Salerni, Sara; Di Francescomarino, Samanta; Cadeddu, Christian; Acquistapace, Flavio; Maffei, Silvia; Gallina, Sabina

    2015-06-01

    Human response to different physiologic stimuli and cardiovascular (CV) adaptation to various pathologies seem to be gender specific. Sex-steroid hormones have been postulated as the major contributors towards these sex-related differences. This review will discuss current evidence on gender differences in CV function and remodelling, and will present the different role of the principal sex-steroid hormones on female heart. Starting from a review of sex hormones synthesis, receptors and CV signalling, we will summarize the current knowledge concerning the role of sex hormones on the regulation of our daily activities throughout the life, via the modulation of autonomic nervous system, excitation-contraction coupling pathway and ion channels activity. Many unresolved questions remain even if oestrogen effects on myocardial remodelling and function have been extensively studied. So this work will focus attention also on the controversial and complex relationship existing between androgens, progesterone and female heart.

  5. Modelling defined mixtures of environmental oestrogens found in domestic animal and sewage treatment effluents using an in vitro oestrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Dieldrich S; Gray, L Earl; Wilson, Vickie S

    2012-06-01

    There is growing concern of exposure of fish, wildlife and humans to water sources contaminated with oestrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. Environmental oestrogens can come from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), municipal waste, agricultural and industrial effluents. US EPA's drinking water contaminant candidate list 3 (CCL3) includes several oestrogenic compounds. Although these contaminants are currently not subject to any proposed or promulgated national primary drinking water regulations, they are known or anticipated to occur in public water systems and may require future regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Using an in vitro transcriptional activation assay, this study evaluated oestrogens from CCL3 both individually and as a seven oestrogen mixture (fixed ray design) over a broad range of concentrations, including environmentally relevant concentrations. Log EC(50) and Hillslope values for individual oestrogens were as follows: estrone, -11.92, 1.283; estradiol-17α, -9.61, 1.486; estradiol-17β, 11.77, 1.494; estriol, -11.14, 1.074; ethinyl estradiol-17α, -12.63, 1.562; Mestranol, -11.08, 0.809 and Equilin, -11.48, 0.946. In addition, mixtures that mirrored the primary oestrogens found in swine, poultry and dairy CAFO effluent (fixed-ratio ray design), and a ternary mixture (4 × 4 × 4 factorial design) of oestrogens found in hormone replacement therapy and/or oral contraceptives were tested. Mixtures were evaluated for additivity using both the concentration addition (CA) model and oestrogen equivalence (EEQ) model. For each of the mixture studies, a broad range of concentrations were tested, both above and below environmentally relevant concentrations. Results show that the observed data did not vary consistently from either the CA or EEQ predictions for any mixture. Therefore, either the CA or EEQ model should be useful predictors for modelling oestrogen mixtures.

  6. Instructor's Guide for Human Development Student Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This instructor's guide is designed for use with an accompanying set of 61 student learning modules on human development. Included among the topics covered in the individual modules are the following: consumer and homemaking education (health and nutrition, personal appearance and grooming, puberty, menstruation, the human reproductive system,…

  7. Oestrogen receptors in the central nervous system and evidence for their role in the control of cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Spary, Emma J; Maqbool, Azhar; Batten, Trevor F C

    2009-11-01

    Oestrogen is considered beneficial to cardiovascular health through protective effects not only on the heart and vasculature, but also on the autonomic nervous system via actions on oestrogen receptors. A plethora of evidence supports a role for the hormone within the central nervous system in modulating the pathways regulating cardiovascular function. A complex interaction of several brainstem, spinal and forebrain nuclei is required to receive, integrate and co-ordinate inputs that contribute appropriate autonomic reflex responses to changes in blood pressure and other cardiovascular parameters. Central effects of oestrogen and oestrogen receptors have already been demonstrated in many of these areas. In addition to the classical nuclear oestrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta) a recently discovered G-protein coupled receptor, GPR30, has been shown to be a novel mediator of oestrogenic action. Many anatomical and molecular studies have described a considerable overlap in the regional expression of these receptors; however, the receptors do exhibit specific characteristics and subtype specific expression is found in many autonomic brain areas, for example ERbeta appears to predominate in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, whilst ERalpha is important in the nucleus of the solitary tract. This review provides an overview of the available information on the localisation of oestrogen receptor subtypes and their multitude of possible modulatory actions in different groups of neurochemically and functionally defined neurones in autonomic-related areas of the brain.

  8. Phytoestrogens oestrogen synthesis and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rice, Suman; Whitehead, Saffron A

    2008-02-01

    Phytoestrogens are used as 'natural' alternatives to HRT and, although epidemiological evidence implies that diets rich in phytoestrogens reduce the incidence of breast cancer, their weak oestrogenicity is also known to stimulate growth in experimental models of breast cancer. This review addresses the question as to how phytoestrogens may protect against breast cancer through their ability to bind preferentially to oestrogen receptor beta, inhibit enzymes that convert circulating steroid precursors into oestradiol and inhibit cell signalling pathways of growth factors.

  9. Integrating Oracle Human Resources with Other Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Karl; Shope, Shawn

    1998-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of implementing an enterprise-wide business system is achieving integration of the different modules to the satisfaction of diverse customers. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) implementation of the Oracle application suite demonstrates the need to coordinate Oracle Human Resources Management System (HRMS) decision across the Oracle modules.

  10. Is oestrogen a ‘biological neuroleptic’?

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadyay, Subhagata

    2003-01-01

    Objective : Oestrogen-hypothesis in schizophrenia is a largely debated issue. Being a multifactor disorder, schizophrenia has gained importance in the field of psychiatric research, especially to dig out the tentative aetiologies (genetic, biological, environmental etc.), still under tested or not tested. The present article is an attempt only to understand the possible role of oestrogen as a ‘core’ biological factor at the backdrop of male-female differences (in the onset, course, treatment response, prognosis) in schizophrenia barring other factors. This is to reduce the level of ‘conflict’ and ‘confusion’ in the article. Method : Electronic data search is the mainstay of the literature bank, included in the article and only ’supportive’ evidences (direct and indirect) are incorporated to understand the role of oestrogen in the brain at the backdrop of schizophrenia. Result: The study comes out with a postulation that oestrogen has got a potential effect in moderating the process of schizophrenia in the females. Conclusion : Oestrogen could be tested as the ’novel’ therapeutic agent in the female schizophrenics with the necessary support from the modern Nuclear Imaging Techniques to get maximum therapeutic benefit in schizophrenia. PMID:21206859

  11. Immunohistochemical quantitation of oestrogen receptors and proliferative activity in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, V; Ladekarl, M

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To evaluate the effect of the duration of formalin fixation and of tumour heterogeneity on quantitative estimates of oestrogen receptor content (oestrogen receptor index) and proliferative activity (MIB-1 index) in breast cancer. METHODS--Two monoclonal antibodies, MIB-1 and oestrogen receptor, were applied to formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue from 25 prospectively collected oestrogen receptor positive breast carcinomas, using a microwave antigen retrieval method. Tumour tissue was allocated systematically to different periods of fixation to ensure minimal intraspecimen variation. The percentages of MIB-1 positive and oestrogen receptor positive nuclei were estimated in fields of vision sampled systematically from the entire specimen and from the whole tumour area of one "representative" cross-section. RESULTS--No correlation was found between the oestrogen receptor and MIB-1 indices and the duration of formalin fixation. The estimated MIB-1 and oestrogen receptor indices in tissue sampled systematically from the entire tumour were closely correlated with estimates obtained in a "representative" section. The intra- and interobserver correlation of the MIB-1 index was good, although a slight systematical error at the second assessment of the intraobserver study was noted. CONCLUSION--Quantitative estimates of oestrogen receptor content and proliferative activity are not significantly influenced by the period of fixation in formalin, varying from less than four hours to more than 48 hours. The MIB-1 and the oestrogen receptor indices obtained in a "representative" section do not deviate significantly from average indices determined in tissue samples from the entire tumour. Finally, the estimation of MIB-1 index is reproducible, justifying its routine use. PMID:7629289

  12. Efficiency of advanced oxidation processes in lowering bisphenol A toxicity and oestrogenic activity in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Plahuta, Maja; Tišler, Tatjana; Toman, Mihael Jožef; Pintar, Albin

    2014-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a well-known endocrine disruptor with adverse oestrogen-like effects eliciting adverse effects in humans and wildlife. For this reason it is necessary to set up an efficient removal of BPA from wastewaters, before they are discharged into surface waters. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of BPA removal from aqueous samples with photolytic, photocatalytic, and UV/H₂O₂ oxidation. BPA solutions were illuminated with different bulbs (halogen; 17 W UV, 254 nm; and 150 W UV, 365 nm) with or without the TiO₂ P-25 catalyst or H₂O₂ (to accelerate degradation). Acute toxicity and oestrogenic activity of treated samples were determined using luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), water fleas (Daphnia magna), zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio), and Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) assay with genetically modified yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results confirmed that BPA is toxic and oestrogenically active. Chemical analysis showed a reduction of BPA levels after photolytic treatment and 100 % conversion of BPA by photocatalytic and UV/H₂O₂ oxidation. The toxicity and oestrogenic activity of BPA were largely reduced in photolytically treated samples. Photocatalytic oxidation, however, either did not reduce BPA toxic and oestrogenic effects or even increased them in comparison with the baseline, untreated BPA solution. Our findings suggest that chemical analysis is not sufficient to determine the efficiency of advanced oxidation processes in removing pollutants from water and needs to be complemented with biological tests.

  13. Fluorene-9-bisphenol is anti-oestrogenic and may cause adverse pregnancy outcomes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaobin; Hu, Ying; Guo, Jilong; Yu, Tong; Sun, Libei; Xiao, Xuan; Zhu, Desheng; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Hiromori, Youhei; Li, Junyu; Fan, Xiaolin; Wan, Yi; Cheng, Siyu; Li, Jun; Guo, Xuan; Hu, Jianying

    2017-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is used in the production of plastic but has oestrogenic activity. Therefore, BPA substitutes, such as fluorene-9-bisphenol (BHPF), have been introduced for the production of so-called ‘BPA-free' plastics. Here we show that BHPF is released from commercial ‘BPA-free' plastic bottles into drinking water and has anti-oestrogenic effects in mice. We demonstrate that BHPF has anti-oestrogenic activity in vitro and, in an uterotrophic assay in mice, induces low uterine weight, atrophic endometria and causes adverse pregnancy outcomes, even at doses lower than those of BPA for which no observed adverse effect have been reported. Female mice given water containing BHPF released from plastic bottles, have detectable levels of BHPF in serum, low uterine weights and show decreased expressions of oestrogen-responsive genes. We also detect BHPF in the plasma of 7/100 individuals, who regularly drink water from plastic bottles. Our data suggest that BPA substitutes should be tested for anti-oestrogenic activity and call for further study of the toxicological effects of BHPF on human health. PMID:28248286

  14. Parabens, oestrogenicity, underarm cosmetics and breast cancer: a perspective on a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W

    2003-01-01

    A recent review by Darbre (2003) published in this journal (J. Appi. Toxicol. 23: 89-95) has attracted public and scientific interest that requires perspective, particularly on the use of esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) as preservatives in underarm cosmetics. Although parabens are generally regarded as safe, recent reports suggest that they are oestrogenic in a variety of in vitro (including MCF7 and ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cell lines) and in vivo tests for oestrogenicity (uterotrophic assays in both rat and mouse). There are also recent reports of adverse reproductive and developmental outcomes in rodent toxicity studies. Of interest is the lack of activity by the oral route but clear activity by the subcutaneous and topical routes, which is of some relevance to the use of underarm cosmetics. There would seem to be a case now to supplement these emerging toxicity data with longer term regulatory standard tests examining other oestrogenic endpoints and at least to consider these findings in more up-to-date risk assessments specific for cosmetic use. Further, there are few data on the use of underarm cosmetics and the risk of breast cancer, and although one recent retrospective interview-based study found no association there is a need for more thorough investigation taking into account the type of chemicals used. Darbre has forwarded a hypothesis and called for further work to establish whether or not the use of underarm cosmetics (particularly containing oestrogenic formulants) contributes to the rising incidence of breast cancer. It would seem prudent to conduct this work because the current database is sparse and the effects of long-term low-level exposures to weakly oestrogenic chemicals on human health, particularly their application to the underarm and the risks of breast cancer, are unknown. The role of oestrogens in breast cancer, however, is undisputed.

  15. Oestrogen receptor negativity in breast cancer: a cause or consequence?

    PubMed Central

    Gajulapalli, Vijaya Narasihma Reddy; Malisetty, Vijaya Lakshmi; Chitta, Suresh Kumar; Manavathi, Bramanandam

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine resistance, which occurs either by de novo or acquired route, is posing a major challenge in treating hormone-dependent breast cancers by endocrine therapies. The loss of oestrogen receptor α (ERα) expression is the vital cause of establishing endocrine resistance in this subtype. Understanding the mechanisms that determine the causes of this phenomenon are therefore essential to reduce the disease efficacy. But how we negate oestrogen receptor (ER) negativity and endocrine resistance in breast cancer is questionable. To answer that, two important approaches are considered: (1) understanding the cellular origin of heterogeneity and ER negativity in breast cancers and (2) characterization of molecular regulators of endocrine resistance. Breast tumours are heterogeneous in nature, having distinct molecular, cellular, histological and clinical behaviour. Recent advancements in perception of the heterogeneity of breast cancer revealed that the origin of a particular mammary tumour phenotype depends on the interactions between the cell of origin and driver genetic hits. On the other hand, histone deacetylases (HDACs), DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), miRNAs and ubiquitin ligases emerged as vital molecular regulators of ER negativity in breast cancers. Restoring response to endocrine therapy through re-expression of ERα by modulating the expression of these molecular regulators is therefore considered as a relevant concept that can be implemented in treating ER-negative breast cancers. In this review, we will thoroughly discuss the underlying mechanisms for the loss of ERα expression and provide the future prospects for implementing the strategies to negate ER negativity in breast cancers. PMID:27884978

  16. Oestrogens ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Carla; Montopoli, Monica; Perli, Elena; Orlandi, Maurizia; Fantin, Marianna; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Caparrotta, Laura; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ghelli, Anna; Sadun, Alfredo A.; d’Amati, Giulia

    2011-01-01

    Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy, the most frequent mitochondrial disease due to mitochondrial DNA point mutations in complex I, is characterized by the selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells, leading to optic atrophy and loss of central vision prevalently in young males. The current study investigated the reasons for the higher prevalence of Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy in males, exploring the potential compensatory effects of oestrogens on mutant cell metabolism. Control and Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy osteosarcoma-derived cybrids (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6) were grown in glucose or glucose-free, galactose-supplemented medium. After having shown the nuclear and mitochondrial localization of oestrogen receptors in cybrids, experiments were carried out by adding 100 nM of 17β-oestradiol. In a set of experiments, cells were pre-incubated with the oestrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy cybrids in galactose medium presented overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which led to decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increased apoptotic rate, loss of cell viability and hyper-fragmented mitochondrial morphology compared with control cybrids. Treatment with 17β-oestradiol significantly rescued these pathological features and led to the activation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2. In addition, 17β-oestradiol induced a general activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and a small although significant improvement in energetic competence. All these effects were oestrogen receptor mediated. Finally, we showed that the oestrogen receptor β localizes to the mitochondrial network of human retinal ganglion cells. Our results strongly support a metabolic basis for the unexplained male prevalence in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy and hold promises for a therapeutic use for oestrogen-like molecules. PMID:20943885

  17. [Apoptosis modulation by human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Ratkovich-González, Sarah; Olimón-Andalón, Vicente; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important processes to keep the homeostasis in organisms is the apoptosis, also called programmed cell death. This mechanism works through two pathways: The intrinsic or mitochondrial, which responds to DNA damage and extern agents like UV radiation; and the extrinsic or receptor-mediated, which binds to their ligands to initiate the apoptotic trail. The evasion of apoptosis is one of the main causes of cellular transformation to malignity. Many viruses had shown capacity to modify the apoptotic process; among them is the human papillomavirus, which, by means of its oncoproteins, interferes in pathways, reacting with the receptors and molecules and participating in the death mechanism. This creates ideal conditions for cancer development.

  18. Mediator kinase module and human tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Alison D.; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Boyer, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a conserved multi-subunit signal processor through which regulatory informatiosn conveyed by gene-specific transcription factors is transduced to RNA Polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, MED13, MED12, CDK8 and Cyclin C (CycC) comprise a four-subunit “kinase” module that exists in variable association with a 26-subunit Mediator core. Genetic and biochemical studies have established the Mediator kinase module as a major ingress of developmental and oncogenic signaling through Mediator, and much of its function in signal-dependent gene regulation derives from its resident CDK8 kinase activity. For example, CDK8-targeted substrate phosphorylation impacts transcription factor half-life, Pol II activity and chromatin chemistry and functional status. Recent structural and biochemical studies have revealed a precise network of physical and functional subunit interactions required for proper kinase module activity. Accordingly, pathologic change in this activity through altered expression or mutation of constituent kinase module subunits can have profound consequences for altered signaling and tumor formation. Herein, we review the structural organization, biological function and oncogenic potential of the Mediator kinase module. We focus principally on tumor-associated alterations in kinase module subunits for which mechanistic relationships as opposed to strictly correlative associations are established. These considerations point to an emerging picture of the Mediator kinase module as an oncogenic unit, one in which pathogenic activation/deactivation through component change drives tumor formation through perturbation of signal-dependent gene regulation. It follows that therapeutic strategies to combat CDK8-driven tumors will involve targeted modulation of CDK8 activity or pharmacologic manipulation of dysregulated CDK8-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:26182352

  19. Striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) is a PGC-1α/oestrogen-related receptor-α target gene and is upregulated in human skeletal muscle after endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Marita A; Hock, M Benjamin; Hazen, Bethany C; Kralli, Anastasia; Snow, Rod J; Russell, Aaron P

    2011-04-15

    The striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) is an actin-binding protein specifically expressed in cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle. STARS has been suggested to provide an important link between the transduction of external stress signals to intracellular signalling pathways controlling genes involved in the maintenance of muscle function. The aims of this study were firstly, to establish if STARS, as well as members of its downstream signalling pathway, are upregulated following acute endurance cycling exercise; and secondly, to determine if STARS is a transcriptional target of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-α (PGC-1α) and oestrogen-related receptor-α (ERRα). When measured 3 h post-exercise, STARS mRNA and protein levels as well as MRTF-A and serum response factor (SRF) nuclear protein content, were significantly increased by 140, 40, 40 and 40%, respectively. Known SRF target genes, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1β (CPT-1β) and jun B proto-oncogene (JUNB), as well as the exercise-responsive genes PGC-1α mRNA and ERRα were increased by 2.3-, 1.8-, 4.5- and 2.7-fold, 3 h post-exercise. Infection of C2C12 myotubes with an adenovirus-expressing human PGC-1α resulted in a 3-fold increase in Stars mRNA, a response that was abolished following the suppression of endogenous ERRα. Over-expression of PGC-1α also increased Cpt-1β, Cox4 and Vegf mRNA by 6.2-, 2.0- and 2.0-fold, respectively. Suppression of endogenous STARS reduced basal Cpt-1β levels by 8.2-fold and inhibited the PGC-1α-induced increase in Cpt-1β mRNA. Our results show for the first time that the STARS signalling pathway is upregulated in response to acute endurance exercise. Additionally, we show in C2C12 myotubes that the STARS gene is a PGC-1α/ERRα transcriptional target. Furthermore, our results suggest a novel role of STARS in the co-ordination of PGC-1α-induced upregulation of the fat oxidative gene, CPT-1β.

  20. Circumventing the natural, frequent oestrogen waves of the female cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) using oral progestin (Altrenogest).

    PubMed

    Crosier, Adrienne E; Comizzoli, Pierre; Koester, Diana C; Wildt, David E

    2016-08-03

    Cheetah are induced ovulators, experiencing short, variable oestrogen waves year-round. Exogenous gonadotrophin administration induces ovulation, but success is variable and often improves if ovaries are quiescent. After affirming the presence of short-term oestrogenic waves, we examined the effect of the timing of administration of exogenous equine and human chorionic gonadotrophins (eCG-hCG) within the oestrogen concentration pattern on subsequent follicle development and oocyte and corpus luteum quality. We also investigated ovarian suppression using an oral progestin (Altrenogest, 7 days) and assessed whether Altrenogest moderated adrenal activity by reducing glucocorticoid metabolites. All cheetahs exhibited short (every ~7-10 days), sporadic, year-round increases in faecal oestradiol punctuated by unpredictable periods (4-10 weeks) of baseline oestradiol (anoestrous). Gonadotrophin (eCG-hCG) efficacy was not affected by oestradiol 'wave' pattern if administered ≥3 days after an oestrogen peak. Such cheetahs produced normative faecal progestagen patterns and higher numbers (P<0.06) of mature oocytes than females given gonadotrophins ≤2 days after an oestradiol peak. Altrenogest supplementation expanded the interval between oestradiol peaks to 12.9 days compared with 7.3 days without progestin pretreatment. Altrenogest-fed females excreted less (P<0.05) glucocorticoid metabolites than non-supplemented counterparts. Results show that Altrenogest is effective for suppressing follicular activity, may contribute to reduced glucocorticoid production and may result in more effective ovulation induction via gonadotrophin therapy.

  1. Oestrogen promotes coronary angiogenesis even under normoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Ghadesi, Mehrzad; Hosseinbalam, Marzieh; Khazaei, Majid; Gharagozloo, Marjan; Gharagozlo, Marjan; Dashti, Gholamreza; Rajabi, Parvin; Rafieian, Shahram

    2008-09-01

    Angiogenic therapy is one of the new treatments of ischaemic heart disease. Oestrogen has angiogenic properties under hypoxic condition, and if oestrogen also induces angiogenesis under normoxic condition, it could be used in combination with other angiogenic therapies in the treatment of ischaemic heart disease. In this study, we evaluated the angiogenic effect of high-dose oestrogen treatment in normoxic rat heart tissue. Fifty-two ovariectomized rats were randomized in oestrogen-treated and control groups. 17beta-oestradiol (1 mg/week) and normal saline (1 mg/week) were administered intramuscularly in the treatment and control groups for 2 months. After that, coronary capillary density and coronary vessel permeability were measured. The serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level was also measured before and after the treatment. The results indicate that coronary capillary density (number of capillary per square millimetre) and coronary vessel permeability (fluorescence intensity) were significantly higher in the oestrogen-treated group than in the control group (628 +/- 26 per mm(2) versus 540 +/- 26 per mm(2); P < 0.05 and 207 +/- 10 versus 147 +/- 19 per gram tissue; P < 0.05). Oestrogen treatment increased serum VEGF level in the oestrogen-treated group compared to the control group (52 +/- 3 versus 33 +/- 6 pg/ml; P < 0.05), but interestingly VEGF was also increased in the control group after placebo treatment. It seems that high-dose oestrogen administration has angiogenic properties even in normoxic conditions. These angiogenic properties may result from oestrogen's direct effect on VEGF or other mechanisms, such as endothelial progenitor cell mobilization. Because of the broad effect of oestrogen on angiogenic growth factors and endothelial cells, more studies are required to clarify angiogenic properties of high-dose oestrogen.

  2. Roles for oestrogen receptor β in adult brain function.

    PubMed

    Handa, R J; Ogawa, S; Wang, J M; Herbison, A E

    2012-01-01

    Oestradiol exerts a profound influence upon multiple brain circuits. For the most part, these effects are mediated by oestrogen receptor (ER)α. We review here the roles of ERβ, the other ER isoform, in mediating rodent oestradiol-regulated anxiety, aggressive and sexual behaviours, the control of gonadotrophin secretion, and adult neurogenesis. Evidence exists for: (i) ERβ located in the paraventricular nucleus underpinning the suppressive influence of oestradiol on the stress axis and anxiety-like behaviour; (ii) ERβ expressed in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurones contributing to oestrogen negative-feedback control of gonadotrophin secretion; (iii) ERβ controlling the offset of lordosis behaviour; (iv) ERβ suppressing aggressive behaviour in males; (v) ERβ modulating responses to social stimuli; and (vi) ERβ in controlling adult neurogenesis. This review highlights two major themes; first, ERβ and ERα are usually tightly inter-related in the oestradiol-dependent control of a particular brain function. For example, even though oestradiol feedback to control reproduction occurs principally through ERα-dependent mechanisms, modulatory roles for ERβ also exist. Second, the roles of ERα and ERβ within a particular neural network may be synergistic or antagonistic. Examples of the latter include the role of ERα to enhance, and ERβ to suppress, anxiety-like and aggressive behaviours. Splice variants such as ERβ2, acting as dominant negative receptors, are of further particular interest because their expression levels may reflect preceeding oestradiol exposure of relevance to oestradiol replacement therapy. Together, this review highlights the predominant modulatory, but nonetheless important, roles of ERβ in mediating the many effects of oestradiol upon adult brain function.

  3. Endocrine disruption by dietary phyto-oestrogens: impact on dimorphic sexual systems and behaviours.

    PubMed

    Patisaul, Heather B

    2016-07-08

    A wide range of health benefits have been ascribed to soya intake including a lowered risk of osteoporosis, heart disease, breast cancer, and menopausal symptoms. Because it is a hormonally active diet, however, soya can also be endocrine disrupting, suggesting that intake has the potential to cause adverse health effects in certain circumstances, particularly when exposure occurs during development. Consequently, the question of whether or not soya phyto-oestrogens are beneficial or harmful to human health is neither straightforward nor universally applicable to all groups. Possible benefits and risks depend on age, health status, and even the presence or absence of specific gut microflora. As global consumption increases, greater awareness and consideration of the endocrine-disrupting properties of soya by nutrition specialists and other health practitioners is needed. Consumption by infants and small children is of particular concern because their hormone-sensitive organs, including the brain and reproductive system, are still undergoing sexual differentiation and maturation. Thus, their susceptibility to the endocrine-disrupting activities of soya phyto-oestrogens may be especially high. As oestrogen receptor partial agonists with molecular and cellular properties similar to anthropogenic endocrine disruptors such as bisphenol A, the soya phyto-oestrogens provide an interesting model for how attitudes about what is 'synthetic' v. what is 'natural,' shapes understanding and perception of what it means for a compound to be endocrine disrupting and/or potentially harmful. This review describes the endocrine-disrupting properties of soya phyto-oestrogens with a focus on neuroendocrine development and behaviour.

  4. Differential regulation of oestrogen receptor β isoforms by 5' untranslated regions in cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura; Brannan, Rebecca A; Hanby, Andrew M; Shaaban, Abeer M; Verghese, Eldo T; Peter, Mark B; Pollock, Steven; Satheesha, Sampoorna; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Speirs, Valerie; Hughes, Thomas A

    2010-08-01

    Oestrogen receptors (ERs) are critical regulators of the behaviour of many cancers. Despite this, the roles and regulation of one of the two known ERs - ERβ- are poorly understood. This is partly because analyses have been confused by discrepancies between ERβ expression at mRNA and proteins levels, and because ERβ is expressed as several functionally distinct isoforms. We investigated human ERβ 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) and their influences on ERβ expression and function. We demonstrate that two alternative ERβ 5'UTRs have potent and differential influences on expression acting at the level of translation. We show that their influences are modulated by cellular context and in carcinogenesis, and demonstrate the contributions of both upstream open reading frames and RNA secondary structure. These regulatory mechanisms offer explanations for the non-concordance of ERβ mRNA and protein. Importantly, we also demonstrate that 5'UTRs allow the first reported mechanisms for differential regulation of the expression of the ERβ isoforms 1, 2 and 5, and thereby have critical influences on ERβ function.

  5. Tissue Specificity of Human Disease Module

    PubMed Central

    Kitsak, Maksim; Sharma, Amitabh; Menche, Jörg; Guney, Emre; Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Loscalzo, Joseph; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    Genes carrying mutations associated with genetic diseases are present in all human cells; yet, clinical manifestations of genetic diseases are usually highly tissue-specific. Although some disease genes are expressed only in selected tissues, the expression patterns of disease genes alone cannot explain the observed tissue specificity of human diseases. Here we hypothesize that for a disease to manifest itself in a particular tissue, a whole functional subnetwork of genes (disease module) needs to be expressed in that tissue. Driven by this hypothesis, we conducted a systematic study of the expression patterns of disease genes within the human interactome. We find that genes expressed in a specific tissue tend to be localized in the same neighborhood of the interactome. By contrast, genes expressed in different tissues are segregated in distinct network neighborhoods. Most important, we show that it is the integrity and the completeness of the expression of the disease module that determines disease manifestation in selected tissues. This approach allows us to construct a disease-tissue network that confirms known and predicts unexpected disease-tissue associations. PMID:27748412

  6. Cell life and death in the anterior pituitary gland: role of oestrogens.

    PubMed

    Seilicovich, A

    2010-07-01

    Apoptotic processes play an important role in the maintenance of cell numbers in the anterior pituitary gland during physiological endocrine events. In this review, we summarise the regulation of apoptosis of anterior pituitary cells, particularly lactotrophs, somatotrophs and gonadotrophs, and analyse the possible mechanisms involved in oestrogen-induced apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells. Oestrogens exert apoptotic actions in several cell types and act as modulators of pituitary cell renewal, sensitising cells to both mitogenic and apoptotic signals. Local synthesis of growth factors and cytokines induced by oestradiol as well as changes in phenotypic features that enhance the responsiveness of anterior pituitary cells to pro-apoptotic factors may account for cyclical apoptotic activity in anterior pituitary cells during the oestrous cycle. Considering that tissue homeostasis results from a balance between cell proliferation and death and that mechanisms involved in apoptosis are tightly regulated, defects in cell death processes could have a considerable physiopathological impact.

  7. Local Oestrogen for Pelvic Floor Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Weber, M. A.; Kleijn, M. H.; Langendam, M.; Limpens, J.; Heineman, M. J.; Roovers, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The decline in available oestrogen after menopause is a possible etiological factor in pelvic floor disorders like vaginal atrophy (VA), urinary incontinence (UI), overactive bladder (OAB) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP). This systematic review will examine the evidence for local oestrogen therapy in the treatment of these pelvic floor disorders. Evidence Acquisition We performed a systematic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the non-MEDLINE subset of PubMed from inception to May 2014. We searched for local oestrogens and VA (I), UI/OAB (II) and POP (III). Part I was combined with broad methodological filters for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and secondary evidence. For part I and II two reviewers independently selected RCTs evaluating the effect of topical oestrogens on symptoms and signs of VA and UI/OAB. In part III all studies of topical oestrogen therapy in the treatment of POP were selected. Data extraction and the assessment of risk of bias using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was undertaken independently by two reviewers. Evidence Synthesis The included studies varied in ways of topical application, types of oestrogen, dosage and treatment durations. Objective and subjective outcomes were assessed by a variety of measures. Overall, subjective and urodynamic outcomes, vaginal maturation and vaginal pH changed in favor of vaginal oestrogens compared to placebo. No obvious differences between different application methods were revealed. Low doses already seemed to have a beneficial effect. Studies evaluating the effect of topical oestrogen in women with POP are scarce and mainly assessed symptoms and signs associated with VA instead of POP symptoms. Conclusion Topical oestrogen administration is effective for the treatment of VA and seems to decrease complaints of OAB and UI. The potential for local oestrogens in the prevention as well as treatment of POP needs further research. PMID:26383760

  8. Orchidectomy versus oestrogen for prostatic cancer: cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, P; Edhag, O

    1986-01-01

    One hundred consecutive patients aged up to 75 with newly diagnosed cancer of the prostate suitable for hormonal treatment were included in a controlled study of the cardiovascular effects of oestrogen versus orchidectomy. In all cases pre-existing cardiovascular morbidity was excluded. Of the 100 patients, 91 were strictly randomised to receive either oestrogen (n = 47) or orchidectomy (n = 44) and 9 (6 given oestrogen, 3 orchidectomy) either chose their own treatment (five cases) or had it selected for them by the urologist (four). Oestrogen was given in the lowest recommended dosage in Sweden--namely, as 160 mg polyestradiol phosphate intramuscularly every month for the first three months, then 80 mg monthly, plus ethinyloestradiol 1 mg by mouth daily for the first two weeks, then 150 micrograms daily. At entry to the study the two treatment groups showed no difference in demographic characteristics or conventional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. During the first year, however, 13 (25%) of the patients given oestrogen suffered major cardiovascular events as compared with none of the patients after orchidectomy. Patients in the oestrogen treatment group who did not have minor signs of atherosclerosis at entry to the study suffered a similar incidence of cardiovascular complications to those who did have these signs at entry. The substantially increased risk of cardiovascular complications in patients given oestrogen for prostatic cancer warrants careful consideration when choosing treatment for this disorder. PMID:3091138

  9. Stressor controllability modulates fear extinction in humans.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Catherine A; Gorun, Alyson; Reddan, Marianne C; Ramirez, Franchesca; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2014-09-01

    Traumatic events are proposed to play a role in the development of anxiety disorders, however not all individuals exposed to extreme stress experience a pathological increase in fear. Recent studies in animal models suggest that the degree to which one is able to control an aversive experience is a critical factor determining its behavioral consequences. In this study, we examined whether stressor controllability modulates subsequent conditioned fear expression in humans. Participants were randomly assigned to an escapable stressor condition, a yoked inescapable stressor condition, or a control condition involving no stress exposure. One week later, all participants underwent fear conditioning, fear extinction, and a test of extinction retrieval the following day. Participants exposed to inescapable stress showed impaired fear extinction learning and increased fear expression the following day. In contrast, escapable stress improved fear extinction and prevented the spontaneous recovery of fear. Consistent with the bidirectional controllability effects previously reported in animal models, these results suggest that one's degree of control over aversive experiences may be an important factor influencing the development of psychological resilience or vulnerability in humans.

  10. The oestrogenic effects of gestodene, a potent contraceptive progestin, are mediated by its A-ring reduced metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lemus, A E; Zaga, V; Santillán, R; García, G A; Grillasca, I; Damián-Matsumura, P; Jackson, K J; Cooney, A J; Larrea, F; Pérez-Palacios, G

    2000-06-01

    Gestodene (17 alpha-ethynyl-13 beta-ethyl-17 beta-hydroxy-4, 15-gonadien-3-one) is the most potent synthetic progestin currently available and it is widely used as a fertility regulating agent in a number of contraceptive formulations because of its high effectiveness, safety and acceptability. The observation that contraceptive synthetic progestins exert hormone-like effects other than their progestational activities, prompted us to investigate whether gestodene (GSD) administration may induce oestrogenic effects, even though the GSD molecule does not interact with intracellular oestrogen receptors (ER). To assess whether GSD may exert oestrogenic effects through some of its neutral metabolites, a series of experimental studies were undertaken using GSD and three of its A-ring reduced metabolites. Receptor binding studies by displacement analysis confirmed that indeed GSD does not bind to the ER, whereas its 3 beta,5 alpha-tetrahydro reduced derivative (3 beta GSD) interacts with a relative high affinity with the ER. The 3 alpha,5 alpha GSD isomer (3 alpha GSD) also binds to the ER, though to a lesser extent. The ability of the A-ring reduced GSD derivatives to induce oestrogenic actions was evaluated by the use of two different molecular bioassays: (a) transactivation of a yeast system co-transfected with the human ER alpha (hER alpha) gene and oestrogen responsive elements fused to the beta-galactosidase reporter vector and (b) transactivation of the hER alpha-mediated transcription of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter gene in a HeLa cells expression system. The oestrogenic potency of 3 beta GSD was also assessed by its capability to induce oestrogen-dependent progestin receptors (PR) in the anterior pituitary of castrated female rats. The results demonstrated that 3 beta GSD and 3 alpha GSD were able to activate, in a dose-dependent manner, the hER alpha-mediated transcription of both the beta-galactosidase and the CAT reporter genes in the

  11. A model to estimate the oestrogen receptor mediated effects from exposure to soy isoflavones in food.

    PubMed

    Safford, Bob; Dickens, Andrea; Halleron, Nadine; Briggs, David; Carthew, Philip; Baker, Valerie

    2003-10-01

    The advantages that regular consumption of a diet containing soy may have on human health have been enshrined in a major health claim that has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the USA, regarding potential protection from heart disease by soy. This could have a major influence on the dietary consumption patterns of soy for consumers and lead to the development of soy enriched foods to enable consumers to achieve the benefits thought to be associated with increased soy consumption in a Western diet. If an increase in soy consumption is beneficial to particular disease conditions, there is always the possibility that there will be effects other than those that are desirable. For soy-containing foods there has been concern that the phytoestrogen content of soy, which is composed of several isoflavones, could be a separate health issue, due to the oestrogen-like activity of isoflavones. To address this, a method has been developed to estimate, relative to 17-beta oestradiol, the activity of the common isoflavones present in soy phytoestrogens, based on their binding to and transcriptional activation of the major oestrogen receptor sub-types alpha and beta. Using this approach, the additional oestrogen-like activity that would be expected from inclusion of soy supplemented foodstuffs in a Western diet, can be determined for different sub-populations, who may have different susceptibilities to the potential for the unwanted biological effects occurring with consumption of soy enriched foods. Because of the theoretical nature of this model, and the controversy over the nature of whether some of the oestrogen-like effects of phytoestrogens are adverse, the biological effects of soy isoflavones and their potential for adverse effects in man, is also reviewed. The question that is critical to the long term safe use of foods enriched in soy is, which observed biological effects in animal studies are likely to also occur in man and whether these would have

  12. Pharmacological modulation of human cardiac Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Krafte, D S; Davison, K; Dugrenier, N; Estep, K; Josef, K; Barchi, R L; Kallen, R G; Silver, P J; Ezrin, A M

    1994-02-15

    Pharmacological modulation of human sodium current was examined in Xenopus oocytes expressing human heart Na+ channels. Na+ currents activated near -50 mV with maximum current amplitudes observed at -20 mV. Steady-state inactivation was characterized by a V1/2 value of -57 +/- 0.5 mV and a slope factor (k) of 7.3 +/- 0.3 mV. Sodium currents were blocked by tetrodotoxin with an IC50 value of 1.8 microM. These properties are consistent with those of Na+ channels expressed in mammalian myocardial cells. We have investigated the effects of several pharmacological agents which, with the exception of lidocaine, have not been characterized against cRNA-derived Na+ channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Lidocaine, quinidine and flecainide blocked resting Na+ channels with IC50 values of 521 microM, 198 microM, and 41 microM, respectively. Use-dependent block was also observed for all three agents, but concentrations necessary to induce block were higher than expected for quinidine and flecainide. This may reflect differences arising due to expression in the Xenopus oocyte system or could be a true difference in the interaction between human cardiac Na+ channels and these drugs compared to other mammalian Na+ channels. Importantly, however, this result would not have been predicted based upon previous studies of mammalian cardiac Na+ channels. The effects of DPI 201-106, RWJ 24517, and BDF 9148 were also tested and all three agents slowed and/or removed Na+ current inactivation, reduced peak current amplitudes, and induced use-dependent block. These data suggest that the alpha-subunit is the site of interaction between cardiac Na+ channels and Class I antiarrhythmic drugs as well as inactivation modifiers such as DPI 201-106.

  13. Detection of modulated tones in modulated noise by non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, Peter; Dylla, Margit; Timms, Courtney; Ramachandran, Ramnarayan

    2014-10-01

    In natural environments, many sounds are amplitude-modulated. Amplitude modulation is thought to be a signal that aids auditory object formation. A previous study of the detection of signals in noise found that when tones or noise were amplitude-modulated, the noise was a less effective masker, and detection thresholds for tones in noise were lowered. These results suggest that the detection of modulated signals in modulated noise would be enhanced. This paper describes the results of experiments investigating how detection is modified when both signal and noise were amplitude-modulated. Two monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to detect amplitude-modulated tones in continuous, amplitude-modulated broadband noise. When the phase difference of otherwise similarly amplitude-modulated tones and noise were varied, detection thresholds were highest when the modulations were in phase and lowest when the modulations were anti-phase. When the depth of the modulation of tones or noise was varied, detection thresholds decreased if the modulations were anti-phase. When the modulations were in phase, increasing the depth of tone modulation caused an increase in tone detection thresholds, but increasing depth of noise modulations did not affect tone detection thresholds. Changing the modulation frequency of tone or noise caused changes in threshold that saturated at modulation frequencies higher than 20 Hz; thresholds decreased when the tone and noise modulations were in phase and decreased when they were anti-phase. The relationship between reaction times and tone level were not modified by manipulations to the nature of temporal variations in the signal or noise. The changes in behavioral threshold were consistent with a model where the brain subtracted noise from signal. These results suggest that the parameters of the modulation of signals and maskers heavily influence detection in very predictable ways. These results are consistent with some results in humans and avians

  14. Reflections on Designing a Biology/Humanities Interdisciplinary Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, David; Battey, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses the reflections of a recent workshop on biology and the humanities subject areas to consider the potential for designing a first year interdisciplinary module that brings together teachers and learners in the Biosciences with their counterparts in English and History. It considers three building blocks of module design: aims and…

  15. [How corticoids, growth hormone and oestrogens influence lipids and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Marek, J; Hána, V; Krsek, M

    2007-04-01

    The hormones with a strong influence on the lipid spectrum and the development of atherosclerosis include cortisol, growth hormone and oestrogens. Cortisol accelerates atherosclerosis both through dyslipidemia and through an increase in visceral fat, hypertension, increased insulin resistance and the development of reduced glucose tolerance which may result in diabetes mellitus. Even when a cortisol excess disappears, as is the case of patients cured of Cushing syndrome, arterial walls remain permanently vulnerable to the atherosclerotic process. In conditions involving a lack of growth hormone, dyslipidemia develops and increases the burden on the cardiovascular system if not treated in a timely manner by the substitution of growth hormone. Oestrogens have a double effect: they have an anti-atherogenic effect on artery walls that are not yet damaged by an atherosclerotic process, but where atherosclerosis has already developed they have a prothrombotic effect and destabilise the atheromatous plaques. If oestrogen is to be used as protection against the onset of atherogenesis, it is necessary to start in a period when the atherosclerotic process has not yet begun to damage the woman's arterial walls and it is best to use natural hormones (estradiol) and to prevent endometriosis it should be combined with crystalline progesterone applied locally--inravaginally. Oestrogens should be given in small doses, preferably parenterally. Even this will not prevent genetic oestrogen effects though.

  16. Oestradiol decreases colonic permeability through oestrogen receptor β-mediated up-regulation of occludin and junctional adhesion molecule-A in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Braniste, Viorica; Leveque, Mathilde; Buisson-Brenac, Claire; Bueno, Lionel; Fioramonti, Jean; Houdeau, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Oestradiol modulates paracellular permeability and tight junction (TJ) function in endothelia and reproductive tissues, but whether the ovarian hormones and cycle affect the paracellular pathway in the intestinal epithelium remains unclear. Oestrogen receptors (ERs) are expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, and oestradiol regulates epithelium formation. We examined the effects of oestrous cycle stage, oestradiol benzoate (EB), and progesterone (P) on colonic paracellular permeability (CPP) in the female rat, and whether EB affects expression of the TJ proteins in the rat colon and the human colon cell line Caco-2. In cyclic rats, CPP was determined through lumen-to-blood 51Cr-labelled EDTA clearance, and in Ussing chambers for dextran permeability. CPP was also examined in ovariectomized (OVX) rats treated with P or EB, with and without the ER antagonist ICI 182,780, or with the selective agonists for ERα (propyl pyrazole triol; PPT) or ERβ (diarylpropionitrile; DPN). In oestrus rats, CPP was reduced (P < 0.01) relative to dioestrus. In OVX rats, EB dose-dependently decreased CPP, an effect mimicked by DPN and blocked by ICI 182,780, whereas P had no effect. Oestradiol increased occludin mRNA and protein in the colon (P < 0.05), but not zona occludens (ZO)-1. Further, EB and DPN enhanced occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-A expression in Caco-2 cells without change in ZO-1, an effect blocked by ICI 182,780. These data show that oestrogen reinforces intestinal epithelial barrier through ERβ-mediated up-regulation of the transmembrane proteins occludin and JAM-A determining paracellular spaces. These findings highlight the importance of the ERβ pathway in the control of colonic paracellular transport and mucosal homeostasis. PMID:19433574

  17. Zinc content of maturing spermatozoa in oestrogen treated rats.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Chowdhury, A R; Setty, B S

    1983-02-01

    Zinc content of spermatozoa collected from the caput and cauda portions of the rat epididymis was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The results showed about 60% reduction in the spermatozoal zinc content by the time they reach the cauda epididymis. This reduction was inhibited in rats receiving micro dose oestrogen which induced 'functional' sterility. It appears that the fall in zinc content of spermatozoa during their transport in the epididymis is related to sperm maturation and that oestrogen treatment interferes with this reduction in sperm zinc content.

  18. Estrogens as Antioxidant Modulators in Human Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, A.; Raimondo, S.; Persano, M.; Di Segni, C.; Cammarano, M.; Gadotti, G.; Silvestrini, A.; Pontecorvi, A.; Meucci, E.

    2013-01-01

    Among treatments proposed for idiopathic male infertility, antiestrogens, like tamoxifen, play a possible role. On the other hand, oxidative stress is a mechanism well recognized for deleterious effects on spermatozoa function. After reviewing the literature on the effects of estrogens in modulation of antioxidant systems, in both sexes, and in different in vivo and in vitro models, we suggest, also on the basis of personal data, that a tamoxifen treatment could be active via an increase in seminal antioxidants. PMID:24363671

  19. Norgestrel and gestodene stimulate breast cancer cell growth through an oestrogen receptor mediated mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Catherino, W. H.; Jeng, M. H.; Jordan, V. C.

    1993-01-01

    There is great concern over the long-term influence of oral contraceptives on the development of breast cancer in women. Oestrogens are known to stimulate the growth of human breast cancer cells, and this laboratory has previously reported (Jeng & Jordan, 1991) that the 19-norprogestin norethindrone could stimulate the proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. We studied the influence of the 19-norprogestins norgestrel and gestodene compared to a 'non' 19-norprogestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) on MCF-7 cell proliferation. The 19-norprogestins stimulated proliferation at a concentration of 10(-8) M, while MPA could not stimulate proliferation at concentrations as great as 3 x 10(-6) M. The stimulatory activity of the 19-norprogestins could be blocked by the antioestrogen ICI 164,384, but not by the antiprogestin RU486. Transfection studies with the reporter plasmids containing an oestrogen response element or progesterone response element (vitERE-CAT, pS2ERE-CAT, and PRE15-CAT) were performed to determine the intracellular action of norgestrel and gestodene. The 19-norprogestins stimulated the vitERE-CAT activity maximally at 10(-6) M, and this stimulation was inhibited by the addition of ICI 164,384. MPA did not stimulate vitERE-CAT activity. A single base pair alteration in the palindromic sequence of vitERE (resulting in the pS2ERE) led to a dramatic decrease in CAT expression by the 19-norprogestins, suggesting that the progestin activity required specific response element base sequencing. PRE15-CAT activity was stimulated by norgestrel, gestodene and MPA at concentrations well below growth stimulatory activity. This stimulation could be blocked by RU486. These studies suggest that the 19-norprogestins norgestrel and gestodene stimulate MCF-7 breast cancer cell growth by activating the oestrogen receptor. PMID:8494728

  20. Lack of Oestrogenic Inhibition of the Nuclear Factor-κB Pathway in Somatolactotroph Tumour Cells.

    PubMed

    Eijo, G; Gottardo, M F; Jaita, G; Magri, M L; Moreno Ayala, M; Zárate, S; Candolfi, M; Pisera, D; Seilicovich, A

    2015-09-01

    Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB promotes cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis. We have previously shown that oestrogens sensitise normal anterior pituitary cells to the apoptotic effect of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α by inhibiting NF-κB nuclear translocation. In the present study, we examined whether oestrogens also modulate the NF-κB signalling pathway and apoptosis in GH3 cells, a rat somatolactotroph tumour cell line. As determined by Western blotting, 17β-oestradiol (E2 ) (10(-9) m) increased the nuclear concentration of NF-κB/p105, p65 and p50 in GH3 cells. However, E2 did not modify the expression of Bcl-xL, a NF-κB target gene. TNF-α induced apoptosis of GH3 cells incubated in either the presence or absence of E2 . Inhibition of the NF-kB pathway using BAY 11-7082 (BAY) (5 μm) decreased the viability of GH3 cells and increased the percentage of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL)-positive GH3 cells. BAY also increased TNF-α-induced apoptosis of GH3 cells, an effect that was further increased by an inhibitor of the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase pathway, SP600125 (10 μm). We also analysed the role of the NF-κB signalling pathway on proliferation and apoptosis of GH3 tumours in vivo. The administration of BAY to nude mice bearing GH3 tumours increased the number of TUNEL-positive cells and decreased the number of proliferating GH3 cells. These findings suggest that GH3 cells lose their oestrogenic inhibitory action on the NF-κB pathway and that the pro-apoptotic effect of TNF-α on these tumour pituitary cells does not require sensitisation by oestrogens as occurs in normal pituitary cells. NF-κB was required for the survival of GH3 cells, suggesting that pharmacological inhibition of the NF-κB pathway could interfere with pituitary tumour progression.

  1. An in vitro demonstration of oestrogenicity with potential for exploitation as a quantitative assay for oestrogenic potency.

    PubMed

    Pugh, D M; Sumano, H S

    1986-01-01

    The pre-implantation embryo of the mouse undergoes a histochemically detectable change in the properties of its trophoblastic cell-surface coat in the immediate pre-implantation period. This change is oestrogen-dependent in vivo and can be induced in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner by oestradiol-17 beta. There is evidence that this coat change is of functional importance in the process of implantation, and its demonstration is of potential value as the basis of an in vitro assay of oestrogenicity.

  2. [Comparison of vaginal cytologic effects and blood elimination curves of different oestrogen drugs (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hempel, E; Bruder, M; Eichhorn, K H; Claussen, C; Klinger, G

    1977-01-01

    With different oral oestrogens it was studied, if relations are existing between pharmacokinetic and vaginal effect. By means of Karyopycnotic Index and Dynamic Oestrogenicity Index the cytological effect was quantified from a single dose of oestradiol valerianate, mestranol, ethinyloestradiol and 3 depot oestrogens proved on postmenopause women and compared with adequate pharmacocinetical investigations. The courses of oestrogen levels did not correlate with indices. Both methods of investigation do not compensate, but complete one another. Depotoestrogens and short acting oestrogens are distinguishable with regard to proliferation maxium and steepness of index decline.

  3. Molecular mechanism(s) of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and their potent oestrogenicity in diverse cells and tissues that express oestrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Tae-Hee; Leung, Peter C K; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are natural or synthetic compounds present in the environment which can interfere with hormone synthesis and normal physiological functions of male and female reproductive organs. Most EDCs tend to bind to steroid hormone receptors including the oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and androgen receptor (AR). As EDCs disrupt the actions of endogenous hormones, they may induce abnormal reproduction, stimulation of cancer growth, dysfunction of neuronal and immune system. Although EDCs represent a significant public health concern, there are no standard methods to determine effect of EDCs on human beings. The mechanisms underlying adverse actions of EDC exposure are not clearly understood. In this review, we highlighted the toxicology of EDCs and its effect on human health, including reproductive development in males and females as shown in in vitro and in vivo models. In addition, this review brings attention to the toxicity of EDCs via interaction of genomic and non-genomic signalling pathways through hormone receptors.

  4. Oestrogen-induced bone marrow aplasia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Bland-van den Berg, P; Bomzon, L; Lurie, A

    1978-12-01

    A case of oestrogen toxicity in the dog is described. The bone marrow was primarily affected with resultant non-regenerative anaemia, leukocytosis followed by leukopaenia, and thrombocytopaenia. Endometritis, toxaemia and disseminate intravascular coagulation were complicating factors. The case terminated fatally intensive therapy.

  5. Sensorimotor modulation of human cortical swallowing pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Shaheen; Aziz, Qasim; Rothwell, John C; Hobson, Anthony; Thompson, David G

    1998-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation over motor areas of cerebral cortex in man can activate short latency bilateral cortical projections to the pharynx and oesophagus. In the present paper we investigate the interaction between pathways from each hemisphere and explore how activity in these pathways is modulated by afferent feedback from the face, pharynx and oesophagus.Comparison of unilateral and bilateral stimulation (using interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 1, 5 or 10 ms between shocks) showed spatial summation of responses from each hemisphere at an ISI of 1 ms, indicating that cortical efferents project onto a shared population of target neurones. Such summation was not evident at ISIs of 5 or 10 ms. There was little evidence for transcallosal inhibition of responses from each hemisphere, as described for limb muscles.Single stimuli applied to the vagus nerve in the neck or the supraorbital nerve, which alone produce intermediate (onset 20-30 ms) and long (50-70 ms) latency reflex responses in the pharynx and oesophagus, were used to condition the cortical responses. Compared with rest, responses evoked by cortical stimulation were facilitated when they were timed to coincide with the late part of the reflex. The onset latency was reduced during both parts of the reflex response. No facilitation was observed with subthreshold reflex stimuli.Single electrical stimuli applied to the pharynx or oesophagus had no effect on the response to cortical stimulation. However, trains of stimuli at frequencies varying from 0.2 to 10 Hz decreased the latency of the cortically evoked responses without consistently influencing their amplitudes. The effect was site specific: pharyngeal stimulation shortened both pharyngeal and oesophageal response latencies, whereas oesophageal stimulation shortened only the oesophageal response latencies.Cortical swallowing motor pathways from each hemisphere interact and their excitability is modulated in a site-specific manner by sensory

  6. Regulation of bradykinin B2-receptor expression by oestrogen

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, Paolo; Emanueli, Costanza; Varoni, Maria Vittoria; Demontis, Maria Piera; Anania, Vittorio; Gorioso, Nicola; Chao, Julie

    1997-01-01

    Tissue kallikrein is overexpressed in the kidney of female rats, this sexual dimorphism being associated with a greater effect of early blockade of bradykinin B2-receptors on female blood pressure phenotype. We evaluated the effect of ovariectomy and oestradiol benzoate (50 μg kg−1 every two days for two weeks) on the vasodepressor response to intra-arterial injection of bradykinin (150–900 ng kg−1) and on the expression of bradykinin B2-receptors.Ovariectomy reduced the magnitude of the vasodepressor response to bradykinin and unmasked a secondary vasopressor effect. Oestrogen replacement restored the vasodepressor response to bradykinin in ovariectomized rats.The vasodepressor responses to sodium nitroprusside (3–18 μg kg−1), acetylcholine (30–600 ng kg−1), desArg9-bradykinin (150–900 ng kg−1) or prostaglandin E2 (30–600 ng kg−1) were significantly reduced by ovariectomy. Oestrogen restored to normal the responses to desArg9-bradykinin, acetylcholine and prostaglandin E2, but not that to sodium nitroprusside.B2-receptor mRNA levels were decreased by ovariectomy in the aorta and kidney and they were restored to normal levels by oestrogen. Neither ovariectomy nor oestradiol affected receptor expression in the heart and uterus.These results indicate that oestrogen regulates B2-receptor gene expression and function. Since kinins exert a cardiovascular protective action, reduction in their vasodilator activity after menopause might contribute to the increased risk of pathological cardiovascular events. Conversely, the cardioprotective effects of oestrogen replacement might be, at least in part, mediated by activation of the kallikrein-kinin system. PMID:9283715

  7. Performance of different composting techniques in reducing oestrogens content in manure from livestock in a Vietnamese setting.

    PubMed

    Le, Thi Anh Hong; Clemens, Joachim; Nguyen, Thai Hoa

    2013-01-01

    Steroid oestrogens (SE) are released by humans and animals into the environment. In the Mekong Delta animal excrement is directly discharged into surface water and can pollute the water. Only a few animal production sites are currently treating the excrement in either biogas plants or vermicomposting systems. The concentration of SE in manures from pigs and cattle was monitored in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Fresh cow faeces had an oestrogen concentration of 3.3 ng E2 eq/g dry weight. The SE concentration in effluent from biogas plants fed with animal manures was 341 ng E2 eq/L. Most of the SE were in the solid phase (77.9-98.7%). Vermicomposting reduced SE to 95% of the original input.

  8. Do dietary phytoestrogens influence susceptibility to hormone-dependent cancer by disrupting the metabolism of endogenous oestrogens?

    PubMed

    Kirk, C J; Harris, R M; Wood, D M; Waring, R H; Hughes, P J

    2001-05-01

    Phytoestrogens are natural constituents of our diets that have been suggested to protect against hormone-dependent breast cancer. Some of the diverse effects of these compounds may be attributed to ligand-dependent differences in their interaction with oestrogen receptor sub-classes. However, phytoestrogens can also inhibit enzymes that are involved in the generation and removal of endogenous steroid hormones. Among the most potent effects of dietary phytoestrogens is their ability to inhibit the sulphotransferases that sulphate both oestrogenic steroids and a variety of environmental chemicals, including dietary pro-carcinogens. Circulating steroid sulphates are thought to be the major source of oestradiol in post-menopausal breast tumours and sulphation is a key step in the activation of some dietary pro-carcinogens. Hence the inhibition of sulphotransferases by dietary phytoestrogens may have complex effects upon human susceptibility to breast cancer.

  9. In vitro evaluation of oestrogenic/androgenic activity of the serum organochlorine pesticide mixtures previously described in a breast cancer case-control study.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Javier; Luzardo, Octavio P; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Machín, Rubén P; Pestano, José; Zumbado, Manuel; Boada, Luis D; Camacho, María; Valerón, Pilar F

    2015-12-15

    Some organochlorine pesticides (OCs) have been individually linked to breast cancer (BC) because they exert oestrogenic effects on mammary cells. However, humans are environmentally exposed to more or less complex mixtures of these organochlorines, and the biological effects of these mixtures must be elucidated. In this work we evaluated the in vitro effects exerted on human BC cells by the OC mixtures that were most frequently detected in two groups of women who participated in a BC case-control study developed in Spain: healthy women and women diagnosed with BC. The cytotoxicity, oestrogenicity, and androgenicity of the most prevalent OC mixtures found in healthy women (H-mixture) and in BC patients (BC-mixture) were tested at concentrations that resembled those found in the serum of the evaluated women. Our results showed that both OC mixtures presented a similar oestrogenic activity and effect on cell viability, but BC-mixture showed an additional anti-androgenic effect. These results indicate that although the proliferative effect exerted by these mixtures on human breast cells seems to depend mainly on their oestrogenic action, the BC-mixture might additionally induce cell proliferation due to its anti-androgenic activity, therefore increasing the carcinogenic potential of this mixture. The findings of this study demonstrate that subtle variations in the composition of a mixture may induce relevant changes in its biological action.

  10. Modulation of stimulus contrast on the human pupil orienting response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chin-An; Munoz, Douglas P

    2014-09-01

    The sudden appearance of a novel stimulus initiates a series of responses to orient the body for appropriate actions, including not only shifts of gaze and attention, but also transient pupil dilation. Modulation of pupil dynamics by stimulus properties is less understood, although its effects on other components of orienting have been extensively explored. Microstimulation of the superior colliculus evoked transient pupil dilation, and the initial component of pupil dilation evoked by microstimulation was similar to that elicited by the presentation of salient sensory stimuli, suggesting a coordinated role of the superior colliculus on this behavior, although evidence in humans is yet to be established. To examine pupil orienting responses in humans, we presented visual stimuli while participants fixated on a central visual spot. Transient pupil dilation in humans was elicited after presentation of a visual stimulus in the periphery. The evoked pupil responses were modulated systematically by stimulus contrast, with faster and larger pupil responses triggered by higher contrast stimuli. The pupil response onset latencies for high contrast stimuli were similar to those produced by the light reflex and significantly faster than the darkness reflex, suggesting that the initial component of pupil dilation is probably mediated by inhibition of the parasympathetic pathway. The contrast modulation was pronounced under different levels of baseline pupil size. Together, our results demonstrate visual contrast modulation on the orienting pupil response in humans.

  11. RNA Directed Modulation of Phenotypic Plasticity in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burdach, Jon; Morris, Kevin V.

    2016-01-01

    Natural selective processes have been known to drive phenotypic plasticity, which is the emergence of different phenotypes from one genome following environmental stimulation. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been observed to modulate transcriptional and epigenetic states of genes in human cells. We surmised that lncRNAs are governors of phenotypic plasticity and drive natural selective processes through epigenetic modulation of gene expression. Using heat shocked human cells as a model we find several differentially expressed transcripts with the top candidates being lncRNAs derived from retro-elements. One particular retro-element derived transcripts, Retro-EIF2S2, was found to be abundantly over-expressed in heat shocked cells. Over-expression of Retro-EIF2S2 significantly enhanced cell viability and modulated a predisposition for an adherent cellular phenotype upon heat shock. Mechanistically, we find that this retro-element derived transcript interacts directly with a network of proteins including 40S ribosomal protein S30 (FAU), Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (EIF5A), and Ubiquitin-60S ribosomal protein L40 (UBA52) to affect protein modulated cell adhesion pathways. We find one motif in Retro-EIF2S2 that exhibits binding to FAU and modulates phenotypic cell transitions from adherent to suspension states. The observations presented here suggest that retroviral derived transcripts actively modulate phenotypic plasticity in human cells in response to environmental selective pressures and suggest that natural selection may play out through the action of retro-elements in human cells. PMID:27082860

  12. RNA Directed Modulation of Phenotypic Plasticity in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Trakman, Laura; Hewson, Chris; Burdach, Jon; Morris, Kevin V

    2016-01-01

    Natural selective processes have been known to drive phenotypic plasticity, which is the emergence of different phenotypes from one genome following environmental stimulation. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been observed to modulate transcriptional and epigenetic states of genes in human cells. We surmised that lncRNAs are governors of phenotypic plasticity and drive natural selective processes through epigenetic modulation of gene expression. Using heat shocked human cells as a model we find several differentially expressed transcripts with the top candidates being lncRNAs derived from retro-elements. One particular retro-element derived transcripts, Retro-EIF2S2, was found to be abundantly over-expressed in heat shocked cells. Over-expression of Retro-EIF2S2 significantly enhanced cell viability and modulated a predisposition for an adherent cellular phenotype upon heat shock. Mechanistically, we find that this retro-element derived transcript interacts directly with a network of proteins including 40S ribosomal protein S30 (FAU), Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (EIF5A), and Ubiquitin-60S ribosomal protein L40 (UBA52) to affect protein modulated cell adhesion pathways. We find one motif in Retro-EIF2S2 that exhibits binding to FAU and modulates phenotypic cell transitions from adherent to suspension states. The observations presented here suggest that retroviral derived transcripts actively modulate phenotypic plasticity in human cells in response to environmental selective pressures and suggest that natural selection may play out through the action of retro-elements in human cells.

  13. Rapid oestrogenic regulation of social and nonsocial learning.

    PubMed

    Ervin, K S J; Phan, A; Gabor, C S; Choleris, E

    2013-11-01

    Much research on oestrogens has focused on their long-term action, exerting behavioural effects within hours to days through gene transcription. Oestrogens also affect behaviour on a much shorter time scale. These rapid effects are assumed to occur through cell signalling and can elicit a behavioural effect as early as 15 min after treatment. These effects on behaviour have primarily been explored through the action of oestradiol at three well-known oestrogen receptors (ERs): ERα, ERβ and the more recently described G protein-coupled ER1 (GPER1). The rapid effects of oestradiol and ER agonists have been tested on both social and nonsocial learning paradigms. Social learning refers to a paradigm in which an animal acquires information and modifies its behaviour based on observation of another animal, commonly studied using the social transmission of food preferences paradigm. When administered shortly before testing, oestradiol rapidly improves social learning on this task, although no ER agonist has definitive, comparable improving effects. Some evidence points to GPER1, whereas ERα impairs, and ERβ activation has no effect on social learning. Conversely, ERα and GPER1 play a larger role than ERβ in the rapid improving effect of oestrogens on nonsocial learning, including social and object recognition. In addition, when administered immediately post-acquisition, oestrogens also rapidly improve memory consolidation in a variety of learning paradigms: object recognition, object placement, inhibitory avoidance and the Morris water maze, indicating that oestradiol affects the consolidation of multiple types of memory. Evidence suggests that these improvements are the result of oestrogens acting in the dorsal hippocampus where selective activation of all three ERs shows rapid improving effects on spatial learning comparable to oestradiol. However, the hippocampus is not necessary for rapid oestradiol improvements on social recognition. Although acute treatment

  14. Frequency Specific Modulation of Human Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Feurra, Matteo; Paulus, Walter; Walsh, Vincent; Kanai, Ryota

    2011-01-01

    Oscillatory neuronal activities are commonly observed in response to sensory stimulation. However, their functional roles are still the subject of debate. One-way to probe the roles of oscillatory neural activities is to deliver alternating current to the cortex at biologically relevant frequencies and examine whether such stimulation influences perception and cognition. In this study, we tested whether transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) over the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) could elicit tactile sensations in humans in a frequency-dependent manner. We tested the effectiveness of tACS over SI at frequency bands ranging from 2 to 70 Hz. Our results show that stimulation in alpha (10–14 Hz) and high gamma (52–70 Hz) frequency range produces a tactile sensation in the contralateral hand. A weaker effect was also observed for beta (16–20 Hz) stimulation. These findings highlight the frequency dependency of effective tACS over SI with the effective frequencies corresponding to those observed in previous electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography studies of tactile perception. Our present study suggests that tACS could be used as a powerful online stimulation technique to reveal the causal roles of oscillatory brain activities. PMID:21713181

  15. Cerebellar modulation of human associative plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Masashi; Strigaro, Gionata; Murase, Nagako; Sadnicka, Anna; Galea, Joseph M; Edwards, Mark J; Rothwell, John C

    2012-01-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS) is a method commonly used in human studies of motor cortex synaptic plasticity. It involves repeated pairs of electrical stimuli to the median nerve and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex. If the interval between peripheral and TMS stimulation is around 21–25 ms, corticospinal excitability is increased for the following 30–60 min via a long term potentiation (LTP)-like effect within the primary motor cortex. Previous work has shown that PAS depends on the present and previous levels of activity in cortex, and that it can be modified by motor learning or attention. Here we show that simultaneous transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS; 2 mA) over the cerebellum can abolish the PAS effect entirely. Surprisingly, the effect is seen when the PAS interval is 25 ms but not when it is 21.5 ms. There are two implications from this work. First, the cerebellum influences PAS effects in motor cortex; second, LTP-like effects of PAS have at least two different mechanisms. The results are relevant for interpretation of pathological changes that have been reported in response to PAS in people with movement disorders and to changes in healthy individuals following exercise or other interventions. PMID:22473780

  16. Oestrogen receptor-α contributes to the regulation of the hedgehog signalling pathway in ERα-positive gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, C; Nakamura, M; Tanaka, H; Yamasaki, A; Kubo, M; Tanaka, M; Onishi, H; Katano, M

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oestrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) is highly expressed in diffuse-type gastric cancer and oestrogen increases the proliferation of ERα-positive gastric cancer. However, a detailed mechanism by which oestrogen increases the proliferation of these cells is still unclear. Methods: We used 17-β-oestradiol (E2) as a stimulator against the ERα pathway. Pure anti-oestrogen drug ICI 182 780 (ICI) and small interfering RNA against ERα (ERα siRNA) were used as inhibitors. Cyclopamine (Cyc) was used as the hedgehog (Hh) pathway inhibitor. Two human ERα-positive gastric cancer cells were used as target cells. Effects of the stimulator and inhibitor on E2-induced cell proliferation were also examined. Results: In ERα-positive cells, E2 increased not only cell proliferation but also one of the ligands of the Hh pathway, Shh expression. 17-β-Oestradiol-induced cell proliferation was suppressed by ICI, ERα siRNA or Cyc. The increased expression of Shh induced by E2 was suppressed by ICI and ERα siRNA but not by Cyc. Furthermore, recombinant Shh activated the Hh pathway and increased cell proliferation, whereas anti-Shh antibody suppressed E2-induced cell proliferation. When a relationship between ERα and Shh expressions was analysed using surgically resected gastric cancer specimens, a positive correlation was found, suggesting a linkage between the ERα and Hh pathways. Conclusion: Our data indicate that activation of the ERα pathway promotes cell proliferation by activating the Hh pathway in a ligand-dependent manner through Shh induction of ERα-positive gastric cancer. PMID:20087349

  17. Mechanisms of oestrogen receptor (ER) gene regulation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Most breast cancers are driven by a transcription factor called oestrogen receptor (ER). Understanding the mechanisms of ER activity in breast cancer has been a major research interest and recent genomic advances have revealed extraordinary insights into how ER mediates gene transcription and what occurs during endocrine resistance. This review discusses our current understanding on ER activity, with an emphasis on several evolving, but important areas of ER biology. PMID:26884552

  18. Oestrogen-mediated hormonal imbalance precipitates erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Adaikan, P G; Srilatha, B

    2003-02-01

    Declining testosterone (T) in an aging male offsets the equilibrium between androgen and oestrogen (oestradiol, E(2)) with a resultant increase in E(2)-T ratio. Similar functional hormone imbalance is existent in clinical states of hypogonadism and is likely to arise from exposure of males to environmental oestrogens. The pathophysiological significance of this derangement on erectile function, hitherto unknown, was estimated in sexually mature male rats following acute and chronic treatment with oestrogen. A total of 60 male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were divided into control and two treatment groups, administered 0.01 and 0.1 mg of oestradiol through oral gavage daily for 1 week (n=30, acute study) and 12 weeks (n=30, long-term study), respectively. Sexual activity in the presence of hormonally primed female rats and intracavernous pressure (ICP) response to electrical stimulation estimated treatment-induced changes, which were correlated with hormone levels and penile morphology at 12 weeks. Following two to five-fold elevation in serum E(2) levels (and simultaneous reduction in testosterone), there was a significant prolongation of mount, intromission, ejaculation latencies and some decrease in frequencies. The ICP response to nerve stimulation was also impaired in all the treated groups. Histologically, trichrome staining highlighted the cavernosal connective tissue hyperplasia in the long-term study groups. Results of this investigation indicate that oestradiol causes pathophysiological changes in erectile function. These observations provide an indirect evidence for the possible sexual health hazards in man upon inadvertent exposure to environmental oestrogens, ageing and derangement of E(2)-T ratio.

  19. Local oestrogenic/androgenic balance in the cerebral vasculature.

    PubMed

    Krause, D N; Duckles, S P; Gonzales, R J

    2011-09-01

    Reproductive effects of sex steroids are well-known; however it is increasingly apparent that these hormones have important actions on non-reproductive tissues such as the vasculature. The latter effects can be relevant throughout the lifespan, not just limited to reproductive years, and are not necessarily restricted to one gender or the other. Our work has established that cerebral blood vessels are a non-reproductive target tissue for sex steroids. We have found that oestrogen and androgens alter vascular tone, endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in cerebral vessels. Often the actions of oestrogen and androgens oppose each other. Moreover, it is clear that cerebral vessels are directly targeted by sex steroids, as they express specific receptors for these hormones. Interestingly, cerebral blood vessels also express enzymes that metabolize sex steroids. These findings suggest that local synthesis of 17ß-estradiol and dihydrotestosterone can occur within the vessel wall. One of the enzymes present, aromatase, converts testosterone to 17ß-estradiol, which would alter the local balance of androgenic and oestrogenic influences. Thus cerebral vessels are affected by circulating sex hormones as well as locally synthesized sex steroids. The presence of vascular endocrine effector mechanisms has important implications for male-female differences in cerebrovascular function and disease. Moreover, the cerebral circulation is a target for gonadal hormones as well as anabolic steroids and therapeutic drugs used to manipulate sex steroid actions. The long-term consequences of these influences are yet to be determined.

  20. G protein-coupled oestrogen receptor 1 (GPER1)/GPR30: a new player in cardiovascular and metabolic oestrogenic signalling

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Bengt-Olof; Olde, Björn; Leeb-Lundberg, LM Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    Oestrogens are important sex hormones central to health and disease in both genders that have protective effects on the cardiovascular and metabolic systems. These hormones act in complex ways via both genomic and non-genomic mechanisms. The genomic mechanisms are relatively well characterized, whereas the non-genomic ones are only beginning to be explored. Two oestrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, have been described that act as nuclear transcription factors but can also associate with the plasma membrane and influence cytosolic signalling. ERα has been shown to mediate both anti-atherogenic effects and pro-survival effects in pancreatic β-cells. In recent years, a third membrane-bound ER has emerged, G protein-coupled receptor 30 or G protein-coupled oestrogen receptor 1 (GPER1), which mediates oestrogenic responses in cardiovascular and metabolic regulation. Both GPER1 knock-out models and pharmacological agents are now available to study GPER1 function. These tools have revealed that GPER1 activation may have several beneficial effects in the cardiovascular system including vasorelaxation, inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation, and protection of the myocardium against ischaemia/reperfusion injury, and in the metabolic system including stimulation of insulin release and protection against pancreatic β-cell apoptosis. Thus, GPER1 is emerging as a candidate therapeutic target in both cardiovascular and metabolic disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is one of a set of reviews submitted to BJP in connection with talks given at the September 2010 meeting of the International Society of Hypertension in Vancouver, Canada. To view the other articles in this collection visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.01167.x, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01260.x and http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01366.x PMID:21250980

  1. Immune Modulation in Primary Vaccinia virus Zoonotic Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Juliana Assis Silva; de Araújo, Fernanda Fortes; Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Quinan, Bárbara Resende; Drumond, Betânia Paiva; Ferreira, Jaqueline Maria Siqueira; Mota, Bruno Eduardo Fernandes; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; Côrrea-Oliveira, Rodrigo; da Fonseca, Flávio Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the WHO celebrated the 30th anniversary of the smallpox eradication. Ironically, infections caused by viruses related to smallpox are being increasingly reported worldwide, including Monkeypox, Cowpox, and Vaccinia virus (VACV). Little is known about the human immunological responses elicited during acute infections caused by orthopoxviruses. We have followed VACV zoonotic outbreaks taking place in Brazil and analyzed cellular immune responses in patients acutely infected by VACV. Results indicated that these patients show a biased immune modulation when compared to noninfected controls. Amounts of B cells are low and less activated in infected patients. Although present, T CD4+ cells are also less activated when compared to noninfected individuals, and so are monocytes/macrophages. Similar results were obtained when Balb/C mice were experimentally infected with a VACV sample isolated during the zoonotic outbreaks. Taking together, the data suggest that zoonotic VACVs modulate specific immune cell compartments during an acute infection in humans. PMID:22229039

  2. Expectation modulates neural representations of valence throughout the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Ramayya, Ashwin G.; Pedisich, Isaac; Kahana, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The brain's sensitivity to unexpected gains or losses plays an important role in our ability to learn new behaviors (Rescorla and Wagner, 1972; Sutton and Barto, 1990). Recent work suggests that gains and losses are ubiquitously encoded throughout the human brain (Vickery et al., 2011), however, the extent to which reward expectation modulates these valence representations is not known. To address this question we analyzed recordings from 4,306 intracranially implanted electrodes in 39 neurosurgical patients as they performed a two-alternative probability learning task. Using high-frequency activity (HFA, 70-200 Hz) as an indicator of local firing rates, we found that expectation modulated reward-related neural activity in widespread brain regions, including regions that receive sparse inputs from midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The strength of unexpected gain signals predicted subjects’ abilities to encode stimulus-reward associations. Thus, neural signals that are functionally related to learning are widely distributed throughout the human brain. PMID:25937489

  3. Environmental concentrations of anti-androgenic pharmaceuticals do not impact sexual disruption in fish alone or in combination with steroid oestrogens.

    PubMed

    Green, Christopher; Brian, Jayne; Kanda, Rakesh; Scholze, Martin; Williams, Richard; Jobling, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Sexual disruption in wild fish has been linked to the contamination of river systems with steroid oestrogens, including the pharmaceutical 17α-ethinylestradiol, originating from domestic wastewaters. As analytical chemistry has advanced, more compounds derived from the human use of pharmaceuticals have been identified in the environment and questions have arisen as to whether these additional pharmaceuticals may also impact sexual disruption in fish. Indeed, pharmaceutical anti-androgens have been shown to induce such effects under laboratory conditions. These are of particular interest since anti-androgenic biological activity has been identified in the aquatic environment and is potentially implicated in sexual disruption alone and in combination with steroid oestrogens. Consequently, predictive modelling was employed to determine the concentrations of two anti-androgenic human pharmaceuticals, bicalutamide and cyproterone acetate, in UK sewage effluents and river catchments and their combined impacts on sexual disruption were then assessed in two fish models. Crucially, fish were also exposed to the anti-androgens in combination with steroid oestrogens to determine whether they had any additional impact on oestrogen induced feminisation. Modelling predicted that the anti-androgenic pharmaceuticals were likely to be widespread in UK river catchments. However, their concentrations were not sufficient to induce significant responses in plasma vitellogenin concentrations, secondary sexual characteristics or gross indices in male fathead minnow or intersex in Japanese medaka alone or in combination with steroid oestrogens. However, environmentally relevant mixtures of oestrone, 17β-oestradiol and 17α-ethinylestradiol did induce vitellogenin and intersex, supporting their role in sexual disruption in wild fish populations. Unexpectedly, a male dominated sex ratio (100% in controls) was induced in medaka and the potential cause and implications are briefly discussed

  4. Synchronization and modulation in the human cardiorespiratory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotrič, Maja Bračič; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2000-08-01

    We analyse phase and frequency synchronization in the human cardio-respiratory system. The method for analysis of noisy nonstationary bivariate data is applied to simultaneously measured cardiac and respiratory activity. Short epochs of phase and/or frequency locking between respiratory and cardiac rhythms are detected in healthy relaxed subjects (non-athletes). We reveal that the strength of phase synchronization is inversely related to the extent of respiratory modulation of the heart rate.

  5. The Effect of Protein Mass Modulation on Human Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Kevin; Sapienza, Paul J.; Lee, Andrew L.; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Escherichia coli has long served as a model enzyme with which to elucidate possible links between protein dynamics and the catalyzed reaction. Such physical properties of its human counterpart have not been rigorously studied so far, but recent computer-based simulations suggest that these two DHFRs differ significantly in how closely coupled the protein dynamics and the catalyzed C-H→C hydride transfer step are. To test this prediction, two contemporary probes for studying the effect of protein dynamics on catalysis were combined here: temperature dependence of intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) that are sensitive to the physical nature of the chemical step, and protein mass-modulation that slows down fast dynamics (femto- to picosecond timescale) throughout the protein. The intrinsic H/T KIEs of human DHFR, like those of E. coli DHFR, are shown to be temperature-independent in the range from 5–45 °C, indicating fast sampling of donor and acceptor distances (DADs) at the reaction’s transition state (or tunneling ready state – TRS). Mass modulation of these enzymes through isotopic labeling with 13C, 15N, and 2H at nonexchangeable hydrogens yield an 11% heavier enzyme. The additional mass has no effect on the intrinsic KIEs of the human enzyme. This finding indicates that the mass-modulation of the human DHFR affects neither DAD distribution nor the DAD’s conformational sampling dynamics. Furthermore, reduction in the enzymatic turnover number and the dissociation rate constant for the product indicate that the isotopic substitution affects kinetic steps that are not the catalyzed C-H→C hydride transfer. The findings are discussed in terms of fast dynamics and their role in catalysis, the comparison of calculations and experiments, and the interpretation of isotopically-modulated heavy enzymes in general. PMID:26813442

  6. Human genome-guided identification of memory-modulating drugs.

    PubMed

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Gerhards, Christiane; Heck, Angela; Ackermann, Sandra; Aerni, Amanda; Schicktanz, Nathalie; Auschra, Bianca; Demougin, Philippe; Mumme, Eva; Elbert, Thomas; Ertl, Verena; Gschwind, Leo; Hanser, Edveena; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Jessen, Frank; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Milnik, Annette; Paganetti, Paolo; Spalek, Klara; Vogler, Christian; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2013-11-12

    In the last decade there has been an exponential increase in knowledge about the genetic basis of complex human traits, including neuropsychiatric disorders. It is not clear, however, to what extent this knowledge can be used as a starting point for drug identification, one of the central hopes of the human genome project. The aim of the present study was to identify memory-modulating compounds through the use of human genetic information. We performed a multinational collaborative study, which included assessment of aversive memory--a trait central to posttraumatic stress disorder--and a gene-set analysis in healthy individuals. We identified 20 potential drug target genes in two genomewide-corrected gene sets: the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction and the long-term depression gene set. In a subsequent double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers, we aimed at providing a proof of concept for the genome-guided identification of memory modulating compounds. Pharmacological intervention at the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction gene set led to significant reduction of aversive memory. The findings demonstrate that genome information, along with appropriate data mining methodology, can be used as a starting point for the identification of memory-modulating compounds.

  7. Human genome–guided identification of memory-modulating drugs

    PubMed Central

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Gerhards, Christiane; Heck, Angela; Ackermann, Sandra; Aerni, Amanda; Schicktanz, Nathalie; Auschra, Bianca; Demougin, Philippe; Mumme, Eva; Elbert, Thomas; Ertl, Verena; Gschwind, Leo; Hanser, Edveena; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Jessen, Frank; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Milnik, Annette; Paganetti, Paolo; Spalek, Klara; Vogler, Christian; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea; de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade there has been an exponential increase in knowledge about the genetic basis of complex human traits, including neuropsychiatric disorders. It is not clear, however, to what extent this knowledge can be used as a starting point for drug identification, one of the central hopes of the human genome project. The aim of the present study was to identify memory-modulating compounds through the use of human genetic information. We performed a multinational collaborative study, which included assessment of aversive memory—a trait central to posttraumatic stress disorder—and a gene-set analysis in healthy individuals. We identified 20 potential drug target genes in two genomewide-corrected gene sets: the neuroactive ligand–receptor interaction and the long-term depression gene set. In a subsequent double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers, we aimed at providing a proof of concept for the genome-guided identification of memory modulating compounds. Pharmacological intervention at the neuroactive ligand–receptor interaction gene set led to significant reduction of aversive memory. The findings demonstrate that genome information, along with appropriate data mining methodology, can be used as a starting point for the identification of memory-modulating compounds. PMID:24145423

  8. Modulation of the insulin-like growth factor-I system by N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-retinamide in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Favoni, R. E.; de Cupis, A.; Bruno, S.; Yee, D.; Ferrera, A.; Pirani, P.; Costa, A.; Decensi, A.

    1998-01-01

    The potent mitogenic activity of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on breast epithelium is inhibited by retinoic acid in oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer cell lines. We studied and compared the effects of N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-retinamide (4-HPR) in terms of growth inhibition and modulation of the IGF-I system in ER+ (MCF-7) and oestrogen receptor-negative (ER-) (MDA-MB231) breast cancer cell lines. Treatment with 1-10 microM 4-HPR for up to 96 h induced a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of proliferation in both breast cancer cell lines. Induction of apoptosis was much more evident in MCF-7 than in MDA-MB231 cells (30-40% compared with 0-5% respectively at 5 microM for 48 h). Exogenous human recombinant IGF-I (hr-IGF-I)-stimulated cell proliferation was abolished by 1 microM 4-HPR in MCF-7 cells. Immunoreactive IGF-I-like protein concentration in conditioned medium was reduced by 38% in MCF-7 and by 90% in MDA-MB231 cell lines following treatment for 48 h with 5 microM 4-HPR. Western ligand blot analysis showed a reduction of IGF-binding protein 4 (BP4) and BP5 by 67% and 87%, respectively, in MCF-7, whereas IGF-BP4 and -BP1 were reduced by approximately 20% in MDA-MB231 cells. Exposure to 5 microM 4-HPR for 48 h inhibited [125I]IGF-I binding and Scatchard analysis revealed a decrease of more than 50% in maximum binding capacity (Bmax) and a reduced receptor number/cell in both cancer cell lines. Steady-state type I IGF-receptor mRNA levels were reduced by approximately 30% in both tumour cell lines. We conclude that 4-HPR induces a significant down-regulation of the IGF-I system in both ER+ (MCF-7) and ER- (MDA-MB231) breast cancer cell lines. These findings suggest that, in our model, interference with the ER signalling pathway is not the only mechanism of breast cancer growth inhibition by 4-HPR. Images Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:9649125

  9. The Way Humans Behave Modulates the Emotional State of Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Brajon, Sophie; Laforest, Jean-Paul; Schmitt, Océane; Devillers, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The emotional state can influence decision-making under ambiguity. Cognitive bias tests (CBT) proved to be a promising indicator of the affective valence of animals in a context of farm animal welfare. Although it is well-known that humans can influence the intensity of fear and reactions of animals, research on cognitive bias often focusses on housing and management conditions and neglects the role of humans on emotional states of animals. The present study aimed at investigating whether humans can modulate the emotional state of weaned piglets. Fifty-four piglets received a chronic experience with humans: gentle (GEN), rough (ROU) or minimal contact (MIN). Simultaneously, they were individually trained on a go/no-go task to discriminate a positive auditory cue, associated with food reward in a trough, from a negative one, associated with punishments (e.g. water spray). Independently of the treatment (P = 0.82), 59% of piglets completed the training. Successfully trained piglets were then subjected to CBT, including ambiguous cues in presence or absence of a human observer. As hypothesized, GEN piglets showed a positive judgement bias, as shown by their higher percentage of go responses following an ambiguous cue compared to ROU (P = 0.03) and MIN (P = 0.02) piglets, whereas ROU and MIN piglets did not differ (P > 0.10). The presence of an observer during CBT did not modulate the percentage of go responses following an ambiguous cue (P > 0.10). However, regardless of the treatment, piglets spent less time in contact with the trough following positive cues during CBT in which the observer was present than absent (P < 0.0001). This study originally demonstrates that the nature of a chronic experience with humans can induce a judgement bias indicating that the emotional state of farm animals such as piglets can be affected by the way humans interact with them. PMID:26244335

  10. Polymeric membranes modulate human keratinocyte differentiation in specific epidermal layers.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Simona; Morelli, Sabrina; Giordano, Francesca; Gordano, Amalia; Bartolo, Loredana De

    2016-10-01

    In vitro models of human bioengineered skin substitutes are an alternative to animal experimentation for testing the effects and toxicity of drugs, cosmetics and pollutants. For the first time specific and distinct human epidermal strata were engineered by using membranes and keratinocytes. To this purpose, biodegradable membranes of chitosan (CHT), polycaprolactone (PCL) and a polymeric blend of CHT-PCL were prepared by phase-inversion technique and characterized in order to evaluate their morphological, physico-chemical and mechanical properties. The capability of membranes to modulate keratinocyte differentiation inducing specific interactions in epidermal membrane systems was investigated. The overall results demonstrated that the membrane properties strongly influence the cell morpho-functional behaviour of human keratinocytes, modulating their terminal differentiation, with the creation of specific epidermal strata or a fully proliferative epidermal multilayer system. In particular, human keratinocytes adhered on CHT and CHT-PCL membranes, forming the structure of the epidermal top layers, such as the corneum and granulosum strata, characterized by withdrawal or reduction from the cell cycle and cell proliferation. On the PCL membrane, keratinocytes developed an epidermal basal lamina, with high proliferating cells that stratified and migrated over time to form a complete differentiating epidermal multilayer system.

  11. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in sound fields

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Kim, Duck O.; Kuwada, Shigeyuki; Anderson, Paul W.; Brandewie, Eugene; Srinivasan, Nirmal

    2011-01-01

    The temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) approach allows techniques from linear systems analysis to be used to predict how the auditory system will respond to arbitrary patterns of amplitude modulation (AM). Although this approach forms the basis for a standard method of predicting speech intelligibility based on estimates of the acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) between source and receiver, human sensitivity to AM as characterized by the TMTF has not been extensively studied under realistic listening conditions, such as in reverberant sound fields. Here, TMTFs (octave bands from 2 – 512 Hz) were obtained in 3 listening conditions simulated using virtual auditory space techniques: diotic, anechoic sound field, reverberant room sound field. TMTFs were then related to acoustical MTFs estimated using two different methods in each of the listening conditions. Both diotic and anechoic data were found to be in good agreement with classic results, but AM thresholds in the reverberant room were lower than predictions based on acoustical MTFs. This result suggests that simple linear systems techniques may not be appropriate for predicting TMTFs from acoustical MTFs in reverberant sound fields, and may be suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation during reverberant listening. PMID:22822417

  12. Human colon-derived soluble factors modulate gut microbiota composition.

    PubMed

    Hevia, Arancha; Bernardo, David; Montalvillo, Enrique; Al-Hassi, Hafid O; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Garrote, Jose A; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Arranz, Eduardo; Knight, Stella C; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    The commensal microbiota modulates immunological and metabolic aspects of the intestinal mucosa contributing to development of human gut diseases including inflammatory bowel disease. The host/microbiota interaction often referred to as a crosstalk, mainly focuses on the effect of the microbiota on the host neglecting effects that the host could elicit on the commensals. Colonic microenvironments from three human healthy controls (obtained from the proximal and distal colon, both in resting conditions and after immune - IL-15- and microbiota - LPS-in vitro challenges) were used to condition a stable fecal population. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene-based analyses were performed to study the effect induced by the host on the microbiota composition and function. Non-supervised principal component analysis (PCA) showed that all microbiotas, which had been conditioned with colonic microenvironments clustered together in terms of relative microbial composition, suggesting that soluble factors were modulating a stable fecal population independently from the treatment or the origin. Our findings confirmed that the host intestinal microenvironment has the capacity to modulate the gut microbiota composition via yet unidentified soluble factors. These findings indicate that an appropriate understanding of the factors of the host mucosal microenvironment affecting microbiota composition and function could improve therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota composition.

  13. Human Colon-Derived Soluble Factors Modulate Gut Microbiota Composition

    PubMed Central

    Hevia, Arancha; Bernardo, David; Montalvillo, Enrique; Al-Hassi, Hafid O.; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Garrote, Jose A.; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Arranz, Eduardo; Knight, Stella C.; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    The commensal microbiota modulates immunological and metabolic aspects of the intestinal mucosa contributing to development of human gut diseases including inflammatory bowel disease. The host/microbiota interaction often referred to as a crosstalk, mainly focuses on the effect of the microbiota on the host neglecting effects that the host could elicit on the commensals. Colonic microenvironments from three human healthy controls (obtained from the proximal and distal colon, both in resting conditions and after immune – IL-15- and microbiota – LPS-in vitro challenges) were used to condition a stable fecal population. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene-based analyses were performed to study the effect induced by the host on the microbiota composition and function. Non-supervised principal component analysis (PCA) showed that all microbiotas, which had been conditioned with colonic microenvironments clustered together in terms of relative microbial composition, suggesting that soluble factors were modulating a stable fecal population independently from the treatment or the origin. Our findings confirmed that the host intestinal microenvironment has the capacity to modulate the gut microbiota composition via yet unidentified soluble factors. These findings indicate that an appropriate understanding of the factors of the host mucosal microenvironment affecting microbiota composition and function could improve therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota composition. PMID:25918688

  14. Human Intellectual Disability Genes Form Conserved Functional Modules in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Oortveld, Merel A. W.; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Oti, Martin; Nijhof, Bonnie; Fernandes, Ana Clara; Kochinke, Korinna; Castells-Nobau, Anna; van Engelen, Eva; Ellenkamp, Thijs; Eshuis, Lilian; Galy, Anne; van Bokhoven, Hans; Habermann, Bianca; Brunner, Han G.; Zweier, Christiane; Verstreken, Patrik; Huynen, Martijn A.; Schenck, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual Disability (ID) disorders, defined by an IQ below 70, are genetically and phenotypically highly heterogeneous. Identification of common molecular pathways underlying these disorders is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of cognition and for the development of therapeutic intervention strategies. To systematically establish their functional connectivity, we used transgenic RNAi to target 270 ID gene orthologs in the Drosophila eye. Assessment of neuronal function in behavioral and electrophysiological assays and multiparametric morphological analysis identified phenotypes associated with knockdown of 180 ID gene orthologs. Most of these genotype-phenotype associations were novel. For example, we uncovered 16 genes that are required for basal neurotransmission and have not previously been implicated in this process in any system or organism. ID gene orthologs with morphological eye phenotypes, in contrast to genes without phenotypes, are relatively highly expressed in the human nervous system and are enriched for neuronal functions, suggesting that eye phenotyping can distinguish different classes of ID genes. Indeed, grouping genes by Drosophila phenotype uncovered 26 connected functional modules. Novel links between ID genes successfully predicted that MYCN, PIGV and UPF3B regulate synapse development. Drosophila phenotype groups show, in addition to ID, significant phenotypic similarity also in humans, indicating that functional modules are conserved. The combined data indicate that ID disorders, despite their extreme genetic diversity, are caused by disruption of a limited number of highly connected functional modules. PMID:24204314

  15. Cholinergic modulation of cognition: Insights from human pharmacological functional neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Paul; Driver, Jon; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from lesion and cortical-slice studies implicate the neocortical cholinergic system in the modulation of sensory, attentional and memory processing. In this review we consider findings from sixty-three healthy human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies that probe interactions of cholinergic drugs with brain activation profiles, and relate these to contemporary neurobiological models. Consistent patterns that emerge are: (1) the direction of cholinergic modulation of sensory cortex activations depends upon top-down influences; (2) cholinergic hyperstimulation reduces top-down selective modulation of sensory cortices; (3) cholinergic hyperstimulation interacts with task-specific frontoparietal activations according to one of several patterns, including: suppression of parietal-mediated reorienting; decreasing ‘effort’-associated activations in prefrontal regions; and deactivation of a ‘resting-state network’ in medial cortex, with reciprocal recruitment of dorsolateral frontoparietal regions during performance-challenging conditions; (4) encoding-related activations in both neocortical and hippocampal regions are disrupted by cholinergic blockade, or enhanced with cholinergic stimulation, while the opposite profile is observed during retrieval; (5) many examples exist of an ‘inverted-U shaped’ pattern of cholinergic influences by which the direction of functional neural activation (and performance) depends upon both task (e.g. relative difficulty) and subject (e.g. age) factors. Overall, human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies both corroborate and extend physiological accounts of cholinergic function arising from other experimental contexts, while providing mechanistic insights into cholinergic-acting drugs and their potential clinical applications. PMID:21708219

  16. Human Health in the Balance. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Melinda S.; Washburn, Sarah; Holman, Jeremy T.

    This learning module aims to engage students in problem solving, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and cooperative learning. The module is appropriate for use in any introductory or intermediate undergraduate course that focuses on human-environment relationships. The module states that human health is a product of complex interactions among…

  17. Oestrogen regulates mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme transcription in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Johann, S; Dahm, M; Kipp, M; Beyer, C; Arnold, S

    2010-08-01

    The regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism is not only important for normal functioning of neurones, but also appears to be essential during acute damage and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. This makes mitochondria an interesting regulatory target for therapeutic approaches. Oestrogen is well-recognised as a protective hormone in the central nervous system under pathological threats. In the present study, we analysed the influence of oestrogen on the expression of mitochondria-encoded genes and mitochondrial activity in spinal cord cells both in vitro and vivo. Hormone application increased the transcription of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes (MRCE). This effect was observed in cultured spinal cord neurones, where it was inhibited by a nuclear oestrogen receptor (ER) antagonist and mainly mediated by the activation of ERbeta. No effect of oestrogen was observed in cultured spinal cord astroglia. In addition, the mitochondrial transcription factor A and nuclear respiratory factor 1 were up-regulated by oestrogen in a similar way as MRCE in vitro, and ATP levels were elevated after the application of the specific ERbeta agonist 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile in cultured spinal cord nerve cells. The exposure of young male mice to oestrogen yielded increased levels of MRCE transcripts in the spinal cord. These data clearly show that systemic application of oestrogen stimulates MRCE expression in the spinal cord and predominantly in neurones. Further studies are required to demonstrate the potency of oestrogen to counteract pathological damage by stabilising mitochondrial performance.

  18. Attention modulates responses in the human lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Daniel H; Fukui, Miki M; Pinsk, Mark A; Kastner, Sabine

    2002-11-01

    Attentional mechanisms are important for selecting relevant information and filtering out irrelevant information from cluttered visual scenes. Selective attention has previously been shown to affect neural activity in both extrastriate and striate visual cortex. Here, evidence from functional brain imaging shows that attentional response modulation is not confined to cortical processing, but can occur as early as the thalamic level. We found that attention modulated neural activity in the human lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in several ways: it enhanced neural responses to attended stimuli, attenuated responses to ignored stimuli and increased baseline activity in the absence of visual stimulation. The LGN, traditionally viewed as the gateway to visual cortex, may also serve as a 'gatekeeper' in controlling attentional response gain.

  19. Oestrogen and the cardiovascular system: the good, the bad and the puzzling.

    PubMed

    Gray, G A; Sharif, I; Webb, D J; Seckl, J R

    2001-03-01

    The concept that oestrogen replacement therapy is cardioprotective has been challenged recently by the negative results of randomized clinical trials in coronary heart disease. These data have come at a time of rapid advances in our understanding of the cellular mechanisms of oestrogen. In particular, the cloning of the classical oestrogen receptor (ERalpha), the identification of a novel ER isoform (ERbeta), the availability of specific ERalpha and ERbeta knockout mice models, and the elucidation of receptor functions and signalling pathways linked to non-genomic actions of oestrogen are helping to unravel this complex biology. In this article, these advances will be discussed with particular emphasis on the regulation of nitric oxide synthesis by oestrogen. Furthermore, the puzzling issues that have emerged and the potential for development of novel and specific therapeutic approaches will be highlighted.

  20. Methylene blue modulates functional connectivity in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Pavel; Singh, Amar P; Malloy, Kristen E; Zhou, Wei; Barrett, Douglas W; Franklin, Crystal G; Altmeyer, Wilson B; Gutierrez, Juan E; Li, Jinqi; Heyl, Betty L; Lancaster, Jack L; Gonzalez-Lima, F; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-03-10

    Methylene blue USP (MB) is a FDA-grandfathered drug used in clinics to treat methemoglobinemia, carbon monoxide poisoning and cyanide poisoning that has been shown to increase fMRI evoked blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response in rodents. Low dose MB also has memory enhancing effect in rodents and humans. However, the neural correlates of the effects of MB in the human brain are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that a single low oral dose of MB modulates the functional connectivity of neural networks in healthy adults. Task-based and task-free fMRI were performed before and one hour after MB or placebo administration utilizing a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled design. MB administration was associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow in a task-related network during a visuomotor task, and with stronger resting-state functional connectivity in multiple regions linking perception and memory functions. These findings demonstrate for the first time that low-dose MB can modulate task-related and resting-state neural networks in the human brain. These neuroimaging findings support further investigations in healthy and disease populations.

  1. Therapeutic modulators of STAT signalling for human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Gabriella; Hilliard, Tyvette S.; Turkson, James

    2014-01-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins have important roles in biological processes. The abnormal activation of STAT signalling pathways is also implicated in many human diseases, including cancer, autoimmune diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and diabetes. Over a decade has passed since the first inhibitor of a STAT protein was reported and efforts to discover modulators of STAT signalling as therapeutics continue. This Review discusses the outcomes of the ongoing drug discovery research endeavours against STAT proteins, provides perspectives on new directions for accelerating the discovery of drug candidates, and highlights the noteworthy candidate therapeutics that have progressed to clinical trials. PMID:23903221

  2. Cyclical modulation of human ventricular repolarization by respiration

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Ben; Gill, Jaswinder; Western, David; Gilbey, Michael P.; Bostock, Julian; Boyett, Mark R.; Zhang, Henggui; Coronel, Ruben; Taggart, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background: Respiratory modulation of autonomic input to the sinus node results in cyclical modulation of heart rate, known as respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We hypothesized that the respiratory cycle may also exert cyclical modulation on ventricular repolarization, which may be separately measurable using local endocardial recordings. Methods and Results: The study included 16 subjects with normal ventricles undergoing routine clinical electrophysiological procedures for supraventricular arrhythmias. Unipolar electrograms were recorded from 10 right and 10 left ventricular endocardial sites. Breathing was voluntarily regulated at 5 fixed frequencies (6, 9, 12, 15, and 30 breaths per min) and heart rate was clamped by RV pacing. Activation-recovery intervals (ARI: a surrogate for APD) exhibited significant (p < 0.025) cyclical variation at the respiratory frequency in all subjects; ARI shortened with inspiration and lengthened with expiration. Peak-to-peak ARI variation ranged from 0–26 ms; the spatial pattern varied with subject. Arterial blood pressure also oscillated at the respiratory frequency (p < 0.025) and lagged behind respiration by between 1.5 s and 0.65 s from slowest to fastest breathing rates respectively. Systolic oscillation amplitude was significantly greater than diastolic (14 ± 5 vs. 8 ± 4 mm Hg ± SD, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Observations in humans with healthy ventricles using multiple left and right ventricular endocardial recordings showed that ARI action potential duration (APD) varied cyclically with respiration. PMID:23055983

  3. Higher cortical modulation of pain perception in the human brain: Psychological determinant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Andrew Cn

    2009-10-01

    Pain perception and its genesis in the human brain have been reviewed recently. In the current article, the reports on pain modulation in the human brain were reviewed from higher cortical regulation, i.e. top-down effect, particularly studied in psychological determinants. Pain modulation can be examined by gene therapy, physical modulation, pharmacological modulation, psychological modulation, and pathophysiological modulation. In psychological modulation, this article examined (a) willed determination, (b) distraction, (c) placebo, (d) hypnosis, (e) meditation, (f) qi-gong, (g) belief, and (h) emotions, respectively, in the brain function for pain modulation. In each, the operational definition, cortical processing, neuroimaging, and pain modulation were systematically deliberated. However, not all studies had featured the brain modulation processing but rather demonstrated potential effects on human pain. In our own studies on the emotional modulation on human pain, we observed that emotions could be induced from music melodies or pictures perception for reduction of tonic human pain, mainly in potentiation of the posterior alpha EEG fields, likely resulted from underneath activities of precuneous in regulation of consciousness, including pain perception. To sum, higher brain functions become the leading edge research in all sciences. How to solve the information bit of thinking and feeling in the brain can be the greatest challenge of human intelligence. Application of higher cortical modulation of human pain and suffering can lead to the progress of social humanity and civilization.

  4. Molecular mechanism(s) of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and their potent oestrogenicity in diverse cells and tissues that express oestrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Tae-Hee; Leung, Peter C K; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are natural or synthetic compounds present in the environment which can interfere with hormone synthesis and normal physiological functions of male and female reproductive organs. Most EDCs tend to bind to steroid hormone receptors including the oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and androgen receptor (AR). As EDCs disrupt the actions of endogenous hormones, they may induce abnormal reproduction, stimulation of cancer growth, dysfunction of neuronal and immune system. Although EDCs represent a significant public health concern, there are no standard methods to determine effect of EDCs on human beings. The mechanisms underlying adverse actions of EDC exposure are not clearly understood. In this review, we highlighted the toxicology of EDCs and its effect on human health, including reproductive development in males and females as shown in in vitro and in vivo models. In addition, this review brings attention to the toxicity of EDCs via interaction of genomic and non-genomic signalling pathways through hormone receptors. PMID:23279634

  5. A Mechanism for Frequency Modulation in Songbirds Shared with Humans

    PubMed Central

    Margoliash, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In most animals that vocalize, control of fundamental frequency is a key element for effective communication. In humans, subglottal pressure controls vocal intensity but also influences fundamental frequency during phonation. Given the underlying similarities in the biomechanical mechanisms of vocalization in humans and songbirds, songbirds offer an attractive opportunity to study frequency modulation by pressure. Here, we present a novel technique for dynamic control of subsyringeal pressure in zebra finches. By regulating the opening of a custom-built fast valve connected to the air sac system, we achieved partial or total silencing of specific syllables, and could modify syllabic acoustics through more complex manipulations of air sac pressure. We also observed that more nuanced pressure variations over a limited interval during production of a syllable concomitantly affected the frequency of that syllable segment. These results can be explained in terms of a mathematical model for phonation that incorporates a nonlinear description for the vocal source capable of generating the observed frequency modulations induced by pressure variations. We conclude that the observed interaction between pressure and frequency was a feature of the source, not a result of feedback control. Our results indicate that, beyond regulating phonation or its absence, regulation of pressure is important for control of fundamental frequencies of vocalizations. Thus, although there are separate brainstem pathways for syringeal and respiratory control of song production, both can affect airflow and frequency. We hypothesize that the control of pressure and frequency is combined holistically at higher levels of the vocalization pathways. PMID:23825417

  6. A mechanism for frequency modulation in songbirds shared with humans.

    PubMed

    Amador, Ana; Margoliash, Daniel

    2013-07-03

    In most animals that vocalize, control of fundamental frequency is a key element for effective communication. In humans, subglottal pressure controls vocal intensity but also influences fundamental frequency during phonation. Given the underlying similarities in the biomechanical mechanisms of vocalization in humans and songbirds, songbirds offer an attractive opportunity to study frequency modulation by pressure. Here, we present a novel technique for dynamic control of subsyringeal pressure in zebra finches. By regulating the opening of a custom-built fast valve connected to the air sac system, we achieved partial or total silencing of specific syllables, and could modify syllabic acoustics through more complex manipulations of air sac pressure. We also observed that more nuanced pressure variations over a limited interval during production of a syllable concomitantly affected the frequency of that syllable segment. These results can be explained in terms of a mathematical model for phonation that incorporates a nonlinear description for the vocal source capable of generating the observed frequency modulations induced by pressure variations. We conclude that the observed interaction between pressure and frequency was a feature of the source, not a result of feedback control. Our results indicate that, beyond regulating phonation or its absence, regulation of pressure is important for control of fundamental frequencies of vocalizations. Thus, although there are separate brainstem pathways for syringeal and respiratory control of song production, both can affect airflow and frequency. We hypothesize that the control of pressure and frequency is combined holistically at higher levels of the vocalization pathways.

  7. Xanthohumol suppresses oestrogen-signalling in breast cancer through the inhibition of BIG3-PHB2 interactions.

    PubMed

    Yoshimaru, Tetsuro; Komatsu, Masato; Tashiro, Etsu; Imoto, Masaya; Osada, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Yasuo; Honda, Junko; Sasa, Mitsunori; Katagiri, Toyomasa

    2014-12-08

    Xanthohumol (XN) is a natural anticancer compound that inhibits the proliferation of oestrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast cancer cells. However, the precise mechanism of the antitumour effects of XN on oestrogen (E2)-dependent cell growth, and especially its direct target molecule(s), remain(s) largely unknown. Here, we focus on whether XN directly binds to the tumour suppressor protein prohibitin 2 (PHB2), forming a novel natural antitumour compound targeting the BIG3-PHB2 complex and acting as a pivotal modulator of E2/ERα signalling in breast cancer cells. XN treatment effectively prevented the BIG3-PHB2 interaction, thereby releasing PHB2 to directly bind to both nuclear- and cytoplasmic ERα. This event led to the complete suppression of the E2-signalling pathways and ERα-positive breast cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo, but did not suppress the growth of normal mammary epithelial cells. Our findings suggest that XN may be a promising natural compound to suppress the growth of luminal-type breast cancer.

  8. Xanthohumol suppresses oestrogen-signalling in breast cancer through the inhibition of BIG3-PHB2 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimaru, Tetsuro; Komatsu, Masato; Tashiro, Etsu; Imoto, Masaya; Osada, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Yasuo; Honda, Junko; Sasa, Mitsunori; Katagiri, Toyomasa

    2014-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN) is a natural anticancer compound that inhibits the proliferation of oestrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast cancer cells. However, the precise mechanism of the antitumour effects of XN on oestrogen (E2)-dependent cell growth, and especially its direct target molecule(s), remain(s) largely unknown. Here, we focus on whether XN directly binds to the tumour suppressor protein prohibitin 2 (PHB2), forming a novel natural antitumour compound targeting the BIG3-PHB2 complex and acting as a pivotal modulator of E2/ERα signalling in breast cancer cells. XN treatment effectively prevented the BIG3-PHB2 interaction, thereby releasing PHB2 to directly bind to both nuclear- and cytoplasmic ERα. This event led to the complete suppression of the E2-signalling pathways and ERα-positive breast cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo, but did not suppress the growth of normal mammary epithelial cells. Our findings suggest that XN may be a promising natural compound to suppress the growth of luminal-type breast cancer. PMID:25483453

  9. Impact of mutational profiles on response of primary oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancers to oestrogen deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Gellert, Pascal; Segal, Corrinne V.; Gao, Qiong; López-Knowles, Elena; Martin, Lesley-Ann; Dodson, Andrew; Li, Tiandao; Miller, Christopher A.; Lu, Charles; Mardis, Elaine R.; Gillman, Alexa; Morden, James; Graf, Manuela; Sidhu, Kally; Evans, Abigail; Shere, Michael; Holcombe, Christopher; McIntosh, Stuart A.; Bundred, Nigel; Skene, Anthony; Maxwell, William; Robertson, John; Bliss, Judith M.; Smith, Ian; Dowsett, Mitch; Johnston, Stephen; Todd, Radha; Horgan, Kieran; Chan, Stephen; Holt, Simon D. H.; Parton, Marina; Laidlaw, Ian; Vaidya, Jayant S.; Irvine, Tracey; Hoar, Fiona; Khattak, Ilyas; Kothari, Ashutosh; Brazil, Lucy; Gallegos, Nicholas; Wheatley, Duncan; Johnson, Tayo; Sparrow, Geoffrey; Ledwidge, Serena; Mortimer, Caroline; Ornstein, Marcus; Ferguson, Douglas; Adamson, Douglas; Cutress, Ramsey; Johnson, Richard; Crowley, Clare; Winters, Zoe; Hamed, Hisham; Burcombe, Russell; Cleator, Susan; Kelleher, Muireann; Roberts, Jonathan; Vesty, Sarah; Hadaki, Maher; Quigley, Mary; Doughty, Julie; Laws, Siobhan; Seetharam, Seema; Thorne, Amanda; Donnelly, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Pre-surgical studies allow study of the relationship between mutations and response of oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer to aromatase inhibitors (AIs) but have been limited to small biopsies. Here in phase I of this study, we perform exome sequencing on baseline, surgical core-cuts and blood from 60 patients (40 AI treated, 20 controls). In poor responders (based on Ki67 change), we find significantly more somatic mutations than good responders. Subclones exclusive to baseline or surgical cores occur in ∼30% of tumours. In phase II, we combine targeted sequencing on another 28 treated patients with phase I. We find six genes frequently mutated: PIK3CA, TP53, CDH1, MLL3, ABCA13 and FLG with 71% concordance between paired cores. TP53 mutations are associated with poor response. We conclude that multiple biopsies are essential for confident mutational profiling of ER+ breast cancer and TP53 mutations are associated with resistance to oestrogen deprivation therapy. PMID:27827358

  10. Oestrogen receptor beta ligand: a novel treatment to enhance endogenous functional remyelination.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Daniel K; Mangiardi, Mario; Song, Bingbing; Patel, Rhusheet; Du, Sienmi; Sofroniew, Michael V; Voskuhl, Rhonda R; Tiwari-Woodruff, Seema K

    2010-10-01

    Demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, are characterized by inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration of the central nervous system. Therapeutic strategies that induce effective neuroprotection and enhance intrinsic repair mechanisms are central goals for future therapy of multiple sclerosis. Oestrogens and oestrogen receptor ligands are promising treatments to prevent multiple sclerosis-induced neurodegeneration. In the present study we investigated the capacity of oestrogen receptor β ligand treatment to affect callosal axon demyelination and stimulate endogenous myelination in chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis using electrophysiology, electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and tract-tracing methods. Oestrogen receptor β ligand treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice prevented both histopathological and functional abnormalities of callosal axons despite the presence of inflammation. Specifically, there were fewer demyelinated, damaged axons and more myelinated axons with intact nodes of Ranvier in oestrogen receptor β ligand-treated mice. In addition, oestrogen receptor β ligand treatment caused an increase in mature oligodendrocyte numbers, a significant increase in myelin sheath thickness and axon transport. Functional analysis of callosal axon conduction showed a significant improvement in compound action potential amplitudes, latency and in axon refractoriness. These findings show a direct neuroprotective effect of oestrogen receptor β ligand treatment on oligodendrocyte differentiation, myelination and axon conduction during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

  11. Feature-Selective Attentional Modulations in Human Frontoparietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sutterer, David W.; Serences, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Control over visual selection has long been framed in terms of a dichotomy between “source” and “site,” where top-down feedback signals originating in frontoparietal cortical areas modulate or bias sensory processing in posterior visual areas. This distinction is motivated in part by observations that frontoparietal cortical areas encode task-level variables (e.g., what stimulus is currently relevant or what motor outputs are appropriate), while posterior sensory areas encode continuous or analog feature representations. Here, we present evidence that challenges this distinction. We used fMRI, a roving searchlight analysis, and an inverted encoding model to examine representations of an elementary feature property (orientation) across the entire human cortical sheet while participants attended either the orientation or luminance of a peripheral grating. Orientation-selective representations were present in a multitude of visual, parietal, and prefrontal cortical areas, including portions of the medial occipital cortex, the lateral parietal cortex, and the superior precentral sulcus (thought to contain the human homolog of the macaque frontal eye fields). Additionally, representations in many—but not all—of these regions were stronger when participants were instructed to attend orientation relative to luminance. Collectively, these findings challenge models that posit a strict segregation between sources and sites of attentional control on the basis of representational properties by demonstrating that simple feature values are encoded by cortical regions throughout the visual processing hierarchy, and that representations in many of these areas are modulated by attention. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Influential models of visual attention posit a distinction between top-down control and bottom-up sensory processing networks. These models are motivated in part by demonstrations showing that frontoparietal cortical areas associated with top-down control

  12. C-reactive protein modulates human lung fibroblast migration.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kazuhiko; Kohyama, Tadashi; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Kato, Jun; Takami, Kazutaka; Okazaki, Hitoshi; Desaki, Masashi; Nagase, Takahide; Rennard, Stephen I; Takizawa, Hajime

    2009-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been classically used as a marker of inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CRP on migration of human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) to human plasma fibronectin (HFn). Using the blindwell chamber technique, CRP inhibited HFL-1 migration in a dose-dependent fashion (at 1 microg/mL, inhibition: 32.5% +/- 7.1%; P < .05). Western blot analysis showed that CRP inhibited the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in the presence of HFn. Moreover, the MAPK inhibitors SB202190 (25 microM) and SB203580 (25 microM) inhibited HFn-induced cell migration, suggesting an important role of p38 MAPK in HFn-induced migration. Taken together, these results suggest that the inhibitory effect of CRP is mediated by blocking MAPK. In summary, this study demonstrates that CRP directly modulates human lung fibroblasts migration. Thus, CRP may contribute to regulation of wound healing and may be endogenous antifibrotic factor acting on lung fibrosis.

  13. Environmental levels of oestrogenic and antiandrogenic compounds feminize digit ratios in male rats and their unexposed male progeny

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Jacques; Le Denmat, Dominique; Berges, Raymond; Doridot, Ludivine; Salmon, Benjamin; Canivenc-Lavier, Marie Chantal; Eustache, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Digit length ratios, especially the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D : 4D), are associated with various pathological and behavioural conditions in many species including humans and are dependent upon prenatal androgen to oestrogen balance. It is unknown whether digit ratios are modified by environmental exposure to ubiquitous endocrine disruptors. We studied the effect on adult male Wistar rat digit ratios of a gestational exposure to the oestrogenic and antiandrogenic compounds bisphenol A (BPA), genistein and vinclozolin, in low doses, and in combination with investigating in parallel a possible sexual dimorphism of this trait. We also investigated the effects on the male progeny not exposed during gestation. X-rays were taken of the left and right forepaws, and 2D–5D proximal to distal phalanx distances were measured by a standardized procedure based on semi-automatic image analysis. We provide evidence that there is a sexual dimorphism of digit ratios in the Wistar rat, and we found that BPA alone or in combination with genistein and vinclozolin significantly feminized digit ratios in male rats. Intriguingly, significant feminization of digit ratios was also found in the unexposed male progeny of males that had been exposed to compound mixtures. In conclusion, prenatal environmental levels of endocrine-active substances permanently disrupt digit ratios. Digit ratio measurement in adults is thus a promising biomarker of prenatal exposure to low-dose endocrine disruptors in rodents, with potential implications for future studies in humans. PMID:23926155

  14. Intestinal microbiota modulates gluten-induced immunopathology in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Galipeau, Heather J; McCarville, Justin L; Huebener, Sina; Litwin, Owen; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Sanz, Yolanda; Murray, Joseph A; Jordana, Manel; Alaedini, Armin; Chirdo, Fernando G; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The recent increase in CD incidence suggests that additional environmental factors, such as intestinal microbiota alterations, are involved in its pathogenesis. However, there is no direct evidence of modulation of gluten-induced immunopathology by the microbiota. We investigated whether specific microbiota compositions influence immune responses to gluten in mice expressing the human DQ8 gene, which confers moderate CD genetic susceptibility. Germ-free mice, clean specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice colonized with a microbiota devoid of opportunistic pathogens and Proteobacteria, and conventional SPF mice that harbor a complex microbiota that includes opportunistic pathogens were used. Clean SPF mice had attenuated responses to gluten compared to germ-free and conventional SPF mice. Germ-free mice developed increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, markers of intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity, gliadin-specific antibodies, and a proinflammatory gliadin-specific T-cell response. Antibiotic treatment, leading to Proteobacteria expansion, further enhanced gluten-induced immunopathology in conventional SPF mice. Protection against gluten-induced immunopathology in clean SPF mice was reversed after supplementation with a member of the Proteobacteria phylum, an enteroadherent Escherichia coli isolated from a CD patient. The intestinal microbiota can both positively and negatively modulate gluten-induced immunopathology in mice. In subjects with moderate genetic susceptibility, intestinal microbiota changes may be a factor that increases CD risk.

  15. Intestinal Microbiota Modulates Gluten-Induced Immunopathology in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Galipeau, Heather J.; McCarville, Justin L.; Huebener, Sina; Litwin, Owen; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Sanz, Yolanda; Murray, Joseph A.; Jordana, Manel; Alaedini, Armin; Chirdo, Fernando G.; Verdu, Elena F.

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The recent increase in CD incidence suggests that additional environmental factors, such as intestinal microbiota alterations, are involved in its pathogenesis. However, there is no direct evidence of modulation of gluten-induced immunopathology by the microbiota. We investigated whether specific microbiota compositions influence immune responses to gluten in mice expressing the human DQ8 gene, which confers moderate CD genetic susceptibility. Germ-free mice, clean specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice colonized with a microbiota devoid of opportunistic pathogens and Proteobacteria, and conventional SPF mice that harbor a complex microbiota that includes opportunistic pathogens were used. Clean SPF mice had attenuated responses to gluten compared to germ-free and conventional SPF mice. Germ-free mice developed increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, markers of intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity, gliadin-specific antibodies, and a proinflammatory gliadin-specific T-cell response. Antibiotic treatment, leading to Proteobacteria expansion, further enhanced gluten-induced immunopathology in conventional SPF mice. Protection against gluten-induced immunopathology in clean SPF mice was reversed after supplementation with a member of the Proteobacteria phylum, an enteroadherent Escherichia coli isolated from a CD patient. The intestinal microbiota can both positively and negatively modulate gluten-induced immunopathology in mice. In subjects with moderate genetic susceptibility, intestinal microbiota changes may be a factor that increases CD risk. PMID:26456581

  16. Modules of human micro-RNA co-target network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Mahashweta; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.; Mohanty, P. K.

    2011-05-01

    Human micro RNAs (miRNAs) target about 90% of the coding genes and form a complex regulatory network. We study the community structure of the miRNA co-target network considering miRNAs as the nodes which are connected by weighted links. The weight of link that connects a pair of miRNAs denote the total number of common transcripts targeted by that pair. We argue that the network consists of about 74 modules, quite similar to the components (or clusters) obtained earlier [Online J Bioinformatics, 10,280], indicating that the components of the miRNA co-target network are self organized in a way to maximize the modularity.

  17. Hepcidin modulation in human diseases: From research to clinic

    PubMed Central

    Piperno, Alberto; Mariani, Raffaella; Trombini, Paola; Girelli, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    By modulating hepcidin production, an organism controls intestinal iron absorption, iron uptake and mobilization from stores to meet body iron need. In recent years there has been important advancement in our knowledge of hepcidin regulation that also has implications for understanding the physiopathology of some human disorders. Since the discovery of hepcidin and the demonstration of its pivotal role in iron homeostasis, there has been a substantial interest in developing a reliable assay of the hormone in biological fluids. Measurement of hepcidin in biological fluids can improve our understanding of iron diseases and be a useful tool for diagnosis and clinical management of these disorders. We reviewed the literature and our own research on hepcidin to give an updated status of the situation in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:19195055

  18. Impact of oestrogenic substances from oil production at sea.

    PubMed

    Lye, C M

    2000-03-15

    The possibility that chemicals present in the environment may mimic hormones, causing deleterious physiological effects to wildlife, has been given considerable attention. Although the question of ecological significance of 'endocrine disrupters' is not yet settled, and standard assessment procedures have not yet been established, proposals to control these chemicals into the marine environment are now being made under the Oslo and Paris Commission (OSPAR) and the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM). A possible source of such emissions is offshore-drilling, where applications containing polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylphenols, indicated as environmental oestrogens, historically have been used. This paper examines available evidence regarding the potential impact of these substances on aquatic organisms living around offshore platforms.

  19. Screening for oestrogenic activity of plant and food extracts using in vitro trout hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Bennetau-Pelissero, C; Latonnelle, K Gontier; Lamothe, V; Shinkaruk-Poix, S; Kaushik, S J

    2004-01-01

    The use of in vitro trout hepatocyte cultures is shown to provide a simple and effective way to screen plant and food products for oestrogenic activity. The relative oestrogenic activities of 0.1 g each of extracts of phytosterol, soy isoflavone, red clover, kudzu and soybean extracts were determined using this assay and found to be equivalent to 212, 1, 3.2, 132 and 1025 nM of 17beta-estradiol, respectively. Controls were performed on soybean and kudzu extracts using specific ELISAs for isoflavones and these confirmed the validity of the cell culture assay. The method described offers an advantage over current methods in that it can detect increased oestrogenic activity that may occur as a result of metabolic activation of pre- or pro-oestrogens liver cells.

  20. Novel female sex-dependent actions of oestrogen in the intestine.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Fiona; Thomas, Warren; Harvey, Brian J

    2009-11-01

    The intestine is an oestrogen responsive organ and circulatory oestrogens suppress Cl(-) secretion across the epithelium of the colon to promote fluid retention at the luteal stage of the menstrual cycle. Ion transporters in the colon which are involved in Cl(-) secretion show differential expression between males and females as do the signalling protein kinase intermediates involved in acutely regulating these transporters. Work from our laboratory has identified the KCNQ1/KCNE3 channel as one of the principal targets for oestrogen-induced signalling cascades in the distal colon. Through inhibition of the KCNQ1 channel, basolateral K(+) recycling is decreased so reducing the favourable electrochemical gradient for Cl(-) extrusion at the apical membrane. The actions of oestrogen on non-reproductive tissues such as the colon, kidney, lung and sweat gland will affect whole body electrolyte and fluid homeostasis and also have consequences for reproductive potential.

  1. Modulating Human Auditory Processing by Transcranial Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Heimrath, Kai; Fiene, Marina; Rufener, Katharina S.; Zaehle, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) has become a valuable research tool for the investigation of neurophysiological processes underlying human action and cognition. In recent years, striking evidence for the neuromodulatory effects of transcranial direct current stimulation, transcranial alternating current stimulation, and transcranial random noise stimulation has emerged. While the wealth of knowledge has been gained about tES in the motor domain and, to a lesser extent, about its ability to modulate human cognition, surprisingly little is known about its impact on perceptual processing, particularly in the auditory domain. Moreover, while only a few studies systematically investigated the impact of auditory tES, it has already been applied in a large number of clinical trials, leading to a remarkable imbalance between basic and clinical research on auditory tES. Here, we review the state of the art of tES application in the auditory domain focussing on the impact of neuromodulation on acoustic perception and its potential for clinical application in the treatment of auditory related disorders. PMID:27013969

  2. Cinobufagin Modulates Human Innate Immune Responses and Triggers Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shanshan; Spelmink, Laura; Codemo, Mario; Subramanian, Karthik; Pütsep, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine Chan-Su is widely used for treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, but also as a remedy for infections such as furunculosis, tonsillitis and acute pharyngitis. The clinical use of Chan-Su suggests that it has anti-infective effects, however, the mechanism of action is incompletely understood. In particular, the effect on the human immune system is poorly defined. Here, we describe previously unrecognized immunomodulatory activities of cinobufagin (CBG), a major bioactive component of Chan-Su. Using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), we show that LPS-induced maturation and production of a number of cytokines was potently inhibited by CBG, which also had a pro-apoptotic effect, associated with activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, CBG triggered caspase-1 activation and significantly enhanced IL-1β production in LPS-stimulated cells. Finally, we demonstrate that CBG upregulates gene expression of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hBD-2 and hBD-3 in DCs, and induces secretion of HNP1-3 and hCAP-18/LL-37 from neutrophils, potentiating neutrophil antibacterial activity. Taken together, our data indicate that CBG modulates the inflammatory phenotype of DCs in response to LPS, and triggers an antibacterial innate immune response, thus proposing possible mechanisms for the clinical effects of Chan-Su in anti-infective therapy. PMID:27529866

  3. Oestrogens and temperature-dependent sex determination in reptiles: all is in the gonads.

    PubMed

    Pieau, C; Dorizzi, M

    2004-06-01

    In many species of oviparous reptiles, the first steps of gonadal sex differentiation depend on the incubation temperature of the eggs. Feminization of gonads by exogenous oestrogens at a male-producing temperature and masculinization of gonads by antioestrogens and aromatase inhibitors at a female-producing temperature have irrefutably demonstrated the involvement of oestrogens in ovarian differentiation. Nevertheless, several studies performed on the entire gonad/adrenal/mesonephros complex failed to find differences between male- and female-producing temperatures in oestrogen content, aromatase activity and aromatase gene expression during the thermosensitive period for sex determination. Thus, the key role of aromatase and oestrogens in the first steps of ovarian differentiation has been questioned, and extragonadal organs or tissues, such as adrenal, mesonephros, brain or yolk, were considered as possible targets of temperature and sources of the oestrogens acting on gonadal sex differentiation. In disagreement with this view, experiments and assays carried out on the gonads alone, i.e. separated from the adrenal/mesonephros, provide evidence that the gonads themselves respond to temperature shifts by modifying their sexual differentiation and are the site of aromatase activity and oestrogen synthesis during the thermosensitive period. Oestrogens act locally on both the cortical and the medullary part of the gonad to direct ovarian differentiation. We have concluded that there is no objective reason to search for the implication of other organs in the phenomenon of temperature-dependent sex determination in reptiles. From the comparison with data obtained in other vertebrates, we propose two main directions for future research: to examine how transcription of the aromatase gene is regulated and to identify molecular and cellular targets of oestrogens in gonads during sex differentiation, in species with strict genotypic sex determination and species with

  4. Different forms of oestrogen rapidly upregulate cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Barha, C K; Lieblich, S E; Galea, L A M

    2009-03-01

    Oestrogens are known to exert significant structural and functional effects in the hippocampus of adult rodents. The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus retains the ability to produce neurones throughout adulthood and 17beta-oestradiol has been shown to influence hippocampal neurogenesis in adult female rats. The effects of other oestrogens, such as oestrone and 17alpha-oestradiol, on neurogenesis have not been investigated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of 17beta-oestradiol, oestradiol benzoate, oestrone, and 17alpha-oestradiol on cell proliferation in ovariectomised adult female rats at two different time points. Young ovariectomised female rats were injected with one of the oestrogens at one of three doses. In Experiment 1, rats were exposed to the hormone for 4 h and, in Experiment 2, rats were exposed to the hormone for 30 min prior to 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine injection to label proliferating cells and their progeny. We found that young ovariectomised females responded with increased cell proliferation to most oestrogens, except oestradiol benzoate, after 30 min of exposure. However, administration of oestrogens for a longer time interval was ineffective at increasing cell proliferation. After 30 min, 17beta-oestradiol and oestrone increased cell proliferation at low (0.3 microg) and high (10 microg) doses, whereas 17alpha-oestradiol increased cell proliferation at medium (1 microg) and high doses. The results of the present study indicate that different oestrogens rapidly increase cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, possibly through a nonclassical, nongenomic mechanism. Future experiments should focus on further elucidating the specific pathways utilised by each oestrogen. These results have important therapeutic implications because it may be possible to use 17alpha-oestradiol and lower doses of oestrogens in hormone replacement therapies.

  5. Transillumination spatially modulated illumination microscopy for human chromosome imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitris, Costas; Heracleous, Peter; Patsalis, Philippos

    2005-03-01

    Human chromosome analysis is an essential task in cytogenetics, especially in prenatal screening, genetic syndrome diagnosis, cancer pathology research and mutagen dosimetry. Chromosomal analysis begins with the creation of a karyotype, which is a layout of chromosome images organized by decreasing size in pairs. Both manual and automatic classification of chromosomes are limited by the resolution of the microscope and imaging system used. One way to improve the results of classification and even detect subtleties now remaining undetected, is to enhance the resolution of the images. It is possible to achieve lateral resolution beyond the classical limit, by using spatially modulated illumination (SMI) in a wide-field, non-confocal microscope. In this case, the sample is illuminated with spatially modulated light, which makes normally inaccessible high-resolution information visible in the observed image by shifting higher frequencies within the OTF limits of the microscope. Although, SMI microscopes have been reported in the past, this manuscript reports the development of a transillumination microscope for opaque, non-fluorescent samples. The illumination path consisted of a light source illuminating a ruled grating which was subsequently imaged on the sample. The grating was mounted on a rotating and translating stage so that the magnification and rotation of the pattern could be adjusted. The imaging lens was a 1.25 NA oil immersion objective. Test samples showed resolution improvement, as judged from a comparison of the experimentally obtained FWHM. Further studies using smaller fringe distance or laser interference pattern illumination will be evaluated to further optimize the SMI results.

  6. Acquired resistance to oestrogen deprivation: role for growth factor signalling kinases/oestrogen receptor cross-talk revealed in new MCF-7X model.

    PubMed

    Staka, Cindy M; Nicholson, Robert I; Gee, Julia M W

    2005-07-01

    In vitro models of long-term oestrogen deprivation utilise increased oestrogen receptor (ER) and are oestrogen hypersensitive, with emerging evidence that growth factor signalling contributes and interacts with ER. However, such models are commonly derived in the presence of serum growth factors that may force the resistance mechanism. Our new in vitro model, MCF-7X, has thus been developed under conditions of both oestrogen and growth factor depletion. ER expression, serine 118 phosphorylation on this receptor and its transcriptional activity were modestly increased compared to the parental MCF-7 cells, although MCF-7X cells were not oestrogen hypersensitive. Faslodex (0.1 microM) partially decreased ER and its transcriptional activity, with associated decreases in serine 118 phosphorylation. Faslodex inhibited MCF-7X growth by 50% for 10 weeks. Classical growth factor receptors did not impact on MCF-7X growth and only a modest contribution for MAP kinase was revealed using PD98059 (25 microM; 35% inhibition for 3 weeks). However, the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH (PI3)-kinase inhibitor LY294002 (5 microM) inhibited MCF-7X growth by 65% for 10 weeks. In contrast to PD98059, LY294002 also partially-inhibited ER transcriptional activity and decreased serine 167 ER phosphorylation. Co-treatment with faslodex plus LY294002 to decrease activity of both serine 118 and 167 proved superior vs the single agents in decreasing ER transcriptional activity and MCF-7X growth (90% inhibition for 25 weeks). However, triple treatment including PD98059 was required to prevent resistance in MCF-7X, an event dependent on maximal depletion of serine 118 phosphorylation and ER transcriptional activity. Kinases clearly contribute in resistance to oestrogen deprivation, cross-talking with ER signalling via AF-1 phosphorylation. While inhibiting each pathway has potential to treat this state, combined therapy targeting all regulators of ER phosphorylation may be required to block subsequent

  7. Deep vein thrombosis and the oestrogen content in oral contraceptives. An epidemiological analysis.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, A

    1985-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have pointed to a correlation between the oestrogen content of oral contraceptives and the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The correlation has been strongest in studies which partially consisted of adverse drug reaction reports to the Swedish Adverse Drug Reaction Advisory Committee (SADRAC). The present study analyzes the epidemiological basis of the adverse drug reaction reports on DVT in women on oral contraceptives to SADRAC. It verifies the reported correlation between the oestrogen content of the pills and the risk of DVT but it also demonstrates that this correlation probably was secondary to differences in the diagnostic standard of DVT, to differences in reporting policies to SADRAC and to an age difference between women on low-oestrogen-pills and those on high-oestrogen pills and is thus due to bias. It is concluded that adverse drug reaction reporting on oral contraceptives has been very unreliable, for which reason it cannot support any epidemiological conclusion concerning the relative thrombogenicity of high-oestrogen pills compared with that of low-oestrogen pills.

  8. Reminder Cues Modulate the Renewal Effect in Human Predictive Learning

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Javier; Uengoer, Metin; Lachnit, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Associative learning refers to our ability to learn about regularities in our environment. When a stimulus is repeatedly followed by a specific outcome, we learn to expect the outcome in the presence of the stimulus. We are also able to modify established expectations in the face of disconfirming information (the stimulus is no longer followed by the outcome). Both the change of environmental regularities and the related processes of adaptation are referred to as extinction. However, extinction does not erase the initially acquired expectations. For instance, following successful extinction, the initially learned expectations can recover when there is a context change – a phenomenon called the renewal effect, which is considered as a model for relapse after exposure therapy. Renewal was found to be modulated by reminder cues of acquisition and extinction. However, the mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of reminder cues are not well understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of reminder cues on renewal in the field of human predictive learning. Experiment I demonstrated that renewal in human predictive learning is modulated by cues related to acquisition or extinction. Initially, participants received pairings of a stimulus and an outcome in one context. These stimulus-outcome pairings were preceded by presentations of a reminder cue (acquisition cue). Then, participants received extinction in a different context in which presentations of the stimulus were no longer followed by the outcome. These extinction trials were preceded by a second reminder cue (extinction cue). During a final phase conducted in a third context, participants showed stronger expectations of the outcome in the presence of the stimulus when testing was accompanied by the acquisition cue compared to the extinction cue. Experiment II tested an explanation of the reminder cue effect in terms of simple cue-outcome associations. Therefore, acquisition and

  9. Human Decidual Stromal Cells as a Component of the Implantation Niche and a Modulator of Maternal Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Vinketova, Kameliya; Mourdjeva, Milena

    2016-01-01

    The human decidua is a specialized tissue characterized by embryo-receptive properties. It is formed during the secretory phase of menstrual cycle from uterine mucosa termed endometrium. The decidua is composed of glands, immune cells, blood and lymph vessels, and decidual stromal cells (DSCs). In the process of decidualization, which is controlled by oestrogen and progesterone, DSCs acquire specific functions related to recognition, selection, and acceptance of the allogeneic embryo, as well as to development of maternal immune tolerance. In this review we discuss the relationship between the decidualization of DSCs and pathological obstetrical and gynaecological conditions. Moreover, the critical influence of DSCs on local immune cells populations as well as their relationship to the onset and maintenance of immune tolerance is described. PMID:27239344

  10. On the existence in human auditory pathways of channels selectively tuned to the modulation present in frequency-modulated tones

    PubMed Central

    Kay, R. H.; Matthews, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    amplitude modulation in a tone is conditioned by prior exposure to either amplitude- or frequency-modulated tones, in contrast the detectability of 8/sec frequency-modulated signals is conditioned only by prior exposure to frequency-modulated tones and not by amplitude-modulated conditioning tones. This underlines the special place of frequency modulation in human audition and emphasizes that the operative stimulus cannot be some aspect common to amplitude modulation and frequency modulation, like identical periodicity or coincident positioning of bands in the integrated spectra of the tones, but points to the instantaneous frequency-modulated wave form as the adequate stimulus. 8. These findings strongly suggest that the human auditory pathways contain `channels' in their organization which determine a final response selectively tuned to particular frequency-modulations. Periodicity coding alone cannot adequately explain this effect which may well only be understood in terms of a `place' theory of frequency selectivity. 9. This organization is well suited to subserve the recognition of frequency-modulation patterns in acoustic signals rather independently of the mean audiofrequency that carries the frequency modulation. PMID:5076392

  11. Oestrogen signalling inhibits invasive phenotype by repressing RelB and its target BCL2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobo; Belguise, Karine; Kersual, Nathalie; Kirsch, Kathrin H; Mineva, Nora D; Galtier, Florence; Chalbos, Dany; Sonenshein, Gail E

    2007-04-01

    Aberrant constitutive expression of c-Rel, p65 and p50 NF-kappaB subunits has been reported in over 90% of breast cancers. Recently, we characterized a de novo RelB NF-kappaB subunit synthesis pathway, induced by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) IE1 protein, in which binding of p50-p65 NF-kappaB and c-Jun-Fra-2 AP-1 complexes to the RELB promoter work in synergy to potently activate transcription. Although RelB complexes were observed in mouse mammary tumours induced by either ectopic c-Rel expression or carcinogen exposure, little is known about RelB in human breast disease. Here, we demonstrate constitutive de novo RelB synthesis is selectively active in invasive oestrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-negative breast cancer cells. ERalpha signalling reduced levels of functional NF-kappaB and Fra-2 AP-1 and inhibited de novo RelB synthesis, leading to an inverse correlation between RELB and ERalpha gene expression in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines. Induction of Bcl-2 by RelB promoted the more invasive phenotype of ERalpha-negative cancer cells. Thus, inhibition of de novo RelB synthesis represents a new mechanism whereby ERalpha controls epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT).

  12. Nanostructured lipid carriers loaded with resveratrol modulate human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, João P; Neves, Ana R; Silva, Andreia M; Barbosa, Mário A; Reis, M Salette; Santos, Susana G

    2016-01-01

    needed to promote a similar effect. Taken together, the results presented show that NLC are suitable carriers of fluorescent labels or bioactive molecules for human DCs, leading to inflammation modulation. PMID:27555771

  13. Modulation of fibronectin gene expression in human mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, K; Martinet, Y; Crystal, R G

    1987-01-01

    Under some conditions, mononuclear phagocytes spontaneously synthesize and release fibronectin, an extracellular matrix glycoprotein with versatile effects on cell-matrix interactions. To gain insight into the processes that modulate the level of fibronectin secretion by these cells, we used monocytes, in vitro matured monocytes and alveolar macrophages as models to compare fibronectin mRNA levels and fibronectin secretion in a variety of circumstances. Using Northern analysis and dot-blot analysis with a 32P-labeled human fibronectin cDNA probe, we evaluated steady-state mRNA levels and a human fibronectin-specific ELISA was used to evaluate fibronectin secretion. In all cases the amounts of fibronectin secreted paralleled fibronectin mRNA levels. Specifically (a) when fibronectin mRNA was undetectable, as in the case of normal blood monocytes, no fibronectin was secreted, but whenever fibronectin mRNA was present, as in normal alveolar macrophages, fibronectin was secreted by the cells; (b) as monocytes matured into macrophages in vitro, the cells began to express fibronectin mRNA and the cells secreted fibronectin; (c) when alveolar macrophages were activated with surface stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or immune complexes, fibronectin mRNA levels decreased and in parallel, the cells secreted less fibronectin; (d) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), alveolar macrophages contained severalfold more fibronectin mRNA transcripts that normal and the cells spontaneously secreted severalfold more fibronectin than normal; and (e) when IPF alveolar macrophages were placed in culture the fibronectin mRNA levels in the cells decreased with time, and concurrently the amounts of fibronectin produced per unit time continually decreased. The observation of a strict concordance of fibronectin mRNA levels and fibronectin release by mononuclear phagocytes suggests that, at least in many circumstances, fibronectin secretion by mononuclear phagocytes is controlled by

  14. A human phospholipid phosphatase activated by a transmembrane control module.

    PubMed

    Halaszovich, Christian R; Leitner, Michael G; Mavrantoni, Angeliki; Le, Audrey; Frezza, Ludivine; Feuer, Anja; Schreiber, Daniela N; Villalba-Galea, Carlos A; Oliver, Dominik

    2012-11-01

    In voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs), a transmembrane voltage sensor domain (VSD) controls an intracellular phosphoinositide phosphatase domain, thereby enabling immediate initiation of intracellular signals by membrane depolarization. The existence of such a mechanism in mammals has remained elusive, despite the presence of VSP-homologous proteins in mammalian cells, in particular in sperm precursor cells. Here we demonstrate activation of a human VSP (hVSP1/TPIP) by an intramolecular switch. By engineering a chimeric hVSP1 with enhanced plasma membrane targeting containing the VSD of a prototypic invertebrate VSP, we show that hVSP1 is a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase whose predominant substrate is PI(4,5)P(2). In the chimera, enzymatic activity is controlled by membrane potential via hVSP1's endogenous phosphoinositide binding motif. These findings suggest that the endogenous VSD of hVSP1 is a control module that initiates signaling through the phosphatase domain and indicate a role for VSP-mediated phosphoinositide signaling in mammals.

  15. Dietary modulation of the human gut microflora using prebiotics.

    PubMed

    Gibson, G R

    1998-10-01

    The human colonic flora has both beneficial and pathogenic potentials with respect to host health. There is now much interest in manipulation of the microbiota composition in order to improve the potentially beneficial aspects. The prebiotic approach dictates that non-viable food components are specifically fermented in the colon by indigenous bacteria thought to be of positive value, e.g. bifidobacteria, lactobacilli. Any food ingredient that enters the large intestine is a candidate prebiotic. However, to be effective, selectivity of the fermentation is essential. Most current attention and success has been derived using non-digestible oligosaccharides. Types primarily being looked at include those which contain fructose, xylose, soya, galactose, glucose and mannose. In particular, fructose-containing oligosaccharides, which occur naturally in a variety of plants such as onion, asparagus, chicory, banana and artichoke, fulfil the prebiotic criteria. Various data have shown that fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) are specifically fermented by bifidobacteria. During controlled feeding studies, ingestion of these prebiotics causes bifidobacteria to become numerically dominant in faeces. Recent studies have indicated that a FOS dose of 4 g/d is prebiotic. To exploit this concept more fully, there is a need for assessments of (a) improved determination of the gut microbiota composition and activity; (b) the use of molecular methodologies to assess accurately prebiotic identities and develop efficient bacterial probing strategies; (c) the prebiotic potential of raw and processed foods; and (d) the health consequences of dietary modulation.

  16. Mechanisms of Nicotinic Modulation of Glutamatergic Neuroplasticity in Humans.

    PubMed

    Lugon, Marcelo Di Marcello Valladão; Batsikadze, Giorgi; Fresnoza, Shane; Grundey, Jessica; Kuo, Min-Fang; Paulus, Walter; Nakamura-Palacios, Ester Miyuki; Nitsche, Michael A

    2015-10-22

    The impact of nicotine (NIC) on plasticity is thought to be primarily determined via calcium channel properties of nicotinic receptor subtypes, and glutamatergic plasticity is likewise calcium-dependent. Therefore glutamatergic plasticity is likely modulated by the impact of nicotinic receptor-dependent neuronal calcium influx. We tested this hypothesis for transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)-induced long-term potentiation-like plasticity, which is abolished by NIC in nonsmokers. To reduce calcium influx under NIC, we blocked N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. We applied anodal tDCS combined with 15 mg NIC patches and the NMDA-receptor antagonist dextromethorphan (DMO) in 3 different doses (50, 100, and 150 mg) or placebo medication. Corticospinal excitability was monitored by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor-evoked potential amplitudes after plasticity induction. NIC abolished anodal tDCS-induced motor cortex excitability enhancement, which was restituted under medium dosage of DMO. Low-dosage DMO did not affect the impact of NIC on tDCS-induced plasticity and high-dosage DMO abolished plasticity. For DMO alone, the low dosage had no effect, but medium and high dosages abolished tDCS-induced plasticity. These results enhance our knowledge about the proposed calcium-dependent impact of NIC on plasticity in humans and might be relevant for the development of novel nicotinic treatments for cognitive dysfunction.

  17. Calcium modulation of doxorubicin cytotoxicity in yeast and human cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Thuy Trang; Lim, Ying Jun; Fan, Melanie Hui Min; Jackson, Rebecca A; Lim, Kim Kiat; Ang, Wee Han; Ban, Kenneth Hon Kim; Chen, Ee Sin

    2016-03-01

    Doxorubicin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, but its utility is limited by cellular resistance and off-target effects. To understand the molecular mechanisms regulating chemotherapeutic responses to doxorubicin, we previously carried out a genomewide search of doxorubicin-resistance genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe fission yeast and showed that these genes are organized into networks that counteract doxorubicin cytotoxicity. Here, we describe the identification of a subgroup of doxorubicin-resistance genes that, when disrupted, leads to reduced tolerance to exogenous calcium. Unexpectedly, we observed a suppressive effect of calcium on doxorubicin cytotoxicity, where concurrent calcium and doxorubicin treatment resulted in significantly higher cell survival compared with cells treated with doxorubicin alone. Conversely, inhibitors of voltage-gated calcium channels enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity in the mutants. Consistent with these observations in fission yeast, calcium also suppressed doxorubicin cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. Further epistasis analyses in yeast showed that this suppression of doxorubicin toxicity by calcium was synergistically dependent on Rav1 and Vph2, two regulators of vacuolar-ATPase assembly; this suggests potential modulation of the calcium-doxorubicin interaction by fluctuating proton concentrations within the cellular environment. Thus, the modulatory effects of drugs or diet on calcium concentrations should be considered in doxorubicin treatment regimes.

  18. Human colostrum oligosaccharides modulate major immunologic pathways of immature human intestine

    PubMed Central

    He, YingYing; Liu, ShuBai; Leone, Serena; Newburg, David S.

    2014-01-01

    The immature neonatal intestinal immune system hyperreacts to newly colonizing unfamiliar bacteria. The hypothesis that human milk oligosaccharides from colostrum (cHMOS) can directly modulate the signaling pathways of the immature mucosa was tested. Modulation of cytokine immune signaling by HMOS was measured ex vivo in intact immature (fetal) human intestinal mucosa. From the genes whose transcription was modulated by colostrum HMOS (cHMOS), Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified networks controlling immune cell communication, intestinal mucosal immune system differentiation, and homeostasis. cHMOS attenuate pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-stimulated acute phase inflammatory cytokine protein levels (IL-8, IL-6, MCP-1/2, IL-1β), while elevating cytokines involved in tissue repair and homeostasis. 3’-, 4-, and 6’-galactosyllactoses of cHMOS account for specific immunomodulation of PIC-induced IL-8 levels. cHMOS attenuate mucosal responses to surface inflammatory stimuli during early development, while enhancing signals that support maturation of the intestinal mucosal immune system. PMID:24691111

  19. Encoding of frequency-modulation (FM) rates in human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-12-14

    Frequency-modulated sounds play an important role in our daily social life. However, it currently remains unclear whether frequency modulation rates affect neural activity in the human auditory cortex. In the present study, using magnetoencephalography, we investigated the auditory evoked N1m and sustained field responses elicited by temporally repeated and superimposed frequency-modulated sweeps that were matched in the spectral domain, but differed in frequency modulation rates (1, 4, 16, and 64 octaves per sec). The results obtained demonstrated that the higher rate frequency-modulated sweeps elicited the smaller N1m and the larger sustained field responses. Frequency modulation rate had a significant impact on the human brain responses, thereby providing a key for disentangling a series of natural frequency-modulated sounds such as speech and music.

  20. Encoding of frequency-modulation (FM) rates in human auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-01-01

    Frequency-modulated sounds play an important role in our daily social life. However, it currently remains unclear whether frequency modulation rates affect neural activity in the human auditory cortex. In the present study, using magnetoencephalography, we investigated the auditory evoked N1m and sustained field responses elicited by temporally repeated and superimposed frequency-modulated sweeps that were matched in the spectral domain, but differed in frequency modulation rates (1, 4, 16, and 64 octaves per sec). The results obtained demonstrated that the higher rate frequency-modulated sweeps elicited the smaller N1m and the larger sustained field responses. Frequency modulation rate had a significant impact on the human brain responses, thereby providing a key for disentangling a series of natural frequency-modulated sounds such as speech and music. PMID:26656920

  1. FGFR2 risk SNPs confer breast cancer risk by augmenting oestrogen responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Thomas M; Castro, Mauro A A; de Santiago, Ines; Fletcher, Michael N C; Halim, Silvia; Prathalingam, Radhika; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B

    2016-08-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) locus is consistently the top hit in genome-wide association studies for oestrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer. Yet, its mode of action continues to be controversial. Here, we employ a systems biology approach to demonstrate that signalling via FGFR2 counteracts cell activation by oestrogen. In the presence of oestrogen, the oestrogen receptor (ESR1) regulon (set of ESR1 target genes) is in an active state. However, signalling by FGFR2 is able to reverse the activity of the ESR1 regulon. This effect is seen in multiple distinct FGFR2 signalling model systems, across multiple cells lines and is dependent on the presence of FGFR2. Increased oestrogen exposure has long been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We therefore hypothesized that risk variants should reduce FGFR2 expression and subsequent signalling. Indeed, transient transfection experiments assaying the three independent variants of the FGFR2 risk locus (rs2981578, rs35054928 and rs45631563) in their normal chromosomal context show that these single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) map to transcriptional silencer elements and that, compared with wild type, the risk alleles augment silencer activity. The presence of risk variants results in lower FGFR2 expression and increased oestrogen responsiveness. We thus propose a molecular mechanism by which FGFR2 can confer increased breast cancer risk that is consistent with oestrogen exposure as a major driver of breast cancer risk. Our findings may have implications for the clinical use of FGFR2 inhibitors.

  2. Ketoprofen and antinociception in hypo-oestrogenic Wistar rats fed on a high sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Morales, Osmar Antonio; Espinosa-Juárez, Josué Vidal; García-Martínez, Betzabeth Anali; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2016-10-05

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ketoprofen are the most commonly used analgesics for the treatment of pain. However, no studies have evaluated the analgesic response to ketoprofen in conditions of obesity. The aim of this study was to analyse the time course of nociceptive pain in Wistar rats with and without hypo-oestrogenism on a high sucrose diet and to compare the antinociceptive response using ketoprofen. Hypo-oestrogenic and naïve rats received a hyper caloric diet (30% sucrose) or water ad libitum for 17 weeks, the thermal nociception ("plantar test" method) and body weight were tested during this period. A biphasic response was observed: thermal latency decreased in the 4th week (hyperalgesia), while from 12th to 17th week, thermal latency increased (hypoalgesia) in hypo-oestrogenic rats fed with high sucrose diet compared with the hypo-oestrogenic control group. At 4th and 17th weeks, different doses of ketoprofen (1.8-100mg/kg p.o.), were evaluated in all groups. The administration of ketoprofen at 4th and 17th weeks showed dose-dependent effects in the all groups; however, a greater pharmacological efficacy was observed in the 4th week in the hypo-oestrogenic animals that received sucrose. Nevertheless, in all the groups significantly diminish the antinociceptive effects in the 17th week. Our data showed that nociception was altered in the hypo-oestrogenic animals that were fed sucrose (hyperalgesia and hypoalgesia). Ketoprofen showed a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect at both time points. However, hypo-oestrogenism plus high-sucrose diet modifies the antinociceptive effect of ketoprofen.

  3. Effect of oestrogen on T cell apoptosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, W-U; Min, S-Y; Hwang, S-H; Yoo, S-A; Kim, K-J; Cho, C-S

    2010-01-01

    Defective control of T cell apoptosis is considered to be one of the pathogenetic mechanisms in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Oestrogen has been known to predispose women to SLE and also to exacerbate activity of SLE; however, the role of oestrogen in the apoptosis of SLE T cells has not yet been documented. In this study, we investigated the direct effect of oestrogen on the activation-induced cell death of T cells in SLE patients. The results demonstrated that oestradiol decreased the apoptosis of SLE T cells stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus ionomycin in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, oestradiol down-regulated the expression of Fas ligand (FasL) in activated SLE T cells at the both protein and mRNA levels. In contrast, testosterone increased FasL expression dose-dependently in SLE T cells stimulated with PMA plus ionomycin. The inhibitory effect of oestradiol on FasL expression was mediated through binding to its receptor, as co-treatment of tamoxifen, an oestrogen receptor inhibitor, completely nullified the oestradiol-induced decrease in FasL mRNA expression. Moreover, pre-treatment of FasL-transfected L5178Y cells with either oestradiol or anti-FasL antibody inhibited significantly the apoptosis of Fas-sensitive Hela cells when two types of cells were co-cultured. These data suggest that oestrogen inhibits activation-induced apoptosis of SLE T cells by down-regulating the expression of FasL. Oestrogen inhibition of T cell apoptosis may allow for the persistence of autoreactive T cells, thereby exhibiting the detrimental action of oestrogen on SLE activity. PMID:20529085

  4. Oestrogen receptor-alpha and -beta expression in breast implant capsules: experimental findings and clinical correlates.

    PubMed

    Persichetti, Paolo; Segreto, Francesco; Carotti, Simone; Marangi, Giovanni Francesco; Tosi, Daniele; Morini, Sergio

    2014-03-01

    Myofibroblasts provide a force to decrease the surface area of breast implant capsules as the collagen matrix matures. 17-β-Oestradiol promotes myofibroblast differentiation and contraction. The aim of the study was to investigate the expression of oestrogen receptors α and β in capsular tissue. The study enrolled 70 women (80 capsules) who underwent expander or implant removal, following breast reconstruction. Specimens were stained with haematoxylin/eosin, Masson trichrome and immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence stainings for alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), oestrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) and oestrogen receptor-beta (ER-β). The relationship between anti-oestrogenic therapy and capsular severity was evaluated. A retrospective analysis of 233 cases of breast reconstruction was conducted. Myofibroblasts expressed ER-α, ER-β or both. In the whole sample, α-SMA score positively correlated with ER-α (p = 0.022) and ER-β expression (p < 0.004). ER-β expression negatively correlated with capsular thickness (p < 0.019). In capsules surrounding expanders α-SMA and ER-α, expressions negatively correlated with time from implantation (p = 0.002 and p = 0.016, respectively). The incidence of grade III-IV contracture was higher in patients who did not have anti-oestrogenic therapy (p < 0.036); retrospective analysis of 233 cases confirmed this finding (p < 0.0001). This study demonstrates the expression of oestrogen receptors in myofibroblasts of capsular tissue. A lower contracture severity was found in patients who underwent anti-oestrogenic therapy.

  5. The somatotropic axis may not modulate ageing and longevity in humans.

    PubMed

    Le Bourg, Éric

    2016-04-01

    Studies in nematodes and mice have shown that the somatotropic axis can modulate their longevity and it has been argued that it could also modulate human longevity. Thus, like nematodes and mice, human beings should live longer when facing starvation and genetic variation of the somatotropic axis should be linked to longevity. This article argues that, because the life-history strategies of humans are very different from those of mice, these hypotheses are not warranted.

  6. The effects of oestrogens and their receptors on cardiometabolic health.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Eugenia; Santos, Roberta S; Criollo, Alfredo; Nelson, Michael D; Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J

    2017-03-17

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of mortality in developed countries. The incidence of CVD is sexually dimorphic, and research has focused on the contribution of sex steroids to the development and progression of the cardiometabolic syndrome, which is defined as a clustering of interrelated risk factors that promote the development of atherosclerosis (which can lead to CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Data are inconclusive as to how sex steroids and their respective receptors increase or suppress the risk of developing the cardiometabolic syndrome and thus CVD. In this Review, we discuss the potential role, or roles, of sex hormones in cardiometabolic health by first focusing on the influence of oestrogens and their receptors on the risk of developing cardiometabolic syndrome and CVD. We also highlight what is known about testosterone and its potential role in protecting against the development of the cardiometabolic syndrome and CVD. Given the inconclusive nature of the data regarding the direct effects of each sex hormone, we advocate and highlight the importance of studying the relative levels and the ratio of sex hormones to each other, as well as the use of cross sex hormone therapy and its effect on cardiometabolic health.

  7. The therapeutic effects of docosahexaenoic acid on oestrogen/androgen-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Luo, Fei; Zhou, Ying; Du, Xiaoling; Shi, Jiandang; Zhao, Xiaoling; Xu, Yong; Zhu, Yan; Hong, Wei; Zhang, Ju

    2016-07-15

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the major disorders of the urinary system in elderly men. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the main component of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) and has nerve protective, anti-inflammatory and tumour-growth inhibitory effects. Here, the therapeutic potential of DHA in treating BPH was investigated. Seal oil effectively prevented the development of prostatic hyperplasia induced by oestradiol/testosterone in a rat model by suppressing the increase of the prostatic index (PI), reducing the thickness of the peri-glandular smooth muscle layer, inhibiting the proliferation of both prostate epithelial and stromal cells, and downregulating the expression of androgen receptor (AR) and oestrogen receptor α (ERα). An in vitro study showed that DHA inhibited the growth of the human prostate stromal cell line WPMY-1 and the epithelial cell line RWPE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In both cell lines, the DHA arrested the cell cycle in the G2/M phase. In addition, DHA also reduced the expression of ERα and AR in the WPMY-1 and RWPE-1 cells. These results indicate that DHA inhibits the multiplication of prostate stromal and epithelial cells through a mechanism that may involve cell cycle arrest and the downregulation of ERα and AR expression.

  8. Sarcoptes scabiei mites modulate gene expression in human skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Marjorie S; Arlian, Larry G; Markey, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    The ectoparasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei that burrows in the epidermis of mammalian skin has a long co-evolution with its hosts. Phenotypic studies show that the mites have the ability to modulate cytokine secretion and expression of cell adhesion molecules in cells of the skin and other cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems that may assist the mites to survive in the skin. The purpose of this study was to identify genes in keratinocytes and fibroblasts in human skin equivalents (HSEs) that changed expression in response to the burrowing of live scabies mites. Overall, of the more than 25,800 genes measured, 189 genes were up-regulated >2-fold in response to scabies mite burrowing while 152 genes were down-regulated to the same degree. HSEs differentially expressed large numbers of genes that were related to host protective responses including those involved in immune response, defense response, cytokine activity, taxis, response to other organisms, and cell adhesion. Genes for the expression of interleukin-1α (IL-1α) precursor, IL-1β, granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) precursor, and G-CSF precursor were up-regulated 2.8- to 7.4-fold, paralleling cytokine secretion profiles. A large number of genes involved in epithelium development and keratinization were also differentially expressed in response to live scabies mites. Thus, these skin cells are directly responding as expected in an inflammatory response to products of the mites and the disruption of the skin's protective barrier caused by burrowing. This suggests that in vivo the interplay among these skin cells and other cell types, including Langerhans cells, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells, is responsible for depressing the host's protective response allowing these mites to survive in the skin.

  9. Modulation of human vestibular reflexes with increased postural threat

    PubMed Central

    Horslen, Brian C; Dakin, Christopher J; Inglis, J Timothy; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Carpenter, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety and arousal have been shown to facilitate human vestibulo-ocular reflexes, presumably through direct neural connections between the vestibular nuclei and emotional processing areas of the brain. However, the effects of anxiety, fear and arousal on balance-relevant vestibular reflexes are currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to manipulate standing height to determine whether anxiety and fear can modulate the direct relationship between vestibular signals and balance reflexes during stance. Stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS; 2–25 Hz) was used to evoke ground reaction forces (GRF) while subjects stood in both LOW and HIGH surface height conditions. Two separate experiments were conducted to investigate the SVS–GRF relationship, in terms of coupling (coherence and cumulant density) and gain, in the medio-lateral (ML) and antero-posterior (AP) directions. The short- and medium-latency cumulant density peaks were both significantly increased in the ML and AP directions when standing in HIGH, compared to LOW, conditions. Likewise, coherence was statistically greater between 4.3 Hz and 6.7 Hz in the ML, and between 5.5 and 17.7 Hz in the AP direction. When standing in the HIGH condition, the gain of the SVS–GRF relationship was increased 81% in the ML direction, and 231% in the AP direction. The significant increases in coupling and gain observed in both experiments demonstrate that vestibular-evoked balance responses are augmented in states of height-induced postural threat. These data support the possibility that fear or anxiety-mediated changes to balance control are affected by altered central processing of vestibular information. PMID:24973412

  10. Protein Stability and Dynamics Modulation: The Case of Human Frataxin

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Mariana; Salvay, Andres G.; Ferreiro, Diego U.; Santos, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Frataxin (FXN) is an α/β protein that plays an essential role in iron homeostasis. Apparently, the function of human FXN (hFXN) depends on the cooperative formation of crucial interactions between helix α1, helix α2, and the C-terminal region (CTR) of the protein. In this work we quantitatively explore these relationships using a purified recombinant fragment hFXN90–195. This variant shows the hydrodynamic behavior expected for a monomeric globular domain. Circular dichroism, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopies show that hFXN90–195 presents native-like secondary and tertiary structure. However, chemical and temperature induced denaturation show that CTR truncation significantly destabilizes the overall hFXN fold. Accordingly, limited proteolysis experiments suggest that the native-state dynamics of hFXN90–195 and hFXN90–210 are indeed different, being the former form much more sensitive to the protease at specific sites. The overall folding dynamics of hFXN fold was further explored with structure-based protein folding simulations. These suggest that the native ensemble of hFXN can be decomposed in at least two substates, one with consolidation of the CTR and the other without consolidation of the CTR. Explicit-solvent all atom simulations identify some of the proteolytic target sites as flexible regions of the protein. We propose that the local unfolding of CTR may be a critical step for the global unfolding of hFXN, and that modulation of the CTR interactions may strongly affect hFXN physiological function. PMID:23049850

  11. Autonomous prolactin secretion in two male-to-female transgender patients using conventional oestrogen dosages

    PubMed Central

    Bunck, Mathijs C; Debono, Miguel; Giltay, Erik J; Verheijen, Andreas T; Diamant, Michaela; Gooren, Louis J

    2009-01-01

    Oestrogen-induced prolactinomas have been reported in male-to-female (MTF) transgender patients after excessive oestrogen self-administration. Here, two prolactinoma cases after 14 years (case 1) and 30 years (case 2) of relatively low-dose oestrogen treatment are reported. Both resolved after treatment with dopamine agonists. During the first year of oestrogen treatment the patient in case 1 showed a remarkable (7.2-fold) increase in serum prolactin concentration, returning to within the normal range for 13 years until the start of autonomous prolactin secretion. It is hypothesised that this strong first-year prolactin response may be a sign of increased pituitary oestrogen sensitivity. Therefore the patient’s increase in prolactin concentration during the first 18 months was compared to 74 matched control patients from a database, and this increase was found to be significantly greater in the case patient. It is suggested that in MTF patients an excessive first year increase in serum prolactin concentration may identify patients at risk for autonomous prolactin secretion later in life. PMID:21829422

  12. Oestrogens have no hormonal effect on the development and reproduction of the harpacticoid copepod Nitocra spinipes.

    PubMed

    Breitholtz, M; Bengtsson, B E

    2001-10-01

    In recent years, reports have described endocrine-disruptive effects of environmental oestrogens in fish, but little is known about similar effects in crustaceans. The objective of the present study was therefore to examine whether the oestrogens 17-beta-oestradiol, 17-alpha-ethynylestradiol and diethylstilbestrol (DES), could affect mortality, larval development rate, fecundity and sex ratio in the sexually reproducing harpacticoid copepod Nitocra spinipes. Newly released nauplii (<24-h old) were exposed to 1/1,000, 1/100 and 1/10 (nominal concentrations) of each oestrogen's 96 h-LC50 value for < or = 18 days at 22 +/- 1 degrees C. The percentage of gravid females and the number of developed copepodites were both reduced at 0.03 mg l(-1) DES, although the latter response was not significant. None of the other two oestrogens induced any measurable effects. Since the only observed significant response appeared at a DES concentration no more than 10 times below the 96 h-LC50 value, there is no evidence of endocrine-disruptive activity in N. spinipes exposed to oestrogens.

  13. Standardization and evaluation of botanical mixtures: lessons from a traditional Chinese herb, Epimedium, with oestrogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Yong, E L; Wong, S P; Shen, P; Gong, Y H; Li, J; Hong, Y

    2007-01-01

    Botanical extracts differ from conventional supplements in that they are complicated mixtures of many bioactive compounds. Here we describe our experience with a traditional Chinese medicinal plant Epimedium sp. to illustrate the scientific challenges of firstly, obtaining a standardized product from a complex mixture and secondly, evaluating that product for preclinical and clinical efficacy. In contrast, to its colloquial name 'Horny goat weed' and Internet advertisements as a herbal 'Viagra' for men, extracts of Epimedium are strongly oestrogenic due to the presence of novel potent phytoestrogens of the prenyl-flavone family. Since Epimedium is not cultivated, it was necessary to source for taxonomically identified samples and to authenticate their species by phylogenetic, chemical and bioresponse profiling. The feasibility of using a panel of oestrogen-responsive cell-based bioassays to measure summated oestrogenic effects at close time points for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling was evaluated. We document proportionate oestrogenic responses in sera of animals fed oestrogenic drugs and botanical extracts, indicating that these target molecule responsive cell-based bioassays may have utility to capture the global effects of the myriad bioactive compounds in botanical extracts, informing the design of rigorous clinical trials for safety and efficacy.

  14. Endocrine factors in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake in females: a review of the physiological roles and interactions of ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, V; Gyorffy, A; Scalise, T J; Kiss, D S; Goszleth, G; Bartha, T; Frenyo, V L; Zsarnovszky, A

    2011-06-01

    Controlling energy homeostasis involves modulating the desire to eat and regulating energy expenditure. The controlling machinery includes a complex interplay of hormones secreted at various peripheral endocrine endpoints, such as the gastrointestinal tract, the adipose tissue, thyroid gland and thyroid hormone-exporting organs, the ovary and the pancreas, and, last but not least, the brain itself. The peripheral hormones that are the focus of the present review (ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin) play integrated regulatory roles in and provide feedback information on the nutritional and energetic status of the body. As peripheral signals, these hormones modulate central pathways in the brain, including the hypothalamus, to influence food intake, energy expenditure and to maintain energy homeostasis. Since the growth of the literature on the role of various hormones in the regulation of energy homeostasis shows a remarkable and dynamic expansion, it is now becoming increasingly difficult to understand the individual and interactive roles of hormonal mechanisms in their true complexity. Therefore, our goal is to review, in the context of general physiology, the roles of the five best-known peripheral trophic hormones (ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin, respectively) and discuss their interactions in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake.

  15. In vitro metabolism of gestodene in target organs: formation of A-ring reduced derivatives with oestrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Lemus, A E; Santillán, R; Damián-Matsumura, P; García, G A; Grillasca, I; Pérez-Palacios, G

    2001-04-13

    Gestodene (13beta-ethyl-17alpha-ethynyl-17beta-hydroxy-4,5-gonadien-3-one), the most potent progestin ever synthesized, stimulates breast cancer cell growth through an oestrogen receptor-mediated mechanism, and its use in hormonal contraception has been associated with side effects attributable to oestrogenic actions. These observations have remained controversial, since gestodene does not bind to the oestrogen receptor or exert oestrogen-like activities. Recently, we have demonstrated that non-phenolic gestodene derivatives interact with oestrogen receptors and induce oestrogenic effects in cell expression systems. To assess whether gestodene is biotransformed to metabolites with intrinsic oestrogenic potency, [3H]- and [14C]-labelled gestodene were incubated in vitro with rat anterior pituitary, hypothalamus and ventral prostate homogenates under different experimental conditions. The most remarkable finding was the isolation and identification of 3beta,5alpha-tetrahydrogestodene and 3alpha,5alpha-tetrahydrogestodene as metabolic conversion products of gestodene, presumably with 5alpha-dihydrogestodene as intermediate. The overall results seem to indicate that the weak oestrogenic effects attributable to gestodene could be mediated by its tetrahydro metabolites.

  16. Oestrogen and parathyroid hormone alleviate lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration in ovariectomized rats and enhance Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haobo; Ma, Jianxiong; Lv, Jianwei; Ma, Xinlong; Xu, Weiguo; Yang, Yang; Tian, Aixian; Wang, Ying; Sun, Lei; Xu, Liyan; Fu, Lin; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mitigation effect and mechanism of oestrogen and PTH on disc degeneration in rats after ovariectomy, as well as on Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity, thirty 3-month-old rats were ovariectomized and divided into three groups. Ten additional rats were used as controls. Eight weeks later, the rats were administered oestrogen or PTH for 12 weeks, and then discs were collected for tests. Results showed that nucleus pulposus cells in the Sham group were mostly notochord cells, while in the OVX group, cells gradually developed into chondrocyte-like cells. Oestrogen or PTH could partly recover the notochord cell number. After ovariectomy, the endplate roughened and endplate porosity decreased. After oestrogen or PTH treatment, the smoothness and porosity of endplate recovered. Compared with the Sham group, Aggrecan, Col2a and Wnt/β-catenin pathway expression in OVX group decreased, and either oestrogen or PTH treatment improved their expression. The biomechanical properties of intervertebral disc significantly changed after ovariectomy, and oestrogen or PTH treatment partly recovered them. Disc degeneration occurred with low oestrogen, and the underlying mechanisms involve nutrition supply disorders, cell type changes and decreased Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity. Oestrogen and PTH can retard disc degeneration in OVX rats and enhance Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity in nucleus pulposus. PMID:27279629

  17. A modified oestrogen receptor ligand-binding domain as an improved switch for the regulation of heterologous proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, T D; Hancock, D C; Danielian, P S; Parker, M G; Evan, G I

    1995-01-01

    A number of proteins have been rendered functionally oestrogen-dependent by fusion with the hormone-binding domain of the oestrogen receptor. There are, however, several significant disadvantages with such fusion proteins. First, their use in cells in vitro requires phenol red-free medium and laborious stripping of steroid hormones from serum in order to avoid constitutive activation. Secondly, control of oestrogen receptor fusion proteins in vivo is precluded by high endogenous levels of circulating oestrogens. Thirdly, the hormone-binding domain of the oestrogen receptor functions as a hormone-dependent transcriptional activation domain making interpretation of fusions with transcription factors problematical. In order to overcome these drawbacks we have used a transcriptionally inactive mutant of the murine oestrogen receptor which is unable to bind oestrogen yet retains normal affinity for the synthetic ligand, 4-hydroxytamoxifen. When the hormone-binding domain of this mutant oestrogen receptor is fused to the C-terminus of the c-Myc protein, Myc-induced proliferation and apoptosis in fibroblasts becomes dependent on 4-hydroxytamoxifen, but remains refractory to 17 beta-oestradiol. Images PMID:7784172

  18. Cross-talk between membrane-initiated and nuclear-initiated oestrogen signaling in the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Roepke, Troy A.; Qiu, Jian; Bosch, Martha A.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    It is increasingly evident that 17β-oestradiol (E2) via a distinct membrane oestrogen receptor (Gq-mER) can rapidly activate kinase pathways to have multiple downstream actions in CNS neurons. We have found that E2 can rapidly reduce the potency of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen and mu-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO to activate G protein-coupled, inwardly rectifying K+ (GIRK) channels in hypothalamic neurons, thereby increasing the excitability (firing activity) of POMC and dopamine neurons. These effects are mimicked by the membrane impermeant E2-BSA and a new ligand (STX) that is selective for the Gq-mER that does not bind to ERα or ERβ. Both E2 and STX are fully efficacious in attenuating the GABAB response in ERα, ERβ and GPR 30 knockout mice in an ICI 182,780 reversible manner. These findings are further proof that E2 signals through a unique plasma membrane ER. We have characterised the coupling of this Gq-mER to a Gq-mediated activation of phospholipase C leading to the up-regulation of protein kinase Cδ and protein kinase A activity in these neurons, which ultimately alters gene transcription. Finally as proof of principle, we have found that STX, like E2, reduces food intake and body weight gain in ovariectomised females. STX, presumably via the Gq-mER, also regulates gene expression of a number of relevant targets including cation channels and signalling molecules that are critical for regulating (as a prime example) POMC neuronal excitability. Therefore, E2 can activate multiple receptor-mediated pathways to modulate excitability and gene transcription in CNS neurons that are critical for controlling homeostasis and motivated behaviors. PMID:19187465

  19. Red wine interferes with oestrogen signalling in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Rosário; Faria, Ana; Mateus, Nuno; Calhau, Conceição; Azevedo, Isabel

    2008-07-01

    Oestrogens have neuroprotective properties, resulting in memory and learning preservation. Red wine (RW) has been linked to neuroprotection, but mechanisms are largely unknown. The aim of this work was to test the effect of RW or 13% ethanol solution consumption on the expression of aromatase and estrogen receptors (ER) in the rat hippocampus. Beverages were supplied to male Wistar rats and after 8 weeks of treatment animals were euthanised, hippocampus was removed, aromatase expression assessed by western blotting and aromatase and ER transcription determined by RT-PCR. The effects of treatments on hippocampal aromatase activity were also determined, as well as the effect of several red wine polyphenols in hippocampal homogenates from untreated animals. Aromatase transcription was increased by ethanol (to 158+/-7%) but only significantly by RW (to 180+/-9%). No difference was found in ERalpha expression among groups, whereas RW significantly decreased ERbeta expression (to 63+/-10%). Resveratrol, quercetin, myricetin and kaempferol had no effect on aromatase activity and catechin (300 microM), epicatechin (200 microM), procyanidin extract (200 mg/L) and fractioned procyanidins (FI and FII; 200 mg/L) significantly decreased aromatase activity. The contribution of procyanidins in wine to the effect observed in aromatase was investigated in animals treated for the same period with these compounds (200 mg/L), although no effect was seen in aromatase activity, mRNA or protein levels, meaning that this group of compounds had little contribution, if any, to the effects observed. Nevertheless, the increase in aromatase expression induced by RW may corroborate the neuroprotective ability attributed to this beverage. Alterations in the relative abundance of ER expression may also play an important role in the protection.

  20. Oestrogen receptors enhance dopamine neurone survival in rat midbrain.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M L; Ho, C C; Day, A E; Walker, Q D; Francis, R; Kuhn, C M

    2010-04-01

    Previous findings in our laboratory and elsewhere have shown that ovariectomy of rats in adulthood attenuates cocaine-stimulated locomotor behaviour. Ovarian hormones enhance both cocaine-stimulated behaviour and increase dopamine overflow after psychomotor stimulants. The present study aimed to determine whether ovarian hormones have these effects in part by maintaining dopamine neurone number in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) and to investigate the roles of specific oestrogen receptors (ERs) in the maintenance of mesencephalic dopamine neurones. To accomplish this goal, we used unbiased stereological techniques to estimate the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-IR) cell bodies in midbrain regions of intact, ovariectomised and hormone-replaced female rats and mice. Animals received active or sham gonadectomy on postnatal day 60 and received vehicle, 17beta-oestradiol (E(2)) or selective ER agonists propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT, ERalpha) or diarylpropionitrile (DPN, ERbeta) for 1 month post-surgery. In both rats and mice, ovariectomy reduced the number of TH-IR cells in the SNpc and VTA. Replacement with E(2), PPT or DPN prevented or attenuated the loss observed with ovariectomy in both rats and mice. An additional study using ER knockout mice revealed that adult female mice lacking ERalpha had fewer TH-IR cells in midbrain regions than wild-type mice, whereas mice lacking ERbeta had TH-IR cell counts comparable to wild-type. These findings suggest that, although both ER subtypes play a role in the maintenance of TH-IR cell number in the SNpc and VTA, ERalpha may play a more significant role.

  1. Functional association of oestrogen receptors with HPV infection in cervical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Balaji

    2017-04-01

    Repeated parity and usage of oral contraceptives have demonstrated an increased risk of cervical cancer (CC) in HPV-infected women. These lifestyle observations raise the likelihood that oestrogens and HPV infection might act synergistically to affect cancers of the cervix. In vivo studies have indicated the requirement of oestrogens and ERα in the development of atypical squamous metaplasia followed by cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) I, II and III. CIN II and III are precancerous cervical lesions that can progress over time to CC as an invasive carcinoma. Recently, there has been evidence suggesting that ERα signalling in the tumour epithelium is a preliminary requisite during cancer initiation that is subsequently lost during tumorigenic progression. Conversely, continued expression of stromal ERα gains control over tumour maintenance. This review summarises the current information on the association between oestrogens and HPV infection in contributing to CC and the possibility of SERMs as a therapeutic option.

  2. Comparison between Urinary Oestrogen Assay and Serial Ultrasonic Cephalometry in Assessment of Fetal Growth Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Stuart; Kurjak, Asim

    1972-01-01

    Urinary oestrogen assay and serial ultrasonic cephalometry were performed on 284 patients who were considered on clinical grounds to be at risk of having a growth-retarded fetus. It was found that ultrasonic cephalometry was significantly better than oestrogens in diagnosing the small-for-dates baby, but that there was no significant difference between the two methods in predicting perinatal asphyxia. Of the 14 stillbirths, three were in the normal ultrasonic growth rate group and five had normal oestrogen excretion. Both methods were found to be of value in the diagnosis of fetal growth-retardation, although cephalometry would seem to have some advantages, especially in distinguishing between fetal growth-retardation and mistaken maturity. PMID:4673993

  3. Case-control study of oestrogen replacement therapy and risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Parazzini, F.; La Vecchia, C.; Negri, E.; Franceschi, S.; Moroni, S.; Chatenoud, L.; Bolis, G.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation between use of oestrogen replacement therapy and risk of cervical cancer. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Northern Italy. SUBJECTS: 645 women aged 40-75 years with cervical cancer admitted between 1981 and 1993 to university and general hospitals. The control group consisted of 749 women aged 40-75 years admitted to the same hospitals with acute conditions judged to be unrelated to any of the known or suspected risk factors for cervical cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Use of oestrogen replacement therapy and risk of cervical cancer. RESULTS: 40 cases versus 86 controls had ever used oestrogens, and the corresponding multivariate odds ratio was 0.5 (95% confidence interval 0.3 to 0.8). The odds ratios of cervical cancer decreased with duration of use, being 0.6 (0.4 to 1.1) for less than 12 months' use and 0.5 (0.2 to 1.0) for use for 12 months or more compared with never users. The protection tended to be somewhat stronger for women reporting first oestrogen use before age 50. The odds ratio was 0.9 (0.5 to 1.7) for women who had taken oestrogens within the past 10 years and 0.4 (0.2 to 0.7) for those who had taken them 10 or more years ago. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that exogenous oestrogens do not increase the risk of cervical cancer and may decrease the risk. PMID:9240046

  4. Increase in plasma cortisol concentrations in ewes fed oestrogenic subterranean clover.

    PubMed

    Tang, B Y; Adams, N R; Sawyer, G J

    1979-11-01

    Pen-feeding oestrogenic clover to ewes increased their plasma cortisol concentration by the third day. This was not due to any change in the variation of cortisol concentration with time of day. Ovulation rate was not affected during the experiment as judged by the levels of plasma progesterone and laparoscopy. The plasma cortisol concentration of ewes also rose within three days of their being placed on oestrogenic clover pasture. During the next 21 days, their mean plasma cortisol was increased by 58 per cent. A previous history of clover disease did not affect this response.

  5. Recombinant human lactoferrin modulates human PBMC derived macrophage responses to BCG and LPS.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shen-An; Kruzel, Marian L; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2016-12-01

    Lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein found in mammalian mucosal secretions and granules of neutrophils, possesses several immune modulatory properties. Published reports indicate that lactoferrin enhances the efficacy of the tuberculosis vaccine, BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin), both by increasing macrophage and dendritic cell ability to stimulate receptive T cells and by modulating the inflammatory response. This report is the first to demonstrate the effects of a recombinant human lactoferrin (10 μg/mL) on human PBMC derived CD14(+) and CD16(+) macrophages stimulated with a strong (LPS, 10 ng/mL) or weaker (BCG, MOI 1:1) stimulator of inflammation. After 3 days culture, LPS and human lactoferrin treated CD14(+) cells significantly increased production of IL-10, IL-6, and MCP-1 compared to the LPS only group. In contrast, similarly treated CD16(+) macrophages increased production of IL-12p40 and IL-10 and decreased TNF-α. Limited changes were observed in BCG stimulated CD14(+) and CD16(+) macrophages with and without lactoferrin. Analysis of surface expression of antigen presentation and co-stimulatory molecules demonstrated that CD14(+) macrophages, when stimulated with BCG or LPS and cultured with lactoferrin, increased expression of CD86. CD16(+) macrophages treated with lactoferrin showed a similar trend of increase in CD86 expression, but only when stimulated with BCG.

  6. Mining a human transcriptome database for Nrf2 modulators

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor important in the protection against oxidative stress. We developed computational procedures to enable the identification of chemical, genetic and environmental modulators of Nrf2 in a large database ...

  7. Dynamics of contextual modulation of perceived shape in human vision

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghiu, Elena; Kingdom, Frederick A. A.

    2017-01-01

    In biological vision, contextual modulation refers to the influence of a surround pattern on either the perception of, or the neural responses to, a target pattern. One studied form of contextual modulation deals with the effect of a surround texture on the perceived shape of a contour, in the context of the phenomenon known as the shape aftereffect. In the shape aftereffect, prolonged viewing, or adaptation to a particular contour’s shape causes a shift in the perceived shape of a subsequently viewed contour. Shape aftereffects are suppressed when the adaptor contour is surrounded by a texture of similarly-shaped contours, a surprising result given that the surround contours are all potential adaptors. Here we determine the motion and temporal properties of this form of contextual modulation. We varied the relative motion directions, speeds and temporal phases between the central adaptor contour and the surround texture and measured for each manipulation the degree to which the shape aftereffect was suppressed. Results indicate that contextual modulation of shape processing is selective to motion direction, temporal frequency and temporal phase. These selectivities are consistent with one aim of vision being to segregate contours that define objects from those that form textured surfaces. PMID:28230085

  8. Oestrogenic activity of a textile industrial wastewater treatment plant effluent evaluated by the E-screen test and MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay.

    PubMed

    Schilirò, Tiziana; Porfido, Arianna; Spina, Federica; Varese, Giovanna Cristina; Gilli, Giorgio

    2012-08-15

    This study quantified the biological oestrogenic activity in the effluent of a textile industrial wastewater treatment plant (IWWTP) in northwestern Italy. Samples of the IWWTP effluent were collected monthly, both before and after tertiary treatment (ozonation). After solid phase extraction, all samples were subjected to two in vitro tests of total estrogenic activity, the human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 BUS) proliferation assay, or E-screen test, and the luciferase-transfected human breast cancer cell line (MELN) gene-reporter assay, to measure the 17β-oestradiol equivalent quantity (EEQ). In the E-screen test, the mean EEQ values were 2.35±1.68 ng/L pre-ozonation and 0.72±0.58 ng/L post-ozonation; in the MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay, the mean EEQ values were 4.18±3.54 ng/L pre-ozonation and 2.53±2.48 ng/L post-ozonation. These results suggest that the post-ozonation IWWTP effluent had a lower oestrogenic activity (simple paired t-tests, p<0.05). The average reduction of estrogenic activity of IWWTP effluent after ozonation was 67±26% and 52±27% as measured by E-screen test and MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay, respectively. There was a positive and significant correlation between the two tests (Rho S=0.650, p=0.022). This study indicates that the environmental risk is low because oestrogenic substances are deposited into the river via IWWTP at concentrations lower than those at which chronic exposure has been reported to affect the endocrine system of living organisms.

  9. Human milk oligosaccharides: the novel modulator of intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyunghun; Nguyen, Vi; Kim, Jaehan

    2012-08-01

    Human milk, which nourishes the early infants, is a source of bioactive components for the infant growth, development and commensal formulation as well. Human milk oligosaccharide is a group of complex and diverse glycans that is apparently not absorbed in human gastrointestinal tract. Although most mammalian milk contains oligosaccharides, oligosaccharides in human milk exhibit unique features in terms of their types, amounts, sizes, and functionalities. In addition to the prevention of infectious bacteria and the development of early immune system, human milk oligosaccharides are able to facilitate the healthy intestinal microbiota. Bifidobacterial intestinal microbiota appears to be established by the unilateral interaction between milk oligosaccharides, human intestinal activity and commensals. Digestibility, membrane transportation and catabolic activity by bacteria and intestinal epithelial cells, all of which are linked to the structural of human milk oligosaccharides, are crucial in determining intestinal microbiota.

  10. The Geography of Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liverman, Diana; Solem, Michael

    This learning module aims to engage students in problem solving, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and cooperative learning. The module is appropriate for use in any introductory or intermediate undergraduate course that focuses on human-environment relationships. The module examines the geography of human activities that produce the major…

  11. Modulation of inflammation by autophagy: Consequences for human disease.

    PubMed

    Netea-Maier, Romana T; Plantinga, Theo S; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Smit, Johannes W; Netea, Mihai G

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and inflammation are 2 fundamental biological processes involved in both physiological and pathological conditions. Through its crucial role in maintaining cellular homeostasis, autophagy is involved in modulation of cell metabolism, cell survival, and host defense. Defective autophagy is associated with pathological conditions such as cancer, autoimmune disease, neurodegenerative disease, and senescence. Inflammation represents a crucial line of defense against microorganisms and other pathogens, and there is increasing evidence that autophagy has important effects on the induction and modulation of the inflammatory reaction; understanding the balance between these 2 processes may point to important possibilities for therapeutic targeting. This review focuses on the crosstalk between autophagy and inflammation as an emerging field with major implications for understanding the host defense on the one hand, and for the pathogenesis and treatment of immune-mediated diseases on the other hand.

  12. Introduction to the Human Dimensions of Global Change. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Emma R. M.; Turner, Billie L., II

    This learning module aims to engage students in problem solving, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and cooperative learning. The module is appropriate for use in any introductory or intermediate undergraduate course that focuses on human-environment relationships. The module provides students with a broad overview of the human dimensions of…

  13. Modulation of human GABArho1 receptors by taurine.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-de la Paz, L D; Martínez-Dávila, I A; Miledi, R; Martínez-Torres, A

    2008-07-01

    A study was made of the effects of taurine on GABArho1 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The EC(50) and reversal potentials for GABA, taurine and glycine currents were 2.3+/-0.4 microM (-25+/-0.9 mV), 5+/-0.8mM (-27+/-0.4 mV) and 7+/-0.5mM (-22+/-0.6 mV), respectively. Co-application of GABA and taurine, revealed a taurine concentration-dependent biphasic-modulation of the receptor: at 0.3-30 microM taurine potentiated the GABA-currents, whereas at 0.3-30 mM the GABA-currents were reduced. In contrast glycine potentiated the GABA-currents at all concentrations tested. TPMPA, a GABA(C) specific receptor antagonist, also blocked effectively and reversibly the taurine and glycine currents. Finally, lanthanum and zinc modulated the currents generated by the three amino acids. Taurine is abundant in the retina and our observations suggest that taurine may play an important role modulating the retinal GABAergic transmission.

  14. Invariance of firing rate and field potential dynamics to stimulus modulation rate in human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Mukamel, Roy; Nir, Yuval; Harel, Michal; Arieli, Amos; Malach, Rafael; Fried, Itzhak

    2011-08-01

    The effect of stimulus modulation rate on the underlying neural activity in human auditory cortex is not clear. Human studies (using both invasive and noninvasive techniques) have demonstrated that at the population level, auditory cortex follows stimulus envelope. Here we examined the effect of stimulus modulation rate by using a rare opportunity to record both spiking activity and local field potentials (LFP) in auditory cortex of patients during repeated presentations of an audio-visual movie clip presented at normal, double, and quadruple speeds. Mean firing rate during evoked activity remained the same across speeds and the temporal response profile of firing rate modulations at increased stimulus speeds was a linearly scaled version of the response during slower speeds. Additionally, stimulus induced power modulation of local field potentials in the high gamma band (64-128 Hz) exhibited similar temporal scaling as the neuronal firing rate modulations. Our data confirm and extend previous studies in humans and anesthetized animals, supporting a model in which both firing rate, and high-gamma LFP power modulations in auditory cortex follow the temporal envelope of the stimulus across different modulation rates.

  15. Inflammation modulates human HDL composition and function in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation may directly impair HDL functions, in particular reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), but limited data support this concept in humans. Our study was designed to investigate this relationship. We employed low-dose human endotoxemia to assess the effects of inflammation on HDL and RCT-rel...

  16. Environmental exposure to xenoestrogens and oestrogen related cancers: reproductive system, breast, lung, kidney, pancreas, and brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The role of steroids in carcinogenesis has become a major concern in environmental protection, biomonitoring, and clinical research. Although historically oestrogen has been related to development of reproductive system, research over the last decade has confirmed its crucial role in the development and homeostasis of other organ systems. As a number of anthropogenic agents are xenoestrogens, environmental health research has focused on oestrogen receptor level disturbances and of aromatase polymorphisms. Oestrogen and xenoestrogens mediate critical points in carcinogenesis by binding to oestrogen receptors, whose distribution is age-, gender-, and tissue-specific. This review brings data about cancer types whose eatiology may be found in environmental exposure to xenoestrogens. Cancer types that have been well documented in literature to be related with environmental exposure include the reproductive system, breast, lung, kidney, pancreas, and brain. The results of our data mining show (a) a significant correlation between exposure to xenoestrogens and increased, gender-related, cancer risk and (b) a need to re-evaluate agents so far defined as endocrine disruptors, as they are also key molecules in carcinogenesis. This revision may be used to further research of cancer aetiology and to improvement of related legislation. Investigation of cancers caused by xenoestrogens may elucidate yet unknown mechanisms also valuable for oncology and the development of new therapies. PMID:22759508

  17. Prediction of in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor activity using hierarchical clustering

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, hierarchical clustering classification models were developed to predict in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor (ER) activity. Classification models were developed for binding, agonist, and antagonist in vitro ER activity and for mouse in vivo uterotrophic ER bindi...

  18. Advances in the treatment of advanced oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nicholas C; Neven, Patrick; Loibl, Sibylle; Andre, Fabrice

    2016-12-06

    Oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer is the most common subtype of breast cancer. Endocrine therapies that target the dependence of this subtype on the oestrogen receptor have substantial activity, yet the development of resistance to therapy is inevitable in advanced cancer. Major progress has been made in identifying the drivers of oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer and the mechanisms of resistance to endocrine therapy. This progress has translated into major advances in the treatment of advanced breast cancer, with several targeted therapies that enhance the efficacy of endocrine therapy; inhibitors of mTOR and inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 substantially improve progression-free survival. A new wave of targeted therapies is being developed, including inhibitors of PI3K, AKT, and HER2, and a new generation of oestrogen-receptor degraders. Considerable challenges remain in patient selection, deciding on the most appropriate order in which to administer therapies, and establishing whether cross-resistance occurs between therapies.

  19. The complex nature of oestrogen signalling in breast cancer: enemy or ally?

    PubMed Central

    Lipovka, Yulia; Konhilas, John P.

    2016-01-01

    The pleiotropic nature of oestradiol, the main oestrogen found in women, has been well described in the literature. Oestradiol is positioned to play a unique role since it can respond to environmental, genetic and non-genetic cues to affect genetic expression and cellular signalling. In breast cancer, oestradiol signalling has a dual effect, promoting or inhibiting cancer growth. The potential impact of oestradiol on tumorigenesis depends on the molecular and cellular characteristics of the breast cancer cell. In this review, we provide a broad survey discussing the cellular and molecular consequences of oestrogen signalling in breast cancer. First, we review the structure of the classical oestrogen receptors and resultant transcriptional (genomic) and non-transcriptional (non-genomic) signalling. We then discuss the nature of oestradiol signalling in breast cancer including the specific receptors that initiate these signalling cascades as well as potential outcomes, such as cancer growth, proliferation and angiogenesis. Finally, we examine cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the dimorphic effect of oestrogen signalling in breast cancer. PMID:27160081

  20. Hormonal therapy with megestrol in inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma characterized by variant oestrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Villa, E; Ferretti, I; Grottola, A; Buttafoco, P; Buono, M G; Giannini, F; Manno, M; Bertani, H; Dugani, A; Manenti, F

    2001-04-06

    Variant liver oestrogen receptor transcripts in hepatocellular carcinoma are associated with aggressive clinical course and unresponsiveness to tamoxifen. To evaluate the impact on survival and on tumour growth of megestrol (progestin drug acting at post-receptorial level) we enrolled 45 patients with HCC characterized by variant liver oestrogen receptors in a prospective, randomized study with megestrol vs. placebo. Presence of variant oestrogen receptors was determined by RT/PCR. 24 patients were randomized to no treatment and 21 to therapy with megestrol 160 mg day(-1). Results were analysed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox methods. Survival of hepatocellular carcinoma characterized by variant oestrogen receptors was extremely poor (median survival 7 months); megestrol significantly improved survival (18 months) (P = 0.0090). Tumour growth at one year was significantly slowed down in megestrol-treated patients (P = 0.0212). Bilirubin levels, presence of portal thrombosis, HBV aetiology and treatment were identified at univariate analysis as factors significantly associated with survival; at multivariate analysis, only megestrol therapy (P = 0.0003), presence of HBV infection (P = 0.0009) and presence of portal vein thrombosis (P = 0.0051) were factors independently related with survival. (1) Megestrol slows down the aggressive tumour growth of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma characterized by variant estrogen receptors and (2) is also able to favourably influence the course of disease, more than doubling median survival.

  1. Oestrogen directly inhibits the cardiovascular L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel Ca{sub v}1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Ullrich, Nina D. . E-mail: ullrich@pyl.unibe.ch; Koschak, Alexandra; MacLeod, Kenneth T.

    2007-09-21

    Oestrogen can modify the contractile function of vascular smooth muscle and cardiomyocytes. The negative inotropic actions of oestrogen on the heart and coronary vasculature appear to be mediated by L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel (Ca{sub v}1.2) inhibition, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We tested the hypothesis that oestrogen directly inhibits the cardiovascular L-type Ca{sup 2+} current, I {sub CaL}. The effect of oestrogen on I {sub CaL} was measured in Ca{sub v}1.2-transfected HEK-293 cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The current revealed typical activation and inactivation profiles of nifedipine- and cadmium-sensitive I {sub CaL}. Oestrogen (50 {mu}M) rapidly reduced I {sub CaL} by 50% and shifted voltage-dependent activation and availability to more negative potentials. Furthermore, oestrogen blocked the Ca{sup 2+} channel in a rate-dependent way, exhibiting higher efficiency of block at higher stimulation frequencies. Our data suggest that oestrogen inhibits I {sub CaL} through direct interaction of the steroid with the channel protein.

  2. Screening the foods of an endangered parrot, the kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), for oestrogenic activity using a recombinant yeast bioassay.

    PubMed

    Fidler, A E; Zwart, S; Pharis, R P; Weston, R J; Lawrence, S B; Jansen, P; Elliott, G; Merton, D V

    2000-01-01

    In recent years the possibility of environmental oestrogens affecting the reproduction of vertebrates has become an issue of both public and scientific interest. Although the significance of such chemicals remains controversial there is clear evidence that, in some contexts, environmental oestrogens can influence the fertility of vertebrates. Highly endangered species represent a situation in which even modest reductions in the fertility of key individuals may have implications for the survival of the entire species. This paper reports the screening of both natural and supplementary foods of the kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), a critically endangered New Zealand nocturnal parrot, for oestrogenic activity using a recombinant yeast based bioassay. Low levels of oestrogenic activity were detected in one of the 'chick-raising' foods, but no oestrogenic activity was detected in the adult supplementary foods. The oestrogenicity of a range of phytochemicals possibly associated with the kakapo natural diet was also examined. Two such phytochemicals, podocarpic acid and its reduced derivative podocarpinol, showed weak oestrogenic activity (approximately 10(-6) and 10(-4) of the activity of 17-beta-oestradiol, respectively).

  3. Effects of chronic oestrogen treatment are not selective for uterine noradrenaline-containing sympathetic nerves: a transplantation study

    PubMed Central

    BRAUER, M. MONICA; CHAVEZ-GENARO, REBECA; LLODRA, JAIME; RICHERI, ANALIA; SCORZA, M. CECILIA

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that chronic administration of oestrogen during postnatal rat development dramatically reduces the total content of noradrenaline in the uterine horn, abolishes myometrial noradrenergic innervation and reduces noradrenaline-fluorescence intensity of intrauterine perivascular nerve fibres. In the present study we analysed if this response is due to a direct and selective effect of oestrogen on the uterine noradrenaline-containing sympathetic nerves, using the in oculo transplantation method. Small pieces of myometrium from prepubertal rats were transplanted into the anterior eye chamber of adult ovariectomised host rats. The effect of systemic chronic oestrogen treatment on the reinnervation of the transplants by noradrenaline-containing sympathetic fibres from the superior cervical ganglion was analysed on cryostat tissue sections processed by the glyoxylic acid technique. In addition, the innervation of the host iris was assessed histochemically and biochemically. The histology of the transplants and irises was examined in toluidine blue-stained semithin sections. These studies showed that after 5 wk in oculo, the overall size of the oestrogen-treated transplants was substantially larger than controls, and histology showed that this change was related to an increase in the size and number of smooth muscle cells within the transplant. Chronic oestrogen treatment did not provoke trophic changes in the irideal muscle. Histochemistry showed that control transplants had a rich noradrenergic innervation, associated with both myometrium and blood vessels. Conversely, in oestrogen-treated transplants only occasional fibres were recognised, showing a reduced NA fluorescence intensity. No changes in the pattern and density of innervation or in the total content of noradrenaline of the host irises were detected after chronic exposure to oestrogen. We interpreted these results to indicate that the effects of oestrogen on uterine noradrenaline

  4. Prolonged oestrogen treatment does not correlate with a sustained increase in anterior pituitary mitotic index in ovariectomized Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Nolan, L A; Levy, A

    2009-03-01

    Oestrogen is a powerful mitogen that is believed to exert a continuous, dose-dependent trophic stimulus at the anterior pituitary. This persistent mitotic effect contrasts with corticosterone and testosterone, changes in the levels of which induce only transient, self-limiting fluctuations in pituitary mitotic activity. To further define the putative long-term trophic effects of oestrogen, we have accurately analysed the effects of 7 and 28 days oestrogen treatment on anterior pituitary mitotic activity in ovariectomized 10-week-old Wistar rats using both bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and timed colchicine-induced mitotic arrest. An oestrogen dose-dependent increase in mitotic index was seen 7 days after the start of treatment as expected, representing an acceleration in gross mitotic activity from 1.7%/day in ovariectomized animals in the absence of any oestrogen replacement to 3.7%/day in the presence of a pharmacological dose of oestrogen (50 mcg/rat per day: approximately 230 mcg/kg per day). Despite continued exposure to high-dose oestrogen and persistence of the increase in pituitary wet weight, the increase in mitotic index was unexpectedly not sustained. After 28 days of high-dose oestrogen treatment, anterior pituitary mitotic index and BrdU-labelling index were not significantly different from baseline. Although a powerful pituitary mitogen in the short term, responsible, presumably, for increased trophic variability in oestrus cycling females, these data indicate that in keeping with other trophic stimuli to the pituitary and in contrast to a much established dogma, the mitotic response to longer-term high-dose oestrogen exposure is transient and is not the driver of persistent pituitary growth, at least in female Wistar rats.

  5. Binding of modulators to mouse and human multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein. A computational study.

    PubMed

    Jara, Gabriel E; Vera, D Mariano A; Pierini, Adriana B

    2013-11-01

    The human multidrug resistance (MDR) P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediates the extrusion of chemotherapeutic drugs from cancer cells. Modulators are relevant pharmaceutical targets since they are intended to control or to inhibit its pumping activity. In the present work, a common binding site for Rhodamine 123 and modulators with different modulation activity was found by molecular docking over the crystal structure of the mouse P-gp. The modulators involved a family of compounds, including derivatives of propafenone (3-phenylpropiophenone nucleus) and XR9576 (tariquidar). Our results showed that the relative binding energies estimated by molecular docking were in good correlation with the experimental activities. Preliminary classical molecular dynamics results on selected P-gp/modulator complexes were also performed in order to understand the nature of the prevalent molecular interactions and the possible main molecular features that characterize a modulator. Besides, the results obtained with a human P-gp homology model from the mouse structure are also presented and analyzed. Our observations suggest that the hydrophobicity and molecular flexibility are the main features related to the inhibitory activity. The latter factor would increase the modulator ability to fit the aromatic rings inside the transmembrane domain.

  6. Is colour modulation an independent factor in human visual photosensitivity?

    PubMed

    Parra, Jaime; Lopes da Silva, Fernando H; Stroink, Hans; Kalitzin, Stiliyan

    2007-06-01

    Considering that the role of colour in photosensitive epilepsy (PSE) remains unclear, we designed a study to determine the potential of different colours, colour combinations and white light to trigger photoparoxysmal responses (PPRs) under stringent controlled conditions. After assessing their photosensitivity to stroboscopic white light and black and white patterns, we studied 43 consecutive PSE patients (mean age 19 years, 34 women), using a specially designed colour stimulator. Stimuli included: pulse trains between 10 and 30 Hz of white light and of all primary colours, and also isoluminant alternating time-sequences of colours. Illuminance was kept constant at 100 lux. A progressive stepwise increase of the modulation-depth (MD) of the stimuli was used to determine PPRs threshold. Whereas all the 43 patients were found to be sensitive during the stroboscopic and pattern protocol, only 25 showed PPRs (Waltz's score >2) at least in one session when studied with the colour stimulator. Coloured stimuli elicited PPRs in all these patients, whereas white light did so only in 17 patients. Of the primary colours, red elicited more PPRs (54 in 22 patients) and at a lower MD (max Z-score 0.93 at 10 Hz). Of the alternating sequences, the red-blue was the most provocative stimulus, especially below 30 Hz (100% of patients, max Z-score: 1.65 at 15 Hz). Blue-green was the least provocative stimulus, since it elicited only seven PPRs in seven (28%) patients (max Z-score 0.44 at 10 Hz). Sensitivity to alternating colours was not correlated to sensitivity to individual colours. We conclude that colour sensitivity follows two different mechanisms: one, dependent on colour modulation, plays a role at lower frequencies (<30 Hz). Another, dependent on single-colour light intensity modulation correlates to white light sensitivity and is activated at higher frequencies. Our results suggest that the prescription of spectacles with coloured lenses, tailored to the patient, can be an

  7. Modulation of early human preadipocyte differentiation by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Julianna J; Boudreau, Adèle; Wu, Dongmei; Atlas, Ella; Haché, Robert J G

    2006-11-01

    Glucocorticoids provide an adipogenic stimulus that is most obvious in the truncal obesity of patients with Cushing's syndrome. Glucocorticoid treatment also strongly potentiates the differentiation of human preadipocytes in culture. However, the molecular basis of these stimulatory effects remains to be defined. In this study, we provide a detailed analysis of the specific contribution of glucocorticoid treatment to the differentiation of primary human preadipocytes cultured in chemically defined medium. Contrary to previous descriptions of glucocorticoids being required throughout the course of differentiation, our results show that glucocorticoid treatment is stimulatory only during the first 48 h of differentiation. Furthermore, stimulation by glucocorticoids and the peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-gamma agonist troglitazone is mediated sequentially. Several details of the early events in the differentiation of human preadipocytes and the contribution of steroid to these events differ from the responses observed previously in murine preadipocyte models. First, glucocorticoid treatment stimulated the early accumulation of CCAAT enhancer binding protein-beta (C/EBPbeta) in primary human preadipocytes. Second, induction of C/EBPalpha in primary human preadipocytes was noted within 4 h of adipogenic stimulus, whereas C/EBPalpha induction is not detected until 24-48 h in the murine 3T3 L1 preadipocyte model. Remarkably, by contrast to human primary preadipocytes, which do not undergo postconfluent mitosis, 3T3 L1 murine preadipocytes stimulated to differentiate under chemically defined conditions required glucocorticoids to survive the clonal expansion that precedes terminal differentiation, revealing a novel signal imparted by glucocorticoids in this immortalized murine cell system.

  8. Distinct sets of locomotor modules control the speed and modes of human locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Hikaru; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Kawashima, Noritaka; Shinya, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    Although recent vertebrate studies have revealed that different spinal networks are recruited in locomotor mode- and speed-dependent manners, it is unknown whether humans share similar neural mechanisms. Here, we tested whether speed- and mode-dependence in the recruitment of human locomotor networks exists or not by statistically extracting locomotor networks. From electromyographic activity during walking and running over a wide speed range, locomotor modules generating basic patterns of muscle activities were extracted using non-negative matrix factorization. The results showed that the number of modules changed depending on the modes and speeds. Different combinations of modules were extracted during walking and running, and at different speeds even during the same locomotor mode. These results strongly suggest that, in humans, different spinal locomotor networks are recruited while walking and running, and even in the same locomotor mode different networks are probably recruited at different speeds. PMID:27805015

  9. Human connectome module pattern detection using a new multi-graph MinMax cut model.

    PubMed

    De, Wang; Wang, Yang; Nie, Feiping; Yan, Jingwen; Cai, Weidong; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Huang, Heng

    2014-01-01

    Many recent scientific efforts have been devoted to constructing the human connectome using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data for understanding the large-scale brain networks that underlie higher-level cognition in human. However, suitable computational network analysis tools are still lacking in human connectome research. To address this problem, we propose a novel multi-graph min-max cut model to detect the consistent network modules from the brain connectivity networks of all studied subjects. A new multi-graph MinMax cut model is introduced to solve this challenging computational neuroscience problem and the efficient optimization algorithm is derived. In the identified connectome module patterns, each network module shows similar connectivity patterns in all subjects, which potentially associate to specific brain functions shared by all subjects. We validate our method by analyzing the weighted fiber connectivity networks. The promising empirical results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  10. Effects of intensity-modulated radiotherapy on human oral microflora.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zi-Yang; Tang, Zi-Sheng; Yan, Chao; Jiang, Yun-Tao; Ma, Rui; Liu, Zheng; Huang, Zheng-Wei

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in the biodiversity of the oral microflora of patients with head and neck cancer treated with postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Pooled dental plaque samples were collected during the radiation treatment from patients receiving IMRT (n = 13) and CRT (n = 12). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to analyze the temporal variation of these plaque samples. The stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rates were also compared between IMRT and CRT patients. Reductions in the severity of hyposalivation were observed in IMRT patients compared with CRT patients. We also observed that the temporal stability of the oral ecosystem was significantly higher in the IMRT group (69.96 ± 7.82%) than in the CRT group (51.98 ± 10.45%) (P < 0.05). The findings of the present study suggest that IMRT is more conducive to maintaining the relative stability of the oral ecosystem than CRT.

  11. Attentional modulation of temporal contrast sensitivity in human vision.

    PubMed

    Motoyoshi, Isamu

    2011-04-25

    Recent psychophysical studies have shown that attention can alter contrast sensitivities for temporally broadband stimuli such as flashed gratings. The present study examined the effect of attention on the contrast sensitivity for temporally narrowband stimuli with various temporal frequencies. Observers were asked to detect a drifting grating of 0-40 Hz presented gradually in the peripheral visual field with or without a concurrent letter identification task in the fovea. We found that removal of attention by the concurrent task reduced the contrast sensitivity for gratings with low temporal frequencies much more profoundly than for gratings with high temporal frequencies and for flashed gratings. The analysis revealed that the temporal contrast sensitivity function had a more band-pass shape with poor attention. Additional experiments showed that this was also true when the target was presented in various levels of luminance noise. These results suggest that regardless of the presence of external noise, attention extensively modulates visual sensitivity for sustained retinal inputs.

  12. Modulation of Human Immune Response by Fungal Biocontrol Agents

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinovas, Cibele; de Oliveira Mendes, Tiago A.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Lima-Santos, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Although the vast majority of biological control agents is generally regarded as safe for humans and environment, the increased exposure of agriculture workers, and consumer population to fungal substances may affect the immune system. Those compounds may be associated with both intense stimulation, resulting in IgE-mediated allergy and immune downmodulation induced by molecules such as cyclosporin A and mycotoxins. This review discusses the potential effects of biocontrol fungal components on human immune responses, possibly associated to infectious, inflammatory diseases, and defective defenses. PMID:28217107

  13. Modulation of Human Immune Response by Fungal Biocontrol Agents.

    PubMed

    Konstantinovas, Cibele; de Oliveira Mendes, Tiago A; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A; Lima-Santos, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Although the vast majority of biological control agents is generally regarded as safe for humans and environment, the increased exposure of agriculture workers, and consumer population to fungal substances may affect the immune system. Those compounds may be associated with both intense stimulation, resulting in IgE-mediated allergy and immune downmodulation induced by molecules such as cyclosporin A and mycotoxins. This review discusses the potential effects of biocontrol fungal components on human immune responses, possibly associated to infectious, inflammatory diseases, and defective defenses.

  14. Modulation of human sinus node function by systemic hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, D. L.; Bastow, H., III; Scruby, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether bradycardia develops during systemic hypoxia in supine conscious human volunteers when respiratory frequency and tidal volume are maintained at constant levels. The obtained results suggest that mild hypoxia provokes cardioacceleration in humans, independent of changes of ventilation or baroreflex responsiveness. The earliest cardioacceleration is more prominent in the inspiratory than in the expiratory phase of respiration, and occurs with very small reductions of arterial oxygen saturation. Moderate systemic hypoxia dampens fluctuations of heart rate during the respiratory cycle.

  15. Cytokine modulation of human blood viscosity from vivax malaria patients.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Edson Fredulin; Cantarini, Déborah Giovanna; Siqueira, Renan; Ribeiro, Elton Brito; Braga, Érika Martins; Honório-França, Adenilda Cristina; França, Eduardo Luzía

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major infectious disease in several countries and is caused by protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. In vivax malaria patients, inflammatory processes occur, as well as changes in cytokines and blood flow. The present study analyzed the cytokine modulation of blood viscosity from patients infected with Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax). Blood samples were collected from 42 non-infected individuals (control group) and 37 individuals infected with P. vivax. The IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNFα, TGF-β and IL-17 cytokine concentrations in the serum were assessed, and the blood rheological properties were determined. The analysis of blood viscosity for shear rates revealed that the blood viscosity of the infected patients was significantly greater than that of the non-infected individuals. The viscosity of the blood was greater in the infected individuals than in the non-infected subjects. The serum from individuals with P. vivax infections exhibited higher IFN-γ and IL-17 concentrations and lower TGF-β levels. Incubation of the blood from infected individuals with IL-17 or IL-17 associated with IFN-γ reduced the viscosity to rates equivalent to the blood from non-infected individuals. Independently of cytokine modulation, no correlation was found between the parasitemia and blood viscosity of the infected patients. These data suggest that the alterations of blood viscosity are relevant as an auxiliary tool for the clinical diagnosis of disease. In malaria, erythrocytes are more sensitive to osmotic shock, and the reduction of viscosity by IL-17 may be related to a possible immunomodulator agent during infection.

  16. Head temperature modulates thermal behavior in the cold in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mündel, Toby; Raman, Aaron; Schlader, Zachary J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We tested the hypothesis that skin temperature, specifically of the head, is capable of modulating thermal behavior during exercise in the cold. Following familiarization 8 young, healthy, recreationally active males completed 3 trials, each consisting of 30 minutes of self-paced cycle ergometry in 6°C. Participants were instructed to control their exercise work rate to achieve and maintain thermal comfort. On one occasion participants wore only shorts and shoes (Control) and on the 2 other occasions their head was either warmed (Warming) or cooled (Cooling). Work rate, rate of metabolic heat production, thermal perceptions, rectal, mean weighted skin and head temperatures were measured. Exercise work rate was reduced during Warming and augmented during Cooling after the first and second minutes of exercise, respectively (P ≤ 0.04), with the rate of metabolic heat production mirroring work rate. At this early stage of exercise (≤5 min) the changes over time for rectal temperature were negligible and similar (0.1 ± 0.1°C, P = 0.51), while the decrease in mean skin temperature was not different between all trials (1.7 ± 0.6°C, P = 0.13). Mean head temperature was either decreased (Control: 1.5 ± 1.1°C, Cooling: 2.9 ± 0.8°C, both P < 0.01) or increased (Warming: 1.7 ± 0.9°C, P < 0.01). Head thermal perception was warmer and more comfortable in Warming and cooler and less comfortable in Cooling (P < 0.01). Participants achieved thermal comfort similarly in all trials (P > 0.09) after 10 ± 7 min and this was maintained until the end of exercise. These results indicate that peripheral temperatures modulate thermal behavior in the cold. PMID:27857959

  17. Modulation of head movement control in humans during treadmill walking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Verstraete, Mary C.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the coordination of the head relative to the trunk within a gait cycle during gaze fixation. Nine normal subjects walked on a motorized treadmill driven at 1.79 m/s (20 s trials) while fixing their gaze on a centrally located earth-fixed target positioned at a distance of 2 m from their eyes. The net and relative angular motions of the head about the three axes of rotations, as well as the corresponding values for the moments acting on it relative to the trunk during the gait cycle were quantified and used as measures of coordination. The average net moment, as well as the average moments about the different axes were significantly different (P<0.01) between the high impact and low/no impact phases of the gait cycle. However, the average net angular displacement as well as the average angular displacement about the axial rotation axis of the head relative to the trunk was maintained uniform (P>0.01) throughout the gait cycle. The average angular displacement about the lateral bending axis was significantly increased (P<0.01) during the high impact phase while that about the flexion-extension axis was significantly decreased (P<0.01) throughout the gait cycle. Thus, the coordination of the motion of the head relative to the trunk during walking is dynamically modulated depending on the behavioral events occurring in the gait cycle. This modulation may serve to aid stabilization of the head by counteracting the force variations acting on the upper body that may aid in the visual fixation of targets during walking.

  18. Student feedback about the use of role plays in Sparshanam, a medical humanities module

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, P Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Background: At KIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal, a Medical Humanities module for first year medical students has been conducted. Role plays are used to explore social, medical and sexual issues in the Nepalese context. The present study obtained student feedback about the role plays used in the module, the difficulties faced, and obtained suggestions for further improvement. Method: The module was conducted from January to August 2011 using a total of 15 role plays. Student feedback was obtained using a semi-structured questionnaire. Informal discussions were held and a questionnaire was circulated among the first year students who had participated in the module. Results: Ninety-eight of the 100 students in the module participated in the study. The overall opinion regarding the role plays was positive. Students stated role plays helped to make module objectives concrete and interesting, made students identify with the problem being investigated and improved communication skills. Role plays were designed to address important health issues in Nepal and prepare students for addressing these issues in future practice. A lack of sufficient time for preparing the role plays and initial problems with group dynamics were mentioned by the respondents during the study. Conclusions: Student feedback about the use of role plays during the module was positive. Role plays helped in making module objectives more concrete and interesting, improved communication skills and addressed important health issues in Nepal. Role plays are not resource intensive and can be considered for use in medical schools in developing nations. PMID:24358816

  19. Human epidermal plasminogen activator. Characterization, localization, and modulation.

    PubMed

    Morioka, S; Jensen, P J; Lazarus, G S

    1985-12-01

    Using biochemical and immunocytochemical approaches, we have investigated the plasminogen activator (PA) of primary human epidermal cell cultures. A rabbit antibody raised against human urinary PA (urokinase) inhibited greater than or equal to 96% of the PA activity in the keratinocyte cultures. Immunoblot and double immunodiffusion analyses of keratinocyte PA with anti-urokinase antibody confirmed that epidermal PA was of the urokinase type. Immunocytochemical investigation of human keratinocyte cultures with anti-urokinase antibody revealed two characteristic staining patterns for PA. First, cells at the advancing edge of subconfluent colonies were cytoplasmically stained in a granular pattern. Similar staining was observed at the migrating edges of confluent epidermal cell cultures that had been wounded by cutting with a blade. This induction of PA staining was independent of cell division. Secondly, differentiated epidermal cells located on the surface of colonies were stained either at the plasma membrane or homogeneously throughout the cell. The highly differentiated, spontaneously shed cells were usually very heavily stained by anti-urokinase antibody. These immunocytochemical experiments suggest that PA expression is highly regulated in human epidermal cells. Specifically, PA expression appears to be related to cellular differentiation and to cell movement in expanding or wounded keratinocyte colonies.

  20. Biphasic modulation of cell growth by recombinant human galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Adams, L; Scott, G K; Weinberg, C S

    1996-06-13

    Human soluble galactose-binding lectin (galectin-1) has been expressed as an Escherichia coli fusion protein, following the amplification by polymerase chain reaction of cDNA prepared from a human osteosarcoma cell line. The fusion protein is a functional beta-galactoside-binding lectin, as is the recombinant galectin when purified from the cleaved fusion protein. The recombinant galectin has a biphasic effect on cell proliferation. Unlike the fusion protein, it functions as a human cell growth inhibitor, confirming earlier findings with natural human galectin-1, though it is less effective than the natural galectin. This reaction is not significantly inhibited by lactose, and is thus largely independent of the beta-galactoside-binding site. At lower concentrations, recombinant galectin-1 is mitogenic, this activity being susceptible to inhibition by lactose, and thus attributable to the beta-galactoside-binding ability of the protein. Some tumour cells are susceptible to the growth-inhibitory effect, and the galectin-1 gene is expressed in both normal and tumour cells.

  1. Macrophages modulate engineered human tissues for enhanced vascularization and healing

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Kara L.; Freytes, Donald O.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering is increasingly based on recapitulating human physiology, through integration of biological principles into engineering designs. In spite of all progress in engineering functional human tissues, we are just beginning to develop effective methods for establishing blood perfusion and controlling the inflammatory factors following implantation into the host. Functional vasculature largely determines tissue survival and function in vivo. The inflammatory response is a major regulator of vascularization and overall functionality of engineered tissues, through the activity of different types of macrophages and the cytokines they secrete. We discuss cell-scaffold-bioreactor systems for harnessing the inflammatory response for enhanced tissue vascularization and healing. To this end, inert scaffolds that have been considered for many decades a “gold standard” in regenerative medicine are beginning to be replaced by a new generation of “smart” tissue engineering systems designed to actively mediate tissue survival and function. PMID:25331098

  2. Pharmacological modulation of human platelet leukotriene C4-synthase.

    PubMed

    Sala, A; Folco, G; Henson, P M; Murphy, R C

    1997-03-21

    The aim of this study was to test if human platelet leukotriene C4-synthase (LTC4-S) is pharmacologically different from cloned and expressed LTC4-S and, in light of the significant homologies between 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) and LTC4-S, if different potencies of leukotriene synthesis inhibitors acting through binding with FLAP (FLAP inhibitors) reflect in different potencies as LTC4-S inhibitors. Leukotriene C4 (LTC4) synthesis by washed human platelets supplemented with synthetic leukotriene A4 (LTA4) was studied in the absence and presence of two different, structurally unrelated FLAP inhibitors (MK-886 and BAY-X1005) as well as a direct 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor (zileuton). LTC4 production was analyzed by RP-HPLC coupled to diode array detection. We report that human platelet LTC4-S was inhibited by MK-886 and BAY-X1005 (IC50 of 4.7 microM and 91.2 microM, respectively), but not by zileuton (inactive up to 300 microM); all 3 compounds were able to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase metabolite biosynthesis in intact human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (IC50 of 0.044 microM, 0.85 microM, and 1.5 microM, respectively). Platelet LTC4-S does not appear pharmacologically different from expression cloned LTC4-S. LTC4-S inhibition by FLAP inhibitors is in agreement with the significant homology reported for expression-cloned LTC4-S with FLAP, Furthermore, functional homology of the binding sites for inhibitors on LTC4-S and FLAP is suggested by the conservation of the relative potencies of MK-886 and BAY-X1005 vs FLAP-dependent 5-lipoxygenase activity and LTC4-S inhibition: MK-886 was 19.3-fold more potent than BAY-X1005 as FLAP inhibitor and 19.6-fold more potent than BAY-X1005 as LTC4-S inhibitor.

  3. Kisspeptin modulates sexual and emotional brain processing in humans

    PubMed Central

    Comninos, Alexander N.; Wall, Matthew B.; Demetriou, Lysia; Shah, Amar J.; Clarke, Sophie A.; Narayanaswamy, Shakunthala; Nesbitt, Alexander; Izzi-Engbeaya, Chioma; Prague, Julia K.; Abbara, Ali; Ratnasabapathy, Risheka; Salem, Victoria; Nijher, Gurjinder M.; Jayasena, Channa N.; Tanner, Mark; Bassett, Paul; Mehta, Amrish; Rabiner, Eugenii A.; Hönigsperger, Christoph; Silva, Meire Ribeiro; Brandtzaeg, Ole Kristian; Wilson, Steven Ray; Brown, Rachel C.; Thomas, Sarah A.; Bloom, Stephen R.; Dhillo, Waljit S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Sex, emotion, and reproduction are fundamental and tightly entwined aspects of human behavior. At a population level in humans, both the desire for sexual stimulation and the desire to bond with a partner are important precursors to reproduction. However, the relationships between these processes are incompletely understood. The limbic brain system has key roles in sexual and emotional behaviors, and is a likely candidate system for the integration of behavior with the hormonal reproductive axis. We investigated the effects of kisspeptin, a recently identified key reproductive hormone, on limbic brain activity and behavior. METHODS. Using a combination of functional neuroimaging and hormonal and psychometric analyses, we compared the effects of kisspeptin versus vehicle administration in 29 healthy heterosexual young men. RESULTS. We demonstrated that kisspeptin administration enhanced limbic brain activity specifically in response to sexual and couple-bonding stimuli. Furthermore, kisspeptin’s enhancement of limbic brain structures correlated with psychometric measures of reward, drive, mood, and sexual aversion, providing functional significance. In addition, kisspeptin administration attenuated negative mood. CONCLUSIONS. Collectively, our data provide evidence of an undescribed role for kisspeptin in integrating sexual and emotional brain processing with reproduction in humans. These results have important implications for our understanding of reproductive biology and are highly relevant to the current pharmacological development of kisspeptin as a potential therapeutic agent for patients with common disorders of reproductive function. FUNDING. National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), Wellcome Trust (Ref 080268), and the Medical Research Council (MRC). PMID:28112678

  4. Sympathetic modulation of sensory nerve activity with age: human and rodent skin models.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Z; LeVasseur, S; Merhi, M; Helme, R D

    1997-11-01

    1. Sensory nerves serve an afferent role and mediate neurogenic components of inflammation and tissue repair via an axon reflex release of sensory peptides at sites of injury. Dysfunction of these nerves with age could contribute to delayed tissue healing. 2. Complementary animal and human skin models were used in the present studies to investigate changes in the modulation of sensory nerve function by sympathetic efferents during ageing. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to monitor neurogenic skin vascular responses. 3. The animal model used skin of the hind footpad of anaesthetized rats combined with electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve, while the human model comprised capsaicin electrophoresis to the volar surface of the forearm. Sympathetic modulation was effected by systemic phentolamine pretreatment in animals and local application in the human model. 4. The results obtained from the human model confirmed the reported decline in sensory nerve function and showed no change in sympathetic modulation with age. The results from the animal model confirm and expand results obtained from the human model. 5. The use of low (5 Hz) and high (15 Hz) frequency electrical stimulation (20 V, 2 ms for 1 min) revealed a preferential response of aged sensory nerves to low-frequency electrical stimulation parameters with differential sympathetic modulation that is dependent on the frequency of stimulation.

  5. Genotype and ancestry modulate brain's DAT availability in healthy humans

    SciTech Connect

    Shumay, E.; Shumay, E.; Chen, J.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-08-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a principal regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission and its gene (the SLC6A3) is a strong biological candidate gene for various behavioral- and neurological disorders. Intense investigation of the link between the SLC6A3 polymorphisms and behavioral phenotypes yielded inconsistent and even contradictory results. Reliance on objective brain phenotype measures, for example, those afforded by brain imaging, might critically improve detection of DAT genotype-phenotype association. Here, we tested the relationship between the DAT brain availability and the SLC6A3 genotypes using an aggregate sample of 95 healthy participants of several imaging studies. These studies employed positron emission tomography (PET) with [{sup 11}C] cocaine wherein the DAT availability was estimated as Bmax/Kd; while the genotype values were obtained on two repeat polymorphisms - 3-UTR- and intron 8- VNTRs. The main findings are the following: (1) both polymorphisms analyzed as single genetic markers and in combination (haplotype) modulate DAT density in midbrain; (2) ethnic background and age influence the strength of these associations; and (3) age-related changes in DAT availability differ in the 3-UTR and intron8 - genotype groups.

  6. Modulation of human motoneuron activity by a mental arithmetic task.

    PubMed

    Bensoussan, Laurent; Duclos, Yann; Rossi-Durand, Christiane

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the performance of a mental task affects motoneuron activity. To this end, the tonic discharge pattern of wrist extensor motor units was analyzed in healthy subjects while they were required to maintain a steady wrist extension force and to concurrently perform a mental arithmetic (MA) task. A shortening of the mean inter-spike interval (ISI) and a decrease in ISI variability occurred when MA task was superimposed to the motor task. Aloud and silent MA affected equally the rate and variability of motoneuron discharge. Increases in surface EMG activity and force level were consistent with the modulation of the motor unit discharge rate. Trial-by-trial analysis of the characteristics of motor unit firing revealed that performing MA increases activation of wrist extensor SMU. It is suggested that increase in muscle spindle afferent activity, resulting from fusimotor drive activation by MA, may have contributed to the increase in synaptic inputs to motoneurons during the mental task performance, likely together with enhancement in the descending drive. The finding that a mental task affects motoneuron activity could have consequences in assessment of motor disabilities and in rehabilitation in motor pathologies.

  7. Volitional exaggeration of body size through fundamental and formant frequency modulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Pisanski, Katarzyna; Mora, Emanuel C.; Pisanski, Annette; Reby, David; Sorokowski, Piotr; Frackowiak, Tomasz; Feinberg, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Several mammalian species scale their voice fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequencies in competitive and mating contexts, reducing vocal tract and laryngeal allometry thereby exaggerating apparent body size. Although humans’ rare capacity to volitionally modulate these same frequencies is thought to subserve articulated speech, the potential function of voice frequency modulation in human nonverbal communication remains largely unexplored. Here, the voices of 167 men and women from Canada, Cuba, and Poland were recorded in a baseline condition and while volitionally imitating a physically small and large body size. Modulation of F0, formant spacing (∆F), and apparent vocal tract length (VTL) were measured using Praat. Our results indicate that men and women spontaneously and systemically increased VTL and decreased F0 to imitate a large body size, and reduced VTL and increased F0 to imitate small size. These voice modulations did not differ substantially across cultures, indicating potentially universal sound-size correspondences or anatomical and biomechanical constraints on voice modulation. In each culture, men generally modulated their voices (particularly formants) more than did women. This latter finding could help to explain sexual dimorphism in F0 and formants that is currently unaccounted for by sexual dimorphism in human vocal anatomy and body size. PMID:27687571

  8. Endotoxin down-modulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (CD114) on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, U; Homoncik, M; Stohlawetz, P J; Marsik, C; Sieder, A; Eichler, H G; Jilma, B

    2000-07-01

    During infection, the development of nonresponsiveness to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be influenced by the down-modulation of G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) by cytokines. This down-modulation was studied during experimental human endotoxemia. Healthy volunteers received either 2 ng/kg endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS], n=20) or placebo (n=10) in a randomized, controlled trial. Endotoxin infusion increased the mean fluorescence intensity of the neutrophil activation marker CD11b >300% after 1 h (P<.001 vs. placebo). LPS infusion down-modulated G-CSFR expression in as early as 60 min (-17%; P=.001 vs. placebo). Down-modulation was almost maximal at 90 min and persisted for 6 h (-50% from baseline; P<.0001 vs. placebo). Plasma levels of G-CSF started to increase only after G-CSFR down-modulation had occurred and peaked 37-fold above baseline at 4 h (P<.0001 vs. placebo). In conclusion, LPS down-modulates G-CSFR expression in humans, which may render neutrophils less responsive to the effects of G-CSF and, thereby, compromise host defense mechanisms.

  9. Influence of oestrogens on formation of reactive oxygen species in liver microsomes of differently aged male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Barth, A; Landmann, G; Liepold, K; Zapf, H; Müller, D; Karge, E; Klinger, W

    1999-07-01

    Metabolic pathways of oestrogens are the formation of catechol oestrogens (CE; 2- and 4-hydroxy-oestrogens), redox cycling of CE and free radical generation, mediated through cytochrome P450 (P450) oxidase/reductase activity. We checked the oestrogens oestradiol (E2), oestradiol valerate (E2V) and ethinyloestradiol (EE2) for formation of reactive oxygen species in vitro and ex vivo in male Wistar rats in dependence on age. In liver microsomes of 10-, 30-, 60- and 270-day-old rats the influence of E2, E2V and EE2 (10(-7)-10(-3) M) on NADPH-Fe(++)-stimulated lipid peroxidation (LPO), H2O2 generation and lucigenin (LUC) and luminol (LUM) amplified chemiluminescence (CL) was investigated. The same parameters, additionally P450 content and monooxygenase activities were measured in liver 9000 x g supernatants after subchronic administration of the oestrogens (1, 10 mg/kg b. wt. orally). The most important results are the strong inhibitory capacities of the oestrogens in vitro on LPO in the order of E2V < E2 < EE2, most pronounced in 10-, 60- and 270-day-old animals. In microsomes of 30-day-old rats with the highest control LPO the antioxidative effect of the oestrogens was lower. Whereas the H2O2 generation was not changed by E2, enhanced by E2V, but diminished by EE2 in all age groups, CL(LUC) and CL(LUM) were inhibited in the order of E2 < E2V < EE2. Also after subchronical treatment of the rats the antioxidative action of the oestrogens was evident, microsomal LPO was inhibited in the order of E2 < E2V < EE2. All oestrogens inhibited ethylmorphine N-demethylation. But enhanced H2O2 generation and increased CL(LUC) also indicate a formation of reactive oxygen species by these oestrogens. Obviously in vitro the antioxidative phenolic structure of the oestrogens dominates, whereas after in vivo administration the dose- and age-dependent biotransformation produces prooxidative in addition to antioxidative structures.

  10. Melatonin and oestrogen treatments were able to improve neuroinflammation and apoptotic processes in dentate gyrus of old ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Kireev, Roman A; Vara, Elena; Viña, Jose; Tresguerres, Jesus A F

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of oestrogen and melatonin treatments following long-term ovarian hormone depletion on neuroinflammation and apoptotic processes in dentate gyrus of hippocampi. Forty-six female Wistar rats of 22 months of age were used. Twelve of them remained intact, and the other 34 were ovariectomized at 12 months of age. Ovariectomized animals were divided into three groups and treated for 10 weeks with oestrogens, melatonin or saline. All rats were killed by decapitation at 24 months of age, and dentate gyri were collected. A group of 2 month-old intact female rats was used as young control. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) were analysed by ELISA. The expressions of TNFα, IL1β, GFAP, nNOS, iNOS, HO-1, NFκB, Bax, Bad, AIF, Bcl2 and SIRT1 genes were detected by real-time (RT)-PCR. Western blots were used to measure the protein expression of NFκB p65, NFκB p50/105, IκBα, IκBβ, p38 MAPK, MAP-2 and synapsin I. We have assessed the ability of 17β-oestradiol and melatonin administration to downregulate markers of neuroinflammation in the dentate gyrus of ovariectomized female rats. Results indicated that 17β-oestradiol and melatonin treatments were able to significantly decrease expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, iNOS and HO-1 in the hippocampus when compared to non-treated animals. A similar age- and long-term ovarian hormone depletion- related increase in GFAP was also attenuated after both melatonin and oestradiol treatments. In a similar way to oestradiol, melatonin decreased the activation of p38 MAPK and NFκB pathways. The treatments enhanced the levels of synaptic molecules synapsin I and MAP-2 and have been shown to modulate the pro-antiapoptotic ratio favouring the second and to increase SIRT1 expression. These findings support the potential therapeutic role of melatonin and oestradiol as protective anti-inflammatory agents for the central nervous system

  11. Acute Exercise Modulates Feature-selective Responses in Human Cortex.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Tom; Elliott, James C; Serences, John T; Giesbrecht, Barry

    2017-04-01

    An organism's current behavioral state influences ongoing brain activity. Nonhuman mammalian and invertebrate brains exhibit large increases in the gain of feature-selective neural responses in sensory cortex during locomotion, suggesting that the visual system becomes more sensitive when actively exploring the environment. This raises the possibility that human vision is also more sensitive during active movement. To investigate this possibility, we used an inverted encoding model technique to estimate feature-selective neural response profiles from EEG data acquired from participants performing an orientation discrimination task. Participants (n = 18) fixated at the center of a flickering (15 Hz) circular grating presented at one of nine different orientations and monitored for a brief shift in orientation that occurred on every trial. Participants completed the task while seated on a stationary exercise bike at rest and during low- and high-intensity cycling. We found evidence for inverted-U effects; such that the peak of the reconstructed feature-selective tuning profiles was highest during low-intensity exercise compared with those estimated during rest and high-intensity exercise. When modeled, these effects were driven by changes in the gain of the tuning curve and in the profile bandwidth during low-intensity exercise relative to rest. Thus, despite profound differences in visual pathways across species, these data show that sensitivity in human visual cortex is also enhanced during locomotive behavior. Our results reveal the nature of exercise-induced gain on feature-selective coding in human sensory cortex and provide valuable evidence linking the neural mechanisms of behavior state across species.

  12. Valsalva maneuver: Insights into baroreflex modulation of human sympathetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael L.; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Fritsch, Janice M.; Beightol, Larry A.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.

    1991-01-01

    Valsalva's maneuver, voluntary forced expiration against a closed glottis, is a well-characterized research tool, used to assess the integrity of human autonomic cardiovascular control. Valsalva straining provokes a stereotyped succession of alternating positive and negative arterial pressure and heart rate changes mediated in part by arterial baroreceptors. Arterial pressure changes result primarily from fluctuating levels of venous return to the heart and changes of sympathetic nerve activity. Muscle sympathetic activity was measured directly in nine volunteers to explore quantitatively the relation between arterial pressure and human sympathetic outflow during pressure transients provoked by controlled graded Valsalva maneuvers. Our results underscore several properties of sympathetic regulation during Valsalva straining. First, muscle sympathetic nerve activity changes as a mirror image of changes in arterial pressure. Second, the magnitude of sympathetic augmentation during Valsalva straining predicts phase 4 arterial pressure elevations. Third, post-Valsalva sympathetic inhibition persists beyond the return of arterial and right atrial pressures to baseline levels which reflects an alteration of the normal relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic activity. Therefore, Valsalva straining may have some utility for investigating changes of reflex control of sympathetic activity after space flight; however, measurement of beat-to-beat arterial pressure is essential for this use. The utility of this technique in microgravity can not be determined from these data. Further investigations are necessary to determine whether these relations are affected by the expansion of intrathoracic blood volume associated with microgravity.

  13. Oxygen-Sensitive K+ Channels Modulate Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Secretion from Human Placental Trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Paula; Sibley, Colin P; Greenwood, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a key autocrine/paracrine regulator of placental syncytiotrophoblast, the transport epithelium of the human placenta. Syncytiotrophoblast hCG secretion is modulated by the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and potassium (K+) channels. Here we test the hypothesis that K+ channels mediate the effects of pO2 and ROS on hCG secretion. Placental villous explants from normal term pregnancies were cultured for 6 days at 6% (normoxia), 21% (hyperoxia) or 1% (hypoxia) pO2. On days 3-5, explants were treated with 5mM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) or tetraethylammonium (TEA), blockers of pO2-sensitive voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels, or ROS (10-1000μM H2O2). hCG secretion and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, a marker of necrosis, were determined daily. At day 6, hCG and LDH were measured in tissue lysate and 86Rb (K+) efflux assessed to estimate syncytiotrophoblast K+ permeability. hCG secretion and 86Rb efflux were significantly greater in explants maintained in 21% pO2 than normoxia. 4-AP/TEA inhibited hCG secretion to a greater extent at 21% than 6% and 1% pO2, and reduced 86Rb efflux at 21% but not 6% pO2. LDH release and tissue LDH/hCG were similar in 6%, 21% and 1% pO2 and unaffected by 4-AP/TEA. H2O2 stimulated 86Rb efflux and hCG secretion at normoxia but decreased 86Rb efflux, without affecting hCG secretion, at 21% pO2. 4-AP/TEA-sensitive K+ channels participate in pO2-sensitive hCG secretion from syncytiotrophoblast. ROS effects on both hCG secretion and 86Rb efflux are pO2-dependent but causal links between the two remain to be established.

  14. Human Driving Forces and Their Impacts on Land Use/Land Cover. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Susanne

    This learning module aims to engage students in problem solving, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and cooperative learning. The module is appropriate for use in any introductory or intermediate undergraduate course that focuses on human-environment relationships. The module explains that land use/cover change has occurred at all times in all…

  15. Long-term topical oestrogen treatment of sun-exposed facial skin in post-menopausal women does not improve facial wrinkles or skin elasticity, but induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun-Sun; Lee, Se-Rah; Chung, Jin Ho

    2014-01-01

    It is controversial whether treatment with oestrogen stimulates collagen production or accumulation in sun-exposed skin. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of long-term treatment with topical oestrogen on photoaged facial skin, with regard to wrinkle severity, and expression of procollagen and matrix metalloproteinase-1 enzyme. Two groups of 40 post-menopausal women applied either 1 g of 1% oestrone or vehicle cream once daily to the face for 24 weeks. Visiometer R1-R5 values (skin wrinkles) and Cutometer values (skin elasticity) were not significantly improved in the oestrone group after 24 weeks of treatment. Type I procollagen immunostaining did not increase in the oestrone group compared with the control group. However, levels of matrix metalloproteinase-1 mRNA increased robustly (10.3 times) in oestrone-treated skin compared with vehicle-treated skin. Thus, treatment with topical oestrogen may be deleterious in ultraviolet-induced skin ageing, at least in part, through induction of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) expression in human skin.

  16. Oestrogen-induced androgen insufficiency results in a reduction of proliferation and differentiation of spermatogonia in the zebrafish testis.

    PubMed

    de Waal, Paul P; Leal, Marcelo C; García-López, Angel; Liarte, Sergio; de Jonge, Hugo; Hinfray, Nathalie; Brion, François; Schulz, Rüdiger W; Bogerd, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Androgens can induce complete spermatogenesis in immature or prepubertal teleost fish. However, many aspects of the role of androgens in adult teleost spermatogenesis have remained elusive. Since oestrogens inhibit androgen synthesis, we used an oestrogen-induced androgen depletion model to identify androgen-dependent stages during adult zebrafish spermatogenesis. Exposure to 10 nM 17beta-oestradiol (E(2)) in vivo at least halved the mass of differentiating germ cells (from type B spermatogonia to spermatids), while type A spermatogonia accumulated. Studies on the cellular dynamics revealed that a reduction of spermatogonial proliferation together with an inhibition of their differentiation to type B spermatogonia were the basis for the oestrogen-mediated disturbance of spermatogenesis. The capacity of the zebrafish testis to produce 11-ketotestosterone as well as the expression of steroidogenesis-related genes was markedly decreased after in vivo oestrogen exposure. Moreover, the androgen-release response to recombinant zebrafish Lh was lost after oestrogen exposure. We conclude that oestrogen exposure caused a state of androgen insufficiency in adult male zebrafish. Since the downregulation of the steroidogenic system as well as the disturbance of spermatogenesis in testicular explants exposed to E(2) ex vivo was much less severe than after in vivo exposure, the main inhibitory effect appears to be exerted via feedback inhibition of gonadotropin release. This experimental set-up helped to identify spermatogonial proliferation and their differentiation as androgen targets in adult zebrafish spermatogenesis.

  17. Oxygen modulates growth of human cells at physiologic partial pressures

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the growth of human diploid fibroblasts (WI-38 and IMR90) as a function of initial seeding density and oxygen tension. Cells at young and mid-passage levels were subcultivated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 10% fetal bovine serum at 0.005, 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1, and 2 X 10(4) cells/cm2. Flasks were equilibrated before and after seeding with 1 of 10 gas mixtures containing the desired oxygen tension (9-591 mm Hg) and placed in incubators that measure and maintain a preset oxygen tension. The partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in media of all flasks was determined at harvest. Cells were shielded from light of wavelength less than 500 nm. Cell growth varied inversely with oxygen tension and seeding density. At 50 cells/cm2, growth was maximal at PO2 9 and 16 mm Hg. Growth was progressively inhibited as the oxygen tension was increased. The population doubling increase at 14 d was 8.6 for PO2 9 and 16 mm Hg, 5.8 for PO2 42 mm Hg, 3.8 for PO2 78 mm Hg, 3.8 for PO2 104 mm Hg, and 3 for PO2 138 mm Hg. As the seeding density was increased, the differences in growth at PO2 less than 140 mm Hg were progressively minimized, such that at seeding densities of 10(4) cells/cm2 there was little difference in the rate of exponential growth or the final saturation density of cells cultivated between PO2 9 and 96 mm Hg. At all seeding densities tested, growth was progressively inhibited when the PO2 was increased greater than 140 mm Hg. The seeding density dependence of oxygen's influence on cellular growth is not explained by oxygen consumption of higher density cultures. Oxygen acts directly on the cells and not by destroying some essential medium component. We have found that oxygen regulates the growth of human cells under pressures of oxygen physiologic to humans, and that oxygen toxicity contributes to the seeding density dependence of cellular growth commonly seen in cell culture. PMID:6736869

  18. Serotonin selectively modulates reward value in human decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Ben; Daw, Nathaniel D.; Roiser, Jonathan P; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Ray

    2017-01-01

    Establishing a function for the neuromodulator serotonin in human decision-making has proved remarkably difficult, because if its complex role in reward and punishment processing. In a novel choice task where actions led concurrently and independently to the stochastic delivery of both money and pain, we studied the impact of decreased brain serotonin induced by acute dietary tryptophan depletion. Depletion selectively impaired both behavioural and neural representations of reward outcome value, and hence the effective exchange rate by which rewards and punishments were compared. This effect was computationally and anatomically distinct from a separate effect on increasing outcome-independent choice perseveration. Our results provide evidence for a surprising role for serotonin in reward processing, while illustrating its complex and multifarious effects. PMID:22539845

  19. Extinction and Renewal of Pavlovian Modulation in Human Sequential Feature Positive Discrimination Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeyens, Frank; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Beckers, Tom; Hermans, Dirk; Kerkhof, Ineke; De Ceulaer, Annick

    2005-01-01

    Using a conditioned suppression task, we investigated extinction and renewal of Pavlovian modulation in human sequential Feature Positive (FP) discrimination learning. In Experiment 1, in context a participants were first trained on two FP discriminations, X[right arrow]A+/A- and Y[right arrow]B+/B-. Extinction treatment was administered in the…

  20. Overcoming Masculine Bias in Introductory College Human Geography: A Module Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rengert, Arlene; Monk, Janice J.

    This report describes a project launched under the auspices of the Association of American Geographers to produce a series of modules designed to increase and improve the representation of women in introductory college human geography courses. The project aimed to produce materials which could be used to supplement existing courses in diverse…

  1. Career Education for Mental Health Workers. Health Assessment. Human Service Instructional Series. Module No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redcay, Madeleine C.

    This module on health assessment is one of a set of six developed to prepare human services workers for the changing mental health service delivery system. A total of seven objectives are included to help students utilize knowledge of physical factors which may influence health and behavior in order to recognize signs and symptoms which indicate…

  2. Production of Recombinant Polypeptides Containing One GA-Module and Analysis of Their Ability to Bind to Human Albumin.

    PubMed

    Bormotova, E A; Gupalova, T V

    2016-11-01

    Surface proteins of many bacterial species interact with human serum albumin (HSA) via a special region of amino acid sequence termed GA module. For instance, surface peptostreptococcal albumin-binding protein of anaerobic bacteria Peptostreptococcus magnus contains one HSA-binding GA-module. Protein G from group G and C Streptococcus strains isolated from humans has HSA-binding region consisting of three GA-modules. HSA-binding protein containing two GA-modules was found in strains of group G Streptococcus of animal origin. We obtained two recombinant polypeptides GA1 and GA2 congaing one GA-module each. Recombinant polypeptide with two GA-modules binds HSA with a much higher affinity than polypeptides GA1 and GA2 containing one GA-module. Polypeptide with the second GAmodule more effectively binds HSA than polypeptides with the GA-module.

  3. Role of oestrogen in the regulation of bone turnover at the menarche.

    PubMed

    Eastell, Richard

    2005-05-01

    The rise in oestrogen levels at menarche in girls is associated with a large reduction in bone turnover markers. This reduction reflects the closure of the epiphyseal growth plates, the reduction in periosteal apposition and endosteal resorption within cortical bone, and in bone remodelling within cortical and cancellous bone. Oestrogen promotes these changes, in part, by promoting apoptosis of chondrocytes in the growth plate and osteoclasts within cortical and cancellous bone. The period of early puberty is associated with an increased risk of fracture, particularly of the distal forearm, and this may be related to the high rate of bone turnover. A late menarche is a consistent risk factor for fracture and low bone mineral density in the postmenopausal period; models that might explain this association are considered.

  4. First report of vaginal prolapse in a bitch treated with oestrogen.

    PubMed

    Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei, F; Saifzadeh, S; Mazaheri, R; Behfar, M

    2008-06-01

    Vaginal prolapse is the protrusion of edematous vaginal tissue into and through the opening of the vulva occurring during the pro-oestrus and oestrus stages of the sexual cycle. True vaginal prolapse may occur near parturition, as the concentration of serum progesterone declines and the concentration of serum oestrogen increases. In a bitch, true vaginal prolapse is a very rare condition. This case report describes an 18-month-old crossbreed bitch, weighing 40 kg presented with type III vaginal prolapse. The patient had developed vaginal prolapse after receiving oestrogen in order to oestrus induction. Subsequent to unsuccessful attempts for repositioning, ovariohysterectomy (OHE), circumferential excision of the prolapsed tissue and finally vulvoplasty were performed. There was no evidence of recurrence of the prolapse during 30 days after surgery. This case report describes type III vaginal prolapse as an unusual side effect of oestrus induction hormonal therapy in the bitch.

  5. Context modulates effects of nicotine abstinence on human cooperative responding.

    PubMed

    Spiga, R; Day, J D; Schmitz, J M; Broitman, M; Elk, R; Caperton-Brown, H

    1998-11-01

    The effects of ad libitum smoking, abstinence, and 0-, 2-, and 4-mg nicotine gum on human cooperative responding were examined. Participants were provided the opportunity to respond cooperatively or independently to episodes initiated by a computer-simulated other person. Participants could also initiate episodes that ostensibly provided the other person the opportunity to respond cooperatively or independently of the participant. Working cooperatively added points to both the participant's and other person's counters. Working independently added points only to the participant's counter. Results demonstrated that abstinence decreased cooperative responses during episodes initiated by the computer-stimulated other person. Relative to abstinence and placebo gum conditions, ad libitum smoking and administration of 2- and 4-mg nicotine gum increased these cooperative responses. No gender differences were observed. The number of cooperative episodes initiated by the participants was not affected significantly by the smoking or gum conditions. Nicotine increased reports of vigor and decreased abstinence-engendered reports of depression, anger, confusion, and tension. The difference in the effects of nicotine abstinence on the 2 classes of cooperative responding demonstrates that the social contingency mediates the behavioral effects of abstinence.

  6. Human Rap1 modulates TRF2 attraction to telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Janoušková, Eliška; Nečasová, Ivona; Pavloušková, Jana; Zimmermann, Michal; Hluchý, Milan; Marini, Victoria; Nováková, Monika; Hofr, Ctirad

    2015-01-01

    More than two decades of genetic research have identified and assigned main biological functions of shelterin proteins that safeguard telomeres. However, a molecular mechanism of how each protein subunit contributes to the protecting function of the whole shelterin complex remains elusive. Human Repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1) forms a multifunctional complex with Telomeric Repeat binding Factor 2 (TRF2). Rap1–TRF2 complex is a critical part of shelterin as it suppresses homology-directed repair in Ku 70/80 heterodimer absence. To understand how Rap1 affects key functions of TRF2, we investigated full-length Rap1 binding to TRF2 and Rap1–TRF2 complex interactions with double-stranded DNA by quantitative biochemical approaches. We observed that Rap1 reduces the overall DNA duplex binding affinity of TRF2 but increases the selectivity of TRF2 to telomeric DNA. Additionally, we observed that Rap1 induces a partial release of TRF2 from DNA duplex. The improved TRF2 selectivity to telomeric DNA is caused by less pronounced electrostatic attractions between TRF2 and DNA in Rap1 presence. Thus, Rap1 prompts more accurate and selective TRF2 recognition of telomeric DNA and TRF2 localization on single/double-strand DNA junctions. These quantitative functional studies contribute to the understanding of the selective recognition of telomeric DNA by the whole shelterin complex. PMID:25675958

  7. Roles of Oestrogen Receptors α and β in Behavioural Neuroendocrinology: Beyond Yin/Yang

    PubMed Central

    Rissman, E. F.

    2009-01-01

    Oestrogen receptor β (ERβ) was discovered more than 10 years ago. It is widely distributed in the brain. In some areas, such as the entorhinal cortex, it is present as the only ER, whereas in other regions, such as the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and preoptic area, it can be found co-expressed with ERα, often within the same neurones. These ERs share ligands, and there are several complex relationships between the two receptors. Initially, the relationship between them was labelled as ‘yin/yang’, meaning that the actions of each complemented those of the other, but now, years later, other relationships have been described. Based on evidence from neuroendocrine and behavioural studies, three types of interactions between the two oestrogen receptors are described in this review. The first relationship is antagonistic; this is evident from studies on the role of oestrogen in spatial learning. When oestradiol is given in a high, chronic dose, spatial learning is impaired. This action of oestradiol requires ERα, and when ERβ is not functional, lower doses of oestradiol have this negative effect on behaviour. The second relationship between the two receptors is one that is synergistic, and this is illustrated in the combined effects of the two receptors on the production of the neuropeptide oxytocin and its receptor. The third relationship is sequential; separate actions of the two receptors are postulated in activation and organisation of sexually dimorphic reproductive behaviours. Future studies on all of these topics will inform us about how ER selective ligands might affect oestrogen functions at the organismal level. PMID:18601711

  8. Calcium pantothenate modulates gene expression in proliferating human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, Tonio; Heise, Ruth; Skazik, Claudia; Marquardt, Yvonne; Joussen, Sylvia; Erdmann, Kati; Schröder, Henning; Merk, Hans F; Baron, Jens Malte

    2009-11-01

    Topical application of pantothenate is widely used in clinical practice for wound healing. Previous studies identified a positive effect of pantothenate on migration and proliferation of cultured fibroblasts. However, these studies were mainly descriptive with no molecular data supporting a possible model of its action. In this study, we first established conditions for an in vitro model of pantothenate wound healing and then analysed the molecular effects of pantothenate. To test the functional effect of pantothenate on dermal fibroblasts, cells were cultured and in vitro proliferation tests were performed using a standardized scratch test procedure. For all three donors analysed, a strong stimulatory effect of pantothenate at a concentration of 20 microg/ml on the proliferation of cultivated dermal fibroblasts was observed. To study the molecular mechanisms resulting in the proliferative effect of pantothenate, gene expression was analysed in dermal fibroblasts cultivated with 20 microg/ml of pantothenate compared with untreated cells using the GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. A number of significantly regulated genes were identified including genes coding for interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, Id1, HMOX-1, HspB7, CYP1B1 and MARCH-II. Regulation of these genes was subsequently verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Induction of HMOX-1 expression by pantothenol and pantothenic acid in dermal cells was confirmed on the protein level using immunoblots. Functional studies revealed the enhanced suppression of free radical formation in skin fibroblasts cultured with panthenol. In conclusion, these studies provided new insight in the molecular mechanisms linked to the stimulatory effect of pantothenate and panthenol on the proliferation of dermal fibroblasts.

  9. Modulation of human corticospinal excitability by paired associative stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Richard G.; Kennedy, Niamh C.

    2013-01-01

    Paired Associative Stimulation (PAS) has come to prominence as a potential therapeutic intervention for the treatment of brain injury/disease, and as an experimental method with which to investigate Hebbian principles of neural plasticity in humans. Prototypically, a single electrical stimulus is directed to a peripheral nerve in advance of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivered to the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1). Repeated pairing of the stimuli (i.e., association) over an extended period may increase or decrease the excitability of corticospinal projections from M1, in manner that depends on the interstimulus interval (ISI). It has been suggested that these effects represent a form of associative long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) that bears resemblance to spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) as it has been elaborated in animal models. With a large body of empirical evidence having emerged since the cardinal features of PAS were first described, and in light of the variations from the original protocols that have been implemented, it is opportune to consider whether the phenomenology of PAS remains consistent with the characteristic features that were initially disclosed. This assessment necessarily has bearing upon interpretation of the effects of PAS in relation to the specific cellular pathways that are putatively engaged, including those that adhere to the rules of STDP. The balance of evidence suggests that the mechanisms that contribute to the LTP- and LTD-type responses to PAS differ depending on the precise nature of the induction protocol that is used. In addition to emphasizing the requirement for additional explanatory models, in the present analysis we highlight the key features of the PAS phenomenology that require interpretation. PMID:24348369

  10. Oleaster oil positively modulates plasma lipids in humans.

    PubMed

    Belarbi, Meriem; Bendimerad, Soraya; Sour, Souad; Soualem, Zoubida; Baghdad, Choukri; Hmimed, Sara; Chemat, Farid; Visioli, Francesco

    2011-08-24

    The olive tree had been domesticated during the early Neolithic in the Near East, and more than 1000 different cultivars have been identified to date. However, examples of wild olive trees (Olea europaea oleaster) can still be found in the Mediterranean basin. Evidence of oleaster use for oil production can be found in historical and sacred texts, such as the Odyssey, the Holey Koran, and the Holey Bible. While the nutritional and healthful properties of olive oil are actively being explored, there are no data on the human actions of oleaster oil. Therefore, we investigated the effect of prolonged, i.e., 1 month, consumption of oleaster oil on the lipid profile of a 40 healthy Algerian subjects (aged 27.9 ± 3.85 years), as compared to nonconsumers from the same area. Plasma urea, creatinine, and uric acid concentrations and glycemia did not significantly differ, at the end of the study, between controls and oleaster-oil-supplemented subjects. Conversely, we recorded significant decreases of plasma triglyceride concentration (-24.8%; p < 0.05), total cholesterol (-12.13%; p < 0.05), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) (-24.39%; p < 0.05) in oleaster-oil-treated subjects. Concomitantly, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations were significantly increased (17.94%; p < 0.05) by oleaster oil administration. In conclusion, we show that oil obtained from feral olive trees, i.e., oleasters, improves the plasma lipid profile of healthy volunteers.

  11. Sensitivity to temporal modulation rate and spectral bandwidth in the human auditory system: MEG evidence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yadong; Ding, Nai; Ahmar, Nayef; Xiang, Juanjuan; Poeppel, David; Simon, Jonathan Z

    2012-04-01

    Slow acoustic modulations below 20 Hz, of varying bandwidths, are dominant components of speech and many other natural sounds. The dynamic neural representations of these modulations are difficult to study through noninvasive neural-recording methods, however, because of the omnipresent background of slow neural oscillations throughout the brain. We recorded the auditory steady-state responses (aSSR) to slow amplitude modulations (AM) from 14 human subjects using magnetoencephalography. The responses to five AM rates (1.5, 3.5, 7.5, 15.5, and 31.5 Hz) and four types of carrier (pure tone and 1/3-, 2-, and 5-octave pink noise) were investigated. The phase-locked aSSR was detected reliably in all conditions. The response power generally decreases with increasing modulation rate, and the response latency is between 100 and 150 ms for all but the highest rates. Response properties depend only weakly on the bandwidth. Analysis of the complex-valued aSSR magnetic fields in the Fourier domain reveals several neural sources with different response phases. These neural sources of the aSSR, when approximated by a single equivalent current dipole (ECD), are distinct from and medial to the ECD location of the N1m response. These results demonstrate that the globally synchronized activity in the human auditory cortex is phase locked to slow temporal modulations below 30 Hz, and the neural sensitivity decreases with an increasing AM rate, with relative insensitivity to bandwidth.

  12. The effect of Ramadan fasting on LH, FSH, oestrogen, progesterone and leptin in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Khoshdel, A; Kheiri, S; Hashemi-Dehkordi, E; Nasiri, J; Shabanian-Borujeni, S; Saedi, E

    2014-10-01

    Many pregnant Muslim women fast during Ramadan. Leptin has an important role in the reproductive system and hormones. In this study, FSH, LH, oestrogen, progesterone and leptin were measured in the first, second and fourth week of Ramadan and the second week post-Ramadan, in 30 fasting pregnant women. Data were analysed using repeated measures ANOVA by SPSS. The weight and BMI did not change during the study. A significant change in FSH, oestrogen, progesterone and leptin was observed (p < 0.05). The lowest value of FSH was in the second week of Ramadan. Progesterone increased at the end of Ramadan and the second week after. Oestrogen increased significantly during Ramadan and decreased after Ramadan. A decreasing trend was seen in LH during the Ramadan and 2 weeks after (p < 0.1). Leptin decreased significantly 2 weeks after Ramadan. We found poor weight gain and hypoleptinaemia in pregnant fasted women during the study. Food restriction in pregnant fasted women during Ramadan may induce poor weight gain during pregnancy. These data confirm that Ramadan fasting by pregnant women may have potential risks during pregnancy. We recommend further study to evaluate long-term effects of Ramadan fasting during pregnancy in different countries with different food habits and traditions, to obtain reliable and documented data.

  13. Oestradiol rapidly inhibits Ca2+ signals in ciliary neurons through classical oestrogen receptors in cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Viso-León, M Carmen; Ripoll, Cristina; Nadal, Angel

    2004-10-01

    Oestrogen plays a key role in a great variety of actions in the nervous system, either through classical or alternative pathways. The classical pathways are initiated after oestrogen binding to the oestrogen receptors ERalpha or ERbeta, which translocate from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and act there as transcription factors. Alternative pathways are initiated at the plasma membrane and cytoplasm, via binding to classical or non-classical ERs. Using isolated ciliary ganglion neurons from the chick embryo and Ca2+ imaging, we demonstrated that a 10-min exposure to 17beta-oestradiol reduces Ca2+ influx through the plasma membrane. This effect was not reproduced by oestradiol conjugated to bovine serum albumin, which does not cross the plasma membrane, indicating that 17beta-oestradiol was acting intracellularly. ERalpha was detected in the cytoplasm by immunostaining and its involvement in the regulation of Ca2+ influx by ICI182,780 inhibition. The phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (Pi3-kinase) inhibitor wortmannin and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) both blocked the oestradiol effect. The oestradiol effect was reproduced by 8Br-cGMP and abolished in the presence of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor KT5823. Our study indicates that 17beta-oestradiol can regulate Ca2+ influx via PI3-kinase, NOS and PKG after activation of cytoplasmic ER.

  14. Altered burst swimming in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss exposed to natural and synthetic oestrogens.

    PubMed

    Osachoff, H L; Osachoff, K N; Wickramaratne, A E; Gunawardane, E K; Venturini, F P; Kennedy, C J

    2014-08-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were exposed to two concentrations each of 17β-oestradiol (E2; natural oestrogen hormone) or 17α-ethinyl oestradiol (EE2; a potent synthetic oestrogen hormone) to evaluate their potential effects on burst-swimming performance. In each of six successive burst-swimming assays, burst-swimming speed (Uburst ) was lower in fish exposed to 0.5 and 1 µg l(-1) E2 and EE2 for four days compared with control fish. A practice swim (2 days prior to exposure initiation) in control fish elevated initial Uburst values, but this training effect was not evident in the 1 µg l(-1) EE2-exposed fish. Several potential oestrogen-mediated mechanisms for Uburst reductions were investigated, including effects on metabolic products, osmoregulation and blood oxygen-carrying capacity. Prior to burst-swimming trials, fish exposed to E2 and EE2 for 4 days had significantly reduced erythrocyte numbers and lower plasma glucose concentrations. After six repeated burst-swimming trials, plasma glucose, lactate and creatinine concentrations were not significantly different among treatment groups; however, plasma Cl(-) concentrations were significantly reduced in E2- and EE2-treated fish. In summary, E2 and EE2 exposure altered oxygen-carrying capacity ([erythrocytes]) and an osmoregulatory-related variable ([Cl(-) ]), effects that may underlie reductions in burst-swimming speed, which will have implications for fish performance in the wild.

  15. Subcellular localisation of VEGF in different pituitary cells. Changes of its expression in oestrogen induced prolactinomas.

    PubMed

    Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; De Paul, Ana Lucía; Gutiérrez, Silvina; Roth, Félix Daniel; Aoki, Agustín; Torres, Alicia Inés

    2005-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important angiogenic factor in the pituitary gland. The objective of this study was to unveil the VEGF subcellular localisation in different pituitary cell types and to evaluate changes in its expression at different time intervals after oestrogen stimulation. A relevant feature demonstrated was the identification of this cytokine in the nucleus and cytoplasm of lactotrophs, somatotrophs and gonadotrophs, as well as in follicle-stellate cells of male rats. Oestrogen treatment increased the number of VEGF immunopositive cells and its expression detected differentially by western blot in both nucleus and cytoplasm of pituitary cells when compared to the control. At ultrastructural level VEGF appeared associated with nucleolus and euchromatin involving a possible internal autocrine loop. In lactotrophs, the predominant cell of the tumour, VEGF was immunodetected in RER, Golgi complex, and vesicular organelles, supporting further the association with an auto-paracrine effect exerted by VEGF. The nucleus/cytoplasm ratio of VEGF revealed a prevalent accumulation of VEGF in the cytoplasm. The presence of VEGF in the nucleus may probably be associated with a translocation to this cell compartment. This study demonstrated a cytoplasmic and nuclear immunolocalisation of VEGF in normal and tumoural adenohypophyseal cells. In the course of prolactinoma development, the oestrogen stimulated VEGF expression in tumoural cells, promoting a vascular adaptation which contributes to growth and progression of the tumour.

  16. D-003 does not possess oestrogenic potential in-vivo: findings of the uterotrophic assay.

    PubMed

    Noa, Miriam; Mendoza, Sarahí; Mas, Rosa; Gámez, Rafael; Valle, Maikel; Pardo, Balia; Gutiérrez, Ariadne; Mendoza, Nilda

    2007-10-01

    D-003 is a mixture of long-chain fatty acids purified from sugarcane wax that inhibits both cholesterol synthesis prior to mevalonate formation, and lipid peroxidation. D-003 has been shown to prevent bone loss and bone resorption in ovariectomized rats, and significantly improves bone resorption markers in postmenopausal women with reduced bone mineral density. As hormone-replacement therapy, D-003 displays cholesterol-lowering and anti-resorptive effects. We have studied its potential oestrogenic activity in-vivo using the uterotrophic assay. Rats were randomly distributed into five groups: a sham-operated group and four groups of ovariectomized rats, one treated with vehicle, one with D-003 (50 mg kg(-1)), one with oestradiol benzoate (30 microg kg(-1)) and one with D-003 (50 mg kg(-1)) plus oestradiol benzoate (30 microg kg(-1)). Treatments were administered for 14 days. Ovariectomy decreased the values of relative uterus weight, epithelium cell height and endometrial thickness compared with sham-operated rats, and these effects were all significantly reduced with oestradiol benzoate, but not with D-003. Concurrent administration of D-003 and oestradiol benzoate had statistically similar effects on all variables as oestradiol benzoate alone. In conclusions, D-003 orally given at 50 mg kg(-1), a dose that prevents bone loss and bone resorption in ovariectomized rats, did not display oestrogenic/anti-oestrogenic activity in-vivo, as assessed in the uterotrophic assay.

  17. Effects of a diet rich in sesame ( Sesamum indicum) pericarp on the expression of oestrogen receptor alpha and oestrogen receptor beta in rat prostate and uterus.

    PubMed

    Anagnostis, Aristotelis; Papadopoulos, Athanasios I

    2009-09-01

    The expression of oestrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta) in the prostate and uterus tissues of Wistar rats supplied for 8 weeks with a diet rich in sesame (Sesamum indicum) pericarp (30 %) was monitored. Eight male rats, aged 6 weeks, were divided into a control group fed on a normal diet, and an experimental one, provided with the normal diet enriched with 30 % sesame pericarp. A similar experiment was performed with female rats. At the end of the experiment, the prostate and uterus tissues were surgically removed and kept at - 80 degrees C for up to 2 months. Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) methods were used in order to investigate the levels of receptor proteins and mRNA. Significant increase in the expression of ERbeta in prostate and uterus was evident in both methods, while the magnitude of the observed alteration depended on the applied method. No statistically significant change was observed in the expression of ERalpha in uterus. In prostate, although the increase was more evident when investigated by means of qRT-PCR, the difference in expression of ERalpha was not statistically significant. In both tissues, a shift of the ratio of ERalpha:ERbeta in favour of ERbeta was evident, indicating, according to existing literature, a beneficial effect of the diet provided upon the health status of the organisms. It is suggested that this effect is attributed to the lignans present in the pericarp which exert phyto-oestrogenic activity.

  18. Light modulates metabolic pathways and other novel physiological traits in the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Müller, Gabriela L; Tuttobene, Marisel; Altilio, Matías; Martinez Amezaga, Maitena; Nguyen, Meaghan; Pamela Cribb, P; Cybulski, Larisa E; Ramírez, María Soledad; Altabe, Silvia; Mussi, María Alejandra

    2017-03-13

    Light sensing in chemotrophic bacteria has been relatively recently ascertained. In the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii, light modulates motility, biofilm formation and virulence through the BLUF photoreceptor BlsA. In addition, light can induce reduction in susceptibility to certain antibiotics such as minocycline and tigecycline in a photoreceptor-independent manner. In this work we identified new traits whose expression are modulated by light in this pathogen, which comprise not only important determinants related to pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance, but also metabolic pathways, which represents a novel concept for chemotrophic bacteria. Indeed, the phenylacetic acid catabolic pathway as well as trehalose biosynthesis were modulated by light, responses that completely depend on BlsA. We further show that tolerance to some antibiotics as well as modulation of antioxidant enzyme levels are also influenced by light, likely contributing to bacterial persistence in adverse environments. Also, we present evidence indicating that surfactant production is modulated by light. Finally, the expression of whole pathways and gene clusters such as genes involved in lipid metabolism and genes encoding components of the type VI secretion system, as well as efflux pumps related to antibiotic resistance, were differentially induced by light. Overall, our results indicate that light modulates global features of A. baumannii lifestyle.Importance The discovery that non-phototrophic bacteria respond to light constituted a novel concept in microbiology. In this context, we demonstrated that light could modulate aspects related to bacterial virulence, persistence and resistance to antibiotics in the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii In this work, we present the novel finding that light directly regulates metabolism in this chemotrophic bacterium. Insights into the mechanism show the involvement of the photoreceptor BlsA. In addition, tolerance to antibiotics and

  19. Hydroxytyrosol supplementation modulates the expression of miRNAs in rodents and in humans.

    PubMed

    Tomé-Carneiro, Joao; Crespo, María Carmen; Iglesias-Gutierrez, Eduardo; Martín, Roberto; Gil-Zamorano, Judit; Tomas-Zapico, Cristina; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Correa, Carlos; Gómez-Coronado, Diego; Lasunción, Miguel A; Herrera, Emilio; Visioli, Francesco; Dávalos, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Dietary microRNAs (miRNAs) modulation could be important for health and wellbeing. Part of the healthful activities of polyphenols might be due to a modulation of miRNAs' expression. Among the most biologically active polyphenols, hydroxytyrosol (HT) has never been studied for its actions on miRNAs. We investigated whether HT could modulate the expression of miRNAs in vivo. We performed an unbiased intestinal miRNA screening in mice supplemented (for 8 weeks) with nutritionally relevant amounts of HT. HT modulated the expression of several miRNAs. Analysis of other tissues revealed consistent HT-induced modulation of only few miRNAs. Also, HT administration increased triglycerides levels. Acute treatment with HT and in vitro experiments provided mechanistic insights. The HT-induced expression of one miRNA was confirmed in healthy volunteers supplemented with HT in a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled trial. HT consumption affects specific miRNAs' expression in rodents and humans. Our findings suggest that the modulation of miRNAs' action through HT consumption might partially explain its healthful activities and might be pharmanutritionally exploited in current therapies targeting endogenous miRNAs. However, the effects of HT on triglycerides warrant further investigations.

  20. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Alexandre; Schönwiesner, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  1. Experiment on parallel correlated recognition of 2030 human faces based on speckle modulation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi; Guo, Yunbo; Cao, Liangcai; Ma, Xiaosu; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2004-08-23

    In this paper, the experiment on parallel correlated recognition of 2030 human faces in Fe:LiNbO(3) crystal is detailedly presented, a very clear correlation spots array was achieved and the recognition accuracy is better than 95%. According to the experiment, it is proved that speckle modulation on the object beam of volume holographic correlators can well suppress the crosstalk, so that the multiplexing spacing is markedly reduced and the channel density is increased 10 times compared with the traditional holographic correlators without speckle modulation.

  2. Does Human Milk Modulate Body Composition in Late Preterm Infants at Term-Corrected Age?

    PubMed Central

    Giannì, Maria Lorella; Consonni, Dario; Liotto, Nadia; Roggero, Paola; Morlacchi, Laura; Piemontese, Pasqua; Menis, Camilla; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Late preterm infants account for the majority of preterm births and are at risk of altered body composition. Because body composition modulates later health outcomes and human milk is recommended as the normal method for infant feeding, we sought to investigate whether human milk feeding in early life can modulate body composition development in late preterm infants; (2) Methods: Neonatal, anthropometric and feeding data of 284 late preterm infants were collected. Body composition was evaluated at term-corrected age by air displacement plethysmography. The effect of human milk feeding on fat-free mass and fat mass content was evaluated using multiple linear regression analysis; (3) Results: Human milk was fed to 68% of the infants. According to multiple regression analysis, being fed any human milk at discharge and at  term-corrected and being fed exclusively human milk at term-corrected age were positively associated with fat-free mass content(β = −47.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = −95.7; −0.18; p = 0.049; β = −89.6, 95% CI = −131.5; −47.7; p < 0.0001; β = −104.1, 95% CI = −151.4; −56.7, p < 0.0001); (4) Conclusion: Human milk feeding appears to be associated with fat-free mass deposition in late preterm infants. Healthcare professionals should direct efforts toward promoting and supporting breastfeeding in these vulnerable infants. PMID:27782098

  3. Does Human Milk Modulate Body Composition in Late Preterm Infants at Term-Corrected Age?

    PubMed

    Giannì, Maria Lorella; Consonni, Dario; Liotto, Nadia; Roggero, Paola; Morlacchi, Laura; Piemontese, Pasqua; Menis, Camilla; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-10-23

    (1) Background: Late preterm infants account for the majority of preterm births and are at risk of altered body composition. Because body composition modulates later health outcomes and human milk is recommended as the normal method for infant feeding, we sought to investigate whether human milk feeding in early life can modulate body composition development in late preterm infants; (2) Methods: Neonatal, anthropometric and feeding data of 284 late preterm infants were collected. Body composition was evaluated at term-corrected age by air displacement plethysmography. The effect of human milk feeding on fat-free mass and fat mass content was evaluated using multiple linear regression analysis; (3) Results: Human milk was fed to 68% of the infants. According to multiple regression analysis, being fed any human milk at discharge and at  term-corrected and being fed exclusively human milk at term-corrected age were positively associated with fat-free mass content(β = -47.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -95.7; -0.18; p = 0.049; β = -89.6, 95% CI = -131.5; -47.7; p < 0.0001; β = -104.1, 95% CI = -151.4; -56.7, p < 0.0001); (4) Conclusion: Human milk feeding appears to be associated with fat-free mass deposition in late preterm infants. Healthcare professionals should direct efforts toward promoting and supporting breastfeeding in these vulnerable infants.

  4. Human body frequency modulation by 0.9% sodium chloride solutions: a new paradigm and perspective for human health.

    PubMed

    Sudan, B J

    2000-08-01

    This case study demonstrates that the normal human body frequency, which can be disturbed by electromagnetic influences of the environment, can be modulated by 0.9% sodium chloride solutions (physiological saline) and that occurrence of allergic reactions have subsequently been suppressed as a result of this modulation. The use of distilled water as control showed no effect on occurrence of allergic reactions. Further observations on the growth of various plants in a greenhouse exposed to various geomagnetic fields support the previous observations on humans. The neutralization of electromagnetic influences on humans using 0.9% sodium chloride solution or by enclosure of plants within a copper wire Faraday cage resulting in a normal and uniform growth of plants as compared with disturbed and irregular growth in unenclosed controls, is demonstrated. These original observations propose a new strategy to suppress or prevent allergic reactions and possibly other effects observed in various human pathologies in relation to a disturbance of human body frequencies. It is hypothesized that the double helix structure of desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) could be modified by environmental electromagnetic fields and that disresonance between the two chains of DNA could lead to the expression of specific pathology.

  5. Efficient specification of interneurons from human pluripotent stem cells by dorsoventral and rostrocaudal modulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Gon; Yao, Ruiqin; Monnell, Travis; Cho, Jun-Hyeong; Vasudevan, Anju; Koh, Alice; Peeyush, Kumar T; Moon, Minho; Datta, Debkanya; Bolshakov, Vadim Y; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Chung, Sangmi

    2014-07-01

    GABAergic interneurons regulate cortical neural networks by providing inhibitory inputs, and their malfunction, resulting in failure to intricately regulate neural circuit balance, is implicated in brain diseases such as Schizophrenia, Autism, and Epilepsy. During early development, GABAergic interneuron progenitors arise from the ventral telencephalic area such as medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) by the actions of secreted signaling molecules from nearby organizers, and migrate to their target sites where they form local synaptic connections. In this study, using combinatorial and temporal modulation of developmentally relevant dorsoventral and rostrocaudal signaling pathways (SHH, Wnt, and FGF8), we efficiently generated MGE cells from multiple human pluripotent stem cells. Most importantly, modulation of FGF8/FGF19 signaling efficiently directed MGE versus CGE differentiation. Human MGE cells spontaneously differentiated into Lhx6-expressing GABAergic interneurons and showed migratory properties. These human MGE-derived neurons generated GABA, fired action potentials, and displayed robust GABAergic postsynaptic activity. Transplantation into rodent brains results in well-contained neural grafts enriched with GABAergic interneurons that migrate in the host and mature to express somatostatin or parvalbumin. Thus, we propose that signaling modulation recapitulating normal developmental patterns efficiently generate human GABAergic interneurons. This strategy represents a novel tool in regenerative medicine, developmental studies, disease modeling, bioassay, and drug screening.

  6. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingmei; Lindström, Linda S.; Foo, Jia N.; Rafiq, Sajjad; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Cornelissen, Sten; Rutgers, Emiel; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Dite, Gillian S.; Hopper, John L.; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Blomqvist, Carl; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, kConFab; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Smeets, Ann; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Seibold, Petra; Rudolph, Anja; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe I. Grenaker; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nord, Silje; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje; Kriege, Mieke; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans; Li, Yi; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans U.; Rüdiger, Thomas; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Teo, Soo Hwang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Har Yip, Cheng; Fuang Ho, Gwo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Yoo, Keun-Young; Maishman, Tom; Tapper, William J.; Dunning, Alison; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Chuen Khor, Chiea; Eccles, Diana M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2q36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49–2.19); P for trend=1.90 × 10−9). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities. PMID:24937182

  7. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingmei; Lindström, Linda S; Foo, Jia N; Rafiq, Sajjad; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Cornelissen, Sten; Rutgers, Emiel; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Dite, Gillian S; Hopper, John L; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Blomqvist, Carl; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Smeets, Ann; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Seibold, Petra; Rudolph, Anja; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe I Grenaker; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nord, Silje; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje; Kriege, Mieke; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans; Li, Yi; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans U; Rüdiger, Thomas; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Teo, Soo Hwang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Har Yip, Cheng; Fuang Ho, Gwo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Maishman, Tom; Tapper, William J; Dunning, Alison; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Eccles, Diana M; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2014-06-17

    Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2q36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49-2.19); P for trend=1.90 × 10(-9)). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities.

  8. Movement-related frequency modulation of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Foffani, G; Bianchi, A M; Baselli, G; Priori, A

    2005-10-15

    Event-related changes of brain electrical rhythms are typically analysed as amplitude modulations of local field potential (LFP) oscillations, like radio amplitude modulation broadcasting. In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) is less susceptible to interference than amplitude modulation (AM) and is therefore preferred for high-fidelity transmissions. Here we hypothesized that LFP rhythms detected from deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease could represent movement-related activity not only in AM but also in FM. By combining adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition, we were able to show that FM of low-beta (13-20 Hz) and high-beta (20-35 Hz) rhythms significantly contributes to the involvement of the human STN in movement preparation, execution and recovery, and that the FM patterns are regulated by the dopamine levels in the system. Movement-related FM of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus therefore provides a novel informational domain for rhythm-based pathophysiological models of cortico-basal ganglia processing.

  9. Vestibular activation differentially modulates human early visual cortex and V5/MT excitability and response entropy.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, Barry M; Guzman-Lopez, Jessica; Arshad, Qadeer; Schultz, Simon R; Walsh, Vincent; Yousif, Nada

    2013-01-01

    Head movement imposes the additional burdens on the visual system of maintaining visual acuity and determining the origin of retinal image motion (i.e., self-motion vs. object-motion). Although maintaining visual acuity during self-motion is effected by minimizing retinal slip via the brainstem vestibular-ocular reflex, higher order visuovestibular mechanisms also contribute. Disambiguating self-motion versus object-motion also invokes higher order mechanisms, and a cortical visuovestibular reciprocal antagonism is propounded. Hence, one prediction is of a vestibular modulation of visual cortical excitability and indirect measures have variously suggested none, focal or global effects of activation or suppression in human visual cortex. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced phosphenes to probe cortical excitability, we observed decreased V5/MT excitability versus increased early visual cortex (EVC) excitability, during vestibular activation. In order to exclude nonspecific effects (e.g., arousal) on cortical excitability, response specificity was assessed using information theory, specifically response entropy. Vestibular activation significantly modulated phosphene response entropy for V5/MT but not EVC, implying a specific vestibular effect on V5/MT responses. This is the first demonstration that vestibular activation modulates human visual cortex excitability. Furthermore, using information theory, not previously used in phosphene response analysis, we could distinguish between a specific vestibular modulation of V5/MT excitability from a nonspecific effect at EVC.

  10. Movement-related frequency modulation of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Foffani, G; Bianchi, AM; Baselli, G; Priori, A

    2005-01-01

    Event-related changes of brain electrical rhythms are typically analysed as amplitude modulations of local field potential (LFP) oscillations, like radio amplitude modulation broadcasting. In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) is less susceptible to interference than amplitude modulation (AM) and is therefore preferred for high-fidelity transmissions. Here we hypothesized that LFP rhythms detected from deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease could represent movement-related activity not only in AM but also in FM. By combining adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition, we were able to show that FM of low-beta (13–20 Hz) and high-beta (20–35 Hz) rhythms significantly contributes to the involvement of the human STN in movement preparation, execution and recovery, and that the FM patterns are regulated by the dopamine levels in the system. Movement-related FM of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus therefore provides a novel informational domain for rhythm-based pathophysiological models of cortico-basal ganglia processing. PMID:16123109

  11. H-reflex modulation in the human medial and lateral gastrocnemii during standing and walking

    PubMed Central

    Makihara, Yukiko; Segal, Richard L.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Thompson, Aiko K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The soleus H-reflex is dynamically modulated during walking. However, modulation of the gastrocnemii H-reflexes has not been studied systematically. Methods The medial and lateral gastrocnemii (MG and LG) and soleus H-reflexes were measured during standing and walking in humans. Results Maximum H-reflex amplitude was significantly smaller in MG (mean 1.1 mV) or LG (1.1 mV) than in soleus (3.3 mV). Despite these size differences, the reflex amplitudes of the three muscles were positively correlated. The MG and LG H-reflexes were phase- and task-dependently modulated in ways similar to the soleus H-reflex. Discussion Although there are anatomical and physiological differences between the soleus and gastrocnemii muscles, the reflexes of the three muscles are similarly modulated during walking and between standing and walking. The findings support the hypothesis that these reflexes are synergistically modulated during walking to facilitate ongoing movement. PMID:22190317

  12. Adult female wildtype, but not oestrogen receptor β knockout, mice have decreased depression-like behaviour during pro-oestrus and following administration of oestradiol or diarylpropionitrile

    PubMed Central

    Walf, AA; Koonce, CJ; Frye, CA

    2013-01-01

    Studies in people and animal models suggest that depression is influenced by natural, fluctuations in the levels of 17β-oestradiol (E2), as well as administration of E2-based therapies, such as selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Elucidating the effects and mechanisms of E2 is important to improve future E2-based therapeutics. An important question is whether effects of E2 or SERMs for mood regulation act at the α or β isoform of the oestrogen receptor (ER) because some of the unwanted trophic effects of E2-based therapies may involve actions at ERα, rather than ERβ. In the present study, whether there are sex differences in depression-like behaviour of adult mice (experiment 1), and the effects of natural fluctuations in E2 (experiment 2), or administration of E2 or a SERM that has higher affinity for ERβ than for ERα (diarylpropionitrile; DPN) to ovariectomised (experiment 3) wildtype and ERβ knockout (βERKO) mice were investigated. Results of this study supported our hypotheses that: there would be sex differences favouring males for depression-like behaviour and endogenous increases in, or exogenous administration of, E2 or administration of an ERβ SERM would decrease depression-like behaviour in wildtype, but not βERKO, mice. In experiment 1, adult male mice spent less time immobile in the forced swim test (i.e., showed less depression-like behaviour) compared with female mice. In experiment 2, pro-oestrous (higher circulating E2 levels), compared with dioestrous (lower circulating E2 levels), mice had reduced immobility in the forced swim test; this effect was not observed in βERKO mice. In experiment 3, administration of E2 or DPN to ovariectomised wildtype, but not βERKO, mice decreased immobility compared with vehicle administration, these data suggest that ERβ may be required for some of the anti–depressant-like effects of E2. PMID:18562442

  13. Comparison between novel steroid-like and conventional nonsteroidal antioestrogens in inhibiting oestradiol- and IGF-I-induced proliferation of human breast cancer-derived cells.

    PubMed Central

    de Cupis, A.; Noonan, D.; Pirani, P.; Ferrera, A.; Clerico, L.; Favoni, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    1. This study has two specific aims: (a) to compare the antioestrogenic activity of two steroidal analogues of 17 beta-oestradiol, the 7 alpha-alkylamide, ICI 164,384 and the 7 alpha-alkylsulphinylamide, ICI 182,780, with that of the triphenylethylene-derived compound 4OH-tamoxifen on a pool of human breast cancer cell lines (HBCCL) with a range of hormonal responsiveness and acquired anti-oestrogen resistance and (b) to investigate the ability of such antioestrogens to modulate the potent breast carcinoma growth-stimulatory activity of the 'IGF-I system'. 2. For the chemosensitivity investigations we used a long-term colorimetric and the short-term thymidine incorporation assay; we analysed IGF-I in conditioned media by a radioimmunoassay, IGF-I mRNA in the cells by RT-PCR and molecular species of IGF-I-binding proteins, secreted in conditioned media, by Western ligand blot. IGF-I receptors were assayed on cell monolayers by binding studies and by Scatchard analysis, we calculated KD, Bmax and sites/cell. 3. Our results indicate that ICI 182,780 and ICI 164,384 are 1.5-5.5 fold more potent than 4OH-tamoxifen in inhibiting the basal proliferation of oestrogen-receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cell lines. Moreover we demonstrate the capacity of ICI 182,780 and ICI 164,384 to reduce, in a time-dependent fashion, oestrogen- and/or IGF-I-stimulated growth of ER+cell lines, possibly by negatively interfering with an IGF-I-like material secretion and IGF-I-receptor number. 4. Our data provide the first evidence that, on ER+human breast carcinoma cell lines, steroidal antioestrogens inhibit cell growth and modulate the IGF-I mitogenic system. The mechanism of this latter effect has yet to be identified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8581274

  14. Discovery of Small-Molecule Modulators of the Human Y4 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, David; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The human neuropeptide Y4 receptor (Y4R) and its native ligand, pancreatic polypeptide, are critically involved in the regulation of human metabolism by signaling satiety and regulating food intake, as well as increasing energy expenditure. Thus, this receptor represents a putative target for treatment of obesity. With respect to new approaches to treat complex metabolic disorders, especially in multi-receptor systems, small molecule allosteric modulators have been in the focus of research in the last years. However, no positive allosteric modulators or agonists of the Y4R have been described so far. In this study, small molecule compounds derived from the Niclosamide scaffold were identified by high-throughput screening to increase Y4R activity. Compounds were characterized for their potency and their effects at the human Y4R and as well as their selectivity towards Y1R, Y2R and Y5R. These compounds provide a structure-activity relationship profile around this common scaffold and lay the groundwork for hit-to-lead optimization and characterization of positive allosteric modulators of the Y4R. PMID:27294784

  15. Transcriptional burst frequency and burst size are equally modulated across the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Roy D.; Razooky, Brandon S.; Singh, Abhyudai; Trimeloni, Thomas V.; McCollum, James M.; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L.; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression occurs either as an episodic process, characterized by pulsatile bursts, or as a constitutive process, characterized by a Poisson-like accumulation of gene products. It is not clear which mode of gene expression (constitutive versus bursty) predominates across a genome or how transcriptional dynamics are influenced by genomic position and promoter sequence. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to analyze 8,000 individual human genomic loci and find that at virtually all loci, episodic bursting—as opposed to constitutive expression—is the predominant mode of expression. Quantitative analysis of the expression dynamics at these 8,000 loci indicates that both the frequency and size of the transcriptional bursts varies equally across the human genome, independent of promoter sequence. Strikingly, weaker expression loci modulate burst frequency to increase activity, whereas stronger expression loci modulate burst size to increase activity. Transcriptional activators such as trichostatin A (TSA) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) only modulate burst size and frequency along a constrained trend line governed by the promoter. In summary, transcriptional bursting dominates across the human genome, both burst frequency and burst size vary by chromosomal location, and transcriptional activators alter burst frequency and burst size, depending on the expression level of the locus. PMID:23064634

  16. Experimental study on trace chemical contaminant generation rates of human metabolism in spacecraft crew module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihua, Guo; Xinxing, He; Guoxin, Xu; Xin, Qi

    2012-12-01

    Trace chemical contaminants generated by human metabolism is a major source of contamination in spacecraft crew module. In this research, types and generation rates of pollutants from human metabolism were determined in the Chinese diets. Expired air, skin gas, and sweat of 20 subjects were analyzed at different exercise states in a simulated module. The exercise states were designed according to the basic activities in the orbit of astronauts. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of contaminants generated by human metabolic were performed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, gas chromatography and UV spectrophotometer. Sixteen chemical compounds from metabolic sources were found. With the increase in physical load, the concentrations of chemical compounds from human skin and expired air correspondingly increased. The species and the offgassing rates of pollutants from human metabolism are different among the Chinese, Americans and the Russians due to differences in ethnicity and dietary customs. This research provides data to aid in the design, development and operation of China's long duration space mission.

  17. Repurposing Resveratrol and Fluconazole To Modulate Human Cytochrome P450-Mediated Arachidonic Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbeni, Ahmed A; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2016-04-04

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes metabolize arachidonic acid (AA) to several biologically active epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). Repurposing clinically-approved drugs could provide safe and readily available means to control EETs and HETEs levels in humans. Our aim was to determine how to significantly and selectively modulate P450-AA metabolism in humans by clinically-approved drugs. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine the formation of 15 AA metabolites by human recombinant P450 enzymes, as well as human liver and kidney microsomes. CYP2C19 showed the highest EET-forming activity, while CYP1B1 and CYP2C8 showed the highest midchain HETE-forming activities. CYP1A1 and CYP4 showed the highest subterminal- and 20-HETE-forming activity, respectively. Resveratrol and fluconazole produced the most selective and significant modulation of hepatic P450-AA metabolism, comparable to investigational agents. Monte Carlo simulations showed that 90% of human population would experience a decrease by 6-22%, 16-39%, and 16-35% in 16-, 18-, and 20-HETE formation, respectively, after 2.5 g daily of resveratrol, and by 22-31% and 14-23% in 8,9- and 14,15-EET formation after 50 mg of fluconazole. In conclusion, clinically-approved drugs can provide selective and effective means to modulate P450-AA metabolism, comparable to investigational drugs. Resveratrol and fluconazole are good candidates to be repurposed as new P450-based treatments.

  18. Modulation of human muscle spindle discharge by arterial pulsations--functional effects and consequences.

    PubMed

    Birznieks, Ingvars; Boonstra, Tjeerd W; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2012-01-01

    Arterial pulsations are known to modulate muscle spindle firing; however, the physiological significance of such synchronised modulation has not been investigated. Unitary recordings were made from 75 human muscle spindle afferents innervating the pretibial muscles. The modulation of muscle spindle discharge by arterial pulsations was evaluated by R-wave triggered averaging and power spectral analysis. We describe various effects arterial pulsations may have on muscle spindle afferent discharge. Afferents could be "driven" by arterial pulsations, e.g., showing no other spontaneous activity than spikes generated with cardiac rhythmicity. Among afferents showing ongoing discharge that was not primarily related to cardiac rhythmicity we illustrate several mechanisms by which individual spikes may become phase-locked. However, in the majority of afferents the discharge rate was modulated by the pulse wave without spikes being phase locked. Then we assessed whether these influences changed in two physiological conditions in which a sustained increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity was observed without activation of fusimotor neurones: a maximal inspiratory breath-hold, which causes a fall in systolic pressure, and acute muscle pain, which causes an increase in systolic pressure. The majority of primary muscle spindle afferents displayed pulse-wave modulation, but neither apnoea nor pain had any significant effect on the strength of this modulation, suggesting that the physiological noise injected by the arterial pulsations is robust and relatively insensitive to fluctuations in blood pressure. Within the afferent population there was a similar number of muscle spindles that were inhibited and that were excited by the arterial pulse wave, indicating that after signal integration at the population level, arterial pulsations of opposite polarity would cancel each other out. We speculate that with close-to-threshold stimuli the arterial pulsations may serve as an

  19. Sex differences and effects of oestrogen in rat gastric mucosal defence

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Richard; Björne, Håkan; Omoto, Yoko; Siemiatkowska, Anna; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Lindblad, Mats; Holm, Lena

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate sex differences and the effects of oestrogen administration in rat gastric mucosal defence. METHODS Sex differences in gastric mucus thickness and accumulation rate, absolute gastric mucosal blood flow using microspheres, the integrity of the gastric mucosal epithelium in response to a chemical irritant and the effects of oestrogen administration on relative gastric mucosal blood flow in an acute setting was assessed in an in vivo rat experimental model. Subsequently, sex differences in the distribution of oestrogen receptors and calcitonin gene related peptide in the gastric mucosa of animals exposed to oestrogen in the above experiments was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS The absolute blood flow in the GI-tract was generally higher in males, but only significantly different in the corpus part of the stomach (1.12 ± 0.12 mL/min•g in males and 0.51 ± 0.03 mL/min•g in females) (P = 0.002). After removal of the loosely adherent mucus layer the thickness of the firmly adherent mucus layer in males and females was 79 ± 1 µm and 80 ± 3 µm respectively. After 60 min the mucus thickness increased to 113 ± 3 µm in males and 121 ± 3 µm in females with no statistically significant difference seen between the sexes. Following oestrogen administration (0.1 followed by 1 µg/kg•min), mean blood flow in the gastric mucosa decreased by 31% [68 ± 13 perfusion units (PFU)] in males which was significantly different compared to baseline (P = 0.02). In females however, mean blood flow remained largely unchanged with a 4% (5 ± 33 PFU) reduction. The permeability of the gastric mucosa increased to a higher level in females than in males (P = 0.01) after taurocholate challenge. However, the calculated mean clearance increase did not significantly differ between the sexes [0.1 ± 0.04 to 1.1 ± 0.1 mL/min•100 g in males and 0.4 ± 0.3 to 2.1 ± 0.3 mL/min•100 g in females (P = 0.065)]. There were no significant differences between 17

  20. GAS, a new glutamate-rich protein, interacts differentially with SRCs and is involved in oestrogen receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Ying; Shang, Yongfeng

    2009-01-01

    Steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs) exert profound effects on animal development and physiology. Genetic ablation experiments indicate that various SRC proteins might have differential physiological roles; however, clear evidence of functional specificity has not yet been shown at the molecular level. Here we report the identification of a new SRC1 interacting protein, glutamate-rich coactivator interacting with SRC1 (GAS), which contains a central glutamate-rich region and has transactivation activity. Interestingly, GAS interacts only with SRC1, and not with glucocorticoid receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) or amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1), the other two members of the SRC family. It interacts with oestrogen receptor-α (ERα) and participates in both oestrogen receptor-regulated gene transcription and oestrogen-stimulated G1/S cell-cycle transition. Our data thus indicate that GAS is a new transcription cofactor and that different SRCs are associated with distinct secondary cofactors. PMID:19039327

  1. A naturally occurring naringenin derivative exerts potent bone anabolic effects by mimicking oestrogen action on osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Swarnkar, Gaurav; Sharan, Kunal; Siddiqui, Jawed A; Mishra, Jay Sharan; Khan, Kainat; Khan, Mohd Parvez; Gupta, Varsha; Rawat, Preeti; Maurya, Rakesh; Dwivedi, Anil K; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Naringenin and its derivatives have been assessed in bone health for their oestrogen-‘like’ effects but low bioavailability impedes clinical potential. This study was aimed at finding a potent form of naringenin with osteogenic action. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Osteoblast cultures were harvested from mouse calvaria to study differentiation by naringenin, isosakuranetin, poncirin, phloretin and naringenin-6-C-glucoside (NCG). Balb/cByJ ovariectomized (OVx) mice without or with osteopenia were given naringenin, NCG, 17β-oestradiol (E2) or parathyroid hormone (PTH). Efficacy was evaluated by bone microarchitecture using microcomputed tomography and determination of new bone formation by fluorescent labelling of bone. Plasma levels of NCG and naringenin were determined by HPLC. KEY RESULTS NCG stimulated osteoblast differentiation more potently than naringenin, while isosakuranetin, poncirin or phloretin had no effect. NCG had better oral bioavailability than naringenin. NCG increased the mRNA levels of oestrogen receptors (ERs) and bone morphogenetic protein (an ER responsive gene) in vivo, more than naringenin. In OVx mice, NCG treatment in a preventive protocol increased bone formation rate (BFR) and improved trabecular microarchitecture more than naringenin or E2. In osteopenic mice, NCG but not naringenin, in a therapeutic protocol, increased BFR and improved trabecular microarchitecture, comparable with effects of PTH treatment. Stimulatory effects of NCG on osteoblasts were abolished by an ER antagonist. NCG transactivated ERβ but not ERα. NCG exhibited no uterine oestrogenicity unlike naringenin. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS NCG is a potent derivative of naringenin that has bone anabolic action through the activation of osteoblast ERs and exhibited substantial oral bioavailability. PMID:21864313

  2. Procyanidin A2 Modulates IL-4-Induced CCL26 Production in Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Sara L.; Kruger, Marlena C.; Sawyer, Gregory M.; Hurst, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is an inflammatory lung disease that is partly sustained by the chemokine eotaxin-3 (CCL26), which extends eosinophil migration into tissues long after allergen exposure. Modulation of CCL26 could represent a means to mitigate airway inflammation. Here we evaluated procyanidin A2 as a means of modulating CCL26 production and investigated interactions with the known inflammation modulator, Interferon γ (IFNγ). We used the human lung epithelial cell line A549 and optimized the conditions for inducing CCL26. Cells were exposed to a range of procyanidin A2 or IFNγ concentrations for varied lengths of time prior to an inflammatory insult of interleukin-4 (IL-4) for 24 h. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure CCL26 production. Exposing cells to 5 μM procyanidin A2 (prior to IL-4) reduced CCL26 production by 35% compared with control. Greatest inhibition by procyanidin A2 was seen with a 2 h exposure prior to IL-4, whereas IFNγ inhibition was greatest at 24 h. Concomitant incubation of procyanidin A2 and IFNγ did not extend the inhibitory efficacy of procyanidin A2. These data provide evidence that procyanidin A2 can modulate IL-4-induced CCL26 production by A549 lung epithelial cells and that it does so in a manner that is different from IFNγ. PMID:27845745

  3. Pupil size directly modulates the feedforward response in human primary visual cortex independently of attention.

    PubMed

    Bombeke, Klaas; Duthoo, Wout; Mueller, Sven C; Hopf, Jens-Max; Boehler, C Nico

    2016-02-15

    Controversy revolves around the question of whether psychological factors like attention and emotion can influence the initial feedforward response in primary visual cortex (V1). Although traditionally, the electrophysiological correlate of this response in humans (the C1 component) has been found to be unaltered by psychological influences, a number of recent studies have described attentional and emotional modulations. Yet, research into psychological effects on the feedforward V1 response has neglected possible direct contributions of concomitant pupil-size modulations, which are known to also occur under various conditions of attentional load and emotional state. Here we tested the hypothesis that such pupil-size differences themselves directly affect the feedforward V1 response. We report data from two complementary experiments, in which we used procedures that modulate pupil size without differences in attentional load or emotion while simultaneously recording pupil-size and EEG data. Our results confirm that pupil size indeed directly influences the feedforward V1 response, showing an inverse relationship between pupil size and early V1 activity. While it is unclear in how far this effect represents a functionally-relevant adaptation, it identifies pupil-size differences as an important modulating factor of the feedforward response of V1 and could hence represent a confounding variable in research investigating the neural influence of psychological factors on early visual processing.

  4. Oestrogen receptors and the response to endocrine therapy in advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, M. M.; Rubens, R. D.; King, R. J.; Hawkins, R. A.; Millis, R. R.; Hayward, J. L.; Forrest, A. P.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between oestrogen-receptor protein (ER) content of the tumour and the response to endocrine therapy was determined in 119 patients, in a collaborative prospective study. Twenty-eight of the 80 patients with measurable ER responded to treatment according to UICC criteria, compared with only 3/39 without ER. It was found that site of biopsy did not influence the result, but tumour content of the tissue sample was significantly related to the presence of receptors. The organizational problems of such a study are discussed. PMID:708575

  5. Phenotypic modulations of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human dermal fibroblasts using two angiogenic assays.

    PubMed

    Bikfalvi, A; Cramer, E M; Tenza, D; Tobelem, G

    1991-01-01

    Different angiogenic assays in vitro have helped to define various events underlying angiogenesis. In this report we have compared the phenotypic modifications of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVE cells) and human dermal fibroblasts using Matrigel and collagen gels. Both HUVE cells and human dermal fibroblasts form a network of anastomosing cords that apparently resemble blood capillaries when grown on Matrigel. The whole network was formed by several cellular aggregates joined to each other by cellular cords. Lumen formation was not observed in this angiogenic system. In opposite, considerable differences between HUVE cells and human dermal fibroblasts were observed in the three-dimensional angiogenic assay on collagen gels described by Montesano et al [14]. These results indicate that data obtained with angiogenic systems using Matrigel must be interpreted with caution and that the assay described by Montesano et al [14], is more reliable to describe angiogenesis.

  6. Characterization of human septic sera induced gene expression modulation in human myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Shaimaa; Michael, Paul; Brabant, Danielle; Omri, Abdelwahab; Narain, Ravin; Passi, Kalpdrum; Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; Parrillo, Joseph E.; Kumar, Anand; Parissenti, Amadeo; Kumar, Aseem

    2009-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the gene expression changes that occurs during sepsis, we have performed a cDNA microarray study utilizing a tissue culture model that mimics human sepsis. This study utilized an in vitro model of cultured human fetal cardiac myocytes treated with 10% sera from septic patients or 10% sera from healthy volunteers. A 1700 cDNA expression microarray was used to compare the transcription profile from human cardiac myocytes treated with septic sera vs normal sera. Septic sera treatment of myocytes resulted in the down-regulation of 178 genes and the up-regulation of 4 genes. Our data indicate that septic sera induced cell cycle, metabolic, transcription factor and apoptotic gene expression changes in human myocytes. Identification and characterization of gene expression changes that occur during sepsis may lead to the development of novel therapeutics and diagnostics. PMID:19684886

  7. Role and interactions of annexin A1 and oestrogens in the manifestation of sexual dimorphisms in cerebral and systemic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Ellen L; Cover, Patricia O; Buckingham, Julia C; Gavins, Felicity NE

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Gender differences in inflammation are well described, with females often showing more robust, oestrogen-associated responses. Here, we investigated the influence of gender, oestrogen and the anti-inflammatory protein annexin A1 (AnxA1) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced leukocyte–endothelial cell interactions in murine cerebral and mesenteric microvascular beds. Experimental Approach Intravital microscopy was used to visualize and quantify the effects of LPS (10 μg·per mouse i.p.) on leukocyte–endothelial interactions in male and female wild-type (WT) mice. The effects of ovariectomy ± oestrogen replacement were examined in WT and AnxA1-null (AnxA1−/−) female mice. Key Results LPS increased leukocyte adherence in the cerebral and mesenteric beds of both male and female WT mice; females showed exacerbated responses in the brain versus males, but not the mesentery. Ovariectomy further enhanced LPS-induced adhesion in the brain but not the mesentery; its effects were reversed by oestrogen treatment. OVX AnxA1−/− mice also showed exaggerated adhesive responses to LPS in the brain. However, these were unresponsive to ovariectomy and, paradoxically, responded to oestrogen with a pronounced increase in basal and LPS-induced leukocyte adhesion in the cerebrovasculature. Conclusions and Implications Our data confirm the fundamental role of AnxA1 in limiting the inflammatory response in the central and peripheral microvasculature. They also (i) show that oestrogen acts via an AnxA1-dependent mechanism to protect the cerebral, but not the mesenteric, vasculature from the damaging effects of LPS and (ii) reveal a paradoxical and potentially toxic effect of the steroid in potentiating the central response to LPS in the absence of AnxA1. PMID:22897118

  8. Oestrogen changed cardiomyocyte contraction and beta-adrenoceptor expression in rat hearts subjected to ischaemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qin; Zhao, Zhi; Sun, Hong; Hao, Yan-ling; Yan, Chang-dong; Gu, Shu-ling

    2008-09-01

    Women with functional ovaries have a lower cardiovascular risk than men and postmenopausal women. However, oestrogen replacement therapy remains controversial. This study examined the effect of ovarian hormone deficiency and oestrogen replacement on ventricular myocyte contractile function and expression of beta-adrenoceptors (beta-ARs). Female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) or sham operation (Sham). A subgroup of OVX rats received oestrogen (E2) replacement (40 microg kg(-1) day(-1)) for 4 weeks. Cardiomyocyte shortening was evaluated in basal conditions and in the presence of isoprenaline (ISO). The expression of beta-ARs was assessed by Western blotting. The presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the coronary effluent was determined. Ovariectomy promoted body weight gain associated with reduced serum E2 and uterine weight, all of which were abolished by treatment with E2. Ovariectomy increased the amplitude of both basal and ISO-stimulated contractions, increased LDH release, upregulated beta1-AR expression and downregulated beta2-AR expression, all of which were restored by treatment with E2. A beta1-AR antagonist, CGP20712A, but not a beta2-AR antagonist, ICI118,551, significantly decreased the amplitude of ventricular myocyte shortening. Oestrogen decreased cardiomyocyte contraction and the expression of beta1-AR, and increased expression of beta2-AR, and all these effects were abolished by the E2 receptor antagonist, ICI182,780. These data suggest that oestrogen plays a cardioprotective role in female rat hearts subjected to ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and the effects of oestrogen are associated with decreased cardiomyocyte contraction and expression of beta1-AR, and increased expression of beta2-AR.

  9. Dietary whey reduces energy intake and alters hypothalamic gene expression in obese phyto-oestrogen-deprived male rats.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María F; Stoker, Cora; Lazzarino, Gisela P; Canesini, Guillermina; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge G

    2016-09-01

    Removing dietary phyto-oestrogens in adult male rats causes obesity and diabetes. As whey proteins have been reported to reduce food intake and improve glucose homoeostasis, we investigated whether they could attenuate susceptibility to obesity and diabetes due to phyto-oestrogen deprivation. To this end, thirty male Wistar rats were fed a high-phyto-oestrogen (HP) or a phyto-oestrogen-free (PF) diet for 10 weeks; six rats from each group were killed. The remaining HP animals (six animals) continued receiving the HP diet for 6 weeks. The remaining PF rats (twelve rats) were divided in two groups: one was given the PF diet and the other a variation of the PF diet plus whey protein (PF-W). Body weight, food intake and adipose tissue weights were recorded. Hypothalamic mRNA expressions of orexigenic (neuropeptide Y, agouti-related protein (AgRP)) and anorexigenic (pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine-amphetamine-related transcript (CART)) neuropeptides were quantified by real-time PCR. Serum glucose, insulin and total thyroxine (T4), thyroid-stimulating hormone, testosterone and oestradiol were assessed. After 10 weeks of PF diet, increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake, with up-regulation of AgRP and down-regulation of POMC', were observed. Longer treatment exacerbated these results, increased total T4 levels, reduced oestradiol levels and impaired glucose homoeostasis. PF-W reduced energy intake and increased POMC expression; however, body weight and adiposity remained unchanged. PF-W could not prevent the hormonal changes or the high circulating glucose levels induced by phyto-oestrogen deprivation, but reduced fasting insulin. These data demonstrate that, although 6 weeks of whey administration could not prevent obesity in phyto-oestrogen-deprived rats, the reduction in energy intake and circulating insulin could be beneficial with longer treatments.

  10. Effects of the oestrogen receptor antagonist Fulvestrant on expression of genes that affect organization of the epididymal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M F N; Fernandes, S A F; Nascimento, A R; Siu, E R; Hess, R A; Oliveira, C A; Porto, C S; Lazari, M F M

    2014-07-01

    The role of oestrogens in epididymal function is still unclear. Knockout of the oestrogen receptor ESR1 (Esr1(-/-) ) or treatment with the anti-oestrogen Fulvestrant affect epididymal milieu and sperm motility. We investigated the effect of in vivo treatment of rats with Fulvestrant on: (i) expression of genes that may be important for the architecture and function of the epididymal epithelium: prominins 1 and 2, metalloproteinase 7, claudin 7, beta-catenin and cadherin 13, and (ii) levels of oestradiol and testosterone, and expression of oestrogen and androgen receptors, in the initial segment (IS), caput, corpus and cauda epididymis. Fulvestrant (i) reduced gene expression of prominin 1 (variant 1) in the caput, reduced prominin 1 protein content in the caput epididymis and in the efferent ductules, and increased the localization of prominin 1 in microvilli of the caput and corpus; (ii) reduced gene expression of prominin 2 in the corpus and cauda epididymis; (iii) increased the metalloproteinase 7 content in the apical region of principal cells from IS/caput; (iv) reduced in the corpus epididymis, but increased in the efferent ductules, the cadherin 13 mRNA level; (v) reduced testosterone but increased oestradiol levels in the corpus and cauda; (vi) increased the androgen receptor protein content in all regions of the epididymis, and the oestrogen receptor GPER in the corpus and cauda epididymis. In conclusion, treatment with Fulvestrant induced regional-specific changes in hormonal and steroid receptor content, and affected expression of proteins important for epithelial organization and absorption/secretion. The mechanisms of oestrogen action may differ among epididymal regions, which may contribute to determine region-specific sperm functions.

  11. Quantitative High-Throughput Identification of Drugs as Modulators of Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Caitlin; Zhao, Jinghua; Huang, Ruili; Xiao, Jingwei; Li, Linhao; Heyward, Scott; Xia, Menghang; Wang, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) plays a key role in governing the transcription of numerous hepatic genes that involve xenobiotic metabolism/clearance, energy homeostasis, and cell proliferation. Thus, identification of novel human CAR (hCAR) modulators may not only enhance early prediction of drug-drug interactions but also offer potentially novel therapeutics for diseases such as metabolic disorders and cancer. In this study, we have generated a double stable cell line expressing both hCAR and a CYP2B6-driven luciferase reporter for quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) of hCAR modulators. Approximately 2800 compounds from the NIH Chemical Genomics Center Pharmaceutical Collection were screened employing both the activation and deactivation modes of the qHTS. Activators (115) and deactivators (152) of hCAR were identified from the primary qHTS, among which 10 agonists and 10 antagonists were further validated in the physiologically relevant human primary hepatocytes for compound-mediated hCAR nuclear translocation and target gene expression. Collectively, our results reveal that hCAR modulators can be efficiently identified through this newly established qHTS assay. Profiling drug collections for hCAR activity would facilitate the prediction of metabolism-based drug-drug interactions, and may lead to the identification of potential novel therapeutics. PMID:25993555

  12. Preexisting antigen-specific immune responses are modulated by oral KLH feeding in humans.

    PubMed

    Hostmann, Arwed; Meyer, Tim; Maul, Jochen; Preiss, Jan; Boortz, Bertram; Thiel, Andreas; Duchmann, Rainer; Ullrich, Reiner

    2015-07-01

    Oral tolerance is the antigen-specific inhibition of a systemic immune response after oral antigen uptake and well established in animal models. We recently showed that keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) feeding modulates subsequently induced systemic immune responses in humans as well. In the present study, we investigated whether oral KLH can also modulate preexisting antigen-specific systemic B- and T-cell responses. We induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions as well as systemic KLH-specific B- and T-cell responses by subcutaneous KLH injections. Subsequent oral KLH administration decreased the small proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for the cytokine IL-17 at the end of the feeding regimen even further. After reimmunization, there was no difference in DTH reactions and the KLH-specific B-cell responses, but KLH-fed volunteers had an increased proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for IL-10 and a reduced proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for the skin-homing receptor cutaneous lymphocyte antigen and IL-2 and IFN-γ. Taken together, oral KLH can modulate a preexisting systemic KLH-specific immune response. These results suggest that feeding antigen may offer therapeutic strategies for the suppression of unwanted immune reactions in humans.

  13. Quantitative high-throughput identification of drugs as modulators of human constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Caitlin; Zhao, Jinghua; Huang, Ruili; Xiao, Jingwei; Li, Linhao; Heyward, Scott; Xia, Menghang; Wang, Hongbing

    2015-05-20

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) plays a key role in governing the transcription of numerous hepatic genes that involve xenobiotic metabolism/clearance, energy homeostasis, and cell proliferation. Thus, identification of novel human CAR (hCAR) modulators may not only enhance early prediction of drug-drug interactions but also offer potentially novel therapeutics for diseases such as metabolic disorders and cancer. In this study, we have generated a double stable cell line expressing both hCAR and a CYP2B6-driven luciferase reporter for quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) of hCAR modulators. Approximately 2800 compounds from the NIH Chemical Genomics Center Pharmaceutical Collection were screened employing both the activation and deactivation modes of the qHTS. Activators (115) and deactivators (152) of hCAR were identified from the primary qHTS, among which 10 agonists and 10 antagonists were further validated in the physiologically relevant human primary hepatocytes for compound-mediated hCAR nuclear translocation and target gene expression. Collectively, our results reveal that hCAR modulators can be efficiently identified through this newly established qHTS assay. Profiling drug collections for hCAR activity would facilitate the prediction of metabolism-based drug-drug interactions, and may lead to the identification of potential novel therapeutics.

  14. Modulation of the human nociceptive flexion reflex by pleasant and unpleasant odors.

    PubMed

    Bartolo, Michelangelo; Serrao, Mariano; Gamgebeli, Zurab; Alpaidze, Marina; Perrotta, Armando; Padua, Luca; Pierelli, Francesco; Nappi, Giuseppe; Sandrini, Giorgio

    2013-10-01

    The nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR), a defensive response that allows withdrawal from a noxious stimulus, is a reliable index of spinal nociception in humans. It has been shown that various kinds of stimuli (emotional, visual, auditory) can modulate the transmission and perception of pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, by means of the NWR, the modulatory effect on the spinal circuitry of olfactory stimuli with different emotional valence. The magnitude of the NWR elicited by electrical stimulation of the sural nerve was measured while 18 subjects (9 women, 9 men) smelled pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral odors. The NWR was conditioned by odor probe with interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 500 ms and 1,500 ms. The magnitude of NWR was significantly greater after the unpleasant odor probe (P <.001) and reduced following the pleasant odor probe (P<.001) at both ISIs. A significant effect of olfactory stimuli on subjective pain ratings were found at both ISIs for pleasant vs unpleasant odors (P<.000), and for both pleasant and unpleasant odors vs neutral and basal conditions (P<.000). No statistical differences in subjective pain ratings at different ISIs were found. Consistent with the notion that NWR magnitude and pain perception can be modulated by stimuli with different emotional valence, these results show that olfactory stimuli, too, can modulate spinal nociception in humans.

  15. TASK-1 Channels May Modulate Action Potential Duration of Human Atrial Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Limberg, Sven H.; Netter, Michael F.; Rolfes, Caroline; Rinné, Susanne; Schlichthörl, Günter; Zuzarte, Marylou; Vassiliou, Timon; Moosdorf, Rainer; Wulf, Hinnerk; Daut, Jürgen; Sachse, Frank B.; Decher, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia in the elderly, and potassium channels with atrium-specific expression have been discussed as targets to treat atrial fibrillation. Our aim was to characterize TASK-1 channels in human heart and to functionally describe the role of the atrial whole cell current ITASK-1. Methods and Results: Using quantitative PCR, we show that TASK-1 is predominantly expressed in the atria, auricles and atrio-ventricular node of the human heart. Single channel recordings show the functional expression of TASK-1 in right human auricles. In addition, we describe for the first time the whole cell current carried by TASK-1 channels (ITASK-1) in human atrial tissue. We show that ITASK-1 contributes to the sustained outward current IKsus and that ITASK-1 is a major component of the background conductance in human atrial cardiomyocytes. Using patch clamp recordings and mathematical modeling of action potentials, we demonstrate that modulation of ITASK-1 can alter human atrial action potential duration. Conclusion: Due to the lack of ventricular expression and the ability to alter human atrial action potential duration, TASK-1 might be a drug target for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. PMID:22178873

  16. α-Fetoprotein as a modulator of the pro-inflammatory response of human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Potapovich, AI; Pastore, S; Kostyuk, VA; Lulli, D; Mariani, V; De Luca, C; Dudich, EI; Korkina, LG

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The immunomodulatory effects of α-fetoprotein (AFP) on lymphocytes and macrophages have been described in vitro and in vivo. Recombinant forms of human AFP have been proposed as potential therapeutic entities for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. We examined the effects of embryonic and recombinant human AFP on the spontaneous, UVA- and cytokine-induced pro-inflammatory responses of human keratinocytes. Experimental approach: Cultures of primary and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and human blood T lymphocytes were used. The effects of AFP on cytokine expression were studied by bioplexed elisa and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay. Kinase and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) phosphorylation were quantified by intracellular elisa. Nuclear activator protein 1 and NFκB DNA binding activity was measured by specific assays. Nitric oxide and H2O2 production and redox status were assessed by fluorescent probe and biochemical methods. Key results: All forms of AFP enhanced baseline expression of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. AFP dose-dependently increased tumour necrosis factor alpha-stimulated granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor and interleukin 8 expression and decreased tumour necrosis factor alpha-induced monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and IP-10 (interferon gamma-produced protein of 10 kDa) expression. AFP induced a marked activator protein 1 activation in human keratinocytes. AFP also increased H2O2 and modulated nitrite/nitrate levels in non-stimulated keratinocytes whereas it did not affect these parameters or cytokine release from UVA-stimulated cells. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and Akt1 but not NFκB was activated by AFP alone or by its combination with UVA. Conclusions and implications: Exogenous AFP induces activation of human keratinocytes, with de novo expression of a number of pro-inflammatory mediators and modulation of their

  17. Cerium dioxide nanoparticles do not modulate the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Salik; Al-Nsour, Faris; Rice, Annette B; Marshburn, Jamie; Ji, Zhaoxia; Zink, Jeffery I; Yingling, Brenda; Walker, Nigel J; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerium dioxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have potential therapeutic applications and are widely used for industrial purposes. However, the effects of these nanoparticles on primary human cells are largely unknown. The ability of nanoparticles to exacerbate pre-existing inflammatory disorders is not well documented for engineered nanoparticles, and is certainly lacking for CeO2 nanoparticles. We investigated the inflammation-modulating effects of CeO2 nanoparticles at noncytotoxic concentrations in human peripheral blood monocytes. Methods CD14+ cells were isolated from peripheral blood samples of human volunteers. Cells were exposed to either 0.5 or 1 μg/mL of CeO2 nanoparticles over a period of 24 or 48 hours with or without lipopolysaccharide (10 ng/mL) prestimulation. Modulation of the inflammatory response was studied by measuring secreted tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, macrophage chemotactic protein-1, interferon-gamma, and interferon gamma-induced protein 10. Results CeO2 nanoparticle suspensions were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering analysis (194 nm hydrodynamic diameter), zeta potential analysis (−14 mV), and transmission electron microscopy (irregular-shaped particles). Transmission electron microscopy of CD14+ cells exposed to CeO2 nanoparticles revealed that these nanoparticles were efficiently internalized by monocytes and were found either in vesicles or free in the cytoplasm. However, no significant differences in secreted cytokine profiles were observed between CeO2 nanoparticle-treated cells and control cells at noncytotoxic doses. No significant effects of CeO2 nanoparticle exposure subsequent to lipopolysaccharide priming was observed on cytokine secretion. Moreover, no significant difference in lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production was observed after exposure to CeO2 nanoparticles followed by lipopolysaccharide exposure. Conclusion CeO2 nanoparticles at noncytotoxic concentrations neither

  18. More than an imitation game: Top-down modulation of the human mirror system.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Megan E J; Cunnington, Ross

    2017-01-30

    All interpersonal interactions are underpinned by action: perceiving and understanding the actions of others, and responding by planning and performing self-made actions. Perception of action, both self-made and observed, informs ongoing motor responses by iterative feedback within a perception-action loop. This fundamental phenomenon occurs within single-cells of the macaque brain which demonstrate sensory and motor response properties. These 'mirror' neurons have led to a swathe of research leading to the broadly accepted idea of a human mirror system. The current review examines the putative human mirror system literature to highlight several inconsistencies in comparison to the seminal macaque data, and ongoing controversies within human focused research (including mirror neuron origin and function). In particular, we will address the often-neglected other side to the 'mirror': complementary and opposing actions. We propose that engagement of the mirror system in meeting changing task-demands is dynamically modulated via frontal control networks.

  19. Small molecule adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulators and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sandeep; Blowers, Elizabeth C; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2015-01-08

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor of cellular energy status that plays a key role in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. AMPK is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by upstream kinases LKB1, CaMKKβ, and Tak1, among others. AMPK exists as αβγ trimeric complexes that are allosterically regulated by AMP, ADP, and ATP. Dysregulation of AMPK has been implicated in a number of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Recent studies have associated roles of AMPK with the development of cancer and neurological disorders, making it a potential therapeutic target to treat human diseases. This review focuses on the structure and function of AMPK, its role in human diseases, and its direct substrates and provides a brief synopsis of key AMPK modulators and their relevance in human diseases.

  20. The sweet taste of true synergy: positive allosteric modulation of the human sweet taste receptor.

    PubMed

    Servant, Guy; Tachdjian, Catherine; Li, Xiaodong; Karanewsky, Donald S

    2011-11-01

    A diet low in carbohydrates helps to reduce the amount of ingested calories and to maintain a healthy weight. With this in mind, food and beverage companies have reformulated a large number of their products, replacing sugar or high fructose corn syrup with several different types of zero-calorie sweeteners to decrease or even totally eliminate their caloric content. A challenge remains, however, with the level of acceptance of some of these products in the market-place. Many consumers believe that zero-calorie sweeteners simply do not taste like sugar. A recent breakthrough reveals that positive allosteric modulators of the human sweet taste receptor, small molecules that enhance the receptor activity and sweetness perception, could be more effective than other reported taste enhancers at reducing calories in consumer products without compromising on the true taste of sugar. A unique mechanism of action at the receptor level could explain the robust synergy achieved with these new modulators.

  1. Modulation of the enterohemorrhagic E. coli virulence program through the human gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Barnett Foster, Debora

    2013-01-01

    Enteric pathogens must not only survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract but must also coordinate expression of virulence determinants in response to localized microenvironments with the host. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), a serious food and waterborne human pathogen, is well equipped with an arsenal of molecular factors that allows it to survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract and successfully colonize the large intestine. This review will explore how EHEC responds to various environmental cues associated with particular microenvironments within the host and how it employs these cues to modulate virulence factor expression, with a view to developing a conceptual framework for understanding modulation of EHEC’s virulence program in response to the host. In vitro studies offer significant insights into the role of individual environmental cues but in vivo studies using animal models as well as data from natural infections will ultimately provide a more comprehensive picture of the highly regulated virulence program of this pathogen. PMID:23552827

  2. TELOMERE AND TELOMERASE MODULATION BY BERGAMOT POLYPHENOLIC FRACTION IN EXPERIMENTAL PHOTOAGEING IN HUMAN KERATINOCYTES.

    PubMed

    Nisticò, S; Ehrlich, J; Gliozzi, M; Maiuolo, J; Del Duca, E; Muscoli, C; Mollace, V

    2015-01-01

    Photoageing represents the addition of extrinsic chronic ultraviolet radiation-induced damage on intrinsic ageing and accounts for most age-associated changes in skin appearance. In this study, we evaluated the effect of 38% BPF, a highly concentrated extract of the bergamot fruit (Citrus bergamia) on UVB-induced photoageing by examining inflammatory cytokine expression, telomere length/telomerase alterations and cellular viability in human immortalized HaCaT keratinocytes. Our results suggest that 38% BPF protects HaCaT cells against UVB-induced oxidative stress and markers of photoageing in a dose-dependent manner and could be a useful supplement in skin care products. Together with antioxidant properties, BPF, a highly concentrated extract of the bergamot fruit, appears to modulate basic cellular signal transduction pathways leading to anti-proliferative, anti-aging and immune modulating responses.

  3. A conserved abundant cytoplasmic long noncoding RNA modulates repression by Pumilio proteins in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Tichon, Ailone; Gil, Noa; Lubelsky, Yoav; Havkin Solomon, Tal; Lemze, Doron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Ulitsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) genes are encoded in the human genome, and hundreds of them are evolutionarily conserved, but their functions and modes of action remain largely obscure. Particularly enigmatic lncRNAs are those that are exported to the cytoplasm, including NORAD—an abundant and highly conserved cytoplasmic lncRNA. Here we show that most of the sequence of NORAD is comprised of repetitive units that together contain at least 17 functional binding sites for the two mammalian Pumilio homologues. Through binding to PUM1 and PUM2, NORAD modulates the mRNA levels of their targets, which are enriched for genes involved in chromosome segregation during cell division. Our results suggest that some cytoplasmic lncRNAs function by modulating the activities of RNA-binding proteins, an activity which positions them at key junctions of cellular signalling pathways. PMID:27406171

  4. Visual assessment of the radiation distribution in the ISS Lab module: visualization in the human body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saganti, P. B.; Zapp, E. N.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    The US Lab module of the International Space Station (ISS) is a primary working area where the crewmembers are expected to spend majority of their time. Because of the directionality of radiation fields caused by the Earth shadow, trapped radiation pitch angle distribution, and inherent variations in the ISS shielding, a model is needed to account for these local variations in the radiation distribution. We present the calculated radiation dose (rem/yr) values for over 3,000 different points in the working area of the Lab module and estimated radiation dose values for over 25,000 different points in the human body for a given ambient radiation environment. These estimated radiation dose values are presented in a three dimensional animated interactive visualization format. Such interactive animated visualization of the radiation distribution can be generated in near real-time to track changes in the radiation environment during the orbit precession of the ISS.

  5. Local modulation of human brain responses by circadian rhythmicity and sleep debt.

    PubMed

    Muto, Vincenzo; Jaspar, Mathieu; Meyer, Christelle; Kussé, Caroline; Chellappa, Sarah L; Degueldre, Christian; Balteau, Evelyne; Shaffii-Le Bourdiec, Anahita; Luxen, André; Middleton, Benita; Archer, Simon N; Phillips, Christophe; Collette, Fabienne; Vandewalle, Gilles; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre

    2016-08-12

    Human performance is modulated by circadian rhythmicity and homeostatic sleep pressure. Whether and how this interaction is represented at the regional brain level has not been established. We quantified changes in brain responses to a sustained-attention task during 13 functional magnetic resonance imaging sessions scheduled across the circadian cycle, during 42 hours of wakefulness and after recovery sleep, in 33 healthy participants. Cortical responses showed significant circadian rhythmicity, the phase of which varied across brain regions. Cortical responses also significantly decreased with accrued sleep debt. Subcortical areas exhibited primarily a circadian modulation that closely followed the melatonin profile. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanisms involved in maintaining cognition during the day and its deterioration during sleep deprivation and circadian misalignment.

  6. Student feedback about the use of literature excerpts in Sparshanam, a Medical Humanities module

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, P Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Medical humanities (MH) modules have been conducted for first year students at KIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal for the last four years. Literature excerpts are widely used in MH programs in developed nations. In Nepal English language literature excerpts had been used previously in two modules. Problems noted were difficulty in comprehending the excerpts and relating them to the Nepalese scenario. The MH module for the 2011 intake was conducted from December 2011 to March 2012. The present study was conducted in the third week of March to obtain student perceptions about use of literature excerpts and suggestions for further improvement using a questionnaire. Literature excerpts used in the module dealt with Nepal and health-related topics. Sixty-eight of the 80 students (85%) participated in the study. The majority were male, self-financing and from urban areas. Respondents felt the excerpts introduced them to different aspects of the medical profession, prepared them for future practice, and underscored the importance of understanding the patients’ feelings. The literature excerpts with which they could identify the most and the least were noted. There were no differences in median enjoyment and effectiveness scores of the literature excerpts according to subgroups of respondents. The suggested benefits of using literature in medical education were similar to those reported previously. Most respondents were able to appreciate the English language excerpts. They felt that Nepali language excerpts and those by Nepali writers could also be included. The findings would be of interest to educators in other developing nations introducing MH modules. PMID:24358812

  7. Use of Human Computer Models to Influence the Design of International Space Station Propulsion Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, George S.; Hall, Meridith L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall design for the International Space Station (ISS) Propulsion (Prop) Module consists of two bell shapes connected by a long tube having a shirt sleeve environment. The tube is to be used by the flight crew to transfer equipment and supplies from the Shuttle to ISS. Due to a desire to use existing space qualified hardware, the tube internal diameter was initially set at 38 inches, while the human engineering specification, NASA-STD-3000, required 50". Human computer modeling using the MannequinPro application was used to help make the case to enlarge the passageway to meet the specification. 3D CAD models of Prop Module were created with 38 inches, 45 inches and 50 inches passageways and human figures in the neutral body posture as well as a fetal posture were inserted into the model and systematically exercised. Results showed that only the 50 inches tube would accommodate a mid tube turn around by a large crew member, 95th percentile American males, by stature.

  8. Differential growth factor induction and modulation of human gastric epithelial regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Tetreault, Marie-Pier; Chailler, Pierre; Rivard, Nathalie; Menard, Daniel . E-mail: Daniel.Menard@USherbrooke.ca

    2005-05-15

    While several autocrine/paracrine growth factors (GFs) can all stimulate epithelial regeneration in experimentally wounded primary gastric cultures, clinical relevance for their non-redundant cooperative actions in human gastric ulcer healing is suggested by the sequential pattern of GF gene induction in vivo. Using new HGE cell lines able to form a coherent monolayer with tight junctions as well as using primary human gastric epithelial cultures, we show that EGF, TGF{alpha}, HGF and IGFs accelerate epithelial restitution upon wounding, independently of the TGF{beta} pathway (as opposed to intestinal cells). However, they differently modulate cell behavior: TGF{alpha} exerts strong effects (even more than EGF) on cytoplasmic spreading and non-oriented protruding activity of bordering cells whereas HGF preferentially coordinates single lamella formation, cell elongation and migration into the wound. IGF-I and IGF-II rather induce the alignment of bordering cells and maintain a compact monolayer front. The number of mitotic cells maximally increases with EGF, followed by TGF{alpha} and IGF-I,-II. The current study demonstrates that GFs differentially regulate the regeneration of human gastric epithelial cells through specific modulation of cell shape adaptation, migration and proliferation, further stressing that a coordination of GF activities would be necessary for the normal progression of post-wounding epithelial repair.

  9. Transcriptional burst frequency and burst size are equally modulated across the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Roy D.; Simpson, Michael L; Weinberger, Leor S.; Razooky, B; Cox, Chris D.; McCollum, James M.; Trimeloni, Tom; Singh, A

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression occurs either as an episodic process, characterized by pulsatile bursts or as a constitutive, Poisson-like accumulation of gene products. It is not clear which mode of gene expression (constitutive versus bursty) predominates across a genome or how transcriptional dynamics are influenced by genomic position and promoter sequence. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, building off of theoretical studies that exploit the time-resolved structure of stochastic fluctuations in gene expression, to develop a three-dimensional method for mapping underlying gene-regulatory mechanisms. Over 8,000 individual human genomic loci were analyzed, and at virtually all loci, episodic bursting as opposed to constitutive expression was found to be the predominant mode of expression. Quantitative analysis of the expression dynamics at these 8,000 loci indicates that both frequency and size of transcriptional bursts vary equally across the human genome independent of promoter sequence. Strikingly, weaker expression loci modulate burst frequency to increase activity, while stronger expression loci modulate burst size to increase activity. Transcriptional activators, such as TNF, generate similar patterns of change in burst frequency and burst size. In summary, transcriptional bursting dominates across the human genome, both burst frequency and burst size vary by chromosomal location, and transcriptional activators alter burst frequency and burst size, depending on the expression level of the locus.

  10. Neisseria gonorrhoeae survives within and modulates apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine production of human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Château, Alice; Seifert, H Steven

    2016-04-01

    The human-adapted organism Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of gonorrhoea, a sexually transmitted infection. It readily colonizes the genital, rectal and nasalpharyngeal mucosa during infection. While it is well established that N. gonorrhoeae recruits and modulates the functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes during infection, how N. gonorrhoeae interacts with macrophages present in infected tissue is not fully defined. We studied the interactions of N. gonorrhoeae with two human monocytic cell lines, THP-1 and U937, and primary monocytes, all differentiated into macrophages. Most engulfed bacteria were killed in the phagolysosome, but a subset of bacteria was able to survive and replicate inside the macrophages suggesting that those cells may be an unexplored cellular reservoir for N. gonorrhoeae during infection. N. gonorrhoeae was able to modulate macrophage apoptosis: N. gonorrhoeae induced apoptosis in THP-1 cells whereas it inhibited induced apoptosis in U937 cells and primary human macrophages. Furthermore, N. gonorrhoeae induced expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, suggesting a role for macrophages in recruiting polymorphonuclear leukocytes to the site of infection. These results indicate macrophages may serve as a significant replicative niche for N. gonorrhoeae and play an important role in gonorrheal pathogenesis.

  11. RNA Splicing Modulation Selectively Impairs Leukemia Stem Cell Maintenance in Secondary Human AML.

    PubMed

    Crews, Leslie A; Balaian, Larisa; Delos Santos, Nathaniel P; Leu, Heather S; Court, Angela C; Lazzari, Elisa; Sadarangani, Anil; Zipeto, Maria A; La Clair, James J; Villa, Reymundo; Kulidjian, Anna; Storb, Rainer; Morris, Sheldon R; Ball, Edward D; Burkart, Michael D; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2016-11-03

    Age-related human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) exhaustion and myeloid-lineage skewing promote oncogenic transformation of hematopoietic progenitor cells into therapy-resistant leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). While acquisition of clonal DNA mutations has been linked to increased rates of secondary AML for individuals older than 60 years, the contribution of RNA processing alterations to human hematopoietic stem and progenitor aging and LSC generation remains unclear. Comprehensive RNA sequencing and splice-isoform-specific PCR uncovered characteristic RNA splice isoform expression patterns that distinguished normal young and aged human stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from malignant myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and AML progenitors. In splicing reporter assays and pre-clinical patient-derived AML models, treatment with a pharmacologic splicing modulator, 17S-FD-895, reversed pro-survival splice isoform switching and significantly impaired LSC maintenance. Therapeutic splicing modulation, together with monitoring splice isoform biomarkers of healthy HSPC aging versus LSC generation, may be employed safely and effectively to prevent relapse, the leading cause of leukemia-related mortality.

  12. Plasma phyto-oestrogens and prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Travis, R C; Spencer, E A; Allen, N E; Appleby, P N; Roddam, A W; Overvad, K; Johnsen, N F; Olsen, A; Kaaks, R; Linseisen, J; Boeing, H; Nöthlings, U; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Ros, M M; Sacerdote, C; Palli, D; Tumino, R; Berrino, F; Trichopoulou, A; Dilis, V; Trichopoulos, D; Chirlaque, M-D; Ardanaz, E; Larranaga, N; Gonzalez, C; Suárez, L R; Sánchez, M-J; Bingham, S; Khaw, K-T; Hallmans, G; Stattin, P; Rinaldi, S; Slimani, N; Jenab, M; Riboli, E; Key, T J

    2009-01-01

    We examined plasma concentrations of phyto-oestrogens in relation to risk for subsequent prostate cancer in a case–control study nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Concentrations of isoflavones genistein, daidzein and equol, and that of lignans enterolactone and enterodiol, were measured in plasma samples for 950 prostate cancer cases and 1042 matched control participants. Relative risks (RRs) for prostate cancer in relation to plasma concentrations of these phyto-oestrogens were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Higher plasma concentrations of genistein were associated with lower risk of prostate cancer: RR among men in the highest vs the lowest fifth, 0.71 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53–0.96, P trend=0.03). After adjustment for potential confounders this RR was 0.74 (95% CI 0.54–1.00, P trend=0.05). No statistically significant associations were observed for circulating concentrations of daidzein, equol, enterolactone or enterodiol in relation to overall risk for prostate cancer. There was no evidence of heterogeneity in these results by age at blood collection or country of recruitment, nor by cancer stage or grade. These results suggest that higher concentrations of circulating genistein may reduce the risk of prostate cancer but do not support an association with plasma lignans. PMID:19436304

  13. Sexual behaviour of neonatally castrated rats injected during infancy with oestrogen and dihydrotestosterone.

    PubMed

    Booth, J E

    1977-02-01

    Male rats were castrated on the day of birth (day 1) and injected with either testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, a synthetic oestrogen (RU 2858 + dihydrotestosterone, or oil from days 1 to 5. The aromatizable androgen, testosterone, and RU 2858 suppressed both cyclic gonadotrophin secretion, indicated by the absence of corpora lutea from implanted ovarian grafts, and the behavioural response to oestradiol benzoate + progesterone injections in adulthood. The 5alpha-reduced androgen, dihydrotestosterone alone did not affect gonadotrophin secretion or female receptive behaviour, but like testosterone, it increased penis development in response to testosterone propionate, and this was positively correlated with copulatory efficiency, i.e. the ratio of intromission to mount frequencies. Nevertheless, ejaculation only occurred among animals that had received testosterone or RU 2858 + dihydrotestosterone. The results support the concept that during the preinatal period, neural conversion of androgens to oestrogens is important both for the suppression of female gonadotrophin secretion and behaviour patterns as well as for the organization of male behaviour patterns. The 5alpha-reduction of unsaturated C19-steriods to dihydrotestosterone in peripheral tissues is also required to complete the development of the male genital tract.

  14. DNA methylation of oestrogen-regulated enhancers defines endocrine sensitivity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Andrew; Zotenko, Elena; Locke, Warwick J.; Korbie, Darren; Millar, Ewan K. A.; Pidsley, Ruth; Stirzaker, Clare; Graham, Peter; Trau, Matt; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Nicholson, Robert I.; Gee, Julia M. W.; Clark, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of oestrogen receptor (ESR1) determines whether a breast cancer patient receives endocrine therapy, but does not guarantee patient response. The molecular factors that define endocrine response in ESR1-positive breast cancer patients remain poorly understood. Here we characterize the DNA methylome of endocrine sensitivity and demonstrate the potential impact of differential DNA methylation on endocrine response in breast cancer. We show that DNA hypermethylation occurs predominantly at oestrogen-responsive enhancers and is associated with reduced ESR1 binding and decreased gene expression of key regulators of ESR1 activity, thus providing a novel mechanism by which endocrine response is abated in ESR1-positive breast cancers. Conversely, we delineate that ESR1-responsive enhancer hypomethylation is critical in transition from normal mammary epithelial cells to endocrine-responsive ESR1-positive cancer. Cumulatively, these novel insights highlight the potential of ESR1-responsive enhancer methylation to both predict ESR1-positive disease and stratify ESR1-positive breast cancer patients as responders to endocrine therapy. PMID:26169690

  15. Yeast Modulation of Human Dendritic Cell Cytokine Secretion: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ida M.; Christensen, Jeffrey E.; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications beyond the current

  16. Yeast modulation of human dendritic cell cytokine secretion: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ida M; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications beyond the current

  17. Partial purification and characterization of oestrogen receptors in subfractions of hepatocyte plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pietras, Richard J.; Szego, Clara M.

    1980-01-01

    To assess the subcellular distribution of oestrogen-binding components in their native state, plasma membrane and other cell fractions were prepared from hepatocytes in the absence of [3H]oestradiol-17β. Cells from livers of ovariectomized rats were disrupted, with submaximal homogenization in buffered isotonic sucrose with CaCl2 and proteinase inhibitor, and fractionated by using isotonic media. Fractions were characterized by determinations of enzyme activities, biochemical constituents and ligand binding. Specific binding of 2nm-[3H]oestradiol-17β to intact cells and their fractions was detemined after equilibration for 1.5h at 4°C. More than 92% of the radioactivity from representative preparations was verified as authentic oestradiol by thin-layer chromatography. Activities of plasma-membrane marker enzymes as well as binding sites for oestrogen and for wheat germ agglutinin were present principally in particulate fractions, rather than in 105000g-supernatant fractions. However, by using alternative homogenization procedures (i.e. hypotonic media), known to fragment and strip structural components, oestradiol-binding sites and activities of plasma-membrane marker enzymes were distributed predominantly into cytosol. By using the more conservative procedures, plasma membranes of low (ρ=1.13–1.16) and high (ρ=1.16–1.18) density were purified from crude nuclear fractions. A second low-density subfraction of plasma membrane was prepared from microsome-rich fractions. Activities of plasma-membrane marker enzymes were enriched to about 28 and four times that of the homogenate in plasma membranes of low and high density respectively. Binding sites for wheat germ agglutinin and oestradiol were concentrated in low-density plasma membranes to 46–63 times that of the homogenate. Specific binding of oestrogen in low-density plasma membranes purified from crude nuclei was saturable, with an apparent association constant of 3.5nm. At saturation, such oestradiol

  18. BAIAP2 is related to emotional modulation of human memory strength.

    PubMed

    Luksys, Gediminas; Ackermann, Sandra; Coynel, David; Fastenrath, Matthias; Gschwind, Leo; Heck, Angela; Rasch, Bjoern; Spalek, Klara; Vogler, Christian; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Memory performance is the result of many distinct mental processes, such as memory encoding, forgetting, and modulation of memory strength by emotional arousal. These processes, which are subserved by partly distinct molecular profiles, are not always amenable to direct observation. Therefore, computational models can be used to make inferences about specific mental processes and to study their genetic underpinnings. Here we combined a computational model-based analysis of memory-related processes with high density genetic information derived from a genome-wide study in healthy young adults. After identifying the best-fitting model for a verbal memory task and estimating the best-fitting individual cognitive parameters, we found a common variant in the gene encoding the brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1-associated protein 2 (BAIAP2) that was related to the model parameter reflecting modulation of verbal memory strength by negative valence. We also observed an association between the same genetic variant and a similar emotional modulation phenotype in a different population performing a picture memory task. Furthermore, using functional neuroimaging we found robust genotype-dependent differences in activity of the parahippocampal cortex that were specifically related to successful memory encoding of negative versus neutral information. Finally, we analyzed cortical gene expression data of 193 deceased subjects and detected significant BAIAP2 genotype-dependent differences in BAIAP2 mRNA levels. Our findings suggest that model-based dissociation of specific cognitive parameters can improve the understanding of genetic underpinnings of human learning and memory.

  19. A Human Centred Interior Design of a Habitat Module for the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burattini, C.

    Since the very beginning of Space exploration, the interiors of a space habitat had to meet technological and functional requirements. Space habitats have now to meet completely different requirements related to comfort or at least to liveable environments. In order to reduce psychological drawbacks afflicting the crew during long periods of isolation in an extreme environment, one of the most important criteria is to assure high habitability levels. As a result of the Transhab project cancellation, the International Space Station (ISS) is actually made up of several research laboratories, but it has only one module for housing. This is suitable for short-term missions; middle ­ long stays require new solutions in terms of public and private spaces, as well as personal compartments. A design concept of a module appositely fit for living during middle-long stays aims to provide ISS with a place capable to satisfy habitability requirements. This paper reviews existing Space habitats and crew needs in a confined and extreme environment. The paper then describes the design of a new and human centred approach to habitation module typologies.

  20. Gentiana asclepiadea and Armoracia rusticana can modulate the adaptive response induced by zeocin in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hudecova, A; Hasplova, K; Kellovska, L; Ikreniova, M; Miadokova, E; Galova, E; Horvathova, E; Vaculcikova, D; Gregan, F; Dusinska, M

    2012-01-01

    Zeocin is a member of bleomycin/phleomycin family of antibiotics isolated from Streptomyces verticullus. This unique radiomimetic antibiotic is known to bind to DNA and induce oxidative stress in different organisms producing predominantly single- and double- strand breaks, as well as a DNA base loss resulting in apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites. The aim of this study was to induce an adaptive response (AR) by zeocin in freshly isolated human lymphocytes from blood and to observe whether plant extracts could modulate this response. The AR was evaluated by the comet assay. The optimal conditions for the AR induction and modulation were determined as: 2 h-intertreatment time (in PBS, at 4°C) given after a priming dose (50 µg/ml) of zeocin treatment. Genotoxic impact of zeocin to lymphocytes was modulated by plant extracts isolated from Gentiana asclepiadea (methanolic and aqueous haulm extracts, 0.25 mg/ml) and Armoracia rusticana (methanolic root extract, 0.025 mg/ml). These extracts enhanced the AR and also decreased DNA damage caused by zeocin (after 0, 1 and 4 h-recovery time after the test dose of zeocin application) to more than 50%. These results support important position of plants containing many biologically active compounds in the field of pharmacology and medicine.

  1. Adenosine modulates cell growth in the human breast cancer cells via adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Panjehpour, Mojtaba; Karami-Tehrani, Fatemeh

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine modulates the proliferation, survival, and apoptosis of many different cell types. The present study was performed to investigate the role of adenosine receptors in the human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB468. The biological effects of adenosine on the cells were analyzed by adenylyl cyclase and cell viability assay as well as RT-PCR of adenosine receptors. RT-PCR results show the expression of the transcript of all adenosine receptors in both cell lines. By using adenosine and selective adenosine receptor agonists or antagonists, we found that A3 stimulation reduced cell viability, which was abolished by pretreatment with A3 receptor antagonist. Moreover, we demonstrated that adenosine (natural agonist) triggers a cytotoxic signal via A3 receptor activation that was not seen for other subclasses of adenosine receptors. Intracellular cAMP concentration was changed significantly only for A3 and A2B receptor-selective agonists, which indicates the functional form of these receptors on the cell surface. In conclusion, our findings revealed the role of adenosine receptors in breast cancer cell lines on growth modulation role of A3 and functional form of A2B, although its involvement in cell growth modulation was not seen. Theses findings as well as data by others may provide a possible application of adenosine receptor agonists/antagonists in breast malignancies.

  2. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in reverberant sound fields: Effects of prior listening exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Anderson, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work [Zahorik et al., POMA, 15, 050002 (2012)] has reported that for both broadband and narrowband noise carrier signals in a simulated reverberant sound field, human sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) is higher than would be predicted based on the acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) of the listening environment. These results may be suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation in reverberant listening, although many details of this enhancement effect are unknown. Given recent findings that demonstrate improvements in speech understanding with prior exposure to reverberant listening environments, it is of interest to determine whether listening exposure to a reverberant room might also influence AM detection in the room, and perhaps contribute to the AM enhancement effect. Here, AM detection thresholds were estimated (using an adaptive 2-alternative forced-choice procedure) in each of two listening conditions: one in which consistent listening exposure to a particular room was provided, and a second that intentionally disrupted listening exposure by varying the room from trial-to-trial. Results suggest that consistent prior listening exposure contributes to enhanced AM sensitivity in rooms. [Work supported by the NIH/NIDCD.] PMID:24163718

  3. Talin Modulation by a Synthetic N-Acylurea Derivative Reduces Angiogenesis in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, I-Rang; Joo, Hyung Joon; Jeong, Minseon; Kim, Jong-Ho; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Kim, Chungho; Jung, Jong-Wha; Hong, Soon Jun

    2017-01-01

    Talin is a focal adhesion protein that activates integrins and recruits other focal adhesion proteins. Talin regulates the interactions between integrins and the extracellular matrix, which are critical for endothelial cells during angiogenesis. In this study, we successfully synthesized a novel talin modulator, N-((2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl)carbamoyl)-2-(benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yloxy)acetamide, referred to as KCH-1521. KCH-1521 was determined to bind talin and modulate downstream signaling molecules of talin. After 24 h of treatment, KCH-1521 changed the cell morphology of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and reduced focal adhesion protein expression including vinculin and paxillin. Talin downstream signaling is regulated via focal adhesion kinase (FAK), kinase B (AKT), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways, however, treatment with KCH-1521 decreased phosphorylation of FAK, AKT, and ERK, leading to reduction of cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. Interestingly, the expression of various angiogenic genes was significantly decreased after treatment with KCH-1521. Also, in vitro tube forming assay revealed that KCH-1521 reduced angiogenic networks in a time-dependent manner. To investigate the reversibility of its effects, KCH-1521 was removed after treatment. HUVECs recovered their morphology through rearrangement of the cytoskeleton and the expression of angiogenic genes was also recovered. By further optimization and in vivo studies of KCH-1521, a novel drug of talin modulation could be used to achieve therapeutic anti-angiogenesis for vascular diseases and cancers. PMID:28117756

  4. Modulation of trichloroethylene in vitro metabolism by different drugs in human.

    PubMed

    Cheikh Rouhou, Mouna; Haddad, Sami

    2014-08-01

    Toxicological interactions with drugs have the potential to modulate the toxicity of trichloroethylene (TCE). Our objective is to identify metabolic interactions between TCE and 14 widely used drugs in human suspended hepatocytes and characterize the strongest using microsomal assays. Changes in concentrations of TCE and its metabolites were measured by headspace GC-MS. Results with hepatocytes show that amoxicillin, cimetidine, ibuprofen, mefenamic acid and ranitidine caused no significant interactions. Naproxen and salicylic acid showed to increase both TCE metabolites levels, whereas acetaminophen, carbamazepine and erythromycin rather decreased them. Finally, diclofenac, gliclazide, sulphasalazine and valproic acid had an impact on the levels of only one metabolite. Among the 14 tested drugs, 5 presented the most potent interactions and were selected for confirmation with microsomes, namely naproxen, salicylic acid, acetaminophen, carbamazepine and valproic acid. Characterization in human microsomes confirmed interaction with naproxen by competitively inhibiting trichloroethanol (TCOH) glucuronidation (Ki=2.329 mM). Inhibition of TCOH formation was also confirmed for carbamazepine (partial non-competitive with Ki=70 μM). Interactions with human microsomes were not observed with salicylic acid and acetaminophen, similar to prior results in rat material. For valproic acid, interactions with microsomes were observed in rat but not in human. Inhibition patterns were shown to be similar in human and rat hepatocytes, but some differences in mechanisms were noted in microsomal material between species. Next research efforts will focus on determining the adequacy between in vitro observations and the in vivo situation.

  5. Human use regulatory affairs advisor (HURAA): learning about research ethics with intelligent learning modules.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiangen; Graesser, Arthur C

    2004-05-01

    The Human Use Regulatory Affairs Advisor (HURAA) is a Web-based facility that provides help and training on the ethical use of human subjects in research, based on documents and regulations in United States federal agencies. HURAA has a number of standard features of conventional Web facilities and computer-based training, such as hypertext, multimedia, help modules, glossaries, archives, links to other sites, and page-turning didactic instruction. HURAA also has these intelligent features: (1) an animated conversational agent that serves as a navigational guide for the Web facility, (2) lessons with case-based and explanation-based reasoning, (3) document retrieval through natural language queries, and (4) a context-sensitive Frequently Asked Questions segment, called Point & Query. This article describes the functional learning components of HURAA, specifies its computational architecture, and summarizes empirical tests of the facility on learners.

  6. The prevention and treatment effects of tanshinone IIA on oestrogen/androgen-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Du, Xiaoling; Yang, Rui; Liu, Jie; Xu, Da; Shi, Jiandang; Chen, Linfeng; Shao, Rui; Fan, Guanwei; Gao, Xiumei; Tian, Guo; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Ju

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the major diseases of the urinary system in elderly men. Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) is the active ingredient extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine Salvia, and it has effects of anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation, vascular smooth muscle relaxation and tumour growth inhibition. The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of Tan IIA in the prevention and treatment of BPH. In a rat model of oestradiol/testosterone-induced BPH, Tan IIA inhibited the increase in the thickness of the peri-glandular smooth muscle layer, suppressed the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in both prostate epithelial cells and stromal cells, downregulated the expression of androgen receptor (AR), oestrogen receptor α (ERα), cyclin B1 (CCNB1) and cyclin D1 (CCND1), and effectively prevented the development of the disorder. In vitro, Tan IIA inhibited the proliferation of human prostate stromal cell line WPMY-1 and epithelial cell line RWPE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In WPMY-1 cells, Tan IIA treatment arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase and downregulated the expression of CCNB1. However, in RWPE-1 cells, Tan IIA treatment arrested cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and reduced the expression of CCND1. Tan IIA also reduced the expression of ERα and AR in WPMY-1 and RWPE-1 cells. These results suggest that Tan IIA can inhibit the growth of prostate stromal and epithelial cells both in vivo and in vitro by a mechanism that may involve arresting the cell cycle and downregulating ERα and AR expression.

  7. Electrophysiology-Based Assays to Detect Subtype-Selective Modulation of Human Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Glenn E.; Fedorov, Nikolai B.; Kuryshev, Yuri A.; Liu, Zhiqi; Orr, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-31) gave the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the responsibility for regulating tobacco products. Nicotine is the primary addictive component of tobacco and its effects can be modulated by additional ingredients in manufactured products. Nicotine acts by mimicking the neurotransmitter acetylcholine on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which function as ion channels in cholinergic modulation of neurotransmission. Subtypes within the family of neuronal nAChRs are defined by their α- and β-subunit composition. The subtype-selective profiles of tobacco constituents are largely unknown, but could be essential for understanding the physiological effects of tobacco products. In this report, we report the development and validation of electrophysiology-based high-throughput screens (e-HTS) for human nicotinic subtypes, α3β4, α3β4α5, α4β2, and α7 stably expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells. Assessment of agonist sensitivity and acute desensitization gave results comparable to those obtained by conventional manual patch clamp electrophysiology assays. The potency of reference antagonists for inhibition of the receptor channels and selectivity of positive allosteric modulators also were very similar between e-HTS and conventional manual patch voltage clamp data. Further validation was obtained in pilot screening of a library of FDA-approved drugs that identified α7 subtype-selective positive allosteric modulation by novel compounds. These assays provide new tools for profiling of nicotinic receptor selectivity. PMID:27505073

  8. Dynamic Modulation of Innate Immune Response by Varying Dosages of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Human Monocytic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew C.; Gilliam, Elizabeth A.; Button, Julia; Li, Liwu

    2014-01-01

    Innate monocytes and macrophages can be dynamically programmed into distinct states depending upon the strength of external stimuli. Innate programming may bear significant relevance to the pathogenesis and resolution of human inflammatory diseases. However, systems analyses with regard to the dynamic programming of innate leukocytes are lacking. In this study, we focused on the dynamic responses of human promonocytic THP-1 cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We observed that varying dosages of LPS differentially modulate the expression of selected pro- and anti- inflammatory mediators such as IL-6 and IL-33. Super-low dosages of LPS preferentially induced the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-6, while higher dosages of LPS induced both IL-6 and IL-33. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that super-low and high doses of LPS cause differential activation of GSK3 and Akt, as well as the transcription factors FoxO1 and CREB. Inhibition of GSK3 enabled THP-1 cells to express IL-33 when challenged with super-low dose LPS. On the other hand, activation of CREB with adenosine suppressed IL-6 expression. Taken together, our study reveals a dynamic modulation of monocytic cells in response to varying dosages of endotoxin, and may shed light on our understanding of the dynamic balance that controls pathogenesis and resolution of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24970893

  9. Transgenic milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin modulates the intestinal flora in piglets.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenping; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Jianwu; Yu, Tian; Wang, Jing; Li, Ning

    2012-06-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a beneficial multifunctional protein in milk. The objective of this study was to determine whether bovine transgenic milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF) can modulate intestinal flora in the neonatal pig as an animal model for the human infant. We fed 7-day-old piglets (i) ordinary whole milk (OM), (ii) a 1:1 mixture of OM and rhLF milk (MM), or (iii) rhLF milk (LFM). LFM provided better average daily mass gain than OM (P = 0.007). PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rDNA sequencing analysis revealed that the LFM piglets exhibited more diversity of the intestinal flora than the OM group. Except for the colon in the LFM group, an increasing trend in microbial diversity occurred from the duodenum to the colon. Fecal flora was not different across different ages or different treatment groups, but a cluster analysis showed that the fecal flora of OM- and MM-fed piglets had a higher degree of similarity than that of LFM-fed piglets. Based on culture-based bacterial counts of intestinal content samples, concentrations of Salmonella spp. in the colon and of Escherichia coli throughout the intestine were reduced with LFM (P < 0.01). Concentrations of Bifidobacterium spp. in the ileum and of Lactobacillus spp. throughout the intestine were also increased with LFM (P ≤ 0.01). We suggest that rhLF can modulate the intestinal flora in piglets.

  10. Chemosensory danger detection in the human brain: Body odor communicating aggression modulates limbic system activation.

    PubMed

    Mutic, Smiljana; Brünner, Yvonne F; Rodriguez-Raecke, Rea; Wiesmann, Martin; Freiherr, Jessica

    2017-02-28

    Although the sense of smell is involved in numerous survival functions, the processing of body odor emitted by dangerous individuals is far from understood. The aim of the study was to explore how human fight chemosignals communicating aggression can alter brain activation related to an attentional bias and danger detection. While the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was seen involved in processing threat-related emotional information, danger detection and error evaluation, it still remains unknown whether human chemosignals communicating aggression can potentially modulate this activation. In the fMRI experiment, healthy male and female normosmic odor recipients (n=18) completed a higher-order processing task (emotional Stroop task with the word categories anger, anxiety, happiness and neutral) while exposed to aggression and exercise chemosignals (collected from a different group of healthy male donors; n=16). Our results provide first evidence that aggression chemosignals induce a time-sensitive attentional bias in chemosensory danger detection and modulate limbic system activation. During exposure to aggression chemosignals compared to exercise chemosignals, functional imaging data indicates an enhancement of thalamus, hypothalamus and insula activation (p<.05, FWE-corrected). Together with the thalamus, the ACC was seen activated in response to threat-related words (p<.001). Chemosensory priming and habituation to body odor signals are discussed.

  11. GABAergic modulation of human social interaction in a prisoner's dilemma model by acute administration of alprazolam.

    PubMed

    Lane, Scott D; Gowin, Joshua L

    2009-10-01

    Recent work in neuroeconomics has used game theory paradigms to examine neural systems that subserve human social interaction and decision making. Attempts to modify social interaction through pharmacological manipulation have been less common. Here we show dose-dependent modification of human social behavior in a prisoner's dilemma model after acute administration of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-A modulating benzodiazepine alprazolam. Nine healthy adults received doses of placebo, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg alprazolam in a counterbalanced within-subject design, while completing multiple test blocks per day on an iterated prisoner's dilemma game. During test blocks in which peak subjective effects of alprazolam were reported, cooperative choices were significantly decreased as a function of dose. Consistent with previous reports showing that high acute doses of GABA-modulating drugs are associated with violence and other antisocial behavior, our data suggest that at sufficiently high doses, alprazolam can decrease cooperation. These behavioral changes may be facilitated by changes in inhibitory control facilitated by GABA. Game theory paradigms may prove useful in behavioral pharmacology studies seeking to measure social interaction, and may help inform the emerging field of neuroeconomics.

  12. Modulation of microRNA-mRNA Target Pairs by Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Harden, Mallory E.; Prasad, Nripesh; Griffiths, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The E6 and E7 proteins are the major oncogenic drivers encoded by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs). While many aspects of the transforming activities of these proteins have been extensively studied, there are fewer studies that have investigated how HPV E6/E7 expression affects the expression of cellular noncoding RNAs. The goal of our study was to investigate HPV16 E6/E7 modulation of cellular microRNA (miR) levels and to determine the potential consequences for cellular gene expression. We performed deep sequencing of small and large cellular RNAs in primary undifferentiated cultures of human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) with stable expression of HPV16 E6/E7 or a control vector. After integration of the two data sets, we identified 51 differentially expressed cellular miRs associated with the modulation of 1,456 potential target mRNAs in HPV16 E6/E7-expressing HFKs. We discovered that the degree of differential miR expression in HFKs expressing HPV16 E6/E7 was not necessarily predictive of the number of corresponding mRNA targets or the potential impact on gene expression. Additional analyses of the identified miR-mRNA pairs suggest modulation of specific biological activities and biochemical pathways. Overall, our study supports the model that perturbation of cellular miR expression by HPV16 E6/E7 importantly contributes to the rewiring of cellular regulatory circuits by the high-risk HPV E6 and E7 proteins that contribute to oncogenic transformation. PMID:28049151

  13. Estrogens and Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Modulate Neoplastic Cell Growth in Human Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, Domenico; Barbaro, Barbara; Franchitto, Antonio; Onori, Paolo; Glaser, Shannon S.; Alpini, Gianfranco; Francis, Heather; Marucci, Luca; Sterpetti, Paola; Ginanni-Corradini, Stefano; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Dostal, David E.; De Santis, Adriano; Attili, Adolfo F.; Benedetti, Antonio; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the expression of estrogen receptors (ERs), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and IGF-1R (receptor) in human cholangiocarcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma cell lines (HuH-28, TFK-1, Mz-ChA-1), evaluating the role of estrogens and IGF-1 in the modulation of neoplastic cell growth. ER-α, ER-β, IGF-1, and IGF-1R were expressed (immunohistochemistry) in all biopsies (18 of 18) of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. ER-α was expressed (Western blot) only by the HuH-28 cell line (intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma), whereas ER-β, IGF-1, and IGF-1R were expressed in the three cell lines examined. In serum-deprived HuH-28 cells, serum readmission induced stimulation of cell proliferation that was inhibited by ER and IGF-1R antagonists. 17β-Estradiol and IGF-1 stimulated proliferation of HuH-28 cells to a similar extent to that of MCF7 (breast cancer) but greater than that of TFK-1 and Mz-ChA-1, inhibiting apoptosis and exerting additive effects. These effects of 17β-estradiol and IGF-1 were associated with enhanced protein expression of ER-α, phosphorylated (p)-ERK1/2 and pAKT but with decreased expression of ER-β. Finally, transfection of IGF-1R anti-sense oligonucleotides in HuH-28 cells markedly decreased cell proliferation. In conclusion, human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas express receptors for estrogens and IGF-1, which cooperate in the modulation of cell growth and apoptosis. Modulation of ER and IGF-1R could represent a strategy for the management of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:16936263

  14. Transgenic (cyp19a1b-GFP) zebrafish embryos as a tool for assessing combined effects of oestrogenic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karina; Fetter, Eva; Kah, Olivier; Brion, François; Scholz, Stefan; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2013-08-15

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals and especially oestrogen receptor (ER) agonists have been extensively studied over the years due to their potential effects on sexual development and reproduction in vertebrates, notably fish. As ER agonists can exist as complex mixtures in the aquatic environment, evaluating the impact of combined exposure on oestrogenic effects has become increasingly important. Use of predictive models such as concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) has allowed assessment of combined estrogenic effects of complex multi-compound mixtures of ER agonists in various fish in vitro and in vivo experimental models. The present work makes use of a transgenic zebrafish strain, tg(cyp19a1b-GFP), which expresses the green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the cyp19a1b (brain aromatase or aromatase B) gene to determine the oestrogenic potency of ER agonists alone or in mixtures. In these studies, tg(cyp19a1b-GFP) zebrafish embryos were exposed for four days (from one to five days post fertilization) to five different oestrogenic chemicals; 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 17β-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), bisphenol A (BPA) and 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), and three mixtures of up to four of these compounds. The mixture of BPA, OP and E2 was also tested with primary cultures of rainbow trout hepatocytes by analysing the ER-mediated induction of the oestrogenic biomarker vitellogenin in order to compare the performance of the two methods for assessing oestrogenic effects of complex mixtures. The three tested mixtures were predominantly acting in an additive manner on the expression of GFP. Additivity was indicated by the overlap of the 95% confidence interval of the concentration response curves for the observed data with the CA and IA prediction models, and model deviation ratios within a factor of two for a majority of the mixture concentrations. However, minor deviations determined as more than additive effects for the mixture of EE2, E1

  15. Oestrogen up-regulates interleukin-21 production by CD4(+) T lymphocytes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer; Shin, Eun-Kyoung; Lee, Seon-Yeong; Her, Yang-Mi; Park, Mi-Kyung; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Ju, Ji Hyeon; Park, Kyung-Su; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La; Park, Sung-Hwan

    2014-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease in which abnormal immune responses are mediated by tissue-binding autoantibodies and immune complex deposition. Because most SLE patients are women of child-bearing age, oestrogen has been suggested to play an important role in SLE pathogenesis. One proposed role is to induce B-cell activation, culminating in increased autoantibody production. Interleukin-21 (IL-21) has been shown to be crucial in the differentiation of activated B cells into plasma cells. We therefore hypothesized that oestrogen up-regulates IL-21 production and induces subsequent B-cell activation in SLE patients. Peripheral blood was obtained from 22 SLE patients and 16 healthy controls. Expression levels of IL-21 and its receptor in serum, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and CD4(+) T cells were higher in SLE patients than in healthy controls. Exposure of CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients to 17β-oestradiol led to a dose- and time-dependent increase in IL-21 expression, which was abolished in the presence of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (MAPK kinase, p38, Jun N-terminal kinase) inhibitors. B cells from healthy controls showed increased antibody production when they were co-cultured with oestrogen-treated CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients. Treatment with IL-21 antibody abrogated the increased antibody production of the co-culture systems. This study revealed the association between oestrogen and IL-21 in SLE patients. Oestrogen up-regulates IL-21 expression of CD4(+) T cells via MAPK-dependent pathways in SLE patients, which in turn induces increased antibody production by B cells.

  16. Human Opiorphin, a natural antinociceptive modulator of opioid-dependent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wisner, Anne; Dufour, Evelyne; Messaoudi, Michaël; Nejdi, Amine; Marcel, Audrey; Ungeheuer, Marie-Noelle; Rougeot, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian zinc ectopeptidases play important roles in turning off neural and hormonal peptide signals at the cell surface, notably those processing sensory information. We report here the discovery of a previously uncharacterized physiological inhibitor of enkephalin-inactivating zinc ectopeptidases in humans, which we have named Opiorphin. It is a QRFSR peptide that inhibits two enkephalin-catabolizing ectoenzymes, human neutral ecto-endopeptidase, hNEP (EC 3.4.24.11), and human ecto-aminopeptidase, hAP-N (EC 3.4.11.2). Opiorphin displays potent analgesic activity in chemical and mechanical pain models by activating endogenous opioid-dependent transmission. Its function is closely related to the rat sialorphin peptide, which is an inhibitor of pain perception and acts by potentiating endogenous μ- and δ-opioid receptor-dependent enkephalinergic pathways. Here we demonstrate the functional specificity in vivo of human Opiorphin. The pain-suppressive potency of Opiorphin is as effective as morphine in the behavioral rat model of acute mechanical pain, the pin-pain test. Thus, our discovery of Opiorphin is extremely exciting from a physiological point of view in the context of endogenous opioidergic pathways, notably in modulating mood-related states and pain sensation. Furthermore, because of its in vivo properties, Opiorphin may have therapeutic implications. PMID:17101991

  17. Human Opiorphin, a natural antinociceptive modulator of opioid-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Wisner, Anne; Dufour, Evelyne; Messaoudi, Michaël; Nejdi, Amine; Marcel, Audrey; Ungeheuer, Marie-Noelle; Rougeot, Catherine

    2006-11-21

    Mammalian zinc ectopeptidases play important roles in turning off neural and hormonal peptide signals at the cell surface, notably those processing sensory information. We report here the discovery of a previously uncharacterized physiological inhibitor of enkephalin-inactivating zinc ectopeptidases in humans, which we have named Opiorphin. It is a QRFSR peptide that inhibits two enkephalin-catabolizing ectoenzymes, human neutral ecto-endopeptidase, hNEP (EC 3.4.24.11), and human ecto-aminopeptidase, hAP-N (EC 3.4.11.2). Opiorphin displays potent analgesic activity in chemical and mechanical pain models by activating endogenous opioid-dependent transmission. Its function is closely related to the rat sialorphin peptide, which is an inhibitor of pain perception and acts by potentiating endogenous mu- and delta-opioid receptor-dependent enkephalinergic pathways. Here we demonstrate the functional specificity in vivo of human Opiorphin. The pain-suppressive potency of Opiorphin is as effective as morphine in the behavioral rat model of acute mechanical pain, the pin-pain test. Thus, our discovery of Opiorphin is extremely exciting from a physiological point of view in the context of endogenous opioidergic pathways, notably in modulating mood-related states and pain sensation. Furthermore, because of its in vivo properties, Opiorphin may have therapeutic implications.

  18. Modulation of cytokine expression in human macrophages by endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanzhen; Mei, Chenfang; Liu, Hao; Wang, Hongsheng; Zeng, Guoqu; Lin, Jianhui; Xu, Meiying

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Effects of BPA on the cytokines expression of human macrophages were investigated. • BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 production. • BPA decreased anti-inflammation IL-10 and TGF-β production. • ERα/β/ERK/NF-κB signaling involved in BPA-mediated cytokines expression. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) is often associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of BPA on the cytokines responses of human macrophages were investigated. Treatment with BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, but decreased anti-inflammation cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in THP1 macrophages, as well as in primary human macrophages. BPA effected cytokines expression through estrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β)-dependent mechanism with the evidence of ERα/β antagonist reversed the expression of cytokines. We also identified that activation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal cascade marked the effects of BPA on cytokines expression. Our results indicated that BPA effected inflammatory responses of macrophages via modulating of cytokines expression, and provided a new insight into the link between exposure to BPA and human health.

  19. Human Milk Components Modulate Toll-Like Receptor-Mediated Inflammation.

    PubMed

    He, YingYing; Lawlor, Nathan T; Newburg, David S

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is central to innate immunity. Aberrant expression of TLRs is found in neonatal inflammatory diseases. Several bioactive components of human milk modulate TLR expression and signaling pathways, including soluble toll-like receptors (sTLRs), soluble cluster of differentiation (sCD) 14, glycoproteins, small peptides, and oligosaccharides. Some milk components, such as sialyl (α2,3) lactose and lacto-N-fucopentaose III, are reported to increase TLR signaling; under some circumstances this might contribute toward immunologic balance. Human milk on the whole is strongly anti-inflammatory, and contains abundant components that depress TLR signaling pathways: sTLR2 and sCD14 inhibit TLR2 signaling; sCD14, lactadherin, lactoferrin, and 2'-fucosyllactose attenuate TLR4 signaling; 3'-galactosyllactose inhibits TLR3 signaling, and β-defensin 2 inhibits TLR7 signaling. Feeding human milk to neonates decreases their risk of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis. Thus, the TLR regulatory components found in human milk hold promise as benign oral prophylactic and therapeutic treatments for the many gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders mediated by abnormal TLR signaling.

  20. Human Milk Components Modulate Toll-Like Receptor–Mediated Inflammation12

    PubMed Central

    He, YingYing; Lawlor, Nathan T

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is central to innate immunity. Aberrant expression of TLRs is found in neonatal inflammatory diseases. Several bioactive components of human milk modulate TLR expression and signaling pathways, including soluble toll-like receptors (sTLRs), soluble cluster of differentiation (sCD) 14, glycoproteins, small peptides, and oligosaccharides. Some milk components, such as sialyl (α2,3) lactose and lacto-N-fucopentaose III, are reported to increase TLR signaling; under some circumstances this might contribute toward immunologic balance. Human milk on the whole is strongly anti-inflammatory, and contains abundant components that depress TLR signaling pathways: sTLR2 and sCD14 inhibit TLR2 signaling; sCD14, lactadherin, lactoferrin, and 2′-fucosyllactose attenuate TLR4 signaling; 3′-galactosyllactose inhibits TLR3 signaling, and β-defensin 2 inhibits TLR7 signaling. Feeding human milk to neonates decreases their risk of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis. Thus, the TLR regulatory components found in human milk hold promise as benign oral prophylactic and therapeutic treatments for the many gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders mediated by abnormal TLR signaling. PMID:26773018

  1. A Western diet ecological module identified from the 'humanized' mouse microbiota predicts diet in adults and formula feeding in children.

    PubMed

    Siddharth, Jay; Holway, Nicholas; Parkinson, Scott J

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between diet and the microbiota has been implicated in the growing frequency of chronic diseases associated with the Western lifestyle. However, the complexity and variability of microbial ecology in humans and preclinical models has hampered identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying the association of the microbiota in this context. We sought to address two key questions. Can the microbial ecology of preclinical models predict human populations? And can we identify underlying principles that surpass the plasticity of microbial ecology in humans? To do this, we focused our study on diet; perhaps the most influential factor determining the composition of the gut microbiota. Beginning with a study in 'humanized' mice we identified an interactive module of 9 genera allied with Western diet intake. This module was applied to a controlled dietary study in humans. The abundance of the Western ecological module correctly predicted the dietary intake of 19/21 top and 21/21 of the bottom quartile samples inclusive of all 5 Western and 'low-fat' diet subjects, respectively. In 98 volunteers the abundance of the Western module correlated appropriately with dietary intake of saturated fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and fiber. Furthermore, it correlated with the geographical location and dietary habits of healthy adults from the Western, developing and third world. The module was also coupled to dietary intake in children (and piglets) correlating with formula (vs breast) feeding and associated with a precipitous development of the ecological module in young children. Our study provides a conceptual platform to translate microbial ecology from preclinical models to humans and identifies an ecological network module underlying the association of the gut microbiota with Western dietary habits.

  2. Understanding response and resistance to oestrogen deprivation in ER-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Patani, N; Martin, L-A

    2014-01-25

    Oestrogens (E) and oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα) play fundamental roles in the development and progression of more than three-quarters of breast cancers (BC). The ability to influence the natural history of BC by hormonal manipulation is well established and endocrine therapies represent the cornerstone of systemic management for women with ERα-positive disease. Endocrine agents abrogate oestrogenic signalling through distinct and incompletely overlapping mechanisms, either impeding the transcriptional activity of ERα or diminishing E-synthesis. In post-menopausal women, E-production is chiefly attributable to the enzymatic conversion of androgens in extra-gonadal tissues by the cytochrome P-450 superfamily member aromatase. Greater understanding of steroid biosynthesis has underpinned rational drug design and pharmacological development of potent and specific aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Contemporary agents induce profound E-suppression in post-menopausal women and are first-line neo-adjuvant, adjuvant and metastatic therapies, with greater efficacy and tolerability than tamoxifen. The principal qualifier for endocrine treatment, including AIs, remains ERα expression. However, it is increasingly apparent that ERα expression is not synonymous with sensitivity to treatment and insufficient to account for the considerable heterogeneity of response. Better predictive biomarkers of de novo resistance are required to improve patient selection and identify those poor-responders who may benefit from alternative or additional systemic treatment from the outset. Among patients who do respond well initially, many relapse during their clinical course and there is also an unmet need for biomarkers of acquired resistance. The majority of women who relapse on AIs continue to express functional ERα which remains a legitimate target for second-line endocrine therapy. Understanding and overcoming acquired resistance to AIs requires a greater appreciation of ERα biology and

  3. Light modulation of human sleep depends on a polymorphism in the clock gene Period3.

    PubMed

    Chellappa, Sarah L; Viola, Antoine U; Schmidt, Christina; Bachmann, Valérie; Gabel, Virginie; Maire, Micheline; Reichert, Carolin F; Valomon, Amandine; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Cajochen, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light powerfully modulate human physiology. However, it remains scarcely understood how NIF responses to light modulate human sleep and its EEG hallmarks, and if there are differences across individuals. Here we investigated NIF responses to light on sleep in individuals genotyped for the PERIOD3 (PER3) variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) polymorphism. Eighteen healthy young men (20-28 years; mean ± SEM: 25.9 ± 1.2) homozygous for the PER3 polymorphism were matched by age, body-mass index, and ethnicity. The study protocol comprised a balanced cross-over design during the winter, during which participants were exposed to either light of 40 lx at 6,500 K (blue-enriched) or light at 2,500 K (non-blue enriched), during 2h in the evening. Compared to light at 2,500 K, light at 6,500 K induced a significant increase in all-night NREM sleep slow-wave activity (SWA: 1.0-4.5 Hz) in the occipital cortex for PER3(5/5) individuals, but not for PER3(4/4) volunteers. Dynamics of SWA across sleep cycles revealed increased occipital NREM sleep SWA for virtually all sleep episode only for PER3(5/5) individuals. Furthermore, they experienced light at 6,500 K as significantly brighter. Intriguingly, this subjective perception of brightness significantly predicted their increased occipital SWA throughout the sleep episode. Our data indicate that humans homozygous for the PER3(5/5) allele are more sensitive to NIF light effects, as indexed by specific changes in sleep EEG activity. Ultimately, individual differences in NIF light responses on sleep may depend on a clock gene polymorphism involved in sleep-wake regulation.

  4. Met/HGF receptor modulates bcl-w expression and inhibits apoptosis in human colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, S; Kondo, S; Shinomura, Y; Kanayama, S; Miyazaki, Y; Kiyohara, T; Hiraoka, S; Matsuzawa, Y

    2000-01-01

    The met proto-oncogene is the tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor for hepatocyte growth factor. In the present study, we investigated the role of met expression on the modulation of apoptosis in colorectal tumours. The gene expressions of c- met and the anti-apoptotic bcl -2 family, including bcl -2, bcl -x L and bcl-w, were analysed in human colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas by using a quantitative polymerase chain-reaction combined with reverse transcription. In seven of 12 adenomas and seven of 11 carcinomas, the c- met gene was overexpressed. The bcl -w, bcl -2 and bcl -x L genes were over-expressed in nine, five and six of 12 adenomas and in five, two and seven of 11 carcinomas, respectively. The c- met mRNA level in human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas was correlated with bcl -w but not with bcl -2 or with bcl -x L mRNA level. The administration of c- met -antisense oligonucleotides decreased Met protein levels in the LoVo human colon cancer cell line. In the case of c- met -antisense-treated cells, apoptotic cell death induced by serum deprivation was more prominent, compared to control or c- met -nonsense-treated cells. Treatment with c- met -antisense oligonucleotides inhibits the gene expression of bcl -w in LoVo cells. On the other hand, the gene expression of bcl -2 or bcl -x L was not affected by treatment with c- met -antisense oligonucleotides. These findings suggest that Met expression modulates apoptosis through bcl -w expression in colorectal tumours. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10944610

  5. Prediction of in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor activity using hierarchical clustering.

    PubMed

    Martin, T M

    2016-01-01

    In this study, hierarchical clustering classification models were developed to predict in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor (ER) activity. Classification models were developed for binding, agonist, and antagonist in vitro ER activity and for mouse in vivo uterotrophic ER binding. In vitro classification models yielded balanced accuracies ranging from 0.65 to 0.85 for the external prediction set. In vivo ER classification models yielded balanced accuracies ranging from 0.72 to 0.83. If used as additional biological descriptors for in vivo models, in vitro scores were found to increase the prediction accuracy of in vivo ER models. If in vitro activity was used directly as a surrogate for in vivo activity, the results were poor (balanced accuracy ranged from 0.49 to 0.72). Under-sampling negative compounds in the training set was found to increase the coverage (fraction of chemicals which can be predicted) and increase prediction sensitivity.

  6. The oestrogen pathway underlies the evolution of exaggerated male cranial shapes in Anolis lizards

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Thomas J.; Seav, Susan M.; Tokita, Masayoshi; Langerhans, R. Brian; Ross, Lela M.; Losos, Jonathan B.; Abzhanov, Arhat

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms vary widely among species. This variation must arise through sex-specific evolutionary modifications to developmental processes. Anolis lizards vary extensively in their expression of cranial dimorphism. Compared with other Anolis species, members of the carolinensis clade have evolved relatively high levels of cranial dimorphism; males of this clade have exceptionally long faces relative to conspecific females. Developmentally, this facial length dimorphism arises through an evolutionarily novel, clade-specific strategy. Our analyses herein reveal that sex-specific regulation of the oestrogen pathway underlies evolution of this exaggerated male phenotype, rather than the androgen or insulin growth factor pathways that have long been considered the primary regulators of male-biased dimorphism among vertebrates. Our results suggest greater intricacy in the genetic mechanisms that underlie sexual dimorphisms than previously appreciated. PMID:24741020

  7. Rendu-Osler disease: treatment with oestrogen/progestagen versus octreotide

    PubMed Central

    Jeanneret, Séverin; Regazzoni, Loic; Favrat, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    In Rendu-Osler disease, haemorrhages due to gastrointestinal vascular malformations are common. Surgical and endoscopic treatments for haemorrhage due to gastrointestinal vascular malformations are compromised when lesions are diffuse, escape identification or are inaccessible to treatment. Hormonal treatment with oestrogen and progestagens is still controversial based on contradictory results from two randomised clinical trials. Although somatostatin and its long-acting analogue, octreotide, have been reported to be beneficial in preventing rebleeding, there is no consensus on this type of treatment. This case report shows how the combination of ethinyloestradiol and norethisterone markedly reduced the need for blood transfusions with few side effects in one patient; in comparison, octreotide seems less effective but this could be related to a worsening of the disease. PMID:22707551

  8. The oestrogen pathway underlies the evolution of exaggerated male cranial shapes in Anolis lizards.

    PubMed

    Sanger, Thomas J; Seav, Susan M; Tokita, Masayoshi; Langerhans, R Brian; Ross, Lela M; Losos, Jonathan B; Abzhanov, Arhat

    2014-06-07

    Sexual dimorphisms vary widely among species. This variation must arise through sex-specific evolutionary modifications to developmental processes. Anolis lizards vary extensively in their expression of cranial dimorphism. Compared with other Anolis species, members of the carolinensis clade have evolved relatively high levels of cranial dimorphism; males of this clade have exceptionally long faces relative to conspecific females. Developmentally, this facial length dimorphism arises through an evolutionarily novel, clade-specific strategy. Our analyses herein reveal that sex-specific regulation of the oestrogen pathway underlies evolution of this exaggerated male phenotype, rather than the androgen or insulin growth factor pathways that have long been considered the primary regulators of male-biased dimorphism among vertebrates. Our results suggest greater intricacy in the genetic mechanisms that underlie sexual dimorphisms than previously appreciated.

  9. Spaceship Discovery's Crew and Cargo Lander Module Designs for Human Exploration of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, Mark G.

    2008-01-01

    The Spaceship Discovery design was first presented at STAIF 2006. This conceptual design space vehicle architecture for human solar system exploration includes two types of Mars exploration lander modules: A piloted crew lander, designated Lander Module 2 (LM2), and an autonomous cargo lander, designated Lander Module 3 (LM3). The LM2 and LM3 designs were first presented at AIAA Space 2007. The LM2 and LM3 concepts have recently been extensively redesigned. The specific objective of this paper is to present these revised designs. The LM2 and LM3 landers are based on a common design that can be configured to carry either crew or cargo. They utilize a combination of aerodynamic reentry, parachutes, and propulsive braking to decelerate from orbital velocity to a soft landing. The LM2 crew lander provides two-way transportation for a nominal three-person crew between Mars orbit and the surface, and provides life support for a 30-day contingency mission. It contains an ascent section to return the crew to orbit after completion of surface operations. The LM3 cargo lander provides one-way, autonomous transportation of cargo from Mars orbit to the surface and can be configured to carry a mix of consumables and equipment, or equipment only. Lander service life and endurance is based on the Spaceship Discovery conjunction-class Design Reference Mission 2. The LM3 is designed to extend the surface stay for three crew members in an LM2 crew lander such that two sets of crew and cargo landers enable human exploration of the surface for the bulk of the 454 day wait time at Mars, in two shifts of three crew members each. Design requirements, mission profiles, mass properties, performance data, and configuration layouts are presented for the LM2 crew and LM3 cargo landers. These lander designs are a proposed solution to the problem of safely transporting a human crew from Mars orbit to the surface, sustaining them for extended periods of time on the surface, and returning them

  10. Direct and indirect responses of a freshwater food web to a potent synthetic oestrogen

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Karen A.; Paterson, Michael J.; Rennie, Michael D.; Podemski, Cheryl L.; Findlay, Dave L.; Blanchfield, Paul J.; Liber, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in municipal effluents directly affect the sexual development and reproductive success of fishes, but indirect effects on invertebrate prey or fish predators through reduced predation or prey availability, respectively, are unknown. At the Experimental Lakes Area in northwestern Ontario, Canada, a long-term, whole-lake experiment was conducted using a before-after-control-impact design to determine both direct and indirect effects of the synthetic oestrogen used in the birth control pill, 17α-ethynyloestradiol (EE2). Algal, microbial, zooplankton and benthic invertebrate communities showed no declines in abundance during three summers of EE2 additions (5–6 ng l−1), indicating no direct toxic effects. Recruitment of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) failed, leading to a near-extirpation of this species both 2 years during (young-of-year, YOY) and 2 years following (adults and YOY) EE2 additions. Body condition of male lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and male and female white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) declined before changes in prey abundance, suggesting direct effects of EE2 on this endpoint. Evidence of indirect effects of EE2 was also observed. Increases in zooplankton, Chaoborus, and emerging insects were observed after 2 or 3 years of EE2 additions, strongly suggesting indirect effects mediated through the reduced abundance of several small-bodied fishes. Biomass of top predator lake trout declined by 23–42% during and after EE2 additions, most probably an indirect effect from the loss of its prey species, the fathead minnow and slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus). Our results demonstrate that small-scale studies focusing solely on direct effects are likely to underestimate the true environmental impacts of oestrogens in municipal wastewaters and provide further evidence of the value of whole-ecosystem experiments for understanding indirect effects of EDCs and other aquatic stressors. PMID:25405967

  11. Puerperal Thromboembolism in Relation to the Inhibition of Lactation by Oestrogen Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jeffcoate, T. N. A.; Miller, Janine; Roos, R. F.; Tindall, V. R.

    1968-01-01

    An analysis was made of 111 consecutive cases of puerperal thromboembolism by the age, parity, mode of delivery, and lactation habit of the women concerned, and the findings were compared with those from control groups. The statistics show that inhibition of lactation by means of ethinyloestradiol is associated with a threefold increase in thromboembolism, although the effect is seen mainly in women who have an operative delivery and who are aged more than 25 years. Among women aged more than 35 years who have an assisted delivery, inhibition of lactation is accompanied by a tenfold increase in the incidence of puerperal thromboembolism. Advancing age and operative intervention (especially caesarean section) are in themselves predisposing causes of deep venous thrombosis and embolism. They can also constitute indications for inhibiting lactation. This makes it difficult to assess whether the relation of thromboembolism to inhibition of lactation or to the administration of oestrogen is real or apparent. Doubts on the interpretation of the findings are raised by the fact that the number of fatal cases of puerperal thromboembolism in England and Wales, and of non-fatal cases in the hospitals under review, has not increased in recent years despite a progressive decrease in breast-feeding. Nevertheless, the evidence suggests that although the administration of ethinyloestradiol is not by itself enough to cause puerperal thromboembolism, it may be a factor which can tip the scales in women who are already predisposed to suffer this condition. Any thromboembolic hazard associated with administration of oestrogens for inhibiting lactation is probably acceptable except in women known to be at special risk by reason of age, operative delivery, obesity, and a past history of thromboembolic episodes. PMID:5677208

  12. Leptin differentially increases sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation in female rats: role of oestrogen.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-04-01

    Obesity and hypertension are commonly associated, and activation of the sympathetic nervous system is considered to be a major contributor, at least in part due to the central actions of leptin. However, while leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. Here, we show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) leptin increases lumbar (LSNA) and renal (RSNA) SNA and baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA in α-chloralose anaesthetized female rats, but only during pro-oestrus. In contrast, i.c.v. leptin increased basal and baroreflex control of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) and heart rate (HR) in rats in both the pro-oestrus and dioestrus states. The effects of leptin on basal LSNA, RSNA, SSNA and HR were similar in males and pro-oestrus females; however, i.c.v. leptin increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) only in males. Leptin did not alter LSNA or HR in ovariectomized rats, but its effects were normalized with 4 days of oestrogen treatment. Bilateral nanoinjection of SHU9119 into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), to block α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) type 3 and 4 receptors, decreased LSNA in leptin-treated pro-oestrus but not dioestrus rats. Unlike leptin, i.c.v. insulin infusion increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA and HR similarly in pro-oestrus and dioestrus rats; these responses did not differ from those in male rats. We conclude that, in female rats, leptin's stimulatory effects on SNA are differentially enhanced by oestrogen, at least in part via an increase in α-MSH activity in the PVN. These data further suggest that the actions of leptin and insulin to increase the activity of various sympathetic nerves occur via different neuronal pathways or cellular mechanisms. These results may explain the poor correlation in females of SNA with adiposity, or of MAP with leptin.

  13. Exogenous Estradiol Benzoate Induces Spermatogenesis Disorder through Influencing Apoptosis and Oestrogen Receptor Signalling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lei, X; Cui, K; Liu, Q; Zhang, H; Li, Z; Huang, B; Shi, D

    2016-02-01

    As the exact role for exogenous oestrogen in spermatogenesis is not fully understood, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of estradiol benzoate (EB) exposure to male mice on their spermatogenesis and fertility. Sixty male mice aged 4 weeks were randomly divided into three groups, including a control group and two treatment groups. The mice of the control group were injected with 250 μl paraffin oil only by every other day subcutaneous injection for 4 weeks. Meantime, the mice of the treatment groups were injected with EB at the concentration of 5 or 10 mg/kg, respectively. Results showed that EB slowed down the body weight gains and generated testicular atrophy with spermatogenesis disorder compared with that of the control mice, and consequently induced their infertility. Moreover, the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the testis of EB-treated mice was significantly increased with the EB concentration rise. In comparison with controls, the mRNA expression level of pro-apoptosis factors (Fas, TNF, Cytochrome C, Apaf1, Chop, Caspase-3, Caspase-8, Caspase-9 and Caspase-12) and key genes in oestrogen receptor (ER) signalling pathway (ER α, ER β, Erk1/2, Hsp90 and DAX-1) were upregulated in the testes of the treatment groups. Furthermore, Western blotting results proved the protein expression level of Fas, TNF, Cytochrome C, Chop, Caspase-3, cleaved Caspase-3, Caspase-9, Erk1/2 and Hsp90 were upregulated, and the phosphorylation level of Erk1/2 was also increased. These results indicate that EB may impair spermatogenesis through influencing the apoptosis and ER signalling pathway.

  14. Role of Oestrogen α Receptors in Sociosexual Behaviour in Female Rats Housed in a Seminatural Environment.

    PubMed

    Snoeren, E M S; Antonio-Cabrera, E; Spiteri, T; Musatov, S; Ogawa, S; Pfaff, D W; Ågmo, A

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated the role of oestrogen receptor (ER)α in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN), the preoptic area (POA), the medial amygdala (MePD) and the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST) in sociosexual behaviour in female rats. This was conducted in two sets of experiments, with the VMN and POA investigated in the first set, and the MePD and BNST in the second set. The VMN and POA received intense projections from the MePD and BNST. We used a short hairpin RNA encoded within an adeno-associated viral vector directed against the gene for ERα to reduce the number of ERα in the VMN or POA (first set of experiments) or in the BNST or MePD (second set of experiments) in female rats. The rats were housed in groups of four ovariectomised females and three males in a seminatural environment for 8 days. Compared with traditional test set-ups, the seminatural environment provides an arena in which the rats can express their full behavioural repertoire, which allowed us to investigate multiple aspects of social and sexual behaviour in groups of rats. Behavioural observation was performed after oestrogen and progesterone injections. A reduction of ERα expression in the VMN or POA diminished the display of paracopulatory behaviours and lordosis responses compared to controls, whereas the lordosis quotient remained unaffected. This suggests that ERα in the VMN and POA play an important role in intrinsic sexual motivation. The reduction in ERα did not affect the social behaviour of the females, although the males sniffed and pursued the females with reduced ERα less than the controls. This suggests that the ERα in the VMN and POA is involved in the regulation of sexual attractiveness of females. The ERα in the MePD and BNST, on the other hand, plays no role in sociosexual behaviour.

  15. Modulation of interleukin-1beta mediated inflammatory response in human astrocytes by flavonoids: implications in neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Mishra, Mamata; Ghosh, Soumya; Tewari, Richa; Basu, Anirban; Seth, Pankaj; Sen, Ellora

    2007-06-15

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) contributes to inflammation and neuronal death in CNS injuries and neurodegenerative pathologies, and astrocytes have been implicated as the primary mediators of IL-1beta induced neuronal death. As astrocytes play an important role in supporting the survival and functions of neurons, we investigated the effect of plant flavonoids quercetin and luteolin, with known anti-inflammatory properties in modulating the response of human astrocytes to IL-1beta for therapeutic intervention. Flavonoids significantly decreased the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from astrocytes stimulated with IL-1beta. This decrease was accompanied by an increase in expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) and thioredoxin (TRX1)-mediators associated with protection against oxidative stress. Flavonoids not only modulated the expression of astrocytes specific molecules such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamine synthetase (GS), and ceruloplasmin (CP) both in the presence and absence of IL-1beta but also decreased the elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), interferon-inducible protein (IP-10), monocyte-chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and RANTES from IL-1beta activated astrocytes. Significant decrease in neuronal apoptosis was observed in neurons cultured in conditioned medium obtained from astrocytes treated with a combination of IL-1beta and flavonoids as compared to that treated with IL-1beta alone. Our result suggests that by (i) enhancing the potential of activated astrocytes to detoxify free radical, (ii) reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and (iii) modulating expression of mediators associated with enhanced physiological activity of astrocyte in response to injury, flavonoids confer (iv) protection against IL-1beta induced astrocyte mediated neuronal damage.

  16. Abnormal dopaminergic modulation of striato-cortical networks underlies levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans.

    PubMed

    Herz, Damian M; Haagensen, Brian N; Christensen, Mark S; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Rowe, James B; Løkkegaard, Annemette; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2015-06-01

    Dopaminergic signalling in the striatum contributes to reinforcement of actions and motivational enhancement of motor vigour. Parkinson's disease leads to progressive dopaminergic denervation of the striatum, impairing the function of cortico-basal ganglia networks. While levodopa therapy alleviates basal ganglia dysfunction in Parkinson's disease, it often elicits involuntary movements, referred to as levodopa-induced peak-of-dose dyskinesias. Here, we used a novel pharmacodynamic neuroimaging approach to identify the changes in cortico-basal ganglia connectivity that herald the emergence of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Twenty-six patients with Parkinson's disease (age range: 51-84 years; 11 females) received a single dose of levodopa and then performed a task in which they had to produce or suppress a movement in response to visual cues. Task-related activity was continuously mapped with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic causal modelling was applied to assess levodopa-induced modulation of effective connectivity between the pre-supplementary motor area, primary motor cortex and putamen when patients suppressed a motor response. Bayesian model selection revealed that patients who later developed levodopa-induced dyskinesias, but not patients without dyskinesias, showed a linear increase in connectivity between the putamen and primary motor cortex after levodopa intake during movement suppression. Individual dyskinesia severity was predicted by levodopa-induced modulation of striato-cortical feedback connections from putamen to the pre-supplementary motor area (Pcorrected = 0.020) and primary motor cortex (Pcorrected = 0.044), but not feed-forward connections from the cortex to the putamen. Our results identify for the first time, aberrant dopaminergic modulation of striatal-cortical connectivity as a neural signature of levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans. We argue that excessive striato-cortical connectivity in response to levodopa produces an

  17. Modulation of virulence factors in Francisella tularensis determines human macrophage responses

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Paul E.; Carroll, James A.; O’Dee, Dawn M.; Nau, Gerard J.

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia and Category A biodefense agent, is known to replicate within host macrophages, though the pathogenesis of this organism is incompletely understood. We have isolated a variant of F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) based on colony morphology and its effect on macrophages. Human monocyte-derived macrophages produced more tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-12 p40 following exposure to the variant, designated the activating variant (ACV). The immunoreactivity of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from both LVS and ACV was comparable to the previously described blue variant and was distinct from the gray variant of LVS. We found, however, the soluble protein fractions of LVS and ACV differed. Further investigation using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis demonstrated higher levels of several proteins in the parental LVS isolate. The differentially-expressed proteins featured several associated with virulence in F. tularensis and other pathogens, including intracellular growth locus C (IglC), a σ54 modulation protein family member (YhbH), and aconitase. ACV reverted to the LVS phenotype, indicated by low cytokine induction and high IglC expression, after growth in a chemically-defined media. These data provide evidence that the levels of virulence factors in F. tularensis are modulated based on culture conditions and that this modulation impacts host responses. This work provides a basis for investigation of Francisella virulence factor regulation and the identification of additional factors, co-regulated with IglC, that affect macrophage responses. PMID:17369012

  18. Exposure to Ozone Modulates Human Airway Protease/Antiprotease Balance Contributing to Increased Influenza A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kesic, Matthew J.; Meyer, Megan; Bauer, Rebecca; Jaspers, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with increased respiratory morbidities and susceptibility to infections. Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known. The greater Mexico City area was the primary site for the spring 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic, which also coincided with high levels of environmental ozone. Proteolytic cleavage of the viral membrane protein hemagglutinin (HA) is essential for influenza virus infectivity. Recent studies suggest that HA cleavage might be cell-associated and facilitated by the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) human airway trypsin-like protease (HAT) and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2), whose activities are regulated by antiproteases, such as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). Based on these observations, we sought to determine how acute exposure to ozone may modulate cellular protease/antiprotease expression and function, and to define their roles in a viral infection. We utilized our in vitro model of differentiated human nasal epithelial cells (NECs) to determine the effects of ozone on influenza cleavage, entry, and replication. We show that ozone exposure disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance within the airway liquid. We also determined that functional forms of HAT, TMPRSS2, and SLPI are secreted from human airway epithelium, and acute exposure to ozone inversely alters their expression levels. We also show that addition of antioxidants significantly reduces virus replication through the induction of SLPI. In addition, we determined that ozone-induced cleavage of the viral HA protein is not cell-associated and that secreted endogenous proteases are sufficient to activate HA leading to a significant increase in viral replication. Our data indicate that pre-exposure to ozone disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance found in the human airway, leading to increased influenza susceptibility. PMID

  19. MRI-constrained spectral imaging of benzodiazepine modulation of spontaneous neuromagnetic activity in human cortex.

    PubMed

    Ahveninen, Jyrki; Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Kivisaari, Reetta; Autti, Taina; Hämäläinen, Matti; Stufflebeam, Steven; Belliveau, John W; Kähkönen, Seppo

    2007-04-01

    Spontaneous electromagnetic brain rhythms have been widely used in human neuropharmacology, but their applicability is complicated by the difficulties to localize their origins in the human cortex. Here, we used a novel multi-modal non-invasive imaging approach to localize lorazepam (30 microg/kg i.v.) modulation of cortical generators of spontaneous brain rhythms. Eight healthy subjects were measured with 306-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled (saline), crossover design. For anatomically realistic source modeling, wavelet-transformed MEG data were combined with high-resolution MRI to constrain the current locations to the cortical mantle, after which individual data were co-registered to surface-based coordinate system for the calculation of group statistical parametric maps of drug effects. The distributed MRI-constrained MEG source estimates demonstrated decreased alpha (10 Hz) activity in and around the parieto-occipital sulcus and in the calcarine sulcus of the occipital lobe, following from increased GABA(A)-inhibition by lorazepam. Anatomically constrained spectral imaging displays the cortical loci of drug effects on oscillatory brain activity, providing a novel tool for human pharmacological neuroimaging.

  20. Global gain modulation generates time-dependent urgency during perceptual choice in humans

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Peter R.; Boonstra, Evert; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Decision-makers must often balance the desire to accumulate information with the costs of protracted deliberation. Optimal, reward-maximizing decision-making can require dynamic adjustment of this speed/accuracy trade-off over the course of a single decision. However, it is unclear whether humans are capable of such time-dependent adjustments. Here, we identify several signatures of time-dependency in human perceptual decision-making and highlight their possible neural source. Behavioural and model-based analyses reveal that subjects respond to deadline-induced speed pressure by lowering their criterion on accumulated perceptual evidence as the deadline approaches. In the brain, this effect is reflected in evidence-independent urgency that pushes decision-related motor preparation signals closer to a fixed threshold. Moreover, we show that global modulation of neural gain, as indexed by task-related fluctuations in pupil diameter, is a plausible biophysical mechanism for the generation of this urgency. These findings establish context-sensitive time-dependency as a critical feature of human decision-making. PMID:27882927

  1. Tetraspanin CD9 modulates human lymphoma cellular proliferation via histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Herr, Michael J.; Longhurst, Celia M.; Baker, Benjamin; Homayouni, Ramin; Speich, Henry E.; Kotha, Jayaprakash; Jennings, Lisa K.

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD9 is differentially expressed in human Burkitt’s lymphoma cells. • We found that CD9 expression promotes these cells proliferation. • CD9 expression also increases HDAC activity. • HDAC inhibition decreased both cell proliferation and importantly CD9 expression. • CD9 may dictate HDAC efficacy and play a role in HDAC regulation. - Abstract: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) is a type of hematological malignancy that affects two percent of the overall population in the United States. Tetraspanin CD9 is a cell surface protein that has been thoroughly demonstrated to be a molecular facilitator of cellular phenotype. CD9 expression varies in two human lymphoma cell lines, Raji and BJAB. In this report, we investigated the functional relationship between CD9 and cell proliferation regulated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in these two cell lines. Introduction of CD9 expression in Raji cells resulted in significantly increased cell proliferation and HDAC activity compared to Mock transfected Raji cells. The increase in CD9–Raji cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) treatment. Pretreatment of BJAB cells with HDAC inhibitors resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous CD9 mRNA and cell surface expression. BJAB cells also displayed decreased cell proliferation after HDACi treatment. These results suggest a significant relationship between CD9 expression and cell proliferation in human lymphoma cells that may be modulated by HDAC activity.

  2. Differential modulation of human intestinal bifidobacterium populations after consumption of a wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) drink.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Fracassetti, Daniela; Taverniti, Valentina; Del Bo', Cristian; Vendrame, Stefano; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Arioli, Stefania; Riso, Patrizia; Porrini, Marisa

    2013-08-28

    Bifidobacteria are gaining increasing interest as health-promoting bacteria. Nonetheless, the genus comprises several species, which can exert different effects on human host. Previous studies showed that wild blueberry drink consumption could selectively increase intestinal bifidobacteria, suggesting an important role for the polyphenols and fiber present in wild blueberries. This study evaluated the modulation of the most common and abundant bifidobacterial taxonomic groups inhabiting the human gut in the same fecal samples. The analyses carried out showed that B. adolescentis, B. breve, B. catenulatum/pseudocatelulatum, and B. longum subsp. longum were always present in the group of subjects enrolled, whereas B. bifidum and B. longum subsp. infantis were not. Furthermore, it was found that the most predominant bifidobacterial species were B. longum subsp. longum and B. adolescentis. The results obtained revealed a high interindividual variability; however, a significant increase of B. longum subsp. infantis cell concentration was observed in the feces of volunteers after the wild blueberry drink treatment. This bifidobacterial group was shown to possess immunomodulatory abilities and to relieve symptoms and promote the regression of several gastrointestinal disorders. Thus, an increased cell concentration of B. longum subsp. infantis in the human gut could be considered of potential health benefit. In conclusion, wild blueberry consumption resulted in a specific bifidogenic effect that could positively affect certain populations of bifidobacteria with demonstrated health-promoting properties.

  3. Serum supplementation modulates the effects of dibutyltin on human natural killer cell function.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Margaret M; DeWitt, Jamie C; Luebke, Robert W

    2008-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a subset of lymphocytes capable of killing tumor cells, virally infected cells and antibody-coated cells. Dibutyltin (DBT) dichloride is an organotin used as a stabilizer in polyvinylchloride (PVC) plastics and as a deworming product in poultry. DBT may leach from PVC water supply pipes and therefore poses a potential risk to human health. We previously reported diminished NK cells lysis of tumor cells following exposure to DBT in serum-free cell culture medium. However, under in vivo conditions, circulating cells will be exposed to DBT in the presence of 100% plasma; thus we investigated whether serum supplementation and incubation time modulates DBT effects on NK cell killing and the accumulation of DBT in freshly isolated NK cells, to determine whether a serum-free model accurately predicts possible effects of DBT on human NK cells under in vivo conditions. Lytic function was decreased by approximately 35% at an intracellular DBT (DBTi) concentration of 200 microM and nearly complete loss of lytic function was observed at DBTi above 300 microM for one h. However, an intracellular concentration of 50 microM DBT, achieved over 24 h of exposure in 50% serum, reduced lytic function by 50%. Thus, conditions that reflect prolonged contact with circulating DBT, in the presence of serum, suggest that NK cell activity is decreased at lower DBTi. These data indicate that the model is useful in predicting potential human effects of relatively low DBTi concentrations.

  4. Improved epidermal barrier formation in human skin models by chitosan modulated dermal matrices

    PubMed Central

    Mieremet, Arnout; Rietveld, Marion; Absalah, Samira; van Smeden, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Full thickness human skin models (FTMs) contain an epidermal and a dermal equivalent. The latter is composed of a collagen dermal matrix which harbours fibroblasts. Current epidermal barrier properties of FTMs do not fully resemble that of native human skin (NHS), which makes these human skin models less suitable for barrier related studies. To further enhance the resemblance of NHS for epidermal morphogenesis and barrier formation, we modulated the collagen dermal matrix with the biocompatible polymer chitosan. Herein, we report that these collagen-chitosan FTMs (CC-FTMs) possess a well-organized epidermis and maintain both the early and late differentiation programs as in FTMs. Distinctively, the epidermal cell activation is reduced in CC-FTMs to levels observed in NHS. Dermal-epidermal interactions are functional in both FTM types, based on the formation of the basement membrane. Evaluation of the barrier structure by the organization of the extracellular lipid matrix of the stratum corneum revealed an elongated repeat distance of the long periodicity phase. The ceramide composition exhibited a higher resemblance of the NHS, based on the carbon chain-length distribution and subclass profile. The inside-out barrier functionality indicated by the transepidermal water loss is significantly improved in the CC-FTMs. The expression of epidermal barrier lipid processing enzymes is marginally affected, although more restricted to a single granular layer. The novel CC-FTM resembles the NHS more closely, which makes them a promising tool for epidermal barrier related studies. PMID:28333992

  5. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christine A; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K Luan

    2014-09-01

    Pre-extinction administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely occurs via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 h after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders.

  6. Hypergravity modulates cyclic GMP efflux in nitric oxide-stimulated human melanocytic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieber, Christiane; Ivannova, Krassimira; Block, Ingrid; Gerzer, Rupert

    2005-08-01

    Gravity alteration is known to influence cell functions. We recently found that hypergravity may stimulate cGMP efflux in human melanocytic cells when cGMP hydrolysis is inhibited. Here we examined whether hypergravity modulates cGMP efflux in nitric oxide (NO)-stimulated melanocytes and melanoma cells (MCs) using NONOates as direct NO donors. In the presence of 0.1 mM DETA-NO and long-term application of hypergravity (up to 5g for 24 h) an elevated cGMP efflux in cultured melanocytes and non-metastatic MCs compared to 1g was observed, whereas short-term exposure was not effective. The hypergravity-stimulated cGMP efflux was inhibited by 1 μM trequinsin, a selective inhibitor of the multidrug resistance proteins 4 and 5 (MRP4/5). The results of the present study indicate that hypergravity may stimulate cGMP efflux in NO- stimulated human melanocytes and non-metastatic MCs most probably by an enhanced expression of MRP4/5. Thus, an altered acceleration vector may induce signaling events in human melanocytic cells.

  7. Sensitivity to temporal modulation rate and spectral bandwidth in the human auditory system: fMRI evidence.

    PubMed

    Overath, Tobias; Zhang, Yue; Sanes, Dan H; Poeppel, David

    2012-04-01

    Hierarchical models of auditory processing often posit that optimal stimuli, i.e., those eliciting a maximal neural response, will increase in bandwidth and decrease in modulation rate as one ascends the auditory neuraxis. Here, we tested how bandwidth and modulation rate interact at several loci along the human central auditory pathway using functional MRI in a cardiac-gated, sparse acquisition design. Participants listened passively to both narrowband (NB) and broadband (BB) carriers (1/4- or 4-octave pink noise), which were jittered about a mean sinusoidal amplitude modulation rate of 0, 3, 29, or 57 Hz. The jittering was introduced to minimize stimulus-specific adaptation. The results revealed a clear difference between spectral bandwidth and temporal modulation rate: sensitivity to bandwidth (BB > NB) decreased from subcortical structures to nonprimary auditory cortex, whereas sensitivity to slow modulation rates was largest in nonprimary auditory cortex and largely absent in subcortical structures. Furthermore, there was no parametric interaction between bandwidth and modulation rate. These results challenge simple hierarchical models, in that BB stimuli evoked stronger responses in primary auditory cortex (and subcortical structures) rather than nonprimary cortex. Furthermore, the strong preference for slow modulation rates in nonprimary cortex demonstrates the compelling global sensitivity of auditory cortex to modulation rates that are dominant in the principal signals that we process, e.g., speech.

  8. Modulation of ABH histo-blood group antigen expression in normal and myasthenic human thymus.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Victoria S; Marinova, Tsvetana T

    2006-10-01

    The role of ABH histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) in intercellular communication during normal and pathological processes is still uncertain. The present work investigates the expression of ABH HBGA in epithelial cells and lymphocytes in normal thymus, and characterizes the modulation of their immunoreactivity during myasthenic transformation. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy were applied on normal young thymus and on myasthenia gravis-associated thymomas and thymic hyperplasias. The Hassall's corpuscules in the thymus of young individuals were homogeneously stained for HBGA, while in hyperplastic glands only their central part was positive. Stromal epithelial cells permanently expressed HBGA in all tissue samples. In thymomas, mainly the lymphocytes in close proximity to antigen expressing epithelial cells were positive, while in the hyperplastic gland the most intensely stained lymphocytes were those within Hassall's corpuscules. Novel evidence for modulation of ABH antigen reactivity in normal and myasthenic human thymus is presented. It suggests that HBGA might participate in the regulation of the cross-talk in the thymocyte microenvironment throughout the ontogeny, as well as during the myasthenic transformation.

  9. Modulation of human auditory spatial scene analysis by transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lewald, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Localizing and selectively attending to the source of a sound of interest in a complex auditory environment is an important capacity of the human auditory system. The underlying neural mechanisms have, however, still not been clarified in detail. This issue was addressed by using bilateral bipolar-balanced transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in combination with a task demanding free-field sound localization in the presence of multiple sound sources, thus providing a realistic simulation of the so-called "cocktail-party" situation. With left-anode/right-cathode, but not with right-anode/left-cathode, montage of bilateral electrodes, tDCS over superior temporal gyrus, including planum temporale and auditory cortices, was found to improve the accuracy of target localization in left hemispace. No effects were found for tDCS over inferior parietal lobule or with off-target active stimulation over somatosensory-motor cortex that was used to control for non-specific effects. Also, the absolute error in localization remained unaffected by tDCS, thus suggesting that general response precision was not modulated by brain polarization. This finding can be explained in the framework of a model assuming that brain polarization modulated the suppression of irrelevant sound sources, thus resulting in more effective spatial separation of the target from the interfering sound in the complex auditory scene.

  10. Extracellular protonation modulates cell-cell interaction mechanics and tissue invasion in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hofschröer, Verena; Koch, Kevin Alexander; Ludwig, Florian Timo; Friedl, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Stock, Christian; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Detachment of cells from the primary tumour precedes metastatic progression by facilitating cell release into the tissue. Solid tumours exhibit altered pH homeostasis with extracellular acidification. In human melanoma, the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 is an important modifier of the tumour nanoenvironment. Here we tested the modulation of cell-cell-adhesion by extracellular pH and NHE1. MV3 tumour spheroids embedded in a collagen matrix unravelled the efficacy of cell-cell contact loosening and 3D emigration into an environment mimicking physiological confinement. Adhesive interaction strength between individual MV3 cells was quantified using atomic force microscopy and validated by multicellular aggregation assays. Extracellular acidification from pHe7.4 to 6.4 decreases cell migration and invasion but increases single cell detachment from the spheroids. Acidification and NHE1 overexpression both reduce cell-cell adhesion strength, indicated by reduced maximum pulling forces and adhesion energies. Multicellular aggregation and spheroid formation are strongly impaired under acidification or NHE1 overexpression. We show a clear dependence of melanoma cell-cell adhesion on pHe and NHE1 as a modulator. These effects are opposite to cell-matrix interactions that are strengthened by protons extruded via NHE1. We conclude that these opposite effects of NHE1 act synergistically during the metastatic cascade. PMID:28205573

  11. Luteinizing hormone modulates intracellular calcium, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and motility during human sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    López-Torres, Aideé S; González-González, María E; Mata-Martínez, Esperanza; Larrea, Fernando; Treviño, Claudia L; Chirinos, Mayel

    2017-02-05

    In order to fertilize, spermatozoa must undergo physiological and biochemical changes during their transit along the female reproductive tract before reaching and fusing with the oocyte, process known as capacitation. Sperm modifications associated with capacitation are modulated by their interaction with molecules present in the female reproductive tract. During the woman fertile window, some reproductive hormones reach their maximum concentrations in serum, such as the luteinizing hormone (LH). Since spermatozoa preparing to fertilize may be exposed to LH, the purpose of this work was to study the effects of this hormone on intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i), protein tyrosine phosphorylation, sperm motility and acrosome reaction under capacitating conditions. The results showed that LH increases the duration and amplitude of Ca(2+) oscillations. Furthermore, motility analysis indicated that LH decreases rapid progressive motility and that sperm hyperactivation as well as several kinetic parameters augment in the presence of 0.5 and 1 μg/ml of the hormone. In addition, these two hormone concentrations also consistently promoted protein tyrosine phosphorylation. However, no effects on acrosome reaction were observed. In conclusion, the evidence indicates that LH modulates several sperm function variables involved in capacitation, suggesting that may have an important and unexplored role during human fertilization.

  12. Extracellular protonation modulates cell-cell interaction mechanics and tissue invasion in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hofschröer, Verena; Koch, Kevin Alexander; Ludwig, Florian Timo; Friedl, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Stock, Christian; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-02-13

    Detachment of cells from the primary tumour precedes metastatic progression by facilitating cell release into the tissue. Solid tumours exhibit altered pH homeostasis with extracellular acidification. In human melanoma, the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1 is an important modifier of the tumour nanoenvironment. Here we tested the modulation of cell-cell-adhesion by extracellular pH and NHE1. MV3 tumour spheroids embedded in a collagen matrix unravelled the efficacy of cell-cell contact loosening and 3D emigration into an environment mimicking physiological confinement. Adhesive interaction strength between individual MV3 cells was quantified using atomic force microscopy and validated by multicellular aggregation assays. Extracellular acidification from pHe7.4 to 6.4 decreases cell migration and invasion but increases single cell detachment from the spheroids. Acidification and NHE1 overexpression both reduce cell-cell adhesion strength, indicated by reduced maximum pulling forces and adhesion energies. Multicellular aggregation and spheroid formation are strongly impaired under acidification or NHE1 overexpression. We show a clear dependence of melanoma cell-cell adhesion on pHe and NHE1 as a modulator. These effects are opposite to cell-matrix interactions that are strengthened by protons extruded via NHE1. We conclude that these opposite effects of NHE1 act synergistically during the metastatic cascade.

  13. Modulation of human alveolar macrophage properties by ozone exposure in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.; Madden, M.C.; Newman, S.L.; Devlin, R.B.; Koren, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    The study investigated changes in human alveolar macrophage (HAM) function after exposure in vitro to ozone (O3)(0.1-1.0 ppm for 2-4 hr). The functions studied reflect concern that O3 is detrimental to host defense mechanisms in the bronchoalveolar spaces. Exposure of HAM to O3 caused a concentration-dependent increase in release of prostaglandin E2(PGE2), an important modulator of inflammation, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst. Although phagocytosis of particulate immune complexes was decreased by O3, the authors found no change in the quantity of Fc receptors and complement receptors on the HAM surface. Superoxide (O2) production in response to phorbol ester was reduced after exposure of HAM to O3 while the basal O2 release in response to plastic adherence was not affected. Growth inhibition of the opportunistic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans by HAM was not affected by O3 exposure. The production of inflammatory mediators and immune modulators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6 were not induced by exposure to O3. However, compared to controls, O3-exposed HAM produced significantly lower levels of these cytokines when simulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

  14. An unavoidable modulation? Sensory attention and human primary motor cortex excitability.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Diane; Muggleton, Neil; Hoad, Damon; Caronni, Antonio; Rothwell, John C

    2014-09-01

    The link between basic physiology and its modulation by cognitive states, such as attention, is poorly understood. A significant association becomes apparent when patients with movement disorders describe experiences with changing their attention focus and the fundamental effect that this has on their motor symptoms. Moreover, frequently used mental strategies for treating such patients, e.g. with task-specific dystonia, widely lack laboratory-based knowledge about physiological mechanisms. In this largely unexplored field, we looked at how the locus of attention, when it changed between internal (locus hand) and external (visual target), influenced excitability in the primary motor cortex (M1) in healthy humans. Intriguingly, both internal and external attention had the capacity to change M1 excitability. Both led to a reduced stimulation-induced GABA-related inhibition and a change in motor evoked potential size, i.e. an overall increased M1 excitability. These previously unreported findings indicated: (i) that cognitive state differentially interacted with M1 physiology, (ii) that our view of distraction (attention locus shifted towards external or distant location), which is used as a prevention or management strategy for use-dependent motor disorders, is too simple and currently unsupported for clinical application, and (iii) the physiological state reached through attention modulation represents an alternative explanation for frequently reported electrophysiology findings in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as an aberrant inhibition.

  15. The therapeutic potential of RORγ modulators in the treatment of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mi Ra; Goswami, Devrishi; Mercer, Becky A; Griffin, Patrick R

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are ligand-regulated transcription factors that bind DNA in proximity to their target genes and exert their effects as a result of binding by small molecule ligands such as sterols, lipids, fatty acids, retinoids, and steroid hormones. The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors or RORs (NR1F1–NR1F3) are nuclear receptors that regulate multiple cellular processes, including metabolism, cellular differentiation, and apoptosis, in a range of tissues and organs. These receptors bind as monomers to ROR response elements commonly called ROREs present in promoter regions of target genes and tether chromatin remodeling enzymes, facilitating recruitment of transcription machinery. Several recent reports have highlighted the potential role for RORs in human disease, and more importantly, studies have demonstrated that these receptors can be modulated by exogenous synthetic ligands, paving the way for development of novel therapeutics. Here we review the current status of synthetic ligand development as well as the structural aspects governing modulation of ROR signaling pathways as they relate to metabolic diseases and autoimmune disorders. PMID:27186126

  16. Modulation of the cytokine response in human monocytes by mycobacterium leprae phenolic glycolipid-1.

    PubMed

    Manca, Claudia; Peixoto, Blas; Malaga, Wladimir; Guilhot, Christophe; Kaplan, Gilla

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic but treatable infectious disease caused by the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. M. leprae cell wall is characterized by a unique phenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) reported to have several immune functions. We have examined the role of PGL-1 in the modulation of monocyte cytokine/chemokine production in naive human monocytes. PGL-1 in its purified form or expressed in a recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Colmette-Guérin (BCG) background (rBCG-PGL-1) was tested. We found that PGL-1 selectively modulated the induction of specific monocyte cytokines and chemokines and, when used as prestimulus, exerted priming and/or inhibitory effects on the induction of selected cytokines/chemokines in response to a second stimulus. Taken together, the results of this study support a modulatory role for PGL-1 in the innate immune response to M. leprae. Thus, PGL-1 may play an important role in the development of the anergic clinical forms of disease and in tissue damage seen in lepromatous patients and during the reactional states of leprosy.

  17. Protein Interactions of the MLL PHD Fingers Modulate MLL Target Gene Regulation in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Keri; Anderson, Melanie; Bulanova, Elena; Mi, Huaifeng; Tropschug, Maximilian; Diaz, Manuel O.

    2001-01-01

    The PHD fingers of the human MLL and Drosophila trx proteins have strong amino acid sequence conservation but their function is unknown. We have determined that these fingers mediate homodimerization and binding of MLL to Cyp33, a nuclear cyclophilin. These two proteins interact in vitro and in vivo in mammalian cells and colocalize at specific nuclear subdomains. Overexpression of the Cyp33 protein in leukemia cells results in altered expression of HOX genes that are targets for regulation by MLL. These alterations are suppressed by cyclosporine and are not observed in cell lines that express a mutant MLL protein without PHD fingers. These results suggest that binding of Cyp33 to MLL modulates its effects on the expression of target genes. PMID:11313484

  18. Protein interactions of the MLL PHD fingers modulate MLL target gene regulation in human cells.

    PubMed

    Fair, K; Anderson, M; Bulanova, E; Mi, H; Tropschug, M; Diaz, M O

    2001-05-01

    The PHD fingers of the human MLL and Drosophila trx proteins have strong amino acid sequence conservation but their function is unknown. We have determined that these fingers mediate homodimerization and binding of MLL to Cyp33, a nuclear cyclophilin. These two proteins interact in vitro and in vivo in mammalian cells and colocalize at specific nuclear subdomains. Overexpression of the Cyp33 protein in leukemia cells results in altered expression of HOX genes that are targets for regulation by MLL. These alterations are suppressed by cyclosporine and are not observed in cell lines that express a mutant MLL protein without PHD fingers. These results suggest that binding of Cyp33 to MLL modulates its effects on the expression of target genes.

  19. Modulation of Different Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef Functions during Progression to AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Carl, Silke; Greenough, Thomas C.; Krumbiegel, Mandy; Greenberg, Michael; Skowronski, Jacek; Sullivan, John L.; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2001-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Nef protein has several independent functions that might contribute to efficient viral replication in vivo. Since HIV-1 adapts rapidly to its host environment, we investigated if different Nef properties are associated with disease progression. Functional analysis revealed that nef alleles obtained during late stages of infection did not efficiently downmodulate class I major histocompatibility complex but were highly active in the stimulation of viral replication. In comparison, functional activity in downregulation of CD4 and enhancement of HIV-1 infectivity were maintained or enhanced after AIDS progression. Our results demonstrate that various Nef activities are modulated during the course of HIV-1 infection to maintain high viral loads at different stages of disease progression. These findings suggest that all in vitro Nef functions investigated contribute to AIDS pathogenesis and indicate that nef variants with increased pathogenicity emerge in a significant number of HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:11264355

  20. Modulation of human c-mpl gene expression by thrombopoietin through protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, M; Morikawa, S; Sato, T; Sato, I; Sato, T; Fuse, A

    2003-01-01

    The c-Mpl, thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor specificially controls megakaryocytic growth and differentiation. TPO increased the c-mpl promoter activity determined by a transient expression system using a vector containing the luciferase gene as a reporter in the human megakaryoblastic cell line CMK. The maximal promoter activity of c-mpl was obtained 24 hr after pretreatment with TPO for 3 hr and then declined with time. This increase was completely abolished by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors (GF109203, calphostin C and H7). Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment led to an increase in c-mpl promoter activity. These results demonstrate that the promoter activity of c-mpl is modulated by transcription through a PKC-dependent pathway.

  1. Modulation of redox status in human lung cell lines by organoselenocompounds: selenazolidines, selenomethionine and methylseleninic acid

    PubMed Central

    Poerschke, Robyn L.; Franklin, Michael R.; Moos, Philip J.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer prevention strategies utilizing selenium-containing compounds have demonstrated reduced cancer mortality and efficacy for some cancer types but considerable differences in cellular effects exist among the selenocompounds employed. The variability of the effects on cell viability, redox modulation, and disruption of subcellular compartments by the conventional selenium-containing amino acid, selenomethionine, the oxidized selenosugar metabolite, methylseleninic acid, and selenazolidines was investigated in A549 and BEAS-2B human lung cell lines. Selenomethionine had little effect whereas methylseleninic acid increased cellular thiols and stress in the endoplasmic reticulum. The cyclohexylselenazolidine increased mild oxidative stress in the adenocarcinoma cell line, A549, but the effects were attenuated in the normal, but virally transformed cell line, BEAS-2B. These data demonstrate that all selenocompounds are not equal and that the form of the organic selenocompound is a major determinant in the expected cellular response. PMID:18768157

  2. The extreme relativity of perception: A new contextual effect modulates human resolving power.

    PubMed

    Namdar, Gal; Ganel, Tzvi; Algom, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The authors report the discovery of a new effect of context that modulates human resolving power with respect to an individual stimulus. They show that the size of the difference threshold or the just noticeable difference around a standard stimulus depends on the range of the other standards tested simultaneously for resolution within the same experimental session. The larger this range, the poorer the resolving power for a given standard. The authors term this effect the range of standards effect (RSE). They establish this result both in the visual domain for the perception of linear extent, and in the somatosensory domain for the perception of weight. They discuss the contingent nature of stimulus resolution in perception and psychophysics and contrast it with the immunity to contextual influences of visually guided action.

  3. Modulation of human motor cortex excitability by single doses of amantadine.

    PubMed

    Reis, Janine; John, Daniel; Heimeroth, Antje; Mueller, Hans-Helge; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Arndt, Torsten; Rosenow, Felix

    2006-12-01

    Amantadine-sulfate has been used for several decades to treat acute influenza A, Parkinson's disease (PD), and acute or chronic drug-induced dyskinesia. Several mechanisms of actions detected in vivo/in vitro including N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonism, blockage of potassium channels, dopamine receptor agonism, enhancement of noradrenergic release, and anticholinergic effects have been described. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to evaluate the effect of single doses of amantadine on human motor cortex excitability in normal subjects. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study design, motor thresholds, recruitment curves, cortical stimulation-induced silent period (CSP), short intracortical inhibition (ICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF), and late inhibition (L-ICI) in 14 healthy subjects were investigated after oral doses of 50 and 100 mg amantadine with single and paired pulse TMS paradigms. Spinal cord excitability was investigated by distal latencies and M-amplitudes of the abductor digiti minimi muscle. After intake of amantadine, a significant dose-dependent decrease of ICF was noticed as well as a significant increase of L-ICI as compared to placebo. The effect on ICF and L-ICI significantly correlated with amantadine serum levels. ICI was slightly increased after amantadine intake, but the effect failed to be significant. Furthermore, amantadine had no significant effects on motor thresholds, MEP recruitment curves, CSP, or peripheral excitability. In conclusion, a low dose of amantadine is sufficient in modulating human motor cortex excitability. The decrease of ICF and increase of L-ICI may reflect glutamatergic modulation or a polysynaptic interaction of glutamatergic and GABA-ergic circuits. Although amantadine has several mechanisms of action, the NMDA-receptor antagonism seems to be the most relevant effect on cortical excitability. As L-ICI can be influenced by this type of drug, it may be an interesting

  4. Beta2-adrenergic signaling affects the phenotype of human cardiac progenitor cells through EMT modulation.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Francesca; Angelini, Francesco; Siciliano, Camilla; Tasciotti, Julia; Mangino, Giorgio; De Falco, Elena; Carnevale, Roberto; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Frati, Giacomo; Chimenti, Isotta

    2017-01-15

    Human cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) offer great promises to cardiac cell therapy for heart failure. Many in vivo studies have shown their therapeutic benefits, paving the way for clinical translation. The 3D model of cardiospheres (CSs) represents a unique niche-like in vitro microenvironment, which includes CPCs and supporting cells. CSs have been shown to form through a process mediated by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). β2-Adrenergic signaling significantly affects stem/progenitor cells activation and mobilization in multiple tissues, and crosstalk between β2-adrenergic signaling and EMT processes has been reported. In the present study, we aimed at investigating the biological response of CSs to β2-adrenergic stimuli, focusing on EMT modulation in the 3D culture system of CSs. We treated human CSs and CS-derived cells (CDCs) with the β2-blocker butoxamine (BUT), using either untreated or β2 agonist (clenbuterol) treated CDCs as control. BUT-treated CS-forming cells displayed increased migration capacity and a significant increase in their CS-forming ability, consistently associated with increased expression of EMT-related genes, such as Snai1. Moreover, long-term BUT-treated CDCs contained a lower percentage of CD90+ cells, and this feature has been previously correlated with higher cardiogenic and therapeutic potential of the CDCs population. In addition, long-term BUT-treated CDCs had an increased ratio of collagen-III/collagen-I gene expression levels, and showed decreased release of inflammatory cytokines, overall supporting a less fibrosis-prone phenotype. In conclusion, β2 adrenergic receptor block positively affected the stemness vs commitment balance within CSs through the modulation of type1-EMT (so called "developmental"). These results further highlight type-1 EMT to be a key process affecting the features of resident cardiac progenitor cells, and mediating their response to the microenvironment.

  5. Resting discharge of human muscle spindles is not modulated by increases in sympathetic drive

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Sverrisdottir, Yrsa B; Wallin, B Gunnar

    2003-01-01

    There is evidence in experimental animals that, in addition to receiving fusimotor drive, muscle spindles are subject to modulation by the sympathetic nervous system. We examined the validity of this idea in human subjects by recording from muscle spindles in the relaxed ankle and toe extensor muscles during a strong and sustained physiological activation of muscle sympathetic outflow. Unitary recordings were made from 20 primary and 17 secondary muscle spindle afferents via a tungsten microelectrode inserted percutaneously into the peroneal nerve in 10 awake, healthy subjects seated with the legs supported in the extended position. ECG, blood pressure, respiration and calf circumference were also recorded. The majority of the muscle spindles were spontaneously active at rest; a background discharge was induced in four silent spindles by vibrating the tendon. A sustained increase in muscle vasoconstrictor activity, an increase in calf volume and a fall in pulse pressure were produced by subjects performing a 30–40 s maximal inspiratory breath-hold. Despite this strong increase in muscle sympathetic outflow no significant changes occurred in the discharge of either primary or secondary muscle spindle afferents, measured as a change in mean frequency and variability over sequential 5 s epochs and compared with the preceding period of rest. Strong chemoreceptor-driven sympathetic bursts during sustained expiratory breath-holds also failed to modulate the firing of 14 spindle endings. We conclude that a sustained, physiological increase in muscle sympathetic activity causes no detectable change in muscle spindle firing, lending no support to the concept that the sympathetic nervous system can influence the sensitivity of human muscle spindles directly. PMID:12923218

  6. RSK activation via ERK modulates human colon cancer cells response to PTHrP.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Natalia; Carriere, Pedro; Martin, Maria Julia; Gentili, Claudia

    2017-04-06

    Parathyroid Hormone-related Peptide (PTHrP) is associated with several human cancers such as colon carcinoma. This disease is a complex multistep process that involves enhanced cell cycle progression and migration. Recently we obtained evidence that in the human colorectal adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells, exogenous PTHrP increases the proliferation and positively modulates cell cycle progression via ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and PI3K. The purpose of this study was to explore if the serine/threonine kinase RSK, which is involved in the progress of many cancers and it is emerging as a potential therapeutic target, mediates PTHrP effects on cancer colon cells. Western blot analysis revealed that PTHrP increases RSK phosphorylation via ERK1/2 signaling pathway but not through p38 MAPK. Performing subcellular fractionation we found that the peptide also induces the nuclear localization of activated RSK, where many of its substrates are located. RSK participates in cell proliferation, in the up-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK6 and in the down-regulation of p53 induced by PTHrP. Wound healing and transwell filters assays revealed that cell migration increased after PTHrP treatment. In addition, the hormone increases the protein expression of the focal adhesion kinase FAK, a regulator of cell motility. We observed that PTHrP induces cell migration and modulates FAK protein expression through ERK/ RSK signaling pathway but not via p38 MAPK pathway. Finally, in vivo studies revealed that the hormone activates RSK in xenografts tumor. Taken together, our findings provide new insights into the deregulated cell cycle and migration that is characteristic of tumor intestinal cells.

  7. Human amnion epithelial cells modulate the inflammatory response to ventilation in preterm lambs

    PubMed Central

    Melville, Jacqueline M.; McDonald, Courtney A.; Bischof, Robert J.; Polglase, Graeme R.; Lim, Rebecca; Wallace, Euan M.; Jenkin, Graham; Moss, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Ventilation of preterm neonates causes pulmonary inflammation that can contribute to lung injury, propagate systemically and result in long-term disease. Modulation of this initial response may reduce lung injury and its sequelae. We aimed to determine the effect of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) on immune activation and lung injury in preterm neonatal lambs. Preterm lambs received intratracheal hAECs (90x106) or vehicle, prior to 2 h of mechanical ventilation. Within 5 min of ventilation onset, lambs also received intravenous hAECs (90x106) or vehicle. Lung histology, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell phenotypes, and cytokine profiles were examined after 2 h of ventilation, and in unventilated controls. Histological indices of lung injury were higher than control, in vehicle-treated ventilated lambs but not in hAEC-treated ventilated lambs. Ventilation-induced pulmonary leukocyte recruitment was greater in hAEC-treated lambs than in vehicle-treated lambs. Lung IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expression was higher in vehicle- and hAEC-treated ventilated lambs than in controls but IL-8 mRNA levels were greater than control only in vehicle-treated ventilated lambs. Numbers of CD44+ and CD21+ lymphocytes and macrophages from the lungs were altered in vehicle- and hAEC-treated ventilated lambs. Numbers of CD8+ macrophages were lower in hAEC-treated ventilated lambs than in vehicle-treated ventilated lambs. Indices of systemic inflammation were not different between vehicle- and hAEC-treated lambs. Human amnion epithelial cells modulate the pulmonary inflammatory response to ventilation in preterm lambs, and reduce acute lung injury. Immunomodulatory effects of hAECs reduce lung injury in preterm neonates and may protect against longer-term respiratory disease. PMID:28346529

  8. Human amnion epithelial cells modulate the inflammatory response to ventilation in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Melville, Jacqueline M; McDonald, Courtney A; Bischof, Robert J; Polglase, Graeme R; Lim, Rebecca; Wallace, Euan M; Jenkin, Graham; Moss, Timothy J

    2017-01-01

    Ventilation of preterm neonates causes pulmonary inflammation that can contribute to lung injury, propagate systemically and result in long-term disease. Modulation of this initial response may reduce lung injury and its sequelae. We aimed to determine the effect of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) on immune activation and lung injury in preterm neonatal lambs. Preterm lambs received intratracheal hAECs (90x106) or vehicle, prior to 2 h of mechanical ventilation. Within 5 min of ventilation onset, lambs also received intravenous hAECs (90x106) or vehicle. Lung histology, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell phenotypes, and cytokine profiles were examined after 2 h of ventilation, and in unventilated controls. Histological indices of lung injury were higher than control, in vehicle-treated ventilated lambs but not in hAEC-treated ventilated lambs. Ventilation-induced pulmonary leukocyte recruitment was greater in hAEC-treated lambs than in vehicle-treated lambs. Lung IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expression was higher in vehicle- and hAEC-treated ventilated lambs than in controls but IL-8 mRNA levels were greater than control only in vehicle-treated ventilated lambs. Numbers of CD44+ and CD21+ lymphocytes and macrophages from the lungs were altered in vehicle- and hAEC-treated ventilated lambs. Numbers of CD8+ macrophages were lower in hAEC-treated ventilated lambs than in vehicle-treated ventilated lambs. Indices of systemic inflammation were not different between vehicle- and hAEC-treated lambs. Human amnion epithelial cells modulate the pulmonary inflammatory response to ventilation in preterm lambs, and reduce acute lung injury. Immunomodulatory effects of hAECs reduce lung injury in preterm neonates and may protect against longer-term respiratory disease.

  9. Microenvironmental modulation of asymmetric cell division in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pine, Sharon R; Ryan, Bríd M; Varticovski, Lyuba; Robles, Ana I; Harris, Curtis C

    2010-02-02

    Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained through asymmetric cell divisions that produce daughter cells with differing self-renewal and differentiation potentials. Certain tumor cell subfractions can self-renew and repopulate the heterogeneous tumor bulk, suggestive of asymmetric cell division, but an equally plausible explanation is that daughter cells of a symmetric division subsequently adopt differing cell fates. Cosegregation of template DNA during mitosis is one mechanism by which cellular components are segregated asymmetrically during cell division in fibroblast, muscle, mammary, intestinal, and neural cells. Asymmetric cell division of template DNA in tumor cells has remained elusive, however. Through pulse-chase experiments with halogenated thymidine analogs, we determined that a small population of cells within human lung cancer cell lines and primary tumor cell cultures asymmetrically divided their template DNA, which could be visualized in single cells and in real time. Template DNA cosegregation was enhanced by cell-cell contact. Its frequency was density-dependent and modulated by environmental changes, including serum deprivation and hypoxia. In addition, we found that isolated CD133(+) lung cancer cells were capable of tumor cell repopulation. Strikingly, during cell division, CD133 cosegregated with the template DNA, whereas the differentiation markers prosurfactant protein-C and pan-cytokeratins were passed to the opposing daughter cell, demonstrating that segregation of template DNA correlates with lung cancer cell fate. Our results demonstrate that human lung tumor cell fate decisions may be regulated during the cell division process. The characterization and modulation of asymmetric cell division in lung cancer can provide insight into tumor initiation, growth, and maintenance.

  10. Modulation of Mitogen-Induced Proliferation of Autologous Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes by Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Henry; Sweeney, Jan A.; Herscowitz, Herbert B.; Barsoum, Ibrahim S.; Kagan, Elliott

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine the effect of cocultivation of T-cell-enriched human peripheral blood lymphocytes with autologous alveolar macrophages on mitogen-induced proliferation as determined by [3H]thymidine uptake. Cells obtained by fiberoptic bronchoscopy and saline bronchial lavage from 14 normal volunteers were enriched for macrophages by adherence in plastic dishes for 1 h in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum. Nonadherent mononuclear cells were prepared from heparinized venous blood after Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation by passage over nylon wool columns. T-cell-enriched populations were incubated with and without alveolar macrophages, either in the presence or absence of phytohemagglutinin. In these experiments, the number of lymphocytes was held constant (105 per well), while the number of alveolar macrophages was varied (0.1 × 105 to 4.0 × 105 per well). Alveolar macrophages generally tended to stimulate phytohemagglutinin-induced lymphoproliferation at lymphocyte/macrophage ratios of 10:1 but consistently and significantly suppressed proliferation at ratios which approach those usually observed in recovered human bronchial lavage fluid, namely, 1:4. The suppressive effect of alveolar macrophages was observed as early as 48 h after culture initiation, while the magnitude of suppression increased with time. Suppression did not appear to be due to alteration in lymphocyte viability, nor was it sensitive to indomethacin. These results indicate that human alveolar macrophages can modulate the in vitro proliferative response of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes. This observation may have relevance to interactions between alveolar macrophages and bronchial lymphocytes in the human lung in vivo. PMID:6982862

  11. In vitro effects of GSM modulated radiofrequency fields on human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Tuschl, Helga; Novak, Waltraud; Molla-Djafari, Hamid

    2006-04-01

    Despite the important role of the immune system in defending the body against infections and cancer, only few investigations on possible effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation on function of human immune cells have been undertaken. Aim of the present investigation was therefore to assess whether GSM modulated RF fields have adverse effects on the functional competence of human immune cells. Within the frame of the multidisciplinary project "Biological effects of high frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF)" sponsored by the National Occupation Hazard Insurance Association (AUVA) in vitro investigations were carried out on human blood cells. Exposure was performed at GSM Basic 1950 MHz, an SAR of 1 mW/g in an intermittent mode (5 min "ON", 10 min "OFF") and a maximum Delta T of 0.06 degrees C for the duration of 8 h. The following immune parameters were evaluated: (1) the intracellular production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon (INF) gamma in lymphocytes, and IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in monocytes were evaluated with monoclonal antibodies. (2) The activity of immune-relevant genes (IL 1-alpha and beta, IL-2, IL-2-receptor, IL-4, macrophage colony stimulating factor (MCSF)-receptor, TNF-alpha, TNF-alpha-receptor) and housekeeping genes was analyzed with real time PCR. (3) The cytotoxicity of lymphokine activated killer cells (LAK cells) against a tumor cell line was determined in a flow cytometric test. For each parameter, blood samples of at least 15 donors were evaluated. No statistically significant effects of exposure were found and there is no indication that emissions from mobile phones are associated with adverse effects on the human immune system.

  12. Hexapeptide-11 is a novel modulator of the proteostasis network in human diploid fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sklirou, Aimilia D.; Ralli, Marianna; Dominguez, Maria; Papassideri, Issidora; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Trougakos, Ioannis P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that several natural products (e.g. crude extracts or purified compounds) have been found to activate cell antioxidant responses and/or delay cellular senescence the effect(s) of small peptides on cell viability and/or modulation of protective mechanisms (e.g. the proteostasis network) remain largely elusive. We have thus studied a hexapeptide (Hexapeptide-11) of structure Phe–Val–Ala–Pro–Phe–Pro (FVAPFP) originally isolated from yeast extracts and later synthesized by solid state synthesis to high purity. We show herein that Hexapeptide-11 exhibits no significant toxicity in normal human diploid lung or skin fibroblasts. Exposure of fibroblasts to Hexapeptide-11 promoted dose and time-dependent activation of proteasome, autophagy, chaperones and antioxidant responses related genes. Moreover, it promoted increased nuclear accumulation of Nrf2; higher expression levels of proteasomal protein subunits and increased proteasome peptidase activities. In line with these findings we noted that Hexapeptide-11 conferred significant protection in fibroblasts against oxidative-stress-mediated premature cellular senescence, while at in vivo skin deformation assays in human subjects it improved skin elasticity. Finally, Hexapeptide-11 was found to induce the activity of extracellular MMPs and it also suppressed cell migration. Our presented findings indicate that Hexapeptide-11 is a promising anti-ageing agent. PMID:25974626

  13. Beta modulation reflects name retrieval in the human anterior temporal lobe: an intracranial recording study.

    PubMed

    Abel, Taylor J; Rhone, Ariane E; Nourski, Kirill V; Ando, Timothy K; Oya, Hiroyuki; Kovach, Christopher K; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Howard, Matthew A; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Naming people, places, and things is a fundamental human ability that is often impaired in patients with language-dominant anterior temporal lobe (ATL) dysfunction or ATL resection as part of epilepsy treatment. Convergent lines of evidence point to the importance of the ATL in name retrieval. The physiologic mechanisms that mediate name retrieval in the ATL, however, are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the electrophysiologic responses of the human ATL during overt cued naming of famous people and objects. Eight neurosurgical patients with suspected temporal lobe epilepsy who underwent implantation of intracranial electrodes for seizure focus localization were the subjects of this study. Specialized coverage of the ATL was achieved in each subject. The subjects named pictures of U.S. presidents and images of common hand-held tools. Event-related band power was measured for each ATL recording site. Both the left and right ATL demonstrated robust and focal increases in beta-band (14-30 Hz) power during person and tool naming. The onset of this response typically occurred at 400 ms but sometimes as early as 200 ms. Visual naming of famous people and tools is associated with robust and localized modulation of the beta band in both the left and right ATL. Measurement of visual naming responses may provide the groundwork for future mapping modalities to localize eloquent cortex in the ATL.

  14. Rewiring of Signaling Networks Modulating Thermotolerance in the Human Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-Hoon; Jung, Kwang-Woo; Bang, Soohyun; Lee, Jang-Won; Song, Min-Hee; Floyd-Averette, Anna; Festa, Richard A; Ianiri, Giuseppe; Idnurm, Alexander; Thiele, Dennis J; Heitman, Joseph; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Thermotolerance is a crucial virulence attribute for human pathogens, including the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans that causes fatal meningitis in humans. Loss of the protein kinase Sch9 increases C. neoformans thermotolerance, but its regulatory mechanism has remained unknown. Here, we studied the Sch9-dependent and Sch9-independent signaling networks modulating C. neoformans thermotolerance by using genome-wide transcriptome analysis and reverse genetic approaches. During temperature upshift, genes encoding for molecular chaperones and heat shock proteins were upregulated, whereas those for translation, transcription, and sterol biosynthesis were highly suppressed. In this process, Sch9 regulated basal expression levels or induced/repressed expression levels of some temperature-responsive genes, including heat shock transcription factor (HSF1) and heat shock proteins (HSP104 and SSA1). Notably, we found that the HSF1 transcript abundance decreased but the Hsf1 protein became transiently phosphorylated during temperature upshift. Nevertheless, Hsf1 is essential for growth and its overexpression promoted C. neoformans thermotolerance. Transcriptome analysis using an HSF1 overexpressing strain revealed a dual role of Hsf1 in the oxidative stress response and thermotolerance. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Hsf1 binds to the step-type like heat shock element (HSE) of its target genes more efficiently than to the perfect- or gap-type HSE. This study provides insight into the thermotolerance of C. neoformans by elucidating the regulatory mechanisms of Sch9 and Hsf1 through the genome-scale identification of temperature-dependent genes.

  15. Cigarette Smoke-Exposed Candida albicans Increased Chitin Production and Modulated Human Fibroblast Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Humidah; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Perraud, Laura; Chmielewski, Witold; Zakrzewski, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The predisposition of cigarette smokers for development of respiratory and oral bacterial infections is well documented. Cigarette smoke can also contribute to yeast infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on C. albicans transition, chitin content, and response to environmental stress and to examine the interaction between CSC-pretreated C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. Following exposure to CSC, C. albicans transition from blastospore to hyphal form increased. CSC-pretreated yeast cells became significantly (P < 0.01) sensitive to oxidation but significantly (P < 0.01) resistant to both osmotic and heat stress. CSC-pretreated C. albicans expressed high levels of chitin, with 2- to 8-fold recorded under hyphal conditions. CSC-pretreated C. albicans adhered better to the gingival fibroblasts, proliferated almost three times more and adapted into hyphae, while the gingival fibroblasts recorded a significantly (P < 0.01) slow growth rate but a significantly higher level of IL-1β when in contact with CSC-pretreated C. albicans. CSC was thus able to modulate both C. albicans transition through the cell wall chitin content and the interaction between C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. These findings may be relevant to fungal infections in the oral cavity in smokers. PMID:25302312

  16. Cigarette smoke-exposed Candida albicans increased chitin production and modulated human fibroblast cell responses.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Humidah; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Perraud, Laura; Chmielewski, Witold; Zakrzewski, Andrew; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    The predisposition of cigarette smokers for development of respiratory and oral bacterial infections is well documented. Cigarette smoke can also contribute to yeast infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on C. albicans transition, chitin content, and response to environmental stress and to examine the interaction between CSC-pretreated C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. Following exposure to CSC, C. albicans transition from blastospore to hyphal form increased. CSC-pretreated yeast cells became significantly (P < 0.01) sensitive to oxidation but significantly (P < 0.01) resistant to both osmotic and heat stress. CSC-pretreated C. albicans expressed high levels of chitin, with 2- to 8-fold recorded under hyphal conditions. CSC-pretreated C. albicans adhered better to the gingival fibroblasts, proliferated almost three times more and adapted into hyphae, while the gingival fibroblasts recorded a significantly (P < 0.01) slow growth rate but a significantly higher level of IL-1β when in contact with CSC-pretreated C. albicans. CSC was thus able to modulate both C. albicans transition through the cell wall chitin content and the interaction between C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. These findings may be relevant to fungal infections in the oral cavity in smokers.

  17. Acidic fibroblast growth factor modulates Staphylococcus aureus adherence to human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, E A; Hatcher, V B; Lowy, F D

    1988-01-01

    Alteration of human endothelial cells may increase their susceptibility to staphylococcal invasion and thus may contribute to the development of intravascular staphylococcal disease. Acidic fibroblast growth factor, a potent regulator of endothelial cell function, had a significant effect on Staphylococcus aureus infection of cultured human endothelial cells. Three of four S. aureus strains had diminished adherence to endothelial cells when the latter were grown in the presence of acidic fibroblast growth factor (P less than 0.05). The diminished adherence was time dependent, maximal at 72 h, and independent of the initial bacterial inoculum. A twofold enhancement of S. aureus adherence was observed when endothelial cells were pretreated with heparitinase. Adherence was unaffected by endothelial cell activation by interleukin-1 or endotoxin. Thus, acidic fibroblast growth factor exerted a protective effect, deterring S. aureus adherence to cultured endothelial cells. Endothelial cell heparan sulfate was also directly involved in the adherence process. Subtle modulations of endothelial cells can significantly affect the ability of S. aureus to adhere to and then infect these cells. Similar alterations may contribute to the ability of S. aureus to infect endovascular tissue in vivo. PMID:3259546

  18. The human two-pore channel 1 is modulated by cytosolic and luminal calcium

    PubMed Central

    Lagostena, Laura; Festa, Margherita; Pusch, Michael; Carpaneto, Armando

    2017-01-01

    Two-pore channels (TPC) are intracellular endo-lysosomal proteins with only recently emerging roles in organellar signalling and involvement in severe human diseases. Here, we investigated the functional properties of human TPC1 expressed in TPC-free vacuoles from Arabidopsis thaliana cells. Large (20 pA/pF) TPC1 currents were elicited by cytosolic addition of the phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-(3,5)-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) with an apparent binding constant of ~15 nM. The channel is voltage-dependent, activating at positive potentials with single exponential kinetics and currents are Na+ selective, with measurable but low permeability to Ca2+. Cytosolic Ca2+ modulated hTPC1 in dual way: low μM cytosolic Ca2+ increased activity by shifting the open probability towards negative voltages and by accelerating the time course of activation. This mechanism was well-described by an allosteric model. Higher levels of cytosolic Ca2+ induced a voltage-dependent decrease of the currents compatible with Ca2+ binding in the permeation pore. Conversely, an increase in luminal Ca2+ decreased hTPC1 activity. Our data point to a process in which Ca2+ permeation in hTPC1 has a positive feedback on channel activity while Na+ acts as a negative regulator. We speculate that the peculiar Ca2+ and Na+ dependence are key for the physiological roles of the channel in organellar homeostasis and signalling. PMID:28252105

  19. Dietary and genetic modulation of DNA repair in healthy human adults.

    PubMed

    Tyson, J; Mathers, J C

    2007-02-01

    The DNA in all cells of the human body is subject to damage continuously from exogenous agents, internal cellular processes and spontaneous decomposition. Failure to repair such damage is fundamental to the development of many diseases and to ageing. Fortunately, the vast majority of DNA damage is detected and repaired by one of five complementary DNA repair systems. However, recent studies have shown that even in healthy individuals there is a wide inter-individual variation in DNA repair capacity. Part of this variation can be accounted for by polymorphisms in the genes encoding DNA repair proteins. However, it is probable that environmental factors, including dietary exposure as well as diet-gene interactions, are also responsible for much of the difference in repair capacity between individuals. Whilst there is some evidence from human studies that generalised malnutrition or low intakes of specific nutrients may affect DNA repair, as yet there is limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which nutrients can modulate this key cellular process.

  20. Interleukin 34: a new modulator of human and experimental inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, Stephanie; Martinez, Gisele L; Bosma, Madeleen; Gerling, Marco; Clark, Reuben; Majster, Mirjam; Söderman, Jan; Almer, Sven; Boström, Elisabeth A

    2015-08-01

    IBD (inflammatory bowel disease), where CD (Crohn's disease) and UC (ulcerative colitis) represent the two main forms, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the intestine. Macrophages play a central role in IBD pathogenesis and are regulated by major differentiation factors such as CSF-1 (colony-stimulating factor 1) in homoeostasis and inflammation. IL (interleukin)-34 has recently been discovered as a second ligand for CSF-1R (CSF-1 receptor). However, expression and involvement of IL-34 in IBD remain unknown. In the present paper, we investigated the expression of IL34, CSF1 and their shared receptor CSF1R in normal human ileum and colon, in inflamed and non-inflamed tissues of CD and UC patients, and in a mouse model of experimental colitis. We found distinct expression patterns of IL34 and CSF1 in ileum and colon, with higher IL34 in ileum and, in contrast, higher CSF1 in colon. Furthermore, IL34 and CSF1 expression was increased with inflammation in IBD patients and in experimental colitis. In humans, infiltrating cells of the lamina propria and intestinal epithelial cells expressed IL-34, and TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor α) regulated IL-34 expression in intestinal epithelial cells through the NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) pathway. These data demonstrate the expression pattern of IL-34 in ileum and colon and suggest IL-34 as a new modulator of inflammation in IBD.

  1. Mycobacterium leprae phenolglycolipid-1 expressed by engineered M. bovis BCG modulates early interaction with human phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Tabouret, Guillaume; Astarie-Dequeker, Catherine; Demangel, Caroline; Malaga, Wladimir; Constant, Patricia; Ray, Aurélie; Honoré, Nadine; Bello, Nana Fatimath; Perez, Esther; Daffé, Mamadou; Guilhot, Christophe

    2010-10-21

    The species-specific phenolic glycolipid 1 (PGL-1) is suspected to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of leprosy, a chronic disease of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Based on studies using the purified compound, PGL-1 was proposed to mediate the tropism of M. leprae for the nervous system and to modulate host immune responses. However, deciphering the biological function of this glycolipid has been hampered by the inability to grow M. leprae in vitro and to genetically engineer this bacterium. Here, we identified the M. leprae genes required for the biosynthesis of the species-specific saccharidic domain of PGL-1 and reprogrammed seven enzymatic steps in M. bovis BCG to make it synthesize and display PGL-1 in the context of an M. leprae-like cell envelope. This recombinant strain provides us with a unique tool to address the key questions of the contribution of PGL-1 in the infection process and to study the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that PGL-1 production endowed recombinant BCG with an increased capacity to exploit complement receptor 3 (CR3) for efficient invasion of human macrophages and evasion of inflammatory responses. PGL-1 production also promoted bacterial uptake by human dendritic cells and dampened their infection-induced maturation. Our results therefore suggest that M. leprae produces PGL-1 for immune-silent invasion of host phagocytic cells.

  2. Extract from the zooxanthellate jellyfish Cotylorhiza tuberculata modulates gap junction intercellular communication in human cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Leone, Antonella; Lecci, Raffaella Marina; Durante, Miriana; Piraino, Stefano

    2013-05-22

    On a global scale, jellyfish populations in coastal marine ecosystems exhibit increasing trends of abundance. High-density outbreaks may directly or indirectly affect human economical and recreational activities, as well as public health. As the interest in biology of marine jellyfish grows, a number of jellyfish metabolites with healthy potential, such as anticancer or antioxidant activities, is increasingly reported. In this study, the Mediterranean "fried egg jellyfish" Cotylorhiza tuberculata (Macri, 1778) has been targeted in the search forputative valuable bioactive compounds. A medusa extract was obtained, fractionated, characterized by HPLC, GC-MS and SDS-PAGE and assayed for its biological activity on breast cancer cells (MCF-7) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKa). The composition of the jellyfish extract included photosynthetic pigments, valuable ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids, and polypeptides derived either from jellyfish tissues and their algal symbionts. Extract fractions showed antioxidant activity and the ability to affect cell viability and intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions (GJIC) differentially in MCF-7 and HEKa cells. A significantly higher cytotoxicity and GJIC enhancement in MCF-7 compared to HEKa cells was recorded. A putative action mechanism for the anticancer bioactivity through the modulation of GJIC has been hypothesized and its nutraceutical and pharmaceutical potential was discussed.

  3. Attentional load modulates responses of human primary visual cortex to invisible stimuli.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Bahador; Lavie, Nilli; Rees, Geraint

    2007-03-20

    Visual neuroscience has long sought to determine the extent to which stimulus-evoked activity in visual cortex depends on attention and awareness. Some influential theories of consciousness maintain that the allocation of attention is restricted to conscious representations [1, 2]. However, in the load theory of attention [3], competition between task-relevant and task-irrelevant stimuli for limited-capacity attention does not depend on conscious perception of the irrelevant stimuli. The critical test is whether the level of attentional load in a relevant task would determine unconscious neural processing of invisible stimuli. Human participants were scanned with high-field fMRI while they performed a foveal task of low or high attentional load. Irrelevant, invisible monocular stimuli were simultaneously presented peripherally and were continuously suppressed by a flashing mask in the other eye [4]. Attentional load in the foveal task strongly modulated retinotopic activity evoked in primary visual cortex (V1) by the invisible stimuli. Contrary to traditional views [1, 2, 5, 6], we found that availability of attentional capacity determines neural representations related to unconscious processing of continuously suppressed stimuli in human primary visual cortex. Spillover of attention to cortical representations of invisible stimuli (under low load) cannot be a sufficient condition for their awareness.

  4. Extract from the Zooxanthellate Jellyfish Cotylorhiza tuberculata Modulates Gap Junction Intercellular Communication in Human Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Antonella; Lecci, Raffaella Marina; Durante, Miriana; Piraino, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    On a global scale, jellyfish populations in coastal marine ecosystems exhibit increasing trends of abundance. High-density outbreaks may directly or indirectly affect human economical and recreational activities, as well as public health. As the interest in biology of marine jellyfish grows, a number of jellyfish metabolites with healthy potential, such as anticancer or antioxidant activities, is increasingly reported. In this study, the Mediterranean “fried egg jellyfish” Cotylorhiza tuberculata (Macri, 1778) has been targeted in the search forputative valuable bioactive compounds. A medusa extract was obtained, fractionated, characterized by HPLC, GC-MS and SDS-PAGE and assayed for its biological activity on breast cancer cells (MCF-7) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKa). The composition of the jellyfish extract included photosynthetic pigments, valuable ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids, and polypeptides derived either from jellyfish tissues and their algal symbionts. Extract fractions showed antioxidant activity and the ability to affect cell viability and intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions (GJIC) differentially in MCF-7and HEKa cells. A significantly higher cytotoxicity and GJIC enhancement in MCF-7 compared to HEKa cells was recorded. A putative action mechanism for the anticancer bioactivity through the modulation of GJIC has been hypothesized and its nutraceutical and pharmaceutical potential was discussed. PMID:23697954

  5. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Economically Depressed Areas Strand: Human Development. Module III-E-1: Characteristics of Economically Depressed Areas Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Fresno. Dept. of Home Economics.

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on characteristics of economically depressed area families is the first in a set of three modules on human development in economically depressed areas (EDA). (This set is part of a larger set of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and…

  6. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Economically Depressed Areas Strand: Human Development. Module III-E-2: The Child and the Economically Depressed Area Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boogaert, John

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on the child and the economically depressed area family is the second in a set of three modules on human development in economically depressed areas (EDA). (This set is part of a larger set of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking…

  7. Global Change and Urbanization in Latin America. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbert, Sarah; Lawson, Victoria

    This learning module aims to engage students in problem solving, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and cooperative learning. The module is appropriate for use in any introductory or intermediate undergraduate course that focuses on human-environment relationships. The module examines how social, economic, political, and environmental forces…

  8. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Consumer Approach Strand: Human Development. Module I-E-3: Financial Pressures in Various Life Styles and Cycles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boogaert, John

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on financial pressures in various life styles and cycles is the third in a set of five modules on consumer education related to human development. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking…

  9. Genome-wide association studies in women of African ancestry identified 3q26.21 as a novel susceptibility locus for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huo, Dezheng; Feng, Ye; Haddad, Stephen; Zheng, Yonglan; Yao, Song; Han, Yoo-Jeong; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Adebamowo, Clement; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Falusi, Adeyinka G; Zheng, Wei; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Deming, Sandra L; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Bensen, Jeannette T; Simon, Michael S; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Leske, M Cristina; Ambs, Stefan; Chen, Lin S; Qian, Frank; Gamazon, Eric R; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Cox, Nancy J; Chanock, Stephen J; Kolonel, Laurence N; Olshan, Andrew F; Ambrosone, Christine B; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Palmer, Julie R; Haiman, Christopher A

    2016-09-04

    Multiple breast cancer loci have been identified in previous genome-wide association studies, but they were mainly conducted in populations of European ancestry. Women of African ancestry are more likely to have young-onset and oestrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancer for reasons that are unknown and understudied. To identify genetic risk factors for breast cancer in women of African descent, we conducted a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies of breast cancer; one study consists of 1,657 cases and 2,029 controls genotyped with Illumina's HumanOmni2.5 BeadChip and the other study included 3,016 cases and 2,745 controls genotyped using Illumina Human1M-Duo BeadChip. The top 18,376 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from the meta-analysis were replicated in the third study that consists of 1,984 African Americans cases and 2,939 controls. We found that SNP rs13074711, 26.5 Kb upstream of TNFSF10 at 3q26.21, was significantly associated with risk of oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer (odds ratio [OR]=1.29, 95% CI: 1.18-1.40; P = 1.8 × 10 (-)  (8)). Functional annotations suggest that the TNFSF10 gene may be involved in breast cancer aetiology, but further functional experiments are needed. In addition, we confirmed SNP rs10069690 was the best indicator for ER-negative breast cancer at 5p15.33 (OR = 1.30; P = 2.4 × 10 (-)  (10)) and identified rs12998806 as the best indicator for ER-positive breast cancer at 2q35 (OR = 1.34; P = 2.2 × 10 (-)  (8)) for women of African ancestry. These findings demonstrated additional susceptibility alleles for breast cancer can be revealed in diverse populations and have important public health implications in building race/ethnicity-specific risk prediction model for breast cancer.

  10. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Brownjohn, Philip W; Smith, James; Portelius, Erik; Serneels, Lutgarde; Kvartsberg, Hlin; De Strooper, Bart; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Livesey, Frederick J

    2017-03-06

    Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation.

  11. Modulation of the effector function of human monocytes for Mycobacterium avium by human immunodeficiency virus-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Shiratsuchi, H; Johnson, J L; Toossi, Z; Ellner, J J

    1994-01-01

    Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in AIDS is associated with high tissue burdens (10(9)-10(10) mycobacteria/g tissue) of organism. The basis for the extraordinary susceptibility of AIDS to M. avium infection is unclear. HIV or its constituents may alter mononuclear phagocyte functions resulting in enhanced intracellular M. avium growth. The effects of an envelope glycoprotein (gp120), a transmembrane protein (p121), and core proteins of HIV-1 on M. avium infection of human monocytes were examined. Preculturing monocytes with gp120 inhibited M. avium phagocytosis and consistently enhanced intracellular growth of six M. avium strains. Pretreatment with p121, gag5, or p24 did not inhibit phagocytosis nor enhance intracellular growth of M. avium. Incubation of gp120 with soluble CD4 before addition to monocyte cultures or pretreatment of monocytes with OKT4A abrogated gp120 effects on M. avium phagocytosis and intracellular growth. gp120 also augmented cytokine production by infected monocytes. These results suggest that gp120, but not p121 or core proteins, modulate monocyte phagocytosis and enhance intracellular growth of M. avium at least in part through monocyte CD4 receptors. Direct effects of HIV-1 products may, therefore, contribute to the diathesis of AIDS to develop disseminated M. avium infection and to the extensive replication of the organisms within tissue macrophages. Images PMID:8113420

  12. Modulation of cytokines and chemokines expression by NAC in cadmium chloride treated human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Odewumi, Caroline O; Latinwo, Lekan M; Ruden, Michael L; Badisa, Veera L D; Fils-Aime, Sheila; Badisa, Ramesh B

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd), is one of the most hazardous metals found in the environment. Cd exposure through inhalation has been linked to various diseases in lungs. It was shown that Cd induces proinflammatory cytokines through oxidative stress mechanism. In this report, we studied the immunomodulatory effect of a well known antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on cadmium chloride (CdCl2 ) treated human lung A549 cells through human cytokine array 6. The lung cells were treated with 0 or 75 µM CdCl2 alone, 2.5 mM NAC alone, or co-treated with 2.5 mM NAC and 75 µM CdCl2 for 24 h. The viability of cells was measured by crystal violet dye. The array results were validated by human IL-1alpha enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. The viability of the 75 µM CdCl2 alone treated cells was decreased to 44.5%, while the viability of the co-treated cells with 2.5 mM NAC was increased to 84.1% in comparison with untreated cells. In the cell lysate of CdCl2 alone treated cells, 19 and 8 cytokines were up and down-regulated, while in the medium 15 and 3 cytokines were up and downregulated in comparison with the untreated cells. In the co-treated cells, all these cytokines expression was modulated by the NAC treatment. The IL-1α ELISA result showed the same pattern of cytokine expression as the cytokine array. This study clearly showed the modulatory effect of NAC on cytokines and chemokines expression in CdCl2- treated cells and suggests the use of NAC as protective agent against cadmium toxicity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1612-1619, 2016.

  13. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rabinak, Christine A.; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R.; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K. Luan

    2013-01-01

    Pre-extinction administration of ∆9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely involves via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 hours after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders. PMID:24055595

  14. A magnesium-deficient high fructose diet augments bone-sparing action of exogenous oestrogen in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Koh, E T; Bourdeau, J E; Tae, W C

    1993-12-01

    To investigate interactions between circulating oestrogen, high dietary fructose, and low dietary magnesium on bone mineral density and numbers of trabeculae, 10 week old ovariectomized (OVX) and sham-ovariectomized (SOVX) rats were studied. The OVX animals were divided into three groups: one-third of the animals were injected with beta-oestradiol-3-benzoate dissolved in sesame oil twice a week; another one-third were injected with testosterone cypionate; and the remaining OVX and all of the SOVX animals were injected with sesame oil only. One-half of the animals in each group were fed cornstarch without magnesium and the other half, fructose without magnesium. After a 14 week experimental period, a 24 h urine sample was collected for measurements of Ca, Mg, P and cAMP. Blood was collected for determination of Ca, Mg, P, 25-hydroxy- and 1,25-dihydroxy-cholecalciferol. Femurs were used for determination of bone density, and tibiae for numbers of trabeculae. Testosterone-treated and OVX control animals fed cornstarch diets had the lowest bone density, whereas oestrogen-treated and SOVX control rats fed fructose had the greatest bone density. Oestrogen-treated animals fed fructose without magnesium had the highest serum and urinary Ca, whereas testosterone-treated animals fed cornstarch without magnesium had the lowest serum and urinary Ca. Serum alkaline phosphatase was higher in OVX- and testosterone-treated and starch-fed animals as compared to their respective counterparts. High urinary cAMP in OVX- and testosterone-treated animals may reflect the action of increased circulating concentrations of PTH, which could be responsible for bone resorption. The results show that high dietary fructose without magnesium interacts with endogenous or exogenous oestrogen to decrease bone mineral loss significantly in ovariectomized rats.

  15. Dietary catechins and procyanidins modulate zinc homeostasis in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Isabel M; Bustos, Mario; Blay, Mayte; Pujadas, Gerard; Ardèvol, Anna; Salvadó, M Josepa; Bladé, Cinta; Arola, Lluís; Fernández-Larrea, Juan

    2011-02-01

    Catechins and their polymers procyanidins are health-promoting flavonoids found in edible vegetables and fruits. They act as antioxidants by scavenging reactive oxygen species and by chelating the redox-active metals iron and copper. They also behave as signaling molecules, modulating multiple cell signalling pathways and gene expression, including that of antioxidant enzymes. This study aimed at determining whether catechins and procyanidins interact with the redox-inactive metal zinc and at assessing their effect on cellular zinc homeostasis. We found that a grape-seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) and the green tea flavonoid (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) bind zinc cations in solution with higher affinity than the zinc-specific chelator Zinquin, and dose-dependently prevent zinc-induced toxicity in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2, evaluated by the lactate dehydrogenase test. GSPE and EGCG hinder intracellular accumulation of total zinc, measured by atomic flame absorption spectrometry, concomitantly increasing the level of cytoplasmic labile zinc detectable by Zinquin fluorescence. Concurrently, GSPE and EGCG inhibit the expression, evaluated at the mRNA level by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, of zinc-binding metallothioneins and of plasma membrane zinc exporter ZnT1 (SLC30A1), while enhancing the expression of cellular zinc importers ZIP1 (SLC39A1) and ZIP4 (SLC39A4). GSPE and EGCG also produce all these effects when HepG2 cells are stimulated to import zinc by treatment with supplemental zinc or the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6. We suggest that extracellular complexation of zinc cations and the elevation of cytoplasmic labile zinc may be relevant mechanisms underlying the modulation of diverse cell signaling and metabolic pathways by catechins and procyanidins.

  16. The Use and Abuse of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Modulate Corticospinal Excitability in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Héroux, Martin E.; Taylor, Janet L.; Gandevia, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of reported physiological effects induced using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to modulate human motor cortical excitability have proven difficult to replicate routinely. We conducted an online survey on the prevalence and possible causes of these reproducibility issues. A total of 153 researchers were identified via their publications and invited to complete an anonymous internet-based survey that asked about their experience trying to reproduce published findings for various TMS protocols. The prevalence of questionable research practices known to contribute to low reproducibility was also determined. We received 47 completed surveys from researchers with an average of 16.4 published papers (95% CI 10.8–22.0) that used TMS to modulate motor cortical excitability. Respondents also had a mean of 4.0 (2.5–5.7) relevant completed studies that would never be published. Across a range of TMS protocols, 45–60% of respondents found similar results to those in the original publications; the other respondents were able to reproduce the original effects only sometimes or not at all. Only 20% of respondents used formal power calculations to determine study sample sizes. Others relied on previously published studies (25%), personal experience (24%) or flexible post-hoc criteria (41%). Approximately 44% of respondents knew researchers who engaged in questionable research practices (range 32–70%), yet only 18% admitted to engaging in them (range 6–38%). These practices included screening subjects to find those that respond in a desired way to a TMS protocol, selectively reporting results and rejecting data based on a gut feeling. In a sample of 56 published papers that were inspected, not a single questionable research practice was reported. Our survey revealed that approximately 50% of researchers are unable to reproduce published TMS effects. Researchers need to start increasing study sample size and eliminating—or at least

  17. Human milk oligosaccharides shorten rotavirus-induced diarrhea and modulate piglet mucosal immunity and colonic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Monaco, Marcia H; Wang, Mei; Comstock, Sarah S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Fahey, George C; Miller, Michael J; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-08-01

    The impact of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) on mucosal immunity, gut microbiota and response to rotavirus (RV) infection was investigated in the piglet model. Newborn piglets were fed with formula alone (FF) or formula supplemented with 4 g l(-1) HMO (HMO) or a prebiotic mixture of 9:1 short-chain galactooligosaccharides (3.6 g l(-1)) and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (0.4 g l(-1)) (PRE) (n=19-21 per group) for 15 days. Piglets (n=7-8) in each dietary group were orally infected with porcine rotavirus (RV) OSU strain on d10, and stool consistency was assessed daily. Blood, small intestine and colonic contents were collected at day 15. Serum RV-specific antibody concentrations, intestinal histomorphology, RV non-structural protein-4 (NSP4) and cytokine mRNA expression were assessed. Colonic content pH, dry matter (DM) and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were measured. Ascending colonic microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene v1-3 region pyrosequencing. HMO- and PRE-fed groups had shorter duration of diarrhea than FF piglets. Infection changed intestinal histomorphology, increased serum RV-specific antibody response and intestinal RV NSP4 expression, and modulated ileal cytokine expression. HMO enhanced T helper type 1 (interferon-gamma) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines in the ileum, while prebiotics promoted RV-specific immunoglobulin M response to the infection. RV infection and HMO supplementation altered intraluminal environment and gut microbiota. HMO increased pH and lowered DM of colonic contents and enhanced the abundance of unclassified Lachnospiraceae, which contains numerous butyrate-producing bacteria. In conclusion, HMO and prebiotics did not prevent the onset of RV infection but reduced the duration of RV-induced diarrhea in piglets, in part, by modulating colonic microbiota and immune response to RV infection.

  18. Ameloblastin Peptides Modulates the Osteogenic Capacity of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stakkestad, Øystein; Lyngstadaas, Ståle P.; Vondrasek, Jiri; Gordeladze, Jan O.; Reseland, Janne Elin

    2017-01-01

    During amelogenesis the extracellular enamel matrix protein AMBN is quickly processed into 17 kDa (N-terminus) and 23 kDa (C-terminus) fragments. In particular, alternatively spliced regions derived by exon 5/6 within the N-terminus region are known to be critical in biomineralization. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) also express and secrete AMBN, but it is unclear if this expression has effects on the hMSC themselves. If, as suggested from previous findings, AMBN act as a signaling molecule, such effects could influence hMSC growth and differentiation, as well as promoting the secretion of other signaling proteins like cytokines and chemokines. If AMBN is found to modulate stem cell behavior and fate, it will impact our understanding on how extracellular matrix molecules can have multiple roles during development ontogenesis, mineralization and healing of mesenchymal tissues. Here we show that synthetic peptides representing exon 5 promote hMSC proliferation. Interestingly, this effect is inhibited by the application of a 15 aa peptide representing the alternatively spliced start of exon 6. Both peptides also influence gene expression of RUNX2 and osteocalcin, and promote calcium deposition in cultures, indicating a positive influence on the osteogenic capacity of hMSC. We also show that the full-length AMBN-WT and N-terminus region enhance the secretion of RANTES, IP-10, and IL-8. In contrast, the AMBN C-terminus fragment and the exon 5 deleted AMBN (DelEx5) have no detectable effects on any of the parameters investigated. These findings suggest the signaling effect of AMBN is conveyed by processed products, whereas the effect on proliferation is differentially modulated through alternative splicing during gene expression. PMID:28223942

  19. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Danner, Simon M; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-07-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22-60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural stimulation in eight motor-complete spinal cord-injured individuals. Periodic amplitude modulation of at least 20 successive responses occurred in 31.4% of all available data sets with stimulation frequency set at 5-26 Hz, with highest prevalence at 16 Hz. It could be evoked in a single muscle group only but was more strongly expressed and consistent when occurring in pairs of antagonists or in the same muscle group bilaterally. Latencies and waveforms of the modulated reflexes corresponded to those of the unmodulated, monosynaptic responses to 2-Hz stimulation. We suggest that the cyclical changes of reflex excitability resulted from the interaction of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms emerging after specific delays and with distinct durations, including postactivation depression, recurrent inhibition and facilitation, as well as reafferent feedback activation. The emergence of large responses within the patterns at a rate of 5.5/s or 8/s may further suggest the entrainment of spinal mechanisms as involved in clonus. The study demonstrates that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can organize a simple form of rhythmicity through the repetitive activation of spinal reflex circuits.

  20. Calcium-regulatory proteins as modulators of chemotherapy in human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Florea, Ana-Maria; Varghese, Elizabeth; McCallum, Jennifer E; Mahgoub, Safa; Helmy, Irfan; Varghese, Sharon; Gopinath, Neha; Sass, Steffen; Theis, Fabian J; Reifenberger, Guido; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2017-02-11

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a pediatric cancer treated with poly-chemotherapy including platinum complexes (e.g. cisplatin (CDDP), carboplatin), DNA alkylating agents, and topoisomerase I inhibitors (e.g. topotecan (TOPO)). Despite aggressive treatment, NB may become resistant to chemotherapy. We investigated whether CDDP and TOPO treatment of NB cells interacts with the expression and function of proteins involved in regulating calcium signaling. Human neuroblastoma cell lines SH-SY5Y, IMR-32 and NLF were used to investigate the effects of CDDP and TOPO on cell viability, apoptosis, calcium homeostasis, and expression of selected proteins regulating intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). In addition, the impact of pharmacological inhibition of [Ca2+]i-regulating proteins on neuroblastoma cell survival was studied. Treatment of neuroblastoma cells with increasing concentrations of CDDP (0.1-10 μM) or TOPO (0.1 nM-1 μM) induced cytotoxicity and increased apoptosis in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Both drugs increased [Ca2+]i over time. Treatment with CDDP or TOPO also modified mRNA expression of selected genes encoding [Ca2+]i-regulating proteins. Differentially regulated genes included S100A6, ITPR1, ITPR3, RYR1 and RYR3. With FACS and confocal laser scanning microscopy experiments we validated their differential expression at the protein level. Importantly, treatment of neuroblastoma cells with pharmacological modulators of [Ca2+]i-regulating proteins in combination with CDDP or TOPO increased cytotoxicity. Thus, our results confirm an important role of calcium signaling in the response of neuroblastoma cells to chemotherapy and suggest [Ca2+]i modulation as a promising strategy for adjunctive treatment.

  1. Human milk oligosaccharides shorten rotavirus-induced diarrhea and modulate piglet mucosal immunity and colonic microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Monaco, Marcia H; Wang, Mei; Comstock, Sarah S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Fahey Jr, George C; Miller, Michael J; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-01-01

    The impact of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) on mucosal immunity, gut microbiota and response to rotavirus (RV) infection was investigated in the piglet model. Newborn piglets were fed with formula alone (FF) or formula supplemented with 4 g l−1 HMO (HMO) or a prebiotic mixture of 9:1 short-chain galactooligosaccharides (3.6 g l−1) and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (0.4 g l−1) (PRE) (n=19–21 per group) for 15 days. Piglets (n=7–8) in each dietary group were orally infected with porcine rotavirus (RV) OSU strain on d10, and stool consistency was assessed daily. Blood, small intestine and colonic contents were collected at day 15. Serum RV-specific antibody concentrations, intestinal histomorphology, RV non-structural protein-4 (NSP4) and cytokine mRNA expression were assessed. Colonic content pH, dry matter (DM) and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were measured. Ascending colonic microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene v1-3 region pyrosequencing. HMO- and PRE-fed groups had shorter duration of diarrhea than FF piglets. Infection changed intestinal histomorphology, increased serum RV-specific antibody response and intestinal RV NSP4 expression, and modulated ileal cytokine expression. HMO enhanced T helper type 1 (interferon-gamma) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines in the ileum, while prebiotics promoted RV-specific immunoglobulin M response to the infection. RV infection and HMO supplementation altered intraluminal environment and gut microbiota. HMO increased pH and lowered DM of colonic contents and enhanced the abundance of unclassified Lachnospiraceae, which contains numerous butyrate-producing bacteria. In conclusion, HMO and prebiotics did not prevent the onset of RV infection but reduced the duration of RV-induced diarrhea in piglets, in part, by modulating colonic microbiota and immune response to RV infection. PMID:24522264

  2. Modulation of the development of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by lithium chloride.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ko-Jiunn; Lee, Yueh-Lun; Yang, Yi-Yuan; Shih, Neng-Yao; Ho, Chia-Chen; Wu, Yu-Chen; Huang, Tze-Sing; Huang, Ming-Chyi; Liu, Hsing-Cheng; Shen, Winston W; Leu, Sy-Jye

    2011-02-01

    Lithium has been used or explored to treat psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases that are frequently associated with an abnormal immune status. It is likely that lithium may work through modulation of immune responses in these patients. Because dendritic cells (DC) play a central role in regulating immune responses, this study investigated the influence of lithium chloride (LiCl) on the development and function of DC. Exposure to LiCl during the differentiation of human monocyte-derived immature DCs (iDC) enhances CD86 and CD83 expression and increases the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α. However, the presence of LiCl during LPS-induced maturation of iDC has the opposite effect. During iDC differentiation, LiCl suppresses the activity of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β, and activates PI3K and MEK. In addition, LiCl activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) during iDC differentiation, a pathway not described before. Each of these signaling pathways appears to have distinct impact on the differentiating iDC. The enhanced CD86 expression by LiCl involves the PI3K/AKT and GSK-3β pathway. LiCl modulates the expression of CD83 in iDC mainly through MEK/ERK, PI3K/AKT, and PPARγ pathways, while the increased production of IL-1β and TNF-α mainly involves the MEK/ERK pathway. The effect of LiCl on IL-6/IL-8/IL-10 secretion in iDC is mediated through inhibition of GSK-3β. We have also demonstrated that PPARγ is downstream of GSK-3β and is responsible for the LiCl-mediated modulation of CD86/83 and CD1 expression, but not IL-6/8/10 secretion. The combined influence of these molecular signaling pathways may account for certain clinical effect of lithium.

  3. Lactate modulates the intracellular pH sensitivity of human TREK1 channels.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Swagata; Sikdar, Sujit Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Tissue acidosis and high lactate concentrations are associated with cerebral ischaemia. The degree of acidosis is dependent on circulating glucose concentration, hyperglycaemia being associated with increased acidosis. Among other agents, lactate and protons have been shown to activate the leak potassium channel; TREK1 (TWIK related potassium channel 1) from the intracellular side and its increased activity is implicated in tolerance towards ischaemic cell damage. In the present study, we show that ischaemic concentrations of lactate (30 mM) at pH 7.0 and 6.5, commonly observed during ischemia, cause robust potentiation of human TREK1 (hTREK1) activity at single-channel level in cell-free inside-out membrane patches, while 30 mM lactate at pH 6.0 to 5.5, commonly observed during hyperglycaemic ischemia, reduces hTREK1 channel activity significantly. The biphasic effect of 30 mM lactate (ischaemic concentrations) on modulation of hTREK1 by varying pH conditions is specific since basal concentrations of lactate (3 mM) and 30 mM pyruvate at pH 7.0 and 5.5 failed to show similar effect as lactate. Experiments with deletion and point mutants of hTREK1 channel suggest that lactate changes the pH modulation of hTREK1 by interacting differently with the histidine residue at 328th position (H328) above and below its pKa (∼6.0) in the intracellular carboxyl-terminal domain of TREK1. This lactate-induced pH modulation of hTREK1 is absent in C-terminal deletion mutant, CTDΔ100, and is similar in E321A-hTREK1 mutant as in wild-type hTREK1 suggesting that it is independent of pH-sensitive glutamate residue at 321st position. Such a differential pH-dependent effect of lactate on an ion channel function has not been reported earlier and has important implications in different stages of ischaemia.

  4. The integrative role of leptin, oestrogen and the insulin family in obesity-associated breast cancer: potential effects of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, S; Monk, J M; Robinson, L E; Mourtzakis, M

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer. The mechanisms through which obesity influences the development and progression of breast cancer are not fully elucidated; however, several factors such as increased oestrogen, concentrations of various members of the insulin family and inflammation that are associated with adiposity are purported to be important factors in this relationship. Emerging research has also begun to focus on the role of adipokines, (i.e. adipocyte secreted factors), in breast cancer. Leptin secretion is directly related to adiposity and is believed to promote breast cancer directly and independently, as well as through involvement with the oestrogen and insulin signalling pathways. As leptin is secreted from white adipose tissue, any intervention that reduces adiposity may be favourable. However, it is also important to consider that energy expenditure through exercise, independent of fat loss, may improve leptin regulation. The purpose of this narrative review was to explore the role of leptin in breast cancer development and progression, identify key interactions with oestrogen and the insulin family, and distinguish the potential effects of exercise on these interactions. PMID:25875578

  5. Biomechanical and histological comparison of the influence of oestrogen deficient state on tendon healing potential in rats

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Sercan; Balcik, Cenk; Bacanli, Didem; Guven, Gulnur; Akgun, Rahmi Can; Tuncay, Ismail Cengiz

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-six female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: oophrectomised (oestrogen deficient) rats and sham operated (oestrogen maintained) rats. Rats were sacrificed at six, ten, and 14 weeks. The rats were randomly chosen to have biomechanical evaluation on one side and histological evaluation on the other. Biomechanical testing was performed on an Instron machine to measure peak load. Histological sections were evaluated for cell proliferation, collagen-fibre organisation, fibroblast density, angiogenesis, inflammatory cells, chondroid and osseous metaplasia. Compared with the sham operated group, the oophrectomised group showed a lesser average maximum stress (42.9 N/m2 versus 33.7 N/m2) at six weeks, which was significant (p < .05). Succeeding weeks showed no significant biomechanical differences between the two groups. The sham operated group showed greater inflammatory response, which was statistically significant (p < 0.05), and also revealed greater cell proliferation and density. The results of this study revealed that endogenous oestrogen may improve healing of the Achilles tendon in rats. PMID:19387642

  6. Immunolocalisation and oestrogen regulation of small proline-rich protein 2a protein in the mouse uterus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyang-Ah; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Lee, Young Jin; Lee, Seung-Joon; Kim, Woo Jin; Han, Seon-Sook; Yang, Se-Ran; Woo, Heung-Myong; Na, Sunghun; Song, Haengseok; Hong, Seok-Ho

    2014-06-01

    Small proline-rich protein 2a (Sprr2a) is one of the structural components of the cornified keratinocyte cell envelope that contributes to form a protective barrier in the skin against dehydration and environmental stress. Interestingly, Sprr2a mRNA is detected in the mouse uterus and is regulated by 17β-oestradiol (E2). In the present study, we investigated the effects of E2 and oestrogenic compounds on the regulation and localisation of Sprr2a protein in the mouse uterus. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that Sprr2a protein is detected only in the adult uterus, and not in the ovary, oviduct or testis. We also demonstrated that Sprr2a protein is tightly regulated by E2 in the mouse uterus and exclusively detected in luminal and glandular epithelial cells. Furthermore, Sprr2a is dose-dependently induced by oestrogenic compounds such as bisphenol A and 4-tert-octylphenol. Collectively, our studies suggest that Sprr2a protein may have a unique function in physiological events in the mouse uterus and can be used as an indicator to detect compounds with oestrogenic activity in the mouse uterus.

  7. The influence of ethanol and liver disease on sex hormones and hepatic oestrogen receptors in women.

    PubMed

    Becker, U

    1993-09-01

    In contrast to the numerous studies of men, very few studies have been concerned with sex hormone disturbances in women with chronic alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver diseases. The aim of the study was, to evaluate the effect of ethanol and liver dysfunction on menstrual cycle, serum sex hormone concentrations and hepatic oestrogen receptors in women. In premenopausal female alcoholics ethanol consumption increase the frequency of menstrual disturbances, abortions, and miscarriages, while infertility is not frequent. Acute ethanol intoxication has only minor effects on pituitary-gonadal hormones in premenopausal women, while chronic ethanol abuse lead to reduced concentrations of sulphated steroids, and these changes may be seen before severe liver dysfunction has appeared. In women liver dysfunction lead to earlier occurrence of menopause in comparison with normal controls, while information is insufficient or lacking regarding the influence upon fertility, pregnancy outcome and sexual behavior in women. In postmenopausal women with alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease, the main disturbances of sex hormone metabolism consist of elevated oestrone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations, while serum concentrations of steroid sulphates and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are reduced, and the degree of liver dysfunction is a major determinant for the observed disturbances. The presence of high affinity, low capacity, specific oestrogen receptors (ER) in the liver is confirmed using a ligand binding assay (DCC), specificity analyses, and sucrose gradient centrifugation. Furthermore, the sensitivity of an enzyme immunoassay has been improved enabling the quantitative measurement of hepatic ER in 102 small liver biopsies from patients with alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver diseases. The method is suitable for quantitative assessment and ER in small tissue samples, and can be applied to other tissues than the liver. Patients with chronic liver

  8. Oestrogenic pollutants promote the growth of a parasite in male sticklebacks.

    PubMed

    Macnab, Vicki; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Tilley, Ceinwen A; Barber, Iain

    2016-05-01

    Aquatic environments are especially susceptible to anthropogenic chemical pollution. Yet although knowledge on the biological effects of pollutants on aquatic organisms is increasing, far less is known about how ecologically-important interspecific interactions are affected by chemicals. In particular, the consequences of anthropogenic pollution for the interaction of hosts and parasites are poorly understood. Here, we examine how exposure to 17β-oestradiol (E2)-a natural oestrogen and a model endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) -affects infection susceptibility and emergent infection phenotypes in an experimental host-parasite system; three spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) infected with the common, debilitating cestode Schistocephalus solidus. We exposed individual sticklebacks to a 0ngl(-1) (control), 10ngl(-1) or 100ngl(-1) E2 treatment before feeding them infective stages of S. solidus. E2 exposure significantly elevated vitellogenin (VTG) levels-a biomarker of exposure to xenoestrogens-in both female and male fish, and reduced their body condition. Susceptibility to parasite infection was unaffected by EDC exposure; however, E2 treatment and fish sex interacted significantly to determine the growth rate of parasites, which grew quickest in male hosts held under the higher (100ngl(-1)) E2 treatment. Tissue VTG levels and parasite mass correlated positively across the whole sample of experimentally infected fish, but separate regressions run on the male and female datasets demonstrated a significant relationship only among male fish. Hence, among males-but not females-elevated VTG levels elicited by E2 exposure led to more rapid parasite growth. We outline plausible physiological mechanisms that could explain these results. Our results demonstrate that oestrogenic pollutants can alter host-parasite interactions by promoting parasite growth, and that male hosts may be disproportionately affected. Because ecologically-relevant effects of infection on

  9. Oestrogenic pollutants promote the growth of a parasite in male sticklebacks

    PubMed Central

    Macnab, Vicki; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Tilley, Ceinwen A.; Barber, Iain

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic environments are especially susceptible to anthropogenic chemical pollution. Yet although knowledge on the biological effects of pollutants on aquatic organisms is increasing, far less is known about how ecologically-important interspecific interactions are affected by chemicals. In particular, the consequences of anthropogenic pollution for the interaction of hosts and parasites are poorly understood. Here, we examine how exposure to 17β-oestradiol (E2)—a natural oestrogen and a model endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) —affects infection susceptibility and emergent infection phenotypes in an experimental host–parasite system; three spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) infected with the common, debilitating cestode Schistocephalus solidus. We exposed individual sticklebacks to a 0 ng l−1 (control), 10 ng l−1 or 100 ng l−1 E2 treatment before feeding them infective stages of S. solidus. E2 exposure significantly elevated vitellogenin (VTG) levels—a biomarker of exposure to xenoestrogens—in both female and male fish, and reduced their body condition. Susceptibility to parasite infection was unaffected by EDC exposure; however, E2 treatment and fish sex interacted significantly to determine the growth rate of parasites, which grew quickest in male hosts held under the higher (100 ng l−1) E2 treatment. Tissue VTG levels and parasite mass correlated positively across the whole sample of experimentally infected fish, but separate regressions run on the male and female datasets demonstrated a significant relationship only among male fish. Hence, among males—but not females—elevated VTG levels elicited by E2 exposure led to more rapid parasite growth. We outline plausible physiological mechanisms that could explain these results. Our results demonstrate that oestrogenic pollutants can alter host–parasite interactions by promoting parasite growth, and that male hosts may be disproportionately affected. Because ecologically

  10. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in reverberant sound fields: Carrier bandwidth effects and binaural versus monaural comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Kim, Duck O.; Kuwada, Shigeyuki; Anderson, Paul W.; Brandewie, Eugene; Collecchia, Regina; Srinivasan, Nirmal

    2012-01-01

    Previous work [Zahorik et al., POMA, 12, 050005 (2011)] has reported that for a broadband noise carrier signal in a simulated reverberant sound field, human sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) is higher than would be predicted based on the broadband acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) of the listening environment. Interpretation of this result was complicated by the fact that acoustical MTFs of rooms are often quite different for different carrier frequency regions, and listeners may have selectively responded to advantageous carrier frequency regions where the effective acoustic modulation loss due to the room was less than indicated by a broadband acoustic MTF analysis. Here, AM sensitivity testing and acoustic MTF analyses were expanded to include narrowband noise carriers (1-octave and 1/3-octave bands centered at 4 kHz), as well as monaural and binaural listening conditions. Narrowband results were found to be consistent with broadband results: In a reverberant sound field, human AM sensitivity is higher than indicated by the acoustical MTFs. The effect was greatest for modulation frequencies above 32 Hz and was present whether the stimulation was monaural or binaural. These results are suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation in reverberant listening. PMID:23437416

  11. MR-1S Interacts with PET100 and PET117 in Module-Based Assembly of Human Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Vidoni, Sara; Harbour, Michael E; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Signes, Alba; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Taylor, Robert W; Tiranti, Valeria; Arnold, Susanne; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Zeviani, Massimo

    2017-02-14

    The biogenesis of human cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is an intricate process in which three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded core subunits are assembled in a coordinated way with at least 11 nucleus-encoded subunits. Many chaperones shared between yeast and humans are involved in COX assembly. Here, we have used a MT-CO3 mutant cybrid cell line to define the composition of assembly intermediates and identify new human COX assembly factors. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis led us to modify the assembly model from a sequential pathway to a module-based process. Each module contains one of the three core subunits, together with different ancillary components, including HIGD1A. By the same analysis, we identified the short isoform of the myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1S) as a new COX assembly factor, which works with the highly conserved PET100 and PET117 chaperones to assist COX biogenesis in higher eukaryotes.

  12. Homeostatic modulation of stimulation-dependent plasticity in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Ilić, N V; Milanović, S; Krstić, J; Bajec, D D; Grajić, M; Ilić, T V

    2011-01-01

    Since recently, it is possible, using noninvasive cortical stimulation, such as the protocol of paired associative stimulation (PAS), to induce the plastic changes in the motor cortex, in humans that mimic Hebb's model of learning. Application of TMS conjugated with peripheral electrical stimulation at strictly coherent temporal manner lead to convergence of inputs in the sensory-motor cortex, with the consequent synaptic potentiation or weakening, if applied repetitively. However, when optimal interstimulus interval (ISI) for induction of LTP-like effects is applied as a single pair, Motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude inhibition is observed, the paradigm known as short-latency afferent inhibition (SLAI). Aiming to resolve this paradox, PAS protocols were applied, with 200 repetitions of TMS pulses paired with median nerve electrical stimulation, at ISI equal to individual latencies of evoked response of somatosensory cortex (N(20)) (PAS(LTP)), and at ISI of N(20) shortened for 5 msec (PAS(LTD)) - protocols that mimic LTP-like changes in the human motor cortex. MEP amplitudes before, during and after interventions were measured as an indicator based on output signals originating from the motor system. Post-intervention MEP amplitudes following the TMS protocols of PAS(LTP) and PAS(LTD) were facilitated and depressed, respectively, contrary to MEP amplitudes during intervention. During PAS(LTP) MEP amplitudes were significantly decreased in case of PAS(LTP), while in the case of PAS(LTD) an upward trend was observed. In conclusions, a possible explanation for the seemingly paradoxical effect of PAS can be found in the mechanism of homeostatic modulation of plasticity. Those findings indicate the existence of complex relationships in the development of plasticity induced by stimulation, depending on the level of the previous motor cortex excitability.

  13. Exposure to ELF-pulse modulated X band microwaves increases in vitro human astrocytoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Castejón, C; Pérez-Bruzón, R N; Llorente, M; Pes, N; Lacasa, C; Figols, T; Lahoz, M; Maestú, C; Vera-Gil, A; Del Moral, A; Azanza, M J

    2009-12-01

    Common concern about the biological effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) is increasing with the expansion of X-band microwaves (MW). The purpose of our work was to determine whether exposure to MW pulses in this range can induce toxic effects on human astrocytoma cells. Cultured astrocytoma cells (Clonetics line 1321N1) were submitted to 9.6 GHz carrier, 90% amplitude modulated by extremely low frequency (ELF)-EMF pulses inside a Gigahertz Transversal Electromagnetic Mode cell (GTEM-cell). Astrocytoma cultures were maintained inside a GTEM-incubator in standard culture conditions at 37+/-0.1 degrees C, 5% CO2, in a humidified atmosphere. Two experimental conditions were applied with field parameters respectively of: PW 100-120 ns; PRF 100-800 Hz; PRI 10-1.25 ms; power 0.34-0.60 mW; electric field strength 1.25-1.64 V/m; magnetic field peak amplitude 41.4-54.6 microOe. SAR was calculated to be 4.0 x 10-4 W/Kg. Astrocytoma samples were grown in a standard incubator. Reaching 70-80% confluence, cells were transferred to a GTEM-incubator. Experimental procedure included exposed human astrocytoma cells to MW for 15, 30, 60 min and 24 h and unexposed sham-control samples. Double blind method was applied. Our results showed that cytoskeleton proteins, cell morphology and viability were not modified. Statistically significant results showed increased cell proliferation rate under 24h MW exposure. Hsp-70 and Bcl-2 antiapoptotic proteins were observed in control and treated samples, while an increased expression of connexin 43 proteins was found in exposed samples. The implication of these results on increased proliferation is the subject of our current research.

  14. Iron oxide nanoparticles modulate lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in primary human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Susann; Stenvik, Jørgen; Nilsen, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Co-stimulation of the immune system to more than one agent concomitantly is very common in real life, and considering the increasing use of engineered nanoparticles and nanomaterials, it is highly relevant to assess the ability of these materials to modulate key innate immune responses, which has not yet been studied in detail. We investigated the immunomodulatory effects of 10 nm and 30 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) on primary human monocytes in the presence and absence of Toll-like receptor 4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Prior to the cell studies, we characterized the physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles in cell culture medium and ensured that the nanoparticles were free from biological contamination. Cellular uptake of the IONPs in monocytes was assessed using transmission electron microscopy. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that the IONPs per se did not induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. However, the IONPs had the ability to suppress LPS-induced nuclear factor kappa B activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines in primary human monocytes in an LPS and a particle dose-dependent manner. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled LPS, we showed that the effects correlated with impaired LPS internalization by monocytes in the presence of IONPs, which could be partly explained by LPS adsorption onto the nanoparticle surface. Additionally, the results from particle pretreatment experiments indicate that other cellular mechanisms might also play a role in the observed effects, which warrants further studies to elucidate the additional mechanisms underlying the capacity of IONPs to alter the reactivity of monocytes to LPS and to mount an appropriate cellular response. PMID:27695322

  15. Recombinant Ad35 adenoviral proteins as potent modulators of human T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Joanne; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André; Astier, Anne L

    2015-01-01

    The protein CD46 protects cells from complement attack by regulating cleavage of C3b and C3d. CD46 also regulates the adaptive immune response by controlling T-cell activation and differentiation. Co-engagement of the T-cell receptor and CD46 notably drives T-cell differentiation by switching production of interferon-γ to secretion of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. This regulatory pathway is altered in several chronic inflammatory diseases, highlighting its key role for immune homeostasis. The manipulation of the CD46 pathway may therefore provide a powerful means to regulate immune responses. Herein, we investigated the effect of recombinant proteins derived from the fibre knob of the adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35) that uses CD46 as its entry receptor, on human T-cell activation. We compared the effects of Ad35K++, engineered to exhibit enhanced affinity to CD46, and of Ad35K−, mutated in the binding site for CD46. Ad35K++ profoundly affects T-cell activation by decreasing the levels of CD46 at the surface of primary T cells, and impairing T-cell co-activation, shown by decreased CD25 expression, reduced proliferation and lower secretion of interleukin-10 and interferon-γ. In contrast, Ad35K− acts a potent co-activator of T cells, enhancing T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. These data show that recombinant Ad35 proteins are potent modulators of human T-cell activation, and support their further development as potential drugs targeting T-cell responses. PMID:25251258

  16. Synergistic Structure in the Speed Dependent Modulation of Muscle Activity in Human Walking

    PubMed Central

    Buurke, Tom J. W.; Lamoth, Claud J. C.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Rob den Otter, A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a modular organisation has been proposed to simplify control of the large number of muscles involved in human walking. Although previous research indicates that a single set of modular activation patterns can account for muscle activity at different speeds, these studies only provide indirect evidence for the idea that speed regulation in human walking is under modular control. Here, a more direct approach was taken to assess the synergistic structure that underlies speed regulation, by isolating speed effects through the construction of gain functions that represent the linear relation between speed and amplitude for each point in the time-normalized gait cycle. The activity of 13 muscles in 13 participants was measured at 4 speeds (0.69, 1.00, 1.31, and 1.61 ms-1) during treadmill walking. Gain functions were constructed for each of the muscles, and gain functions and the activity patterns at 1.00 ms-1 were both subjected to dimensionality reduction, to obtain modular gain functions and modular basis functions, respectively. The results showed that 4 components captured most of the variance in the gain functions (74.0% ± 1.3%), suggesting that the neuromuscular regulation of speed is under modular control. Correlations between modular gain functions and modular basis functions (range 0.58–0.89) and the associated synergistic muscle weightings (range 0.6–0.95) were generally high, suggesting substantial overlap in the synergistic control of the basic phasing of muscle activity and its modulation through speed. Finally, the combined set of modular functions and associated weightings were well capable of predicting muscle activity patterns obtained at a speed (1.31 ms-1) that was not involved in the initial dimensionality reduction, confirming the robustness of the presently used approach. Taken together, these findings provide direct evidence of synergistic structure in speed regulation, and may inspire further work on flexibility in the modular

  17. Coordinative modulation of human zinc transporter 2 gene expression through active and suppressive regulators.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu-Ju; Liu, Ya-Chuan; Lin, Meng-Chieh; Chen, Yi-Ting; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Zinc transporter 2 (ZnT2) is one of the cellular factors responsible for Zn homeostasis. Upon Zn overload, ZnT2 reduces cellular Zn by transporting it into excretory vesicles. We investigated the molecular mechanism that regulates human ZnT2 (hZnT2) gene expression. Zn induces hZnT2 expression in dose- and time-dependent manners. Overexpression of metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) increases hZnT2 transcription, whereas depletion of MTF-1 reduces hZnT2 expression. There are five putative metal response elements (MREs) within 1kb upstream of the hZnT2 gene. A serial deletion of the hZnT2 promoter region (from 5' to 3') shows that the two MREs proximal to the gene are essential for Zn-induced promoter activity. Further mutation analysis concludes that the penultimate MRE (MREb) supports the metal-induced promoter activity. The hZnT2 promoter has also a zinc finger E-box binding homeobox (ZEB) binding element. Mutation or deletion of this ZEB binding element elevates the basal and Zn-induced hZnT2 promoter activities. Knockdown of ZEB1 mRNA enhances the hZnT2 transcript level in HEK-293 cells. In MCF-7 (ZEB-deficient) cells, expression of ZEB proteins attenuates the Zn-induced hZnT2 expression. However, expressions of MTF-1 target genes such as human ZnT1 and metallothionein IIA were not affected. Our study shows the expression of the hZnT2 gene is coordinately regulated via active and suppressive modulators.

  18. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Couvigny, Benoît; de Wouters, Tomas; Kaci, Ghalia; Jacouton, Elsa; Delorme, Christine; Doré, Joël; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB) in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor), we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health. PMID:25946041

  19. N-Glycans Modulate the Function of Human Corticosteroid-Binding Globulin*

    PubMed Central

    Sumer-Bayraktar, Zeynep; Kolarich, Daniel; Campbell, Matthew P.; Ali, Sinan; Packer, Nicolle H.; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Human corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), a heavily glycosylated protein containing six N-linked glycosylation sites, transports cortisol and other corticosteroids in blood circulation. Here, we investigate the biological importance of the N-glycans of CBG derived from human serum by performing a structural and functional characterization of CBG N-glycosylation. Liquid chromatography-tandem MS-based glycoproteomics and glycomics combined with exoglycosidase treatment revealed 26 complex type N-glycoforms, all of which were terminated with α2,3-linked neuraminic acid (NeuAc) residues. The CBG N-glycans showed predominantly bi- and tri-antennary branching, but higher branching was also observed. N-glycans from all six N-glycosylation sites were identified with high site occupancies (70.5–99.5%) and glycoforms from all sites contained a relatively low degree of core-fucosylation (0–34.9%). CBG showed site-specific glycosylation and the site-to-site differences in core-fucosylation and branching could be in silico correlated with the accessibility to the individual glycosylation sites on the maturely folded protein. Deglycosylated and desialylated CBG analogs were generated to investigate the biological importance of CBG N-glycans. As a functional assay, MCF-7 cells were challenged with native and glycan-modified CBG and the amount of cAMP, which is produced as a quantitative response upon CBG binding to its cell surface receptor, was used to evaluate the CBG:receptor interaction. The removal of both CBG N-glycans and NeuAc residues increased the production of cAMP significantly. This confirms that N-glycans are involved in the CBG:receptor interaction and indicates that the modulation is performed by steric and/or electrostatic means through the terminal NeuAc residues. PMID:21558494

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization: Modulation of Host Immune Response and Impact on Human Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aisling F.; Leech, John M.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    In apparent contrast to its invasive potential Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the anterior nares of 20–80% of the human population. The relationship between host and microbe appears particularly individualized and colonization status seems somehow predetermined. After decolonization, persistent carriers often become re-colonized with their prior S. aureus strain, whereas non-carriers resist experimental colonization. Efforts to identify factors facilitating colonization have thus far largely focused on the microorganism rather than on the human host. The host responds to S. aureus nasal colonization via local expression of anti-microbial peptides, lipids, and cytokines. Interplay with the co-existing microbiota also influences colonization and immune regulation. Transient or persistent S. aureus colonization induces specific systemic immune responses. Humoral responses are the most studied of these and little is known of cellular responses induced by colonization. Intriguingly, colonized patients who develop bacteremia may have a lower S. aureus-attributable mortality than their non-colonized counterparts. This could imply a staphylococcal-specific immune “priming” or immunomodulation occurring as a consequence of colonization and impacting on the outcome of infection. This has yet to be fully explored. An effective vaccine remains elusive. Anti-S. aureus vaccine strategies may need to drive both humoral and cellular immune responses to confer efficient protection. Understanding the influence of colonization on adaptive response is essential to intelligent vaccine design, and may determine the efficacy of vaccine-mediated immunity. Clinical trials should consider colonization status and the resulting impact of this on individual patient responses. We urgently need an increased appreciation of colonization and its modulation of host immunity. PMID:24409186

  1. PFKFB3 modulates glycolytic metabolism and alleviates endoplasmic reticulum stress in human osteoarthritis cartilage.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jining; Lu, Daigang; Guo, Hua; Miao, Wusheng; Wu, Ge; Zhou, Meifen

    2016-03-01

    Glycolytic disorder has been demonstrated to be a major cause of osteoarthritis (OA) and chondrocyte dysfunction. The present work aimed to investigate the expression and role of the glycolytic regulator 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3) in OA cartilage. It was found that PFKFB3 expression was down-regulated in human OA cartilage tissues and in tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α- or interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated human chondrocytes. The glycolytic metabolism appeared as glucose utilization and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation, and lactate production was stunted in OA cartilage. However, the impaired glycolytic process in OA cartilage was improved by PFKFB3 overexpression, which was confirmed in TNF-α- or IL-1β-treated chondrocytes. Furthermore, the expressions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated genes including PERK, ATF3, IRE1, phosphorylated eIF2α (p-eIF2α) and MMP13 were enhanced in OA cartilage explants, while they were decreased by AdPFKFB3 transfection. PFKFB3 also modulated the expressions of PERK, ATF3, IRE1, p-eIF2α and MMP13 in tunicamycin-exposed chondrocytes. Additionally, PFKFB3 improved the cell viability of OA cartilage explants and chondrocytes through the PI3K/Akt/C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) signalling pathway. The transfection of AdPFKFB3 also significantly reduced caspase 3 activation and promoted aggrecan and type II collagen expressions in OA cartilage explants and chondrocytes. In all, this study characterizes a novel role of PFKFB3 in glycolytic metabolism and ER stress of OA cartilage explants and chondrocytes. The study might provide a potential target for OA prevention or therapy.

  2. Identification of Lactobacillus plantarum genes modulating the cytokine response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modulation of the immune system is one of the most plausible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria on human health. Presently, the specific probiotic cell products responsible for immunomodulation are largely unknown. In this study, the genetic and phenotypic diversity of strains of the Lactobacillus plantarum species were investigated to identify genes of L. plantarum with the potential to influence the amounts of cytokines interleukin 10 (IL-10) and IL-12 and the ratio of IL-10/IL-12 produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results A total of 42 Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from diverse environmental and human sources were evaluated for their capacity to stimulate cytokine production in PBMCs. The L. plantarum strains induced the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 over an average 14-fold range and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12 over an average 16-fold range. Comparisons of the strain-specific cytokine responses of PBMCs to comparative genome hybridization profiles obtained with L. plantarum WCFS1 DNA microarrays (also termed gene-trait matching) resulted in the identification of 6 candidate genetic loci with immunomodulatory capacities. These loci included genes encoding an N-acetyl-glucosamine/galactosamine phosphotransferase system, the LamBDCA quorum sensing system, and components of the plantaricin (bacteriocin) biosynthesis and transport pathway. Deletion of these genes in L. plantarum WCFS1 resulted in growth phase-dependent changes in the PBMC IL-10 and IL-12 cytokine profiles compared with wild-type cells. Conclusions The altered PBMC cytokine profiles obtained with the L. plantarum WCFS1 mutants were in good agreement with the predictions made by gene-trait matching for the 42 L. plantarum strains. This study therefore resulted in the identification of genes present in certain strains of L. plantarum which might be responsible for the stimulation of anti

  3. The brain is not a radio receiver for wireless phone signals: Human tissue does not demodulate a modulated radiofrequency carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Christopher C.; Balzano, Quirino

    2010-11-01

    It has been suggested that the low frequency modulations of the radiofrequency (RF) signal from a wireless phone could be demodulated by human tissue. If this occurred it could lead to interactions with ions in the tissue, with possible biological consequences. In recent experiments it has been shown that biological cells do not exhibit significant electrical nonlinearity to be able to demodulate low frequency signals present as modulations of a RF carrier. This makes irrelevant any hypothetical interactions between RF electromagnetic waves and biological systems involving such demodulation mechanisms. Your wireless phone is not an athermal hazard to your brain.

  4. Delivery of RNA-based molecules to human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells for modulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Diener, Yvonne; Bosio, Andreas; Bissels, Ute

    2016-11-01

    Gene modulation of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) harbors great potential for therapeutic application of these cells and presents a versatile tool in basic research to enhance our understanding of HSPC biology. However, stable genetic modification might be adverse, particularly in clinical settings. Here, we review a broad range of approaches to transient, nonviral modulation of protein expression with a focus on RNA-based methods. We compare different delivery methods and describe the usefulness of RNA molecules for overexpression as well as downregulation of proteins in HSPCs.