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Sample records for oestrous cyclicity hypothalamic

  1. Electrical and manual acupuncture stimulation affect oestrous cyclicity and neuroendocrine function in an 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced rat polycystic ovary syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Johansson, Julia; Shao, Ruijin; Mannerås-Holm, Louise; Billig, Håkan; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet

    2012-05-01

    Both low-frequency electro-acupuncture (EA) and manual acupuncture improve menstrual frequency and decrease circulating androgens in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We sought to determine whether low-frequency EA is more effective than manual stimulation in regulating disturbed oestrous cyclicity in rats with PCOS induced by 5α-dihydrotestosterone. To identify the central mechanisms of the effects of stimulation, we assessed hypothalamic mRNA expression of molecules that regulate reproductive and neuroendocrine function. From age 70 days, rats received 2 Hz EA or manual stimulation with the needles five times per week for 4-5 weeks; untreated rats served as control animals. Specific hypothalamic nuclei were obtained by laser microdissection, and mRNA expression was measured with TaqMan low-density arrays. Untreated rats were acyclic. During the last 2 weeks of treatment, seven of eight (88%) rats in the EA group had epithelial keratinocytes, demonstrating oestrous cycle change (P = 0.034 versus control rats). In the manual group, five of eight (62%) rats had oestrous cycle changes (n.s. versus control animals). The mRNA expression of the opioid receptors Oprk1 and Oprm1 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus was lower in the EA group than in untreated control rats. The mRNA expression of the steroid hormone receptors Esr2, Pgr and Kiss1r was lower in the manual group than in the control animals. In rats with 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS, low-frequency EA restored disturbed oestrous cyclicity but did not differ from the manual stimulation group, although electrical stimulation lowered serum testosterone in responders, those with restored oestrus cyclicity, and differed from both control animals and the manual stimulation group. Thus, EA cannot in all aspects be considered superior to manual stimulation. The effects of low-frequency EA may be mediated by central opioid receptors, while manual stimulation may involve regulation of steroid hormone

  2. In vivo increase in hypothalamic cyclic AMP following 5-hydroxytryptophan administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Bundman, M C; Browning, R A

    1984-09-01

    The administration of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP, 100 mg/kg, i.p.) consistently increased hypothalamic cyclic AMP levels in rats treated 10 days earlier with the serotonin neurotoxin, 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT), to produce 5-HT receptor supersensitivity. However 5-HTP (100 mg/kg), failed to cause an increase in hypothalamic cyclic AMP in rats not pretreated with 5,7-DHT. The 5-HTP-induced increase in cyclic AMP was blocked by the decarboxylase inhibitor, benserazide (RO 4-4602, 800 mg/kg) and by the 5-HT antagonist metergoline (5 mg/kg). Other treatments that caused a significant elevation of hypothalamic cyclic AMP included: (a) L-Tryptophan plus the monoamine oxidase inhibitor, tranylcypromine, and (b) the serotonin agonist, 1-(m-trifluromethylphenyl)-1-piperazine. The 5-HT antagonist, methysergide, blocked the serotonin receptor mediated behavioral syndrome, but failed to prevent the increase in hypothalamic cyclic AMP. Moreover, the 5-HT agonist, 5-methoxy-N, N-dimethyltryptamine, (5-Me-DMT), induced a strong behavioral syndrome but failed to significantly increase hypothalamic cyclic AMP. These findings suggest that activation of 5-HT receptors somewhere in the brain causes an increase in hypothalamic cyclic AMP, but further studies will be needed to determine whether this is a direct result of activation of the 5-HT receptors in the hypothalamus.

  3. Muscarinic Receptors Types 1 and 2 in the Preoptic-Anterior Hypothalamic Areas Regulate Ovulation Unequally in the Rat Oestrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    López-Ramírez, Yadira L.; López-Ramírez, Kayro; Arrieta-Cruz, Isabel; Flores, Angélica; Mendoza-Garcés, Luciano; Librado-Osorio, Raúl A.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger; Domínguez, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors types 1 (m1AChR) and 2 (m2AChR) in the preoptic and anterior hypothalamus areas (POA-AHA) were counted, and the effects of blocking these receptors on spontaneous ovulation were analysed throughout the rat oestrous cycle. Rats in each phase of the oestrous cycle were assigned to the following experiments: (1) an immunohistochemical study of the number of cells expressing m1AChR or m2AChR in the POA-AHA and (2) analysis of the effects of the unilateral blockade of the m1AChR (pirenzepine, PZP) or m2AChR (methoctramine, MTC) on either side of the POA-AHA on the ovulation rate. The number of m2AChR-immunoreactive cells was significantly higher at 09:00 h on each day of the oestrous cycle in the POA-AHA region, while no changes in the expression profile of m1AChR protein were observed. The ovulation rate in rats treated with PZP on the oestrous day was lower than that in the vehicle group. Animals treated on dioestrous-1 with PZP or MTC had a higher ovulation rate than those in the vehicle group. In contrast, on dioestrous-2, the MTC treatment decreased the ovulation rate. These results suggest that m1AChR or m2AChR in the POA-AHA could participate in the regulation of spontaneous ovulation in rats.

  4. Biosynthesis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) in hypothalamic-pituitary unit of anoestrous and cyclic ewes.

    PubMed

    Ciechanowska, M O; Łapot, M; Mateusiak, K; Paruszewska, E; Malewski, T; Przekop, F

    2017-02-01

    This study was performed to explain how the molecular processes governing the biosynthesis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) in the hypothalamic-pituitary unit are reflected by luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in sheep during anoestrous period and during luteal and follicular phases of the oestrous cycle. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we analyzed the levels of GnRH and GnRHR in preoptic area (POA), anterior (AH) and ventromedial hypothalamus (VM), stalk-median eminence (SME), and GnRHR in the anterior pituitary gland (AP). Radioimmunoassay has also been used to define changes in plasma LH concentrations. The study provides evidence that the levels of GnRH in the whole hypothalamus of anoestrous ewes were lower than that in sheep during the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle (POA: p < 0.001, AH: p < 0.001, VM: p < 0.01, SME: p < 0.001) and not always than in luteal phase animals (POA: p < 0.05, SME: p < 0.05). It has also been demonstrated that the GnRHR amount in the hypothalamus-anterior pituitary unit, as well as LH level, in the blood in anoestrous ewes were significantly lower than those detected in animals of both cyclic groups. Our data suggest that decrease in LH secretion during the long photoperiod in sheep may be due to low translational activity of genes encoding both GnRH and GnRHR.

  5. Diazepam increases the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity by a cyclic AMP-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, M Luisa; Abella, Cristina; Hernandez, Jesus

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have shown that diazepam behaves as a phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE 4) inhibitor. It has been reported that PDE-4 inhibitors activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis in the rat. In the present study we have examined whether activation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is involved in the effect of diazepam on basal HPA axis activity. Acute systemic administration of diazepam (10 mg kg−1 i.p.) was found to increase the basal HPA axis activity, increasing the plasma concentrations of corticotrophin (ACTH) and corticosterone 30 min post injection. Diazepam also elevated cyclic AMP content of the hypothalamus. Pretreatment of the animals with dexamethasone (1 mg kg−1 s.c.) for 3 days completely abolished the effect of diazepam on HPA axis activity. The antagonists of central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, flumazenil (10 mg kg−1 i.p.) and PK 11195 (5 mg kg−1 i.p.) did not affect the diazepam induced increase of HPA axis activity nor did they have an effect per se. The increase in ACTH and corticosterone levels was significantly reduced by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor, H-89, given either subcutaneously (5 mg kg−1 s.c.) or intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.; 28 μg in 10 μl). The results indicate that diazepam can stimulate basal HPA axis activity in the rat by a cyclic AMP-dependent PKA mediated pathway. PMID:11498522

  6. The use of a synthetic progesterone, levonorgestrel (LNG), to control the oestrous cycle in the koala.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, K; Anderson, S T; Pyne, M; Nicolson, V; Mucci, A; Lisle, A; Johnston, S D

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a synthetic progestogen, levonorgestrel (LNG), to control koala ovarian activity for the purposes of oestrous synchronisation. Captive koalas were administered either saline control or a 70-mg LNG implant on Day 2 of oestrus. Urogenital cytology, oestrous behaviour and plasma oestradiol-17β and LH concentrations were monitored over a 6-week period. After LNG implant removal females were monitored to determine if the return to oestrus was synchronised. LNG-treated koalas immediately ceased displaying oestrous behaviour, showed no evidence of cornified epithelial cells in smears of urogenital cytology and exhibited low plasma oestradiol-17β concentrations throughout the implantation period. In contrast, oestradiol-17β levels in control koalas showed evidence of continued cyclic activity associated with behavioural oestrus and increased cornified epithelial cells in urogenital smears on Days 33 to 35 after saline injection. After implant removal, LNG-treated koalas exhibited oestrus at 13, 14, 17 and 30 days after implant removal. Plasma LH concentrations varied throughout the study period with no significant time (P = 0.49) or treatment (P = 0.13) effect. Overall results from this study suggest that LNG implants in koalas can inhibit oestrous behaviour and reduce circulating oestradiol-17β levels before oestrus, most likely by preventing development of the pre-ovulatory follicle. However, there was no evidence of LH suppression by the LNG implants. Removal of LNG implants resulted in the synchronous return to oestrus in three of the four treated koalas. Further studies on a larger population are required to validate these findings.

  7. Oestrous cycles in Bos taurus cattle.

    PubMed

    Forde, N; Beltman, M E; Lonergan, P; Diskin, M; Roche, J F; Crowe, M A

    2011-04-01

    The oestrous cycle in cattle lasts for 18-24 days. It consists of a luteal phase (14-18 days) and a follicular phase (4-6 days). During the cycle there are generally two (dairy cows) or three (heifers and beef cows) waves of ovarian follicle growth. Each wave of follicle growth consists of a period of emergence of a cohort of follicles, selection of a dominant follicle and either atresia or ovulation of the dominant follicle. These waves of follicle growth, initially established during the early pre-pubertal period of development occur throughout the entire cycle, with only the dominant follicle (DF) of the final wave coinciding with the follicular phase that undergoes final maturation and ovulation. Ovarian functions (follicle growth, ovulation, luteinisation and luteolysis) are regulated by the endocrine hormones of the hypothalamus (gonadotrophin-releasing hormone), anterior pituitary (follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone), ovaries (progesterone, oestradiol and inhibins) and the uterus (prostaglandin F2α). In postpartum cows resumption of regular oestrous cycles (in addition to uterine involution) is fundamental for re-establishment of pregnancy.

  8. Validation of bovine oestrous-specific synthetic molecules with trained scent dogs; similarities between natural and synthetic oestrous smell.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Tenhagen, C; Johnen, D; Le Danvic, C; Gatien, J; Salvetti, P; Tenhagen, B A; Heuwieser, W

    2015-02-01

    Oestrous detection is crucial for successful dairy cow reproduction. Bulls identify cows in oestrus by oestrous-specific odours especially in urine and vaginal fluid. These have been used to train dogs to detect cows in heat. To improve and simplify the dog training, a spray containing synthetic oestrous molecules was developed. The objective of this study was to test the spray on similarities to the natural substance thus to assess its suitability as a training substance for heat detection dogs. Ten privately owned dogs of various breeds were trained. Dogs should be trained either to differentiate natural vaginal fluid from cows in oestrus and dioestrus (n = 5), or spray with or without synthetic oestrous molecules (n = 5). Dogs trained on natural fluid and on spray could detect the oestrous odour they had been trained on with an overall accuracy of 69.0% and 82.4%, respectively (p = 0.019). To validate the synthetic molecules, dogs trained with synthetic molecules had to detect oestrous odour in natural fluid without further training (accuracy 37.6%). Dogs trained on natural fluid detected the synthetic molecules with an accuracy of 50.0% (50% vs 37.4%, p < 0.05). Dogs can recognize natural vaginal fluid from cows in oestrus after they have been trained with synthetic oestrous molecules, but accuracy needs to be improved. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Immunohistochemical studies on the progesterone receptor (PR) in the sow uterus during the oestrous cycle and in inseminated sows at oestrus and early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sukjumlong, S; Dalin, A-M; Sahlin, L; Persson, E

    2005-03-01

    Physiological changes in the sow uterus involve the regulation by progesterone and its receptor proteins (PR). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the localization of PR during different stages of the oestrous cycle and in inseminated sows during early pregnancy by use of immunohistochemistry. Uterine samples were collected from cyclic and inseminated sows at different stages of the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy. The samples were fixed in 10% formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin. Immunohistochemistry was done by use of a mouse monoclonal antibody to PR. The highest PR immunostaining in the surface epithelium was observed at oestrus/5-6 h after artificial insemination (AI) and early dioestrus/70 h after AI. In the glandular epithelium, the highest level of PR was found at oestrus with the lowest at late dioestrus/d 19. Higher levels of PR were observed in inseminated groups compared with cyclic sows. In the myometrium, a high level of PR was found at oestrus, while stromal PR cells were constantly present throughout the oestrous cycle and at different stages of early pregnancy. In conclusion, this study shows that the immunopresence of PR in the sow uterus differed between uterine compartments at the same reproductive stage. Differences were also found for some uterine compartments between cyclic and inseminated/early pregnant sows. The relatively consistent immunostaining of PR in the stroma strengthens a stromal role in the regulation of physiological activities in the sow uterus during the oestrous cycle as well as early pregnancy.

  10. Proteomes of the Female Genital Tract During the Oestrous Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Soleilhavoup, Clement; Riou, Cindy; Tsikis, Guillaume; Labas, Valerie; Harichaux, Gregoire; Kohnke, Philippa; Reynaud, Karine; de Graaf, Simon P.; Gerard, Nadine; Druart, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The female genital tract includes several anatomical regions whose luminal fluids successively interact with gametes and embryos and are involved in the fertilisation and development processes. The luminal fluids from the inner cervix, the uterus and the oviduct were collected along the oestrous cycle at oestrus (Day 0 of the cycle) and during the luteal phase (Day 10) from adult cyclic ewes. The proteomes were assessed by GeLC-MS/MS and quantified by spectral counting. A set of 940 proteins were identified including 291 proteins differentially present along the cycle in one or several regions. The global analysis of the fluid proteomes revealed a general pattern of endocrine regulation of the tract, with the cervix and the oviduct showing an increased differential proteins abundance mainly at oestrus while the uterus showed an increased abundance mainly during the luteal phase. The proteins more abundant at oestrus included several families such as the heat shock proteins (HSP), the mucins, the complement cascade proteins and several redox enzymes. Other proteins known for their interaction with gametes such as oviductin (OVGP), osteopontin, HSPA8, and the spermadhesin AWN were also overexpressed at oestrus. The proteins more abundant during the luteal phase were associated with the immune system such as ceruloplasmin, lactoferrin, DMBT1, or PIGR, and also with tissue remodeling such as galectin 3 binding protein, alkaline phosphatase, CD9, or fibulin. Several proteins differentially abundant between estrus and the luteal phase, such as myosin 9 and fibronectin, were also validated by immunohistochemistry. The potential roles in sperm transit and uterine receptivity of the proteins differentially regulated along the cycle in the female genital tract are discussed. PMID:26518761

  11. Expression of a cytosolic phospholipase A2 by ovine endometrium on days 11-14 of a simulated oestrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Graf, G A; Burns, P D; Silvia, W J

    1999-03-01

    Oxytocin stimulates the synthesis and secretion of PGF2 alpha from uterine tissues in vivo and in vitro late in the ovine oestrous cycle. The synthesis of eicosanoids is dependent upon the availability of free arachidonic acid which is released through the activity of arachidonate releasing phospholipases. In the present study, the following hypothesis was tested: the ovine endometrium expresses a cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and expression or activity of cPLA2 increases as uterine secretory responsiveness to oxytocin develops late in the oestrous cycle. Endometrial tissue was collected from cyclic ewes on day 15 of the oestrous cycle for the preparation of tissue homogenates and isolation of mRNA to determine whether ovine endometrium expressed a cPLA2. A 110 kDa band was detected by western blotting, indicating the presence of a putative ovine cPLA2. A 834 bp fragment of the ovine cPLA2 shared 87% homology with human and mouse cDNA, and northern blot hybridization analysis indicated a single 3.4 kb transcript. A total of 20 ewes were ovariectomized and treated with progesterone and oestrogen to simulate the oestrous cycle to determine whether the expression or activity of ovine cPLA2 changed during the onset of uterine secretory responsiveness to oxytocin in vivo. On days 11-14 (n = 5 per day) of a simulated oestrous cycle, caruncular endometrium was evaluated for expression of ovine cPLA2 mRNA and protein and the synthesis of PGF2 alpha in response to melittin (a potent stimulator of PLA2 activity). Immunoreactive cPLA2 and cPLA2 mRNA were observed on all days and did not increase during the development of uterine responsiveness to oxytocin in vivo. Similarly, melittin increased the synthesis of PGF2 alpha irrespective of day, indicating the presence of a functional cPLA2 on all days examined. These data indicate that the ovine endometrium expresses a functional cPLA2 and that ample concentrations of cPLA2 are present by day 11 of a simulated oestrous

  12. The effects of sensorial denervation on the ovarian function, by the local administration of capsaicin, depend on the day of the oestrous cycle when the treatment was performed.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Angélica; Morales, Leticia; Domínguez, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    There is evidence that sensory innervation plays a role in the regulation of puberty. The present study investigates the effects of functional sensorial desensitisation induced by capsaicin administration to adult female rats in the days of diestrus 1, diestrus 2, pro-oestrus or oestrus on ovulation and serum oestradiol and progesterone concentration. The animals were allotted at random to one of the following groups: (1) animals with capsaicin administration into the bursa ovarica (local administration) (2) animals with vehicle administration into the bursa ovarica and (3) untreated animals group. The animals treated were killed on the day of oestrus after three consecutive 4-day oestrous cycles. No differences were observed in oestrous cyclicity or the average number of ova shed between the sensorial desensitisation animals and the vehicle-treated groups. Capsaicin administration resulted in a significant increase in the intra-ovarian noradrenaline levels in the day of diestrus 2 and pro-oestrus. Serum oestradiol and progesterone concentrations were different, depending on the day of the oestrous cycle in which the treatment was performed. These results suggest that in adult normal female rats, ovarian sensorial innervations participate together with the sympathetic innervation in the ovarian function regulating the hormone secretion and this participation varies along the oestrous cycle.

  13. Swine uterus carnosinase activity in oestrous cycle and early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jabłonowska, C; Piechocki, D; Wołos, A

    1985-01-01

    Carnosinase activity was determined in uterus extracts of sexually immature sows, on particular days of the oestrous cycle, and on the 20th and 30th day of pregnancy. In mature sows carnosinase activity in the uterus was on the average 4.5 times higher than in immature sows. Activity of the enzyme in the oestrous cycle increased from the zero day (first day of the heat) until 13th day, followed by a rapid decrease, reaching the lowest levels on the 17th day of the cycle (3 times lower on the average than on the zero day). On the last days of the cycle (20-21st) activity of carnosinase reached again levels similar to those of the zero day. Carnosinase activity in a uterus corner of pregnant sows (20th day of pregnancy) was over 4 times higher than in the "peak" day of the oestrous cycle (13th day), and over 12 times higher than in immature sows. Activity of the enzyme increased along with progressing pregnancy. It was found that activity of carnosinase in uterus corner of swines was related to the level of progesterone determined by other authors in the blood plasma.

  14. Male influence on oestrous cycles in female woolly opossum (Caluromys philander).

    PubMed

    Perret, M; Ben M'Barek, S

    1991-03-01

    Plasma progesterone concentrations and the occurrence of oestrous cycles were studied in isolated woolly opossums subsequently subjected to male influences during a 40-day period. Pairing (N = 48) or exposure to male urine (N = 15) resulted in all females exhibiting oestrous during the stimulation phase, providing evidence that the activation of ovarian activity in the woolly opossum involves pheromonal cues from males. The latency of occurrence of oestrous in stimulated females depended upon their sexual state before male stimulation. In anoestrous females, the mean latency was 20.7 +/- 0.9 days (N = 35), a value which agrees with the duration of the follicular phase. In females which first entered oestrous before male stimulation, the latency of induced oestrous was inversely correlated to the date of occurrence of the previous oestrous. The inter-oestrous interval was normal (38.1 +/- 1 days, N = 5) when females were in oestrous at the beginning of male stimulation. In contrast, the inter-oestrous interval was significantly shortened (28.7 +/- 2 days, N = 7) or lengthened (51.1 +/- 1.7 days, N = 16) depending on whether females were in the luteal or follicular phases at the beginning of male stimulation. During pairing several females became pregnant and gave birth 24 +/- 0.9 days (N = 13) after copulation. In the woolly opossum, the response to male influences involves mechanisms similar to those observed in eutherians and results in enhancement and synchronization of oestrous cycles in females. Pheromonal interactions could play an important role in synchronizing oestrous cycles in wild females during the dry season, a period when animals regroup to feed on spatially localized food resources.

  15. Central genomic regulation of the expression of oestrous behaviour in dairy cows: a review.

    PubMed

    Woelders, H; van der Lende, T; Kommadath, A; te Pas, M F W; Smits, M A; Kaal, L M T E

    2014-05-01

    The expression of oestrous behaviour in Holstein Friesian dairy cows has progressively decreased over the past 50 years. Reduced oestrus expression is one of the factors contributing to the current suboptimal reproductive efficiency in dairy farming. Variation between and within cows in the expression of oestrous behaviour is associated with variation in peripheral blood oestradiol concentrations during oestrus. In addition, there is evidence for a priming role of progesterone for the full display of oestrous behaviour. A higher rate of metabolic clearance of ovarian steroids could be one of the factors leading to lower peripheral blood concentrations of oestradiol and progesterone in high-producing dairy cows. Oestradiol acts on the brain by genomic, non-genomic and growth factor-dependent mechanisms. A firm base of understanding of the ovarian steroid-driven central genomic regulation of female sexual behaviour has been obtained from studies on rodents. These studies have resulted in the definition of five modules of oestradiol-activated genes in the brain, referred to as the GAPPS modules. In a recent series of studies, gene expression in the anterior pituitary and four brain areas (amygdala, hippocampus, dorsal hypothalamus and ventral hypothalamus) in oestrous and luteal phase cows, respectively, has been measured, and the relation with oestrous behaviour of these cows was analysed. These studies identified a number of genes of which the expression was associated with the intensity of oestrous behaviour. These genes could be grouped according to the GAPPS modules, suggesting close similarity of the regulation of oestrous behaviour in cows and female sexual behaviour in rodents. A better understanding of the central genomic regulation of the expression of oestrous behaviour in dairy cows may in due time contribute to improved (genomic) selection strategies for appropriate oestrus expression in high-producing dairy cows.

  16. Effect of season on the oestrous cycle of cows (Bos indicus) indigenous to northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Zakari, A Y; Molokwu, E C; Osori, D I

    1981-09-12

    A seasonal effect was demonstrated on the occurrence of oestrus and on the length of oestrous cycles in Bunaji and Bokoloji cows. There was a gradual lengthening of oestrous cycle which resulted in fewer cycles occurring in the dry and pre-rainy seasons. Oestrous cycle length was the same for Bunaji (22.89 +/-0.70 days) and Bokoloji (23.76 +/- 0.65 days) cows (P less than 0.05). Season had an equally depressing effect on the duration and intensity of oestrus in both breeds of cows. During the dry and pre-rainy seasons the behavioural signs of oestrus were poorly manifested and lasted for only a short period. During the rainy and pre-dry seasons, the duration of oestrus and behavioural signs were much more pronounced.

  17. Follicular dynamics and oestrous detection in Thai postpartum swamp buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Yindee, M; Techakumphu, M; Lohachit, C; Sirivaidyapong, S; Na-Chiangmai, A; Rodriguez-Martinez, H; van der Weyden, G C; Colenbrander, B

    2011-02-01

    This study characterized follicular activity and oestrous behaviour from 5 to 9 days post-calving up to the 4th ovulation postpartum (pp) in 16 multiparous (range 2-7 parities) Thai swamp buffalo cows (Bubalus bubalis), aged 4-12 years and weighing from 432 to 676 kg. Ovarian follicular activity was examined by transrectal ultrasonography (TUS) every morning. Oestrous detection was performed twice daily by direct personal observation of behaviour and for presence of clear cervical mucus discharge and indirectly by video camera recording during 21 h/day. A follicular wave-like pattern was present before the 1st ovulation leading to short oestrous cycles. Growth rates and maximum diameters of the ovulatory follicles did not differ between the 1st and 4th ovulations. However, growth rate for non-ovulatory dominant follicles (DF) before the 1st ovulation was lower than for the ovulatory follicle (p<0.05). In addition, the diameter of all ovulatory follicles (14.3 ± 0.46 mm, n=39) was significantly larger (p < 0.01) than those of the preceding last but one non-ovulatory DF (10.8 ± 0.20 mm, n = 5), but similar to the last preceding non-ovulatory DF diameter (12.92 ± 0.96 mm, n = 14). Short oestrous cycles were most common between the 1st and 2nd ovulations (93.75%, 15/16 cows, 10.2 ± 0.38 days) decreasing in prevalence thereafter (50%, 3/6 buffaloes, 12.0 ± 1.53 days). Oestrous signs were relatively vague around the 1st ovulation pp to become more easily detectable thereafter. This study suggests that properly fed swamp buffaloes could be mated successfully within 2 months pp, at their 2nd spontaneous ovulation, provided oestrous detection is at least performed daily at 06:00-08:00 hour.

  18. Anandamide Levels Fluctuate in the Bovine Oviduct during the Oestrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gervasi, Maria Gracia; Marczylo, Timothy H.; Lam, Patricia M.; Rana, Shashi; Franchi, Ana M.; Konje, Justin C.; Perez-Martinez, Silvina

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian oviduct acts as a reservoir for spermatozoa and provides an environment in which they may compete for the opportunity to fertilize the oocyte. Whilst in the oviduct spermatozoa undergo capacitation essential for fertilization. Sperm-oviduct interaction is essential for sperm capacitation and is a tightly regulated process influenced by the local microenvironment. Previously we reported that the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) regulates sperm release from epithelial oviductal cells by promoting sperm capacitation. The aims of this work were to measure the AEA content and to characterize the main AEA metabolic pathway in the bovine oviduct and determine how these change through the oestrous cycle. In this study, the levels of AEA and two other N-acylethanolamines, N-oleoylethanolamine and N-palmitoylethanolamine, were measured in bovine oviduct collected during different stages of oestrous cycle by ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results indicated that intracellular oviductal epithelial levels of all three N-acylethanolamines fluctuate during oestrous cycle. Anandamide from oviductal fluid also varied during oestrous cycle, with the highest values detected during the periovulatory period. Endocannabinoid levels from ipsilateral oviduct to ovulation were higher than those detected in the contralateral one, suggesting that levels of oviductal AEA may be regulated by ovarian hormones. The expression and localization of N-acylethanolamines metabolizing enzymes in bovine oviduct were also determined by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry but no change was found during the oestrous cycle. Furthermore, nanomolar levels of AEA were detected in follicular fluids, suggesting that during ovulation the mature follicle may contribute to oviductal AEA levels to create an endocannabinoid gradient conducive to the regulation of sperm function for successful fertilization. PMID:23977311

  19. Expression of 17?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and the effects of LH, FSH and prolactin on oestrone and 17?-oestradiol secretion in the endometrium of pigs during early pregnancy and the oestrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowicz, B; Kotwica, G; Zglejc, K; Waszkiewicz, E; Franczak, A

    2016-03-07

    The endometrium of pregnant and cyclic pigs is a source of oestrone (E1) and 17β-oestradiol (E2). However, the roles of LH, FSH and prolactin (PRL) as regulators of endometrial steroidogenesis, and the presence of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) in the porcine endometrium, remain unknown. Therefore, in the present study we examined 17β-HSD expression and the effects of LH, FSH and PRL on E1 and E2 release in vitro in endometrial explants harvested from gravid pigs on Days 10-11 (embryo migration within the uterus), 12-13 (maternal recognition of pregnancy) and 15-16 (beginning of implantation) and compared them with results obtained in non-gravid pigs. The results show that: (1) endometrial 17β-HSD activity was decreased on Days 15-16 in pregnant and cyclic pigs compared with the preceding days; (2) LH, FSH and PRL increased endometrial E1 secretion on Days 10-11 and 15-16 of pregnancy and on Days 12-13 and 15-16 of the oestrous cycle; and (3) LH, FSH and PRL increased endometrial E2 secretion on Days 15-16 of pregnancy and during the days studied in the oestrous cycle. In conclusion, data suggest that LH, FSH and PRL affect endometrial secretion of estrogens in pigs.

  20. Influence of gender and the oestrous cycle on in vitro contractile responses of the rat urinary bladder to cholinergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Longhurst, Penelope A; Levendusky, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were done to determine the influence of gender and the oestrous cycle on rat urinary bladder contractility in response to cholinergic stimulation. Bladder strips from female rats responded to high frequency stimulation with smaller contractile responses than did strips from males, and to low concentrations of carbachol with greater responses. The decreased responsiveness of bladder strips from female rats to electrical field stimulation can be primarily attributed to the rats in the oestrous stage of the oestrous cycle. Bladder strips from female rats in all stages of the oestrous cycle were more sensitive to carbachol than those from males, but there were no differences in sensitivity to electrical field stimulation. The contractile responses of strips from both male and female rats to carbachol were antagonized by muscarinic antagonists with the following rank order of affinity (pA2) estimates: 4-DAMP>>pirenzepine>methoctramine, suggesting that the receptor mediating contraction was the M3 subtype. There were no differences in pA2 values between bladder strips from male and female rats. The data indicate that responsiveness of bladder strips to electrical field stimulation and carbachol is altered in female rats in the oestrous stage of the oestrous cycle. Furthermore, gender influences the sensitivity of rat bladder to muscarinic stimulation. PMID:10991909

  1. Oestrous cycle of captive southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons) in South Australia, Australia.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, G R; Shimmin, G A; Taggart, D A; Skinner, J F; Gilmore, A; Paris, M C J

    2006-10-01

    There is limited information available on the oestrous cycle of female southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons). This is mainly due to an extremely poor breeding success in captivity and the difficulty in routine recapturing of these cryptic, semi-fossorial animals in the wild. The aim of this study was to characterise the oestrous cycle of this species by monitoring peripheral plasma concentrations of progesterone and oestradiol, assessing changes in vaginal cytology, pouch condition and the urogenital sinus. Eight adult female wombats were monitored during the breeding season (July-December) over 2 years (2002-2003). Samples were collected up to three times a week. Vaginal smears contained several cell types, categorised by morphology, as either superficial epithelial cells or parabasal-intermediate cells. Leucocytes were also counted. Plasma progesterone profiles showed a mean oestrous cycle length of 36.33+/-0.67 days with a peak progesterone concentration of 139.53+/-10.62nmol/L. Levels of oestradiol peaked at a mean level of 467.33+/-44.32pmol/L on average 5 days before a rise in plasma progesterone values. The proportion of epithelial cells in vaginal smears varied throughout the cycle, with a high percentage of superficial epithelial cells observed during the follicular phase. During periods when progesterone concentrations were high, a greater percentage of parabasal-intermediate cells was observed. In conclusion, this study has characterised the oestrous cycle of the southern hairy-nosed wombat and confirmed that changes in vaginal smears together with pouch and urogenital sinus details could be used to determine signs of oestrus in this species.

  2. Ovarian function in ewes after treatment with mifepristone early during the oestrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Paslay, E M; Jaeger, J R; Salli, U; Stormshak, F

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether endogenous progesterone regulates synthesis and secretion of luteal oxytocin. In Expt 1, mature ewes (n = 5 per group) were assigned randomly to control or mifepristone (RU486) treatment groups. Ewes were injected s.c. twice a day with vehicle or 10 mg RU486 on days 5-7 of the oestrous cycle (oestrus = day 0). On day 8, after an i.v. injection with prostaglandin F(2alpha) (250 microg cloprostenol), venous blood samples were collected at frequent intervals to determine plasma oxytocin concentrations. Plasma oxytocin concentrations of RU486-treated ewes were not significantly different from those of control ewes. In Expt 2, ewes were injected s.c. each day with vehicle or 175 mg RU486 on days 2-5 of the oestrous cycle followed by administration of prostaglandin F(2alpha) on day 6. Four of five RU486-treated ewes showed 'split-oestrus' (oestrous behaviour for 36 h and then again at 84-108 h after the onset of initial oestrus). There was no significant difference in mean plasma oxytocin or progesterone concentrations between treatment groups. The mean masses of mature corpora lutea from control and RU486-treated ewes on day 6 of the oestrous cycle did not differ significantly (394.8 +/- 28.8 versus 319.5 +/- 48.3 mg). RU486-treated ewes contained mature corpora lutea, new corpora lutea (two of four ewes) and preovulatory follicles (>or= 10 mm, two of four ewes). The average interoestrous interval for RU486-treated ewes was 9 days more than that for control animals (26.2 +/- 2.9 versus 17 +/- 0.5 days; P < 0.025).

  3. Influence of seasonality and stimulus of oestrous does in bucks' aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Ungerfeld, Rodolfo; Freitas-de-Melo, Aline; Giriboni, Julia; Lacuesta, Lorena; Toledano-Díaz, Adolfo; Santiago-Moreno, Julián

    2016-12-01

    Aggressiveness is directly related to testosterone concentration, which varies with seasons and in response to female stimulation. The aim was to determine if the frequency and pattern of agonistic interactions between bucks varies seasonally and in response to oestrous female stimulation. In the first study we characterized the pattern of agonistic interactions during feeding throughout a whole year in groups of Iberian ibex bucks; and in the second study, we determined the influence of oestrous does on the frequencies of agonistic behaviours between Gabon bucks in different seasons. In Iberian ibex bucks, the frequency of agonistic behaviours was maximum in summer and testosterone concentration in late autumn. In Gabon bucks, total agonistic interactions increased in bucks stimulated by females in late summer and autumn. In late autumn there were more interactions without physical contact in stimulated than in isolated bucks. Aggressiveness in bucks varied along the year, but the seasonal pattern was related to the context in which behaviours were recorded. Stimulation with oestrous females induced an increase of aggressiveness during the breeding season. At least in the conditions of these studies, testosterone concentrations seemed not to be the main influence on the frequency in which aggressive behaviour was displayed.

  4. Lysophosphatidic Acid Synthesis and its Receptors' Expression in the Bovine Oviduct During the Oestrous Cycle.

    PubMed

    Sinderewicz, E; Grycmacher, K; Boruszewska, D; Kowalczyk-Zięba, I; Yamamoto, Y; Yoshimoto, Y; Woclawek-Potocka, I

    2016-08-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a naturally occurring simple phospholipid which in the bovine reproductive system can be produced in the endometrium, corpus luteum, ovarian follicle and embryo. In this study, we examined the possibility that LPA receptors are expressed, and LPA synthesized, in the bovine oviduct. We found that the concentration of LPA was highest in infundibulum in the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle and was relatively high during the early-luteal phase in all examined parts of the oviduct. We also documented that LPA synthesis engages both available pathways for LPA production. The autotaxin (ATX) protein expression was significantly higher in the infundibulum compared to the isthmus during the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle. During the early-luteal phase of the oestrous cycle, ATX and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) protein expression was highest in ampulla, although the expression of LPARs was not as dynamic as LPA concentration in the oviduct tissue, and we presume that in the bovine oviduct, the most abundantly expressed receptor is LPAR2. In conclusion, our results indicate that the bovine oviduct is a site of LPA synthesis and a target for LPA action in the bovine reproductive tract. We documented that LPAR2 is the most abundantly expressed in the bovine oviduct. We hypothesize that in the bovine oviduct, LPA may be involved in the transport of gametes, fertilization and cellular signalling between the oviduct and cumulus-oocyte complex. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Hypothalamic obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Bereket, A; Kiess, W; Lustig, R H; Muller, H L; Goldstone, A P; Weiss, R; Yavuz, Y; Hochberg, Z

    2012-09-01

    Hypothalamic obesity is an intractable form of obesity syndrome that was initially described in patients with hypothalamic tumours and surgical damage. However, this definition is now expanded to include obesity developing after a variety of insults, including intracranial infections, infiltrations, trauma, vascular problems and hydrocephalus, in addition to acquired or congenital functional defects in central energy homeostasis in children with the so-called common obesity. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying hypothalamic obesity are complex and multifactorial. Weight gain results from damage to the ventromedial hypothalamus, which leads, variously, to hyperphagia, a low-resting metabolic rate; autonomic imbalance; growth hormone-, gonadotropins and thyroid-stimulating hormone deficiency; hypomobility; and insomnia. Hypothalamic obesity did not receive enough attention, as evidenced by rarity of studies in this group of patients. A satellite symposium was held during the European Congress of Obesity in May 2011, in Istanbul, Turkey, to discuss recent developments and concepts regarding pathophysiology and management of hypothalamic obesity in children. An international group of leading researchers presented certain aspects of the problem. This paper summarizes the highlights of this symposium. Understanding the central role of the hypothalamus in the regulation of feeding and energy metabolism will help us gain insights into the pathogenesis and management of common obesity. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  6. Effect of intrauterine infusion of Escherichia coli on hormonal patterns in gilts during the oestrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Jana, Barbara; Kucharski, Jan; Ziecik, Adam J

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intrauterine Escherichia coli infusion on the patterns of plasma LH, prolactin, progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, oestrone, oestradiol-17beta, cortisol and 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-prostaglandin F2alpha (PGFM) in gilts during the oestrous cycle. On day 4 of the oestrous cycle (day 0), 25 mL of saline or 25 mL of Escherichia coli suspension, containing 10(7) colony forming units x mL(-1), was infused once into the each uterine horn in group I or II respectively. The control gilts developed a new oestrous cycle at the expected time but not bacteria-treated. Endometritis and vaginal discharge developed in all gilts after Escherichia coli infusion. The administration of Escherichia coli resulted in a reduction of plasma levels of LH, prolactin, oestrone and oestradiol-17beta (P < 0.05-0.001), mainly on days 15-18 after treatment (expected perioestrous period). During this time, the plasma androstenedione level was elevated (P < 0.05-0.001) after bacteria infusion. In the gilts receiving bacteria, progesterone concentration decreased from day 8 after treatment and was low until the end of the study (P < 0.05-0.001). On days 8-12 after bacteria administration, the level of PGFM was higher (P < 0.001) than that found in the control group. These results suggest that the developing inflammatory process of the endometrium in gilts following Escherichia coli infusion significantly affects the pituitary-ovarian axis function as well as prostaglandin production leading to anoestrus.

  7. Endocrinological profile and follicular development in cyclic ewes subjected to repeated ovum pick-up.

    PubMed

    Valasi, I; Theodosiadou, E; Fthenakis, G C; Papanikolaou, T; Deligiannis, C; Kalogiannis, D; Chadio, S; Amiridis, G S

    2013-05-01

    Blood concentrations of progesterone, FSH and oestradiol in Karagouniko ewes subjected to laparoscopic ovum pick-up (OPU) at specific stages of induced oestrous cycle, were measured. Twenty-four cyclic ewes were randomly allocated into four equal groups (A, B, C and D). Oestrus was synchronized with progestagen intravaginal sponges and detected by teaser rams (oestrus: day 0). In group A, during the induced oestrous cycle, OPU was performed on days 4, 9 and 14 (sessions A1, A2 and A3, respectively). In group B and group D, OPU was performed once, on day 9 and 14, respectively. In group C (controls), endoscopic observation of follicular population was performed three times, as in group A. Starting at sponge removal, progesterone was measured in blood samples collected on 22 daily occasions and oestradiol in samples collected on 27 occasions collected at various time-points starting 2h before to 24h after OPU. Follicular populations did not differ among A1, A2, A3 or between C1, C2, C3 and A1, A2, A3 or A1, B, D, respectively. Oocytes of better quality (category '1' or '2') were collected at A3 session compared with A1 (P<0.05). Progesterone concentration and oestrous cycle length did not differ among groups. Decreased oestradiol concentrations followed by FSH increase were recorded 3-5h after OPU. The results confirm the regulatory role of oestradiol on FSH secretion. The quality of collected oocytes was improved in subsequent pick-up sessions in the oestrous cycle. Moreover, OPU at specific stages of the luteal phase of the cycle, even when applied repeatedly, do not affect the normal oestrous cycle length of ewes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The uterine vascular system of the golden hamster and its changes during the oestrous cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, A; Nishida, T

    1988-01-01

    The vascular pattern of the hamster uterus and its changes during the oestrous cycle were studied by using the corrosion vascular casting method. The vascular system of the hamster uterus has two main division, the circumferential division and the medial arterial division. The former consists of circumferential and radial vessels and supplies the major part of the uterus. In this system the arteries and veins run parallel to each other throughout the uterus except for the inner circumferential plexus to which veins are predominantly distributed. The latter division has a delicate arterial system which supplies the mesometrial are of the endometrium. It forms a conglomerate structure along the mesometrial surface of the circular muscle layer. The arrangement of the vessels, especially those in the circumferential division, evidently changes during the oestrous cycle. From the evening of dioestrus II to the evening of pro-oestrus most of the circumferential and radial vessels are enormously dilated and subepithelial capillaries make an elaborate network without blind endings. These changes in the vascular structure are associated with those in the external and internal (or luminal) aspects of the uterus: the uterine horns are markedly swollen and the luminal surface becomes much more irregular due to the indentations in the endometrium. No new vascular formation is found in the uterus throughout the four days cycle. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:3225224

  9. Oestrous cycle of the common wombat, Vombatus ursinus, in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    West, M; Galloway, D; Shaw, J; Trouson, A; Paris, M C J

    2004-01-01

    Wild-caught female common wombats from Victoria, Australia, were studied in captivity to investigate the oestrous cycle by assessing vaginal cytology and peripheral plasma progesterone concentrations. Eight wombats, five adults (21-29 kg) and three subadults (19-23 kg), which were held for between 2 weeks and 11 months did not cycle in captivity. Their progesterone concentrations were consistently low (< or = 6.9 nmol L(-1)) and vaginal smears contained predominantly superficial epithelial cells. Three wombats (21-27 kg), held in captivity for >1 year, regularly cycled (when bodyweights exceeded 23.5 kg). Information gathered from four consecutive cycles in each of these three wombats revealed a follicular phase with low progesterone concentrations (< or = 6.9 nmol L(-1)) and vaginal smears with a high percentage of superficial epithelial cells alternating with periods of high progesterone concentrations (range 41.6-123.8 nmol L(-1)) and smears in which parabasal-intermediate epithelial cells predominated. The average length of the monitored oestrous cycles was 47.2 days (35-60 days). The follicular phase lasted ~19 days and the luteal phase lasted ~28 days. In conclusion, wombats can cycle regularly in captivity even under conditions of intensive monitoring.

  10. Vaginal histological changes after using intravaginal sponges for oestrous synchronization in anoestrous ewes.

    PubMed

    Manes, J; Campero, C; Hozbor, F; Alberio, R; Ungerfeld, R

    2015-04-01

    To characterize the histological and cytological vaginal changes generated by the use of intravaginal sponge (IS) applied in oestrous synchronization treatments in ewes during mid-non-breeding season. Thirty-five multiparous ewes were allocated to three experimental groups according to the moment in which the samples were taken: (i) ewes treated with IS containing 60 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate for 14 days, sampled the day of IS removal (group ISR; n = 10), (ii) or after sponge removal at time of oestrus or 72 h after removal (group AR; n = 14) and (iii) ewes without sponge treatment that were sampled at the day of IS removal of the other groups (group CG; n = 11). Vaginal biopsies and cytological samples were taken from the anterior vaginal fornix area. The vagina of the CG group had a stratified squamous epithelium with a moderate degree of cellular infiltration with lymphocytes and plasma cells in the lamina propia. Treated ewes (ISR and AR) had epithelial hyperplasia and hypertrophy. ISR ewes had haemorrhage and perivascular infiltrate and an increased number of epithelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages and erythrocytes at IS removal. The use of IS generated histological and cytological alterations in the vaginal wall when used for oestrous synchronization in anoestrous ewes. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme increases oestradiol production in ewes submitted to oestrous synchronization protocol.

    PubMed

    Costa, A s; Junior, A S; Viana, G E N; Muratori, M C S; Reis, A M; Costa, A P R

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril) and angiotensin II antagonist (valsartan) on the oestradiol and progesterone production in ewes submitted to oestrous synchronization protocol. The animals were weighed and randomly divided into three groups (n = 7). A pre-experiment conducted to verify the effectiveness and toxicity of enalapril (0.5 mg/kg LW) and valsartan (2.2 mg/kg LW) showed that, in the doses used, these drugs were effective in reducing blood pressure without producing toxic effects. In the experiment, all animals were subjected to oestrous synchronization protocol during 12 days. On D10, D11 and D12, animals received saline, enalapril or valsartan (same doses of the pre-experiment), according to the group randomly divided. The hormonal analysis showed an increase in oestradiol on the last day of the protocol (D12) in animals that received enalapril (p < 0.05), but not in other groups, without changing the concentration of progesterone in any of the treatments. It is concluded that valsartan and enalapril are safe and effective subcutaneously for use in sheep and that the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition with enalapril leads to an increase in oestradiol production near ovulation without changing the concentration of progesterone. This shows that ACE inhibition may be a useful tool in reproductive biotechnologies involving induction and synchronization of oestrus and ovulation in sheep.

  12. Expression of adiponectin and its receptors in the porcine hypothalamus during the oestrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, T; Smolinska, N; Maleszka, A; Kiezun, M; Dobrzyn, K; Czerwinska, J; Szeszko, K; Nitkiewicz, A

    2014-06-01

    Adiponectin is a hormonal link between obesity and reproduction, and its actions are mediated by two types of receptors: adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) and adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2). This study compares the expression levels of adiponectin and adiponectin receptor mRNAs and proteins in selected areas of the porcine hypothalamus responsible for GnRH production and secretion: the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), pre-optic area (POA) and stalk median eminence (SME). The tissue samples were harvested on days 2-3, 10-12, 14-16 and 17-19 of the oestrous cycle. Adiponectin mRNA expression in MBH was significantly lower on days 14-16, whereas in SME, the most pronounced gene expression was found on days 2-3 of the cycle (p < 0.05). Adiponectin protein in MBH was most abundant on days 17-19 and in POA on days 2-3 (p < 0.05). Adiponectin protein expression in SME was at similar level throughout the most of the cycle with a statistically significant drop (p < 0.05) on days 14-16. AdipoR1 gene expression in POA was potentiated on days 2-3 and 10-12 of the oestrous cycle (p < 0.05). In SME, the highest AdipoR1 mRNA expression was noted on days 2-3 (p < 0.05). The concentrations of the AdipoR1 protein in POA were similar throughout the luteal phase (days 2-14 of the cycle), and they decreased on days 17-19 (p < 0.05). In SME, AdipoR1 protein expression peak occurred on days 2-3 (p < 0.05). The expression patterns of the AdipoR2 gene in MBH, POA and SME revealed the highest mRNA levels on days 2-3 of the cycle (p < 0.05). The highest content of AdipoR2 protein in MBH was reported on days 2-3 (p < 0.05), while in POA on days 17-19 and in SME on days 10-12 and 14-16 (p < 0.05). This study demonstrated that adiponectin and adiponectin receptor mRNAs and proteins are present in the porcine hypothalamus and that their expression levels are determined by the pig's endocrine status related to the oestrous cycle.

  13. Oestrous cycle-dependent equine uterine immune response to induced infectious endometritis.

    PubMed

    Marth, Christina D; Firestone, Simon M; Glenton, Lisa Y; Browning, Glenn F; Young, Neil D; Krekeler, Natali

    2016-11-08

    Infectious endometritis is a major cause of reduced pregnancy rates in horses. The objectives of this study were to establish a timeline of the innate immune response in the uterus of healthy horses and to investigate the oestrous cycle effect on this. Endometrial biopsies were collected from five horses before and at 3, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after inoculation of Escherichia coli, once in oestrus and once in dioestrus. They were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR, microbiology and histology. Neutrophil numbers increased from very low levels in the absence of inflammation to severe neutrophilia 3 h after inoculation. The concentrations of mRNAs for Toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, NOD-like receptor NLRC5, tissue inhibitor of metallopeptidases 1 (TIMP1) and chemokines CCL2, CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 were all increased 3 h after inoculation of E. coli compared to levels detected prior to inoculation. Chemokine mRNA levels remained elevated for 48 h. Concentrations of mRNAs for the antimicrobial peptides equine β-defensin 1 (EBD1), lysozyme, secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI), lipocalin 2 (LCN2), lactoferrin and uteroferrin were increased between 3 and 12 h post inoculation. The gene for secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) was expressed constitutively. P19 uterocalin mRNA levels were higher in dioestrus than in oestrus over the first 24 h of inflammation. Neutrophils and many innate immune genes responded rapidly to the introduction of E. coli into the uterus, while the oestrous cycle stage had only a relatively minor effect on the response to E. coli. This study has delineated a useful model of innate immunity in infectious endometritis of healthy animals.

  14. Lectin binding patterns of porcine oviduct mucosa and endometrium during the oestrous cycle

    PubMed Central

    WALTER, INGRID; BAVDEK, S.

    1997-01-01

    Important functions of the oviduct during reproduction include the provision of an optimal environment for gametes and zygotes and nutrition of the early embryo. These functions are ensured by the secretion of an oviductal fluid which is known to contain organ-specific glycoproteins. Glycoconjugates of the apical glycocalyx are considered to play a major role in cell recognition and interaction processes. In the present investigation, binding patterns of Con A, HPA, LTA, RCA I, UEA I, and WGA were studied in defined segments of the oviduct (infundibulum, ampulla, isthmus) and in the uterus during the oestrous cycle. The carbohydrate distribution showed regional as well as time dependent differences. LTA, HPA and WGA reacted strongly with Golgi regions and secretory granules in the oviduct epithelium during the follicular phase, indicating high secretory activity. LTA, HPA, and UEA I also revealed a varying carbohydrate composition of the glycocalyx during the oestrous cycle. Prominent regional differences in glycoconjugate expression were shown in oviductal segments by LTA and HPA binding: during the follicular phase, LTA binding sites were only present on epithelial cells of the isthmic segment, the ampulla and infundibulum being unreactive. D-N-acetyl-galactosamine residues were demonstrated on ciliated epithelial cells of the ampulla and infundibulum exclusively during oestrus. The glycocalyx of uterine epithelial cells was clearly defined by HPA, WGA, LTA, RCA I and UEA I; LTA binding was restricted to the secretory phase. The observation of regional and time dependent variability in glycoconjugate distribution strongly indicates their specific physiological functions in reproductive processes. PMID:9061451

  15. Use of porcine luteinizing hormone at oestrous onset in a protocol for fixed-time artificial insemination in gilts.

    PubMed

    Ulguim, R R; Fontana, D L; Rampi, J Z; Bernardi, M L; Wentz, I; Bortolozzo, F P

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of porcine luteinizing hormone (pLH) given at oestrous onset in gilts, by different routes and doses, on the interval between onset of oestrus and ovulation (IOEO) and reproductive performance using a single fixed-time artificial insemination (FTAI). A total of 153 gilts were submitted to oestrous detection at 8-h intervals and assigned to three groups: control - without hormone application and inseminated at 0, 24 and 48 h after oestrous onset; VS2.5FTAI - 2.5 mg pLH by the vulvar submucosal route at oestrous onset and a single FTAI 16 h later; IM5FTAI - 5 mg pLH by the intramuscular route at oestrous onset and a single FTAI 16 h later. More VS2.5FTAI gilts (47.1%; p < 0.05) ovulated within 24 h after oestrous onset than control gilts (25.5%) whereas IM5FTAI gilts had an intermediate percentage (31.4%; p > 0.05). The IOEO tended to be shorter (p = 0.06) in VS2.5FTAI (30.2 ± 1.4 h) than in control (34.7 ± 1.4 h) gilts, but there was no difference (p > 0.05) between control and IM5FTAI (32.8 ± 1.4 h) gilts. Farrowing rate was not different (p > 0.05) among treatments. Total born piglets (TB) was lower (p < 0.05) in VS2.5FTAI (12.3 ± 0.4) than in control gilts (14.1 ± 0.4), whereas intermediate TB was observed in IM5FTAI gilts (13.3 ± 0.4). Due to the advancement of ovulation, reduction of the hormonal dose and the ease of application, the vulvar submucosal route would be the best option for FTAI protocols, but their negative impact on litter size remains to be elucidated. Taking into account the good fertility results obtained in IM5FTAI gilts whose ovulation was not advanced, the possibility of a single FTAI without any hormonal treatment should be further investigated, to establish reliable FTAI protocols for gilts.

  16. Characterization of the Th profile of the bovine endometrium during the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lilian J; Mansouri-Attia, Nadéra; Mansourri-Attia, Nadéra; Fahey, Alan G; Browne, John; Forde, Niamh; Roche, James F; Lonergan, Patrick; Fair, Trudee

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive research in the area of cow fertility, the extent to which the maternal immune system is modulated during pregnancy in cattle remains unclear. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to characterize the presence and response profile of B, T-helper (LTh), T- cytotoxic (LTc), gamma delta-T (γδT) and natural killer (NK) lymphocytes in terms of cell number, distribution and cytokine expression in bovine endometrial tissue to pregnancy. Endometrial tissue samples were collected from beef heifers on Days 5, 7, 13 and 16 of the estrous cycle or pregnancy. Samples were analysed by immunofluorescence to identify the presence and abundance of B-B7 (B-cells), CD4 (LTh), CD8 (LTc), γδT cell receptor (TCR) and CD335/NKp46 (NK cells) -positive immune cells. Quantitative real time PCR (QPCR) was carried out to analyse mRNA relative abundance of FOXP3 (a marker of regulatory T (Treg) cells) and a panel of immune factors, including MHC-I, LIF, Interleukins 1, 2, 6, 8, 10, 11,12A, IFNa and IFNG. Results indicate that B-B7+ cells are quite populous in bovine endometrial tissue, CD4+ and CD8+ -cells are present in moderate numbers and γδTCR+ and CD335+ cells are present in low numbers. Pregnancy affected the total number and distribution pattern of the NK cell population, with the most significant variation observed on Day 16 of pregnancy. Neither B lymphocytes nor T lymphocyte subsets were regulated temporally during the oestrous cycle or by pregnancy prior to implantation. mRNA transcript abundance of the immune factors LIF, IL1b, IL8 and IL12A, IFNa and IFNG, expression was regulated temporally during the estrous cycle and LIF, IL1b, IL-10, IL11, IL12A were also temporally regulated during pregnancy. In conclusion, the endometrial immune profile of the oestrous cycle favours a Th2 environment in anticipation of pregnancy and the presence of an embryo acts to fine tune this environment.

  17. Characterization of the Th Profile of the Bovine Endometrium during the Oestrous Cycle and Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Lilian J.; Mansourri-Attia, Nadéra; Fahey, Alan G.; Browne, John; Forde, Niamh; Roche, James F.; Lonergan, Patrick; Fair, Trudee

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive research in the area of cow fertility, the extent to which the maternal immune system is modulated during pregnancy in cattle remains unclear. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to characterize the presence and response profile of B, T-helper (LTh), T- cytotoxic (LTc), gamma delta-T (γδT) and natural killer (NK) lymphocytes in terms of cell number, distribution and cytokine expression in bovine endometrial tissue to pregnancy. Endometrial tissue samples were collected from beef heifers on Days 5, 7, 13 and 16 of the estrous cycle or pregnancy. Samples were analysed by immunofluorescence to identify the presence and abundance of B-B7 (B-cells), CD4 (LTh), CD8 (LTc), γδT cell receptor (TCR) and CD335/NKp46 (NK cells) -positive immune cells. Quantitative real time PCR (QPCR) was carried out to analyse mRNA relative abundance of FOXP3 (a marker of regulatory T (Treg) cells) and a panel of immune factors, including MHC-I, LIF, Interleukins 1, 2, 6, 8, 10, 11,12A, IFNa and IFNG. Results indicate that B-B7+ cells are quite populous in bovine endometrial tissue, CD4+ and CD8+ -cells are present in moderate numbers and γδTCR+ and CD335+ cells are present in low numbers. Pregnancy affected the total number and distribution pattern of the NK cell population, with the most significant variation observed on Day 16 of pregnancy. Neither B lymphocytes nor T lymphocyte subsets were regulated temporally during the oestrous cycle or by pregnancy prior to implantation. mRNA transcript abundance of the immune factors LIF, IL1b, IL8 and IL12A, IFNa and IFNG, expression was regulated temporally during the estrous cycle and LIF, IL1b, IL-10, IL11, IL12A were also temporally regulated during pregnancy. In conclusion, the endometrial immune profile of the oestrous cycle favours a Th2 environment in anticipation of pregnancy and the presence of an embryo acts to fine tune this environment. PMID:24204576

  18. Activin A and follistatin during the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy in ewes.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Anne R; McNatty, Kenneth P; Hurst, Peter R; Spencer, Thomas E; Bazer, Fuller W; Reader, Karen L; Johnstone, Peter D; Davis, George H; Juengel, Jennifer L

    2016-03-01

    The activin pathway has been postulated to be involved in regulation of multiple reproductive processes important for survival of the conceptus. These processes include luteinisation of the follicular cells and thus function of the corpus luteum, early embryo development and uterine function including implantation of the conceptus. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine whether the concentrations of activin A and follistatin (FST), an activin-binding protein, differed between ewes with a lifetime history of enhanced or reduced embryonic survival (ES). The mRNAs encoding FST and activin A (inhibin beta A subunit; INHBA) were present in the uterus and abundant in the uterine luminal or glandular epithelia by day 18 of gestation. A peak of activin A was observed in the systemic circulation around the time of oestrus, and activin A concentrations were elevated in animals with reduced ES during the oestrous cycle and early gestation. Concentrations of activin A in uterine fluid were approximately twofold greater on day 16 of gestation in ewes with reduced ES compared to those with enhanced ES. No consistent differences in FST were observed between these groups. Treatment of luteinising ovine granulosa cells with activin A in vitro suppressed progesterone secretion providing evidence of a potential pathway whereby increased concentrations of activin A may decrease ES. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  19. Oestrous red deer hinds prefer male roars with higher fundamental frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Reby, David; Charlton, Benjamin D.; Locatelli, Yann; McComb, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Across vertebrates, the observation that lower-pitched vocalizations are typically associated with larger and/or higher quality males has lead to the widespread belief that inter- and intra-sexual selection will produce male calls with low fundamental frequencies (F0). Here we investigated the response of oestrous red deer hinds to playback of re-synthesized male roars characterized by either higher than average or lower than average F0. We found that hinds prefer higher rather than lower ‘pitched’ roars, providing, to our knowledge, the first evidence of such a bias in nonhuman mammals. Our findings can be interpreted in relation to previous observations that the minimum F0 of roars is positively correlated with male reproductive success in free-ranging red deer stags, and that across Cervids the F0 of male mating calls shows extreme variability. Females showing preferences for higher-pitched roars might derive genetic benefits through more competitive male offspring. Our results emphasize the need for further investigations of female preferences in mammals in order to better understand the extreme variation of F0 values observed in male sexual calls. PMID:20427342

  20. [Hypothalamic involvement in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Darlix, A; Mathey, G; Monin, M-L; Sauvée, M; Braun, M; Schaff, J-L; Debouverie, M

    2012-05-01

    Hypothalamic involvement is a rare condition in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We report two patients with a long history of MS who presented with severe acute hypothermia with associated thrombocytopenia and elevated transaminase levels. Several cases of hypothermia or hyperthermia in patients with MS have been reported in the literature. They could be linked with hypothalamic lesions, in particular in the pre-optic area. However, other anatomical locations seem to be involved in thermoregulation and can be affected by MS. Besides, some cases of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion have been reported in patients with MS. Finally, some sleep disorders, particularly hypersomnia or narcolepsy, could be related to hypothalamic lesions, through the fall in hypocretin-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid. Hypocretin-1 is a neuropeptide that is secreted by some hypothalamic cells. It plays a role in the sleep-awake rhythm. We report one patient with narcolepsy and cataplexy before the first symptoms of MS appeared. Hypothalamic signs are rare in MS. However, several series of autopsies have shown a high frequency of demyelinating lesions in the hypothalamic area. Among these lesions, the proportion of active lesions seems elevated. Yet only few of them have a clinical or biological translation such as thermoregulation dysfunction, sleep disorders or natremia abnormalities. Thus, it seems unlikely that inflammatory hypothalamic lesions alone, even when bilateral, could be the explanation of these signs. A sufficient number of inflammatory demyelinating lesions, which we can observe in patients with a long history of MS and an already severe disability, is probably necessary to develop such a rare symptomatology. Hypothalamic signs might be a factor of poor prognosis for the disease course and progression of the disability.

  1. Disturbances of the hypothalamic thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Clar, H E

    1985-01-01

    Although compression of the hypothalamus in cases of suprasellar tumour is common, spontaneous dysregulation of body temperature is extremely rare. Bilateral localization of the hypothalamic nuclei and a high grade of compensatory value of temperature regulation may be the reason for this phenomenon. In the postoperative period temperature dysregulation is observed more often. In order to analyse the influence of diencephalic regulation in these patients classification of the degree of hypothalamic compression is necessary. The problem was studied under experimental and clinical conditions. Experimental studies in rabbits after acute hypothalamic compression and decompression showed a reversible disturbances of temperature regulation. Hypothalamic compression in dogs resulted in reversible hypothalamic endocrine dysfunction. Clinical observations of body temperature in the period after operation of suprasellar tumors showed similar results. The temperature study was extended on patients with cerebral trauma and intracranial haemorrhage to differentiate the degree of hypothalamic lesion. Morphological examinations confirmed alterations localized in the anterior and posterior region of the hypothalamus. The analysis proved the fact that temperature regulation seems to be a highly sensitive parameter of diencephalic function.

  2. [Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea].

    PubMed

    Stárka, Luboslav; Dušková, Michaela

    2015-10-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) besides pregnancy and syndrome of polycystic ovary is one of the most common causes of secondary amenorrhea. FHA results from the aberrations in pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, which in turn causes impairment of the gonadotropins (follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone). FHA is a form of the defence of organism in situations where life functions are more important than reproductive function. FHA is reversible; it can be normalized after ceasing the stress situation. There are three types of FHA: weight loss related, stress-related, and exercise-related amenorrhea. The final consequences are complex hormonal changes manifested by profound hypoestrogenism. Additionally, these patients present mild hypercortisolemia, low serum insulin levels, low insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and low total triiodothyronine. Women health in this disorder is disturbed in several aspects including the skeletal system, cardiovascular system, and mental problems. Patients manifest a decrease in bone mass density, which is related to an increase in fracture risk. Therefore, osteopenia and osteoporosis are the main long-term complications of FHA. Cardiovascular complications include endothelial dysfunction and abnormal changes in the lipid profile. FHA patients present significantly higher depression and anxiety and also sexual problems compared to healthy subjects.

  3. [Hypothalamic dysfunction in obesity].

    PubMed

    van de Sande-Lee, Simone; Velloso, Licio A

    2012-08-01

    Obesity, defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair life quality, is one of the major public health problems worldwide. It results from an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure. The control of energy balance in animals and humans is performed by the central nervous system (CNS) by means of neuroendocrine connections, in which circulating peripheral hormones, such as leptin and insulin, provide signals to specialized neurons of the hypothalamus reflecting body fat stores, and induce appropriate responses to maintain the stability of these stores. The majority of obesity cases are associated with central resistance to both leptin and insulin actions. In experimental animals, high-fat diets can induce an inflammatory process in the hypothalamus, which impairs leptin and insulin intracellular signaling pathways, and results in hyperphagia, decreased energy expenditure and, ultimately, obesity. Recent evidence obtained from neuroimaging studies and assessment of inflammatory markers in the cerebrospinal fluid of obese subjects suggests that similar alterations may be also present in humans. In this review, we briefly present the mechanisms involved with the loss of homeostatic control of energy balance in animal models of obesity, and the current evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction in obese humans.

  4. Preovulatory follicle development in goats following oestrous synchronization with progestagens or prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moro, D; Veiga-Lopez, A; Ariznavarreta, C; Tresguerres, J A F; Encinas, T; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A

    2008-02-01

    The study reports on differences in the dynamics of growth and functionality of preovulatory follicles in response to oestrous synchronization, either by the administration of two doses of prostaglandin or by an intravaginal progestagen sponge, in goats. The progestagen-treated group (n = 8) showed more follicles of preovulatory size (> or =5.5 mm) than the cloprostenol group (n = 8) during the follicular phase (4.5 +/- 0.6 vs 1.9 +/- 0.2, p < 0.01). The diameters of the largest follicles (LF1, LF2 and LF3) were also larger in the progestagen group (LF1, 7.8 +/- 0.3 vs 7.0 +/- 0.2 mm, p < 0.05; LF2, 6.7 +/- 0.2 vs 5.6 +/- 0.2 mm, p < 0.01; LF3, 5.5 +/- 0.3 vs 4.2 +/- 0.2 mm, p < 0.01). The study of the preovulatory follicles showed that 27.2% (3/11) of the follicles were in the static phase in the cloprostenol group, whilst 71.4% (10/14) were static in progestagen group (p < 0.05). Higher plasma oestradiol levels were recorded in the progestagen-treated goats during the 48 h prior to cloprostenol injection or progestagen withdrawal (4.2 +/- 0.4 vs 3.0 +/- 0.2 pg/ml, p < 0.05). In conclusion, goats with oestrus synchronized by progestagen showed a higher number of preovulatory-sized follicles, but a decreased oestradiol secretion when compared with does with oestrus synchronized by using prostaglandin analogues. These would support the development of alternative protocols for assisted reproduction.

  5. Oestrous sheep serum balances ROS levels to supply in vitro capacitation of ram spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Del Olmo, E; García-Álvarez, O; Maroto-Morales, A; Ramón, M; Iniesta-Cuerda, M; Martinez-Pastor, F; Montoro, V; Soler, A J; Garde, J J; Fernández-Santos, M R

    2016-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are fundamental for intracellular signalling. In spermatozoa, they are involved both to apoptosis and to capacitation, and changes in ROS levels can alter the balance between these two processes. Oestrous sheep serum (OSS) is considered an efficient agent for in vitro capacitation of ram spermatozoa. We have explored the effects of OSS on ram sperm physiology, especially on ROS production, during in vitro capacitation. Semen samples from 15 rams were cryopreserved. After thawing, samples were submitted to four treatments: control (CTL), 10% OSS supplementation for in vitro sperm capacitation, caspase inhibitor (INH, Z-VAD-FMK 100 μM) and OSS (10%) plus caspase inhibitor (I + E). Sperm samples were incubated for 30 min at 38.5°C and 5% CO2 and evaluated motility and kinetic parameters by computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) and viability (propidium iodide), apoptotic-like membrane changes (YO-PRO-1), acrosomal status (PNA-FITC), intracellular calcium (FLUO-3), membrane fluidity (M540) and ROS production (CM-H2 DCFDA) by flow cytometry. OSS induced changes in kinetic parameters compatible with capacitation, with a decrease in the percentage of progressive motility and linearity, and an increase in the amplitude of the lateral displacement of the sperm head (p < .05). Moreover, OSS increased the proportion of M540+ viable spermatozoa, YO-PRO-1+ and acrosome-reacted spermatozoa (p < .05). After incubation, OSS and I+E achieved lower ROS levels (p < .05). Ca(2+) levels did not change with the incubation, but were slightly higher (p < .05) when both OSS and the inhibitor were present. We suggest that OSS may modulate ROS levels, allowing intracellular signalling for capacitation to occur while preventing higher levels that could trigger apoptosis.

  6. Species-specific features of oestrous development and blastogenesis in domestic canine species.

    PubMed

    Valtonen, M; Jalkanen, L

    1993-01-01

    The reproductive physiology of taxonomically closely related species is usually very similar. The main difference in the reproduction of the dog and fox is the length of the different phases of the oestrous cycle. Pro-oestrus and oestrus are longest in the dog: oestrus lasts 3-5 days in the blue fox and 1-3 days in the silver fox, compared with about 1 week in the dog. The profiles of sex steroid concentrations in plasma during oestrus and pregnancy are similar and the luteal phase in non-pregnant animals is prolonged, progesterone concentrations reaching a maximum by 15-30 days after the luteinizing hormone (LH) peak in the dog, by 10-20 days in the blue fox and by 5-15 days in the silver fox. The duration from LH surge to ovulation is about the same in the dog and fox, but thereafter the oocytes and early embryos develop faster in foxes than in the dog. The tubal transport time is 4-6 days in the silver fox, embryos entering the uterus at the 4-16-cell stage. In the blue fox the oocytes remain in the oviducts for 8-10 days, developing into the morula stage, whereas in the dog a still longer oviductal phase results in embryos that are at the compact morula or blastocyst stage when entering the uterus. The preimplantation period is about 1 week in the dog and the blue fox, but 9-10 days in the silver fox.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Changes in milk oxidative stress biomarkers in lactating dairy cows with ovulatory and an-ovulatory oestrous cycles.

    PubMed

    Talukder, S; Kerrisk, K L; Gabai, G; Fukutomi, A; Celi, P

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate changes in milk profiles of oxidative stress (OS) biomarkers in dairy cows with ovulatory and an-ovulatory oestrous cycles. Thirty healthy, cycling Holstein cows averaging 60±17 days in milk, and producing 33±6kg of milk per day (the week before commencing the study) were enrolled in this study. Composite milk samples were collected thrice weekly and assayed for the following OS biomarkers: lipoperoxides (LPO), biological advanced potential, superoxide dismutase (SOD), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), ceruloplasmin, glutathione (GSH), β-carotene and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). Milk samples were also tested for fat and protein composition and the fat:protein ratio (FPR) was categorized as low (≤1.31), medium (1.32-1.56) and high (>1.57) to evaluate their main effect and the interaction effect of FPR and the week of study on OS using linear mixed models with cow identification being a random factor. Cows with ovulatory oestrous cycles (n=20) presented significantly greater SOD levels than cows that did not ovulate ((n=10; P<0.05). On the other hand, LPO, GSH-Px and GSH concentrations were lower in ovulated cows compared to the an-ovulated cows (P<0.05). The highest level of LPO and AOPP were noted at prooestrus phase while β-carotene presented the lowest value at that phase of oestrous cycle. It could be postulated that the elevated level of milk SOD and the observed lower level of LPO, GSH-Px and GSH in ovulating cows may be an essential event preceding the ovulatory response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cyclic Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dennis H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is a simple experiment that has become popular in chemical research because it can provide useful information about redox reactions in a form which is easily obtained and interpreted. Discusses principles of the method and illustrates its use in the study of four electrode reactions. (Author/JN)

  9. Cyclic Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dennis H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is a simple experiment that has become popular in chemical research because it can provide useful information about redox reactions in a form which is easily obtained and interpreted. Discusses principles of the method and illustrates its use in the study of four electrode reactions. (Author/JN)

  10. Effect of Mimosa pudica root powder on oestrous cycle and ovulation in cycling female albino rat, Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Valsala, S; Karpagaganapathy, P R

    2002-03-01

    Mimosa pudica root powder (150 mg/kg body weight) when administered intragastrically, altered the oestrous cycle pattern in female Rattus norvegicus. Nucleated and cornified cells were absent in all rats. The smear was characterized by leucocytes only, as in dioestrus, which persisted for 2 weeks. There was a significant reduction in the number of normal ova in rats treated with the root powder compared with the control rats, and a significant increase in the number of degenerated ova. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Gelastic epilepsy: Beyond hypothalamic hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Uribe-San-Martin, Reinaldo; Ciampi, Ethel; Lawson-Peralta, Balduin; Acevedo-Gallinato, Keryma; Torrealba-Marchant, Gonzalo; Campos-Puebla, Manuel; Godoy-Fernández, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Gelastic epilepsy or laughing seizures have been historically related to children with hypothalamic hamartomas. We report three adult patients who had gelastic epilepsy, defined as the presence of seizures with a prominent laugh component, including brain imaging, surface/invasive electroencephalography, positron emission tomography, and medical/surgical outcomes. None of the patients had hamartoma or other hypothalamic lesion. Two patients were classified as having refractory epilepsy (one had biopsy-proven neurocysticercosis and the other one hippocampal sclerosis and temporal cortical dysplasia). The third patient had no lesion on MRI and had complete control with carbamazepine. Both lesional patients underwent resective surgery, one with complete seizure control and the other one with poor outcome. Although hypothalamic hamartomas should always be ruled out in patients with gelastic epilepsy, laughing seizures can also arise from frontal and temporal lobe foci, which can be surgically removed. In addition, we present the first case of gelastic epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis.

  12. Cyclic regulation of apoptotic gene expression in the mouse oviduct.

    PubMed

    Jeoung, Myoungkun; Bridges, Phillip J

    2011-01-01

    The oviduct is a dynamic structure whose function relies upon cyclic changes in the morphology of both ciliated and secretory luminal epithelial cells. Unfortunately, infection of these epithelial cells by sexually transmitted pathogens can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancies and infertility. The disruption of normal, cyclic apoptosis in the oviducal epithelium appears to be a causal factor of oviducal pathology and therefore, these pathways represent a potential target for diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of expression for apoptotic genes in the oviduct of the naturally cycling mouse, generating fundamental information that can be applied to the development of animal models for research and the identification of targets for disease intervention. Whole oviducts were collected from regular cycling mice killed at 1p.m. on each day of the oestrous cycle and the expression of 84 apoptotic genes determined by targeted PCR super-array. Intact and cleaved caspases were then evaluated by western blotting. The expression of mRNA for genes classified as pro-apoptotic (Bad, Bak1 and Bok) and anti-apoptotic (Bag3, Bnip2 and Xiap) was regulated by day (P < 0.05). Differences in the temporal expression of several p53-related genes (Trp53bp2, Trp53inp1 and Trp73), those specific to the TNF superfamily (Tnfrsf10 and Tnfsf10b) and one caspase (Casp14) were also observed (P < 0.05). The cleaved forms of Caspases-3, -6 and -12 were all detected throughout the oestrous cycle. These results represent the first pathway-wide analysis of apoptotic gene expression in the murine oviduct.

  13. Torsional nystagmus in hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Aasef G

    2013-12-01

    Torsional nystagmus was noted in a patient with hypothalamic hamartoma. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an exophytic hypothalamic mass extending into the pre-pontine cistern and abutting ventral mesencephalon. The quickphase of the torsional nystagmus was directed towards the left side, ipsilateral to the side of compression by the hamartoma. Ipsi-lesionally directed pure torsional nystagmus in this case is attributed to the compressive lesion of ocular motor structures responsible for the neural integration of torsional and vertical eye movements, the interstitial nucleus of Cajal. [Published with video sequences].

  14. Reproductive functional anatomy and oestrous cycle pattern of the female brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus, Gray 1842) from Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mayor, P; López-Béjar, M; Jori, F; Fenech, M; López-Gatius, F

    2003-07-15

    In the present study, we examined certain features of the functional anatomy of the female genital tract of the wild brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus) to obtain data on the reproductive biology of this African forest rodent. Two consecutive experiments were performed. The aim of the first was to establish macroscopic and microscopic features of the genital organs, and to explore correlations between predominant ovarian structures and vaginal contents in 20 wild, mature females. In the second experiment, we inspected the external genitalia and vaginal smears of a further 10 females in captivity on a daily basis for 90 days. The uterus of the brush-tailed porcupine is bicornuate and composed of two separated uterine horns, a uterine body and cervix. The genital tract does not present a vaginal vestibule. Thus, there is no portion common to genital and urinary tracts. Females in the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle showed increased cornification of the vaginal epithelium and a high density of eosinophilic cells in vaginal smears. The vulva and vaginal opening were open, reddish and tumefacted. In luteal phase or in pregnancy, epithelial cornification and eosinophilic features were notably reduced and the vagina presented a pale, non-tumefacted vulva and a vaginal closure membrane. Females in captivity showed spontaneous cycles, a polyoestrous reproduction pattern and, based on features of the external genitalia and vaginal smears, their oestrous cycle length was 27.1+/-6.4 days (n=12).

  15. Investigations on the endometrial response to intrauterine administration of N-acetylcysteine in oestrous mares.

    PubMed

    Melkus, E; Witte, T; Walter, I; Heuwieser, W; Aurich, C

    2013-08-01

    In mares, mating-induced persistent endometritis contributes to low fertility. The condition is in part related to delayed clearance of mucus accumulated within the uterine lumen. The objective of this study was to investigate the endometrial response of healthy mares to intrauterine (i.u.) treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Oestrous mares (n = 12) were randomly assigned to a treatment (TM) or control (C) group and received an i.u. infusion of 5% NAC and saline (total volume 140 ml), respectively. Endometrial biopsies were collected in five of the mares 24 h after treatment, in the remaining seven mares 72 h after treatment. Endometrial biopsies were evaluated for integrity of the luminal epithelium, number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), staining for cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), staining with Kiel 67 antigen (Ki-67), lectins and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS). The integrity of endometrial epithelial cells was not affected by treatment (no statistical differences between groups or times). At 24 h after treatment, the mean number of PMN in endometrial biopsies from NAC- and C-mares did not differ, but at 72 h after treatment, number of PMN was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in C (3.9 ± 0.6 PMN/field) compared with NAC-treated mares (2.3 ± 0.2 PMN/field). At 72 h after treatment, the intensity of staining for COX2 was significantly higher after saline than after NAC treatment (p < 0.05). In the epithelium, no differences in staining for the proliferation marker Ki-67 were seen with respect to time and treatment. Score for the lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was slightly higher in NAC-treated mares than in C-mares 72 h after treatment (p < 0.05). Score for PAS staining of mucus in deep uterine glands differed significantly between groups at 24 h after treatment (p < 0.05). The present study demonstrates that NAC does not adversely affect the endometrial function. Moreover, an anti-inflammatory effect on the equine endometrium was

  16. Hypothalamic involvement in chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Peres, M; del Rio, M S.; Seabra, M; Tufik, S; Abucham, J; Cipolla-Neto, J; Silberstein, S; Zukerman, E

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Chronic migraine (CM), previously called transformed migraine, is a frequent headache disorder that affects 2%-3% of the general population. Analgesic overuse, insomnia, depression, and anxiety are disorders that are often comorbid with CM. Hypothalamic dysfunction has been implicated in its pathogenesis, but it has never been studied in patients with CM. The aim was to analyze hypothalamic involvement in CM by measurement of melatonin, prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol nocturnal secretion.
METHODS—A total of 338 blood samples (13/patient) from 17 patients with CM and nine age and sex matched healthy volunteers were taken. Melatonin, prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol concentrations were determined every hour for 12 hours. The presence of comorbid disorders was also evaluated.
RESULTS—An abnormal pattern of hypothalamic hormonal secretion was found in CM. This included: (1) a decreased nocturnal prolactin peak, (2) increased cortisol concentrations, (3) a delayed nocturnal melatonin peak in patients with CM, and (4) lower melatonin concentrations in patients with CM with insomnia. Growth hormone secretion did not differ from controls.
CONCLUSION—These results support hypothalamic involvement in CM, shown by a chronobiologic dysregulation, and a possible hyperdopaminergic state in patients with CM. Insomnia might be an important variable in the study findings.

 PMID:11723194

  17. Hypothalamic PKA regulates leptin sensitivity and adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linghai; McKnight, G. Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Mice lacking the RIIβ regulatory subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) display reduced adiposity and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Here we show that RIIβ knockout (KO) mice have enhanced sensitivity to leptin's effects on both feeding and energy metabolism. After administration of a low dose of leptin, the duration of hypothalamic JAK/STAT3 signalling is increased, resulting in enhanced POMC mRNA induction. Consistent with the extended JAK/STAT3 activation, we find that the negative feedback regulator of leptin receptor signalling, Socs3, is inhibited in the hypothalamus of RIIβ KO mice. During fasting, RIIβ–PKA is activated and this correlates with an increase in CREB phosphorylation. The increase in CREB phosphorylation is absent in the fasted RIIβ KO hypothalamus. Selective inhibition of PKA activity in AgRP neurons partially recapitulates the leanness and resistance to diet-induced obesity of RIIβ KO mice. Our findings suggest that RIIβ–PKA modulates the duration of leptin receptor signalling and therefore the magnitude of the catabolic response to leptin. PMID:26381935

  18. Cyclic multiverses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marosek, Konrad; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Balcerzak, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Using the idea of regularization of singularities due to the variability of the fundamental constants in cosmology we study the cyclic universe models. We find two models of oscillating and non-singular mass density and pressure (`non-singular' bounce) regularized by varying gravitational constant G despite the scale factor evolution is oscillating and having sharp turning points (`singular' bounce). Both violating (big-bang) and non-violating (phantom) null energy condition models appear. Then, we extend this idea on to the multiverse containing cyclic individual universes with either growing or decreasing entropy though leaving the net entropy constant. In order to get an insight into the key idea, we consider the doubleverse with the same geometrical evolution of the two `parallel' universes with their physical evolution [physical coupling constants c(t) and G(t)] being different. An interesting point is that there is a possibility to exchange the universes at the point of maximum expansion - the fact which was already noticed in quantum cosmology. Similar scenario is also possible within the framework of Brans-Dicke theory where varying G(t) is replaced by the dynamical Brans-Dicke field φ(t) though these theories are slightly different.

  19. Hypothalamic neurohormones and immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Quintanar, J. Luis; Guzmán-Soto, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed. PMID:23964208

  20. Hypothalamic neurohormones and immune responses.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, J Luis; Guzmán-Soto, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed.

  1. Sugar expression in the mucosae of the canine uterus and vagina during the oestrous cycle and with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Y; Takeuchi, T; Shimokawa, T; Asano, A; Nabeta, M; Ohta, Y

    2013-04-01

    The pathogenesis of canine pyometra is still unclear, but bacterial infection of the endometrium, mediated by bacterial lectins, is suspected to induce pyometra. The aim of this study was to investigate sugar expression in the mucosae of the uterus and vagina of healthy dogs with normal oestrous cycles and in dogs with pyometra, using a panel of lectins to investigate the pathogenesis of pyometra. In dogs with pyometra, the uterine and vaginal mucosae were positive for lectins that selectively bind to glucose or mannose, especially during days 7-10 and 30-40 of dioestrus. These results suggest that temporal changes in sugar expression in the uterus and vagina present an opportunity for pathogens to infect the endometrium, causing pyometra.

  2. Follistatin concentrations in maternal and fetal fluids during the oestrous cycle, gestation and parturition in Merino sheep.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, J R; Xia, Y; O'Shea, T; Hayward, S; O'Connor, A E; De Kretser, D M

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in follistatin, an activin binding protein, during the oestrous cycle, gestation and parturition in ewes using a radioimmunoassay for total follistatin, which uses dissociating reagents to remove the interference of activin. Follistatin concentrations remained unchanged (2.7 +/- 0.2 ng ml(-1)) during the oestrous cycle and decreased as pregnancy progressed. Follistatin concentrations in allantoic fluid also decreased during gestation, whereas in amniotic fluid follistatin concentrations reached a peak at day 75 of gestation (9.8 ng ml(-1)) and had decreased to 4.4 ng ml(-1) at day 140. Follistatin concentrations in fetal blood (7.0 +/- 0.5 ng ml(-1)) did not change from day 50 to day 140 of gestation but were significantly higher than in matched maternal samples (3.1 +/- 0.3 ng ml(-1)). Circulating follistatin in ewes was significantly increased on the day of parturition (5.6 +/- 0.6 ng ml(-1)) compared with the days before parturition (2.7 +/- 0.4 ng ml(-1)), but had decreased by day 2 after birth. Blood samples from newborn lambs showed that plasma follistatin concentration (13.4 +/- 2.3 ng ml(-1)) was significantly higher than that of the mothers and remained high for at least 7 days after birth. These data support previous studies of the human menstrual cycle indicating that follistatin is not an endocrine signal from the ovary; however, in contrast to human pregnancies, follistatin concentrations in sheep decreased and become high only after or during parturition. This difference observed between species may reflect different physiological effects of follistatin or may be the result of measurement of different isoforms.

  3. Oestrous synchronization, ovarian superovulation and intraspecific transfers from a closed breeding colony of inbred SLA miniature pigs.

    PubMed

    Arlaud, J J; Baker, L; Williams, R L; French, A J

    2010-12-01

    The inbred SLA miniature pig is a unique animal model developed for organ transplantation studies and pre-clinical experimental purposes. Reported oestrous synchronization and superovulation treatments were examined in two SLA haplotypes (AA and DD) to allow collection of embryos for both practical embryo transfer and experimental technologies from a closed breeding colony. Pre-puberal miniature pigs were poor responders to oestrous synchronization treatments, while post-puberal sows were equivalent to commercial sows. Following superovulation, the ovulation number (corpora .hemorrhagica) was higher (p < 0.05) in the cycling sows when compared with non-cycling sows. Ovulations were equivalent to commercial pre-puberal gilts and non-cycling sows (p > 0.05). No difference in ovulation number between haplotypes was observed, which differs from the previous report (DD>AA). Collection of zygotes for pronuclear injection was the highest in the non-cycling post-puberal miniature pig group (p < 0.05), although significantly lower when compared with the commercial pig treatment groups (p < 0.05). The incidence of cystic endometrial hyperplasia in our colony was equivalent to rates observed in commercial pigs. Pronuclear visualization following centrifugation was the highest in the non-cycling miniature sow group and approximates to about 25% of ovulations and about half the rate observed in the commercial pigs (50%). Miniature pig embryos transferred between SLA haplotypes and transfer of DD embryos to commercial pigs resulted in live births at a higher efficiency than previously reported. This study demonstrates the feasibility of undertaking assisted reproductive technologies in a closed breeding colony of inbred SLA miniature pigs without compromise to the breeding programmes. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Gene expression profiling of bovine endometrium during the oestrous cycle: detection of molecular pathways involved in functional changes.

    PubMed

    Bauersachs, S; Ulbrich, S E; Gross, K; Schmidt, S E M; Meyer, H H D; Einspanier, R; Wenigerkind, H; Vermehren, M; Blum, H; Sinowatz, F; Wolf, E

    2005-06-01

    The endometrium plays a central role among the reproductive tissues in the context of early embryo-maternal communication and pregnancy. It undergoes typical changes during the sexual/oestrous cycle, which are regulated by the ovarian hormones progesterone and oestrogen. To identify the underlying molecular mechanisms we have performed the first holistic screen of transcriptome changes in bovine intercaruncular endometrium at two stages of the cycle--end of day 0 (late oestrus, low progesterone) and day 12 (dioestrus, high progesterone). A combination of subtracted cDNA libraries and cDNA array hybridisation revealed 133 genes showing at least a 2-fold change of their mRNA abundance, 65 with higher levels at oestrus and 68 at dioestrus. Interestingly, genes were identified which showed differential expression between different uterine sections as well. The most prominent example was the UTMP (uterine milk protein) mRNA, which was markedly upregulated in the cranial part of the ipsilateral uterine horn at oestrus. A Gene Ontology classification of the genes with known function characterised the oestrus time by elevated expression of genes, for example related to cell adhesion, cell motility and extracellular matrix and the dioestrus time by higher expression of mRNAs encoding for a variety of enzymes and transport proteins, in particular ion channels. Searching in pathway databases and literature data-mining revealed physiological processes and signalling cascades, e.g. the transforming growth factor-beta signalling pathway and retinoic acid signalling, which are potentially involved in the regulation of changes of the endometrium during the oestrous cycle.

  5. Hypothalamic thermosensitivity in capsaicin-desensitized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cormarèche-Leydier, M; Shimada, S G; Stitt, J T

    1985-01-01

    In rats, we tested the hypothesis that capsaicin desensitization reduces hypothalamic warm thermosensitivity. We locally heated and cooled the hypothalamus using water-perfused thermodes while observing thermoregulatory variables. In untreated rats, a small dose of capsaicin had profound effects on thermoregulation. However, desensitizing rats to capsaicin had no effect on hypothalamic thermosensitivity for metabolic rate or changes in body temperature due to displacements of hypothalamic temperature. Contrary to current opinion, we conclude that capsaicin desensitization does not alter hypothalamic thermosensitivity to warm or cold. PMID:4020699

  6. Bariatric Surgery in Hypothalamic Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Nathan C.; Rose, Susan R.; Inge, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas (CP) are epithelial neoplasms generally found in the area of the pituitary and hypothalamus. Despite benign histology, these tumors and/or their treatment often result in significant, debilitating disorders of endocrine, neurological, behavioral, and metabolic systems. Severe obesity is observed in a high percentage of patients with CP resulting in significant comorbidities and negatively impacting quality of life. Obesity occurs as a result of hypothalamic damage and disruption of normal homeostatic mechanisms regulating energy balance. Such pathological weight gain, termed hypothalamic obesity (HyOb), is often severe and refractory to therapy. Unfortunately, neither lifestyle intervention nor pharmacotherapy has proven effective in the treatment of HyOb. Given the limited choices and poor results of these treatments, several groups have examined bariatric surgery as a treatment alternative for patients with CP–HyOb. While a large body of evidence exists supporting the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of exogenous obesity and its comorbidities, its role in the treatment of HyOb has yet to be defined. To date, the existing literature on bariatric surgery in CP–HyOb is largely limited to case reports and series with short term follow-up. Here we review the current reports on the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of CP–HyOb. We also compare these results to those reported for other populations of HyOb, including Prader–Willi Syndrome, Bardet–Biedl syndrome, and hypothalamic melanocortin signaling defects. While initial reports of bariatric surgery in CP–HyOb are promising, their limited scope makes it difficult to draw any substantial conclusions as to the long term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in CP–HyOb. There continues to be a need for more robust, controlled, prospective studies with long term follow-up in order to better define the role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of HyOb. PMID:22649412

  7. Bariatric surgery in hypothalamic obesity.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Nathan C; Rose, Susan R; Inge, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas (CP) are epithelial neoplasms generally found in the area of the pituitary and hypothalamus. Despite benign histology, these tumors and/or their treatment often result in significant, debilitating disorders of endocrine, neurological, behavioral, and metabolic systems. Severe obesity is observed in a high percentage of patients with CP resulting in significant comorbidities and negatively impacting quality of life. Obesity occurs as a result of hypothalamic damage and disruption of normal homeostatic mechanisms regulating energy balance. Such pathological weight gain, termed hypothalamic obesity (HyOb), is often severe and refractory to therapy. Unfortunately, neither lifestyle intervention nor pharmacotherapy has proven effective in the treatment of HyOb. Given the limited choices and poor results of these treatments, several groups have examined bariatric surgery as a treatment alternative for patients with CP-HyOb. While a large body of evidence exists supporting the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of exogenous obesity and its comorbidities, its role in the treatment of HyOb has yet to be defined. To date, the existing literature on bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb is largely limited to case reports and series with short term follow-up. Here we review the current reports on the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of CP-HyOb. We also compare these results to those reported for other populations of HyOb, including Prader-Willi Syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, and hypothalamic melanocortin signaling defects. While initial reports of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb are promising, their limited scope makes it difficult to draw any substantial conclusions as to the long term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb. There continues to be a need for more robust, controlled, prospective studies with long term follow-up in order to better define the role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of HyOb.

  8. Cyclic Cushing syndrome: definitions and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Velez, Dennis A; Mayberg, Marc R; Ludlam, William H

    2007-01-01

    Endogenous Cushing syndrome (CS) results from hypercortisolemia caused by excess adrenocorticotropic hormone production in a pituitary adenoma or ectopic tumor, or by an adrenal tumor that directly produces excess cortisol. The diagnosis can usually be ascertained with a reasonable degree of certainty based on clinical and laboratory findings of hypercortisolism. There are patients, however, in whom the production of excess cortisol exhibits a cyclic or intermittent pattern, and, as a result, the clinical symptoms may be quite complex and varied. In these patients the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis may be normal between cycles, and dexamethasone suppression testing may produce a paradoxical response. In the present article, the authors provide a definition of cyclic Cushing syndrome, review the causes and its potential pathophysiological mechanisms, and discuss the treatment options based on a review of the available literature.

  9. Competition for oestrous ewes between rams reared by their mothers or artificially reared: Effects on sexual behaviour and testosterone and cortisol serum concentrations.

    PubMed

    Damián, J P; Hötzel, M J; Banchero, G; Ungerfeld, R

    2017-09-15

    The objective of this study was to determine how the social competition for an oestrous ewe affects the sexual behaviour and the endocrine response in two groups of rams, one reared by their mothers and another artificially reared. Thus, we compared the sexual behaviour and testosterone and cortisol changes in each group of rams in competitive and non-competitive tests, both during the first and second breeding seasons. Two groups of rams were: 1) artificially reared lambs, separated from their dams 24-36 h after birth (Week 0) and artificially fed with sheep milk until 10 weeks of age (group AR, n = 14); and 2) lambs reared by their dams until 10 weeks of age (group DR, n = 13). Rams were subjected to non-competitive and competitive tests for an oestrous ewe during their first and second breeding seasons, when they were 8 and 20 months old, respectively. Sexual behaviours toward an oestrous ewe were recorded during 20 min and the testosterone and cortisol concentrations were determined in serum samples collected immediately before the test, and 20, 40 and 60 min after it. During the first breeding season, the number of flehmen decreased in DR rams, and the number of flehmen and ano-genital sniffings also decreased in DR rams, but the frequency of some copulatory behaviours increased (matings and ejaculation/total mounts in DR rams, and total mounts in AR rams) in competitive tests. During the second breeding season, competition caused a decrease in the number of all the recorded behaviours (courtship and copulation) with the exception of flehmen in AR rams; however, in DR rams only the number of the copulatory behaviours decreased under competition. Competition did not affect the endocrine response during the first breeding season. During the second breeding season, while testosterone concentrations were greater in non-competitive than in competitive tests at 60 min (P = 0.0008) in AR rams, in DR rams it tended to be greater (P = 0.09). Competition did

  10. Hypothalamic control of bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Kunal; Yadav, Vijay K

    2014-10-01

    Bones are structures in vertebrates that provide support to organs, protect soft organs, and give them shape and defined features, functions that are essential for their survival. To perform these functions, bones are constantly renewed throughout life. The process through which bones are renewed is known as bone remodeling, an energy demanding process sensitive to changes in energy homeostasis of the organism. A close interplay takes place between the diversity of nutritional cues and metabolic signals with different elements of the hypothalamic circuits to co-ordinate energy metabolism with the regulation of bone mass. In this review, we focus on how mouse and human genetics have elucidated the roles of hormonal signals and neural circuits that originate in, or impinge on, the hypothalamus in the regulation of bone mass. This will help to understand the mechanisms whereby regulation of bone is gated and dynamically regulated by the hypothalamus.

  11. The precision of peri-oestrous predictors of the date of onset of parturition in the bitch.

    PubMed

    De Cramer, K G M; Nöthling, J O

    2017-07-01

    Precise prediction of the date of onset of parturition in the bitch is clinically important. The study compared the precision with which four peri-oestrous predictors predict the date of onset of parturition. The predictors evaluated in 24 bitches were: the date of the first or only day of the LH surge, the date on which the concentration of progesterone in the blood plasma first exceeded 6 nmol/L, the date on which the concentration of progesterone in the blood plasma first exceeded 16 nmol/L and the date of onset of cytological dioestrus. Among the 24 bitches, the date of onset of cytological dioestrus predicted the date of onset of parturition with greater precision than the other three predictors. Following the evaluation of another 218 intervals between the onset of cytological dioestrus and the date of onset of parturition, it was shown that the onset of cytological dioestrus predicted the date of onset parturition with a precision of ±1 d, ± 2 d and ±3 d in 88%, 99% and 100% of the 242 pregnancies. This study concludes that the first day of cytological dioestrus is a useful predictor of the date of onset of parturition. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis in men and women with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Holley, Jean L

    2004-10-01

    Although the precise abnormalities that lead to failure of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in men and women with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains undefined, evidence exists for defects in both the hypothalamus and the pituitary. The lack of appropriate cyclic release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) by the hypothalamus leads to loss of normal pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) release by the pituitary, which results in impaired ovulation in women and reduced testosterone and sperm production in men. The cause of impaired cyclic release of GnRH is unclear, but hyperprolactinemia, elevated endorphins, and high levels of GnRH and LH caused by reduced clearance may contribute. Perturbations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadaotropin axis in CKD lead to high rates of infertility, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, and impaired puberty in children. Only through additional study of the complex effects of CKD on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis will the precise abnormalities in hormonal control of reproduction be explained.

  13. Neuropeptide Y stimulates autophagy in hypothalamic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aveleira, Célia A.; Botelho, Mariana; Carmo-Silva, Sara; Ferreira-Marques, Marisa; Nóbrega, Clévio; Cortes, Luísa; Valero, Jorge; Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; Álvaro, Ana R.; Santana, Magda; Kügler, Sebastian; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Aging is characterized by autophagy impairment that contributes to age-related disease aggravation. Moreover, it was described that the hypothalamus is a critical brain area for whole-body aging development and has impact on lifespan. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the major neuropeptides present in the hypothalamus, and it has been shown that, in aged animals, the hypothalamic NPY levels decrease. Because caloric restriction (CR) delays aging, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy, and also increases hypothalamic NPY levels, we hypothesized that NPY could have a relevant role on autophagy modulation in the hypothalamus. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of NPY on autophagy in the hypothalamus. Using both hypothalamic neuronal in vitro models and mice overexpressing NPY in the hypothalamus, we observed that NPY stimulates autophagy in the hypothalamus. Mechanistically, in rodent hypothalamic neurons, NPY increases autophagy through the activation of NPY Y1 and Y5 receptors, and this effect is tightly associated with the concerted activation of PI3K, MEK/ERK, and PKA signaling pathways. Modulation of hypothalamic NPY levels may be considered a potential strategy to produce protective effects against hypothalamic impairments associated with age and to delay aging. PMID:25775546

  14. Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc

    2007-01-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3′,5′-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed. PMID:19704553

  15. Region-specific expression of nitric oxide synthases in the bovine oviduct during the oestrous cycle and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, S E; Rehfeld, S; Bauersachs, S; Wolf, E; Rottmayer, R; Hiendleder, S; Vermehren, M; Sinowatz, F; Meyer, H H D; Einspanier, R

    2006-02-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) account for the endogenous production of nitric oxide (NO), a small and permeable bioreactive molecule. NO is known to act as a paracrine mediator during various processes associated with female reproduction. In the present study, the mRNA expression of the endothelial (eNOS) and inducible (iNOS) NO synthases were examined in bovine oviduct epithelial cells (BOEC) during the oestrous cycle. In addition, eNOS and iNOS mRNA and protein were localised by in situ hybridisation and immunocytochemistry respectively. Furthermore, the effects of exogenously applied oestradiol-17beta and progesterone on NOS mRNA regulation were studied in a suspension culture of BOEC. The eNOS mRNA abundance was low around ovulation (day 0) and increased significantly until pro-oestrus (day 18) in the ampulla. Immunoreactive protein of eNOS was detected predominantly in endothelial cells as well as in secretory oviduct epithelial cells at pro-oestrus. The iNOS mRNA concentration was significantly reduced in the isthmus at pro-oestrus (day 18) and oestrus (day 0) compared with persistently high levels in the ampulla. By in situ hybridisation, specific iNOS transcripts were additionally demonstrated in the oviduct epithelium. Immunoreactive iNOS protein was localised in secretory epithelial cells as well as in the lamina muscularis. The in vitro stimulation showed that both NOS were stimulated by progesterone, but not by oestradiol-17beta. The region-specific modulated expression of eNOS and iNOS provides evidence for an involvement of endogenously produced NO in the regulation of oviductal functions.

  16. Effect of the in vitro maturation medium on equine oocytes: comparison of follicular fluid and oestrous mare serum.

    PubMed

    Gil, Lydia; Saura, S; Echegaray, Arantxa; Martinez, Felisa; de Blas, I; Akourki, A; Gonzalez, Noelia; Espinosa, E; Josa, A

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of supplementing the medium used to mature equine oocytes in vitro with oestrous mare serum (EMS) or horse follicular fluid (HFF). To this end, 144 ovaries were obtained from mares aged 16-21 months and transported to the laboratory in Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline (D-PBS) at 30 degrees C. Oocytes were harvested from the ovaries by slicing, and then selected for in vitro maturation (IVM) according to the number of cumulus cell layers and the characteristics of the cytoplasm. The selected oocytes were washed three times in TCM199 medium plus HEPES (TCM-199H) or in the same medium plus glutamine (TCM-199G), then matured in vitro in six study groups established according to the in vitro maturation (IVM) treatment to see possible interactions between HEPES and glutamine on other supplements: Ten percent EMS was added to two of these media (TCM-199H+EMS and TCM-199G+EMS) and 10% HFF was added to the media in two other groups (TCM-199H+HFF and TCM-199G+HFF). IVM was performed at 38.5 degrees C for 40 h in a controlled atmosphere (5% CO2, 95% relative humidity). The findings indicate that the presence of EMS or HFF in the TCM-199H medium gives rise to the best results in terms of the proportions of oocytes reaching maturity (37.7% and 36.8%, respectively). The values obtained with EMS and HFF were statistically similar to each other but differed from the other treatments. The media containing glutamine led to the highest proportions of degenerated oocytes.

  17. Ultrastructural changes in the uterine luminal and glandular epithelium during the oestrous cycle of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica (grey short-tailed opossum).

    PubMed

    Wick, Regula; Kress, Annetrudi

    2002-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes in the endometrium associated with the oestrous cycle were studied in the South American marsupial Monodelphis domestica. The most conspicuous changes include the height and the differentiation of the uterine luminal and glandular epithelium, which consists of ciliated and non-ciliated cells. The glandular epithelium attains its maximum development during oestrus, the luminal epithelium at postoestrus. A distinct increase in the number of ciliated cells can be observed during pro-oestrus, reaching a maximum number at oestrus; this is followed by a process of deciliation. The presence of solitary cilia on the apices of non-ciliated cells is very conspicuous during all oestrous stages and can best be seen on the luminal epithelium. These findings differ from the observations in eutherian mammals, where solitary cilia are only found in the immature uterus or after ovariectomy. The secretory activity of non-ciliated cells of the luminal epithelium is hardly noticeable along the apical membrane and stains only very faintly with Alcian blue. The glandular epithelium cells are filled apically with exocytotic vesicles at oestrus and early postoestrus. However, in contrast to the cervical gland cells, they hardly stain with Alcian blue, indicating that mucins of a different type must be present. Mechanisms for the remodelling of the luminal and glandular epithelium are especially conspicuous at metoestrus and early pro-oestrus and include the presence of autolysosomes, residual bodies and apoptotic bodies. In the endometrial stroma, around the uterine glands, macrophages accumulate and attain a typical oestrous stage-dependent appearance during their phagocytotic activities.

  18. Local relaxin biosynthesis in the ovary and uterus through the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy in the female marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Einspanier, A; Zarreh-Hoshyari-Khah, M R; Balvers, M; Kerr, L; Fuhrmann, K; Ivell, R

    1997-06-01

    The pattern of peripheral serum concentration for the peptide hormone relaxin in women points to the possibility of an interesting paracrine function in the cycle and early pregnancy. In order to investigate this physiology in detail, it was decided to examine local relaxin biosynthesis in an established primate model for human female reproductive function, the marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus). In this initial study relaxin biosynthesis was assessed using a combination of molecular and immunological techniques through the oestrous cycle in the marmoset monkey. The nucleotide sequence of the full-length relaxin gene transcript was cloned from the marmoset ovary and found to be closely homologous to that of the human H2 relaxin. Using gene specific probes derived from this sequence, RNase protection assays, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays and in-situ hybridization, showed relaxin gene expression within the ovary in theca cells and corpora lutea in the oestrous cycle, increasing in early pregnancy. Relaxin gene expression was also identified at a low level in the uterus and placenta, and at a higher level in the prostate in the male marmoset monkey. Using two different relaxin-specific antisera, relaxin-like immunoreactivity was observed in the ovary with a pattern of distribution coincident with that obtained by in-situ hybridization. Immunoreactivity was also found in the non-pregnant uterus, within the endometrial epithelium of the late proliferative phase and increasing within the glands through the secretory phase. Taken together, the pattern of relaxin peptide and mRNA expression show there is the basis for local relaxin physiology within the ovarian follicle and corpus luteum, and within the uterus during the oestrous cycle in this new world monkey.

  19. Expression of adiponectin and adiponectin receptors 1 (AdipoR1) and 2 (AdipoR2) in the porcine uterus during the oestrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Smolinska, Nina; Dobrzyn, Kamil; Maleszka, Anna; Kiezun, Marta; Szeszko, Karol; Kaminski, Tadeusz

    2014-04-01

    Adiponectin is a hormone secreted primarily by white adipose tissue. Recent studies have shown that adiponectin and its receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) are expressed in different reproductive tissues, including the ovary and uterus. This newly discovered endocrine system plays an important role in the regulation of reproductive processes. The expression of the adiponectin system in the porcine uterus during the oestrous cycle has not been researched to date. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence and changes in adiponectin system expression in the porcine uterus on days 2-3, 10-12, 14-16, and 17-19 of the oestrous cycle. The expression of the adiponectin gene was highest on days 14-16 and 2-3 in the endometrium and myometrium, respectively. In the endometrium, the content of AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 mRNAs was highest on days 10-12, whereas significantly higher expression levels of both genes were noted in the myometrium on days 17-19. The highest content of adiponectin and AdipoR1 protein in the endometrium was reported on days 2-3. In the myometrium, the expression levels of both receptor proteins were significantly higher on days 17-19. Adiponectin system proteins were localized in endometrial epithelial glandular cells, luminal epithelial cells and stromal cells as well as in longitudinal and circular muscles of the myometrium. This study demonstrated the presence of adiponectin, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 genes and proteins in the porcine uterus and the effect of the stage of the oestrous cycle on the expression of the adiponectin system. Our results suggest that locally synthesized adiponectin directly affects uterine functions.

  20. Hypothalamic Neuroendocrine Functions in Rats with Dihydrotestosterone-Induced Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Effects of Low-Frequency Electro-Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yi; Johansson, Julia; Shao, Ruijin; Mannerås, Louise; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Julia; Billig, Håkan; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet

    2009-01-01

    Adult female rats continuously exposed to androgens from prepuberty have reproductive and metabolic features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We investigated whether such exposure adversely affects estrous cyclicity and the expression and distribution of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GnRH receptors, and corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the hypothalamus and whether the effects are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). We also assessed the effect of low-frequency electro-acupuncture (EA) on those variables. At 21 days of age, rats were randomly divided into three groups (control, PCOS, and PCOS EA; n = 12/group) and implanted subcutaneously with 90-day continuous-release pellets containing vehicle or 5α-dihydrostestosterone (DHT). From age 70 days, PCOS EA rats received 2-Hz EA (evoking muscle twitches) five times/week for 4–5 weeks. Hypothalamic protein expression was measured by immunohistochemistry and western blot. DHT-treated rats were acyclic, but controls had regular estrous cycles. In PCOS rats, hypothalamic medial preoptic AR protein expression and the number of AR- and GnRH-immunoreactive cells were increased, but CRH was not affected; however, GnRH receptor expression was decreased in both the pituitary and hypothalamus. Low-frequency EA restored estrous cyclicity within 1 week and reduced the elevated hypothalamic GnRH and AR expression levels. EA did not affect GnRH receptor or CRH expression. Interestingly, nuclear AR co-localized with GnRH in the hypothalamus. Thus, rats with DHT-induced PCOS have disrupted estrous cyclicity and an increased number of hypothalamic cells expressing GnRH, most likely mediated by AR activation. Repeated low-frequency EA normalized estrous cyclicity and restored GnRH and AR protein expression. These results may help explain the beneficial neuroendocrine effects of low-frequency EA in women with PCOS. PMID:19680559

  1. Supplementation of Slow-Release Melatonin Improves Recovery of Ovarian Cyclicity and Conception in Summer Anoestrous Buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Mehrotra, S; Singh, G; Maurya, V P; Narayanan, K; Mahla, A S; Chaudhari, R K; Singh, M; Soni, Y K; Kumawat, B L; Dabas, S K; Srivastava, N

    2016-02-01

    The role of melatonin as a protective neurohormone against restoring cyclicity in summer anoestrous animals in photoperiod species has gained wider acceptance. This study was designed to uncover the evidence the slow-release melatonin (MLT) has on initiation of ovarian cyclicity and conception rate (CR) in summer anoestrous buffaloes. Thus, buffaloes diagnosed as summer anoestrous (absence of overt signs of oestrus, concurrent rectal examination and radioimmunoassay for serum progesterone at 10 days interval) were grouped as untreated (Group I, sterilized corn oil, n = 8) and treated (Group II, single subcutaneous injection of MLT @18 mg/50 kg bwt in sterilized corn oil, n = 20). Animals treated and detected in oestrus were artificially inseminated (AI) followed by division into Group III (second dose of MLT on 5th day post-AI, n = 8) and Group IV (no melatonin administration, n = 10). Blood samples were collected at 4 days interval for estimation of serum MLT, progesterone and oestrogen using radioimmunoassay kit. Mean oestrous induction rate (OIR), oestrous induction interval (OII), interoestrous interval (IOI) and CR were estimated. Compared to control, concentration of melatonin was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in treated group ranging from 14.34 ± 1.72 to 412.31 ± 14.47 pg/ml whereas other two hormones did not show any concentration difference. Melatonin-administered buffaloes showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher (90%) OIR with OII of 18.06 ± 1.57 days. Results showed improvement in conception rate in buffaloes administered with post-insemination melatonin. It can be concluded from the study that slow-release melatonin supplementation restored cyclicity in summer anoestrous animals resulting in improvement in conception rate in buffaloes. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Solitary Hypothalamitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Jing; Wu, Yue; Tang, Ying; Tao, Ran; Ye, Hongying; Yao, Zhenwei

    The study aimed to characterize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of solitary hypothalamitis and evaluate their clinical value in diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging scans, including T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences, of 8 biopsy-proven hypothalamitis lesions were retrospectively analyzed along with MRI features including size, shape, signal intensity, enhancement pattern, correlation with adjacent tissues, and changes in infundibular stalk and sella turcica. Of 8 patients, 5 were diagnosed with lymphoplasmacytic proliferative inflammation, 2 with Langerhans cell histocytosis, and 1 with Rosai-Dorfman disease. Solitary hypothalamitis predominantly demonstrated mild hypointensity/isointensity in T1WI and mild hyperintensity in T2-weighted imaging. In contrast-enhanced T1WI, all lesions showed heterogeneous but primarily peripheral enhancement patterns. Seven cases showed the polygon sign. In T1WI, the normal high signal intensity of neurohypophysis was absent from all patients, with no infundibular stalk thickening. Seven patients presented with optic chiasma edema, and 5 with edema-like changes along the optic tract (OTE), but most showed no visual impairment (n = 7). Magnetic resonance imaging, particularly postcontrast MRI, is the optimal modality for assessment of hypothalamic lesions. Peripheral enhancement with polygon sign and optic tract or chiasm edema without visual impairment are highly suggestive of hypothalamitis.

  3. Bardoxolone methyl prevents obesity and hypothalamic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Camer, Danielle; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wang, Hongqin; Dinh, Chi H L; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-08-25

    High-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity is associated with hypothalamic leptin resistance and low grade chronic inflammation, which largely impairs the neuroregulation of negative energy balance. Neuroregulation of negative energy balance is largely controlled by the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus via leptin signal transduction. Recently, a derivative of oleanolic acid, bardoxolone methyl (BM), has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. We tested the hypothesis that BM would prevent HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation in mice fed a HF diet. Oral administration of BM via drinking water (10 mg/kg daily) for 21 weeks significantly prevented an increase in body weight, energy intake, hyperleptinemia, and peripheral fat accumulation in mice fed a HF diet. Furthermore, BM treatment prevented HF diet-induced decreases in the anorexigenic effects of peripheral leptin administration. In the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced impairments of the downstream protein kinase b (Akt) pathway of hypothalamic leptin signalling. BM treatment also prevented an increase in inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in these two hypothalamic regions. These results identify a potential novel neuropharmacological application for BM in preventing HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hypothalamic dysfunction following whole-brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mechanick, J.I.; Hochberg, F.H.; LaRocque, A.

    1986-10-01

    The authors describe 15 cases with evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction 2 to 9 years following megavoltage whole-brain x-irradiation for primary glial neoplasm. The patients received 4000 to 5000 rads in 180- to 200-rad fractions. Dysfunction occurred in the absence of computerized tomography-delineated radiation necrosis or hypothalamic invasion by tumor, and antedated the onset of dementia. Fourteen patients displayed symptoms reflecting disturbances of personality, libido, thirst, appetite, or sleep. Hyperprolactinemia (with prolactin levels up to 70 ng/ml) was present in all of the nine patients so tested. Of seven patients tested with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, one demonstrated an abnormal pituitary gland response consistent with a hypothalamic disorder. Seven patients developed cognitive abnormalities. Computerized tomography scans performed a median of 4 years after tumor diagnosis revealed no hypothalamic tumor or diminished density of the hypothalamus. Cortical atrophy was present in 50% of cases and third ventricular dilatation in 58%. Hypothalamic dysfunction, heralded by endocrine, behavioral, and cognitive impairment, represents a common, subtle form of radiation damage.

  5. Neuroanatomy and physiology of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis: clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Midge

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the anatomy of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the somatotrophic axis, and neurohypophysis.

  6. Transcriptional profiling of fetal hypothalamic TRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During murine hypothalamic development, different neuroendocrine cell phenotypes are generated in overlapping periods; this suggests that cell-type specific developmental programs operate to achieve complete maturation. A balance between programs that include cell proliferation, cell cycle withdrawal as well as epigenetic regulation of gene expression characterizes neurogenesis. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) is a peptide that regulates energy homeostasis and autonomic responses. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying TRH neuron development, we performed a genome wide study of its transcriptome during fetal hypothalamic development. Results In primary cultures, TRH cells constitute 2% of the total fetal hypothalamic cell population. To purify these cells, we took advantage of the fact that the segment spanning -774 to +84 bp of the Trh gene regulatory region confers specific expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the TRH cells. Transfected TRH cells were purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting, various cell preparations pooled, and their transcriptome compared to that of GFP- hypothalamic cells. TRH cells undergoing the terminal phase of differentiation, expressed genes implicated in protein biosynthesis, intracellular signaling and transcriptional control. Among the transcription-associated transcripts, we identified the transcription factors Klf4, Klf10 and Atf3, which were previously uncharacterized within the hypothalamus. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports identifying transcripts with a potentially important role during the development of a specific hypothalamic neuronal phenotype. This genome-scale study forms a rational foundation for identifying genes that might participate in the development and function of hypothalamic TRH neurons. PMID:21569245

  7. Psychogenic gelastic seizures in a patient with hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Scarella, Timothy; Macken, Michael P; Gerard, Elizabeth; Schuele, Stephan U

    2012-06-01

    Gelastic seizures are classically associated with hypothalamic hamartoma. The most effective treatment for gelastic epilepsy is surgery, although confirming that a hypothalamic hamartoma is an epileptic lesion prior to surgical intervention is challenging. Here, we report the case of a patient with a hypothalamic hamartoma who was diagnosed with psychogenic non-epileptic gelastic seizures using video-EEG monitoring. [Published with video sequences].

  8. Affordable Cyclic Voltammetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Greg; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Amend, John R.; Collins, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is an important component of the undergraduate chemical curriculum. Unfortunately, undergraduate students rarely have the opportunity to conduct experiments in cyclic voltammetry owing to the high cost of potentiostats, which are required to control these experiments. By using MicroLab data acquisition interfaces in conjunction…

  9. Affordable Cyclic Voltammetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Greg; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Amend, John R.; Collins, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is an important component of the undergraduate chemical curriculum. Unfortunately, undergraduate students rarely have the opportunity to conduct experiments in cyclic voltammetry owing to the high cost of potentiostats, which are required to control these experiments. By using MicroLab data acquisition interfaces in conjunction…

  10. Designing cyclic universe models.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Justin; Steinhardt, Paul J; Turok, Neil

    2004-01-23

    The phenomenological constraints on the scalar field potential in cyclic models of the Universe are presented. We show that cyclic models require a comparable degree of tuning to that needed for inflationary models. The constraints are reduced to a set of simple design rules including "fast-roll" parameters analogous to the "slow-roll" parameters in inflation.

  11. Cyclic Hematopoiesis: animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.B.; Lange, R.D.

    1983-08-01

    The four existing animal models of cyclic hematopoiesis are briefly described. The unusual erythropoietin (Ep) responses of the W/Wv mouse, the Sl/Sld mouse, and cyclic hematopoietic dog are reviewed. The facts reviewed indicate that the bone marrow itself is capable of influencing regulatory events of hematopoiesis.

  12. The role of tanycytes in hypothalamic glucosensing

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Cortes-Campos, Christian; Barahona, Maria J; Oyarce, Karina A; Carril, Claudio A; García-Robles, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Tanycytes are elongated hypothalamic glial cells that cover the basal walls of the third ventricle; their apical regions contact the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and their processes reach hypothalamic neuronal nuclei that control the energy status of an organism. These nuclei maintain the balance between energy expenditure and intake, integrating several peripheral signals and triggering cellular responses that modify the feeding behaviour and peripheral glucose homeostasis. One of the most important and well-studied signals that control this process is glucose; however, the mechanism by which this molecule is sensed remains unknown. We along with others have proposed that tanycytes play a key role in this process, transducing changes in CSF glucose concentration to the neurons that control energy status. Recent studies have demonstrated the expression and function of monocarboxylate transporters and canonical pancreatic β cell glucose sensing molecules, including glucose transporter 2 and glucokinase, in tanycytes. These and other data, which will be discussed in this review, suggest that hypothalamic glucosensing is mediated through a metabolic interaction between tanycytes and neurons through lactate. This article will summarize the recent evidence that supports the importance of tanycytes in hypothalamic glucosensing, and discuss the possible mechanisms involved in this process. Finally, it is important to highlight that a detailed analysis of this mechanism could represent an opportunity to understand the evolution of associated pathologies, including diabetes and obesity, and identify new candidates for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26081217

  13. Hyperprolactinemia from radiation-induced hypothalamic hypopituitarism

    SciTech Connect

    Corkill, G.; Hanson, F.W.; Gold, E.M.; White, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    In 1975 Samaan et al., described the effects of radiation damage of the hypothalamus in 15 patients with head and neck cancer. Shalet et al., in 1977 described endocrine morbidity in adults who as children had been irradiated for brain tumors. This report describes instances of hyperprolactinemia and associated hypothalamic, pituitary, and thyroid dysfunction following irradiation of a young adult female for brain neoplasia.

  14. Gelastic seizures: not always hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christina S; Parrent, Andrew G; Burneo, Jorge G

    2007-12-01

    Gelastic seizures are often associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. However, focal cortical dysplasias can also cause "laughing seizures", and such cases can be difficult to localize with EEG. This case report presents a 29-year-old woman who was successfully rendered free of gelastic seizures after resection of a frontal cortical dysplasia, localized through MRI and SPECT imaging.[Published with video sequences].

  15. Flatfish metamorphosis: a hypothalamic independent process?

    PubMed

    Campinho, Marco A; Silva, Nadia; Roman-Padilla, Javier; Ponce, Marian; Manchado, Manuel; Power, Deborah M

    2015-03-15

    Anuran and flatfish metamorphosis are tightly regulated by thyroid hormones that are the necessary and sufficient factors that drive this developmental event. In the present study whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) and quantitative PCR in sole are used to explore the central regulation of flatfish metamorphosis. Central regulation of the thyroid in vertebrates is mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Teleosts diverge from other vertebrates as hypothalamic regulation in the HPT axis is proposed to be through hypothalamic inhibition although the regulatory factor remains enigmatic. The dynamics of the HPT axis during sole metamorphosis revealed integration between the activity of the thyrotrophes in the pituitary and the thyroid follicles. No evidence was found supporting a role for thyroid releasing hormone (trh) or corticotrophin releasing hormone (crh) in hypothalamic control of TH production during sole metamorphosis. Intriguingly the results of the present study suggest that neither hypothalamic trh nor crh expression changes during sole metamorphosis and raises questions about the role of these factors and the hypothalamus in regulation of thyrotrophs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Immunoglobulin therapy in idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Huppke, Peter; Heise, Alexander; Rostasy, Kevin; Huppke, Brenda; Gärtner, Jutta

    2009-09-01

    Idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction is a rare disorder presenting at age 3-7 years. Severe hypothalamic and brainstem dysfunction leads to death in 25% of patients. The disease is presumed to be autoimmune, or in some cases paraneoplastic. No successful treatment has been reported. Patient V. developed hyperphagia, hypersomnia, and extreme aggression at age 7 years, accompanied by episodes of hyperthermia, hypothermia, sinus bradycardia, hypernatremia, hyponatremia, persistent hyperprolactinemia, hypothyroidism, and growth-hormone deficiency. At age 9 years, a diagnosis of idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction was rendered, and immunoglobulin therapy was commenced. Nine courses of immunoglobulins, at a dose of 2 g/kg every 4 weeks, were administered. Reproducible improvements in behavior and no further episodes of hyponatremia or hypernatremia and sinus bradycardia were evident. The endocrinologic abnormalities and poor thermoregulation remained. Administration of immunoglobulins during late stages of idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction led to improvement in some but not all signs. Assuming an autoimmune basis for this disorder, treatment during early stages of disease should be more effective. To facilitate such early treatment, increased awareness of this disorder is necessary, to allow for early diagnosis.

  17. Role of developmental factors in hypothalamic function

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Jakob; Tahor, Maayan; Wircer, Einav; Levkowitz, Gil

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a brain region which regulates homeostasis by mediating endocrine, autonomic and behavioral functions. It is comprised of several nuclei containing distinct neuronal populations producing neuropeptides and neurotransmitters that regulate fundamental body functions including temperature and metabolic rate, thirst and hunger, sexual behavior and reproduction, circadian rhythm, and emotional responses. The identity, number and connectivity of these neuronal populations are established during the organism’s development and are of crucial importance for normal hypothalamic function. Studies have suggested that developmental abnormalities in specific hypothalamic circuits can lead to obesity, sleep disorders, anxiety, depression and autism. At the molecular level, the development of the hypothalamus is regulated by transcription factors (TF), secreted growth factors, neuropeptides and their receptors. Recent studies in zebrafish and mouse have demonstrated that some of these molecules maintain their expression in the adult brain and subsequently play a role in the physiological functions that are regulated by hypothalamic neurons. Here, we summarize the involvement of some of the key developmental factors in hypothalamic development and function by focusing on the mouse and zebrafish genetic model organisms. PMID:25954163

  18. Hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, Mauricio D.; Thaler, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Purpose of review Hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis are recently discovered mechanisms that may contribute to obesity pathogenesis. Current research in this area suggests that investigation of these CNS responses may provide opportunities to develop new weight loss treatments. Recent findings In rodents, hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis occur rapidly with high-fat diet consumption prior to significant weight gain. In addition, sensitivity or resistance to diet-induced obesity in rodents generally correlates with the presence or absence of hypothalamic inflammation and reactive gliosis (brain response to injury). Moreover, functional interventions that increase or decrease inflammation in neurons and glia correspondingly alter diet-associated weight gain. However, some conflicting data have recently emerged that question the contribution of hypothalamic inflammation to obesity pathogenesis. However, several studies have detected gliosis and disrupted connectivity in obese humans, highlighting the potential translational importance of this mechanism. Summary There is growing evidence that obesity is associated with brain inflammation in humans, particularly in the hypothalamus where its presence may disrupt body weight control and glucose homeostasis. More work is needed to determine whether this response is common in human obesity and to what extent it can be manipulated for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26192704

  19. Faecal progesterone metabolites and behavioural observations for the non-invasive assessment of oestrous cycles in the common wombat (Vombatus ursinus) and the southern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus latifrons).

    PubMed

    Paris, M C J; White, A; Reiss, A; West, M; Schwarzenberger, F

    2002-08-15

    Wombats belong to Australia's unique marsupial species. Two of the three remaining species, the common wombat (Vombatus ursinus) and the southern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus latifrons) are abundant. The third species, the northern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus krefftii) has only about 115 individuals left in the wild. This study aimed to gain further insight into the basic reproductive biology of wombat species and evaluate the value of faecal progesterone metabolites and behavioural patterns as a means for non-invasive monitoring of the oestrous cycle in common and the southern hairy-nosed wombats. In an initial study, three different faecal steroid assays showed that 20alpha-OH-pregnanes were the main progesterone metabolites. These metabolites were examined in captive female common wombats (n = 5) and southern hairy-nosed wombats (n = 2). In one female common wombat 11.7 days with a follicular phase of 25.6 +/- 6.3 days and a luteal phase of 28.2 +/- 12.7 days. The data for faecal pregnanes obtained in the southern and in one male common wombat oestrous related behavioural data were obtained. Individual cycling females exhibited a significant relationship between plasma progesterone and faecal pregnanes. In the common wombat, the values for faecal pregnanes showed an oestrous cycle length of 55.1 +/- hairy-nosed wombat during the breeding season gave an oestrous cycle length of 41.1 +/- 12.8 days with a follicular phase of 27.9 +/- 12.3 days and a short luteal phase of 13.3 +/- 1.1 days. The behavioural data show that the faecal sniffing behaviour of the male, tended to increase around the time that oestrous was found. In conclusion, monitoring of 20alpha-OH-pregnanes in wombat faeces could be a useful methodology to monitor reproductive cycles in the wombat, and can possibly be applied to monitor the endangered northern hairy-nosed wombat.

  20. The localization of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in the endometrium and the cervix of dogs at different stages of the oestrous cycle and with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Chotimanukul, S; Sirivaidyapong, S

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to localize and evaluate the role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in the endometrium and cervix of bitches at different stages of the oestrous cycle and in bitches with pyometra. Sixty-seven nulliparous dogs, ranging in age from 1 to 13 years, were allocated amongst five groups (pro-oestrus; n = 7, oestrus; n = 10, dioestrus; n = 16, anoestrus; n = 11, pyometra; n = 23). Blood samples were collected for the measurement of progesterone concentration. The mean progesterone concentration was analysed as a parameter for validating the stage of the oestrous cycle in bitches. Tissues collected from uterine horn and cervix were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde for immunohistochemical examination of TLR2. The expression of TLR2 was assessed semi-quantitatively. No pathological changes were found in the uterine samples of healthy dogs. In bitches with pyometra, the glandular epithelium expressed TLR2 more intensely than the surface epithelium. The expression of TLR2 in the glandular epithelium was also significantly higher in healthy dogs at oestrus, dioestrus and dogs with pyometra compared with anoestrous dogs (p < 0.01). The expression of TLR2 in the stroma was not observed in the group of healthy dogs at all stages. The surface epithelium of cervix in dogs with pyometra expressed TLR2 significantly more intensely than did the stoma, whereas the expression of TLR2 during oestrus and dioestrus was absent in the stroma of cervix. This study provides the first report of immunohistochemical localization of TLR2 in the canine reproductive tract. In the present study, TLR2 was expressed in endometrial epithelium but was absent in the endometrial stroma of healthy dogs at all oestrous cycle stages. These findings suggest differential expression of TLR in endometrial cells. On the other hand, the lack of TLR2 in the stroma of healthy uteri of dogs may predispose to infection from the invading pathogens once the epithelial cells have been destroyed by the

  1. Treatment of unobserved oestrus in a dairy cattle herd with low oestrous detection rate up to 60 days post-partum.

    PubMed

    Mateus, L; da Costa, L Lopes; Cardos, J J Alfaro; Silva, J Robalo

    2002-02-01

    The efficiency of treatments for unobserved oestrus and their effect on the reproductive performance of a dairy cattle herd with low oestrous detection rate till 60 days post-partum (dpp), attributed to the declivous and slippery concrete floor were investigated. The herdsman requested advice in order to improve the mean days open of the herd, but no investments were allowed because a new unit was about to be built. Due to the low oestrus detection rate of the herd, the breeding policy was to inseminate at the first detected post-partum oestrus. Cows were examined at 20-30 dpp to assess uterine involution, ovarian activity and prevalence of reproductive disorders and, at 60 dpp if no previous oestrus was detected. Each examination included palpation per rectum, ultrasound scanning and collection of a blood sample for plasma progesterone (P4) measurement. Cows with unobserved oestrus till 60 dpp were allocated either to a treatment group (n=139) or to a control group (n=139). Three treatments were used: (a) injection of PGF(2 alpha) (PG) upon detection of a corpus luteum (CL; n = 30), cows not observed in oestrus being re-injected 11-12 days later. AI was at oestrus; (b) PRID (n=35) or Crestar (n=74) devices kept in situ for 12 and 9 days, respectively, were associated to an injection of PG and of equine chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) at device removal. Cows were double-fixed time-inseminated at 48 and 72 h after device removal. All treated cows were examined at 48-72 h after treatment to confirm oestrus. The percentage of cows detected in oestrus up to 60 dpp remained unchanged through the trial (35 and 47% for years before intervention: 1994-95; 51 and 48% for years of intervention: 1996-97). In contrast, the oestrous detection rate was high both in treated (93%) and control (100%) cows. This possibly resulted from an improvement in the oestrous detection efficiency of the herd's personnel and from examination of cows at 48-72 h after treatment. Treated and control

  2. Effects of graded doses of the pesticide heptachlor on body weight, mating success, oestrous cycle, gestation length and litter size in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Oduma, J A; Wango, E O; Makawiti, D W; Einer-Jensen, N; Oduor-Okelo, D

    1995-02-01

    Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with 5 or 20 mg/kg body weight heptachlor solution every other day for up to 18 days. They were weighed every day and the stage of oestrus determined by vaginal smears. One experimental group was mated and pregnancy characteristics studied. Heptachlor affected body weights, cycle patterns, length of gestation period and litter sizes in a dose-related manner. At a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, heptachlor caused a significant decrease in average body weight (P < 0.01), disrupted and/or prolonged oestrous cycles, decreased mating success (P < 0.001), slightly increased gestation length (P < 0.05) and decreased litter size (P < 0.01).

  3. Cyclic control stick

    DOEpatents

    Whitaker, Charles N.; Zimmermann, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclic control stick of the type used in helicopters for reducing the safety hazards associated with such a mechanism in the event of a crewman being thrown violently into contact with the cyclic control stick resulting from a crash or the like. The cyclic control stick is configured to break away upon the exertion of an impact force which exceeds a predetermined value and/or is exerted for more than a momentary time duration. The cyclic control stick is also configured to be adjustable so as to locate the grip thereof as far away from the crewman as possible for safety reasons without comprising the comfort of the crewman or the use of the control stick, and a crushable pad is provided on the top of the grip for impact energy absorbing purposes.

  4. Cyclic steps on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokawa, M.; Izumi, N.; Naito, K.; Parker, G.; Yamada, T.; Greve, R.

    2016-05-01

    Boundary waves often form at the interface between ice and fluid flowing adjacent to it, such as ripples under river ice covers, and steps on the bed of supraglacial meltwater channels. They may also be formed by wind, such as the megadunes on the Antarctic ice sheet. Spiral troughs on the polar ice caps of Mars have been interpreted to be cyclic steps formed by katabatic wind blowing over ice. Cyclic steps are relatives of upstream-migrating antidunes. Cyclic step formation on ice is not only a mechanical but also a thermodynamic process. There have been very few studies on the formation of either cyclic steps or upstream-migrating antidunes on ice. In this study, we performed flume experiments to reproduce cyclic steps on ice by flowing water, and found that trains of steps form when the Froude number is larger than unity. The features of those steps allow them to be identified as ice-bed analogs of cyclic steps in alluvial and bedrock rivers. We performed a linear stability analysis and obtained a physical explanation of the formation of upstream-migrating antidunes, i.e., precursors of cyclic steps. We compared the results of experiments with the predictions of the analysis and found the observed steps fall in the range where the analysis predicts interfacial instability. We also found that short antidune-like undulations formed as a precursor to the appearance of well-defined steps. This fact suggests that such antidune-like undulations correspond to the instability predicted by the analysis and are precursors of cyclic steps.

  5. Cyclic polymers from alkynes.

    PubMed

    Roland, Christopher D; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A; Wagener, Kenneth B; Veige, Adam S

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer.

  6. Cyclic polymers from alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christopher D.; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A.; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Veige, Adam S.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer.

  7. Developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems.

    PubMed

    Ralevski, Alexandra; Horvath, Tamas L

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that the perinatal environment may alter the developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems in a manner that predisposes offspring to the development of metabolic syndrome. Although it is unclear how these effects might be mediated, it has been shown that changes in neuroendocrine programing during critical periods of development, either via maternal metabolic programming or other factors, can alter a fetus's metabolic fate. This review summarizes the hypothalamic circuits that mediate energy homeostasis and discusses the various factors that may influence the development and functioning of these neural systems, as well as the possible cognitive impairments that may arise as a result of these metabolic influences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Organisation of the human dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Koutcherov, Yuri; Mai, Juergen K; Ashwell, Ken W; Paxinos, George

    2004-01-19

    This study used acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry to reveal the organization of the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DM) in the human. Topographically, the human DM is similar to DM in the monkey and rat. It is wedged between the paraventricular nucleus, dorsally, and the ventromedial nucleus, ventrally. Laterally, DM borders the lateral hypothalamic area while medially it approaches the 3rd ventricle. The AChE staining distinguished two subcompartments of the human DM: the larger diffuse and the smaller compact DM. The subcompartmental organization of the human DM appears homologous to that found in the monkey and less complex than that reported in rats. Understanding of the organization of DM creates meaningful anatomical reference for physiological and pharmacological studies in the human hypothalamus.

  9. Hypothalamic Survival Circuits: Blueprints for Purposive Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Sternson, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Neural processes that direct an animal’s actions toward environmental goals are critical elements for understanding behavior. The hypothalamus is closely associated with motivated behaviors required for survival and reproduction. Intense feeding, drinking, aggressive, and sexual behaviors can be produced by a simple neuronal stimulus applied to discrete hypothalamic regions. What can these “evoked behaviors” teach us about the neural processes that determine behavioral intent and intensity? Small populations of neurons sufficient to evoke a complex motivated behavior may be used as entry points to identify circuits that energize and direct behavior to specific goals. Here, I review recent applications of molecular genetic, optogenetic, and pharmacogenetic approaches that overcome previous limitations for analyzing anatomically complex hypothalamic circuits and their interactions with the rest of the brain. These new tools have the potential to bridge the gaps between neurobiological and psychological thinking about the mechanisms of complex motivated behavior. PMID:23473313

  10. Hypothalamic NUCKS regulates peripheral glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Beiying; Shi, Xiaohe; Zhou, Qiling; Chen, Hui Shan; Lim, Joy; Han, Weiping; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate (NUCKS) is highly expressed in the brain and peripheral metabolic organs, and regulates transcription of a number of genes involved in insulin signalling. Whole-body depletion of NUCKS (NKO) in mice leads to obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. However, a tissue-specific contribution of NUCKS to the observed phenotypes remains unknown. Considering the pivotal roles of insulin signalling in the brain, especially in the hypothalamus, we examined the functions of hypothalamic NUCKS in the regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism. Insulin signalling in the hypothalamus was impaired in the NKO mice when insulin was delivered through intracerebroventricular injection. To validate the hypothalamic specificity, we crossed transgenic mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the Nkx2.1 promoter with floxed NUCKS mice to generate mice with hypothalamus-specific deletion of NUCKS (HNKO). We fed the HNKO and littermate control mice with a normal chow diet (NCD) and a high-fat diet (HFD), and assessed glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and metabolic parameters. HNKO mice showed mild glucose intolerance under an NCD, but exacerbated obesity and insulin resistance phenotypes under an HFD. In addition, NUCKS regulated levels of insulin receptor in the brain. Unlike HNKO mice, mice with immune-cell-specific deletion of NUCKS (VNKO) did not develop obesity or insulin-resistant phenotypes under an HFD. These studies indicate that hypothalamic NUCKS plays an essential role in regulating glucose homoeostasis and insulin signalling in vivo. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  11. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways.

  12. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and the regulation of appetite.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jennifer A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2012-07-01

    Neuropeptides released by hypothalamic neurons play a major role in the regulation of feeding, acting both within the hypothalamus, and at other appetite regulating centres throughout the brain. Where classical neurotransmitters signal only within synapses, neuropeptides diffuse over greater distances affecting both nearby and distant neurons expressing the relevant receptors, which are often extrasynaptic. As well as triggering a behavioural output, neuropeptides also act as neuromodulators: altering the response of neurons to both neurotransmitters and circulating signals of nutrient status. The mechanisms of action of hypothalamic neuropeptides with established roles in feeding, including melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), the orexins, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), agouti-gene related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y, and oxytocin, are reviewed in this article, with emphasis laid on both their effects on appetite regulating centres throughout the brain, and on examining the evidence for their physiological roles. In addition, evidence for the involvement of several putative appetite regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides is assessed including, ghrelin, cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), neuropeptide W and the galanin-like peptides. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central control of Food Intake'.

  13. Leptin signaling in astrocytes regulates hypothalamic neuronal circuits and feeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Geun; Suyama, Shigetomo; Koch, Marco; Jin, Sungho; Argente-Arizon, Pilar; Argente, Jesús; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Zimmer, Marcelo R; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Gao, Yuanqing; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Yi, Chun-Xia; Salmaso, Natalina; Vaccarino, Flora M; Chowen, Julie; Diano, Sabrina; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Tschöp, Matthias H; Horvath, Tamas L

    2014-07-01

    We found that leptin receptors were expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes and that their conditional deletion led to altered glial morphology and synaptic inputs onto hypothalamic neurons involved in feeding control. Leptin-regulated feeding was diminished, whereas feeding after fasting or ghrelin administration was elevated in mice with astrocyte-specific leptin receptor deficiency. These data reveal an active role of glial cells in hypothalamic synaptic remodeling and control of feeding by leptin.

  14. Hypothalamic AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates Glucose Production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Clair S.; Lam, Carol K.L.; Chari, Madhu; Cheung, Grace W.C.; Kokorovic, Andrea; Gao, Sun; Leclerc, Isabelle; Rutter, Guy A.; Lam, Tony K.T.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The fuel sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the hypothalamus regulates energy homeostasis by sensing nutritional and hormonal signals. However, the role of hypothalamic AMPK in glucose production regulation remains to be elucidated. We hypothesize that bidirectional changes in hypothalamic AMPK activity alter glucose production. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS To introduce bidirectional changes in hypothalamic AMPK activity in vivo, we first knocked down hypothalamic AMPK activity in male Sprague-Dawley rats by either injecting an adenovirus expressing the dominant-negative form of AMPK (Ad-DN AMPKα2 [D157A]) or infusing AMPK inhibitor compound C directly into the mediobasal hypothalamus. Next, we independently activated hypothalamic AMPK by delivering either an adenovirus expressing the constitutive active form of AMPK (Ad-CA AMPKα1312 [T172D]) or the AMPK activator AICAR. The pancreatic (basal insulin)-euglycemic clamp technique in combination with the tracer-dilution methodology was used to assess the impact of alternations in hypothalamic AMPK activity on changes in glucose kinetics in vivo. RESULTS Injection of Ad-DN AMPK into the hypothalamus knocked down hypothalamic AMPK activity and led to a significant suppression of glucose production with no changes in peripheral glucose uptake during the clamps. In parallel, hypothalamic infusion of AMPK inhibitor compound C lowered glucose production as well. Conversely, molecular and pharmacological activation of hypothalamic AMPK negated the ability of hypothalamic nutrients to lower glucose production. CONCLUSIONS These data indicate that changes in hypothalamic AMPK activity are sufficient and necessary for hypothalamic nutrient-sensing mechanisms to alter glucose production in vivo. PMID:20682691

  15. Regulation of the Immune System by Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    AD-All? 395 REGULATION OF THE IMMUNE SYSTEM DY HYPOTHALAMIC 1/1 RELEASING HORMONES (U) TEXAS UNIV MEDICAL BRANCH AT GALVESTON E M SMITH S1 NOV 6? fW...441F004 11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) Regulation of the Immune System by Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Eric M. Smith...34Hypothalamic releasing hormones , stress, immune system,. L08 ACTH, endorphins, corticosteroids, monokines, neuroimmunomodulation *’" . - " - 19 ABSTRACT

  16. The cyclic reduction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Dario; Meini, Beatrice

    2009-05-01

    Cyclic reduction is an algorithm invented by G.H. Golub and R. W. Hockney in the mid 1960s for solving linear systems related to the finite differences discretization of the Poisson equation over a rectangle. Among the algorithms of Gene Golub, it is one of the most versatile and powerful ever created. Recently, it has been applied to solve different problems from different applicative areas. In this paper we survey the main features of cyclic reduction, relate it to properties of analytic functions, recall its extension to solving more general finite and infinite linear systems, and different kinds of nonlinear matrix equations, including algebraic Riccati equations, with applications to Markov chains, queueing models and transport theory. Some new results concerning the convergence properties of cyclic reduction and its applicability are proved under very weak assumptions. New formulae for overcoming breakdown are provided.

  17. Cyclic membrane separation process

    DOEpatents

    Bowser, John

    2004-04-13

    A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In one of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the other part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. Ambient air is charged to the membrane separation unit during the latter part of the cycle.

  18. Cyclic membrane separation process

    DOEpatents

    Nemser, Stuart M.

    2005-05-03

    A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In the first part of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the second part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. In one aspect of this invention, a vacuum is drawn in the membrane separation unit thus reducing overall VOC emissions.

  19. Hypothalamic glucose sensing: making ends meet

    PubMed Central

    Routh, Vanessa H.; Hao, Lihong; Santiago, Ammy M.; Sheng, Zhenyu; Zhou, Chunxue

    2014-01-01

    The neuroendocrine system governs essential survival and homeostatic functions. For example, growth is needed for development, thermoregulation maintains optimal core temperature in a changing environment, and reproduction ensures species survival. Stress and immune responses enable an organism to overcome external and internal threats while the circadian system regulates arousal and sleep such that vegetative and active functions do not overlap. All of these functions require a significant portion of the body's energy. As the integrator of the neuroendocrine system, the hypothalamus carefully assesses the energy status of the body in order to appropriately partition resources to provide for each system without compromising the others. While doing so the hypothalamus must ensure that adequate glucose levels are preserved for brain function since glucose is the primary fuel of the brain. To this end, the hypothalamus contains specialized glucose sensing neurons which are scattered throughout the nuclei controlling distinct neuroendocrine functions. We hypothesize that these neurons play a key role in enabling the hypothalamus to partition energy to meet these peripheral survival needs without endangering the brain's glucose supply. This review will first describe the varied mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in neurons within discrete hypothalamic nuclei. We will then evaluate the way in which peripheral energy status regulates glucose sensitivity. For example, during energy deficit such as fasting specific hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons become sensitized to decreased glucose. This increases the gain of the information relay when glucose availability is a greater concern for the brain. Finally, changes in glucose sensitivity under pathological conditions (e.g., recurrent insulin-hypoglycemia, diabetes) will be addressed. The overall goal of this review is to place glucose sensing neurons within the context of hypothalamic control of neuroendocrine function

  20. Cyclic Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Remesic, Michael; Lee, Yeon Sun; Hruby, Victor J

    2016-01-01

    For decades the opioid receptors have been an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Since the first discovery of enkephalin, approximately a dozen endogenous opioid peptides have been known to produce opioid activity and analgesia, but their therapeutics have been limited mainly due to low blood brain barrier penetration and poor resistance to proteolytic degradation. One versatile approach to overcome these drawbacks is the cyclization of linear peptides to cyclic peptides with constrained topographical structure. Compared to their linear parents, cyclic analogs exhibit better metabolic stability, lower offtarget toxicity, and improved bioavailability. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies have uncovered promising compounds for the treatment of pain as well as further elucidate structural elements required for selective opioid receptor activity. The benefits that come with employing cyclization can be further enhanced through the generation of polycyclic derivatives. Opioid ligands generally have a short peptide chain and thus the realm of polycyclic peptides has yet to be explored. In this review, a brief history of designing ligands for the opioid receptors, including classic linear and cyclic ligands, is discussed along with recent approaches and successes of cyclic peptide ligands for the receptors. Various scaffolds and approaches to improve bioavailability are elaborated and concluded with a discourse towards polycyclic peptides.

  1. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Benschoten, James J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-part experiment designed to introduce cyclic voltammetry to graduate/undergraduate students. Part 1 demonstrates formal reduction potential, redox electron transfer, diffusion coefficient, and electrochemical reversibility. Part 2 investigates electrochemical behavior of acetaminophen. Part 3 examines such experimental variables…

  2. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Benschoten, James J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-part experiment designed to introduce cyclic voltammetry to graduate/undergraduate students. Part 1 demonstrates formal reduction potential, redox electron transfer, diffusion coefficient, and electrochemical reversibility. Part 2 investigates electrochemical behavior of acetaminophen. Part 3 examines such experimental variables…

  3. Hypothalamic control of sleep in aging.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Asya

    2012-09-01

    The timing of sleep and its duration are affected by circadian and homeostatic factors. Physiological and behavioral attributes such as the duration of previous wake period, food availability, temperature, and stress all affect sleep and its quality. As many of these physiological inputs are integrated in the hypothalamus, it is not surprising that this brain structure plays a crucial role in the regulation of sleep. I will discuss this role also in the context of aging, which is associated with changes in both hypothalamic function and the composition of sleep.

  4. Severe hyponatremia caused by hypothalamic adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Shibata, T; Oeda, T; Saito, Y

    1999-05-01

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted with severe hyponatremia. Basal values of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), thyroid hormone and cortisol were normal on admission. Impairment of water diuresis was observed by water loading test. Initially, we diagnosed her condition as the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). By provocation test, we finally confirmed that the hyponatremia was caused by hypothalamic adrenal insufficiency. The basal values of ACTH and cortisol might not be sufficient to exclude the possibility of adrenal insufficiency. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate adrenal function by provocation test or to re-evaluate it after recovery from hyponatremia.

  5. Expression and localization of gap junctional connexins 26 and 43 in bovine periovulatory follicles and in corpus luteum during different functional stages of oestrous cycle and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Berisha, B; Bridger, P; Toth, A; Kliem, H; Meyer, H H D; Schams, D; Pfarrer, C

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the regulation of connexins (Cx26 and Cx43) in the bovine ovary (experiment 1-3). Experiment 1: ovaries containing preovulatory follicles or corpora lutea (CL) were collected at 0, 4, 10, 20, 25 (follicles) and 60 h (CL) relative to injection of GnRH. Experiment 2: CL were assigned to the following stages: days 1-2, 3-4, 5-7, 8-12, 13-16, >18 (after regression) of oestrous cycle and of early and late pregnancy (<4 and >4 months). Experiment 3: induced luteolysis, cows on days 8-12 were injected with PGF2alpha analogue (Cloprostenol), and CL were collected by transvaginal ovariectomy before and 0.5, 2, 4, 12, 24, 48 and 64 h after PGF2alpha injection. Real-time RT-PCR was applied to investigate mRNA expression and immunofluorescence was utilized for protein localization. Cx26 mRNA increased rapidly 4 h after GnRH injection (during LH surge) and decreased afterwards during the whole experimental period. Cx43 mRNA expression decreased continuously after GnRH application. Cx26 mRNA in CL increased significantly in the second part of oestrous cycle and after regression. In contrast, the highest mRNA expression for Cx43 in CL was detected during the early luteal phase. After induced luteolysis the mRNA expression of Cx26 increased significantly at 24 h. As shown by immunofluorescence, Cx26 was predominantly localized in the connective tissue and blood vessels of bovine CL, whereas Cx43 was present in the luteal cells and blood vessels. This resulted in a strong increase of Cx26 expression during the late luteal phase and after luteal regression. Subsequently, Cx43 expression was distinctly decreased after luteal regression. These data suggest that Cx26 and Cx43 are involved in the local cellular mechanisms participating in tissue remodelling during the critical time around periovulation as well as during CL formation (angiogenesis), function and regression in the bovine ovary.

  6. Plasma progesterone, oestradiol-17β and total oestrogen profiles in relation to oestrous behaviour during induced ovulation in Murrah buffalo heifers.

    PubMed

    Roy, K S; Prakash, B S

    2009-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish the characteristics of oestrous behaviour in Ovsynch (induction of ovulation through administration of GnRH-PGF2-GnRH in a systemic manner on 0, seventh and ninth day respectively) and Ovsynch plus Norprolac (Quinagolide hydrochloride – an inhibitor of prolactin secretion) treated Murrah buffalo heifers and to determine the relationships between this behaviour and the plasma concentrations of oestradiol-17β (E2), total oestrogen, and progesterone. Oestrus was detected by visual observations of oestrus signs, per rectal examination of genitalia and bull parading thrice a day during treatment period. Among all the symptoms, it was observed that bull mounting of heifers in oestrus was highest. Examination of genital tracts per rectum revealed that the cervix was relaxed, uterus was turgid and ovaries had palpable follicle in animals with oestrus. The peak concentrations of E2 (10.81 ± 0.62 pg/ml) and total oestrogen (17.11 ± 1.21 pg/ml) occurred at 9.45 ± 0.85 and 9.64 ± 0.93 h after second GnRH administration, respectively, in Ovsynch treated animals. However, the peak levels of E2 (20.02 ± 2.87 pg/ml) and total oestrogen (32.71 ± 3.15 pg/ml) occurred at 10.18 ± 0.50 and 10.36 ± 0.75 h after second GnRH administration, respectively, in Ovsynch plus Norprolac treated animals. Plasma progesterone concentration was basal (0.20 ± 0.001 ng/ml) during the peri-oestrus period. The plasma progesterone concentration was the lowest on the day of oestrus and increased to register a peak on day 13 ± 2 of the cycle. Oestrous behaviour was positively correlated with the peak concentration of E2 (p < 0.001) and total oestrogen (p < 0.001) during the peri-oestrus period. Inhibition of prolactin by Norprolac administration significantly increased the concentration of E2 and total oestrogen during oestrus in buffaloes in comparison to those recorded in animals subjected to Ovsynch protocol alone. In conclusion, our results

  7. Plasma luteinizing hormone and progesterone in the adult female pig during the oestrous cycles, late pregnancy and lactation, and after ovariectomy and pentobarbitone treatment.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, N; Elsaesser, F; Smidt, D; Ellendorff, F

    1976-05-01

    In a series of experiments on female miniature pigs, the pattern of plasma LH and progesterone levels during the oestrous cycle, late pregnancy and lactation and after ovariectomy were characterized, and the effect of pentobarbitone treatment was tested. The preovulatory surge of LH occurred in seven out of eight animals between 00.00 and 12.0 h on day 0 of the oestrous cycle (day 1 of standing heat). Plasma progesterone strated to decline 8 days before oestrus and reached its lowest value 5 days before the preovulatory LH peak. Increases in progesteron concentration were already noticeable 48 h after the LH surge. During late pregnancy, parturition and lactation, plasma LH was low and showed only minor fluctuations, while plasma progesterone declined 4 to 5 days before parturition. Both hormones remained at low levels throughout lactation. Three weeks before parturition increases in LH were always followed by an increase in progesterone. This dependency was greatly diminished immediately before delivery. Four to 12 days after weaning the animals came into oestrus which was followed by an increase in LH and later an increase in progesterone concentrations. Ovariectomy during dioestrus resulted in a steady increase in plasma LH levels of 35-39 days. Ovariectomy caused abortion if performed on day 100 of pregnancy. It was followed by a rapid increase of plasma LH concentration. Normal parturition (around day 115) and lactation took place when animals were spayed on day 112 of pregnancy. In this case, plasma LH levels remained even lower than before ovariectomy as long as lactation was maintained. Immediately after weaning a rapid increase in the normal postovariectomy pattern of LH secretion was observed. Pentobarbitone anaesthesia (30-35 mg/kg body wt, initial dose), during pro-oestrusoestrus, for less than 5 h had no effect on the preovulatory LH increase. However, pentobarbitone anaesthesia for more than 6 h inhibitied the LH peak and ovulation if the animal was

  8. Cyclic networks of quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabauy, Peter

    In this thesis we first give an introduction to the basic aspects of quantum computation followed by an analysis of networks of quantum logic gates where the qubit lines are loops (cyclic). Thus far, investigations into cyclic networks of quantum logic gates have not been examined (as far as we know) by the quantum information community. In our investigations of cyclic quantum networks we have studied simple, one and two qubit systems. The analysis includes: classifying networks into groups, the dynamics of the qubits in a cyclic quantum network, and the perturbation effects of an external qubit acting on a cyclic quantum network. The analysis will be followed by a discussion on quantum algorithms and quantum information processing with cyclic quantum networks, a novel implementation of a cyclic network quantum memory and a discussion of quantum sensors via cyclic quantum networks.

  9. Giant solid-cystic hypothalamic hamartoma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Dorfer, Christian; Kasprian, Gregor; Mühlebner, Angelika; Czech, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas are rare lesions for which different classification schemes have been proposed. The authors report on an exceptionally large solid-cystic hamartoma that led to hydrocephalus, precocious puberty, and intractable gelastic seizures. They discuss potential mechanisms of the development of hypothalamic hamartomas.

  10. Lef1-dependent hypothalamic neurogenesis inhibits anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuanyuan; Panahi, Samin; Gaynes, John A.; Watters, Harrison N.; Zhou, Dingxi; Xue, Hai-Hui; Fung, Camille M.; Levine, Edward M.; Letsou, Anthea; Brennan, K. C.

    2017-01-01

    While innate behaviors are conserved throughout the animal kingdom, it is unknown whether common signaling pathways regulate the development of neuronal populations mediating these behaviors in diverse organisms. Here, we demonstrate that the Wnt/ß-catenin effector Lef1 is required for the differentiation of anxiolytic hypothalamic neurons in zebrafish and mice, although the identity of Lef1-dependent genes and neurons differ between these 2 species. We further show that zebrafish and Drosophila have common Lef1-dependent gene expression in their respective neuroendocrine organs, consistent with a conserved pathway that has diverged in the mouse. Finally, orthologs of Lef1-dependent genes from both zebrafish and mouse show highly correlated hypothalamic expression in marmosets and humans, suggesting co-regulation of 2 parallel anxiolytic pathways in primates. These findings demonstrate that during evolution, a transcription factor can act through multiple mechanisms to generate a common behavioral output, and that Lef1 regulates circuit development that is fundamentally important for mediating anxiety in a wide variety of animal species. PMID:28837622

  11. Hypothalamic Leucine Metabolism Regulates Liver Glucose Production

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ya; Lam, Tony K.T.; He, Wu; Pocai, Alessandro; Bryan, Joseph; Aguilar-Bryan, Lydia; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids profoundly affect insulin action and glucose metabolism in mammals. Here, we investigated the role of the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), a key center involved in nutrient-dependent metabolic regulation. Specifically, we tested the novel hypothesis that the metabolism of leucine within the MBH couples the central sensing of leucine with the control of glucose production by the liver. We performed either central (MBH) or systemic infusions of leucine in Sprague-Dawley male rats during basal pancreatic insulin clamps in combination with various pharmacological and molecular interventions designed to modulate leucine metabolism in the MBH. We also examined the role of hypothalamic ATP-sensitive K+ channels (KATP channels) in the effects of leucine. Enhancing the metabolism of leucine acutely in the MBH lowered blood glucose through a biochemical network that was insensitive to rapamycin but strictly dependent on the hypothalamic metabolism of leucine to α-ketoisocaproic acid and, further, insensitive to acetyl- and malonyl-CoA. Functional KATP channels were also required. Importantly, molecular attenuation of this central sensing mechanism in rats conferred susceptibility to developing hyperglycemia. We postulate that the metabolic sensing of leucine in the MBH is a previously unrecognized mechanism for the regulation of hepatic glucose production required to maintain glucose homeostasis. PMID:22187376

  12. Estrogen Signaling in Hypothalamic Circuits Controling Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Martin J.; Qiu, Jian

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that many of the actions of 17β-estradiol (E2) in the central nervous system are mediated via intracellular receptor/transcription factors that interact with steroid response elements on target genes. However, there is compelling evidence for membrane steroid receptors for estrogen in hypothalamic and other brain neurons. Yet, it is not well understood how estrogen signals via membrane receptors, and how these signals impact not only membrane excitability but also gene transcription in neurons that modulate GnRH neuronal excitability. Indeed, it has been known for sometime that E2 can rapidly alter neuronal activity within seconds, indicating that some cellular effects can occur via membrane delimited events. In addition, E2 can affect second messenger systems including calcium mobilization and a plethora of kinases to alter cell signaling. Therefore, this review will consider our current knowledge of rapid membrane-initiated and intracellular signaling by E2 in hypothalamic neurons critical for reproductive function. PMID:20807512

  13. Activation of the hypothalamic feeding centre upon visual prey detection

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Akira; Lal, Pradeep; Ailani, Deepak; Abe, Gembu; Itoh, Mari; Kawakami, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    The visual system plays a major role in food/prey recognition in diurnal animals, and food intake is regulated by the hypothalamus. However, whether and how visual information about prey is conveyed to the hypothalamic feeding centre is largely unknown. Here we perform real-time imaging of neuronal activity in freely behaving or constrained zebrafish larvae and demonstrate that prey or prey-like visual stimuli activate the hypothalamic feeding centre. Furthermore, we identify prey detector neurons in the pretectal area that project to the hypothalamic feeding centre. Ablation of the pretectum completely abolishes prey capture behaviour and neurotoxin expression in the hypothalamic area also reduces feeding. Taken together, these results suggest that the pretecto-hypothalamic pathway plays a crucial role in conveying visual information to the feeding centre. Thus, this pathway possibly converts visual food detection into feeding motivation in zebrafish. PMID:28425439

  14. Cyclic quantum teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Xuan; Du, Jing; Liu, Si-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Hui

    2017-08-01

    We propose a scheme of cyclic quantum teleportation for three unknown qubits using six-qubit maximally entangled state as the quantum channel. Suppose there are three observers Alice, Bob and Charlie, each of them has been given a quantum system such as a photon or spin-1/2 particle, prepared in state unknown to them. We show how to implement the cyclic quantum teleportation where Alice can transfer her single-qubit state of qubit a to Bob, Bob can transfer his single-qubit state of qubit b to Charlie and Charlie can also transfer his single-qubit state of qubit c to Alice. We can also implement the cyclic quantum teleportation with N≥slant 3 observers by constructing a 2 N-qubit maximally entangled state as the quantum channel. By changing the quantum channel, we can change the direction of teleportation. Therefore, our scheme can realize teleportation in quantum information networks with N observers in different directions, and the security of our scheme is also investigated at the end of the paper.

  15. Metallo-supramolecular cyclic polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Zha, Yongping; Peng, Bo; Chen, Yongming; Tew, Gregory N

    2013-10-30

    Cyclic brush polymers represent an exciting new macromolecular topology. For the first time, this new topology has been combined with metallo-supramolecular interactions to construct novel cyclic brush polymers. Here, ring-expansion metathesis polymerization was used to synthesize a universal cyclic template with a polynorbornene backbone, which was further modified with the metal-chelating synthon terpyridine. The terpyridine side chains served as the key supramolecular unit for the creation of cyclic polymer brushes and gels. This metallo-supramolecular functionality allowed direct visualization of the cyclic brush polymers by transmission electron microscopy for the first time. This demonstration should open a new area in which supramolecular interactions are used to build an array of novel cyclic brush copolymers as well as other cyclic-polymer-based architectures generating new materials.

  16. Hypothalamic inflammation: a double-edged sword to nutritional diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Dongsheng; Liu, Tiewen

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is one of the master regulators of various physiological processes, including energy balance and nutrient metabolism. These regulatory functions are mediated by discrete hypothalamic regions that integrate metabolic sensing with neuroendocrine and neural controls of systemic physiology. Neurons and non-neuronal cells in these hypothalamic regions act supportively to execute metabolic regulations. Under conditions of brain and hypothalamic inflammation, which may result from overnutrition-induced intracellular stresses or disease-associated systemic inflammatory factors, extracellular and intracellular environments of hypothalamic cells are disrupted, leading to central metabolic dysregulations and various diseases. Recent research has begun to elucidate the effects of hypothalamic inflammation in causing diverse components of metabolic syndrome leading to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These new understandings have provocatively expanded previous knowledge on the cachectic roles of brain inflammatory response in diseases, such as infections and cancers. This review describes the molecular and cellular characteristics of hypothalamic inflammation in metabolic syndrome and related diseases as opposed to cachectic diseases, and also discusses concepts and potential applications of inhibiting central/hypothalamic inflammation to treat nutritional diseases. PMID:22417140

  17. Increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover in inflammation-induced anorexia.

    PubMed

    Dwarkasing, J T; Witkamp, R F; Boekschoten, M V; Ter Laak, M C; Heins, M S; van Norren, K

    2016-05-20

    Anorexia can occur as a serious complication of disease. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a major role, along with a hypothalamic dysregulation characterized by locally elevated serotonin levels. The present study was undertaken to further explore the connections between peripheral inflammation, anorexia and hypothalamic serotonin metabolism and signaling pathways. First, we investigated the response of two hypothalamic neuronal cell lines to TNFα, IL-6 and LPS. Next, we studied transcriptomic changes and serotonergic activity in the hypothalamus of mice after intraperitoneal injection with TNFα, IL-6 or a combination of TNFα and IL-6. In vitro, we showed that hypothalamic neurons responded to inflammatory mediators by releasing cytokines. This inflammatory response was associated with an increased serotonin release. Mice injected with TNFα and IL-6 showed decreased food intake, associated with altered expression of inflammation-related genes in the hypothalamus. In addition, hypothalamic serotonin turnover showed to be elevated in treated mice. Overall, our results underline that peripheral inflammation reaches the hypothalamus where it affects hypothalamic serotoninergic metabolism. These hypothalamic changes in serotonin pathways are associated with decreased food intake, providing evidence for a role of serotonin in inflammation-induced anorexia.

  18. MEMBRANE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR REGULATION OF HYPOTHALAMIC FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Micevych, Paul E.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the decades, our understanding of estrogen receptor (ER) function has evolved. Today we are confronted by at least two nuclear ERs: ERα and ERβ; and a number of putative membrane ERs, including ERα, ERβ, ER-X, GPR30 and Gq-mER. These receptors all bind estrogens or at least estrogenic compounds and activate intracellular signaling pathways. In some cases, a well-defined pharmacology, and physiology has been discovered. In other cases, the identity or the function remains to be elucidated. This mini-review attempts to synthesize our understanding of 17β-estradiol membrane signaling within hypothalamic circuits involved in homeostatic functions focusing on reproduction and energy balance. PMID:22538318

  19. Lateral Hypothalamic Circuits for Feeding and Reward

    PubMed Central

    Stuber, Garret D.; Wise, Roy A.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments conducted over 60 years ago, the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) was identified as a critical neuroanatomical substrate for motivated behavior. Electrical stimulation of the LHA induces voracious feeding even in non-restricted animals. In the absence of food, animals will work tirelessly, often lever-pressing 1000’s of times per hour, for electrical stimulation at the same site that provokes feeding, drinking, and other species-typical motivated behaviors. Here we review the classic findings from electrical stimulation studies and integrate them with more recent work that has utilized contemporary circuit-based approaches to study the LHA. We identify specific anatomically and molecularly defined LHA elements that integrate diverse information arising from cortical, extended amygdala, and basal forebrain networks to ultimately generate a highly specified and invigorated behavioral state conveyed via LHA projections to downstream reward and feeding specific circuits. PMID:26814589

  20. Lateral hypothalamic circuits for feeding and reward.

    PubMed

    Stuber, Garret D; Wise, Roy A

    2016-02-01

    In experiments conducted over 60 years ago, the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) was identified as a critical neuroanatomical substrate for motivated behavior. Electrical stimulation of the LHA induces voracious feeding even in well-fed animals. In the absence of food, animals will work tirelessly, often lever-pressing thousands of times per hour, for electrical stimulation at the same site that provokes feeding, drinking and other species-typical motivated behaviors. Here we review the classic findings from electrical stimulation studies and integrate them with more recent work that has used contemporary circuit-based approaches to study the LHA. We identify specific anatomically and molecularly defined LHA elements that integrate diverse information arising from cortical, extended amygdala and basal forebrain networks to ultimately generate a highly specified and invigorated behavioral state conveyed via LHA projections to downstream reward and feeding-specific circuits.

  1. ALTERED HYPOTHALAMIC FUNCTION IN DIET-INDUCED OBESITY

    PubMed Central

    Velloso, L A; Schwartz, M W

    2012-01-01

    Energy homeostasis involves a complex network of hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic neurons that transduce hormonal, nutrient and neuronal signals into responses that ultimately match caloric intake to energy expenditure and thereby promote stability of body fat stores. Growing evidence suggests that rather than reflecting a failure to regulate caloric intake, common forms of obesity involve fundamental changes to this homeostatic system that favor the defense of an elevated level of body adiposity. This article reviews emerging evidence that during high-fat feeding, obesity pathogenesis involves fundamental alteration of hypothalamic systems that regulate food intake and energy expenditure. PMID:21386802

  2. Cyclic torsion testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leese, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    Torsional fatigue testing and data analysis procedures are described. Since there are no standards governing cyclic torsion testing that are generally accepted on a widespread basis by the technical community, the different approaches that dominate current experimental activity, and the ramifications of each are discussed. Particular attention is given to the theoretical and experimental difficulties that have paced refinement and general acceptance of test procedures. Finally, specific quantities and nomenclature modelled after analagous axial fatigue properties are suggested as an effective way to communicate torsional fatigue results until accepted standards are established.

  3. An Early Cyclic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhe, William; Biswas, Tirthibir

    2014-03-01

    We provide a comprehensive numerical study of the Emergent Cyclic Inflation scenario. This is a scenario where instead of traditional monotonic slow roll inflation, the universe expands over numerous short asymmetric cycles due to the production of entropy via interactions among different species. This is one of the very few scenarios of inflation which provides a nonsingular geodesically complete space-time and does not require any ``reheating'' mechanism. A special thanks to Loyola University for an excellent community to help this project grow.

  4. Hypothalamic dysfunction without hamartomas causing gelastic seizures in optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Fink, Cassandra; Borchert, Mark; Simon, Carrie Zaslow; Saper, Clifford

    2015-02-01

    This report describes gelastic seizures in patients with optic nerve hypoplasia and hypothalamic dysfunction without hypothalamic hamartoma. All participants (n = 4) from the optic nerve hypoplasia registry study at Children's Hospital Los Angeles presenting with gelastic seizures were included. The clinical and pathology characteristics include hypothalamic dysgenesis and dysfunction, but no hamartomas. Optic nerve hypoplasia is the only reported condition with gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartomas, suggesting that hypothalamic disorganization alone can cause gelastic seizures.

  5. [Asthma and cyclic neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Salazar Cabrera, A N; Berrón Pérez, R; Ortega Martell, J A; Onuma Takane, E

    1996-01-01

    We report a male with history of recurrent infections (recurrent oral aphtous disease [ROAD], middle ear infections and pharyngo amigdalitis) every 3 weeks since he was 7 months old. At the age of 3 years cyclic neutropenia was diagnosed with cyclic fall in the total neutrophil count in blood smear every 21 days and prophylactic antimicrobial therapy was indicated. Episodic events every 3 weeks of acute asthma and allergic rhinitis were detected at the age of 6 years old and specific immunotherapy to Bermuda grass was given during 3 years with markedly improvement in his allergic condition but not in the ROAD. He came back until the age of 16 with episodic acute asthma and ROAD. The total neutrophil count failed to 0 every 21 days and surprisingly the total eosinophil count increased up to 2,000 at the same time, with elevation of serum IgE (412 Ul/mL). Specific immunotherapy to D.pt. and Aller.a. and therapy with timomodulin was indicated. After 3 months we observed clinical improvement in the asthmatic condition and the ROAD disappeared, but the total neutrophil count did not improve. We present this case as a rare association between 2 diseases with probably no etiological relationship but may be physiopatological that could help to understand more the pathogenesis of asthma.

  6. Ekpyrotic and cyclic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehners, Jean-Luc

    2008-09-01

    Ekpyrotic and cyclic cosmologies provide theories of the very early and of the very late universe. In these models, the big bang is described as a collision of branes — and thus the big bang is not the beginning of time. Before the big bang, there is an ekpyrotic phase with equation of state w=Pρ≫1 (where P is the average pressure and ρ the average energy density) during which the universe slowly contracts. This phase resolves the standard cosmological puzzles and generates a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of cosmological perturbations containing a significant non-Gaussian component. At the same time it produces small-amplitude gravitational waves with a blue spectrum. The dark energy dominating the present-day cosmological evolution is reinterpreted as a small attractive force between our brane and a parallel one. This force eventually induces a new ekpyrotic phase and a new brane collision, leading to the idea of a cyclic universe. This review discusses the detailed properties of these models, their embedding in M-theory and their viability, with an emphasis on open issues and observational signatures.

  7. Cyclic generalized projection MRI.

    PubMed

    Sarty, Gordon E

    2015-04-01

    Progress in the development of portable MRI hinges on the ability to use lightweight magnets that have non-uniform magnetic fields. An image encoding method and mathematical procedure for recovering the image from the NMR signal from non-uniform magnets with closed isomagnetic contours is given. Individual frequencies in an NMR signal from an object in a non-uniform magnetic field give rise to integrals of the object along contours of constant magnetic field: generalized projections. With closed isomagnetic field contours a simple, cyclic, direct reconstruction of the image from the generalized projections is possible when the magnet and RF transmit coil are held fixed relative to the imaged object while the RF receive coil moves. Numerical simulations, using the Shepp and Logan mathematical phantom, were completed to show that the mathematical method works and to illustrate numerical limitations. The method is numerically verified and exact reconstruction demonstrated for discrete mathematical image phantoms. Correct knowledge of the RF receive field is necessary or severe image distortions will result. The cyclic mathematical reconstruction method presented here will be useful for portable MRI schemes that use non-uniform magnets with closed isomagnetic contours along with mechanically or electronically moving the RF receive coils.

  8. Hypothalamic obesity in children: pathophysiology to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Haliloglu, Belma; Bereket, Abdullah

    2015-05-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HyOb) is a complex neuroendocrine disorder caused by damage to the hypothalamus, which results in disruption of energy regulation. The key hypothalamic areas of energy regulation are the ARC (arcuate nucleus), the VMH (ventromedial hypothalamus), the PVN (paraventriculer nuclei) and the LHA (lateral hypothalamic area). These pathways can be disrupted mechanically by hypothalamic tumors, neurosurgery, inflammatory disorders, radiotherapy and trauma or functionally as such seen in genetic diseases. Rapid weight gain and severe obesity are the most striking features of HyOb and caused by hyperphagia, reduced basal metabolic rate (BMR) and decreased physical activity. HyOb is usually unresponsive to diet and exercise. Although, GLP-1 and its anologs seem to be a new agent, there is still no curative treatment. Thus, prevention is of prime importance and the clinicians should be alert and vigilant in patients at risk for development of HyOb.

  9. Delineating the regulation of energy homeostasis using hypothalamic cell models.

    PubMed

    Wellhauser, Leigh; Gojska, Nicole M; Belsham, Denise D

    2015-01-01

    Attesting to its intimate peripheral connections, hypothalamic neurons integrate nutritional and hormonal cues to effectively manage energy homeostasis according to the overall status of the system. Extensive progress in the identification of essential transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms regulating the controlled expression and actions of hypothalamic neuropeptides has been identified through the use of animal and cell models. This review will introduce the basic techniques of hypothalamic investigation both in vivo and in vitro and will briefly highlight the key advantages and challenges of their use. Further emphasis will be place on the use of immortalized models of hypothalamic neurons for in vitro study of feeding regulation, with a particular focus on cell lines proving themselves most fruitful in deciphering fundamental basics of NPY/AgRP, Proglucagon, and POMC neuropeptide function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid-onset obesity, hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, autonomic dysregulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maksoud, Ismaeil; Kassab, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction and autonomic dysregulation syndrome is a rare disorder that presents with rapidly evolving obesity with several endocrine disorders during early childhood. We present here a documented case of a 6-year-old Syrian girl with the characteristic symptoms of rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation, associated with an abdominal mass (mature ganglioneuroma).

  11. Rapid-onset obesity, hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, autonomic dysregulation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maksoud, Ismaeil; Kassab, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction and autonomic dysregulation syndrome is a rare disorder that presents with rapidly evolving obesity with several endocrine disorders during early childhood. We present here a documented case of a 6-year-old Syrian girl with the characteristic symptoms of rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation, associated with an abdominal mass (mature ganglioneuroma). PMID:26229761

  12. Pure endoscopic management of epileptogenic hypothalamic hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Chibbaro, S; Cebula, H; Scholly, J; Todeschi, J; Ollivier, I; Timofeev, A; Ganau, M; Di Emidio, P; Valenti, M P; Staack, A M; Bast, T; Steinhoff, B J; Hirsch, E; Kehrli, P; Proust, F

    2017-02-07

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HH) are rare congenital malformations located in the region of the tuber cinereum and third ventricle. Their usual clinical presentation is characterized by gelastic/dacrystic seizures which often become pharmaco-resistant and progress to secondary focal/generalized intractable epilepsy causing mostly in children cognitive and behavioral problems (particularly in cases of progressive epileptic encephalopathy) and precocious puberty. Whereas gelastic seizures can be surgically controlled either by resection of the lesion or disconnection (tissue-destructive) procedures, aimed at functionally prevent the spreading of the epileptic burst; generalized seizures tend to respond better to HH excision rather than isolated neocortical resections, which generally fail to control them. Prospective analysis of 14 consecutive patients harboring HH treated in an 8-year period; 12 patients had unilateral and two bilateral HH. All patients were managed by pure endoscopic excision of the HH. The mean operative time was 48 min and mean hospital stay was 2 days; perioperative blood loss was negligible in all cases. Two patients showed a transient diabetes insipidus (DI); no transient or permanent postoperative neurological deficit or memory impairment was recorded. Complete HH excision was achieved in 10/14 patients. At a mean follow-up of 48 months, no wound infection, meningitis, postoperative hydrocephalus, and/or mortality were recorded in this series of patients. Eight patients became seizure free (Engel class I), 2 other experienced worthwhile improvement of disabling seizures (Engel class II); 2 patients were cured from gelastic attacks while still experiencing focal dyscognitive seizures; and 2, having bilateral HH (both undergoing unilateral HH excision), did not experience significant improvement and required later on a temporal lobectomy coupled to amygdalohyppocampectomy. Overall, the followings resulted to be predictive factors for better

  13. Hypothalamic germinoma masquerading as superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vethakkan, Shireene R; Venugopal, Yogeswari; Tan, Alexander T B; Paramasivam, Sharmila S; Ratnasingam, Jeyakantha; Razak, Rohaya A; Alias, Azmi; Kassim, Fauziah; Choong, Karen

    2013-01-01

    To report a case of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome secondary to hypothalamic germinoma. We describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic work-up, management, and clinical course of a patient admitted with SMA syndrome who was subsequently found to have a hypothalamic germinoma. An adolescent boy was admitted to the surgical ward with progressive weight loss over a 2 year period and postprandial vomiting. He was diagnosed with SMA syndrome based on evidence of proximal duodenal dilatation, extrinsic compression of the distal duodenum, and a narrowed aortomesenteric angle (16°). Investigations performed to exclude thyrotoxicosis unexpectedly revealed secondary hypothyroidism and further evaluation demonstrated evidence of pan-hypopituitarism. Psychiatric evaluation excluded anorexia nervosa and bulimia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a heterogeneously enhancing hypothalamic lesion, but a normal pituitary gland. Hormone replacement with hydrocortisone, desmopressin, testosterone, and thyroxine resulted in weight gain and resolution of gastrointestinal symptoms. A transventricular endoscopic biopsy subsequently confirmed a hypothalamic germinoma and he was referred to an oncologist. SMA syndrome secondary to severe weight loss is an uncommon cause of upper gastrointestinal obstruction. While there have been reports of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and thyrotoxicosis manifesting as SMA syndrome, there are no published reports to date of SMA syndrome secondary to hypothalamic/pituitary disease. Management of SMA syndrome is conservative, as symptoms of intestinal obstruction resolve with weight gain following treatment of the underlying cause. Awareness of this uncommon presentation of endocrine cachexia/hypothalamic disease will prevent unnecessary laparotomies and a misdiagnosis of an eating disorder.

  14. Cyclic GMP transporters.

    PubMed

    Sager, Georg

    2004-11-01

    The biokinetics of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) is characterized by three distinct processes: synthesis by guanylate cyclases (GCs), conversion of cGMP to GMP by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and the excretion of unchanged cGMP by transport proteins in the cell membrane. Efflux is observed in virtually all cell types including cells which originate from brain. Studies of intact cells, in which metabolic inhibitors and probenecid reduced extrusion of cGMP and wherein cGMP was extruded against concentration gradients, indicated the existence of ATP requiring organic anion transport system(s). Functional studies of inside-out vesicles have revealed cGMP transport systems wherein translocation is coupled to hydrolysis of ATP. The extrusion of cGMP is inhibited by a number of unrelated compounds and this indicates that cGMP is substrate for multispecific transporters. Recent transfection studies suggest that members of the MRP (multidrug resistance protein) family; MRP4, MRP5 and MRP8 translocate cGMP across the cell membrane. Many of the MRPs have been detected in brain. In addition tertiary active transport by the organic anion transporter family has also been identified. At least one member (OAT1) shows relative high affinity for cGMP and is also expressed in brain. The biological significance of cGMP transporters has to be clarified. Their role in cGMP biokinetics, being responsible for one of the cellular elimination pathways, is well established. However, there is growing evidence that extracellular cGMP has effects on cell physiology and pathophysiology by an auto- or paracrine mechanism.

  15. Hypothyroidism Compromises Hypothalamic Leptin Signaling in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Groba, Claudia; Mayerl, Steffen; van Mullem, Alies A.; Visser, Theo J.; Darras, Veerle M.; Habenicht, Andreas J.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of thyroid hormone (TH) on metabolism and energy expenditure is well established, but the role of TH in regulating nutritional sensing, particularly in the central nervous system, is only poorly defined. Here, we studied the consequences of hypothyroidism on leptin production as well as leptin sensing in congenital hypothyroid TRH receptor 1 knockout (Trhr1 ko) mice and euthyroid control animals. Hypothyroid mice exhibited decreased circulating leptin levels due to a decrease in fat mass and reduced leptin expression in white adipose tissue. In neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, hypothyroid mice showed increased leptin receptor Ob-R expression and decreased suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 transcript levels. In order to monitor putative changes in central leptin sensing, we generated hypothyroid and leptin-deficient animals by crossing hypothyroid Trhr1 ko mice with the leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Hypothyroid Trhr1/ob double knockout mice showed a blunted response to leptin treatment with respect to body weight and food intake and exhibited a decreased activation of phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as well as a up-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 upon leptin treatment, particularly in the arcuate nucleus. These data indicate alterations in the intracellular processing of the leptin signal under hypothyroid conditions and thereby unravel a novel mode of action by which TH affects energy metabolism. PMID:23518925

  16. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis: neuropsychiatric aspects.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-04-01

    Evidence of aberrant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) activity in many psychiatric disorders, although not universal, has sparked long-standing interest in HPA hormones as biomarkers of disease or treatment response. HPA activity may be chronically elevated in melancholic depression, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia. The HPA axis may be more reactive to stress in social anxiety disorder and autism spectrum disorders. In contrast, HPA activity is more likely to be low in PTSD and atypical depression. Antidepressants are widely considered to inhibit HPA activity, although inhibition is not unanimously reported in the literature. There is evidence, also uneven, that the mood stabilizers lithium and carbamazepine have the potential to augment HPA measures, while benzodiazepines, atypical antipsychotics, and to some extent, typical antipsychotics have the potential to inhibit HPA activity. Currently, the most reliable use of HPA measures in most disorders is to predict the likelihood of relapse, although changes in HPA activity have also been proposed to play a role in the clinical benefits of psychiatric treatments. Greater attention to patient heterogeneity and more consistent approaches to assessing treatment effects on HPA function may solidify the value of HPA measures in predicting treatment response or developing novel strategies to manage psychiatric disease. © 2014 American Physiological Society.

  17. Hypothyroidism compromises hypothalamic leptin signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Groba, Claudia; Mayerl, Steffen; van Mullem, Alies A; Visser, Theo J; Darras, Veerle M; Habenicht, Andreas J; Heuer, Heike

    2013-04-01

    The impact of thyroid hormone (TH) on metabolism and energy expenditure is well established, but the role of TH in regulating nutritional sensing, particularly in the central nervous system, is only poorly defined. Here, we studied the consequences of hypothyroidism on leptin production as well as leptin sensing in congenital hypothyroid TRH receptor 1 knockout (Trhr1 ko) mice and euthyroid control animals. Hypothyroid mice exhibited decreased circulating leptin levels due to a decrease in fat mass and reduced leptin expression in white adipose tissue. In neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, hypothyroid mice showed increased leptin receptor Ob-R expression and decreased suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 transcript levels. In order to monitor putative changes in central leptin sensing, we generated hypothyroid and leptin-deficient animals by crossing hypothyroid Trhr1 ko mice with the leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Hypothyroid Trhr1/ob double knockout mice showed a blunted response to leptin treatment with respect to body weight and food intake and exhibited a decreased activation of phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as well as a up-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 upon leptin treatment, particularly in the arcuate nucleus. These data indicate alterations in the intracellular processing of the leptin signal under hypothyroid conditions and thereby unravel a novel mode of action by which TH affects energy metabolism.

  18. Hypothalamic dopaminergic stimulation in cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Lepper, Anne; Frese, Achim; Summ, Oliver; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch; Evers, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Cluster headache is associated with structural abnormalities of the hypothalamus. We were interested in the association of cluster headache with endocrinological functional abnormalities. Therefore, we applied the apomorphine challenge test, which is a specific test of hypothalamic dopaminergic activation. We enrolled 13 patients with cluster headache outside the bout and without medication. They were stimulated with 0.005 mg/kg of body weight subcutaneous apomorphine hydrochloride. After 45 and 60 minutes, growth hormone (GH), prolactin and cortisol were measured. The test was also applied to 14 sex- and age-matched healthy control subjects. There were significantly higher GH levels in healthy subjects as compared to cluster headache patients 45 minutes after injection (10.8 ± 10.8 versus 4.4 ± 7.4 ng/ml; P  = 0.038). Only in cluster headache, the GH level after 60 minutes was not significantly different from the baseline. The levels of prolactin and cortisol did not show any significant differences between cluster headache patients and in healthy subjects. Our data suggest that cluster headache is associated with an impaired dopaminergic stimulation. This finding supports the body of evidence that cluster headache is associated with a functional abnormality of the hypothalamus and that this association is a primary (i.e. idiopathic) and not a secondary phenomenon during the bout.

  19. Hypothalamic control of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, Sebastien M.; Caron, Alexandre; Lanfray, Damien; Monge-Rofarello, Boris; Bartness, Timothy J.; Richard, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known, in large part from animal studies, that the control of brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis is insured by the central nervous system (CNS), which integrates several stimuli in order to control BAT activation through the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). SNS-mediated BAT activity is governed by diverse neurons found in brain structures involved in homeostatic regulations and whose activity is modulated by various factors including oscillations of energy fluxes. The characterization of these neurons has always represented a challenging issue. The available literature suggests that the neuronal circuits controlling BAT thermogenesis are largely part of an autonomic circuitry involving the hypothalamus, brainstem and the SNS efferent neurons. In the present review, we recapitulate the latest progresses in regards to the hypothalamic regulation of BAT metabolism. We briefly addressed the role of the thermoregulatory pathway and its interactions with the energy balance systems in the control of thermogenesis. We also reviewed the involvement of the brain melanocortin and endocannabinoid systems as well as the emerging role of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) neurons in BAT thermogenesis. Finally, we examined the link existing between these systems and the homeostatic factors that modulate their activities. PMID:26578907

  20. Hypothalamic effects of thyroid hormones on metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Alvarez, Clara V; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    Over the past few decades, obesity and its related metabolic disorders have increased at an epidemic rate in the developed and developing world. New signals and factors involved in the modulation of energy balance and metabolism are continuously being discovered, providing potential novel drug targets for the treatment of metabolic disease. A parallel strategy is to better understand how hormonal signals, with an already established role in energy metabolism, work, and how manipulation of the pathways involved may lead to amelioration of metabolic dysfunction. The thyroid hormones belong to the latter category, with dysregulation of the thyroid axis leading to marked alterations in energy balance. The potential of thyroid hormones in the treatment of obesity has been known for decades, but their therapeutic use has been hampered because of side-effects. Data gleaned over the past few years, however, have uncovered new features at the mechanisms of action involved in thyroid hormones. Sophisticated neurobiological approaches have allowed the identification of specific energy sensors, such as AMP-activated protein kinase and mechanistic target of rapamycin, acting in specific groups of hypothalamic neurons, mediating many of the effects of thyroid hormones on food intake, energy expenditure, glucose, lipid metabolism, and cardiovascular function. More extensive knowledge about these molecular mechanisms will be of great relevance for the treatment of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  1. Paraventricular Hypothalamic Mechanisms of Chronic Stress Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Herman, James P.; Tasker, Jeffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is the primary driver of hypothalamo–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) responses. At least part of the role of the PVN is managing the demands of chronic stress exposure. With repeated exposure to stress, hypophysiotrophic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons of the PVN display a remarkable cellular, synaptic, and connectional plasticity that serves to maximize the ability of the HPA axis to maintain response vigor and flexibility. At the cellular level, chronic stress enhances the production of CRH and its co-secretagogue arginine vasopressin and rearranges neurotransmitter receptor expression so as to maximize cellular excitability. There is also evidence to suggest that efficacy of local glucocorticoid feedback is reduced following chronic stress. At the level of the synapse, chronic stress enhances cellular excitability and reduces inhibitory tone. Finally, chronic stress causes a structural enhancement of excitatory innervation, increasing the density of glutamate and noradrenergic/adrenergic terminals on CRH neuronal cell somata and dendrites. Together, these neuroplastic changes favor the ability of the HPA axis to retain responsiveness even under conditions of considerable adversity. Thus, chronic stress appears able to drive PVN neurons via a number of convergent mechanisms, processes that may play a major role in HPA axis dysfunction seen in variety of stress-linked disease states. PMID:27843437

  2. Corticosterone Blocks Ovarian Cyclicity and the LH Surge via Decreased Kisspeptin Neuron Activation in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Elena; Stephens, Shannon B. Z.; Chaing, Sharon; Munaganuru, Nagambika; Kauffman, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Stress elicits activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which leads to enhanced circulating glucocorticoids, as well as impaired gonadotropin secretion and ovarian cyclicity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that elevated, stress-levels of glucocorticoids disrupt ovarian cyclicity by interfering with the preovulatory sequence of endocrine events necessary for the LH surge. Ovarian cyclicity was monitored in female mice implanted with a cholesterol or corticosterone (Cort) pellet. Cort, but not cholesterol, arrested cyclicity in diestrus. Subsequent studies focused on the mechanism whereby Cort stalled the preovulatory sequence by assessing responsiveness to the positive feedback estradiol signal. Ovariectomized mice were treated with an LH surge-inducing estradiol implant, as well as Cort or cholesterol, and assessed several days later for LH levels on the evening of the anticipated surge. All cholesterol females showed a clear LH surge. At the time of the anticipated surge, LH levels were undetectable in Cort-treated females. In situ hybridization analyses the anteroventral periventricular nucleus revealed that Cort robustly suppressed the percentage of Kiss1 cells coexpressing cfos, as well as reduced the number of Kiss1 cells and amount of Kiss1 mRNA per cell, compared with expression in control brains. In addition, Cort blunted pituitary expression of the genes encoding the GnRH receptor and LHβ, indicating inhibition of gonadotropes during the blockage of the LH surge. Collectively, our findings support the hypothesis that physiological stress-levels of Cort disrupts ovarian cyclicity, in part, through disruption of positive feedback mechanisms at both the hypothalamic and pituitary levels which are necessary for generation of the preovulatory LH surge. PMID:26697722

  3. Hypothalamic integration of body fluid regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Denton, D A; McKinley, M J; Weisinger, R S

    1996-01-01

    The progression of animal life from the paleozoic ocean to rivers and diverse econiches on the planet's surface, as well as the subsequent reinvasion of the ocean, involved many different stresses on ionic pattern, osmotic pressure, and volume of the extracellular fluid bathing body cells. The relatively constant ionic pattern of vertebrates reflects a genetic "set" of many regulatory mechanisms--particularly renal regulation. Renal regulation of ionic pattern when loss of fluid from the body is disproportionate relative to the extracellular fluid composition (e.g., gastric juice with vomiting and pancreatic secretion with diarrhea) makes manifest that a mechanism to produce a biologically relatively inactive extracellular anion HCO3- exists, whereas no comparable mechanism to produce a biologically inactive cation has evolved. Life in the ocean, which has three times the sodium concentration of extracellular fluid, involves quite different osmoregulatory stress to that in freshwater. Terrestrial life involves risk of desiccation and, in large areas of the planet, salt deficiency. Mechanisms integrated in the hypothalamus (the evolutionary ancient midbrain) control water retention and facilitate excretion of sodium, and also control the secretion of renin by the kidney. Over and above the multifactorial processes of excretion, hypothalamic sensors reacting to sodium concentration, as well as circumventricular organs sensors reacting to osmotic pressure and angiotensin II, subserve genesis of sodium hunger and thirst. These behaviors spectacularly augment the adaptive capacities of animals. Instinct (genotypic memory) and learning (phenotypic memory) are melded to give specific behavior apt to the metabolic status of the animal. The sensations, compelling emotions, and intentions generated by these vegetative systems focus the issue of the phylogenetic emergence of consciousness and whether primal awareness initially came from the interoreceptors and vegetative

  4. Dorsomedial hypothalamic NPY and energy balance control

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Sheng; Kim, Yonwook J.; Zheng, Fenping

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a potent hypothalamic orexigenic peptide. Within the hypothalamus, Npy is primarily expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH). While the actions of ARC NPY in energy balance control have been well studied, a role for DMH NPY is still being unraveled. In contrast to ARC NPY that serves as one of downstream mediators of actions of leptin in maintaining energy homeostasis, DMH NPY is not under the control of leptin. Npy gene expression in the DMH is regulated by brain cholecystokinin (CCK) and other yet to be identified molecules. The findings of DMH NPY overexpression or induction in animals with increased energy demands and in certain rodent models of obesity implicate a role for DMH NPY in maintaining energy homeostasis. In support of this view, adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated overexpression of NPY in the DMH causes increases in food intake and body weight and exacerbates high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia and obesity. Knockdown of NPY in the DMH via AAV-mediated RNAi ameliorates hyperphagia, obesity and glucose intolerance of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats in which DMH NPY overexpression has been proposed to play a causal role. NPY knockdown in the DMH also prevents high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia, obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis. A detailed examination of actions of DMH NPY reveals that DMH NPY specifically affects nocturnal meal size and produces an inhibitory action on within meal satiety signals. In addition, DMH NPY modulates energy expenditure likely through affecting brown adipocyte formation and thermogenic activity. Overall, the recent findings provide clear evidence demonstrating critical roles for DMH NPY in energy balance control, and also imply a potential role for DMH NPY in maintaining glucose homeostasis. PMID:23083763

  5. Hypothalamic regulation of sleep and arousal.

    PubMed

    McGinty, Dennis; Szymusiak, Ronald

    2003-09-01

    The hypnogenic function of the rostral hypothalamic region, particularly the preoptic area (POA) was established previously on the basis of lesion, neuronal unit recording, and neurochemical and thermal stimulation studies. Recent studies have mapped the locations of putative sleep-promoting neurons in the POA using c-Fos immunostaining techniques and confirmed these findings with electrophysiological methods. Segregated groups of sleep-active neurons have been localized in the ventrolateral POA (vlPOA) and median preoptic nucleus (MnPN). MnPN and vlPOA sleep-active neurons express the inhibitory transmitter, GABA. In vlPOA neurons, GABA is co-localized with a second inhibitory transmitter, galanin. Descending projections from these sites terminate in putative arousal-promoting cell groups, including histaminergic, serotonergic, orexinergic, noradrenergic, and cholinergic neurons. These findings suggest the hypothesis that non-REM sleep occurs as a consequence of GABAergic and galaninergic inhibition of arousal-promoting neurons resulting from activation of vlPOA and MnPN sleep-promoting neurons. In support of this hypothesis, it was shown that putative sleep-promoting and arousal-promoting neurons exhibit reciprocal changes in discharge across the sleep-wake cycle and that GABA release in wake-promoting sites increases during nonREM sleep. In addition, some POA sleep-active neurons are warm-sensitive. Local POA warming inhibits discharge of multiple arousal-promoting neuronal groups. POA warming, unit recording, and lesion studies also show that POA regulates the amount of delta EEG activity within nonREM sleep, and index of the depth of sleep. Finally, there is evidence that arousal systems inhibit vlPOA and MnPN neurons and the POA hypnogenic mechanism. Mutually-inhibitory interactions between sleep-promoting and arousal-promoting systems are hypothesized to form a functional sleep-wake switch.

  6. Dorsomedial hypothalamic NPY and energy balance control.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sheng; Kim, Yonwook J; Zheng, Fenping

    2012-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a potent hypothalamic orexigenic peptide. Within the hypothalamus, Npy is primarily expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH). While the actions of ARC NPY in energy balance control have been well studied, a role for DMH NPY is still being unraveled. In contrast to ARC NPY that serves as one of downstream mediators of actions of leptin in maintaining energy homeostasis, DMH NPY is not under the control of leptin. Npy gene expression in the DMH is regulated by brain cholecystokinin (CCK) and other yet to be identified molecules. The findings of DMH NPY overexpression or induction in animals with increased energy demands and in certain rodent models of obesity implicate a role for DMH NPY in maintaining energy homeostasis. In support of this view, adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated overexpression of NPY in the DMH causes increases in food intake and body weight and exacerbates high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia and obesity. Knockdown of NPY in the DMH via AAV-mediated RNAi ameliorates hyperphagia, obesity and glucose intolerance of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats in which DMH NPY overexpression has been proposed to play a causal role. NPY knockdown in the DMH also prevents high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia, obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis. A detailed examination of actions of DMH NPY reveals that DMH NPY specifically affects nocturnal meal size and produces an inhibitory action on within meal satiety signals. In addition, DMH NPY modulates energy expenditure likely through affecting brown adipocyte formation and thermogenic activity. Overall, the recent findings provide clear evidence demonstrating critical roles for DMH NPY in energy balance control, and also imply a potential role for DMH NPY in maintaining glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cyclic AMP in prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Botsford, J L; Harman, J G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is found in a variety of prokaryotes including both eubacteria and archaebacteria. cAMP plays a role in regulating gene expression, not only for the classic inducible catabolic operons, but also for other categories. In the enteric coliforms, the effects of cAMP on gene expression are mediated through its interaction with and allosteric modification of a cAMP-binding protein (CRP). The CRP-cAMP complex subsequently binds specific DNA sequences and either activates or inhibits transcription depending upon the positioning of the complex relative to the promoter. Enteric coliforms have provided a model to explore the mechanisms involved in controlling adenylate cyclase activity, in regulating adenylate cyclase synthesis, and in performing detailed examinations of CRP-cAMP complex-regulated gene expression. This review summarizes recent work focused on elucidating the molecular mechanisms of CRP-cAMP complex-mediated processes. For other bacteria, less detail is known. cAMP has been implicated in regulating antibiotic production, phototrophic growth, and pathogenesis. A role for cAMP has been suggested in nitrogen fixation. Often the only data that support cAMP involvement in these processes includes cAMP measurement, detection of the enzymes involved in cAMP metabolism, or observed effects of high concentrations of the nucleotide on cell growth. PMID:1315922

  8. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Stranahan, Alexis M.; Martin, Bronwen; Chadwick, Wayne; Park, Sung-Soo; Wang, Liyun; Becker, Kevin G.; WoodIII, William H.; Zhang, Yongqing; Maudsley, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db) and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6) animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds. PMID:22934110

  9. Behavioural responses to hypothalamic cooling and heating in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cabanac, M; Dib, B

    1983-03-28

    Rats with hypothalamic thermodes had their hypothalamus cooled or warmed for short sessions. In a first series of experiments, rats could bar-press to obtain fanning with cool air. Cooling the hypothalamus did not suppress or inhibit this behaviour although rectal temperature was markedly increased. In a second series of experiments, bar-pressing would warm the water flowing in the thermode. The rats thus self suppressed the cooling of their hypothalamus. This behaviour was absent at 10 degrees C ambient temperature, and increased with increasing ambient temperature up to 35 degrees C. The result of this behaviour was a small hyperthermia in warm and hot environment compared to control when the rats could not self-suppress the cooling of hypothalamus. The results of both experiments suggest that no conscious direct sensation is aroused by hypothalamic cooling. Hypothalamic heating increased the rat's bar-pressing for cool air and decreased the rat's rectal temperature. When pressure on the lever would suppress a warm hypothalamic stimulus rats self-cooled their hypothalamus, especially in warm environments. Such behaviour resulted in an increased somatic hyperthermia due to the warm environment and hypothalamic cooling. These results are compatible with the hypothesis of a direct conscious sensation from a warm hypothalamus.

  10. Risk factors for mortality caused by hypothalamic obesity in children with hypothalamic tumours.

    PubMed

    Haliloglu, B; Atay, Z; Guran, T; Abalı, S; Bas, S; Turan, S; Bereket, A

    2016-10-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HyOb) is a common complication of childhood hypothalamic tumours. Patients with HyOb probably have a higher mortality rate than those with other types of obesity due in many cases to obstructive sleep apnoea/hypoventilation. To identify predictive factors for mortality caused by HyOb in children. Twenty children with HyOb secondary to hypothalamic tumours that were followed-up for ≥3 years and aged <15 years at diagnosis, and received supraphysiological glucocorticoid treatment for ≤1 month. Mean age at diagnosis was 6.36 ± 3.60 years. Mean body mass index (BMI) Standard deviation of the samples (SDS) increased from 0.77 ± 1.26 to 2.66 ± 1.45 during the first 6 months, but slowed from month 6-12 (2.73 ± 1.35). ΔBMI SDS at 0-6 months was significantly higher in patients aged <6 years at diagnosis than in those aged >6 years at diagnosis (3.71 ± 1.96 vs. 0.83 ± 0.73, P < 0.001). Maximum BMI SDS was also significantly higher in the younger group (3.88 ± 1.39 vs. 2.79 ± 0.64, P < 0.05). In all, four patients died and the mortality rate was significantly higher in the patients with a further increase in BMI SDS > 1 SDS after 6 months of therapy (RR: 8.4, P < 0.05). Both overall mortality and obesity-related mortality rates were higher in the patients aged <6 years at diagnosis (4.5-fold, 7.2-fold higher, respectively, P > 0.05). The mortality rate was also 3.7-fold higher in the patients with a maximum BMI SDS ≥ 3 at any time during the first 3 years after therapy(P > 0.05). An increase in BMI SDS after 6 months of therapy was observed to be a risk factor for mortality caused by HyOb. In addition, age <6 years at diagnosis and a maximum BMI SDS ≥ 3 were associated with a higher mortality rate, indicating that earlier and more aggressive treatment of obesity is required. © 2015 World Obesity.

  11. Hypothalamic BOLD response to glucose intake and hypothalamic volume are similar in anorexia nervosa and healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    van Opstal, Anna M.; Westerink, Anna M.; Teeuwisse, Wouter M.; van der Geest, Mirjam A. M.; van Furth, Eric F.; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inconsistent findings about the neurobiology of Anorexia Nervosa (AN) hinder the development of effective treatments for this severe mental disorder. Therefore, the need arises for elucidation of neurobiological factors involved in the pathophysiology of AN. The hypothalamus plays a key role in the neurobiological processes that govern food intake and energy homeostasis, processes that are disturbed in anorexia nervosa (AN). The present study will assess the hypothalamic response to energy intake and the hypothalamic structure in patients with AN and healthy controls. Methods: Ten women aged 18–30 years diagnosed with AN and 11 healthy, lean (BMI < 23 kg/m2) women in the same age range were recruited. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine function of the hypothalamus in response to glucose. Structural MRI was used to determine differences in hypothalamic volume and local gray matter volume using manual segmentation and voxel-based morphometry. Results: No differences were found in hypothalamic volume and neuronal activity in response to a glucose load between the patients and controls. Whole brain structural analysis showed a significant decrease in gray matter volume in the cingulate cortex in the AN patients, bilaterally. Conclusions: We argue that in spite of various known changes in the hypothalamus the direct hypothalamic response to glucose intake is similar in AN patients and healthy controls. PMID:25999808

  12. Hypothalamic Obesity in Craniopharyngioma Patients: Disturbed Energy Homeostasis Related to Extent of Hypothalamic Damage and Its Implication for Obesity Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Christian L.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HO) occurs in patients with tumors and lesions in the medial hypothalamic region. Hypothalamic dysfunction can lead to hyperinsulinemia and leptin resistance. This review is focused on HO caused by craniopharyngiomas (CP), which are the most common childhood brain tumors of nonglial origin. Despite excellent overall survival rates, CP patients have substantially reduced quality of life because of significant long-term sequelae, notably severe obesity in about 50% of patients, leading to a high rate of cardiovascular mortality. Recent studies reported that both hyperphagia and decreased energy expenditure can contribute to severe obesity in HO patients. Recognized risk factors for severe obesity include large hypothalamic tumors or lesions affecting several medial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei that impact satiety signaling pathways. Structural damage in these nuclei often lead to hyperphagia, rapid weight gain, central insulin and leptin resistance, decreased sympathetic activity, low energy expenditure, and increased energy storage in adipose tissue. To date, most efforts to treat HO have shown disappointing long-term success rates. However, treatments based on the distinct pathophysiology of disturbed energy homeostasis related to CP may offer options for successful interventions in the future. PMID:26371051

  13. Genetics Home Reference: cyclic neutropenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection, neutrophils release neutrophil elastase. This protein then modifies the function of certain cells and proteins to help fight the infection. ELANE gene mutations that cause cyclic neutropenia lead to an ...

  14. Cyclic Cushing's syndrome: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mantero, Franco; Scaroni, Carla M; Albiger, Nora M E

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic Cushing's syndrome (CS) involves rhythmic fluctuations in ACTH secretion resulting in a cyclic variation of adrenal steroid production. In the majority of cases, cyclic CS is caused by an ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma, but it can also be due to ectopic ACTH production or an adrenal adenoma. This condition should be strongly suspected in patients with symptoms or signs of hypercortisolism but normal cortisol levels and paradoxical responses to the dexamethasone test, that may reflect an increasing or decreasing endogenous hormone activity. Dynamic tests are best interpreted if they are performed during a sustained period of hypercortisolism. Sometimes, it is necessary to confirm the diagnosis over lengthy periods of observation. Responses to treatment must be closely monitored, interpreted and evaluated with caution because of the potential variations in steroidogenesis. An original case report of a cyclic Cushing's syndrome is presented in this review.

  15. Gelastic epilepsy without hypothalamic hamartoma: three additional cases.

    PubMed

    Savasta, Salvatore; Budetta, Mauro; Spartà, Maria Valentina; Carpentieri, Maria Luisa; Trasimeni, Guido; Zavras, Niki; Villa, Maria Pia; Parisi, Pasquale

    2014-08-01

    We describe three children with gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartoma whose seizures were characterized by typical laughing attacks associated or not with other seizure types. Ictal/interictal EEG and magnetic resonance imaging were performed. All three subjects showed a good response to carbamazepine therapy with complete seizure control in addition to a benign clinical and cognitive outcome. These three cases confirm that gelastic epilepsy without hypothalamic hamartoma, both in cryptogenic or symptomatic patients (one child showed a dysplastic right parietotemporal lesion), usually has a more benign natural history, and carbamazepine seems to be the most efficacious therapy to obtain both immediate and long-term seizure control. These findings need to be confirmed in a larger sample of children affected by gelastic epilepsy without hypothalamic hamartoma.

  16. The Role of Hypothalamic Neuropeptides in Neurogenesis and Neuritogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bakos, Jan; Zatkova, Martina; Bacova, Zuzana; Ostatnikova, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a source of neural progenitor cells which give rise to different populations of specialized and differentiated cells during brain development. Newly formed neurons in the hypothalamus can synthesize and release various neuropeptides. Although term neuropeptide recently undergoes redefinition, small-size hypothalamic neuropeptides remain major signaling molecules mediating short- and long-term effects on brain development. They represent important factors in neurite growth and formation of neural circuits. There is evidence suggesting that the newly generated hypothalamic neurons may be involved in regulation of metabolism, energy balance, body weight, and social behavior as well. Here we review recent data on the role of hypothalamic neuropeptides in adult neurogenesis and neuritogenesis with special emphasis on the development of food intake and social behavior related brain circuits. PMID:26881105

  17. Hypothalamic AMPK as a Regulator of Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, My Khanh Q.; Kinyua, Ann W.; Yang, Dong Joo

    2016-01-01

    Activated in energy depletion conditions, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a cellular energy sensor and regulator in both central nervous system and peripheral organs. Hypothalamic AMPK restores energy balance by promoting feeding behavior to increase energy intake, increasing glucose production, and reducing thermogenesis to decrease energy output. Besides energy state, many hormones have been shown to act in concert with AMPK to mediate their anorexigenic and orexigenic central effects as well as thermogenic influences. Here we explore the factors that affect hypothalamic AMPK activity and give the underlying mechanisms for the role of central AMPK in energy homeostasis together with the physiological effects of hypothalamic AMPK on energy balance restoration. PMID:27547453

  18. Hypothalamic adipic hypernatraemia syndrome with normal osmoregulation of vasopressin.

    PubMed

    López-Capapé, Marta; Golmayo, Luz; Lorenzo, Gustavo; Gallego, Nieves; Barrio, Raquel

    2004-10-01

    Adipsic hypernatraemia is an uncommon disorder in childhood caused by a defect in the osmoregulation of thirst, leading to impairment of water homeostasis and chronic hyperosmolality of body fluids. Adipsia is often associated with an abnormality in osmoregulated vasopressin secretion due to the close proximity of the hypothalamic osmoreceptors that control thirst with those regulating vasopressin secretion. Hypothalamic lesions of diverse aetiology (vascular abnormalities, neoplasms, granulomatous diseases, trauma etc.) have been described in this syndrome. We report a 12-year-old boy with evident weight loss due to hypernatraemic dehydration with a selective defect in osmoregulation of thirst and normal vasopressin secretion with no demonstrable structural lesion. To date, only six paediatric patients with this condition have been described in the literature. Hypothalamic adipsic hypernatraemia syndrome must be suspected when a dehydrated patient denies thirst. The study of antidiuretic function is necessary because the osmoregulation of vasopressin secretion could be altered.

  19. Hypothalamic Lipids: Key Regulators of Whole Body Energy Balance.

    PubMed

    González-García, Ismael; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; López, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Hypothalamic lipid metabolism plays a major role in the physiological regulation of energy balance. Modulation of several enzymatic activities that control lipid biosynthesis, such as fatty acid synthase and AMP-activated protein kinase, impacts both feeding and energy expenditure. However, lipids can also cause pathological alterations in the hypothalamus. Lipotoxicity is promoted by excess lipids in tissues not suitable for their storage. A large amount of evidence has demonstrated that lipotoxicity is a pathophysiological mechanism leading to metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis, and steatohepatitis. Current data have reported that, similar to what is observed in peripheral tissues, complex lipids such as ceramides and sphingolipids act as lipotoxic species at the hypothalamic level to impact metabolism. Here, we will review what is currently known about hypothalamic lipid metabolism and the modulation of energy homeostasis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Cyclic mixmaster universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.; Ganguly, Chandrima

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the behavior of bouncing Bianchi type IX "mixmaster" universes in general relativity. This generalizes all previous studies of the cyclic behavior of closed spatially homogeneous universes with and without an entropy increase. We determine the behavior of models containing radiation by analytic and numerical integration and show that an increase of radiation entropy leads to an increasing cycle size and duration. We introduce a null energy condition violating ghost field to create a smooth, nonsingular bounce of finite size at the end of each cycle and compute the evolution through many cycles with and without an entropy increase injected at the start of each cycle. In the presence of increasing entropy, we find that the cycles grow larger and longer and the dynamics approach flatness, as in the isotropic case. However, successive cycles become increasingly anisotropic at the expansion maxima which is dominated by the general-relativistic effects of anisotropic 3-curvature. When the dynamics are significantly anisotropic, the 3-curvature is negative. However, it becomes positive after continued expansion drives the dynamics close enough to isotropy for the curvature to become positive and for gravitational collapse to ensue. In the presence of a positive cosmological constant, radiation, and a ghost field, we show that, for a very wide range of cosmological constant values, the growing oscillations always cease and the dynamics subsequently approach those of the isotropic de Sitter universe at late times. This model is not included in the scope of earlier cosmic no-hair theorems because the 3-curvature can be positive. In the case of a negative cosmological constant, radiation, and an ultrastiff field (to create nonsingular bounces), we show that a sequence of chaotic oscillations also occurs, with sensitive dependence on initial conditions. In all cases, we follow the oscillatory evolution of the scale factors, the shear, and the 3-curvature from

  1. Computer Simulation Of Cyclic Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.; Lowell, C. E.

    1990-01-01

    Computer model developed to simulate cyclic oxidation of metals. With relatively few input parameters, kinetics of cyclic oxidation simulated for wide variety of temperatures, durations of cycles, and total numbers of cycles. Program written in BASICA and run on any IBM-compatible microcomputer. Used in variety of ways to aid experimental research. In minutes, effects of duration of cycle and/or number of cycles on oxidation kinetics of material surveyed.

  2. Cyclic Cushing's syndrome: an overview.

    PubMed

    Albiger, Nora Maria Elvira; Scaroni, Carla M; Mantero, Franco

    2007-11-01

    Cyclic Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a disorder in which glucocorticoid levels are alternately normal and high, the latter occurring in episodes that can last from a few days to several months. It is more common in children than in adults. Cyclic CS may be either of the two different forms of CS (ACTH-dependent or -independent CS). Clinically, it may present with one or many symptoms, depending on the duration of disease activity and the timing of the fluctuations. A serotoninergic influence, cyclic changes in central dopaminergic tone, spontaneous episodic hemorrhage in the tumor, and the action of inflammatory cytokines with antitumor properties are some of the mechanisms suggested to explain the physiopathology of this phenomenon but the exact mechanism remains to be clarified. The cyclic pattern of hypercortisolism can delay the final diagnosis of CS and make it difficult to interpret the results of dynamic tests. Patients may have paradoxical responses to dexamethasone that can reflect increasing or decreasing levels of endogenous activity. Hormone assessments have to be repeated periodically when a diagnosis of CS is suspected. The cyclic pattern can also interfere with medical treatment because patients may show unexpected clinical and biochemical signs of hypocortisolism when cortisol secretion cyclically returns to normal, so an accurate follow-up is mandatory in these patients.

  3. Regulation of Blood Glucose by Hypothalamic Pyruvate Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Tony K. T.; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Pocai, Alessandro; Rossetti, Luciano

    2005-08-01

    The brain keenly depends on glucose for energy, and mammalians have redundant systems to control glucose production. An increase in circulating glucose inhibits glucose production in the liver, but this negative feedback is impaired in type 2 diabetes. Here we report that a primary increase in hypothalamic glucose levels lowers blood glucose through inhibition of glucose production in rats. The effect of glucose requires its conversion to lactate followed by stimulation of pyruvate metabolism, which leads to activation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels. Thus, interventions designed to enhance the hypothalamic sensing of glucose may improve glucose homeostasis in diabetes.

  4. Medical management and antiepileptic drugs in hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Helen Cross, J; Spoudeas, Helen

    2017-06-01

    Hypothalamic hamartoma may present with epilepsy, specifically gelastic or dacrystic seizures, or endocrine dysfunction, commonly precocious puberty. The epilepsy in many patients is drug resistant, and has a high association with progressive cognitive, learning and behavioral difficulty. Medical treatment of seizures remains problematic, with many resistant to drug treatment. Surgical resection, or disconnection of the hamartoma provides the optimal chance of seizure control but with a relatively high risk of endocrine dysfunction, the result of interference with the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in many. Careful assessment and monitoring by specialist centers with discussion of optimal intervention is required for individual cases. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Kisspeptin cell-specific PI3K signaling regulates hypothalamic kisspeptin expression and participates in the regulation of female fertility

    PubMed Central

    Beymer, Matthew; Negrón, Ariel L.; Yu, Guiqin; Wu, Samuel; Mayer, Christian; Lin, Richard Z.; Boehm, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic kisspeptin neurons integrate and translate cues from the internal and external environments that regulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and maintain fertility in mammals. However, the intracellular signaling pathways utilized to translate such information into changes in kisspeptin expression, release, and ultimately activation of the kisspeptin-receptive GnRH network have not yet been identified. PI3K is an important signaling node common to many peripheral factors known to regulate kisspeptin expression and GnRH release. We investigated whether PI3K signaling regulates hypothalamic kisspeptin expression, pubertal development, and adult fertility in mice. We generated mice with a kisspeptin cell-specific deletion of the PI3K catalytic subunits p110α and p110β (kiss-p110α/β-KO). Using in situ hybridization, we examined Kiss1 mRNA expression in gonad-intact, gonadectomized (Gdx), and Gdx + steroid-replaced mice. Kiss1 cell number in the anteroventral periventricular hypothalamus (AVPV) was significantly reduced in intact females but not in males. In contrast, compared with WT and regardless of steroid hormone status, Kiss1 cell number was lower in the arcuate (ARC) of kiss-p110α/β-KO males, but it was unaffected in females. Both intact Kiss-p110α/β-KO males and females had reduced ARC kisspeptin-immunoreactive (IR) fibers compared with WT animals. Adult kiss-p110α/β-KO males had significantly lower circulating luteinizing hormone (LH) levels, whereas pubertal development and fertility were unaffected in males. Kiss-p110α/β-KO females exhibited a reduction in fertility despite normal pubertal development, LH levels, and estrous cyclicity. Our data show that PI3K signaling is important for the regulation of hypothalamic kisspeptin expression and contributes to normal fertility in females. PMID:25269483

  6. Stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation for hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic seizures.

    PubMed

    Homma, Junpei; Kameyama, Shigeki; Masuda, Hiroshi; Ueno, Takehiko; Fujimoto, Ayataka; Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi

    2007-08-01

    Management of hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic epilepsy remains controversial. We have used stereotactic thermocoagulation for treatment of hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic epilepsy since 1997. Herein, we review our experience in five cases to clarify the usefulness of this treatment. A total of five patients with hypothalamic hamartoma were treated by stereotactic thermocoagulation at our hospital during the period October 1997 through February 2004. In all patients, the hamartoma was less than 10mm in diameter and was located on the floor of the third ventricle with sessile attachment to the wall. To identify ictal onset, chronic intracranial electroencephalography was performed in three patients with the use of a depth electrode implanted in the hamartoma. Attempts were made to induce gelastic seizure by electrical stimulation of the hamartoma in three patients. After magnetic resonance imaging-guided targeting, radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the boundary between the hamartoma and normal hypothalamus was performed to achieve disconnection effects. Marked reductions in seizure frequency were obtained in all cases, with three patients becoming seizure-free after the procedure. No intraoperative complications occurred except in one patient who experienced acute and transient panidrosis with hot flushes during coagulation. Our results suggest that stereotactic thermocoagulation of hypothalamic hamartoma is an acceptable treatment option for patients with intractable gelastic seizures.

  7. Hypothalamic inflammation in the control of metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Valdearcos, Martin; Xu, Allison W; Koliwad, Suneil K

    2015-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity leads to devastating and common chronic diseases, fueling ongoing interest in determining new mechanisms underlying both obesity and its consequences. It is now well known that chronic overnutrition produces a unique form of inflammation in peripheral insulin target tissues, and efforts to limit this inflammation have met with some success in preserving insulin sensitivity in obese individuals. Recently, the activation of inflammatory pathways by dietary excess has also been observed among cells located in the mediobasal hypothalamus, a brain area that exerts central control over peripheral glucose, fat, and energy metabolism. Here we review progress in the field of diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation, drawing key distinctions between metabolic inflammation in the hypothalamus and that occurring in peripheral tissues. We focus on specific stimuli of the inflammatory response, the roles of individual hypothalamic cell types, and the links between hypothalamic inflammation and metabolic function under normal and pathophysiological circumstances. Finally, we explore the concept of controlling hypothalamic inflammation to mitigate metabolic disease.

  8. The effect of spaceflight on retino-hypothalamic tract development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, D. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Tang, I. H.; Fuller, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers examined the effect of late prenatal exposure to microgravity on the development of the retina, retinohypothalamic tract, geniculo-hypothalamic tract, and suprachiasmatic nucleus. Results indicate an effect on c-fos activity in the intergeniculate leaflet between gestational day 20 and postnatal day 8, suggesting a delay in development of the circadian timing system.

  9. Age-Dependent Neurochemical Remodeling of Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Santos, Camila Leite; Roppa, Paola Haack Amaral; Truccolo, Pedro; Fontella, Fernanda Urruth; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2017-10-04

    The hypothalamus is a crucial integrative center in the central nervous system, responsible for the regulation of homeostatic activities, including systemic energy balance. Increasing evidence has highlighted a critical role of astrocytes in orchestrating hypothalamic functions; they participate in the modulation of synaptic transmission, metabolic and trophic support to neurons, immune defense, and nutrient sensing. In this context, disturbance of systemic energy homeostasis, which is a common feature of obesity and the aging process, involves inflammatory responses. This may be related to dysfunction of hypothalamic astrocytes. In this regard, the aim of this study was to evaluate the neurochemical properties of hypothalamic astrocyte cultures from newborn, adult, and aged Wistar rats. Age-dependent changes in the regulation of glutamatergic homeostasis, glutathione biosynthesis, amino acid profile, glucose metabolism, trophic support, and inflammatory response were observed. Additionally, signaling pathways including nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2/heme oxygenase-1 p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor kappa B, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt, and leptin receptor expression may represent putative mechanisms associated with the cellular alterations. In summary, our findings indicate that as age increases, hypothalamic astrocytes remodel and exhibit changes in their neurochemical properties. This process may play a role in the onset and/or progression of metabolic disorders.

  10. The effect of spaceflight on retino-hypothalamic tract development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, D. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Tang, I. H.; Fuller, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers examined the effect of late prenatal exposure to microgravity on the development of the retina, retinohypothalamic tract, geniculo-hypothalamic tract, and suprachiasmatic nucleus. Results indicate an effect on c-fos activity in the intergeniculate leaflet between gestational day 20 and postnatal day 8, suggesting a delay in development of the circadian timing system.

  11. Enhanced hypothalamic glucose sensing in obesity: alteration of redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Colombani, Anne-Laure; Carneiro, Lionel; Benani, Alexandre; Galinier, Anne; Jaillard, Tristan; Duparc, Thibaut; Offer, Géraldine; Lorsignol, Anne; Magnan, Christophe; Casteilla, Louis; Pénicaud, Luc; Leloup, Corinne

    2009-10-01

    Recent data demonstrated that glucose sensing in different tissues is initiated by an intracellular redox signaling pathway in physiological conditions. However, the relevance of such a mechanism in metabolic disease is not known. The aim of the present study was to determine whether brain glucose hypersensitivity present in obese Zücker rats is related to an alteration in redox signaling. Brain glucose sensing alteration was investigated in vivo through the evaluation of electrical activity in arcuate nucleus, changes in reactive oxygen species levels, and hypothalamic glucose-induced insulin secretion. In basal conditions, modifications of redox state and mitochondrial functions were assessed through oxidized glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, manganese superoxide dismutase, aconitase activities, and mitochondrial respiration. Hypothalamic hypersensitivity to glucose was characterized by enhanced electrical activity of the arcuate nucleus and increased insulin secretion at a low glucose concentration, which does not produce such an effect in normal rats. It was associated with 1) increased reactive oxygen species levels in response to this low glucose load, 2) constitutive oxidized environment coupled with lower antioxidant enzyme activity at both the cellular and mitochondrial level, and 3) overexpression of several mitochondrial subunits of the respiratory chain coupled with a global dysfunction in mitochondrial activity. Moreover, pharmacological restoration of the glutathione hypothalamic redox state by reduced glutathione infusion in the third ventricle fully reversed the cerebral hypersensitivity to glucose. The data demonstrated that obese Zücker rats' impaired hypothalamic regulation in terms of glucose sensing is linked to an abnormal redox signaling, which originates from mitochondria dysfunction.

  12. A Hypothalamic Phosphatase Switch Coordinates Energy Expenditure with Feeding.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Garron T; Andrews, Zane B; Simonds, Stephanie E; Michael, Natalie J; DeVeer, Michael; Brüning, Jens C; Spanswick, David; Cowley, Michael A; Tiganis, Tony

    2017-08-01

    Beige adipocytes can interconvert between white and brown-like states and switch between energy storage versus expenditure. Here we report that beige adipocyte plasticity is important for feeding-associated changes in energy expenditure and is coordinated by the hypothalamus and the phosphatase TCPTP. A fasting-induced and glucocorticoid-mediated induction of TCPTP, inhibited insulin signaling in AgRP/NPY neurons, repressed the browning of white fat and decreased energy expenditure. Conversely feeding reduced hypothalamic TCPTP, to increase AgRP/NPY neuronal insulin signaling, white adipose tissue browning and energy expenditure. The feeding-induced repression of hypothalamic TCPTP was defective in obesity. Mice lacking TCPTP in AgRP/NPY neurons were resistant to diet-induced obesity and had increased beige fat activity and energy expenditure. The deletion of hypothalamic TCPTP in obesity restored feeding-induced browning and increased energy expenditure to promote weight loss. Our studies define a hypothalamic switch that coordinates energy expenditure with feeding for the maintenance of energy balance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gels based on cyclic polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Lackey, Melissa A; Cui, Jun; Tew, Gregory N

    2011-03-23

    Cyclic poly(5-hydroxy-1-cyclooctene) (PACOE) was synthesized by ring-expansion metathesis polymerization (REMP), and thiol-ene chemistry was used to cross-link the internal double bonds in the PACOE backbone. This created a novel network material (gels formed from cyclic polymers) with unique structural units, where the cyclic PACOE main chains, which serve as secondary topological cross-linkages, were connected by primary intermolecular chemical cross-linkages. The resulting properties were notably different from those of traditional chemically cross-linked linear PACOE gels, whose gel fraction (GF) and modulus (G) increased while the swelling ratio (Q) decreased with increasing initial polymer concentration in the gel precursor solution (C(0)). For the gels formed from cyclic polymers, however, the GF, Q, and G all simultaneously increased as C(0) increased at the higher range. Furthermore, at the same preparation state (same C(0)), the swelling ability and the maximum strain at break of the gels formed from cyclic polymers were always greater than those of the gels formed from linear polymers, and these differences became more pronounced as C(0) increased.

  14. Inhibition of growth of pancreatic carcinomas in animal models by analogs of hypothalamic hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Redding, T W; Schally, A V

    1984-01-01

    Using animal models of acinar and ductal pancreatic cancer, we investigated the effect of analogs of hypothalamic hormones on tumor growth. In Wistar/Lewis rats bearing the acinar pancreatic tumor DNCP-322, chronic administration of [L-5-Br-Trp8]somatostatin-14 significantly decreased tumor weights and volume. Somatostatin-28 and the cyclic hexapeptide analog of somatostatin cyclo(Pro-Phe-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Phe) failed to influence the growth of this tumor. The agonistic analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone [D-Trp6]LH-RH also significantly decreased tumor weight and volume in this model and reduced testosterone levels and the weights of the ventral prostate and tests. In Syrian hamsters bearing ductal type of pancreatic carcinoma, chronic administration of [L-5-Br-Trp8]somatostatin diminished tumor weights and volume. The percentage change in tumor volume was significantly decreased when compared to control animals. In one experiment, cyclic hexapeptide of somatostatin also inhibited growth of this tumor. [D-Trp6]LH-RH, given twice daily or injected in the form of microcapsules for constant controlled release, significantly decreased tumor weight and volume and suppressed serum testosterone levels. Hamsters castrated 4 days after transplantation of the pancreatic tumors showed a significant decrease in weight and volume of these tumors. This suggests that pancreatic cancers may, at least in part, be sex hormone sensitive. [D-Trp6]LH-RH may decrease the growth of pancreatic carcinomas by suppressing androgens. Somatostatin analogs reduce the growth of pancreatic ductal and acinar cancers, probably by inhibiting the release or stimulatory action of gastrointestinal hormones on tumor cells (or both). Inhibition of animal models of pancreatic tumors by chronic administration of somatostatin analogs and [D-Trp6]LH-RH suggests that these compounds should be considered for the development of a new hormonal therapy for cancer of the pancreas. PMID:6141560

  15. Craniopharyngioma and hypothalamic injury: latest insights into consequent eating disorders and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Hermann L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Hypothalamic alterations, pathological or treatment induced, have major impact on prognosis in craniopharyngioma patients mainly because of consequent hypothalamic obesity. Recent insight in molecular genetics, treatment strategies, risk factors and outcomes associated with hypothalamic obesity provide novel therapeutic perspectives. This review includes relevant publications since 2013. Recent findings Recent findings confirm that alterations in posterior hypothalamic areas because of tumour location and/or treatment-related injuries are associated with severe hypothalamic obesity, reduced overall survival and impaired quality of life in long-term survivors of childhood-onset craniopharyngioma. However, eating disorders are observed because of hypothalamic obesity without clear disease-specific patterns. Treatment options for hypothalamic obesity are very limited. Treatment with invasive, nonreversible bariatric methods such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is most efficient in weight reduction, but controversial in the paediatric population because of medical, ethical, and legal considerations. Accordingly, treatment in craniopharyngioma should focus on prevention of (further) hypothalamic injury. Presurgical imaging for grading of hypothalamic involvement should be the basis for hypothalamus-sparing strategies conducted by experienced multidisciplinary teams. Summary Until a nonsurgical therapeutic option for hypothalamic obesity for paediatric patients is found, prevention of hypothalamic injury should be the preferred treatment strategy, conducted exclusively by experienced multidisciplinary teams. PMID:26574645

  16. Color visualization of cyclic magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Alfredo; Estupiñán, Viviana

    2014-02-01

    We exploit the perceptual, circular ordering of the hues in a technique for the visualization of cyclic variables. The hue is thus meaningfully used for the indication of variables such as the azimuth and the units of the measurement of time. The cyclic (or circular) variables may be both of the continuous type or the discrete type; among the first there is azimuth and among the last you find the musical notes and the days of the week. A correspondence between the values of a cyclic variable and the chromatic hues, where the natural circular ordering of the variable is respected, is called a color code for the variable. We base such a choice of hues on an assignment of of the unique hues red, yellow, green and blue, or one of the 8 even permutations of this ordered list, to 4 cardinal values of the cyclic variable, suitably ordered; color codes based on only 3 cardinal points are also possible. Color codes, being intuitive, are easy to remember. A possible low accuracy when reading instruments that use this technique is compensated by fast, ludic and intuitive readings; also, the use of a referential frame makes readings precise. An achromatic version of the technique, that can be used by dichromatic people, is proposed.

  17. Buffering in cyclic gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyzin, S. D.; Kolesov, A. Yu.; Rozov, N. Kh.

    2016-06-01

    We consider cyclic chains of unidirectionally coupled delay differential-difference equations that are mathematical models of artificial oscillating gene networks. We establish that the buffering phenomenon is realized in these system for an appropriate choice of the parameters: any given finite number of stable periodic motions of a special type, the so-called traveling waves, coexist.

  18. Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal responsiveness in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Grinevich, V; Ma, X M; Verbalis, J; Aguilera, G

    2001-10-01

    The differential effects of osmotic stimulation on magnocellular and parvocellular hypothalamic neurons were studied by analysis of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin (VP) expression in controls and 48-h water-deprived rats subjected to either restraint for 1 h or a single lipopolysaccharide injection (250 microg/100 g). Water deprivation reduced basal CRH mRNA levels but the increments following 4 h of restraint or 6 h lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection were similar to those in controls. In contrast, water deprivation had no effect on basal VP heteronuclear RNA (hnRNA) and mRNA levels in parvocellular neurons, but responses to restraint or LPS injection were reduced. VP expression in magnocellular paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei, and plasma sodium and vasopressin were higher in water-deprived rats, changes which were unaffected by restraint. LPS injection reduced VP mRNA but not hnRNA levels in magnocellular neurons and increased plasma vasopressin levels only in water-deprived rats independently of changes in plasma sodium. This was accompanied by an increase in vasopressin mRNA content in the posterior pituitary. The data show that the blunted ACTH responses to acute stress during chronic osmotic stimulation are correlated with the inability of parvocellular neurons to increase VP rather than CRH expression. In addition, LPS-induced endotoxemia causes disturbances of the magnocellular vasopressinergic system with an unexpected potentiation of osmotic simulated VP secretion. The lack of increase in VP transcription after LPS and changes in VP mRNA distribution suggest that endotoxemia affect the secretory process at the levels of the neurohypophyseal axon terminal.

  19. Cyclic peptide therapeutics: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-02-26

    Cyclic peptides combine several favorable properties such as good binding affinity, target selectivity and low toxicity that make them an attractive modality for the development of therapeutics. Over 40 cyclic peptide drugs are currently in clinical use and around one new cyclic peptide drug enters the market every year on average. The vast majority of clinically approved cyclic peptides are derived from natural products, such as antimicrobials or human peptide hormones. New powerful techniques based on rational design and in vitro evolution have enabled the de novo development of cyclic peptide ligands to targets for which nature does not offer solutions. A look at the cyclic peptides currently under clinical evaluation shows that several have been developed using such techniques. This new source for cyclic peptide ligands introduces a freshness to the field, and it is likely that de novo developed cyclic peptides will be in clinical use in the near future.

  20. Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin processing and the regulation of energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play a key role in regulating energy balance and neuroendocrine function. Much attention has been focused on regulation of POMC gene expression with less emphasis on regulated peptide processing. This is particularly important given the complexity of posttranslational POMC processing which is essential for the generation of biologically active MSH peptides. Mutations that impair POMC sorting and processing are associated with obesity in humans and in animals. Specifically, mutations in the POMC processing enzymes prohormone convertase 1/3 (PCI/3) and in carboxypeptidase E (CPE) and in the α-MSH degrading enzyme, PRCP, are associated with changes in energy balance. There is increasing evidence that POMC processing is regulated with respect to energy balance. Studies have implicated both the leptin and insulin signaling pathways in the regulation of POMC at various steps in the processing pathway. This article will review the role of hypothalamic POMC in regulating energy balance with a focus on POMC processing. PMID:21208604

  1. Hypothalamic ER stress: A bridge between leptin resistance and obesity.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Sara; Claret, Marc

    2015-06-22

    The prevalence of obesity has increased worldwide at an alarming rate. However, non-invasive pharmacological treatments remain elusive. Leptin resistance is a general feature of obesity, thus strategies aimed at enhancing the sensitivity to this hormone may constitute an excellent therapeutical approach to counteract current obesity epidemics. Nevertheless, the etiology and neuronal basis of leptin resistance remains an enigma. A recent hypothesis gaining substantial experimental support is that hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a causal role in the development of leptin resistance and obesity. The objective of this review article is to provide an updated view on current evidence connecting hypothalamic ER stress with leptin resistance. We discuss the experimental findings supporting this hypothesis, as well as the potential causes and underlying mechanisms leading to this metabolic disorder. Understanding these mechanisms may provide key insights into the development of novel intervention approaches.

  2. Endocrine changes in histiocytosis of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

    PubMed

    Toro Galván, Silvia; Planas Vilaseca, Alejandra; Michalopoulou Alevras, Theodora; Torres Díaz, Alberto; Suárez Balaguer, Javier; Villabona Artero, Carles

    2015-02-01

    Histiocytosis is characterized by proliferation of cells from the mononuclear phagocyte system, and may be divided into Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis (including Erdheim-Chester disease [ECD]). While diabetes insipidus (DI) is the most common hypothalamic-pituitary consequence, anterior pituitary deficiencies are less known. This study analyzed the frequency and progression of pituitary hormone deficiencies and the radiographic findings in 9 patients (7 with LCH and 2 with ECD) with hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) axis. Eighty-nine percent of patients had DI (62% at diagnosis), and 78% had one or more anterior pituitary deficiencies (71% at diagnosis). HP involvement is relatively common in patients diagnosed with histiocytosis and hormone deficiencies may be present at diagnosis or appear gradually during the course of disease. Regular monitoring of these patients is recommended. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Hypothalamic pituitary disorders expressed by galactorrhea. A dynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Perez-Lopez, F R

    1975-11-01

    Physiologic and pathologic production of milk involves complex relations between the mammary glands, hormones, and the central nervous system. In all the galactorrhea syndromes there is a functional or mechanical problem at the pituitary level, with abnormal secretion or reserve of prolactin secretion. Stimulatory agents of prolactin, like thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), chlorpromazine, amnio acids, and insulin, can be helpful in the study of the hypothalamic pituitary functional reserve, while the osmotic tests seem to provide a clear distinction between functional and tumoral causes. The inhibitory agents of prolactin secretion, L-dopa and CB 154, permit the study of the negative control of the hormone. In addition, CB 154 appears to be an effective treatment for functional galactorrhea. Hyperprolactinemia appears to exert an inhibitory influence on gonadotropins. Clomiphene, acting on the hypothalamus, and LHRH, acting on the gonadotropes, permit the assessment of the gonadotropic hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis.

  4. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zorzano, Antonio; Claret, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1) cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA). Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction. PMID:26113818

  5. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  6. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function during perinatal depression.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Phillipe Leff; Flores-Ramos, Mónica; López-Martínez, Margarita; Fuentes, Carlos Cruz; Grajeda, Juan Pablo Reyes

    2015-06-01

    Abnormal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is an important pathological finding in pregnant women exhibiting major depressive disorder. They show high levels of cortisol pro-inflammatory cytokines, hypothalamic-pituitary peptide hormones and catecholamines, along with low dehydroepiandrosterone levels in plasma. During pregnancy, the TH2 balance together with the immune system and placental factors play crucial roles in the development of the fetal allograft to full term. These factors, when altered, may generate a persistent dysfunction of the HPA axis that may lead to an overt transfer of cortisol and toxicity to the fetus at the expense of reduced activity of placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2. Epigenetic modifications also may contribute to the dysregulation of the HPA axis. Affective disorders in pregnant women should be taken seriously, and therapies focused on preventing the deleterious effects of stressors should be implemented to promote the welfare of both mother and baby.

  7. Results on Cyclic Signal Processing Systems,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    8] Vaidyanathan, P. P. Multirate systems and filter banks , Prentice Hall, 1993. [9] Vaidyanathan, P. P., and Kirac, A. "Theory of cyclic filter ...91125 Abstract We present a state space description for cyclic LTI sys- tems which find applications in cyclic filter banks and wavelets. We also...in a unified way by using the realization matrix defined by the state space description. 1. INTRODUCTION Cyclic digital filters and filter banks

  8. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Masumi

    2013-12-30

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates). Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrates known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates), the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol) feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir) GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTHβ mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  9. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Endocrine System in the Hagfish

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Masumi

    2013-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates). Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrates known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates), the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol) feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir) GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTHβ mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates. PMID:24416029

  10. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  11. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  12. Enhanced Hypothalamic Glucose Sensing in Obesity: Alteration of Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Colombani, Anne-Laure; Carneiro, Lionel; Benani, Alexandre; Galinier, Anne; Jaillard, Tristan; Duparc, Thibaut; Offer, Géraldine; Lorsignol, Anne; Magnan, Christophe; Casteilla, Louis; Pénicaud, Luc; Leloup, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent data demonstrated that glucose sensing in different tissues is initiated by an intracellular redox signaling pathway in physiological conditions. However, the relevance of such a mechanism in metabolic disease is not known. The aim of the present study was to determine whether brain glucose hypersensitivity present in obese Zücker rats is related to an alteration in redox signaling. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Brain glucose sensing alteration was investigated in vivo through the evaluation of electrical activity in arcuate nucleus, changes in reactive oxygen species levels, and hypothalamic glucose-induced insulin secretion. In basal conditions, modifications of redox state and mitochondrial functions were assessed through oxidized glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, manganese superoxide dismutase, aconitase activities, and mitochondrial respiration. RESULTS Hypothalamic hypersensitivity to glucose was characterized by enhanced electrical activity of the arcuate nucleus and increased insulin secretion at a low glucose concentration, which does not produce such an effect in normal rats. It was associated with 1) increased reactive oxygen species levels in response to this low glucose load, 2) constitutive oxidized environment coupled with lower antioxidant enzyme activity at both the cellular and mitochondrial level, and 3) overexpression of several mitochondrial subunits of the respiratory chain coupled with a global dysfunction in mitochondrial activity. Moreover, pharmacological restoration of the glutathione hypothalamic redox state by reduced glutathione infusion in the third ventricle fully reversed the cerebral hypersensitivity to glucose. CONCLUSIONS The data demonstrated that obese Zücker rats' impaired hypothalamic regulation in terms of glucose sensing is linked to an abnormal redox signaling, which originates from mitochondria dysfunction. PMID:19581415

  13. Hypothalamic Inflammation and Energy Balance Disruptions: Spotlight on Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Le Thuc, Ophélia; Stobbe, Katharina; Cansell, Céline; Nahon, Jean-Louis; Blondeau, Nicolas; Rovère, Carole

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a key brain region in the regulation of energy balance as it controls food intake and both energy storage and expenditure through integration of humoral, neural, and nutrient-related signals and cues. Many years of research have focused on the regulation of energy balance by hypothalamic neurons, but the most recent findings suggest that neurons and glial cells, such as microglia and astrocytes, in the hypothalamus actually orchestrate together several metabolic functions. Because glial cells have been described as mediators of inflammatory processes in the brain, the existence of a causal link between hypothalamic inflammation and the deregulations of feeding behavior, leading to involuntary weight loss or obesity for example, has been suggested. Several inflammatory pathways that could impair the hypothalamic control of energy balance have been studied over the years such as, among others, toll-like receptors and canonical cytokines. Yet, less studied so far, chemokines also represent interesting candidates that could link the aforementioned pathways and the activity of hypothalamic neurons. Indeed, chemokines, in addition to their role in attracting immune cells to the inflamed site, have been suggested to be capable of neuromodulation. Thus, they could disrupt cellular activity together with synthesis and/or secretion of multiple neurotransmitters/mediators involved in the maintenance of energy balance. This review discusses the different inflammatory pathways that have been identified so far in the hypothalamus in the context of feeding behavior and body weight control impairments, with a particular focus on chemokines signaling that opens a new avenue in the understanding of the major role played by inflammation in obesity.

  14. Hypothalamic stimulation and baroceptor reflex interaction on renal nerve activity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. F.; Ninomiya, I.; Franz, G. N.; Judy, W. V.

    1971-01-01

    The basal level of mean renal nerve activity (MRNA-0) measured in anesthetized cats was found to be modified by the additive interaction of hypothalamic and baroceptor reflex influences. Data were collected with the four major baroceptor nerves either intact or cut, and with mean aortic pressure (MAP) either clamped with a reservoir or raised with l-epinephrine. With intact baroceptor nerves, MRNA stayed essentially constant at level MRNA-0 for MAP below an initial pressure P1, and fell approximately linearly to zero as MAP was raised to P2. Cutting the baroceptor nerves kept MRNA at MRNA-0 (assumed to represent basal central neural output) independent of MAP. The addition of hypothalamic stimulation produced nearly constant increments in MRNA for all pressure levels up to P2, with complete inhibition at some level above P2. The increments in MRNA depended on frequency and location of the stimulus. A piecewise linear model describes MRNA as a linear combination of hypothalamic, basal central neural, and baroceptor reflex activity.

  15. Effects of sugar solutions on hypothalamic appetite regulation.

    PubMed

    Colley, Danielle L; Castonguay, Thomas W

    2015-02-01

    Several hypotheses for the causes of the obesity epidemic in the US have been proposed. One such hypothesis is that dietary intake patterns have significantly shifted to include unprecedented amounts of refined sugar. We set out to determine if different sugars might promote changes in the hypothalamic mechanisms controlling food intake by measuring several hypothalamic peptides subsequent to overnight access to dilute glucose, sucrose, high fructose corn syrup, or fructose solutions. Rats were given access to food, water and a sugar solution for 24h, after which blood and tissues were collected. Fructose access (as opposed to other sugars that were tested) resulted in a doubling of circulating triglycerides. Glucose consumption resulted in upregulation of 7 satiety-related hypothalamic peptides whereas changes in gene expression were mixed for remaining sugars. Also, following multiple verification assays, 6 satiety related peptides were verified as being affected by sugar intake. These data provide evidence that not all sugars are equally effective in affecting the control of intake. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Hypothalamic leptin action is mediated by histone deacetylase 5

    PubMed Central

    Kabra, Dhiraj G.; Pfuhlmann, Katrin; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Schriever, Sonja C.; Casquero García, Veronica; Kebede, Adam Fiseha; Fuente-Martin, Esther; Trivedi, Chitrang; Heppner, Kristy; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Legutko, Beata; Kabra, Uma D.; Gao, Yuanqing; Yi, Chun-Xia; Quarta, Carmelo; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Finan, Brian; Müller, Timo D.; Meyer, Carola W.; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stemmer, Kerstin; Woods, Stephen C.; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Schneider, Robert; Olson, Eric N.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Pfluger, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic leptin signalling has a key role in food intake and energy-balance control and is often impaired in obese individuals. Here we identify histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) as a regulator of leptin signalling and organismal energy balance. Global HDAC5 KO mice have increased food intake and greater diet-induced obesity when fed high-fat diet. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of HDAC5 activity in the mediobasal hypothalamus increases food intake and modulates pathways implicated in leptin signalling. We show HDAC5 directly regulates STAT3 localization and transcriptional activity via reciprocal STAT3 deacetylation at Lys685 and phosphorylation at Tyr705. In vivo, leptin sensitivity is substantially impaired in HDAC5 loss-of-function mice. Hypothalamic HDAC5 overexpression improves leptin action and partially protects against HFD-induced leptin resistance and obesity. Overall, our data suggest that hypothalamic HDAC5 activity is a regulator of leptin signalling that adapts food intake and body weight to our dietary environment. PMID:26923837

  17. EJE PRIZE 2017: Hypothalamic AMPK: a golden target against obesity?

    PubMed

    López, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular gauge that is activated under conditions, such as low energy, increasing energy production and reducing energy waste. Centrally, the AMPK pathway is a canonical route regulating energy homeostasis, by integrating peripheral signals, such as hormones and metabolites, with neuronal networks. Current evidence links hypothalamic AMPK with feeding, brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis and browning of white adipose tissue (WAT), as well as muscle metabolism, hepatic function and glucose homeostasis. The relevance of these data is interesting from a therapeutic point of view as several agents with potential anti-obesity and/or antidiabetic effects, some currently in clinical use, such as nicotine, metformin and liraglutide are known to act through AMPK, either peripherally or centrally. Furthermore, the orexigenic and weight-gaining effects of the worldwide use of antipsychotic drugs (APDs), such as olanzapine, are also mediated by hypothalamic AMPK. Overall, this evidence makes hypothalamic AMPK signaling an interesting target for the drug development, with its potential for controlling both sides of the energy balance equation, namely feeding and energy expenditure through defined metabolic pathways. © 2017 The authors.

  18. Role of leptin in energy expenditure: the hypothalamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Pandit, R; Beerens, S; Adan, R A H

    2017-06-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin is a peripheral signal that informs the brain about the metabolic status of an organism. Although traditionally viewed as an appetite-suppressing hormone, studies in the past decade have highlighted the role of leptin in energy expenditure. Leptin has been shown to increase energy expenditure in particular through its effects on the cardiovascular system and brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis via the hypothalamus. The current review summarizes the role of leptin signaling in various hypothalamic nuclei and its effects on the sympathetic nervous system to influence blood pressure, heart rate, and BAT thermogenesis. Specifically, the role of leptin signaling on three different hypothalamic nuclei, the dorsomedial hypothalamus, the ventromedial hypothalamus, and the arcuate nucleus, is reviewed. It is known that all of these brain regions influence the sympathetic nervous system activity and thereby regulate BAT thermogenesis and the cardiovascular system. Thus the current work focuses on how leptin signaling in specific neuronal populations within these hypothalamic nuclei influences certain aspects of energy expenditure. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. High fructose diet increases anterior hypothalamic alpha 2-adrenoceptors responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Marcos A; Höcht, Christian; Opezzo, Javier A; Taira, Carlos A; Fernández, Belisario E; Puyó, Ana M

    2007-08-16

    Activation of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in the anterior hypothalamic area (AHA) decreases sympathetic nervous system activity and blood pressure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate activity of pre- and postsynaptic alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in the AHA of fructose hypertensive rats (F), an animal model of insulin resistance and hypertension. The AHA of Control (C) and F anaesthetized rats was perfused with Ringer solution in the absence or presence of clonidine (100 or 300 microg ml(-1)) using reverse microdialysis. Clonidine effects on mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR), and on hypothalamic noradrenaline levels were measured along perfusion time. Noradrenaline extracellular levels in the AHA were significantly diminished in F hypertensive rats compared to C animals. The depressor effect of intrahypothalamic perfusion of clonidine on MAP was enhanced in F rats compared with C animals. Intrahypothalamic perfusion of clonidine reduced HR only in F rats. The effect of clonidine on noradrenaline hypothalamic extracellular levels was enhanced in F rats. These results suggest, in our experimental conditions, the existence of an increased responsiveness of pre- and postsynaptic alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in the AHA of F hypertensive rats. This fact could be a consequence of a compensatory supersensitivity of alpha-adrenoceptors due to a decrease in noradrenaline release from nerve terminals located in the AHA.

  20. Hypothalamic stimulation and baroceptor reflex interaction on renal nerve activity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. F.; Ninomiya, I.; Franz, G. N.; Judy, W. V.

    1971-01-01

    The basal level of mean renal nerve activity (MRNA-0) measured in anesthetized cats was found to be modified by the additive interaction of hypothalamic and baroceptor reflex influences. Data were collected with the four major baroceptor nerves either intact or cut, and with mean aortic pressure (MAP) either clamped with a reservoir or raised with l-epinephrine. With intact baroceptor nerves, MRNA stayed essentially constant at level MRNA-0 for MAP below an initial pressure P1, and fell approximately linearly to zero as MAP was raised to P2. Cutting the baroceptor nerves kept MRNA at MRNA-0 (assumed to represent basal central neural output) independent of MAP. The addition of hypothalamic stimulation produced nearly constant increments in MRNA for all pressure levels up to P2, with complete inhibition at some level above P2. The increments in MRNA depended on frequency and location of the stimulus. A piecewise linear model describes MRNA as a linear combination of hypothalamic, basal central neural, and baroceptor reflex activity.

  1. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea — diagnostic challenges, monitoring, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sowińska-Przepiera, Elżbieta; Andrysiak-Mamos, Elżbieta; Jarząbek-Bielecka, Grażyna; Walkowiak, Aleksandra; Osowicz-Korolonek, Lilianna; Syrenicz, Małgorzata; Kędzia, Witold; Syrenicz, Anhelli

    2015-01-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea (FHA) is associated with functional inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Causes of FHA can be classified into the three groups: 1) stress-related factors, 2) consequences of weight loss and/or underweight, and 3) consequences of physical exercise or practicing sports. Diagnosis of FHA should be based on a history of menstrual disorders. During physical examination, patients with FHA present with secondary and tertiary sex characteristics specific for the pubertal stage preceding development of the condition and with the signs of hypoestrogenism. Laboratory results determine further management of patients with amenorrhea, and thus their correct interpretation is vital for making appropriate therapeutic decisions. Treatment of chronic anovulation, menstrual disorders, and secondary amenorrhea resulting from hypothalamic disorders should be aimed at the elimination of the primary cause, i.e. a decrease in psycho-emotional strain, avoidance of chronic stressors, reduction of physical exercise level, or optimisation of BMI in patients who lose weight. If menses do not resume after a period of six months or primary causative treatment is not possible, neutralisation of hypoestrogenism consequences, especially unfavourable effects on bone metabolism, become the main issue. Previous studies have shown that oestroprogestagen therapy is useful in both the treatment of menstrual disorders and normalisation of bone mineral density. Hormonal preparations should be introduced into therapeutic protocol on an individualised basis.

  2. EJE PRIZE 2017: Hypothalamic AMPK: a golden target against obesity?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular gauge that is activated under conditions, such as low energy, increasing energy production and reducing energy waste. Centrally, the AMPK pathway is a canonical route regulating energy homeostasis, by integrating peripheral signals, such as hormones and metabolites, with neuronal networks. Current evidence links hypothalamic AMPK with feeding, brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis and browning of white adipose tissue (WAT), as well as muscle metabolism, hepatic function and glucose homeostasis. The relevance of these data is interesting from a therapeutic point of view as several agents with potential anti-obesity and/or antidiabetic effects, some currently in clinical use, such as nicotine, metformin and liraglutide are known to act through AMPK, either peripherally or centrally. Furthermore, the orexigenic and weight-gaining effects of the worldwide use of antipsychotic drugs (APDs), such as olanzapine, are also mediated by hypothalamic AMPK. Overall, this evidence makes hypothalamic AMPK signaling an interesting target for the drug development, with its potential for controlling both sides of the energy balance equation, namely feeding and energy expenditure through defined metabolic pathways. PMID:28232370

  3. Early life stress experience may blunt hypothalamic leptin signalling.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Yoo, S B; Kim, J Y; Lee, J Y; Kim, B T; Park, K; Jahng, J W

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether neonatal maternal separation (MS) - chronic stress experience in early life - affects the anorectic efficacy of leptin in the offspring at adolescence. Sprague-Dawley pups were separated from the dam daily for 3 h during postnatal day 1-14 or left undisturbed as non-handled controls (NH). NH and MS male pups received an intraperitoneal leptin (100 μg/kg) or saline on postnatal day (PND) 28, and then food intake and body weight gain were recorded. The hypothalamic levels of leptin-signalling-related genes, phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3) and protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) were examined at 40 min after a single injection of leptin on PND 39 by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Leptin-induced suppressions in food intake and weight gain was observed in NH pups, but not in MS. Leptin increased pSTAT3 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of NH pups, but not of MS. Interestingly, basal levels of the hypothalamic PTP1B and pSTAT3 were increased in MS pups compared with NH controls. The results suggest that neonatal MS experience may blunt the anorectic efficacy of leptin later in life, possibly in relation with increased expressions of PTP1B and/or pSTAT3 in the hypothalamus.

  4. Central apelin-13 administration modulates hypothalamic control of feeding.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, C; Orlando, G; Recinella, L; Leone, S; Chiavaroli, A; Di Nisio, C; Shohreh, R; Manippa, F; Ricciuti, A; Vacca, M; Brunetti, L

    2016-01-01

    The 77 amino prepropeptide apelin has been isolated from bovine stomach tissue and several smaller fragments, including apelin-13, showed high affinity for the orphan APJ receptor. The distribution of apelinergic fibers and receptors in the hypothalamus may suggest a role of apelin-13 on energy balance regulation, albeit the studies reporting the acute effects of apelin on feeding control are inconsistent. Considering the possible involvement of apelinergic system on hypothalamic appetite controlling network, in the present study we evaluated in the rat the effects of intrahypothalamic apelin-13 injection on food intake and the involvement of orexigenic and anorexigenic hypothalamic peptides and neurotransmitters. Eighteen rats (6 for each group of treatment) were injected into the ARC with either vehicle or apelin-13 (1-2 μg/rat). Food intake and hypothalamic peptide and neurotransmitter levels were evaluated 2 and 24 h after injection. Compared to vehicle, apelin-13 administration increased food intake both 2 and 24 h following treatment. This effect could be related to inhibited cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) gene expression and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) synthesis and release, and increased orexin A gene expression in the hypothalamus.

  5. Effects of undernourishment on the hypothalamic orexinergic system.

    PubMed

    Pinos, H; Pérez-Izquierdo, M A; Carrillo, B; Collado, P

    2011-01-10

    The present study examined the effects of a severely restricted diet during the pre- and postnatal periods with later nutritional rehabilitation on orexin hypothalamic neurons in male and female Wistar rats. Immunocytochemistry was used to reveal orexin-immunoreactive (orexin-ir) cells in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), lateral hypothalamic area (LH) and the perifornical nucleus (PF). Dietary restriction decreased the number of orexin-ir cells in the LH, whereas DMH or PF orexin-ir populations were not affected in either male or female rats. Nutritional rehabilitation resulted in a differential recovery that depended on the period during which rehabilitation occurred and on the sex of the animal. In summary, our study suggests that the hypothalamic nuclei implicated in eating behavior present a differential vulnerability to adverse environmental conditions during development. Specifically, among the studied nuclei only the LH orexin-ir cells were sensitive to severe food deprivation during development in male and female rats. These results suggest that starvation interferes with developmental events that occur during CNS sexual differentiation. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neurohormones, rikkunshito and hypothalamic neurons interactively control appetite and anorexia.

    PubMed

    Yada, Toshihiko; Kohno, Daisuke; Maejima, Yuko; Sedbazar, Udval; Arai, Takeshi; Toriya, Masako; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Kurita, Hedeharu; Niijima, Akira; Yakabi, Koji

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin is the orexigenic peptide produced in the periphery, and its plasma level shows remarkable pre/postprandial changes. Ghrelin is considered a pivotal signal to the brain to stimulate feeding. Hence, characterizing the target neurons for ghrelin in the hypothalamic feeding center and the signaling cascade in the target neurons are essential for understanding the mechanisms regulating appetite. Anorexia and cachexia associated with gastric surgery, stress-related diseases, and use of anti-cancer drugs cause the health problems, markedly deteriorating the quality of life. The anorexia involves several neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in the hypothalamic feeding center, in which corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), urocortine, serotonin (5HT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) play a pivotal role. A Japanese herbal medicine, rikkunshito, has been reported to ameliorate the anorexia by promoting the appetite. This review describes 1) the interaction of ghrelin with the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) and underlying signaling cascade in NPY neurons, 2) the anorectic pathway driven by BDNF-CRH/urocortine and 5HTCRH/ urocortine pathways, 3) the effect of rikkunshito on the interaction of ghrelin and NPY neurons in ARC, and 4) the effect of rikkunshito on the interaction of 5HT on CRH neurons in paraventricular nucleus (PVN).

  7. 17β-Oestradiol indirectly inhibits thyrotrophin-releasing hormone expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of female rats and blunts thyroid axis response to cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Uribe, R M; Zacarias, M; Corkidi, G; Cisneros, M; Charli, J-L; Joseph-Bravo, P

    2009-05-01

    Energy expenditure and thermogenesis are regultated by thyroid and sex hormones. Several parameters of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis function are modulated by 17β-oestradiol (E(2)) but its effects on thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) mRNA levels remain unknown. We evaluated, by in situ hybridisation and Northern bloting, TRH expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) of cycling rats, 2 weeks-ovariectomised (OVX) and OVX animals injected s.c. during 1-4 days with E(2) (5, 50, 100 or 200 μg ⁄ kg) (OVX-E). Serum levels of E(2), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), prolactin, corticosterone and triiodothyronine (T(3)) were quantified by radioimmunoassay. Increased serum E(2) levels were observed after 4 days injection of 50 μg ⁄ kg E(2) (to 68.5 ± 4.8 pg ⁄ ml) in OVX rats. PVN-TRH mRNA levels were slightly higher in OVX than in virgin females at dioestrous 1 or pro-oestrous, decreasing proportionally to increased serum E(2) levels. E(2) injections augmented serum T(3), prolactin, and corticosterone levels. Serum TSH levels augmented with 4 days 50 μg ⁄ kg E(2), but not with the higher doses that enhanced serum T(3) levels. Exposure to cold for 1 h resulted in marked HPT axis activation in OVX rats, increasing the levels of TRH mRNA along the rostro-caudal PVN areas, as well as serum TSH, T(3), corticosterone and prolactin levels. By contrast, no significant changes in any of these parameters were observed in cold-exposed OVX-E (50 μg ⁄ kg E(2)) rats. Very few PVN-TRHergic neurones expressed the oestrogen receptor type-α, suggesting that the effects of E(2) on PVN-TRH expression are indirect, most probably as a result of its multiple modulatory effects on circulating hormones and their receptor sensitivity. The blunted response of OVX-E rats to cold coincides with the effects of E(2) on the autonomic nervous system and increased cold tolerance.

  8. Cyclic Pursuit in Three Dimensions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-17

    A three-dimensional version of the motion camouflage pursuit 49th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control December 15-17, 2010 Hilton Atlanta Hotel ...show that Θ is a constant value on MCB(a). Proposition 4: Consider a two-particle system operating on MCB(a) according to the closed-loop mutual CB...illustrate various types of trajectories in terms of initial conditions (` and Θ) and parameter values (a+ and a−). In our planar discussion of cyclic

  9. Plant cyclic nucleotide signalling: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc; Maathuis, Frans Jm

    2007-11-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3',5'-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3',5'-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed.

  10. Supramolecular nesting of cyclic polymers.

    PubMed

    Kondratuk, Dmitry V; Perdigão, Luís M A; Esmail, Ayad M S; O'Shea, James N; Beton, Peter H; Anderson, Harry L

    2015-04-01

    Advances in template-directed synthesis make it possible to create artificial molecules with protein-like dimensions, directly from simple components. These synthetic macromolecules have a proclivity for self-organization that is reminiscent of biopolymers. Here, we report the synthesis of monodisperse cyclic porphyrin polymers, with diameters of up to 21 nm (750 C–C bonds). The ratio of the intrinsic viscosities for cyclic and linear topologies is 0.72, indicating that these polymers behave as almost ideal flexible chains in solution. When deposited on gold surfaces, the cyclic polymers display a new mode of two-dimensional supramolecular organization, combining encapsulation and nesting; one nanoring adopts a near-circular conformation, thus allowing a second nanoring to be captured within its perimeter, in a tightly folded conformation. Scanning tunnelling microscopy reveals that nesting occurs in combination with stacking when nanorings are deposited under vacuum, whereas when they are deposited directly from solution under ambient conditions there is stacking or nesting, but not a combination of both.

  11. Cyclic Deformation in Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Sha, Z D; Qu, S X; Liu, Z S; Wang, T J; Gao, H

    2015-10-14

    Despite the utmost importance and decades of experimental studies on fatigue in metallic glasses (MGs), there has been so far little or no atomic-level understanding of the mechanisms involved. Here we perform molecular dynamics simulations of tension-compression fatigue in Cu50Zr50 MGs under strain-controlled cyclic loading. It is shown that the shear band (SB) initiation under cyclic loading is distinctly different from that under monotonic loading. Under cyclic loading, SB initiation takes place when aggregates of shear transformation zones (STZs) accumulating at the MG surface reach a critical size comparable to the SB width, and the accumulation of STZs follows a power law with rate depending on the applied strain. It is further shown that almost the entire fatigue life of nanoscale MGs under low cycle fatigue is spent in the SB-initiation stage, similar to that of crystalline materials. Furthermore, a qualitative investigation of the effect of cycling frequency on the fatigue behavior of MGs suggests that higher cycling frequency leads to more cycles to failure. The present study sheds light on the fundamental fatigue mechanisms of MGs that could be useful in developing strategies for their engineering applications.

  12. [Hypothalamic inflammation and energy balance deregulations: focus on chemokines.

    PubMed

    Le Thuc, Ophélia; Rovère, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a key brain region in the regulation of energy balance. It especially controls food intake and both energy storage and expenditure through integration of humoral, neural and nutrient-related signals and cues. Hypothalamic neurons and glial cells act jointly to orchestrate, both spatially and temporally, regulated metabolic functions of the hypothalamus. Thus, the existence of a causal link between hypothalamic inflammation and deregulations of feeding behavior, such as involuntary weight-loss or obesity, has been suggested. Among the inflammatory mediators that could induce deregulations of hypothalamic control of the energy balance, chemokines represent interesting candidates. Indeed, chemokines, primarily known for their chemoattractant role of immune cells to the inflamed site, have also been suggested capable of neuromodulation. Thus, chemokines could disrupt cellular activity together with synthesis and/or secretion of multiple neurotransmitters/mediators that are involved in the maintenance of energy balance. Here, we relate, on one hand, recent results showing the primary role of the central chemokinergic signaling CCL2/CCR2 for metabolic and behavioral adaptation to high-grade inflammation, especially loss of appetite and weight, through its activity on hypothalamic neurons producing the orexigenic peptide Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH) and, on the other hand, results that suggest that chemokines could also deregulate hypothalamic neuropeptidergic circuits to induce an opposite phenotype and eventually participate in the onset/development of obesity. In more details, we will emphasize a study recently showing, in a model of high-grade acute inflammation of LPS injection in mice, that central CCL2/CCR2 signaling is of primary importance for several aspects explaining weight loss associated with inflammation: after LPS injection, animals lose weight, reduce their food intake, increase their fat oxidation (thus energy consumption from

  13. Cyclic modular beta-sheets.

    PubMed

    Woods, R Jeremy; Brower, Justin O; Castellanos, Elena; Hashemzadeh, Mehrnoosh; Khakshoor, Omid; Russu, Wade A; Nowick, James S

    2007-03-07

    The development of peptide beta-hairpins is problematic, because folding depends on the amino acid sequence and changes to the sequence can significantly decrease folding. Robust beta-hairpins that can tolerate such changes are attractive tools for studying interactions involving protein beta-sheets and developing inhibitors of these interactions. This paper introduces a new class of peptide models of protein beta-sheets that addresses the problem of separating folding from the sequence. These model beta-sheets are macrocyclic peptides that fold in water to present a pentapeptide beta-strand along one edge; the other edge contains the tripeptide beta-strand mimic Hao [JACS 2000, 122, 7654] and two additional amino acids. The pentapeptide and Hao-containing peptide strands are connected by two delta-linked ornithine (deltaOrn) turns [JACS 2003, 125, 876]. Each deltaOrn turn contains a free alpha-amino group that permits the linking of individual modules to form divalent beta-sheets. These "cyclic modular beta-sheets" are synthesized by standard solid-phase peptide synthesis of a linear precursor followed by solution-phase cyclization. Eight cyclic modular beta-sheets 1a-1h containing sequences based on beta-amyloid and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 were synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR. Linked cyclic modular beta-sheet 2, which contains two modules of 1b, was also synthesized and characterized. 1H NMR studies show downfield alpha-proton chemical shifts, deltaOrn delta-proton magnetic anisotropy, and NOE cross-peaks that establish all compounds but 1c and 1g to be moderately or well folded into a conformation that resembles a beta-sheet. Pulsed-field gradient NMR diffusion experiments show little or no self-association at low (

  14. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Function in Diverse Hyperprolactinemic States

    PubMed Central

    Boyar, R. M.; Kapen, S.; Finkelstein, J. W.; Perlow, M.; Sassin, J. F.; Fukushima, D. K.; Weitzman, E. D.; Hellman, Leon

    1974-01-01

    Prolactin secretion in normal adults is characterized by periods of episodic secretion which increase in magnitude during sleep. In this study, we report the 24-h mean prolactin concentrations, prolactin secretory patterns, and associated pituitary hormone function in nine patients (seven women and two men) with hyperprolactinemia of diverse etiologies. Four of the women and one of the men had clinically demonstrable pituitary tumors, one boy had a hypothalamic tumor, and the three other women had “functional” hyperprolactinemia. The 24-h mean prolactin concentrations derived from averaging the 20-min interval samples for 24 h ranged from 28.6 to 1,220 ng/ml. The plasma prolactin patterns in these patients showed persistence of episodic secretion in all and loss of the normal sleep-wake difference in plasma prolactin in seven of nine. Three of the patients with galactorrhea and comparable 24-h mean prolactin concentrations (58.3, 59.7, and 64.3 ng/ml) showed similar prolactin secretory patterns despite different etiologic mechanisms. Evaluation of the secretory patterns of luteinizing hormone (LH) in these patients showed loss of normal pulsatile LH release and a low 24-h mean LH concentration in the patient with the pituitary tumor, while the two patients without clinically demonstrable pituitary tumors (“post-pill” galactorrhea and “idiopathic” galactorrhea) showed normal LH secretory patterns and 24-h mean LH concentrations. The 24-h mean cortisol concentrations and secretory patterns were normal in five of the seven patients who had these parameters measured. The patient with the hypothalamic tumor had a low 24-h mean cortisol concentration and production rate and absent response to metyrapone. The patient with “idiopathic” galactorrhea had an elevated 24-h mean cortisol concentration but normal cortisol production rate and urinary 17-hydroxycorticoid excretion. Growth hormone secretion was abnormal in four of the patients (one with the

  15. Thyroid hormone activation of retinoic acid synthesis in hypothalamic tanycytes

    PubMed Central

    Stoney, Patrick N.; Helfer, Gisela; Rodrigues, Diana; Morgan, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for adult brain function and its actions include several key roles in the hypothalamus. Although TH controls gene expression via specific TH receptors of the nuclear receptor class, surprisingly few genes have been demonstrated to be directly regulated by TH in the hypothalamus, or the adult brain as a whole. This study explored the rapid induction by TH of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (Raldh1), encoding a retinoic acid (RA)‐synthesizing enzyme, as a gene specifically expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, cells that mediate a number of actions of TH in the hypothalamus. The resulting increase in RA may then regulate gene expression via the RA receptors, also of the nuclear receptor class. In vivo exposure of the rat to TH led to a significant and rapid increase in hypothalamic Raldh1 within 4 hours. That this may lead to an in vivo increase in RA is suggested by the later induction by TH of the RA‐responsive gene Cyp26b1. To explore the actions of RA in the hypothalamus as a potential mediator of TH control of gene regulation, an ex vivo hypothalamic rat slice culture method was developed in which the Raldh1‐expressing tanycytes were maintained. These slice cultures confirmed that TH did not act on genes regulating energy balance but could induce Raldh1. RA has the potential to upregulate expression of genes involved in growth and appetite, Ghrh and Agrp. This regulation is acutely sensitive to epigenetic changes, as has been shown for TH action in vivo. These results indicate that sequential triggering of two nuclear receptor signalling systems has the capability to mediate some of the functions of TH in the hypothalamus. GLIA 2016;64:425–439 PMID:26527258

  16. Neurological complications after gamma-knife radiosurgery for hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Butragueño Laiseca, Laura; Oikonomopoulou, Niki; Miranda Herrero, María Concepción; Barredo Valderrama, Estíbaliz; Vázquez López, María; Jiménez de Domingo, Ana; Aguado Del Hoyo, Alejandra; García-Leal, Roberto; Meiriño, Rosa M

    2016-09-01

    The Gamma-knife technique is a safe and effective option for the treatment of hypothalamic hamartomas that produce epileptic seizures refractory to medical treatment and/or serious behavioral disorders. After this type of radiosurgery, an adequate symptomatic control is normally achieved, with notable decrease or even disappearance of the seizures. Radiological changes, such as a decrease in the size of the tumor or adjacent edema secondary to non-necrotizing radioinduced inflammatory reaction are unusual consequences. Side effects and neurological complications are also rare events. This report describes an unusual case of complete radiological resolution of a hypothalamic hamartoma as well as neurological complications after Gamma-knife surgery (receiving 13 Gy to the 85% isodose line, 1 cm(3) of tumor volume) in a 8-year-old boy who suffered from severe refractory seizures. After radiosurgery, the patient experienced a notable improvement in his symptoms, achieving seizure cessation within 3 months. However, 4 months after the procedure he presented drowsiness, fever and decreased level of consciousness due to a direct effect on the hypothalamus with local and regional edema secondary to the radiosurgery that was performed. He was successfully treated with corticosteroids (with a total duration of 11 months), and twelve months after the surgery, complete disappearance of both the nodular lesion and the secondary edema was observed. The patient remains seizure-free in the last 16 months, with remarkable changes in his behavior. The present case shows that complete radiological resolution of a hypothalamic hamartoma after Gamma-knife technique is unusual but possible, without long-term neurological consequences. Nevertheless, despite its low incidence, if a patient presents neurological symptoms, primarily during the first year after intervention, possible complications of this type of surgery must be taken into account. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric

  17. The hypothalamic peptidergic system, hypocretin/orexin and vigilance control.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Seiji

    2007-06-01

    Using forward and reverse genetics, the genes (hypocretin/orexin ligand and its receptor) involved in the pathogenesis of the sleep disorder, narcolepsy, in animals, have been identified. Mutations in hypocretin related-genes are extremely rare in humans, but hypocretin-ligand deficiency is found in most narcolepsy-cataplexy cases. Hypocretin deficiency in humans can be clinically detected by CSF hypocretin-1 measures, and undetectably low CSF hypocretin-1 is now included in the revised international diagnostic criteria of narcolepsy. Since hypocretin-ligand deficiency is the major pathophysiology in human narcolepsy, hypocretin replacements (using hypocretin agonists or gene therapy) are promising future therapeutic options. New insights into the roles of hypocretin system on sleep physiology have also rapidly increased. Hypocretins are involved in various fundamental hypothalamic functions such as feeding, energy homeostasis and neuroendocrine regulation. Hypocretin neurons project to most ascending arousal systems (including monoaminergic and cholinergic systems), and generally exhibit excitatory inputs. Together with the recent finding of the sleep promoting system in the hypothalamus (especially in the GABA/galanin ventrolateral preoptic area which exhibits inhibitory inputs to these ascending systems), the hypothalamus is now recognized as the most important brain site for the sleep switch, and other peptidergic systems may also participate in this regulation. Meanwhile, narcolepsy now appears to be a more complex condition than previously thought. The pathophysiology of the disease is involved in the abnormalities of sleep and various hypothalamic functions due to hypocretin deficiency, such as the changes in energy homeostasis, stress reactions and rewarding. Narcolepsy is therefore, an important model to study the link between sleep regulation and other fundamental hypothalamic functions.

  18. Hypothalamic opioid-melanocortin appetitive balance and addictive craving.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Whilst the parallels between drug and food craving are receiving increasing attention, the recently elucidated complex physiology of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centres has been largely overlooked in the efforts to understand drug craving which is one of the most refractory and problematic aspects of drug and behavioural addictions. Important conceptual gains could be made by researchers from both appetite and addiction neuroscience if they were to have an improved understanding of each others' disciplines. It is well known in addiction medicine that the use of many substances is elevated in opiate dependency. There is voluminous evidence of very high rates of drug use in opiate agonist maintained patients, and the real possibility exists that opiate agonist therapy therefore increases drug craving. Conversely, opiate antagonist therapy with naloxone or naltrexone has been shown to reduce most chemical and behavioural addictions, and naltrexone is now being developed together with bupropion as the anti-obesity drug "Contrave". Hypothalamic melanocortins, particularly α-MSH, are known to constitute the main brake to consumptive behaviour of food. There is a well described antagonism between melanocortins and opioids at many loci including the hypothalamus. Administration of exogenous opiates is known to both suppress α-MSH and to stimulate hedonic food consumption. Opiate maintenance programs are associated with weight gain. As monoamines, opioids and cannabinoids are known to be involved in appetite regulation, and as endorphin opioids are known to be perturbed in other addictions, further exploration of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centre would appear to be an obvious, albeit presently largely overlooked, locus in which to study drug and other craving mechanisms.

  19. Hypothalamic neuropeptide systems and anticipatory weight change in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Adam, C L; Mercer, J G

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal animals are able both to programme changes in body weight in response to annual changes in photoperiod (anticipatory regulation) and to correct changes in body weight caused by imposed energetic demand (compensatory regulation). Experimental evidence from the Siberian hamster suggests that seasonally appropriate body weight is continually reset according to photoperiodic history, even when actual body weight is driven away from this target weight by manipulation of energy intake. These characteristics constitute the "sliding set point" of seasonal body weight regulation. To define the mechanisms and molecules underlying anticipatory body weight regulation, we are investigating the involvement of hypothalamic systems with an established role in the compensatory defence of body weight. Weight loss or restricted growth induced by short days (SD) results in low circulating leptin compared with long day (LD) controls. However, this chronic low leptin signal is read differently from acute low leptin resulting from food deprivation; leptin receptor gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) is lower in SD, whereas food deprivation increases expression levels, suggesting changes in sensitivity to leptin feedback. SD alterations in mRNA levels for a number of hypothalamic neuropeptide and receptor genes appear counter-intuitive for a SD body weight trajectory. However, early increases in ARC cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) gene expression in SDs could be involved in driving body weight loss or growth restriction. The sites of photoperiod interaction with energy balance neuronal circuitry and the neurochemical encoding of body weight set point require full characterisation. Study of anticipatory regulation in seasonal animals offers new insight into body weight regulation across mammalian species, including man.

  20. Projections from the Subfornical Region of the Lateral Hypothalamic Area

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, MARINA; CANTERAS, NEWTON S.; BURNS, GULLY; SWANSON, LARRY W.

    2010-01-01

    The L-shaped anterior zone of the lateral hypothalamic area’s subfornical region (LHAsfa) is delineated by a pontine nucleus incertus input. Function evidence suggests the subfornical region and nucleus incertus modulate foraging and defensive behaviors, although subfornical region connections are poorly understood. A high resolution Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHAL) structural analysis is presented here of the LHAsfa neuron population’s overall axonal projection pattern. The strongest LHAsfa targets are in the interbrain and cerebral hemisphere. The former include inputs to anterior hypothalamic nucleus, dorsomedial part of the ventromedial nucleus, and ventral region of the dorsal premammillary nucleus (defensive behavior control system components), and to lateral habenula and dorsal region of the dorsal premammillary nucleus (foraging behavior control system components). The latter include massive inputs to lateral and medial septal nuclei (septo-hippocampal system components), and inputs to bed nuclei of the stria terminalis posterior division related to the defensive behavior system, intercalated amygdalar nucleus (projecting to central amygdalar nucleus), and posterior part of the basomedial amygdalar nucleus. LHAsfa vertical and horizontal limb basic projection patterns are similar, although each preferentially innervates certain terminal fields. Lateral hypothalamic area regions immediately medial, lateral, and caudal to the LHAsfa each generate quite distinct projection patterns. Combined with previous evidence that major sources LHAsfa neural inputs include the parabrachial nucleus (nociceptive information), defensive and foraging behavior system components, and the septo-hippocampal system, the present results suggest that the LHAsfa helps match adaptive behavioral responses (either defensive or foraging) to current internal motivational status and external environmental conditions. PMID:16261534

  1. Regulation of Prolactin in Mice with Altered Hypothalamic Melanocortin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dutia, Roxanne; Kim, Andrea J.; Mosharov, Eugene; Savontaus, Eriika; Chua, Streamson C.; Wardlaw, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    This study used two mouse models with genetic manipulation of the melanocortin system to investigate prolactin regulation. Mice with overexpression of the melanocortin receptor (MC-R) agonist, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (Tg-MSH) or deletion of the MC-R antagonist agouti-related protein (AgRP KO) were studied. Male Tg-MSH mice had lower blood prolactin levels at baseline (2.9±0.3 vs 4.7±0.7 ng/ml) and after restraint stress(68 ±6.5 vs 117±22 ng/ml) versus WT (p<0.05); however, pituitary prolactin content was not different. Blood prolactin was also decreased in male AgRP KO mice at baseline (4.2±0.5 vs 7.6±1.3 ng/ml) and after stress (60±4.5 vs 86.1±5.7 ng/ml) vs WT (p <0.001). Pituitary prolactin content was lower in male AgRP KO mice (4.3±0.3 vs 6.7±0.5 μg/pituitary, p <0.001) versus WT. No differences in blood or pituitary prolactin levels were observed in female AgRP KO mice versus WT. Hypothalamic dopamine activity was assessed as the potential mechanism responsible for changes in prolactin levels. Hypothalamic tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA was measured in both genetic models versus WT mice and hypothalamic dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) content were measured in male AgRP KO and WT mice but neither were significantly different. However, these results do not preclude changes in dopamine activity as dopamine turnover was not directly investigated. This is the first study to show that baseline and stress-induced prolactin release and pituitary prolactin content are reduced in mice with genetic alterations of the melanocortin system and suggests that changes in hypothalamic melanocortin activity may be reflected in measurements of serum prolactin levels. PMID:22800691

  2. Hypothalamic hamartoma in an unusual case with delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Nakhaeimoghadam, Maryam; Rostami, Parastoo; Zare-Shahabadi, Ameneh; Mehdizadeh, Mehrzad; Rabbani, Ali; Rezaei, Nima

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) is a rare intracranial lesion that usually presents with classic triad of central precocious puberty, gelastic epilepsy, and developmental delay. Herein, a 14-year old boy is presented in whom the diagnosis of HH was made by magnetic resonance imaging. While he did not have any complain of precocious puberty, he surprisingly suffered from delay in puberty. The definite diagnosis of HH can only be made by appropriate imaging, in a case with atypical feature of delay in puberty and in the absence of gelastic epilepsy. To our best knowledge, this is the first case of HH who is presented with delay in puberty as of first manifestation.

  3. Methamphetamine and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis

    PubMed Central

    Zuloaga, Damian G.; Jacobskind, Jason S.; Raber, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants such as methamphetamine (MA) induce significant alterations in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. These changes in HPA axis function are associated with altered stress-related behaviors and might contribute to addictive processes such as relapse. In this mini-review we discuss acute and chronic effects of MA (adult and developmental exposure) on the HPA axis, including effects on HPA axis associated genes/proteins, brain regions, and behaviors such as anxiety and depression. A better understanding of the mechanisms through which MA affects the HPA axis may lead to more effective treatment strategies for MA addiction. PMID:26074755

  4. Alterations in the hypothalamic melanocortin pathway in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; El Oussini, Hajer; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Dengler, Reinhard; Meyer, Thomas; Zierz, Stephan; Kassubek, Jan; Fischer, Wilhelm; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Grehl, Torsten; Hermann, Andreas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Witting, Anke; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease, leads to death within 3 to 5 years after onset. Beyond progressive motor impairment, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis suffer from major defects in energy metabolism, such as weight loss, which are well correlated with survival. Indeed, nutritional intervention targeting weight loss might improve survival of patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying metabolic impairment in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis remain elusive, in particular due to the lack of longitudinal studies. Here we took advantage of samples collected during the clinical trial of pioglitazone (GERP-ALS), and characterized longitudinally energy metabolism of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in response to pioglitazone, a drug with well-characterized metabolic effects. As expected, pioglitazone decreased glycaemia, decreased liver enzymes and increased circulating adiponectin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, showing its efficacy in the periphery. However, pioglitazone did not increase body weight of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis independently of bulbar involvement. As pioglitazone increases body weight through a direct inhibition of the hypothalamic melanocortin system, we studied hypothalamic neurons producing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and the endogenous melanocortin inhibitor agouti-related peptide (AGRP), in mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutant SOD1(G86R). We observed lower Pomc but higher Agrp mRNA levels in the hypothalamus of presymptomatic SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistently, numbers of POMC-positive neurons were decreased, whereas AGRP fibre density was elevated in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistent with a defect in the hypothalamic melanocortin system, food intake after short term fasting was increased in SOD1(G86R) mice. Importantly, these findings were replicated in two other amyotrophic

  5. Experience salience gates endocannabinoid signaling at hypothalamic synapses.

    PubMed

    Wamsteeker Cusulin, Jaclyn I; Senst, Laura; Teskey, G Campbell; Bains, Jaideep S

    2014-04-30

    Alterations in synaptic endocannabinoid signaling are a widespread neurobiological consequence of many in vivo experiences, including stress. Here, we report that stressor salience is critical for bidirectionally modifying presynaptic CB-1 receptor (CB1R) function at hypothalamic GABA synapses controlling the neuroendocrine stress axis in male rats. While repetitive, predictable stressor exposure impairs presynaptic CB1R function, these changes are rapidly reversed upon exposure to a high salience experience such as novel stress or by manipulations that enhance neural activity levels in vivo or in vitro. Together these data demonstrate that experience salience, through alterations in afferent synaptic activity, induces rapid changes in endocannabinoid signaling.

  6. Hypothalamic miRNAs: emerging roles in energy balance control.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Marc; Gomez-Valadés, Alicia G; Ramirez, Sara; Gomis, Ramon; Claret, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a crucial central nervous system area controlling appetite, body weight and metabolism. It consists in multiple neuronal types that sense, integrate and generate appropriate responses to hormonal and nutritional signals partly by fine-tuning the expression of specific batteries of genes. However, the mechanisms regulating these neuronal gene programmes in physiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression that recently emerged as pivotal modulators of systemic metabolism. In this article we will review current evidence indicating that miRNAs in hypothalamic neurons are also implicated in appetite and whole-body energy balance control.

  7. Advances in targeting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Donald H.; Ke, Hengming; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Wang, Yousheng; Chung, Jay; Manganiello, Vincent C.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyse the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, thereby regulating the intracellular concentrations of these cyclic nucleotides, their signalling pathways and, consequently, myriad biological responses in health and disease. Currently, a small number of PDE inhibitors are used clinically for treating the pathophysiological dysregulation of cyclic nucleotide signalling in several disorders, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pharmaceutical interest in PDEs has been reignited by the increasing understanding of the roles of individual PDEs in regulating the subcellular compartmentalization of specific cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways, by the structure-based design of novel specific inhibitors and by the development of more sophisticated strategies to target individual PDE variants. PMID:24687066

  8. [Cyclic Cushing's Syndrome - rare or rarely recognized].

    PubMed

    Kiałka, Marta; Doroszewska, Katarzyna; Mrozińska, Sandra; Milewicz, Tomasz; Stochmal, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic Cushing's syndrome is a type of Cushing's disease which is characterized by alternating periods of increasing and decreasing levels of cortisol in the blood. The diagnostic criteria for cyclic Cushing's syndrome are at least three periods of hypercortisolism alternating with at least two episodes of normal levels of serum cortisol concentration. The epidemiology, signs, symptoms, pathogenesis and treatment of cyclic Cushing's syndrome have been discussed.

  9. Cyclic Imide Dioxime: Formation and Hydrolytic Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.O.; Vukovic, Sinisa; Custelcean, Radu; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Poly(acrylamidoximes) play an important role in the uranium extraction from seawater. The present work reports solution studies of simple analogs to address the formation and stability of two binding sites present in these polymers, open-chain amidoximes and cyclic imide dioximes, including: 1) conditions that maximize the formation of the cyclic form, 2) existence of a base-induced conversion from open-chain to cyclic form, and 3) degradation under acid and base conditions.

  10. Childhood maltreatment and adult psychopathology: pathways to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Marcelo F.; Faria, Alvaro A.; Mello, Andrea F.; Carpenter, Linda L.; Tyrka, Audrey R.; Price, Lawrence H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this paper was to examine the relationship between childhood maltreatment and adult psychopathology, as reflected in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction. Method A selective review of the relevant literature was undertaken in order to identify key and illustrative research findings. Results There is now a substantial body of preclinical and clinical evidence derived from a variety of experimental paradigms showing how early-life stress is related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function and psychological state in adulthood, and how that relationship can be modulated by other factors. Discussion The risk for adult psychopathology and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction is related to a complex interaction among multiple experiential factors, as well as to susceptibility genes that interact with those factors. Although acute hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responses to stress are generally adaptive, excessive responses can lead to deleterious effects. Early-life stress alters hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function and behavior, but the pattern of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal dysfunction and psychological outcome in adulthood reflect both the characteristics of the stressor and other modifying factors. Conclusion Research to date has identified multiple determinants of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction seen in adults with a history of childhood maltreatment or other early-life stress. Further work is needed to establish whether hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis abnormalities in this context can be used to develop risk endophenotypes for psychiatric and physical illnesses. PMID:19967199

  11. A treasure trove of hypothalamic neurocircuitries governing body weight homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Claudia R; Coppari, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Changes in physical activities and feeding habits have transformed the historically rare disease of obesity into a modern metabolic pandemic. Obesity occurs when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure over time. This energy imbalance significantly increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus and as such represents an enormous socioeconomic burden and health threat. To combat obesity, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms and neurocircuitries underlying normal body weight homeostasis is required. In the 1940s, pioneering lesion experiments unveiled the importance of medial and lateral hypothalamic structures. In the 1980s and 1990s, several neuropeptides and peripheral hormones critical for appropriate feeding behavior, energy expenditure, and hence body weight homeostasis were identified. In the 2000s, results from metabolic analyses of genetically engineered mice bearing mutations only in selected neuronal groups greatly advanced our knowledge of the peripheral/brain feedback-loop modalities by which central neurons control energy balance. In this review, we will summarize these recent progresses with particular emphasis on the biochemical identities of hypothalamic neurons and molecular components underlying normal appetite, energy expenditure, and body weight homeostasis. We will also parse which of those neurons and molecules are critical components of homeostatic adaptive pathways against obesity induced by hypercaloric feeding.

  12. [Symptomatic hypersomnia due to orexin deficiency in hypothalamic lesions].

    PubMed

    Kanbayashi, Takashi; Arii, Junko; Kubota, Hiroaki; Yano, Tamami; Kashiwagi, Mitsuru; Yoshikawa, Sousuke; Tohyama, Jun; Sawaishi, Yukio

    2006-09-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy and other abnormal manifestations of REM sleep. Recently, it was discovered that the pathophysiology of idiopathic narcolepsy-cataplexy is linked to orexin ligand deficiency in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Orexin neurons localize in the posterior hypothalamic area, which was previously described as "waking center" by von Economo in 1920s. Hypersomnia due to orexin ligand deficiency can also occur during the course of other neurological conditions, such as hypothalamic tumor, encephalopathy and demyelinating disorder (i.e. symptomatic hypersomnia). We experienced 8 pediatric cases with symptomatic hypersomnia. These cases were diagnosed as brain tumor (n = 2), head trauma (n = 1), encephalopathy (n = 1), demyelinating disorder (n = 3) and infarction (n = 1). Six pediatric cases with orexin measurements from the literatures were additionally included and total 14 cases were studied. Although it is difficult to rule out the comorbidity of idiopathic narcolepsy in some cases, a review of the case histories reveals numerous unquestionable cases of symptomatic hypersomnia. In these cases, the occurrences of the hypersomnia run parallel with the rise and fall of the causative diseases. Most of symptomatic hypersomnia cases show both extended nocturnal sleep time and EDS consisting of prolonged sleep episodes of NREM sleep. The features of nocturnal sleep and EDS in symptomatic hypersomnia are more similar to idiopathic hypersomnia than to narcolepsy.

  13. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-03-30

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons.

  14. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  15. Molecular interrogation of hypothalamic organization reveals distinct dopamine neuronal subtypes.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Roman A; Zeisel, Amit; Bakker, Joanne; Girach, Fatima; Hellysaz, Arash; Tomer, Raju; Alpár, Alán; Mulder, Jan; Clotman, Frédéric; Keimpema, Erik; Hsueh, Brian; Crow, Ailey K; Martens, Henrik; Schwindling, Christian; Calvigioni, Daniela; Bains, Jaideep S; Máté, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Zhang, Ming-Dong; Rendeiro, Andre; Farlik, Matthias; Uhlén, Mathias; Wulff, Peer; Bock, Christoph; Broberger, Christian; Deisseroth, Karl; Hökfelt, Tomas; Linnarsson, Sten; Horvath, Tamas L; Harkany, Tibor

    2017-02-01

    The hypothalamus contains the highest diversity of neurons in the brain. Many of these neurons can co-release neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in a use-dependent manner. Investigators have hitherto relied on candidate protein-based tools to correlate behavioral, endocrine and gender traits with hypothalamic neuron identity. Here we map neuronal identities in the hypothalamus by single-cell RNA sequencing. We distinguished 62 neuronal subtypes producing glutamatergic, dopaminergic or GABAergic markers for synaptic neurotransmission and harboring the ability to engage in task-dependent neurotransmitter switching. We identified dopamine neurons that uniquely coexpress the Onecut3 and Nmur2 genes, and placed these in the periventricular nucleus with many synaptic afferents arising from neuromedin S(+) neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. These neuroendocrine dopamine cells may contribute to the dopaminergic inhibition of prolactin secretion diurnally, as their neuromedin S(+) inputs originate from neurons expressing Per2 and Per3 and their tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation is regulated in a circadian fashion. Overall, our catalog of neuronal subclasses provides new understanding of hypothalamic organization and function.

  16. Early effects of cranial irradiation on hypothalamic-pituitary function

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, K.S.; Tse, V.K.; Wang, C.; Yeung, R.T.; Ma, J.T.; Ho, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary function was studied in 31 patients before and after cranial irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The estimated radiotherapy (RT) doses to the hypothalamus and pituitary were 3979 +/- 78 (+/- SD) and 6167 +/- 122 centiGrays, respectively. All patients had normal pituitary function before RT. One year after RT, there was a significant decrease in the integrated serum GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In the male patients, basal serum FSH significantly increased, while basal serum LH and testosterone did not change. Moreover, in response to LHRH, the integrated FSH response was increased while that of LH was decreased. Such discordant changes in FSH and LH may be explained by a defect in LHRH pulsatile release involving predominantly a decrease in pulse frequency. The peak serum TSH response to TRH became delayed in 28 patients, suggesting a defect in TRH release. Twenty-one patients were reassessed 2 yr after RT. Their mean basal serum T4 and plasma cortisol levels had significantly decreased. Hyperprolactinemia associated with oligomenorrhoea was found in 3 women. Further impairment in the secretion of GH, FSH, LH, TSH, and ACTH had occurred, and 4 patients had hypopituitarism. Thus, progressive impairment in hypothalamic-pituitary function occurs after cranial irradiation and can be demonstrated as early as 1 yr after RT.

  17. Few isolated neurons in hypothalamic hamartomas may cause gelastic seizures.

    PubMed

    Waldau, Ben; McLendon, Roger E; Fuchs, Herbert E; George, Timothy M; Grant, Gerald A

    2009-01-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are congenital, benign masses in the hypothalamus and tuber cinereum that may cause central precocious puberty and gelastic seizures. Nodules of small neurons are thought to be a universal feature of the microarchitecture of HH lesions associated with epilepsy. Here we describe the case of a 5-year-old boy with gelastic seizures who underwent resection of a HH that contained nodules of glial cells, but only few, randomly distributed neurons. HHs that contain few or no neurons have only been reported thus far in cases associated with precocious puberty. This case demonstrates that few solitary neurons in HHs can drive the development of gelastic seizures, and nodules of small neurons may not be a universal feature of HHs associated with epilepsy. This finding is clinically important since hypothalamic hamartomas with rare neurons can easily be misdiagnosed as pilocytic astrocytomas or subependymomas if their presence is overlooked. A neuronal stain is helpful in making the correct diagnosis in these cases.

  18. Endoscopic disconnection of hypothalamic astrocytoma causing gelastic epilepsy. Case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Seok; Lee, Yun Ho; Shim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Dong-Seok; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Heung Dong

    2009-08-01

    The authors report on a case of juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) and concomitant hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) with gelastic epilepsy that was successfully treated with endoscopic disconnection. This 6-year-old girl presented with prolonged, medically intractable gelastic seizures that were often followed by generalized tonic seizures. An enhancing, low-grade hypothalamic tumor was identified on MR images obtained when she was 11 months old, but no surgical intervention was attempted at that time apart from bur hole drainage of a chronic subdural hemorrhage. In the first surgery, performed when she was 6 years of age, the authors attempted disconnection and tumor sampling; the lesion was revealed to be a JPA. A second endoscopic disconnection was performed 1 year later to improve seizure control and obtain a pathological specimen from the nonenhancing contralateral side. The pathological results after the second surgery revealed that the enhancing mass was a spontaneously regressing JPA and the contralateral nonenhancing mass was an HH. The HH was found as latent tumor and the JPA was the mass causing gelastic epilepsy. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with a spontaneously regressing JPA and concomitant HH, both of which were treated by endoscopic disconnection.

  19. Oestrogen Modulates Hypothalamic Control of Energy Homeostasis Through Multiple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Roepke, Troy A.

    2009-01-01

    The control of energy homeostasis in women is correlated with the anorectic effects of oestrogen, which can attenuate body weight gain and reduce food intake in rodent models. This review will investigate the multiple signalling pathways and cellular targets that oestrogen utilises to control energy homeostasis in the hypothalamus. Oestrogen affects all of the hypothalamic nuclei that control energy homeostasis. Oestrogen controls the activity of hypothalamic neurones through gene regulation and neuronal excitability. Oestrogen’s primary cellular pathway is the control of gene transcription through the classical ERs (ERα and ERβ) with ERα having the primary role in energy homeostasis. Oestrogen also controls energy homeostasis through membrane-mediated events via membrane-associated ERs or a novel, putative membrane ER that is coupled to G-proteins. Therefore, oestrogen has at least two receptors with multiple signalling and transcriptional pathways to activate during immediate and long-term anorectic effects. Ultimately, it is the interactions of all the receptor-mediated processes in hypothalamus and other areas of the CNS that will determine the anorectic effects of oestrogen and its control of energy homeostasis. PMID:19076267

  20. [Behavioral specialization of cortical and hypothalamic neurons in the rabbit].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, D G

    1987-01-01

    Behavioural specialization was analyzed of hypothalamic and limbic neurones, with their activity recorded in rabbits during food-acquisition behaviour. The neurones with activity changed during staying of the animal in a definite place of the cage or during behavioural acts, characteristic of a specific behaviour in the cage, are considered as specialized in relation to the most "new" systems, acquired by the rabbit directly during learning of the given behaviour. Neurones with the activity changed with rabbit's turns, i.e. connected with behavioural acts, which the rabbit has not specially learnt, are considered specialized in relation to more "old" inborn systems. Neurones, in which no constant connection with any part of the studied behaviour was observed, are related to the most "ancient" systems. Comparison of the number of hypothalamic and limbic neurones of different groups showed that in the cortex there were some more neurones specialized in relation to behavioural acts, which were formed directly during learning of the rabbit in the experimental cage.

  1. Ca2+/calmodulin system: participation on rat sexual hypothalamic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Medina, M; Canchola, E; Vergara-Onofre, M; Rosado, A

    1993-11-01

    Modifications of male rat hypothalamic sexual differentiation after neonatal administration of drugs that participate on the Ca2+/calmodulin system (haloperidol, trifluoperazine, penfluridol, pimozide, and verapamil) were studied. Pups treated 72 h after birth were behaviorally tested on day 120 of extrauterine life. Five tests for homotypical behavior were conducted. Afterwards animals were castrated and tested twice for heterotypical (female) behavior under replacement hormonal therapy. Fifty percent (80% in the case of pimozide) of all treated males showed lordotic behavior compared with none of the controls. Haloperidol (39%, lordosis quotient) and pimozide (40%, lordosis quotient) were more active than the others. Results obtained with verapamil were not statistically different from the controls. Pimozide was the most active agent influencing the appetitive masculine behavior (mount latency, intromission latency, and postejaculatory interval). Verapamil was more efficient than the rest of the drugs on the consummatory behavior (mount latency, intromission frequency, interintromission interval, and ejaculatory latency). Our results support the participation of the Ca2+/calmodulin system in hypothalamic sexual differentiation and in the differential modulation of the masculine and feminine behavioral patterns.

  2. Glucose and hypothalamic astrocytes: More than a fueling role?

    PubMed

    Leloup, C; Allard, C; Carneiro, L; Fioramonti, X; Collins, S; Pénicaud, L

    2016-05-26

    Brain plays a central role in energy homeostasis continuously integrating numerous peripheral signals such as circulating nutrients, and in particular blood glucose level, a variable that must be highly regulated. Then, the brain orchestrates adaptive responses to modulate food intake and peripheral organs activity in order to achieve the fine tuning of glycemia. More than fifty years ago, the presence of glucose-sensitive neurons was discovered in the hypothalamus, but what makes them specific and identifiable still remains disconnected from their electrophysiological signature. On the other hand, astrocytes represent the major class of macroglial cells and are now recognized to support an increasing number of neuronal functions. One of these functions consists in the regulation of energy homeostasis through neuronal fueling and nutrient sensing. Twenty years ago, we discovered that the glucose transporter GLUT2, the canonical "glucosensor" of the pancreatic beta-cell together with the glucokinase, was also present in astrocytes and participated in hypothalamic glucose sensing. Since then, many studies have identified other actors and emphasized the astroglial participation in this mechanism. Growing evidence suggest that astrocytes form a complex network and have to be considered as spatially coordinated and regulated metabolic units. In this review we aim to provide an updated view of the molecular and respective cellular pathways involved in hypothalamic glucose sensing, and their relevance in physiological and pathological states.

  3. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Reveals Hypothalamic Cell Diversity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renchao; Wu, Xiaoji; Jiang, Lan; Zhang, Yi

    2017-03-28

    The hypothalamus is one of the most complex brain structures involved in homeostatic regulation. Defining cell composition and identifying cell-type-specific transcriptional features of the hypothalamus is essential for understanding its functions and related disorders. Here, we report single-cell RNA sequencing results of adult mouse hypothalamus, which defines 11 non-neuronal and 34 neuronal cell clusters with distinct transcriptional signatures. Analyses of cell-type-specific transcriptomes reveal gene expression dynamics underlying oligodendrocyte differentiation and tanycyte subtypes. Additionally, data analysis provides a comprehensive view of neuropeptide expression across hypothalamic neuronal subtypes and uncover Crabp1(+) and Pax6(+) neuronal populations in specific hypothalamic sub-regions. Furthermore, we found food deprivation exhibited differential transcriptional effects among the different neuronal subtypes, suggesting functional specification of various neuronal subtypes. Thus, the work provides a comprehensive transcriptional perspective of adult hypothalamus, which serves as a valuable resource for dissecting cell-type-specific functions of this complex brain region.

  4. Hypothalamic leptin-neurotensin-hypocretin neuronal networks in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levitas-Djerbi, Talia; Yelin-Bekerman, Laura; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-04-01

    Neurotensin (NTS) is a 13 amino acid neuropeptide that is expressed in the hypothalamus. In mammals, NTS-producing neurons that express leptin receptor (LepRb) regulate the function of hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) and dopamine neurons. Thus, the hypothalamic leptin-NTS-HCRT neuronal network orchestrates key homeostatic output, including sleep, feeding, and reward. However, the intricate mechanisms of the circuitry and the unique role of NTS-expressing neurons remain unclear. We studied the NTS neuronal networks in zebrafish and cloned the genes encoding the NTS neuropeptide and receptor (NTSR). Similar to mammals, the ligand is expressed primarily in the hypothalamus, while the receptor is expressed widely throughout the brain in zebrafish. A portion of hypothalamic nts-expressing neurons are inhibitory and some coexpress leptin receptor (lepR1). As in mammals, NTS and HCRT neurons are localized adjacently in the hypothalamus. To track the development and axonal projection of NTS neurons, the NTS promoter was isolated. Transgenesis and double labeling of NTS and HCRT neurons showed that NTS axons project toward HCRT neurons, some of which express ntsr. Moreover, another target of NTS neurons is ntsr-expressing dopaminergeric neurons. These findings suggest structural circuitry between leptin, NTS, and hypocretinergic or dopaminergic neurons and establish the zebrafish as a model to study the role of these neuronal circuits in the regulation of feeding, sleep, and reward.

  5. Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin processing and the regulation of energy balance.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, Sharon L

    2011-06-11

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play a key role in regulating energy balance and neuroendocrine function. Much attention has been focused on the regulation of POMC gene expression with less emphasis on regulated peptide processing. This is particularly important given the complexity of posttranslational POMC processing which is essential for the generation of biologically active MSH peptides. Mutations that impair POMC sorting and processing are associated with obesity in humans and in animals. Specifically, mutations in the POMC processing enzymes prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) and in carboxypeptidase E (CPE) and in the α-MSH degrading enzyme, PRCP, are associated with changes in energy balance. There is increasing evidence that POMC processing is regulated with respect to energy balance. Studies have implicated both the leptin and insulin signaling pathways in the regulation of POMC at various steps in the processing pathway. This article will review the role of hypothalamic POMC in regulating energy balance with a focus on POMC processing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Treasure Trove of Hypothalamic Neurocircuitries Governing Body Weight Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Claudia R.; Coppari, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Changes in physical activities and feeding habits have transformed the historically rare disease of obesity into a modern metabolic pandemic. Obesity occurs when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure over time. This energy imbalance significantly increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus and as such represents an enormous socioeconomic burden and health threat. To combat obesity, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms and neurocircuitries underlying normal body weight homeostasis is required. In the 1940s, pioneering lesion experiments unveiled the importance of medial and lateral hypothalamic structures. In the 1980s and 1990s, several neuropeptides and peripheral hormones critical for appropriate feeding behavior, energy expenditure, and hence body weight homeostasis were identified. In the 2000s, results from metabolic analyses of genetically engineered mice bearing mutations only in selected neuronal groups greatly advanced our knowledge of the peripheral/brain feedback-loop modalities by which central neurons control energy balance. In this review, we will summarize these recent progresses with particular emphasis on the biochemical identities of hypothalamic neurons and molecular components underlying normal appetite, energy expenditure, and body weight homeostasis. We will also parse which of those neurons and molecules are critical components of homeostatic adaptive pathways against obesity induced by hypercaloric feeding. PMID:21068159

  7. Disruption of neurogenesis by hypothalamic inflammation in obesity or aging.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Cai, Dongsheng

    2013-12-01

    Adult neural stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and plasticity of the brain which is essential for central regulation of systemic homeostasis. Damage to these homeostatic components, depending on locations in the brain, poses threat to impaired neurogenesis, neurodegeneration, cognitive loss and energy imbalance. Recent research has identified brain metabolic inflammation via proinflammatory IκB kinase-β (IKKβ) and its downstream nuclear transcription factor NF-κB pathway as a non-classical linker of metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders. Chronic activation of the pathway results in impairment of energy balance and nutrient metabolism, impediment of neurogenesis, neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation, collectively converging on metabolic and cognitive decline. Hypothalamic IKKβ/NF-κB via inflammatory crosstalk between microglia and neurons has been discovered to direct systemic aging by inhibiting the production of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and inhibition of inflammation or GnRH therapy could revert aging related degenerative symptoms at least in part. This article reviews the crucial role of hypothalamic inflammation in affecting neural stem cells which mediates the neurodegenerative mechanisms of causing metabolic derangements as well as aging-associated disorders or diseases.

  8. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Autoimmunity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Guaraldi, Federica; Grottoli, Silvia; Arvat, Emanuela; Ghigo, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of secondary hypopituitarism in children and adults, and is responsible for impaired quality of life, disabilities and compromised development. Alterations of pituitary function can occur at any time after the traumatic event, presenting in various ways and evolving during time, so they require appropriate screening for early detection and treatment. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, several mechanisms have been hypothesized, including hypothalamic-pituitary autoimmunity (HP-A). The aim of this study was to systematically review literature on the association between HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Major pitfalls related to the HP-A investigation were also discussed. Methods: The PubMed database was searched with a string developed for this purpose, without temporal or language limits, for original articles assessing the association of HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Results: Three articles from the same group met the inclusion criteria. Anti-pituitary and anti-hypothalamic antibodies were detected using indirect immunofluorescence in a significant number of patients with acute and chronic TBI. Elevated antibody titer was associated with an increased risk of persistent hypopituitarism, especially somatotroph and gonadotroph deficiency, while no correlations were found with clinical parameters. Conclusion: HPA seems to contribute to TBI-induced pituitary damage, although major methodological issues need to be overcome and larger studies are warranted to confirm these preliminary data. PMID:26239463

  9. [A successful surgical case of a hypothalamic hamartoma with gelastic seizure: a case report].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoaki; Nishimura, Shinjitsu; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Furuno, Yuichi; Mino, Masaki; Hori, Emiko; Kaimori, Mitsuomi; Shirane, Reizou; Nishijima, Michiharu

    2009-08-01

    Gelastic seizure is a rare form of epilepsy defined as automatic bouts of laughter without mirth commonly associated with a hypothalamic hamartoma. Surgical treatment of hypothalamic hamartomas is associated with a high risk of complications because of the close vicinity of adjacent structures such as the optic tracts and mammillary bodies. This case was an 11-year-old girl who presented with gelastic seizure and complicated partial seizure. She developed gelastic seizure at a frequency of 10 bouts per day. She was found to have an elliptical mass close to the left hypothalamus. The signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was consistent with hypothalamic hamartoma. The patient underwent surgical resection by a subtemporal approach. Pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of hypothalamic hamartoma. Postoperative MRI demonstrated that the hypothalamic hamartoma was successfully resected. Twenty four months after surgery, complicated partial seizure in this patient has improved to Engel's class 1a and gelastic seizure has improved to Engel's class IIIa.

  10. Amphetamine, an appetite suppressant, decreases neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity in rat hypothalamic paraventriculum.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Yang, Shun-Fa; Kuo, Dong-Yih

    2005-04-15

    Amphetamine (AMPH) is a well-known anorectic agent. The mechanism underlying the anorectic response of AMPH has been attributed to its inhibitory effect on hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY), an orexigenic peptide in the brain. However, there is still lack of genomic or in situ immunohistochemical evidence to prove it. The present study was aimed to assess the molecular mechanism of AMPH anorexia by immunostaining of hypothalamic NPY protein in the area of paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and by detecting the change of hypothalamic NPY mRNA level using RT-PCR. Results revealed that an AMPH treatment might reduce the expression of NPY at both transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Comparatively, a treatment of clomipramine, a serotonin transporter inhibitor, was unable to reduce NPY mRNA level, revealing the noninvolvement of hypothalamic NPY gene in serotonin anorexia. Our results provided genomic and in situ immunohistochemical evidence to confirm the mediation of hypothalamic NPY neurons in the anorectic action of AMPH.

  11. Synthesis of chiral cyclic amines via Ir-catalyzed enantioselective hydrogenation of cyclic imines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Kong, Duanyang; Wang, Rui; Hou, Guohua

    2017-04-05

    A highly enantioselective hydrogenation of cyclic imines for synthesis of chiral cyclic amines has been realized. With the complex of iridium and (R,R)-f-spiroPhos as the catalyst, a range of cyclic 2-aryl imines were smoothly hydrogenated under mild conditions without any additive to provide the corresponding chiral cyclic amines with excellent enantioselectivities of up to 98% ee. Moreover, this method could be successfully applied to the synthesis of (+)-(6S,10bR)-McN-4612-Z.

  12. Investigating cyclic nucleotide and cyclic dinucleotide binding to HCN channels by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Hayoz, Sebastien; Tiwari, Purushottam B; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Üren, Aykut; Brelidze, Tinatin I

    2017-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN) channels control cardiac and neuronal rhythmicity. HCN channels contain cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) in their C-terminal region linked to the pore-forming transmembrane segment with a C-linker. The C-linker couples the conformational changes caused by the direct binding of cyclic nucleotides to the HCN pore opening. Recently, cyclic dinucleotides were shown to antagonize the effect of cyclic nucleotides in HCN4 but not in HCN2 channels. Based on the structural analysis and mutational studies it has been proposed that cyclic dinucleotides affect HCN4 channels by binding to the C-linker pocket (CLP). Here, we first show that surface plasmon resonance (SPR) can be used to accurately measure cyclic nucleotide binding affinity to the C-linker/CNBD of HCN2 and HCN4 channels. We then used SPR to investigate cyclic dinucleotide binding in HCN channels. To our surprise, we detected no binding of cyclic dinucleotides to the isolated monomeric C-linker/CNBDs of HCN4 channels with SPR. The binding of cyclic dinucleotides was further examined with isothermal calorimetry (ITC), which indicated no binding of cyclic dinucleotides to both monomeric and tetrameric C-linker/CNBDs of HCN4 channels. Taken together, our results suggest that interaction of the C-linker/CNBD with other parts of the channel is necessary for cyclic-dinucleotide binding in HCN4 channels.

  13. Structure-activity relationships of a series of analogs of the endozepine octadecaneuropeptide (ODN(11)(-)(18)) on neurosteroid biosynthesis by hypothalamic explants.

    PubMed

    Rego, Jean Luc Do; Leprince, Jérôme; Luu-The, Van; Pelletier, Georges; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Vaudry, Hubert

    2007-06-28

    We have previously shown that the endozepine octadecaneuropeptide (ODN) stimulates the biosynthesis of neurosteroids from frog hypothalamic explants. In the present study, we have investigated the structure-activity relationships of a series of analogs of the C-terminal octapeptide of ODN (OP) on neurosteroid formation. We found that OP and its cyclic analog cyclo1-8OP stimulate in a concentration-dependent manner the synthesis of various steroids including 17-hydroxypregnenolone, progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone. Deletion or Ala-substitution of the Arg1 or Pro2 residues of OP did not affect the activity of the peptide. In contrast, deletion or replacement of any of the amino acids of the C-terminal hexapeptide fragment totally abolished the effect of OP on neurosteroid biosynthesis. The present study indicates that the C-terminal hexapeptide of ODN/OP is the minimal sequence retaining full biological activity on steroid-producing neurons.

  14. Mu-opioid receptor A118G polymorphism in healthy volunteers affects hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis adrenocorticotropic hormone stress response to metyrapone.

    PubMed

    Ducat, Elizabeth; Ray, Brenda; Bart, Gavin; Umemura, Yoshie; Varon, Jack; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-03-01

    The mu-opioid receptor encoded by the gene OPRM1 plays a primary role in opiate, alcohol, cocaine and nicotine addiction. Studies using opioid antagonists demonstrate that the mu-opioid receptor (MOP-r) also mediates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis stress response. A common polymorphism in exon one of the MOP-r gene, A118G, has been shown to significantly alter receptor function and MOP-r gene expression; therefore, this variant likely affects HPA-axis responsivity. In the current study, we have investigated whether the presence of the 118AG variant genotype affects HPA axis responsivity to the stressor metyrapone, which transiently blocks glucocorticoid production in the adrenal cortex. Forty-eight normal and healthy volunteers (32 men, 16 women) were studied, among whom nine men and seven women had the 118AG genotype. The 118G allele blunted the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) response to metyrapone. Although there was no difference in basal levels of ACTH, subjects with the 118AG genotype had a more modest rise and resultant significantly lower ACTH levels than those with the prototype 118AA at the 8-hour time point (P < 0.02). We found no significant difference between genders. These findings suggest a relatively greater tonic inhibition at hypothalamic-pituitary sites through the mu-opioid receptor and relatively less cyclical glucocorticoid inhibition in subjects with the 118G allele.

  15. Depression and alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis function in male abstinent methamphetamine abusers.

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Xia; Yan, Shi-Yan; Bao, Yan-Ping; Lian, Zhi; Qu, Zhi; Wu, Ya-Ping; Liu, Zhi-Min

    2013-09-01

    The present study was to investigate depression and alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis function in methamphetamine (METH) abusers after abstinence. Depression was assessed using the 13-item Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-13) scale; blood samples from in-patients who were METH abusers and age-matched and sex-matched healthy controls were collected. The demographic characteristics and history of METH abuse also was assessed. We found that serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and thyroxine were increased; and serum levels of cortisol, triiodothyronine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone were decreased; and the BDI score was higher in METH abusers compared with control. In addition, there was no correlation between the BDI-13 score and any of hormones of HPA and HPT axis was found. Particularly, we found abnormally higher ACTH level and mismatched with lower cortisol level in abstinent METH abusers. These results indicate that METH abusers and that their HPA and HPT functions are all altered after abstinence. Chronically using METH may destroy the regulatory function of the HPA axis, especially the feedback regulation of cortisol to ACTH. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Nonlinear, nonbinary cyclic group codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, G.

    1992-01-01

    New cyclic group codes of length 2(exp m) - 1 over (m - j)-bit symbols are introduced. These codes can be systematically encoded and decoded algebraically. The code rates are very close to Reed-Solomon (RS) codes and are much better than Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem (BCH) codes (a former alternative). The binary (m - j)-tuples are identified with a subgroup of the binary m-tuples which represents the field GF(2 exp m). Encoding is systematic and involves a two-stage procedure consisting of the usual linear feedback register (using the division or check polynomial) and a small table lookup. For low rates, a second shift-register encoding operation may be invoked. Decoding uses the RS error-correcting procedures for the m-tuple codes for m = 4, 5, and 6.

  17. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    PubMed Central

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations – cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell’s passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells, measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity. PMID:24875391

  18. Metal dihalide photodissociation cyclic laser

    SciTech Connect

    Celto, J.E.; Schimitschek, E.J.; Trias, J.A.

    1980-10-21

    A pulsed laser produces emitted laser energy by photodissociation of metal dihalide and cyclic recombination. A metal dihalide selected from sub-group ii-b of the periodic table of elements is contained within an elongated sealed enclosure. Ultraviolet photons supplied from another laser employed as an excitation pump causes dissociation of the metal dihalide for achieving the ultimate laser action. An inert buffer gas is included within the enclosure for aiding photon energy transfer uniformity and to provide vibrational relaxation of the lasing medium in its electronic states. Two reflective surfaces, one of which is only partially reflective, are aligned with the principal axis of the laser assembly for producing an optical resonator for the emitted laser energy.

  19. A Cyclic Universe Numerically Realized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhe, William; Biswas, Tirthbar

    2013-04-01

    A unique way of realizing inflation has been proposed recently in the context of cyclic cosmology where the universe grows by a constant factor in each cycle. This leads to an overall exponential growth over many cycles. In a given cycle such a growth is possible if, for instance, ``heavy particles'' can decay into radiation (photons) leading to an increase in entropy. However, to sustain this mechanism over successive cycles, it is crucial to reproduce the heavy particles back through quantum scattering processes and re-establish thermal equilibrium between all the species. We attempt to prove the viability of a ``multiple bang'' scenario to produce known cosmological data as well as use it to predict fluctuations in the upcoming higher resolution plank telescope data. This paradigm opens doors for new investigations into the principles surrounding the content and origin of the universe.

  20. Cyclic metabolites: chemical and biological considerations.

    PubMed

    Erve, John C L

    2008-02-01

    Metabolism of xenobiotics can sometimes generate cyclic metabolites. Such metabolites are usually the result of intramolecular reactions occurring within a primary or secondary metabolite and this chemistry may lead to unexpected structures. Intramolecular chemistry is often driven by nucleophilic groups reacting with electrophilic atoms, often carbon, although radical processes also occur. Conjugation of xenobiotics or their metabolites with endogenous thiols, such as glutathione or cysteine, introduce a reactive amino group that can lead to the formation of cyclic structures. Less common than chemically driven cyclizations are enzymatically mediated ring-closures, although this may reflect our incomplete recognition of enzymatic involvement in this step of cyclic metabolite formation. While some cyclic metabolites are biologically inactive, others are biologically active. Thus, a cyclic metabolite may display desirable pharmacology, or, contribute to toxicology. When a cyclic metabolite is identified, it is important to consider the possibility that it is an artifact, i.e. metabonate, that was formed during processing of the sample, for example, through degradation or by chemical reactions with other components present in the matrix. From a medicinal chemistry perspective, a cyclic metabolite with a different chemical scaffold from the parent structure may lead to a new series of structurally novel, biologically active molecules with the same, or different, pharmacology from the parent. This review will cover a selection of cyclic metabolites from a mechanistic point of view, and when possible, discuss their biological relevance.

  1. Enantioselective Conjugate Allylation of Cyclic Enones

    PubMed Central

    Taber, Douglass F.; Gerstenhaber, David A.; Berry, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Enantioselective organocatalytic 1,2-allylation of a cyclic enone followed by anionic oxy-Cope rearrangement delivered the ketone as a mixture of diastereomers. This appears to be a general method for the net enantioselective conjugate allylation of cyclic enones. PMID:21830779

  2. Cyclic Linearization and Island Repair in Sluicing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Chunan

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic Linearization is adopted to account for the island repair of Sluicing in English. The extraction of wh-phrase out of certain islands undergoes non-successive-cyclic movement, which yields conflicting ordering statements. The derivation can be rescued by deleting all ordering statements in IP, including those conflicting ones. Two arguments…

  3. Cyclic homology for Hom-associative algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Mohammad; Shapiro, Ilya; Sütlü, Serkan

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper we investigate the noncommutative geometry of a class of algebras, called the Hom-associative algebras, whose associativity is twisted by a homomorphism. We define the Hochschild, cyclic, and periodic cyclic homology and cohomology for this class of algebras generalizing these theories from the associative to the Hom-associative setting.

  4. Modular arithmetic weight and cyclic shifting.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    This note shows that the modular arithmetic weight of an integer is invariant to the cyclic shifts of its radix-2 form. This result leads to a reduced search for the minimum weight codeword in a cyclic AN-code as well as to a better understanding of previous work.

  5. Cyclic malyl anthocyanins in Dianthus caryophyllus.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, M; Koshioka, M; Yoshida, H; Kan, Y; Fukui, Y; Koike, A; Yamaguchi, M

    2000-12-01

    3,5-Di-O-(beta-glucopyranosyl) pelargonidin 6''-O-4,6'''-O-1-cyclic malate and a previously reported cyanidin equivalent, 3,5-di-O-(beta-glucopyranosyl) cyanidin 6''-O-4,6'''-O-1-cyclic malate were identified from petals of deep pink and red-purple flower cultivars of Dianthus caryophyllus, respectively.

  6. Computational Analysis of the Hypothalamic Control of Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Tabe-Bordbar, Shayan; Anastasio, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Food-intake control is mediated by a heterogeneous network of different neural subtypes, distributed over various hypothalamic nuclei and other brain structures, in which each subtype can release more than one neurotransmitter or neurohormone. The complexity of the interactions of these subtypes poses a challenge to understanding their specific contributions to food-intake control, and apparent consistencies in the dataset can be contradicted by new findings. For example, the growing consensus that arcuate nucleus neurons expressing Agouti-related peptide (AgRP neurons) promote feeding, while those expressing pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC neurons) suppress feeding, is contradicted by findings that low AgRP neuron activity and high POMC neuron activity can be associated with high levels of food intake. Similarly, the growing consensus that GABAergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus suppress feeding is contradicted by findings suggesting the opposite. Yet the complexity of the food-intake control network admits many different network behaviors. It is possible that anomalous associations between the responses of certain neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with known interactions, but their effect on feeding depends on the responses of the other neural subtypes in the network. We explored this possibility through computational analysis. We made a computer model of the interactions between the hypothalamic and other neural subtypes known to be involved in food-intake control, and optimized its parameters so that model behavior matched observed behavior over an extensive test battery. We then used specialized computational techniques to search the entire model state space, where each state represents a different configuration of the responses of the units (model neural subtypes) in the network. We found that the anomalous associations between the responses of certain hypothalamic neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with the known structure

  7. Toward structure prediction of cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongtao; Lin, Yu-Shan

    2015-02-14

    Cyclic peptides are a promising class of molecules that can be used to target specific protein-protein interactions. A computational method to accurately predict their structures would substantially advance the development of cyclic peptides as modulators of protein-protein interactions. Here, we develop a computational method that integrates bias-exchange metadynamics simulations, a Boltzmann reweighting scheme, dihedral principal component analysis and a modified density peak-based cluster analysis to provide a converged structural description for cyclic peptides. Using this method, we evaluate the performance of a number of popular protein force fields on a model cyclic peptide. All the tested force fields seem to over-stabilize the α-helix and PPII/β regions in the Ramachandran plot, commonly populated by linear peptides and proteins. Our findings suggest that re-parameterization of a force field that well describes the full Ramachandran plot is necessary to accurately model cyclic peptides.

  8. Ribosomally encoded cyclic peptide toxins from mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Walton, Jonathan D; Luo, Hong; Hallen-Adams, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic peptide toxins of poisonous Amanita mushrooms are chemically unique among known natural products. Furthermore, they differ from other fungal cyclic peptides in being synthesized on ribosomes instead of by nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Because of their novel structures and biogenic origins, elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway of the Amanita cyclic peptides presents both challenges and opportunities. In particular, a full understanding of the pathway should lead to the ability to direct synthesis of a large number of novel cyclic peptides based on the Amanita toxin scaffold by genetic engineering of the encoding genes. Here, we highlight some of the principal methods for working with the Amanita cyclic peptides and the known steps in their biosynthesis.

  9. Twice-Daily Subcutaneous Injection of Kisspeptin-54 Does Not Abolish Menstrual Cyclicity in Healthy Female Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Jayasena, C. N.; Comninos, A. N.; Nijher, G. M. K.; Abbara, A.; De Silva, A.; Veldhuis, J. D.; Ratnasabapathy, R.; Izzi-Engbeaya, C.; Lim, A.; Patel, D. A.; Ghatei, M. A.; Bloom, S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Kisspeptin is a critical hypothalamic regulator of reproductive function. Chronic kisspeptin administration causes profound tachyphylaxis in male monkeys and in women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea. The pharmacological effects of chronic kisspeptin exposure in healthy women with normal menstrual cycles have not been studied previously. Aim: Our aim was to determine the effects of follicular-phase kisspeptin-54 treatment on menstrual cyclicity in healthy women. Methods: We performed a prospective, single-blinded, 1-way crossover study. Healthy women received twice-daily sc injections of kisspeptin (6.4 nmol/kg) or 0.9% saline during menstrual days 7–14 (n = 5 per treatment arm). Serial assessments of basal reproductive hormones, ultrasound parameters, LH pulsatility, and acute sensitivity to GnRH and kisspeptin-54 injection were performed. Results: Menstrual cyclicity persisted in all women after follicular-phase kisspeptin-54 treatment. Chronic exposure to kisspeptin-54 did not abolish acute stimulation of LH after injection of kisspeptin-54 or GnRH. In addition, kisspeptin-54 treatment was associated with a shorter mean length of the menstrual cycle (mean length of menstrual cycle was 28.6 ± 1.4 days with saline vs 26.8 ± 3.1 days with kisspeptin, P < .01), earlier onset of highest recorded serum LH (mean menstrual day of highest LH was 15.2 ± 1.3 with saline vs 13.0 ± 1.9 with kisspeptin, P < .05), and earlier onset of the luteal phase (mean menstrual day of progesterone increase was 18.0 ± 2.1 with saline vs 15.8 ± 0.9 with kisspeptin, P < .05). Conclusion: Our data suggest that 1 week of exogenous kisspeptin-54 does not abolish menstrual cyclicity in healthy women. Further work is needed to determine whether kisspeptin could be used to treat certain anovulatory disorders. PMID:24030945

  10. Effect of dehydration on hypothalamic control of evaporation in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M A; Doris, P A

    1982-01-01

    1. Cats were surgically prepared with intracranial thermodes for heating of the hypothalamic thermosensitive area or with venous cannulae for measurement of blood volume and plasma osmolality. They were kept in an environmental chamber in which the ambient temperature was cycled between 25 and 38 degrees C on an 18:6 hr diurnal schedule. 2. Measurements of blood volume and plasma osmolality and of the evaporative response to hypothalamic heating were made during the 38 degrees C phase of the diurnal temperature cycle in animals when they were hydrated ad lib and in the same animals after 72--96 hr of water deprivation. 3. Water deprivation produced a loss of 10% of the body weight, a significant rise in plasma osmolality and a significant fall in blood volume. 4. Hypothalamic heating in hydrated animals generated a highly significant, positive, linear relationship between hypothalamic temperature and evaporative heat loss in every case. 5. In dehydrated animals, the evaporative response to hypothalamic heating was reduced. Rates of evaporation at a given hypothalamic temperature were lower and the slopes of the lines relating evaporative heat loss to hypothalamic temperature were significantly reduced. 6. It is concluded that dehydration reduces the thermal responsiveness of central neural structures controlling evaporation in the cat. PMID:7069627

  11. Hypothalamic Dysfunction and Multiple Sclerosis: Implications for Fatigue and Weight Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, Kevin G; Yadav, Vijayshree; Marks, Daniel L

    2016-11-01

    Signs and symptoms of multiple sclerosis are usually attributed to demyelinating lesions in the spinal cord or cerebral cortex. The hypothalamus is a region that is often overlooked yet controls many important homeostatic functions, including those that are perturbed in multiple sclerosis. In this review we discuss how hypothalamic dysfunction may contribute to signs and symptoms in people with multiple sclerosis. While dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is common in multiple sclerosis, the effects and mechanisms of this dysfunction are not well understood. We discuss three hypothalamic mechanisms of fatigue in multiple sclerosis: (1) general hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity, (2) disordered orexin neurotransmission, (3) abnormal cortisol secretion. We then review potential mechanisms of weight dysregulation caused by hypothalamic dysfunction. Lastly, we propose future studies and therapeutics to better understand and treat hypothalamic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. Hypothalamic dysfunction appears to be common in multiple sclerosis, yet current studies are underpowered and contradictory. Future studies should contain larger sample sizes and standardize hormone and neuropeptide measurements.

  12. The hypothalamic GnRH pulse generator: multiple regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Krsmanovic, Lazar Z; Hu, Lian; Leung, Po-Ki; Feng, Hao; Catt, Kevin J

    2009-10-01

    Pulsatile secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release is an intrinsic property of hypothalamic GnRH neurons. Pulse generation has been attributed to multiple specific mechanisms, including spontaneous electrical activity of GnRH neurons, calcium and cAMP signaling, a GnRH receptor autocrine regulatory component, a GnRH concentration-dependent switch in GnRH receptor (GnRH-R) coupling to specific G proteins, the expression of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and steroid receptors, and homologous and heterologous interactions between cell membrane receptors expressed in GnRH neurons. The coexistence of multiple regulatory mechanisms for pulsatile GnRH secretion provides a high degree of redundancy in maintaining this crucial component of the mammalian reproductive process. These studies provide insights into the basic cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in GnRH neuronal function.

  13. [Cortico-hypothalamic interneuronal correlation during learning in cats].

    PubMed

    Merzhanova, G Kh; Berg, A I

    1988-01-01

    Spatial-temporal organization of neuronal activity in the motor cortex and hypothalamus lateral nucleus (inter- and intrastructural neuronal interactions) in cats with elaborated conditioned alimentary instrumental reflexes were studied by means of recording the multineuronal activity of structures under investigation and with the use of cross-correlation method of analysis. An increase was shown of the number of cortico-hypothalamic neurones pairs acting in interconnection after elaboration of conditioned reflexes, and a decrease of their number at extinction due to interaction with temporal delays (up to 30 ms). Local (intrastructural) connections of the motor cortex and lateral hypothalamus had opposite dynamics at extinction of the conditioned reflexes: the number of the first increased and the number of the second decreased. The character of the interconnected activity of neurones pairs of interstructural interaction is discussed.

  14. Surgical management of hypothalamic hamartomas in patients with gelastic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Addas, Bassam; Sherman, Elisabeth M S; Hader, Walter J

    2008-09-01

    Gelastic epilepsy (GE) associated with hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) is now a well-characterized clinical syndrome consisting of gelastic seizures starting in infancy, medically refractory seizures with or without the development of multiple seizure types, and behavioral and cognitive decline. It has been postulated that the development of the HH-GE syndrome is a result of a progressive epileptic encephalopathy or secondary epileptogenesis, which is potentially reversible with treatment of the HH. A variety of surgical options for the treatment of HHs exist, including open and endoscopic procedures, radiosurgery, interstitial radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation. Surgical treatment can result in seizure freedom in up to 50% of patients and can be accompanied by significant improvements in behavior, cognition, and quality of life. Partial treatment of HHs may be sufficient to reduce seizure frequency and improve behavior and quality of life with less risk. A component of reversible cognitive dysfunction may be present in some patients with an HH-GE syndrome.

  15. Hypothalamic CRH neurons orchestrate complex behaviours after stress

    PubMed Central

    Füzesi, Tamás; Daviu, Nuria; Wamsteeker Cusulin, Jaclyn I.; Bonin, Robert P.; Bains, Jaideep S.

    2016-01-01

    All organisms possess innate behavioural and physiological programmes that ensure survival. In order to have maximum adaptive benefit, these programmes must be sufficiently flexible to account for changes in the environment. Here we show that hypothalamic CRH neurons orchestrate an environmentally flexible repertoire of behaviours that emerge after acute stress in mice. Optical silencing of CRH neurons disrupts the organization of individual behaviours after acute stress. These behavioural patterns shift according to the environment after stress, but this environmental sensitivity is blunted by activation of PVN CRH neurons. These findings provide evidence that PVN CRH cells are part of a previously unexplored circuit that matches precise behavioural patterns to environmental context following stress. Overactivity in this network in the absence of stress may contribute to environmental ambivalence, resulting in context-inappropriate behavioural strategies. PMID:27306314

  16. Water intoxication death following hypothalamic lesions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wishart, T B; Walls, E K

    1975-09-01

    Rats received large, bilateral lesions of the ventromedial hypothalamus. Water or saline intakes, urine outputs and body temperatures were observed for up to 24 hr after surgery. Fifty percent of the operated animals drank excessively and died within 4-6 hr when permitted access to water. Urine outputs were low and symptoms of water intoxication were evident. When allowed access to saline, outputs rose and the number of animals which survived increased as the saline concentration increased. Body temperatures approached 40 degrees C during drinking, but did not differ from operated animals which refused to drink. It was concluded that the deposition of metallic ions strongly stimulates a hypothalamic drinking system which results in overhydration and water intoxication death.

  17. Effects of neonatal programming on hypothalamic mechanisms controlling energy balance.

    PubMed

    Contreras, C; Novelle, M G; Leis, R; Diéguez, C; Skrede, S; López, M

    2013-12-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity in most developed countries has markedly increased during the last decades. In addition to genetic, hormonal, and metabolic influences, environmental factors like fetal and neonatal nutrition play key roles in the development of obesity. Interestingly, overweight during critical developmental periods of fetal and/or neonatal life has been demonstrated to increase the risk of obesity throughout juvenile life into adulthood. In spite of this evidence, the specific mechanisms underlying this fetal/neonatal programming are not perfectly understood. However, it is clear that circulating hormones such as insulin and leptin play a critical role in the development and programming of hypothalamic circuits regulating energy balance. Here, we review what is currently known about the impact of perinatal malnutrition on the mechanisms regulating body weight homeostasis. Understanding these molecular mechanisms may provide new targets for the treatment of obesity. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Ventromedial hypothalamic neurons control a defensive emotion state.

    PubMed

    Kunwar, Prabhat S; Zelikowsky, Moriel; Remedios, Ryan; Cai, Haijiang; Yilmaz, Melis; Meister, Markus; Anderson, David J

    2015-03-06

    Defensive behaviors reflect underlying emotion states, such as fear. The hypothalamus plays a role in such behaviors, but prevailing textbook views depict it as an effector of upstream emotion centers, such as the amygdala, rather than as an emotion center itself. We used optogenetic manipulations to probe the function of a specific hypothalamic cell type that mediates innate defensive responses. These neurons are sufficient to drive multiple defensive actions, and required for defensive behaviors in diverse contexts. The behavioral consequences of activating these neurons, moreover, exhibit properties characteristic of emotion states in general, including scalability, (negative) valence, generalization and persistence. Importantly, these neurons can also condition learned defensive behavior, further refuting long-standing claims that the hypothalamus is unable to support emotional learning and therefore is not an emotion center. These data indicate that the hypothalamus plays an integral role to instantiate emotion states, and is not simply a passive effector of upstream emotion centers.

  19. The Hypothalamic Median Eminence and its Role in Reproductive Aging

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Weiling; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-01-01

    The median eminence at the base of the hypothalamus serves as an interface between the neural and peripheral endocrine systems. It is the site where hypothalamic releasing hormones are released into the portal capillary bed to be transported to the anterior pituitary, which provides further signals to target endocrine systems. Of specific relevance to reproduction, a group of about 1000 neurons in mammals release the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) peptide from neuroterminals in the median eminence. During the life cycle, there are dramatic changes in reproductive demands, and we focus this review on how GnRH terminals in the median eminence change during reproductive senescence. We discuss morphological and functional properties of the median eminence, and how relationships among GnRH terminals and their microenvironment of nerve terminals, glial cells, and the portal capillary vasculature determine the ability of GnRH peptide to be secreted and to reach its target in the anterior pituitary gland. PMID:20738281

  20. Neurokinin B and the Hypothalamic Regulation of Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Rance, Naomi E.; Krajewski, Sally J.; Smith, Melinda A.; Cholanian, Marina; Dacks, Penny A.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the genes encoding either neurokinin B (NKB) or its receptor, NK3 (NK3R), result in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, characterized by an absence of pubertal development and low circulating levels of LH and gonadal steroids. These studies implicate NKB and NK3R as essential elements of the human reproductive axis. Studies over the last two decades provide evidence that a group of neurons in the hypothalamic infundibular/arcuate nucleus form an important component of this regulatory circuit. These neurons are steroid-responsive and coexpress NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3R and estrogen receptor α (ERα) in a variety of mammalian species. Compelling evidence in the human indicates these neurons function in the hypothalamic circuitry regulating estrogen negative feedback on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion. Moreover, in the rat, they form a bilateral, interconnected network that projects to NK3R-expressing GnRH terminals in the median eminence. This network provides an anatomical framework to explain how coordination among NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin/NK3R/ERα neurons could mediate feedback information from the gonads to modulate pulsatile GnRH secretion. There is substantial (but indirect) evidence that this network may be part of the neural circuitry known as the “GnRH pulse generator”, with NK3R signaling as an important component. This theory provides a compelling explanation for the occurrence of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in patients with inactivating mutations in the TAC3 orTACR3 genes. Future studies will be needed to determine whether NKB signaling plays a permissive role in the onset of puberty or is part of the driving force initiating the maturation of reproductive function. PMID:20800582

  1. Hypothalamic signaling in anorexia induced by indispensable amino acid deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinxia; Krasnow, Stephanie M.; Roth-Carter, Quinn R.; Levasseur, Peter R.; Braun, Theodore P.; Grossberg, Aaron J.

    2012-01-01

    Animals exhibit a rapid and sustained anorexia when fed a diet that is deficient in a single indispensable amino acid (IAA). The chemosensor for IAA deficiency resides within the anterior piriform cortex (APC). Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which the APC detects IAA deficiency are well established, the efferent neural pathways that reduce feeding in response to an IAA-deficient diet remain to be fully characterized. In the present work, we investigated whether 1) central melanocortin signaling is involved in IAA deficiency-induced anorexia (IAADA) and 2) IAADA engages other key appetite-regulating neuronal populations in the hypothalamus. Rats and mice that consumed a valine-deficient diet (VDD) for 2–3 wk exhibited marked reductions in food intake, body weight, fat and lean body mass, body temperature, and white adipose tissue leptin gene expression, as well as a paradoxical increase in brown adipose tissue uncoupling protein-1 mRNA. Animals consuming the VDD had altered hypothalamic gene expression, typical of starvation. Pharmacological and genetic blockade of central melanocortin signaling failed to increase long-term food intake in this model. Chronic IAA deficiency was associated with a marked upregulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone expression in the lateral hypothalamus, particularly in the parasubthalamic nucleus, an area heavily innervated by efferent projections from the APC. Our observations indicate that the hypothalamic melanocortin system plays a minor role in acute, but not chronic, IAADA and suggest that the restraint on feeding is analogous to that observed after chronic dehydration. PMID:23047987

  2. Genetic, hypothalamic and endocrine features of clinical and experimental obesity.

    PubMed

    Bray, G A

    1992-01-01

    Obesity occurs in both clinical and animal forms in a variety of specific models which allow study of its underlining endocrine and mechanistic features. Among the neuroendocrine varieties of obesity, polycystic ovaries are probably the most common. The importance of the gonadal feedback system for regulation of food intake and obesity is indicated by the effects of castration in experimental animals which is a widely used mechanism for producing experimental obesity. Cushing syndrome and hypothalamic obesity are rare clinical syndromes. The current evidence suggests that there are two types of hypothalamic obesity from a mechanistic point of view--one associated with hyperphagia as a necessary and sufficient cause and a disturbance of the autonomic nervous system without hyperphagia as a second mechanism. Although genetic factors underlie most types of human obesity, there are several dymorphic forms of obesity including the Prader-Willy syndrome, Cohen's syndrome, Carpenter's syndrome, Ahlstrom's syndrome and the Bardet-Biedel syndrome. The Prader-Willi syndrome is characterized by obesity hypotonia hypogonadism and mental retardation. In animals, a dominant form of inheritance of obesity is seen in the yellow mouse. Current evidence suggests that this syndrome can be explained by reduced acetylation of MSH in the pituitary and/or hypothalamus. Several recessively inherited forms of obesity exist including the obese mouse, the diabetes mouse, fatty rat, the fat mouse, tubby mouse and the corpulent rat. In addition, there are a number of polygenic types of experimental obesity. The final mechanistic classification of obesity are those due to dietary manipulation. For both human beings and animals, a highly fat diet appears to be particularly problematic for the development of obesity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. MRI-guided stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation for 100 hypothalamic hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Shigeki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Ito, Yosuke; Sonoda, Masaki; Akazawa, Kohei

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to elucidate the invasiveness, effectiveness, and feasibility of MRI-guided stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation (SRT) for hypothalamic hamartoma (HH). METHODS The authors examined the clinical records of 100 consecutive patients (66 male and 34 female) with intractable gelastic seizures (GS) caused by HH, who underwent SRT as a sole surgical treatment between 1997 and 2013. The median duration of follow-up was 3 years (range 1-17 years). Seventy cases involved pediatric patients. Ninety percent of patients also had other types of seizures (non-GS). The maximum diameter of the HHs ranged from 5 to 80 mm (median 15 mm), and 15 of the tumors were giant HHs with a diameter of 30 mm or more. Comorbidities included precocious puberty (33.0%), behavioral disorder (49.0%), and mental retardation (50.0%). RESULTS A total of 140 SRT procedures were performed. There was no adaptive restriction for the giant or the subtype of HH, regardless of any prior history of surgical treatment or comorbidities. Patients in this case series exhibited delayed precocious puberty (9.0%), pituitary dysfunction (2.0%), and weight gain (7.0%), besides the transient hypothalamic symptoms after SRT. Freedom from GS was achieved in 86.0% of patients, freedom from other types of seizures in 78.9%, and freedom from all seizures in 71.0%. Repeat surgeries were not effective for non-GS. Seizure freedom led to disappearance of behavioral disorders and to intellectual improvement. CONCLUSIONS The present SRT procedure is a minimally invasive and highly effective surgical procedure without adaptive limitations. SRT involves only a single surgical procedure appropriate for all forms of epileptogenic HH and should be considered in patients with an early history of GS.

  4. The hypothalamic neuropeptide FF network is impaired in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Goncharuk, Valeri D; Buijs, Ruud M; Jhamandas, Jack H; Swaab, Dick F

    2014-01-01

    Background The human hypothalamus contains the neuropeptide FF (NPFF) neurochemical network. Animal experiments demonstrated that NPFF is implicated in the central cardiovascular regulation. We therefore studied expression of this peptide in the hypothalamus of individuals who suffered from essential hypertension (n = 8) and died suddenly due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and compared to that of healthy individuals (controls) (n = 6) who died abruptly due to mechanical trauma of the chest. Methods The frozen right part of the hypothalamus was cut coronally into serial sections of 20 μm thickness, and each tenth section was stained immunohistochemically using antibody against NPFF. The central section through each hypothalamic nucleus was characterized by the highest intensity of NPFF immunostaining and thus was chosen for quantitative densitometry. Results In hypertensive patients, the area occupied by NPFF immunostained neuronal elements in the central sections through the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (Pa), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST), perinuclear zone (PNZ) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), dorso- (DMH), ventromedial (VMH) nuclei, and perifornical nucleus (PeF) was dramatically decreased compared to controls, ranging about six times less in the VMH to 15 times less in the central part of the BST (BSTC). The NPFF innervation of both nonstained neuronal profiles and microvasculature was extremely poor in hypertensive patients compared to control. Conclusions The decreased NPFF expression in the hypothalamus of hypertensive patients might be a cause of impairment of its interaction with other neurochemical systems, and thereby might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:25161813

  5. Hypoxia reduces the hypothalamic thermogenic threshold and thermosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Tattersall, Glenn J; Milsom, William K

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia is well known to reduce the body temperature (Tb) of mammals, although the neural origins of this response remain uncertain. Short-term hypoxic exposure causes a reduction in the lower critical temperature of the thermal neutral zone and a reduction in whole body thermal conductance of rodents, providing indirect support that hypoxia lowers Tb in a regulated manner. In this study, we examined directly the potential for changes in central thermosensitivity to evoke the hypoxic metabolic response by heating and cooling the preoptic area of the hypothalamus (the area which integrates thermoreceptor input and regulates thermoeffector outputs) using chronic, indwelling thermodes in ground squirrels during normoxia and hypoxia (7, 10 and 12% O2). We found that the threshold hypothalamic temperature for the metabolic response to cooling (Tth) of ∼38°C in normoxia was proportionately reduced in hypoxia (down to 28–31°C at 7% O2) and that the metabolic thermosensitivity (α; the change in metabolic rate for any given change in hypothalamic temperature below the lower critical temperature) was comparatively reduced by 5 to 9 times. This provides strong support for the hypothesis that the fall in temperature that occurs during hypoxia is the result of a reduction in the activation of thermogenic mechanisms. The decrease in the central thermosensitivity in hypoxia, however, appears to be a critical factor in the alteration of mammalian Tb. We suggest, therefore, that an altered central thermosensitivity may provide a proximate explanation of how low oxygen and similar stressors reduce normal fluctuations in Tb (i.e. circadian), in addition to the depression in regulated Tb. PMID:19770191

  6. Hypothalamic inflammation and energy homeostasis: resolving the paradox.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Joshua P; Choi, Sun Ju; Schwartz, Michael W; Wisse, Brent E

    2010-01-01

    Determining the effect of hypothalamic inflammatory signals on energy balance presents a paradox. On the one hand, a large body of work has identified inflammatory signaling in the hypothalamus as an essential mediator of the sickness response--the anorexia, cachexia, fever, inactivity, lethargy, anhedonia and adipsia that are triggered by systemic inflammatory stimuli and promote negative energy balance. On the other hand, numerous recent studies implicate inflammatory activation within the hypothalamus as a key factor whereby high-fat diets--and saturated fats in particular--cause central leptin and insulin resistance and thereby promote the defense of elevated body weight. This paradox will likely remain unresolved until several issues have been addressed. Firstly, the hypothalamus--unlike many peripheral inflamed tissues--is an extremely heterogeneous tissue comprised of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, endothelial cells, ependymal cells as well as numerous neuronal subgroups. Determining exactly which cells activate defined inflammatory signals in response to a particular stimulus--i.e. sepsis vs. nutrient excess--may yield critical clues. Secondly, for the sake of simplicity many studies evaluate inflammation as an on/off phenomenon. More realistically, inflammatory signaling occurs as a cascade or cycle that changes and progresses over time. Accordingly, even within the same cell type, the low-grade, chronic signal induced by nutrient excess may invoke a different cascade of signals than a strong, acute signal such as sepsis. In addition, because tolerance can develop to certain inflammatory mediators, physiological outcomes may not correlate with early biochemical markers. Lastly, the neuroanatomical location, magnitude, and duration of the inflammatory stimulus can undoubtedly influence the net CNS response. Rigorously evaluating the progression of the inflammatory signaling cascade within specific hypothalamic cell types is a key next step towards

  7. Computer simulation of a neurosurgical operation: craniotomy for hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, S; Natarajan, K; Walsh, A R; Rolfe, E B; Hockley, A D

    1998-07-01

    Although magnetic resonance imaging has revolutionised the management of intracranial lesions with improved visualisation of anatomical structures, it only produces two-dimensional images, from which the clinician has to extrapolate a three-dimensional interpretation. Several approaches can be used to create 3D images; the discipline of image segmentation has encompassed a number of these techniques. Such techniques allow the clinician to delineate areas of interest. The resulting computer-generated outlines can be reconstructed in a three-dimensional arrangement. Although a plethora of "generic" segmentation techniques exist, we have developed a refined form, dependent on general and particular properties of the anatomical structures under investigation. High-contrast structures such as the ventricles and external surface of the head are found by using a localised adaptive thresholding technique. Less definable structures, with poor or nonexistent signal change across neighbouring structures, such as brain stem or pituitary, are found by applying an "energy minimisation"-based technique. To demonstrate the techniques we used the example of an 8-year-old boy with uncontrolled gelastic seizures due to a hypothalamic hamartoma, who is being considered for surgery. We were able to demonstrate the anatomical relationships between the hypothalamic hamartoma and adjacent structures such as optic chiasm, brain stem and ventricular system. We were subsequently able to create a video, reproducing the stages of craniotomy for excision of this tumour. By creating true 3D objects, we were able at any stage of the simulation to visualise structures situated contralaterally to the approaching surgical dissector. These 3D representations of the structures can be either invisible or opaque, in order to afford 3D localisation as the "virtual" surgical dissection proceeds. The clinical application of such techniques will enable surgeons to improve their understanding of anatomical

  8. Estrogens modulate ventrolateral ventromedial hypothalamic glucose-inhibited neurons.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Ammy M; Clegg, Deborah J; Routh, Vanessa H

    2016-10-01

    Brain regulation of glucose homeostasis is sexually dimorphic; however, the impact sex hormones have on specific neuronal populations within the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN), a metabolically sensitive brain region, has yet to be fully characterized. Glucose-excited (GE) and -inhibited (GI) neurons are located throughout the VMN and may play a critical role in glucose and energy homeostasis. Within the ventrolateral portion of the VMN (VL-VMN), glucose sensing neurons and estrogen receptor (ER) distributions overlap. We therefore tested the hypothesis that VL-VMN glucose sensing neurons were sexually dimorphic and regulated by 17β-estradiol (17βE). Electrophysiological recordings of VL-VMN glucose sensing neurons in brain slices isolated from age- and weight-matched female and male mice were performed in the presence and absence of 17βE. We found a new class of VL-VMN GI neurons whose response to low glucose was transient despite continued exposure to low glucose. Heretofore, we refer to these newly identified VL-VMN GI neurons as 'adapting' or AdGI neurons. We found a sexual dimorphic response to low glucose, with male nonadapting GI neurons, but not AdGI neurons, responding more robustly to low glucose than those from females. 17βE blunted the response of both nonadapting GI and AdGI neurons to low glucose in both males and females, which was mediated by activation of estrogen receptor β and inhibition of AMP-activated kinase. In contrast, 17βE had no impact on GE or non-glucose sensing neurons in either sex. These data suggest sex differences and estrogenic regulation of VMN hypothalamic glucose sensing may contribute to the sexual dimorphism in glucose homeostasis.

  9. Hypothalamic mTOR: the rookie energy sensor.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Morentin, P B; Martinez-Sanchez, N; Roa, J; Ferno, J; Nogueiras, R; Tena-Sempere, M; Dieguez, C; Lopez, M

    2014-01-01

    Optimal cellular function and therefore organism's survival is determined by the sensitive and accurate convergence of energy and nutrient abundance to cell growth and division. Among other factors, this integration is coupled by the target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway, which is able to sense nutrient, energy and oxygen availability and also growth factor signaling. Indeed, TOR signaling regulates cell energy homeostasis by coordinating anabolic and catabolic processes for survival. TOR, named mTOR in mammals, is a conserved serine/threonine kinase that exists in two different complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. Recently, studies are suggesting that alterations of those complexes promote disease and disrupted phenotypes, such as aging, obesity and related disorders and even cancer. The evidences linking mTOR to energy and metabolic homeostasis included the following. At central level mTOR regulates food intake and body weight being involved in the mechanism by which signals such as leptin and ghrelin exert its effects. At peripheral level it influences adipogenesis and lipogenesis in different tissues including the liver. Noteworthy chronic nutritional activation of mTOR signaling has been implicated in the development of beta cell mass expansion and on insulin resistance. Understanding of mTOR and other molecular switches, such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), as well as their interrelationship is crucial to know how organisms maintain optimal homeostasis. This review summarizes the role of hypothalamic TOR complex in cellular energy sensing, evidenced in the last years, focusing on the metabolic pathways where it is involved and the importance of this metabolic sensor in cellular and whole body energy management. Understanding the exact role of hypothalamic mTOR may provide new cues for therapeutic intervention in diseases.

  10. Nutritional programming affects hypothalamic organization and early response to leptin.

    PubMed

    Coupé, Bérengère; Amarger, Valérie; Grit, Isabelle; Benani, Alexandre; Parnet, Patricia

    2010-02-01

    Nutritional programming, taking place in utero or early after birth, is closely linked with metabolic and appetite disorders in adulthood. Following the hypothesis that nutritional programming impacts hypothalamic neuronal organization, we report on discrepancies of multiple molecular and cellular early events that take place in the hypothalamus of rats submitted to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Expression screening performed on hypothalami from IUGR rats at birth and at postnatal d 12 identified changes in gene expression of neurodevelopmental process (cell differentiation and cytoskeleton organization). Additionally, a slight reduction of agouti-related protein and a strong reduction of alpha-MSH-immunoreactive efferent fibers were demonstrated in the paraventricular nucleus of IUGR rats. Rapid catch-up growth of IUGR rats, 5 d after birth, had a positive effect on neurodevelopmental factors and on neuronal projections emanating from the arcuate nucleus. The molecular and cellular anomalies detected in IUGR rats can be related to the reduced and delayed plasma leptin surge from d 0-16 when compared with control and IUGR rats with catch-up growth. However, the ability of leptin to activate intracellular signaling in arcuate nucleus neurons was not reduced in IUGR rats. Other mechanism such as epigenetic regulation of the major appetite-regulating neuropeptides genes was analyzed in parallel with their mRNA expression during postnatal development. This study reveals the importance of an early catch-up growth that reduces abnormal organization of hypothalamic pathways involved in energy homeostasis, whereas protein restriction, maintained during postnatal development leads to an important immaturity of the hypothalamus.

  11. Regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical stress response

    PubMed Central

    Herman, James P.; McKlveen, Jessica M.; Ghosal, Sriparna; Kopp, Brittany; Wulsin, Aynara; Makinson, Ryan; Scheimann, Jessie; Myers, Brent

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis) is required for stress adaptation. Activation of the HPA axis causes secretion of glucocorticoids, which act on multiple organ systems to redirect energy resources to meet real or anticipated demand. The HPA stress response is driven primarily by neural mechanisms, invoking corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) release from hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) neurons. Pathways activating CRH release are stressor dependent: reactive responses to homeostatic disruption frequently involve direct noradrenergic or peptidergic drive of PVN neurons by sensory relays, whereas anticipatory responses use oligosynaptic pathways originating in upstream limbic structures. Anticipatory responses are driven largely by disinhibition, mediated by trans-synaptic silencing of tonic PVN inhibition via GABAergic neurons in the amygdala. Stress responses are inhibited by negative feedback mechanisms, whereby glucocorticoids act to diminish drive (brainstem), promote trans-synaptic inhibition by limbic structures (e.g, hippocampus). Glucocorticoids also act at the PVN to rapidly inhibit CRH neuronal activity via membrane glucocorticoid receptors. Chronic stress-induced activation of the HPA axis takes many forms (chronic basal hypersecretion, sensitized stress responses, even adrenal exhaustion), with manifestation dependent upon factors such as stressor chronicity, intensity, frequency and modality. Neural mechanisms driving chronic stress responses can be distinct from those controlling acute reactions, including recruitment of novel limbic, hypothalamic and brainstem circuits. Importantly, an individual’s response to acute or chronic stress is determined by numerous factors, including genetics, early life experience, environmental conditions, sex and age. The context in which stressors occur will determine whether an individual’s acute or chronic stress responses are adaptive or maladaptive (pathological). PMID:27065163

  12. Hypothalamic CB1 cannabinoid receptors regulate energy balance in mice.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Pierre; Bellocchio, Luigi; Clark, Samantha; Cannich, Astrid; Klugmann, Matthias; Lutz, Beat; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cota, Daniela

    2012-09-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 (CB(1)) receptor activation is generally considered a powerful orexigenic signal and inhibition of the endocannabinoid system is beneficial for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic diseases. The hypothalamus plays a critical role in regulating energy balance by modulating both food intake and energy expenditure. Although CB(1) receptor signaling has been implicated in the modulation of both these mechanisms, a complete understanding of its role in the hypothalamus is still lacking. Here we combined a genetic approach with the use of adeno-associated viral vectors to delete the CB(1) receptor gene in the adult mouse hypothalamus and assessed the impact of such manipulation on the regulation of energy balance. Viral-mediated deletion of the CB(1) receptor gene in the hypothalamus led to the generation of Hyp-CB(1)-KO mice, which displayed an approximately 60% decrease in hypothalamic CB(1) receptor mRNA levels. Hyp-CB(1)-KO mice maintained on a normocaloric, standard diet showed decreased body weight gain over time, which was associated with increased energy expenditure and elevated β(3)-adrenergic receptor and uncoupling protein-1 mRNA levels in the brown adipose tissue but, surprisingly, not to changes in food intake. Additionally, Hyp-CB(1)-KO mice were insensitive to the anorectic action of the hormone leptin (5 mg/kg) and displayed a time-dependent hypophagic response to the CB(1) inverse agonist rimonabant (3 mg/kg). Altogether these findings suggest that hypothalamic CB(1) receptor signaling is a key determinant of energy expenditure under basal conditions and reveal its specific role in conveying the effects of leptin and pharmacological CB1 receptor antagonism on food intake.

  13. Perinatal nutrition programs the hypothalamic melanocortin system in offspring.

    PubMed

    Wattez, J-S; Delahaye, F; Lukaszewski, M-A; Risold, P-Y; Eberlé, D; Vieau, D; Breton, C

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological studies initially suggested that maternal undernutrition leading to low birth weight may predispose for long-lasting energy balance disorders. High birth weight due to maternal obesity or diabetes, inappropriate early postnatal nutrition, and rapid catch-up growth, may also sensitize to increased risk of obesity. As stated by the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease concept, the perinatal perturbation of fetus/neonate nutrient supply might be a crucial determinant of individual programming of body weight set-point. The hypothalamic melanocortin system composed of the melanocortin receptor 4, its agonist α-melanin-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and its antagonist agouti-related protein (AgRP) is considered as the main central anorexigenic pathway controlling energy homeostasis. Studies in numerous animal models demonstrated that this system is a prime target of developmental programming by maternal nutritional manipulation. In rodents, the perinatal period of life corresponds largely to the period of brain maturation (i. e., melanocortin neuronal differentiation and development of their neural projections). In contrast, these phenomena essentially take place before birth in bigger mammals. Despite these different developmental time windows, altricial and precocial species share several common offspring programming mechanisms. Offspring from malnourished dams present a hypothalamic melanocortin system with a series of alterations: impaired neurogenesis and neuronal functionality, disorganization of feeding pathways, modified glucose sensing, and leptin/insulin resistance. Overall, these alterations may account for the long-lasting dysregulation of energy balance and obesity. Following maternal malnutrition, hormonal and epigenetic mechanisms might be responsible for melanocortin system programming in offspring. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Thiamine deficiency induces anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Alimov, A P; Wang, H; Frank, J A; Katz, W; Xu, M; Ke, Z-J; Luo, J

    2014-05-16

    Obesity and eating disorders are prevailing health concerns worldwide. It is important to understand the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential nutrient. Thiamine deficiency (TD) can cause a number of disorders in humans, such as Beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We demonstrated here that TD caused anorexia in C57BL/6 mice. After feeding a TD diet for 16days, the mice displayed a significant decrease in food intake and an increase in resting energy expenditure (REE), which resulted in a severe weight loss. At the 22nd day, the food intake was reduced by 69% and 74% for male and female mice, respectively in TD group. The REE increased by ninefolds in TD group. The loss of body weight (17-24%) was similar between male and female animals and mainly resulted from the reduction of fat mass (49% decrease). Re-supplementation of thiamine (benfotiamine) restored animal's appetite, leading to a total recovery of body weight. The hypothalamic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical regulator of food intake. TD inhibited the phosphorylation of AMPK in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus without affecting its expression. TD-induced inhibition of AMPK phosphorylation was reversed once thiamine was re-supplemented. In contrast, TD increased AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle and upregulated the uncoupling protein (UCP)-1 in brown adipose tissues which was consistent with increased basal energy expenditure. Re-administration of thiamine stabilized AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle as well as energy expenditure. Taken together, TD may induce anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK activity. With a simultaneous increase in energy expenditure, TD caused an overall body weight loss. The results suggest that the status of thiamine levels in the body may affect food intake and body weight.

  15. Effects of taurine, homotaurine and GABA on hypothalamic and striatal dopamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Panula-Lehto, E; Mäkinen, M; Ahtee, L

    1992-07-01

    To elucidate the effects of taurine on hypothalamic and striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission we compared its effects to those of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and homotaurine (a GABAA-receptor agonist) on hypothalamic and striatal concentrations of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and, in the case of striatum, 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) in rats. In addition, hypothalamic and striatal 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) und 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, hypothalamic noradrenaline (NA) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol sulfate, and pituitary DA concentrations were also measured. The amino acids were injected into the lateral brain ventricles of conscious male rats in doses of 10 and 36 mumol/rat, and rat were sacrificed 15 and 60 min later, respectively. Homotaurine (by 11%) but not the other two amino acids elevated striatal DA, whereas hypothalamic DA was increased by both taurine (36%) and homotaurine (31%). All three amino acids at 36 mumol elevated striatal DOPAC, homotaurine (51%) more than taurine (31%) or GABA (30%), and hypothalamic DOPAC, both taurine (102%) and homotaurine (82%) clearly more than GABA (34%). Neither striatal nor hypothalamic HVA was altered by any of the amino acids. At 10 mumol the amino acids decreased striatal 3-MT by about 40%. At 36 mumol taurine and homotaurine reduced 3-MT by about 70%, whereas increasing the dose of GABA did not further reduce 3-MT. Both taurine and homotaurine at 36 mumol decreased hypothalamic NA content. Neither hypothalamic nor striatal 5-HT metabolism was altered. In the neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary gland taurine at 10 mumol but not at 36 mumol slightly (20%) increased DA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Acute Effect of Manganese on Hypothalamic Luteinizing Hormone Releasing Hormone Secretion in Adult Male Rats: Involvement of Specific Neurotransmitter Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prestifilippo, Juan Pablo; Fernández-Solari, Javier; De Laurentiis, Andrea; Mohn, Claudia Ester; de la Cal, Carolina; Reynoso, Roxana; Dees, W. Les; Rettori, Valeria

    2008-01-01

    Manganese chloride (MnCl2) is capable of stimulating luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats through the activation of the hypothalamic nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)/protein kinase G pathway. The present study aimed to determine the involvement of specific neurotransmitters involved in this action. Our results indicate that dopamine, but not glutamic acid and prostaglandinds, mediates the MnCl2 stimulated secretion of LHRH from medial basal hypothalami in vitro, as well as increases the activity of nitric oxide synthase. Furthermore, a biphasic response was observed in that gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) release was also increased, which acts to attenuate the MnCl2 action to stimulate LHRH secretion. Although it is clear that manganese (Mn+2) can acutely induce LHRH secretion in adult males, we suggest that the additional action of MnCl2 to release GABA, a LHRH inhibitor, may ultimately contribute to suppressed reproductive function observed in adult animals following exposure to high chromic levels of Mn+2. PMID:18603625

  17. Time course of the estradiol-dependent induction of oxytocin receptor binding in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.E.; Ball, G.F.; Coirini, H.; Harbaugh, C.R.; McEwen, B.S.; Insel, T.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Oxytocin (OT) transmission is involved in the steroid-dependent display of sexual receptivity in rats. One of the biochemical processes stimulated by the ovarian steroid 17 beta-estradiol (E2) that is relevant to reproduction is the induction of OT receptor binding in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN). The purpose of these experiments was to determine if E2-induced changes in OT receptor binding in the VMN occur within a time frame relevant to cyclic changes in ovarian steroid secretion. OT receptor binding was measured in the VMN of ovariectomized rats implanted for 0-96 h with E2-containing Silastic capsules. The rate of decay of OT receptor binding was measured in another group of animals 6-48 h after capsule removal. Receptors were labeled with the specific OT receptor antagonist ({sup 125}I)d(CH2)5(Tyr(Me)2,Thr4,Tyr-NH2(9))OVT, and binding was measured with quantitative autoradiographic methods. In addition, plasma E2 levels and uterine weights were assessed in animals from each treatment condition. Significant increases in E2-dependent OT receptor binding and uterine weight occurred within 24 h of steroid treatment. After E2 withdrawal, OT receptor binding and uterine weight decreased significantly within 24 h. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that steroid modulation of OT receptor binding is necessary for the induction of sexual receptivity.

  18. Sex differences in the responses of orexin neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area and feeding behavior to fasting.

    PubMed

    Funabashi, Toshiya; Hagiwara, Hiroko; Mogi, Kazutaka; Mitsushima, Dai; Shinohara, Kazuyuki; Kimura, Fukuko

    2009-09-29

    Because there are sex differences in feeding-related behavior and orexin neurons are involved in feeding, we looked for a possible sex difference in the response of orexin neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area to fasting, using the phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) as a marker of neural activity. Intact male and female rats at proestrus, estrus, or diestrus, were fed normally or fasted for 48h. After fasting, they were intravenously injected with saline or glucose and subjected to immunohistochemical processing for the detection of orexin and pCREB. In the rats fed normally and injected with saline, only a small population of orexin neurons expressed pCREB in both male and female rats. However, fasting increased the number of orexin neurons with pCREB (double-stained cells) in female rats regardless of the estrous day but not in male rats, revealing a significant sex difference in the response of orexin neurons to fasting. Glucose injection in fasted rats decreased the number of double-stained cells in female rats, and the magnitude of glucose-dependent decrease was greater at proestrus and estrus than at diestrus 2. We also found that female rats, but not male rats, showed an increase in total food intake after fasting (rebound feeding). We speculate that the demonstrated sex differences in the response of orexin neurons to fasting reflect the vulnerability of feeding mechanisms in females.

  19. Hypothalamic obesity syndrome: rare presentation of CNS+ B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Quigg, Troy C; Haddad, Nadine G; Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C; Shih, Chie-Schin

    2012-11-01

    Hypothalamic obesity syndrome can affect brain tumor patients following surgical intervention and irradiation. This syndrome is rare at diagnosis in childhood cancer, but has been reported with relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we present a case of hypothalamic obesity syndrome as the primary presentation of a toddler found to have CNS+ B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. Cytogenetic studies on diagnostic cerebrospinal fluid revealed MLL gene rearrangement (11q23). Hyperphagia and obesity dramatically improved following induction and consolidation chemotherapy. We describe a novel presentation of hypothalamic obesity syndrome in CNS B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, responsive to chemotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Gelastic seizures and low-grade hypothalamic astrocytoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Spagnoli, Diego; Sciscio, Nicola; Russo, Francesco; Villani, Roberto Matteo

    2002-04-01

    The typical, well recognized childhood epilepsy syndrome caused by hypothalamic hamartoma is characterized by early-onset, stereotyped attacks of uncontrollable laughter, frequent refractory seizures with progressive cognitive deterioration and severe behavioral problems. Here, we report a 17-year-old patient with gelastic phenomenon started in the neonatal period, later on associated with drug resistant polymorphic seizures, intellectual deficit and behavioral disorders, who improved by partial resection of an expected hypothalamic hamartoma that, in turn, resulted to be a hypothalamic low-grade astrocytoma.

  1. Mixed Strategies in cyclic competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intoy, Ben; Pleimling, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Physicists have been using evolutionary game theory to model and simulate cyclically competing species, with applications to lizard mating strategies and competing bacterial strains. However these models assume that each agent plays the same strategy, which is called a pure strategy in game theory, until they are beaten by a better strategy which they immediately adopt. We relax this constraint of an agent playing a single strategy by instead letting the agent pick its strategy randomly from a probability distribution, which is called a mixed strategy in game theory. This scheme is very similar to multiple occupancy models seen in the literature, the major difference being that interactions happen between sites rather than within them. Choosing strategies out of a distribution also has applications to economic/social systems such as the public goods game. We simulate a model of mixed strategy and cylic competition on a one-dimensional lattice with three and four strategies and find interesting spatial and stability properties depending on how discretized the choice of strategy is for the agents. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR-1205309.

  2. Cardiovascular responses to chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in the rat: role of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Tetsuya; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of cardiovascular responses to chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) was studied in urethane-anesthetized adult male Wistar rats. At the baseline mean arterial pressure (BLMAP) close to normal, ARCN stimulation elicited decreases in MAP and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). The decreases in MAP elicited by ARCN stimulation were attenuated by either gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), neuropeptide Y (NPY), or beta-endorphin receptor blockade in the ipsilateral hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Combined blockade of GABA-A, NPY1 and opioid receptors in the ipsilateral PVN converted the decreases in MAP and SNA to increases in these variables. Conversion of inhibitory effects on the MAP and SNA to excitatory effects following ARCN stimulation was also observed when the BLMAP was decreased to below normal levels by an infusion of sodium nitroprusside. The pressor and tachycardic responses to ARCN stimulation at below normal BLMAP were attenuated by blockade of melanocortin 3/4 (MC3/4) receptors in the ipsilateral PVN. Unilateral blockade of GABA-A receptors in the ARCN increased the BLMAP and heart rate (HR) revealing tonic inhibition of the excitatory neurons in the ARCN. ARCN stimulation elicited tachycardia regardless of the level of BLMAP. ARCN neurons projecting to the PVN were immunoreactive for glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), NPY, and beta-endorphin. These results indicated that: 1) at normal BLMAP, decreases in MAP and SNA induced by ARCN stimulation were mediated via GABA-A, NPY1 and opioid receptors in the PVN, 2) lowering of BLMAP converted decreases in MAP following ARCN stimulation to increases in MAP, and 3) at below normal BLMAP, increases in MAP and HR induced by ARCN stimulation were mediated via MC3/4 receptors in the PVN. These results provide a base for future studies to explore the role of ARCN in cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axes: sex differences in regulation of stress responsivity.

    PubMed

    Oyola, Mario G; Handa, Robert J

    2017-08-31

    Gonadal hormones play a key role in the establishment, activation, and regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. By influencing the response and sensitivity to releasing factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, gonadal steroids help orchestrate the gain of the HPA axis to fine-tune the levels of stress hormones in the general circulation. From early life to adulthood, gonadal steroids can differentially affect the HPA axis, resulting in sex differences in the responsivity of this axis. The HPA axis influences many physiological functions making an organism's response to changes in the environment appropriate for its reproductive status. Although the acute HPA response to stressors is a beneficial response, constant activation of this circuitry by chronic or traumatic stressful episodes may lead to a dysregulation of the HPA axis and cause pathology. Compared to males, female mice and rats show a more robust HPA axis response, as a result of circulating estradiol levels which elevate stress hormone levels during non-threatening situations, and during and after stressors. Fluctuating levels of gonadal steroids in females across the estrous cycle are a major factor contributing to sex differences in the robustness of HPA activity in females compared to males. Moreover, gonadal steroids may also contribute to epigenetic and organizational influences on the HPA axis even before puberty. Correspondingly, crosstalk between the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and HPA axes could lead to abnormalities of stress responses. In humans, a dysregulated stress response is one of the most common symptoms seen across many neuropsychiatric disorders, and as a result, such interactions may exacerbate peripheral pathologies. In this review, we discuss the HPA and HPG axes and review how gonadal steroids interact with the HPA axis to regulate the stress circuitry during all stages in life.

  4. Stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus increases brown adipose tissue nerve activity via hypothalamic paraventricular and dorsomedial nuclei.

    PubMed

    Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2016-08-01

    Hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) stimulation elicited increases in sympathetic nerve activity (IBATSNA) and temperature (TBAT) of interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). The role of hypothalamic dorsomedial (DMN) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei in mediating these responses was studied in urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated, male Wistar rats. In different groups of rats, inhibition of neurons in the DMN and PVN by microinjections of muscimol attenuated the increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by microinjections of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid into the ipsilateral ARCN. In other groups of rats, blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors by combined microinjections of D(-)-2-amino-7-phosphono-heptanoic acid (D-AP7) and NBQX into the DMN and PVN attenuated increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by ARCN stimulation. Blockade of melanocortin 3/4 receptors in the DMN and PVN in other groups of rats resulted in attenuation of increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by ipsilateral ARCN stimulation. Microinjections of Fluoro-Gold into the DMN resulted in retrograde labeling of cells in the ipsilateral ARCN, and some of these cells contained proopiomelanocortin (POMC), α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), or vesicular glutamate transporter-3. Since similar projections from ARCN to the PVN have been reported by us and others, these results indicate that neurons containing POMC, α-MSH, and glutamate project from the ARCN to the DMN and PVN. Stimulation of ARCN results in the release of α-MSH and glutamate in the DMN and PVN which, in turn, cause increases in IBATSNA and TBAT. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Asymmetric cyclic evolution in polymerised cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hrycyna, Orest; Mielczarek, Jakub; Szydłowski, Marek E-mail: jakub.mielczarek@uj.edu.pl

    2009-12-01

    The dynamical systems methods are used to study evolution of the polymerised scalar field cosmologies with the cosmological constant. We have found all evolutional paths admissible for all initial conditions on the two-dimensional phase space. We have shown that the cyclic solutions are generic. The exact solution for polymerised cosmology is also obtained. Two basic cases are investigated, the polymerised scalar field and the polymerised gravitational and scalar field part. In the former the division on the cyclic and non-cyclic behaviour is established following the sign of the cosmological constant. The value of the cosmological constant is upper bounded purely from the dynamical setting.

  6. Repeated ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte retrieval from cyclic Murrah buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis): oocyte recovery and quality.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V; Manik, R S; Chauhan, M S; Singla, S K; Akshey, Y S; Palta, P

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the potential of the Murrah breed of buffaloes as donors of oocytes and to find out the recovery rate and oocyte quality in cyclic Murrah buffaloes subjected to oocyte recovery once a week. Murrah buffaloes (n = 5) were synchronized for estrus by a single prostaglandin injection schedule. The animals were subjected to transvaginal oocyte retrieval (TVOR) once weekly for 6 weeks, starting from Day 7 of the oestrous cycle (Day 0 = day of oestrus). TVOR was performed using an ultrasound machine with a 5 MHz transvaginal transducer, single lumen 19-gauge, 60 cm long needle and a constant vacuum pressure of 50 mmHg. The number and size of follicles in each ovary was determined before puncture. The follicles were characterized on the basis of their diameter as small (3-5 mm), medium (6-9 mm) and large (> or = 10 mm). The oocytes recovered were classified as grade A, cumulus-oocytes complexes (COCs) with > or = 5 layers of cumulus cells; grade B, those with two to four layers; grade C, partially denuded oocytes; and grade D, completely denuded oocytes. The mean (+/- S.E.M) number of small, medium and large follicles, and the number of total follicles observed per animal per session, which was 2.2 +/- 0.3, 0.6 +/- 0.2, 0.9 +/- 0.1 and 3.7 +/- 0.3, respectively, did not differ between animals or between puncture sessions. Small follicles constituted a major proportion (59%) of the total observed follicles. A mean (+/- S.E.M) number of 3.0 +/- 0.3 follicles were punctured and 2.0 +/- 0.3 oocytes recovered per animal per session, with a recovery rate of 68%. Out of the total 61 oocytes recovered, 36 (59%) were of grades A + B whereas 25 (41%) were of grades C + D. In conclusion, this study describes the potential of cyclic Murrah buffaloes as donors of oocytes collected by repeated TVOR once a week, without any adverse effects on follicular growth and oocyte recovery. It also describes an efficient system for carrying out TVOR in

  7. Growth, Hypothalamic Function, and Brain Ventricle Size in Mentally Retarded Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leisti, S.; Iianainen, M.

    1978-01-01

    To determine whether moderate enlargement of the third brain ventricle or the temporal horns of the lateral ventricles was associated with hypothalamic dysfunction, 15 mentally retarded Ss (ages 12-25 years) with such characteristics were studies. (DLS)

  8. Temporal Lobe Hypometabolism Ipsilateral to a Hypothalamic Mass. Relationship to Gelastic Seizures.

    PubMed

    Meyer

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate metabolic changes associated with a right hypothalamic mass in a 26-year-old gelastic seizure patient. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the brain was performed in the interictal state using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in this patient. Temporal lobe hypometabolism was noted ipsilateral to the hypothalamic lesion. The mass itself had little to no uptake of 18F-FDG. This is the first known PET imaging report of temporal lobe hypometabolism ipsilateral to a presumed hypothalamic hamartoma causing gelastic seizures. Further studies are needed in other patients to test whether interictal PET imaging may help plan the removal of epileptogenic hypothalamic lesions.

  9. Growth, Hypothalamic Function, and Brain Ventricle Size in Mentally Retarded Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leisti, S.; Iianainen, M.

    1978-01-01

    To determine whether moderate enlargement of the third brain ventricle or the temporal horns of the lateral ventricles was associated with hypothalamic dysfunction, 15 mentally retarded Ss (ages 12-25 years) with such characteristics were studies. (DLS)

  10. Hypothalamic κ-Opioid Receptor Modulates the Orexigenic Effect of Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Picó, Amparo; Vázquez, Maria J; González-Touceda, David; Folgueira, Cintia; Skibicka, Karolina P; Alvarez-Crespo, Mayte; Van Gestel, Margriet A; Velásquez, Douglas A; Schwarzer, Christoph; Herzog, Herbert; López, Miguel; Adan, Roger A; Dickson, Suzanne L; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    The opioid system is well recognized as an important regulator of appetite and energy balance. We now hypothesized that the hypothalamic opioid system might modulate the orexigenic effect of ghrelin. Using pharmacological and gene silencing approaches, we demonstrate that ghrelin utilizes a hypothalamic κ-opioid receptor (KOR) pathway to increase food intake in rats. Pharmacological blockade of KOR decreases the acute orexigenic effect of ghrelin. Inhibition of KOR expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is sufficient to blunt ghrelin-induced food intake. By contrast, the specific inhibition of KOR expression in the ventral tegmental area does not affect central ghrelin-induced feeding. This new pathway is independent of ghrelin-induced AMP-activated protein kinase activation, but modulates the levels of the transcription factors and orexigenic neuropeptides triggered by ghrelin to finally stimulate feeding. Our novel data implicate hypothalamic KOR signaling in the orexigenic action of ghrelin. PMID:23348063

  11. Leptin signaling in GFAP-expressing adult glia cells regulates hypothalamic neuronal circuits and feeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim1, Jae Geun; Suyama, Shigetomo; Koch, Marco; Jin, Sungho; Argente-Arizon, Pilar; Argente, Jesus; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Zimmer, Marcelo R.; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Gao, Yuanqing; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Yi, Chun-Xia; Salmaso, Natalina; Vaccarino, Flora M.; Chowen, Julie; Diano, Sabrina; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that synaptic re-organization of hypothalamic feeding circuits in response to metabolic shifts involves astrocytes, cells that can directly respond to the metabolic hormone, leptin, in vitro. It is not known whether the role of glia cells in hypothalamic synaptic adaptions is active or passive. Here we show that leptin receptors are expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes and that conditional, adult deletion of leptin receptors in astrocytes leads to altered glial morphology, decreased glial coverage and elevated synaptic inputs onto pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)- and Agouti-related protein (AgRP)-producing neurons. Leptin-induced suppression of feeding was diminished, while rebound feeding after fasting or ghrelin administration was elevated in mice with astrocyte-specific leptin receptor deficiency. These data unmask an active role of glial cells in the initiation of hypothalamic synaptic plasticity and neuroendocrine control of feeding by leptin. PMID:24880214

  12. Specification of select hypothalamic circuits and innate behaviors by the embryonic patterning gene Dbx1

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowski, Katie; Esumi, Shigeyuki; Hirata, Tsutomu; Kamal, Yasman; Tran, Tuyen; Lam, Andrew; Oboti, Livio; Brighthaupt, Sherri-Chanelle; Zaghlula, Manar; Martinez, Jennifer; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Knoblach, Susan; Pierani, Alessandra; Tamamaki, Nobuaki; Shah, Nirao M; Jones, Kevin S; Corbin, Joshua G

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The hypothalamus integrates information required for the production of a variety of innate behaviors such as feeding, mating, aggression and predator avoidance. Despite an extensive knowledge of hypothalamic function, how embryonic genetic programs specify circuits that regulate these behaviors remains unknown. Here, we find that in the hypothalamus the developmentally regulated homeodomain-containing transcription factor Dbx1 is required for the generation of specific subclasses of neurons within the lateral hypothalamic area/zona incerta (LH) and the arcuate (Arc) nucleus. Consistent with this specific developmental role, Dbx1 hypothalamic-specific conditional-knockout mice display attenuated responses to predator odor and feeding stressors but do not display deficits in other innate behaviors such as mating or conspecific aggression. Thus, activity of a single developmentally regulated gene, Dbx1, is a shared requirement for the specification of hypothalamic nuclei governing a subset of innate behaviors. PMID:25864637

  13. Neuropeptide exocytosis involving synaptotagmin-4 and oxytocin in hypothalamic programming of body weight and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo; Bai, Hua; Zhang, Hai; Dean, Camin; Wu, Qiang; Li, Juxue; Guariglia, Sara; Meng, Qingyuan; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-02-10

    Hypothalamic neuropeptides play essential roles in regulating energy and body weight balance. Energy imbalance and obesity have been linked to hypothalamic signaling defects in regulating neuropeptide genes; however, it is unknown whether dysregulation of neuropeptide exocytosis could be critically involved. This study discovered that synaptotagmin-4, an atypical modulator of synaptic exocytosis, is expressed most abundantly in oxytocin neurons of the hypothalamus. Synaptotagmin-4 negatively regulates oxytocin exocytosis, and dietary obesity is associated with increased vesicle binding of synaptotagmin-4 and thus enhanced negative regulation of oxytocin release. Overexpressing synaptotagmin-4 in hypothalamic oxytocin neurons and centrally antagonizing oxytocin in mice are similarly obesogenic. Synaptotagmin-4 inhibition prevents against dietary obesity by normalizing oxytocin release and energy balance under chronic nutritional excess. In conclusion, the negative regulation of synaptotagmin-4 on oxytocin release represents a hypothalamic basis of neuropeptide exocytosis in controlling obesity and related diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cyclic hardening in bundled actin networks.

    PubMed

    Schmoller, K M; Fernández, P; Arevalo, R C; Blair, D L; Bausch, A R

    2010-01-01

    Nonlinear deformations can irreversibly alter the mechanical properties of materials. Most soft materials, such as rubber and living tissues, display pronounced softening when cyclically deformed. Here we show that, in contrast, reconstituted networks of crosslinked, bundled actin filaments harden when subject to cyclical shear. As a consequence, they exhibit a mechano-memory where a significant stress barrier is generated at the maximum of the cyclic shear strain. This unique response is crucially determined by the network architecture: at lower crosslinker concentrations networks do not harden, but soften showing the classic Mullins effect known from rubber-like materials. By simultaneously performing macrorheology and confocal microscopy, we show that cyclic shearing results in structural reorganization of the network constituents such that the maximum applied strain is encoded into the network architecture.

  15. Parallel architectures for computing cyclic convolutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, C.-S.; Reed, I. S.; Truong, T. K.

    1983-01-01

    In the paper two parallel architectural structures are developed to compute one-dimensional cyclic convolutions. The first structure is based on the Chinese remainder theorem and Kung's pipelined array. The second structure is a direct mapping from the mathematical definition of a cyclic convolution to a computational architecture. To compute a d-point cyclic convolution the first structure needs d/2 inner product cells, while the second structure and Kung's linear array require d cells. However, to compute a cyclic convolution, the second structure requires less time than both the first structure and Kung's linear array. Another application of the second structure is to multiply a Toeplitz matrix by a vector. A table is listed to compare these two structures and Kung's linear array. Both structures are simple and regular and are therefore suitable for VLSI implementation.

  16. Parallel architectures for computing cyclic convolutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, C.-S.; Reed, I. S.; Truong, T. K.

    1983-01-01

    In the paper two parallel architectural structures are developed to compute one-dimensional cyclic convolutions. The first structure is based on the Chinese remainder theorem and Kung's pipelined array. The second structure is a direct mapping from the mathematical definition of a cyclic convolution to a computational architecture. To compute a d-point cyclic convolution the first structure needs d/2 inner product cells, while the second structure and Kung's linear array require d cells. However, to compute a cyclic convolution, the second structure requires less time than both the first structure and Kung's linear array. Another application of the second structure is to multiply a Toeplitz matrix by a vector. A table is listed to compare these two structures and Kung's linear array. Both structures are simple and regular and are therefore suitable for VLSI implementation.

  17. Cultured hypothalamic neurons are resistant to inflammation and insulin resistance induced by saturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Ju; Kim, Francis; Schwartz, Michael W; Wisse, Brent E

    2010-06-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation induced by high-fat feeding causes insulin and leptin resistance and contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity. Since in vitro exposure to saturated fatty acids causes inflammation and insulin resistance in many cultured cell types, we determined how cultured hypothalamic neurons respond to this stimulus. Two murine hypothalamic neuronal cell cultures, N43/5 and GT1-7, were exposed to escalating concentrations of saturated fatty acids for up to 24 h. Harvested cells were evaluated for activation of inflammation by gene expression and protein content. Insulin-treated cells were evaluated for induction of markers of insulin receptor signaling (p-IRS, p-Akt). In both hypothalamic cell lines, inflammation was induced by prototypical inflammatory mediators LPS and TNFalpha, as judged by induction of IkappaBalpha (3- to 5-fold) and IL-6 (3- to 7-fold) mRNA and p-IkappaBalpha protein, and TNFalpha pretreatment reduced insulin-mediated p-Akt activation by 30% (P < 0.05). By comparison, neither mixed saturated fatty acid (100, 250, or 500 microM for hypothalamic neurons, whereas they did in control muscle and endothelial cell lines. Despite the lack of evidence of inflammatory signaling, saturated fatty acid exposure in cultured hypothalamic neurons causes endoplasmic reticulum stress, induces mitogen-activated protein kinase, and causes apoptotic cell death with prolonged exposure. We conclude that saturated fatty acid exposure does not induce inflammatory signaling or insulin resistance in cultured hypothalamic neurons. Therefore, hypothalamic neuronal inflammation in the setting of DIO may involve an indirect mechanism mediated by saturated fatty acids on nonneuronal cells.

  18. Colour cyclic code for Brillouin distributed sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, Sébastien; Sauser, Florian; Llera, Miguel; Rochat, Etienne

    2015-09-01

    For the first time, a colour cyclic coding (CCC) is theoretically and experimentally demonstrated for Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) distributed sensors. Compared to traditional intensity-modulated cyclic codes, the code presents an additional gain of √2 while keeping the same number of sequences as for a colour coding. A comparison with a standard BOTDA sensor is realized and validates the theoretical coding gain.

  19. Cyclic period in the CBE model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul H.

    2017-08-01

    In a cyclic entropy model in which the extroverse is jettisoned at turnaround with a Come Back Empty (CBE) assumption, we address the matching of the contaction scale factor â(t) = f(tT)a(t) to the expansion scale factor a(t), where f(tT) is the ratio at turnaround of the introverse to the extroverse radii. Such matching is necessary for infinite cyclicity and fixes the CBE period at ˜ 2.6 Ty.

  20. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-07

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time.

  1. The evolution of Momordica cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Mahatmanto, Tunjung; Mylne, Joshua S; Poth, Aaron G; Swedberg, Joakim E; Kaas, Quentin; Schaefer, Hanno; Craik, David J

    2015-02-01

    Cyclic proteins have evolved for millions of years across all kingdoms of life to confer structural stability over their acyclic counterparts while maintaining intrinsic functional properties. Here, we show that cyclic miniproteins (or peptides) from Momordica (Cucurbitaceae) seeds evolved in species that diverged from an African ancestor around 19 Ma. The ability to achieve head-to-tail cyclization of Momordica cyclic peptides appears to have been acquired through a series of mutations in their acyclic precursor coding sequences following recent and independent gene expansion event(s). Evolutionary analysis of Momordica cyclic peptides reveals sites that are under selection, highlighting residues that are presumably constrained for maintaining their function as potent trypsin inhibitors. Molecular dynamics of Momordica cyclic peptides in complex with trypsin reveals site-specific residues involved in target binding. In a broader context, this study provides a basis for selecting Momordica species to further investigate the biosynthesis of the cyclic peptides and for constructing libraries that may be screened against evolutionarily related serine proteases implicated in human diseases. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Antimicrobial Cyclic Peptides for Plant Disease Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Wan; Kim, Beom Seok

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from microbes bind stably with target sites, have a tolerance to hydrolysis by proteases, and a favorable degradability under field conditions, which make them an attractive proposition for use as agricultural fungicides. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides are classified according to the types of bonds within the ring structure; homodetic, heterodetic, and complex cyclic peptides, which in turn reflect diverse physicochemical features. Most antimicrobial cyclic peptides affect the integrity of the cell envelope. This is achieved through direct interaction with the cell membrane or disturbance of the cell wall and membrane component biosynthesis such as chitin, glucan, and sphingolipid. These are specific and selective targets providing reliable activity and safety for non-target organisms. Synthetic cyclic peptides produced through combinatorial chemistry offer an alternative approach to develop antimicrobials for agricultural uses. Those synthesized so far have been studied for antibacterial activity, however, the recent advancements in powerful technologies now promise to provide novel antimicrobial cyclic peptides that are yet to be discovered from natural resources. PMID:25774105

  3. Tibolone Rapidly Attenuates the GABAB Response in Hypothalamic Neurones

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Bosch, Martha A.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kloosterboer, Helenius J.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    Tibolone is primarily used for the treatment of climacteric symptoms. Tibolone is rapidly converted into three major metabolites: 3α- and 3β-hydroxy-tibolone (3α- and 3βOH-tibolone), which have oestrogenic effects, and the Δ4-isomer (Δ4-tibolone), which has progestogenic and androgenic effects. Since tibolone is effective in treating climacteric symptoms, the effects on the brain may be explained by the oestrogenic activity of tibolone. Previously using whole-cell patch clamp recording, we found that 17β-oestradiol (E2) rapidly altered GABA neurotransmission in hypothalamic neurones through a membrane oestrogen receptor (mER). E2 reduced the potency of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen to activate G-protein-coupled, inwardly rectifying K+ channels in hypothalamic neurones. Therefore, we hypothesized that tibolone may have some rapid effects through the mER and sought to elucidate the signalling pathway of tibolone’s action using selective inhibitors and whole cell recording in ovariectomized female guinea pigs and mice. A sub-population of neurones was identified post hoc as proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurones by immunocytochemical staining. Similar to E2, we have found that tibolone and its active metabolite 3βOH-tibolone rapidly reduced the potency of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen to activate GIRK channels in POMC neurones. The effects were blocked by the ER antagonist ICI 182,780. Other metabolites of tibolone (3αOH-tibolone and Δ4-tibolone) had no effect. Furthermore, tibolone (and 3βOH-tibolone) was fully efficacious in ERαKO and ERβKO mice to attenuate GABAB responses. The effects of tibolone were blocked by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. However, in contrast to E2, the effects of tibolone were not blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors or protein kinase A inhibitors. It appears that tibolone (and 3βOH-tibolone) activates phospholipase C leading to PIP2 metabolism and direct alteration of GIRK channel function. Therefore, tibolone

  4. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, neuroendocrine factors and stress.

    PubMed

    Tsigos, Constantine; Chrousos, George P

    2002-10-01

    The stress system coordinates the adaptive responses of the organism to stressors of any kind.(1). The main components of the stress system are the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and locus ceruleus-norepinephrine (LC/NE)-autonomic systems and their peripheral effectors, the pituitary-adrenal axis, and the limbs of the autonomic system. Activation of the stress system leads to behavioral and peripheral changes that improve the ability of the organism to adjust homeostasis and increase its chances for survival. The CRH and LC/NE systems stimulate arousal and attention, as well as the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system, which is involved in anticipatory and reward phenomena, and the hypothalamic beta-endorphin system, which suppresses pain sensation and, hence, increases analgesia. CRH inhibits appetite and activates thermogenesis via the catecholaminergic system. Also, reciprocal interactions exist between the amygdala and the hippocampus and the stress system, which stimulates these elements and is regulated by them. CRH plays an important role in inhibiting GnRH secretion during stress, while, via somatostatin, it also inhibits GH, TRH and TSH secretion, suppressing, thus, the reproductive, growth and thyroid functions. Interestingly, all three of these functions receive and depend on positive catecholaminergic input. The end-hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, glucocorticoids, on the other hand, have multiple roles. They simultaneously inhibit the CRH, LC/NE and beta-endorphin systems and stimulate the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system and the CRH peptidergic central nucleus of the amygdala. In addition, they directly inhibit pituitary gonadotropin, GH and TSH secretion, render the target tissues of sex steroids and growth factors resistant to these substances and suppress the 5' deiodinase, which converts the relatively inactive tetraiodothyronine (T(4)) to triiodothyronine (T(3)), contributing further to the suppression of

  5. Social crowding stress diminishes the pituitary-adrenocortical and hypothalamic histamine response to adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bugajski, J; Gadek-Michalska, A; Borycz, J

    1993-12-01

    Social stress of crowding almost totally reduced the rise in serum corticosterone elicited by intracerebroventricular administration of isoprenaline, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, after 3 and 7 day of crowding and substantially diminished that response after 14 and 21 days. Crowding stress totally abolished the increase in hypothalamic histamine induced by isoprenaline in control rats. Crowding also significantly diminished the increase in serum corticosterone evoked by clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, and abolished the clonidine-induced elevation in hypothalamic histamine levels. The stimulatory effect of phenylephrine, an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist, on corticosterone secretion was only moderately diminished in crowded rats. Neither phenylephrine nor crowding stress changed significantly the hypothalamic histamine levels. These results indicate that social stress of crowding considerably impairs the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical responsiveness to central beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Crowding also abolishes the rise in hypothalamic histamine induced by beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, suggesting a role of hypothalamic histamine in the HPA adaptation to the social stress of crowding.

  6. Role of Hypothalamic VGF in Energy Balance and Metabolic Adaption to Environmental Enrichment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Foglesong, Grant D.; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xianglan; Slater, Andrew M.; Siu, Jason; Yildiz, Vedat; Salton, Stephen R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE), a housing condition providing complex physical, social, and cognitive stimulation, leads to improved metabolic health and resistance to diet-induced obesity and cancer. One underlying mechanism is the activation of the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis with hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as the key mediator. VGF, a peptide precursor particularly abundant in the hypothalamus, was up-regulated by EE. Overexpressing BDNF or acute injection of BDNF protein to the hypothalamus up-regulated VGF, whereas suppressing BDNF signaling down-regulated VGF expression. Moreover, hypothalamic VGF expression was regulated by leptin, melanocortin receptor agonist, and food deprivation mostly paralleled to BDNF expression. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer of Cre recombinase to floxed VGF mice specifically decreased VGF expression in the hypothalamus. In contrast to the lean and hypermetabolic phenotype of homozygous germline VGF knockout mice, specific knockdown of hypothalamic VGF in male adult mice led to increased adiposity, decreased core body temperature, reduced energy expenditure, and impaired glucose tolerance, as well as disturbance of molecular features of brown and white adipose tissues without effects on food intake. However, VGF knockdown failed to block the EE-induced BDNF up-regulation or decrease of adiposity indicating a minor role of VGF in the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis. Taken together, our results suggest hypothalamic VGF responds to environmental demands and plays an important role in energy balance and glycemic control likely acting in the melanocortin pathway downstream of BDNF. PMID:26730934

  7. Hypothalamic activation is essential for endotoxemia-induced acute muscle wasting

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Kaipeng; Chen, Qiyi; Cheng, Minhua; Zhao, Chenyan; Lin, Zhiliang; Tan, Shanjun; Xi, Fengchan; Gao, Tao; Shi, Jialiang; Shen, Juanhong; Li, Weiqin; Yu, Wenkui; Li, Jieshou; Li, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests acute skeletal muscle wasting is a key factor affecting nutritional support and prognosis in critical patients. Previously, plenty of studies of muscle wasting focused on the peripheral pathway, little was known about the central role. We tested the hypothesis whether central inflammatory pathway and neuropeptides were involved in the process. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated rats, hypothalamic NF-κB pathway and inflammation were highly activated, which was accompanied with severe muscle wasting. Central inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) pathway activation by infusion of an inhibitor (PS1145) can efficiently reduce muscle wasting as well as attenuate hypothalamic neuropeptides alteration. Furthermore, knockdown the expression of anorexigenic neuropeptide proopiomelanocortin (POMC) expression with a lentiviral vector containing shRNA can significantly alleviate LPS-induced muscle wasting, whereas hypothalamic inflammation or NF-κB pathway was barely affected. Taken together, these results suggest activation of hypothalamic POMC is pivotal for acute muscle wasting caused by endotoxemia. Neuropeptide POMC expression may have mediated the contribution of hypothalamic inflammation to peripheral muscle wasting. Pharmaceuticals with the ability of inhibiting hypothalamic NF-κB pathway or POMC activation may have a therapeutic potential for acute muscle wasting and nutritional therapy in septic patients. PMID:27922103

  8. Increasing Fatty Acid Oxidation Remodels the Hypothalamic Neurometabolome to Mitigate Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Joseph W.; Aja, Susan; Li, Qun; Bandaru, Veera V. R.; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Haughey, Norman J.; Kuhajda, Francis P.; Ronnett, Gabriele V.

    2014-01-01

    Modification of hypothalamic fatty acid (FA) metabolism can improve energy homeostasis and prevent hyperphagia and excessive weight gain in diet-induced obesity (DIO) from a diet high in saturated fatty acids. We have shown previously that C75, a stimulator of carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1) and fatty acid oxidation (FAOx), exerts at least some of its hypophagic effects via neuronal mechanisms in the hypothalamus. In the present work, we characterized the effects of C75 and another anorexigenic compound, the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) inhibitor FSG67, on FA metabolism, metabolomics profiles, and metabolic stress responses in cultured hypothalamic neurons and hypothalamic neuronal cell lines during lipid excess with palmitate. Both compounds enhanced palmitate oxidation, increased ATP, and inactivated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in hypothalamic neurons in vitro. Lipidomics and untargeted metabolomics revealed that enhanced catabolism of FA decreased palmitate availability and prevented the production of fatty acylglycerols, ceramides, and cholesterol esters, lipids that are associated with lipotoxicity-provoked metabolic stress. This improved metabolic signature was accompanied by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and yet favorable changes in oxidative stress, overt ER stress, and inflammation. We propose that enhancing FAOx in hypothalamic neurons exposed to excess lipids promotes metabolic remodeling that reduces local inflammatory and cell stress responses. This shift would restore mitochondrial function such that increased FAOx can produce hypothalamic neuronal ATP and lead to decreased food intake and body weight to improve systemic metabolism. PMID:25541737

  9. Activation of Strychnine-Sensitive Glycine Receptors by Shilajit on Preoptic Hypothalamic Neurons of Juvenile Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Janardhan Prasad; Cho, Dong Hyu; Han, Seong Kyu

    2016-02-29

    Shilajit, a mineral pitch, has been used in Ayurveda and Siddha system of medicine to treat many human ailments, and is reported to contain at least 85 minerals in ionic form. This study examined the possible mechanism of Shilajit action on preoptic hypothalamic neurons using juvenile mice. The hypothalamic neurons are the key regulator of many hormonal systems. In voltage clamp mode at a holding potential of -60 mV, and under a high chloride pipette solution, Shilajit induced dose-dependent inward current. Shilajit-induced inward currents were reproducible and persisted in the presence of 0.5 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX) suggesting a postsynaptic action of Shilajit on hypothalamic neurons. The currents induced by Shilajit were almost completely blocked by 2 μM strychnine (Stry), a glycine receptor antagonist. In addition, Shilajit-induced inward currents were partially blocked by bicuculline. Under a gramicidin-perforated patch clamp mode, Shilajit induced membrane depolarization on juvenile neurons. These results show that Shilajit affects hypothalamic neuronal activities by activating the Stry-sensitive glycine receptor with α₂/α₂β subunit. Taken together, these results suggest that Shilajit contains some ingredients with possible glycine mimetic activities and might influence hypothalamic neurophysiology through activation of Stry-sensitive glycine receptor-mediated responses on hypothalamic neurons postsynaptically.

  10. Epigenetic changes in fetal hypothalamic energy regulating pathways are associated with maternal undernutrition and twinning

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Ghazala; Stevens, Adam; Smith, Emma Bolton; Connor, Kristin; Challis, John R. G.; Bloomfield, Frank; White, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Undernutrition during pregnancy is implicated in the programming of offspring for the development of obesity and diabetes. We hypothesized that maternal programming causes epigenetic changes in fetal hypothalamic pathways regulating metabolism. This study used sheep to examine the effect of moderate maternal undernutrition (60 d before to 30 d after mating) and twinning to investigate changes in the key metabolic regulators proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in fetal hypothalami. Methylation of the fetal hypothalamic POMC promoter was reduced in underfed singleton, fed twin, and underfed twin groups (60, 73, and 63% decrease, respectively). This was associated with reduced DNA methyltransferase activity and altered histone methylation and acetylation. Methylation of the hypothalamic GR promoter was decreased in both twin groups and in maternally underfed singleton fetuses (52, 65, and 55% decrease, respectively). This correlated with changes in histone methylation and acetylation and increased GR mRNA expression in the maternally underfed singleton group. Alterations in GR were hypothalamic specific, with no changes in hippocampi. Unaltered levels of OCT4 promoter methylation indicated gene-specific effects. In conclusion, twinning and periconceptional undernutrition are associated with epigenetic changes in fetal hypothalamic POMC and GR genes, potentially resulting in altered energy balance regulation in the offspring.—Begum, G., Stevens, A., Smith, E. B., Connor, K., Challis, J. R. G., Bloomfield, F., White, A. Epigenetic changes in fetal hypothalamic energy regulating pathways are associated with maternal undernutrition and twinning. PMID:22223754

  11. Clusterin and LRP2 are critical components of the hypothalamic feeding regulatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Gil, So Young; Youn, Byung-Soo; Byun, Kyunghee; Huang, Hu; Namkoong, Churl; Jang, Pil-Geum; Lee, Joo-Yong; Jo, Young-Hwan; Kang, Gil Myoung; Kim, Hyun-Kyong; Shin, Mi-Seon; Pietrzik, Claus U; Lee, Bonghee; Kim, Young-Bum; Kim, Min-Seon

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic feeding circuits are essential for the maintenance of energy balance. There have been intensive efforts to discover new biological molecules involved in these pathways. Here we report that central administration of clusterin, also called apolipoprotein J, causes anorexia, weight loss and activation of hypothalamic signal transduction-activated transcript-3 in mice. In contrast, inhibition of hypothalamic clusterin action results in increased food intake and body weight, leading to adiposity. These effects are likely mediated through the mutual actions of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2, a potential receptor for clusterin, and the long-form leptin receptor. In response to clusterin, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 binding to long-form leptin receptor is greatly enhanced in cultured neuronal cells. Furthermore, long-form leptin receptor deficiency or hypothalamic low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 suppression in mice leads to impaired hypothalamic clusterin signalling and actions. Our study identifies the hypothalamic clusterin-low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 axis as a novel anorexigenic signalling pathway that is tightly coupled with long-form leptin receptor-mediated signalling.

  12. The Recreational Drug Ecstasy Disrupts the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Reproductive Axis in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Sarah M.; Walker, Deena M.; Reveron, Maria E.; Duvauchelle, Christine L.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-01-01

    Reproductive function involves an interaction of three regulatory levels: hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonad. The primary drive upon this system comes from hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretory cells, which receive afferent inputs from other neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system to result in the proper coordination of reproduction and the environment. Here, we hypothesized that the recreational drug ±-3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; “ecstasy”), which acts through several of the neurotransmitter systems that affect GnRH neurons, suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) reproductive axis of male rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered saline or MDMA or saline either once (acute) or for 20 days (chronic), and were euthanized 7 days following last administration. We quantified hypothalamic GnRH mRNA, serum luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations, and serum testosterone levels, as indices of hypothalamic, pituitary, and gonadal functions, respectively. The results indicate that the hypothalamic and gonadal levels of the HPG axis are significantly altered by MDMA, with GnRH mRNA and serum testosterone levels suppressed in rats administered MDMA compared to saline. Furthermore, our finding that hypothalamic GnRH mRNA levels are suppressed in the context of low testosterone concentrations suggests that the central GnRH neurosecretory system may be a primary target of inhibitory regulation by MDMA usage. PMID:18309234

  13. Role of Hypothalamic VGF in Energy Balance and Metabolic Adaption to Environmental Enrichment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Foglesong, Grant D; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xianglan; Slater, Andrew M; Siu, Jason; Yildiz, Vedat; Salton, Stephen R J; Cao, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE), a housing condition providing complex physical, social, and cognitive stimulation, leads to improved metabolic health and resistance to diet-induced obesity and cancer. One underlying mechanism is the activation of the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis with hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as the key mediator. VGF, a peptide precursor particularly abundant in the hypothalamus, was up-regulated by EE. Overexpressing BDNF or acute injection of BDNF protein to the hypothalamus up-regulated VGF, whereas suppressing BDNF signaling down-regulated VGF expression. Moreover, hypothalamic VGF expression was regulated by leptin, melanocortin receptor agonist, and food deprivation mostly paralleled to BDNF expression. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer of Cre recombinase to floxed VGF mice specifically decreased VGF expression in the hypothalamus. In contrast to the lean and hypermetabolic phenotype of homozygous germline VGF knockout mice, specific knockdown of hypothalamic VGF in male adult mice led to increased adiposity, decreased core body temperature, reduced energy expenditure, and impaired glucose tolerance, as well as disturbance of molecular features of brown and white adipose tissues without effects on food intake. However, VGF knockdown failed to block the EE-induced BDNF up-regulation or decrease of adiposity indicating a minor role of VGF in the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis. Taken together, our results suggest hypothalamic VGF responds to environmental demands and plays an important role in energy balance and glycemic control likely acting in the melanocortin pathway downstream of BDNF.

  14. Hypoxia-inducible factor directs POMC gene to mediate hypothalamic glucose sensing and energy balance regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Guo; Gonzalez, Frank J; Park, Sung-Min; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-07-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a nuclear transcription factor that responds to environmental and pathological hypoxia to induce metabolic adaptation, vascular growth, and cell survival. Here we found that HIF subunits and HIF2α in particular were normally expressed in the mediobasal hypothalamus of mice. Hypothalamic HIF was up-regulated by glucose to mediate the feeding control of hypothalamic glucose sensing. Two underlying molecular pathways were identified, including suppression of PHDs by glucose metabolites to prevent HIF2α degradation and the recruitment of AMPK and mTOR/S6K to regulate HIF2α protein synthesis. HIF activation was found to directly control the transcription of POMC gene. Genetic approach was then employed to develop conditional knockout mice with HIF inhibition in POMC neurons, revealing that HIF loss-of-function in POMC neurons impaired hypothalamic glucose sensing and caused energy imbalance to promote obesity development. The metabolic effects of HIF in hypothalamic POMC neurons were independent of leptin signaling or pituitary ACTH pathway. Hypothalamic gene delivery of HIF counteracted overeating and obesity under conditions of nutritional excess. In conclusion, HIF controls hypothalamic POMC gene to direct the central nutrient sensing in regulation of energy and body weight balance.

  15. Preoptic-hypothalamic periventricular lesions: thirst deficits and hypernatremia.

    PubMed

    Buggy, J; Jonhson, A K

    1977-07-01

    To assess the significance of stimulation studies suggesting an anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) dipsogenic site of action for hyperosmotic and angiotensin thirst stimuli, electrolytic lesions of periventricular tissue surrounding AV3V were produced under ether anesthesia in rats preselected for responsiveness to subcutaneous angiotensin and hypertonic NaCl thirst challenges. Lesions limited to preoptic-anterior hypothalamic periventricular substrates resulted in adipsia; those rats resuming ad lib. drinking after a period of adipsia exhibited persistent drinking deficits to angiotensin and hypertonic NaCl thirst challenges, reduced drinking after water deprivation, and increased plasma osmolality and sodium. Drinking to polyethylene glycol-induced hypovolemia and feeding after food deprivation did not differ between lesioned and sham-lesioned animals. The disturbances in behavioral control of fluid balance imply that AV3V periventricular tissue normally plays a key role in mediating regulatory drinking. It is proposed that these AV3V periventricular lesion-induced effects on drinking behavior are due to destruction of receptors and/or integrative systems monitoring fluid-borne angiotensin and hyperosmotic stimuli.

  16. Ventromedial hypothalamic neurons control a defensive emotion state

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Prabhat S; Zelikowsky, Moriel; Remedios, Ryan; Cai, Haijiang; Yilmaz, Melis; Meister, Markus; Anderson, David J

    2015-01-01

    Defensive behaviors reflect underlying emotion states, such as fear. The hypothalamus plays a role in such behaviors, but prevailing textbook views depict it as an effector of upstream emotion centers, such as the amygdala, rather than as an emotion center itself. We used optogenetic manipulations to probe the function of a specific hypothalamic cell type that mediates innate defensive responses. These neurons are sufficient to drive multiple defensive actions, and required for defensive behaviors in diverse contexts. The behavioral consequences of activating these neurons, moreover, exhibit properties characteristic of emotion states in general, including scalability, (negative) valence, generalization and persistence. Importantly, these neurons can also condition learned defensive behavior, further refuting long-standing claims that the hypothalamus is unable to support emotional learning and therefore is not an emotion center. These data indicate that the hypothalamus plays an integral role to instantiate emotion states, and is not simply a passive effector of upstream emotion centers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06633.001 PMID:25748136

  17. Hypothalamic gene expression underlying pre-hibernation satiety.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, C; Hampton, M; Andrews, M T

    2015-03-01

    Prior to hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) enter a hypophagic period where food consumption drops by an average of 55% in 3 weeks. This occurs naturally, while the ground squirrels are in constant environmental conditions and have free access to food. Importantly, this transition occurs before exposure to hibernation conditions (5°C and constant darkness), so the ground squirrels are still maintaining a moderate level of activity. In this study, we used the Illumina HiSeq 2000 system to sequence the hypothalamic transcriptomes of ground squirrels before and after the autumn feeding transition to examine the genes underlying this extreme change in feeding behavior. The hypothalamus was chosen because it is known to play a role in the control and regulation of food intake and satiety. Overall, our analysis identified 143 genes that are significantly differentially expressed between the two groups. Specifically, we found five genes associated with feeding behavior and obesity (VGF, TRH, LEPR, ADIPOR2, IRS2) that are all upregulated during the hypophagic period, after the feeding transition has occurred. We also found that serum leptin significantly increases in the hypophagic group. Several of the genes associated with the natural autumnal feeding decline in 13-lined ground squirrels show parallels to signaling pathways known to be disrupted in human metabolic diseases, like obesity and diabetes. In addition, many other genes were identified that could be important for the control of food consumption in other animals, including humans.

  18. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    PubMed Central

    Muindi, Fanuel; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Heller, Horace Craig

    2014-01-01

    The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages. PMID:25140132

  19. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Function in Brain Death: A Review.

    PubMed

    Nair-Collins, Michael; Northrup, Jesse; Olcese, James

    2016-01-01

    The Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA) states that an individual is dead when "all functions of the entire brain" have ceased irreversibly. However, it has been questioned whether some functions of the hypothalamus, particularly osmoregulation, can continue after the clinical diagnosis of brain death (BD). In order to learn whether parts of the hypothalamus can continue to function after the diagnosis of BD, we performed 2 separate systematic searches of the MEDLINE database, corresponding to the functions of the posterior and anterior pituitary. No meta-analysis is possible due to nonuniformity in the clinical literature. However, some modest generalizations can reasonably be drawn from a narrative review and from anatomic considerations that explain why these findings should be expected. We found evidence suggesting the preservation of hypothalamic function, including secretion of hypophysiotropic hormones, responsiveness to anterior pituitary stimulation, and osmoregulation, in a substantial proportion of patients declared dead by neurological criteria. We discuss several possible explanations for these findings. We conclude by suggesting that additional clinical research with strict inclusion criteria is necessary and further that a more nuanced and forthright public dialogue is needed, particularly since standard diagnostic practices and the UDDA may not be entirely in accord.

  20. Childhood Parental Loss and Adult Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Function

    PubMed Central

    Tyrka, Audrey R.; Wier, Lauren; Price, Lawrence H.; Ross, Nicole; Anderson, George M.; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Carpenter, Linda L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Several decades of research link childhood parental loss with risk for major depression and other forms of psychopathology. A large body of preclinical work on maternal separation and some recent studies of humans with childhood parental loss have demonstrated alterations of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function which could predispose to the development of psychiatric disorders. Methods Eighty-eight healthy adults with no current Axis I psychiatric disorder participated in this study. Forty-four participants experienced parental loss during childhood, including 19 with a history of parental death and 25 with a history of prolonged parental separation. The loss group was compared to a matched group of individuals who reported no history of childhood parental separation or childhood maltreatment. Participants completed diagnostic interviews and questionnaires and the dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing hormone (Dex/CRH) test. Repeated measures general linear models were used to test the effects of parental loss, a measure of parental care, sex, and age on the hormone responses to the Dex/CRH test. Results Parental loss was associated with increased cortisol responses to the test, particularly in males. The effect of loss was moderated by levels of parental care; participants with parental desertion and very low levels of care had attenuated cortisol responses. ACTH responses to the Dex/CRH test did not differ significantly as a function of parental loss. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that early parental loss induces enduring changes in neuroendocrine function. PMID:18339361

  1. Thyroid hormone is required for hypothalamic neurons regulating cardiovascular functions.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Jens; Lyons, David J; Sällström, Johan; Vujovic, Milica; Dudazy-Gralla, Susi; Warner, Amy; Wallis, Karin; Alkemade, Anneke; Nordström, Kristina; Monyer, Hannah; Broberger, Christian; Arner, Anders; Vennström, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is well known for its profound direct effects on cardiovascular function and metabolism. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the hormone also regulates these systems indirectly through the central nervous system. While some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormone's central control of metabolism have been identified, its actions in the central cardiovascular control have remained enigmatic. Here, we describe a previously unknown population of parvalbuminergic neurons in the anterior hypothalamus that requires thyroid hormone receptor signaling for proper development. Specific stereotaxic ablation of these cells in the mouse resulted in hypertension and temperature-dependent tachycardia, indicating a role in the central autonomic control of blood pressure and heart rate. Moreover, the neurons exhibited intrinsic temperature sensitivity in patch-clamping experiments, providing a new connection between cardiovascular function and core temperature. Thus, the data identify what we believe to be a novel hypothalamic cell population potentially important for understanding hypertension and indicate developmental hypothyroidism as an epigenetic risk factor for cardiovascular disorders. Furthermore, the findings may be beneficial for treatment of the recently identified patients that have a mutation in thyroid hormone receptor α1.

  2. Hypothalamic Insulin Resistance in Obesity: Effects on Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyi; Balland, Eglantine; Cowley, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    The central link between obesity and type 2 diabetes is the development of insulin resistance. To date, it is still not clear whether hyperinsulinemia causes insulin resistance, which underlies the pathogenesis of obesity-associated type 2 diabetes, owing to the sophisticated regulatory mechanisms that exist in the periphery and in the brain. In recent years, accumulating evidence has demonstrated the existence of insulin resistance within the hypothalamus. In this review, we have integrated the recent discoveries surrounding both central and peripheral insulin resistance to provide a comprehensive overview of insulin resistance in obesity and the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. In particular, this review will discuss how hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia in obesity impair insulin sensitivity in tissues such as the liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and the brain. In addition, this review highlights insulin transport into the brain, signaling pathways associated with hypothalamic insulin receptor expression in the regulation of hepatic glucose production, and finally the perturbation of systemic glucose homeostasis as a consequence of central insulin resistance. We also suggest future approaches to overcome both central and peripheral insulin resistance to treat obesity and type 2 diabetes. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. An Undiagnosed Case of Hypothalamic Hamartoma with a Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bahrani, Saeideh; Tabrizi, Nasim; Moein, Houshang; Zare, Mohammad; Barekatain, Majid; Basiratnia, Reza; Rahimian, Elham; Mehvari Habibabadi, Amirali; Moein, Payam

    2017-01-01

    Background. Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are rare tumor-like malformations that may present with complex partial seizures refractory to anticonvulsants in adulthood. The condition may be misdiagnosed because of rarity. Case Presentation. We report a 25-year-old man with complaint of seizures presented by falling, tonic spasm of limbs, oral automatism, vocalization, and hypermotor activities. His seizures started at the age of one month and presented as eye deviation and upper limbs myoclonic jerk, followed by frequent seizures with variable frequency. The patient had delayed developmental milestones and was mentally retarded. He was hospitalized and underwent video-EEG monitoring and neuroimaging, and the diagnosis of HH was made. The patient became candidate for surgery after that. Conclusion. In this case, the underlying etiology of seizures was diagnosed after 25 years. HH is a rare condition and neurologists may encounter very small number of these cases during their practice. Therefore, they should consider it in patients who present with suspected signs and symptoms. PMID:28246530

  4. Effect of dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei knife cuts on ingestive behavior.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, L L; Bernardis, L L

    1999-06-01

    Previous findings show that rats with electrolytic or excitotoxic lesions in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMN) are hypophagic and hypodipsic and have reduced ponderal and linear growth but normal body composition. DMN-lesioned (DMNL) rats also show altered ingestive responses to naloxone. The present study investigated the intrahypothalamic nerve pathways involved in these DMNL effects and the response of the pathways to deprivation challenges by placing knife cuts posterior (Post), lateral (Lat), ventral (Vent), dorsal, or anterior to the DMN or by administering sham operations. One major finding was that rats with Post or Vent were hypophagic (P < 0. 05) and had reduced body weight but responded normally to deprivation challenges. Post and Lat groups were hypodipsic (P < 0. 05), but plasma Na+, K+, and osmolality and 24-h post-water-deprivation drinking responses were similar in all groups. Naloxone did not suppress the intake of Post rats. It appears that the hypophagia and the reduced body weight after DMNL involve fibers entering or leaving the DMN from ventral and posterior directions, and they may be part of an opioid feeding system.

  5. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric dominance, and family bonding behavior.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-07-01

    The isoprenoid pathway produces endogenous digoxin, a substance that can regulate neurotransmitter and amino acid transport. Digoxin synthesis and neurotransmitter patterns were assessed in individuals with differing family bonding patterns. The family bonding patterns were assessed by the FACES scale--family adaptability and cohesiveness evaluation scale. The criteria given in the handbook for the 16 PF--16 personality factors questionnaire by Cattell, Eber, and Tatsouke--was also chosen for assessing the individual personality aspect of family bonding after suitable modification. The patterns were compared in those with right hemispheric and left hemispheric dominance. Digoxin synthesis was increased with upregulated tryptophan catabolism (increased levels of serotonin, strychnine, and nicotine) and downregulated tyrosine catabolism (decreased levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine) in those with reduced family bonding and right hemispheric dominance. Digoxin synthesis was reduced with downregulated tryptophan catabolism (decreased levels of serotonin, strychnine, and nicotine) and upregulated tyrosine catabolism (increased levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine) in those with increased family bonding and left hemispheric chemical dominance. Hypothalamic digoxin plays a central role in the regulation of family bonding behavior. Hemispheric chemical dominance in relation to digoxin status is also crucial in this respect.

  6. Thyroid hormone is required for hypothalamic neurons regulating cardiovascular functions

    PubMed Central

    Mittag, Jens; Lyons, David J.; Sällström, Johan; Vujovic, Milica; Dudazy-Gralla, Susi; Warner, Amy; Wallis, Karin; Alkemade, Anneke; Nordström, Kristina; Monyer, Hannah; Broberger, Christian; Arner, Anders; Vennström, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is well known for its profound direct effects on cardiovascular function and metabolism. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the hormone also regulates these systems indirectly through the central nervous system. While some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormone’s central control of metabolism have been identified, its actions in the central cardiovascular control have remained enigmatic. Here, we describe a previously unknown population of parvalbuminergic neurons in the anterior hypothalamus that requires thyroid hormone receptor signaling for proper development. Specific stereotaxic ablation of these cells in the mouse resulted in hypertension and temperature-dependent tachycardia, indicating a role in the central autonomic control of blood pressure and heart rate. Moreover, the neurons exhibited intrinsic temperature sensitivity in patch-clamping experiments, providing a new connection between cardiovascular function and core temperature. Thus, the data identify what we believe to be a novel hypothalamic cell population potentially important for understanding hypertension and indicate developmental hypothyroidism as an epigenetic risk factor for cardiovascular disorders. Furthermore, the findings may be beneficial for treatment of the recently identified patients that have a mutation in thyroid hormone receptor α1. PMID:23257356

  7. Neuronal glucoprivation enhances hypothalamic histamine turnover in rats.

    PubMed

    Oohara, A; Yoshimatsu, H; Kurokawa, M; Oishi, R; Saeki, K; Sakata, T

    1994-08-01

    Histamine (HA) turnover in the rat hypothalamus following insufficient energy supply due to glucoprivation was examined after administration of insulin or 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG). HA turnover was assessed by accumulation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MH), a major metabolite of brain HA, following administration of pargyline. Intraperitoneal injection of 1, 2, and 4 U/kg of insulin, which had no influence on steady-state levels of HA and t-MH, increased pargyline-induced accumulation of t-MH. Accumulation of t-MH due to pargyline was inversely related to the concomitant plasma glucose concentration after different doses of insulin. The level of t-MH accumulated by pargyline did not change compared with that of controls, when a euglycemic condition was maintained or insulin at a dose of 6 mU per rat was infused into the third cerebroventricle. Intracerebroventricular infusion of 24 mumol per rat of 2-DG, which had no influence on steady-state levels of HA and t-MH, increased the level of t-MH enhanced by pargyline. The results indicate that an increase in hypothalamic HA turnover in response to glucoprivation may be involved in homeostatic regulation of energy metabolism in the brain.

  8. Dopamine Autoreceptor Regulation of a Hypothalamic Dopaminergic Network

    PubMed Central

    Stagkourakis, Stefanos; Kim, Hoseok; Lyons, David J.; Broberger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Summary How autoreceptors contribute to maintaining a stable output of rhythmically active neuronal circuits is poorly understood. Here, we examine this issue in a dopamine population, spontaneously oscillating hypothalamic rat (TIDA) neurons, that underlie neuroendocrine control of reproduction and neuroleptic side effects. Activation of dopamine receptors of the type 2 family (D2Rs) at the cell-body level slowed TIDA oscillations through two mechanisms. First, they prolonged the depolarizing phase through a combination of presynaptic increases in inhibition and postsynaptic hyperpolarization. Second, they extended the discharge phase through presynaptic attenuation of calcium currents and decreased synaptic inhibition. Dopamine reuptake blockade similarly reconfigured the oscillation, indicating that ambient somatodendritic transmitter concentration determines electrical behavior. In the absence of D2R feedback, however, discharge was abolished by depolarization block. These results indicate the existence of an ultra-short feedback loop whereby neuroendocrine dopamine neurons tune network behavior to echoes of their own activity, reflected in ambient somatodendritic dopamine, and also suggest a mechanism for antipsychotic side effects. PMID:27149844

  9. Developmental programming of energy balance and its hypothalamic regulation.

    PubMed

    Remmers, Floor; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A

    2011-04-01

    Developmental programming is an important physiological process that allows different phenotypes to originate from a single genotype. Through plasticity in early life, the developing organism can adopt a phenotype (within the limits of its genetic background) that is best suited to its expected environment. In humans, together with the relative irreversibility of the phenomenon, the low predictive value of the fetal environment for later conditions in affluent countries makes it a potential contributor to the obesity epidemic of recent decades. Here, we review the current evidence for developmental programming of energy balance. For a proper understanding of the subject, knowledge about energy balance is indispensable. Therefore, we first present an overview of the major hypothalamic routes through which energy balance is regulated and their ontogeny. With this background, we then turn to the available evidence for programming of energy balance by the early nutritional environment, in both man and rodent models. A wealth of studies suggest that energy balance can indeed be permanently affected by the early-life environment. However, the direction of the effects of programming appears to vary considerably, both between and within different animal models. Because of these inconsistencies, a comprehensive picture is still elusive. More standardization between studies seems essential to reach veritable conclusions about the role of developmental programming in adult energy balance and obesity.

  10. Decoding Ventromedial Hypothalamic Neural Activity during Male Mouse Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Dollar, Piotr; Perona, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The ventromedial hypothalamus, ventrolateral area (VMHvl) was identified recently as a critical locus for inter-male aggression. Optogenetic stimulation of VMHvl in male mice evokes attack toward conspecifics and inactivation of the region inhibits natural aggression, yet very little is known about its underlying neural activity. To understand its role in promoting aggression, we recorded and analyzed neural activity in the VMHvl in response to a wide range of social and nonsocial stimuli. Although response profiles of VMHvl neurons are complex and heterogeneous, we identified a subpopulation of neurons that respond maximally during investigation and attack of male conspecific mice and during investigation of a source of male mouse urine. These “male responsive” neurons in the VMHvl are tuned to both the inter-male distance and the animal's velocity during attack. Additionally, VMHvl activity predicts several parameters of future aggressive action, including the latency and duration of the next attack. Linear regression analysis further demonstrates that aggression-specific parameters, such as distance, movement velocity, and attack latency, can model ongoing VMHvl activity fluctuation during inter-male encounters. These results represent the first effort to understand the hypothalamic neural activity during social behaviors using quantitative tools and suggest an important role for the VMHvl in encoding movement, sensory, and motivation-related signals. PMID:24760856

  11. Membrane-initiated Estrogen Signaling in Hypothalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Martin J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary It is well known that many of the actions of 17β-estradiol (E2) in the central nervous system are mediated via intracellular receptor/transcription factors that interact with steroid response elements on target genes. However, there is compelling evidence for membrane steroid receptors for estrogen in hypothalamic and other brain neurons. But it is not well understood how estrogen signals via membrane receptors, and how these signals impact not only membrane excitability but also gene transcription in neurons. Indeed, it has been known for sometime that E2 can rapidly alter neuronal activity within seconds, indicating that some cellular effects can occur via membrane delimited events. In addition, E2 can affect second messenger systems including calcium mobilization and a plethora of kinases to alter cell signaling. Therefore, this review will consider our current knowledge of rapid membrane-initiated and intracellular signaling by E2 in the hypothalamus, the nature of receptors involved and how they contribute to homeostatic functions. PMID:18538919

  12. Hypothalamic eIF2α Signaling Regulates Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Benani, Alexandre; Lorsignol, Anne; Brenachot, Xavier; Parry, Laurent; Carraro, Valérie; Guissard, Christophe; Averous, Julien; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Chaveroux, Cédric; B’chir, Wafa; Muranishi, Yuki; Ron, David; Pénicaud, Luc; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Summary The reversible phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) is a highly conserved signal implicated in the cellular adaptation to numerous stresses such as the one caused by amino acid limitation. In response to dietary amino acid deficiency, the brain-specific activation of the eIF2α kinase GCN2 leads to food intake inhibition. We report here that GCN2 is rapidly activated in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) after consumption of a leucine-deficient diet. Furthermore, knockdown of GCN2 in this particular area shows that MBH GCN2 activity controls the onset of the aversive response. Importantly, pharmacological experiments demonstrate that the sole phosphorylation of eIF2α in the MBH is sufficient to regulate food intake. eIF2α signaling being at the crossroad of stress pathways activated in several pathological states, our study indicates that hypothalamic eIF2α phosphorylation could play a critical role in the onset of anorexia associated with certain diseases. PMID:24485657

  13. Regulation of nucleus accumbens activity by the hypothalamic neuropeptide MCH

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Robert M.; Liu, Rong-Jian; Narayanan, Nandakumar S.; Sharf, Ruth; Yeckel, Mark F.; Laubach, Mark; Aghajanian, George K.; DiLeone, Ralph J.

    2010-01-01

    The lateral hypothalamus (LH) and the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) are brain regions important for food intake. The AcbSh contains high levels of receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), a lateral hypothalamic peptide critical for feeding and metabolism. MCH receptor (MCHR1) activation in the AcbSh increases food intake while AcbSh MCHR1 blockade reduces feeding. Here biochemical and cellular mechanisms of MCH action in the rodent AcbSh are described. A reduction of phosphorylation of GluR1 at Serine 845 (pSer845) is shown to occur after both pharmacological and genetic manipulations of MCHR1 activity. These changes depend upon signaling through Gi/o, and result in decreased surface expression of GluR1-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Electrophysiological analysis of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the AcbSh revealed decreased amplitude of AMPAR-mediated synaptic events (mEPSC) with MCH treatment. In addition, MCH suppressed action potential firing MSNs through K+ channel activation. Finally, in vivo recordings confirmed that MCH reduces neuronal cell firing in the AcbSh in freely moving animals. The ability of MCH to reduce cell firing in the AcbSh is consistent with a general model from other pharmacological and electrophysiological studies whereby reduced AcbSh neuronal firing leads to food intake. The current work integrates the hypothalamus into this model, providing biochemical and cellular mechanisms whereby metabolic and limbic signals converge to regulate food intake. PMID:20554878

  14. Paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus: axonal projections to the brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Geerling, Joel C.; Shin, Jung-Won; Chimenti, Peter C.; Loewy, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    The paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) contains many neurons that innervate the brainstem, but information regarding their target sites remains incomplete. Here, we labeled neurons in the rat PVH with an anterograde axonal tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHAL) and studied their descending projections in reference to specific neuronal subpopulations throughout the brainstem. While many of their target sites were identified previously, numerous new observations were made. Major findings include: (1) In the midbrain, the PVH projects lightly to the ventral tegmental area, Edinger-Westphal nucleus, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter, reticular formation, pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, and dorsal raphe nucleus. (2) In the dorsal pons, the PVH projects heavily to the pre-locus coeruleus, yet very little to the catecholamine neurons in the locus coeruleus, and selectively targets the viscerosensory subregions of the parabrachial nucleus; (3) In the ventral medulla, the superior salivatory nucleus, retrotrapezoid nucleus, compact and external formations of the nucleus ambiguus, A1 and caudal C1 catecholamine neurons, and caudal pressor area receive dense axonal projections, generally exceeding the PVH projection to the rostral C1 region; (4) The medial nucleus of the solitary tract (including A2 noradrenergic and aldosterone-sensitive neurons) receives the most extensive projections of the PVH, substantially more than the dorsal vagal nucleus or area postrema. Our findings suggest that the PVH may modulate a range of homeostatic functions, including cerebral and ocular blood flow, corneal and nasal hydration, ingestive behavior, sodium intake, and glucose metabolism, as well as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and respiratory activities. PMID:20187136

  15. Dietary macronutrient composition affects hypothalamic appetite regulation in chicks.

    PubMed

    McConn, Betty R; Matias, Justin; Wang, Guoqing; Cline, Mark A; Gilbert, Elizabeth R

    2016-08-16

    The objective was to determine the effects of high-protein and high-fat diets, and fasting and refeeding, on appetite regulation in chicks. Day of hatch chicks were fed one of four diets: basal, high protein (25% crude protein), and 15 and 30% high fat (15 and 30% metabolizable energy derived from soybean oil, respectively), and assigned to one of three treatments at 4 days: (1) access to feed, (2) 3 hours of fasting, or (3) fasting followed by 1 hour of refeeding. The hypothalamus was collected, total RNA isolated, and mRNA abundance measured. Food intake was reduced in chicks fed the high-protein and high-fat diets. Agouti-related peptide, neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY receptors 1, 2, and 5, melanocortin receptors 3 and 4 (MC3R and 4R, respectively), mesotocin, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), and CRF receptor sub-type 2 (CRFR2) mRNAs were greatest in chicks that consumed the basal diet. Refeeding was associated with increased MC3R mRNA in the high-protein diet group. CRFR2 mRNA was increased by fasting and refeeding in chicks that consumed the high-protein diet. Food intake and hypothalamic gene expression of some important appetite-associated factors were reduced in chicks fed the high-protein or high-fat diets. Fasting and refeeding accentuated several differences and results suggest that the CRF and melanocortin pathways are involved.

  16. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis homeostasis predicts longevity.

    PubMed

    Yonker, James A; Chang, Vicky; Roetker, Nicholas S; Hauser, Taissa S; Hauser, Robert M; Atwood, Craig S

    2013-02-01

    The reproductive-cell cycle theory of aging posits that reproductive hormone changes associated with menopause and andropause drive senescence via altered cell cycle signaling. Using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (n = 5,034), we analyzed the relationship between longevity and menopause, including other factors that impact "ovarian lifespan" such as births, oophorectomy, and hormone replacement therapy. We found that later onset of menopause was associated with lower mortality, with and without adjusting for additional factors (years of education, smoking status, body mass index, and marital status). Each year of delayed menopause resulted in a 2.9% reduction in mortality; after including a number of additional controls, the effect was attenuated modestly but remained statistically significant (2.6% reduction in mortality). We also found that no other reproductive parameters assessed added to the prediction of longevity, suggesting that reproductive factors shown to affect longevity elsewhere may be mediated by age of menopause. Thus, surgical and natural menopause at age 40, for example, resulted in identical survival probabilities. These results support the maintenance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in homeostasis in prolonging human longevity, which provides a coherent framework for understanding the relationship between reproduction and longevity.

  17. Expression of gastrointestinal nesfatin-1 and gastric emptying in ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus- and ventrolateral hypothalamic nucleus-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zi-Bin; Deng, Run-Jun; Sun, Gui-Rong; Wei, Liang-Zhou; Kong, Xin-Juan; Ding, Xue-Li; Jing, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ping; Ge, Yin-Lin

    2014-06-14

    To determine the expression levels of gastrointestinal nesfatin-1 in ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH)-lesioned (obese) and ventrolateral hypothalamic nucleus (VLH)-lesioned (lean) rats that exhibit an imbalance in their energy metabolism and gastric mobility. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into a VMH-lesioned group, a VLH-lesioned group, and their respective sham-operated groups. The animals had free access to food and water, and their diets and weights were monitored after surgery. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining were used to analyse the levels of NUCB2 mRNA and nesfatin-1 immunoreactive (IR) cells in the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and colon, respectively. Gastric emptying was also assessed using a modified phenol red-methylcellulose recovery method. The VMH-lesioned rats fed normal chow exhibited markedly greater food intake and body weight gain, whereas the VLH-lesioned rats exhibited markedly lower food intake and body weight gain. NUCB2/nesfatin-1 IR cells were localised in the lower third and middle portion of the gastric mucosal gland and in the submucous layer of the enteric tract. Compared with their respective controls, gastric emptying was enhanced in the VMH-lesioned rats (85.94% ± 2.27%), whereas the VLH lesions exhibited inhibitory effects on gastric emptying (29.12% ± 1.62%). In the VMH-lesioned rats, the levels of NUCB2 mRNA and nesfatin-1 protein were significantly increased in the stomach and duodenum and reduced in the small intestine. In addition, the levels of NUCB2 mRNA and nesfatin-1 protein in the VLH-lesioned rats were decreased in the stomach, duodenum, and small intestine. Our study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 level in the stomach and duodenum is positively correlated with body mass. Additionally, there is a positive relationship between gastric emptying and body mass. The results of this study indicate that gastrointestinal nesfatin-1 may play a significant role in gastric

  18. Measuring Cyclic Error in Laser Heterodyne Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Abramovici, Alexander; Zhao, Feng; Dekens, Frank; An, Xin; Azizi, Alireza; Chapsky, Jacob; Halverson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus have been devised for measuring cyclic errors in the readouts of laser heterodyne interferometers that are configured and operated as displacement gauges. The cyclic errors arise as a consequence of mixing of spurious optical and electrical signals in beam launchers that are subsystems of such interferometers. The conventional approach to measurement of cyclic error involves phase measurements and yields values precise to within about 10 pm over air optical paths at laser wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. The present approach, which involves amplitude measurements instead of phase measurements, yields values precise to about .0.1 microns . about 100 times the precision of the conventional approach. In a displacement gauge of the type of interest here, the laser heterodyne interferometer is used to measure any change in distance along an optical axis between two corner-cube retroreflectors. One of the corner-cube retroreflectors is mounted on a piezoelectric transducer (see figure), which is used to introduce a low-frequency periodic displacement that can be measured by the gauges. The transducer is excited at a frequency of 9 Hz by a triangular waveform to generate a 9-Hz triangular-wave displacement having an amplitude of 25 microns. The displacement gives rise to both amplitude and phase modulation of the heterodyne signals in the gauges. The modulation includes cyclic error components, and the magnitude of the cyclic-error component of the phase modulation is what one needs to measure in order to determine the magnitude of the cyclic displacement error. The precision attainable in the conventional (phase measurement) approach to measuring cyclic error is limited because the phase measurements are af-

  19. The envelope-based cyclic periodogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, P.

    2015-06-01

    Cyclostationary analysis has proven effective in identifying signal components for diagnostic purposes. A key descriptor in this framework is the cyclic power spectrum, traditionally estimated by the averaged cyclic periodogram and the smoothed cyclic periodogram. A lengthy debate about the best estimator finally found a solution in a cornerstone work by Antoni, who proposed a unified form for the two families, thus allowing a detailed statistical study of their properties. Since then, the focus of cyclostationary research has shifted towards algorithms, in terms of computational efficiency and simplicity of implementation. Traditional algorithms have proven computationally inefficient and the sophisticated "cyclostationary" definition of these estimators slowed their spread in the industry. The only attempt to increase the computational efficiency of cyclostationary estimators is represented by the cyclic modulation spectrum. This indicator exploits the relationship between cyclostationarity and envelope analysis. The link with envelope analysis allows a leap in computational efficiency and provides a "way in" for the understanding by industrial engineers. However, the new estimator lies outside the unified form described above and an unbiased version of the indicator has not been proposed. This paper will therefore extend the analysis of envelope-based estimators of the cyclic spectrum, proposing a new approach to include them in the unified form of cyclostationary estimators. This will enable the definition of a new envelope-based algorithm and the detailed analysis of the properties of the cyclic modulation spectrum. The computational efficiency of envelope-based algorithms will be also discussed quantitatively for the first time in comparison with the averaged cyclic periodogram. Finally, the algorithms will be validated with numerical and experimental examples.

  20. Comparison of luteinizing hormone, leptin and progesterone levels in the systemic circulation (Vena jugularis) and near the ovarian circulation (Vena cava caudalis) during the oestrous cycle in Mangalica and Landrace gilts.

    PubMed

    Brüssow, Klaus-Peter; Schneider, Falk; Tuchscherer, Armin; Egerszegi, Istvan; Rátky, Jozsef

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate luteinizing hormone (LH) and luteal progesterone (P4) secretion in systemic blood and blood near the ovaries in Mangalica (M) and Landrace (L) gilts by implanting catheters into the Vena jugularis and the Vena cava caudalis via the Vena saphena, respectively. Furthermore, leptin was analyzed in jugular vein blood. Blood was collected twice daily from day 7 to day 19 of the oestrous cycle and frequently (10-min intervals for 6 h) on day 9, day 12 and day 15 in M (n=3) and L gilts (n=4). L gilts had congruent pulsatile LH secretion in both veins, but the LH concentrations in M were always below the assay sensitivity during the luteal phase. In both breeds, episodic P4 secretion was found in the jugular and caval veins, and both sampling site and breed had an influence on P4 secretion (P<0.05). The mean concentration of P4 was higher (P<0.01) in utero-ovarian blood (75.8+/-5.3 in M; 49.6+/-4.2 ng/ml in L) than in the periphery (31.3+/-2.0 in M; 21.2+/-1.8 ng/ml in L). M pigs had a lower number of corpora lutea (9.7+/-2.3 vs. 20.5+/-4.4), and analysis of the P4 secretion ratio per corpus luteum revealed an influence of breed (P<0.01). This ratio was significantly higher in M (3.8+/-0.3 and 8.7+/-0.7 ng/ml) compared with the L gilts (1.4+/-0.1 and 2.8+/-0.3 ng/ml) in the jugular and caval veins, respectively. Blood sampling from the Vena cava caudalis is potentially more precise than from the Vena jugularis for evaluation of ovarian P4 secretion. Both the higher P4 concentration and increased leptin secretion (11.3+/-0.6 vs. 3.0+/-0.1 ng/ml, P<0.05) and consequently the altered LH secretion pattern in the Mangalica may contribute to the lower fecundity of this breed.

  1. Cyclic alternating ring-opening metathesis polymerization (CAROMP). Rapid access to functionalized cyclic polymers.

    PubMed

    Song, Airong; Parker, Kathlyn A; Sampson, Nicole S

    2010-09-03

    Catalysis of alternating ROMP with (H(2)IMes)Cl(2)Ru=CHPh(OiPr), the second generation Hoveyda-Grubbs catalyst, provided an entirely cyclic alternating polymer. Conditions for the cyclic AROMP were used to prepare a polymer in which one of the repeat units bore a primary alkyl chloride that was used for further elaboration.

  2. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs): coincidence detectors acting to spatially and temporally integrate cyclic nucleotide and non-cyclic nucleotide signals.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Donald H; Wilson, Lindsay S; Rampersad, Sarah N; Hubert, Fabien; Truong, Tammy; Kaczmarek, Milosz; Brzezinska, Paulina; Freitag, Silja I; Umana, M Bibiana; Wudwud, Alie

    2014-04-01

    The cyclic nucleotide second messengers cAMP and cGMP each affect virtually all cellular processes. Although these hydrophilic small molecules readily diffuse throughout cells, it is remarkable that their ability to activate their multiple intracellular effectors is spatially and temporally selective. Studies have identified a critical role for compartmentation of the enzymes which hydrolyse and metabolically inactivate these second messengers, the PDEs (cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases), in this specificity. In the present article, we describe several examples from our work in which compartmentation of selected cAMP- or cGMP-hydrolysing PDEs co-ordinate selective activation of cyclic nucleotide effectors, and, as a result, selectively affect cellular functions. It is our belief that therapeutic strategies aimed at targeting PDEs within these compartments will allow greater selectivity than those directed at inhibiting these enzymes throughout the cells.

  3. GABAergic activation inhibits the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovaric axis and sexual development in the immature female rat. Associated changes in hypothalamic glutamatergic and taurinergic systems.

    PubMed

    Feleder, C; Ginzburg, M; Wuttke, W; Moguilevsky, J A; Arias, P

    1999-09-06

    The aim of the present studies was to assess, in immature female rats, the effect of the GABAergic system on the reproductive axis and on pubertal development. With this purpose we initially evaluated, in 30-day-old female rats, the effect of persistently enhanced GABAergic activity (aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA) 10 mg/kg per day i.p., during postnatal days 23-29) on hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and amino acid neurotransmitter (AANT; glutamate or GLU, and taurine or TAU) concentrations, on circulating luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol levels, and on ovaric weight. In a second group of similarly treated rats, the date of vaginal opening (VO) was recorded. Complementary in vitro experiments (superfusion of anterior/mediobasal hypothalamic fragments obtained from rats aged 30 days) were performed to evaluate the effect of the short-term activation of the GABAergic system (by means of AOAA, muscimol or baclofen) on hypothalamic GnRH and AANT release. Prolonged treatment with AOAA led to a marked increase in hypothalamic gamma-aminobutyric-acid (GABA) concentrations (p<0.002), and to a significant decrease in hypothalamic GnRH and GLU content (p<0.05 and <0.02, respectively). Furthermore, treated animals showed diminished serum LH (p<0.05) and estradiol (p<0.005) levels, and a clear reduction in ovaric weight (p<0.002). Mean age at VO was 30. 8+/-0.6 days in control animals (range: 29-34 days), and 36.7+/-0.98 days in AOAA-treated rats (range: 33-40 days; p<0.0001). Acute treatment with AOAA resulted in a decreased GnRH and GLU output, and in an increased TAU release from superfused hypothalamic fragments. This effect was mimicked by the GABA-A and GABA-B agonists. Our results show that the activation of the GABAergic system during postnatal days 23-29 significantly restrains the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovaric axis, resulting in a clear-cut delay in sexual development. This can be attributed to the inhibitory effect exerted by GABA (acting on both

  4. Therapeutic Neuroendocrine Agonist and Antagonist Analogs of Hypothalamic Neuropeptides as Modulators of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis.

    PubMed

    Newton, Claire L; Anderson, Ross C; Millar, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive hormones play a role at all stages of life and affect most tissues of the body. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) synthesized in the hypothalamus stimulates the secretion of gonadotropins which in turn stimulate gonadal sex hormone production and gamete formation. This hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis has, therefore, been the target for the development of numerous drugs which regulate it at various points. These include sex steroid agonists and antagonists, inhibitors of sex steroid biosynthesis, and GnRH agonists and antagonists, which have found extensive applications in treating numerous conditions such as precocious puberty, delayed puberty, prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia, endometriosis, uterine fibroids and also in in vitro fertilization protocols. The novel neuroendocrine peptides, kisspeptin (KP) and neurokinin B (NKB), were recently discovered as upstream regulators of GnRH, and inactivating mutations of KP and NKB ligands or receptors result in a failure to progress through puberty. Agonists and antagonists of KP and NKB are being developed as more subtle modulators of the HPG axis. These new drugs offer additional and alternative therapeutic options in pediatric and adult hormone-dependent diseases.

  5. Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation: analysis of hypothalamic and autonomic candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Rand, Casey M; Patwari, Pallavi P; Rodikova, Ekaterina A; Zhou, Lili; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth M; Wilson, Richard J A; Bech-Hansen, Torben; Weese-Mayer, Debra E

    2011-10-01

    Rapid-onset Obesity with Hypothalamic Dysfunction, Hypoventilation, and Autonomic Dysregulation (ROHHAD) is a rare and complex pediatric disorder. Despite increased identification and advancing knowledge of the disease course, the variable onset and timing of phenotypic features in ROHHAD often result in delayed or missed diagnosis, potentially leading to fatal central hypoventilation, cardiorespiratory arrest, and impaired neurocognitive development. The 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1A (HTR1A), orthopedia (OTP), and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) genes were targeted in the etiology of ROHHAD based on their roles in the embryologic development of the hypothalamus and autonomic nervous system. We hypothesized that variations of HTR1A, OTP, and/or PACAP would be associated with ROHHAD. All coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of the HTR1A, OTP, and PACAP genes, in addition to the promoter region of the HTR1A gene, were analyzed by standard sequencing in 25 ROHHAD cases and 25 matched controls. Thirteen variations, including six protein-changing mutations, were identified. None of these variations were significantly correlated with ROHHAD. This report provides evidence that variation of the HTR1A, OTP, and PACAP genes are not responsible for ROHHAD. These results represent a further step in the investigation of the genetic determinants of ROHHAD.

  6. Cyclic depsipeptides as potential cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kitagaki, Jirouta; Shi, Genbin; Miyauchi, Shizuka; Murakami, Shinya; Yang, Yili

    2015-03-01

    Cyclic depsipeptides are polypeptides in which one or more amino acid is replaced by a hydroxy acid, resulting in the formation of at least one ester bond in the core ring structure. Many natural cyclic depsipeptides possessing intriguing structural and biological properties, including antitumor, antifungal, antiviral, antibacterial, anthelmintic, and anti-inflammatory activities, have been identified from fungi, plants, and marine organisms. In particular, the potent effects of cyclic depsipeptides on tumor cells have led to a number of clinical trials evaluating their potential as chemotherapeutic agents. Although many of the trials have not achieved the desired results, romidepsin (FK228), a bicyclic depsipeptide that inhibits histone deacetylase, has been shown to have clinical efficacy in patients with refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and has received Food and Drug Administration approval for use in treatment. In this review, we discuss antitumor cyclic depsipeptides that have undergone clinical trials and focus on their structural features, mechanisms, potential applications in chemotherapy, and pharmacokinetic and toxicity data. The results of this study indicate that cyclic depsipeptides could be a rich source of new cancer therapeutics.

  7. Novel pH-Sensitive Cyclic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Weerakkody, Dhammika; Moshnikova, Anna; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Adochite, Ramona-Cosmina; Slaybaugh, Gregory; Golijanin, Jovana; Tiwari, Rakesh K.; Andreev, Oleg A.; Parang, Keykavous; Reshetnyak, Yana K.

    2016-01-01

    A series of cyclic peptides containing a number of tryptophan (W) and glutamic acid (E) residues were synthesized and evaluated as pH-sensitive agents for targeting of acidic tissue and pH-dependent cytoplasmic delivery of molecules. Biophysical studies revealed the molecular mechanism of peptides action and localization within the lipid bilayer of the membrane at high and low pHs. The symmetric, c[(WE)4WC], and asymmetric, c[E4W5C], cyclic peptides translocated amanitin, a polar cargo molecule of similar size, across the lipid bilayer and induced cell death in a pH- and concentration-dependent manner. Fluorescently-labelled peptides were evaluated for targeting of acidic 4T1 mammary tumors in mice. The highest tumor to muscle ratio (5.6) was established for asymmetric cyclic peptide, c[E4W5C], at 24 hours after intravenous administration. pH-insensitive cyclic peptide c[R4W5C], where glutamic acid residues (E) were replaced by positively charged arginine residues (R), did not exhibit tumor targeting. We have introduced a novel class of cyclic peptides, which can be utilized as a new pH-sensitive tool in investigation or targeting of acidic tissue. PMID:27515582

  8. Cyclic transformation of orbital angular momentum modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlederer, Florian; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Malik, Mehul; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-04-01

    The spatial modes of photons are one realization of a QuDit, a quantum system that is described in a D-dimensional Hilbert space. In order to perform quantum information tasks with QuDits, a general class of D-dimensional unitary transformations is needed. Among these, cyclic transformations are an important special case required in many high-dimensional quantum communication protocols. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a cyclic transformation in the high-dimensional space of photonic orbital angular momentum (OAM). Using simple linear optical components, we show a successful four-fold cyclic transformation of OAM modes. Interestingly, our experimental setup was found by a computer algorithm. In addition to the four-cyclic transformation, the algorithm also found extensions to higher-dimensional cycles in a hybrid space of OAM and polarization. Besides being useful for quantum cryptography with QuDits, cyclic transformations are key for the experimental production of high-dimensional maximally entangled Bell-states.

  9. Regulation of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA by central glucose and leptin

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Michael J.; Cha, Seung Hun; Sidhaye, Aniket; Chohnan, Shigeru; Cline, Gary; Shulman, Gerald I.; Lane, M. Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Hypothalamic malonyl-CoA has been shown to function in global energy homeostasis by modulating food intake and energy expenditure. Little is known, however, about the regulation of malonyl-CoA concentration in the central nervous system. To address this issue we investigated the response of putative intermediates in the malonyl-CoA pathway to metabolic and endocrine cues, notably those provoked by glucose and leptin. Hypothalamic malonyl-CoA rises in proportion to the carbohydrate content of the diet consumed after food deprivation. Malonyl-CoA concentration peaks 1 h after refeeding or after peripheral glucose administration. This response depends on the dose of glucose administered and is blocked by the i.c.v. administration of an inhibitor of glucose metabolism, 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). The kinetics of change in hypothalamic malonyl-CoA after glucose administration is coincident with the suppression of phosphorylation of AMP kinase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Blockade of glucose utilization in the CNS by i.c.v. 2-DG prevented the effects of glucose on 5′AMP-activated protein kinase, malonyl-CoA, hypothalamic neuropeptide expression, and food intake. Finally, we showed that leptin can increase hypothalamic malonyl-CoA and that the increase is additive with glucose administration. Leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, however, showed no defect in the glucose- or refeeding-induced rise in hypothalamic malonyl-CoA after food deprivation, demonstrating that leptin was not required for this effect. These studies show that hypothalamic malonyl-CoA responds to the level of circulating glucose and leptin, both of which affect energy homeostasis. PMID:18032600

  10. Dexmedetomidine ameliorates muscle wasting and attenuates the alteration of hypothalamic neuropeptides and inflammation in endotoxemic rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Minhua; Gao, Tao; Xi, Fengchan; Cao, Chun; Chen, Yan; Zhao, Chenyan; Li, Qiurong

    2017-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is generally used for sedaton in critically ill, it could shorten duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay and lower basic metabolism. However, the exact mechanism of these positive effects remains unkown. Here we investigated the hypothesis that dexmedetomidine could ameliorate muscle wasting in endotoxemic rats and whether it was related to hypothalamic neuropeptides alteration and inflammation. Fourty-eight adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg/kg) or saline, followed by 50 μg/kg dexmedetomidine or saline administration via the femoral vein catheter (infusion at 5 μg·kg-1·hr-1). Twenty-four hours after injection, hypothalamus tissues and skeletal muscle were obtained. Muscle wasting was measured by the mRNA expression of two E3 ubiquitin ligases, muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF-1) as well as 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) and tyrosine release. Hypothalamic inflammatory markers and neuropeptides expression were also detected in all four groups. Results showed that LPS administration led to significant increase in hypothalamic inflammation together with muscle wasting. Increased hypothalamic neuropeptides, proopiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine and amphetamine-related transcript (CART) and neuropeptides Y (NPY) and decreased agouti-related protein (AgRP) were also observed. Meanwhile dexmedetomidine administration ameliorated muscle wasting, hypothalamic inflammation and modulated the alteration of neuropeptides, POMC, CART and AgRP, in endotoxemic rats. In conclusion, dexmedetomidine could alleviate muscle wasting in endotoxemic rats, and it could also attenuate the alteration of hypothalamic neuropeptides and reduce hypothalamic inflammation. PMID:28358856

  11. Hypothalamic tumors impact gray and white matter volumes in fronto-limbic brain areas.

    PubMed

    Özyurt, Jale; Müller, Hermann L; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Thiel, Christiane M

    2017-04-01

    Patients with hypothalamic involvement of a sellar/parasellar tumor often suffer from cognitive and social-emotional deficits that a lesion in the hypothalamus cannot fully explain. It is conceivable that these deficits are partly due to distal changes in hypothalamic networks, evolving secondary to a focal lesion. Focusing on childhood-onset craniopharyngioma patients, we aimed at investigating the impact of hypothalamic lesions on gray and white matter areas densely connected to the hypothalamus, and to relate structural changes to neuropsychological deficits frequently observed in patients. We performed a voxel-based morphometric analysis based on data of 11 childhood-onset craniopharyngioma patients with hypothalamic tumor involvement, and 18 healthy controls (median age: 17.2 and 17.4 yrs.). Whole-brain analyses were used to test for volumetric differences between the groups (T-tests) and subsequent regression analyses were used to correlate neuropsychological performance with gray and white matter volumes within the patient group. Patients compared to controls had significantly reduced gray matter volumes in areas of the anterior and posterior limbic subsystems which are densely connected with the hypothalamus. In addition, a reduction in white matter volumes was observed in tracts connecting the hypothalamus to other limbic areas. Worse long-term memory retrieval was correlated with smaller gray matter volumes in the posterior cingulate cortex. Our data provide the first evidence that hypothalamic tumor involvement impacts gray and white matter volumes in limbic areas, outside the area of tumor growth. Notably, the functional range of the two limbic subsystems affected, strikingly parallels the two major domains of psychological complaints in patients i.e., deficits in episodic memory and in socio-emotional functioning. We suggest that focal hypothalamic lesions may trigger distal changes in connected brain areas, which then contribute to the impairments in

  12. Hypothalamic Angptl4/Fiaf Is a Novel Regulator of Food Intake and Body Weight

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Kyong; Youn, Byung-Soo; Shin, Mi-Seon; Namkoong, Churl; Park, Kyeong Han; Baik, Ja Hyun; Kim, Jae Bum; Park, Joong-Yeol; Lee, Ki-up; Kim, Young-Bum; Kim, Min-Seon

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4)/fasting-induced adipose factor (Fiaf) is known as a regulator of peripheral lipid and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we investigated the physiological role of Angptl4 in central regulation of body weight homeostasis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Hypothalamic Angptl4 expression levels were measured using immunoblot assay during feeding manipulation or after administration of leptin, insulin, and nutrients. The effects of Angptl4 on food intake, body weight, and energy expenditure were determined following intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of Angptl4 in C57BL/6 mice. Food intake, energy metabolism, and feeding responses to leptin, insulin, and nutrients were compared between Angptl4-null mice and their wild littermates. Finally, the relationship of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Angptl4 was studied. RESULTS Hypothalamic Angptl4 expression levels were increased upon food intake or administration of leptin, insulin, and nutrients. Furthermore, central administration of Angptl4 suppressed food intake and body weight gain but enhanced energy expenditure. These effects were mediated via suppression of hypothalamic AMPK activities. Consistently, Angptl4-null mice displayed increased body weight and hypothalamic AMPK activity but reduced energy expenditure. Food intake following a fast was significantly greater in Angptl4-null mice, which was normalized by centrally administered Angptl4. Moreover, anorectic responses to leptin, insulin, and glucose were diminished in Angptl4-null mice. In contrast, Angptl4-null mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity, indicating obesity-promoting effects of Angptl4 under the condition of fat-enriched diet. CONCLUSIONS We have demonstrated that hypothalamic Angptl4 is regulated by physiological appetite regulators and mediates their anorexigenic effects via inhibition of hypothalamic AMPK activity. Therefore, Angptl4 appears to have an

  13. Growth hormone modulates hypothalamic inflammation in long-lived pituitary dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Sadagurski, Marianna; Landeryou, Taylor; Cady, Gillian; Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Bartke, Andrzej; Miller, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Mice in which the genes for growth hormone (GH) or GH receptor (GHR(-/-) ) are disrupted from conception are dwarfs, possess low levels of IGF-1 and insulin, have low rates of cancer and diabetes, and are extremely long-lived. Median longevity is also increased in mice with deletion of hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), which leads to isolated GH deficiency. The remarkable extension of longevity in hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice can be reversed by a 6-week course of GH injections started at the age of 2 weeks. Here, we demonstrate that mutations that interfere with GH production or response, in the Snell dwarf, Ames dwarf, or GHR(-/-) mice lead to reduced formation of both orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) projections to the main hypothalamic projection areas: the arcuate nucleus (ARH), paraventricular nucleus (PVH), and dorsomedial nucleus (DMH). These mutations also reduce hypothalamic inflammation in 18-month-old mice. GH injections, between 2 and 8 weeks of age, reversed both effects in Ames dwarf mice. Disruption of GHR specifically in liver (LiGHRKO), a mutation that reduces circulating IGF-1 but does not lead to lifespan extension, had no effect on hypothalamic projections or inflammation, suggesting an effect of GH, rather than peripheral IGF-1, on hypothalamic development. Hypothalamic leptin signaling, as monitored by induction of pStat3, is not impaired by GHR deficiency. Together, these results suggest that early-life disruption of GH signaling produces long-term hypothalamic changes that may contribute to the longevity of GH-deficient and GH-resistant mice.

  14. The nature of solar cyclicity. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanchuk, P. R.

    1981-02-01

    The report contains a critical survey of work devoted to the study of the nature of solar cyclicity. The inconsistency of the representation of cyclic curves using a frequency spectrum is indicated. The useful contribution of the ideas of Wolf, Newcomb, and Waldmeier to the solution of the problem is noted. Data are cited in favor of the theory of the tidal nature of solar cyclicity developed by the author, which also takes into account the ideas of the above-mentioned authors: the continuous paired and single tidal actions of the planets and the resonance character of this action, thanks to which the approximately 10-year period of action of Jupiter and Saturn is transformed into the 11-year activity cycle.

  15. Evaluation of homogeneous electrocatalysts by cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Rountree, Eric S; McCarthy, Brian D; Eisenhart, Thomas T; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2014-10-06

    The pursuit of solar fuels has motivated extensive research on molecular electrocatalysts capable of evolving hydrogen from protic solutions, reducing CO2, and oxidizing water. Determining accurate figures of merit for these catalysts requires the careful and appropriate application of electroanalytical techniques. This Viewpoint first briefly presents the fundamentals of cyclic voltammetry and highlights practical experimental considerations before focusing on the application of cyclic voltammetry for the characterization of electrocatalysts. Key metrics for comparing catalysts, including the overpotential (η), potential for catalysis (E(cat)), observed rate constant (k(obs)), and potential-dependent turnover frequency, are discussed. The cyclic voltammetric responses for a general electrocatalytic one-electron reduction of a substrate are presented along with methods to extract figures of merit from these data. The extension of this analysis to more complex electrocatalytic schemes, such as those responsible for H2 evolution and CO2 reduction, is then discussed.

  16. Cyclic and low temperature effects on microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissflug, V. A.; Sisul, E. V.

    1977-01-01

    Cyclic temperature and low temperature operating life tests, and pre-/post-life device evaluations were used to determine the degrading effects of thermal environments on microcircuit reliability. Low power transistor-transistor-logic gates and linear devices were included in each test group. Device metallization systems included aluminum metallization/aluminum wire, aluminum metallization/gold wire, and gold metallization/gold wire. Fewer than 2% electrical failures were observed during the cyclic and low temperature life tests and the post-life evaluations revealed approximately 2% bond pull failures. Reconstruction of aluminum die metallization was observed in all devices and the severity of the reconstruction appeared to be directly related to the magnitude of the temperature excursion. All types of bonds except the gold/gold bonds were weakened by exposure to repeated cyclic temperature stress.

  17. Cyclic Cocycles on Twisted Convolution Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Eitan

    2013-01-01

    We give a construction of cyclic cocycles on convolution algebras twisted by gerbes over discrete translation groupoids. For proper étale groupoids, Tu and Xu (Adv Math 207(2):455-483, 2006) provide a map between the periodic cyclic cohomology of a gerbe-twisted convolution algebra and twisted cohomology groups which is similar to the construction of Mathai and Stevenson (Adv Math 200(2):303-335, 2006). When the groupoid is not proper, we cannot construct an invariant connection on the gerbe; therefore to study this algebra, we instead develop simplicial techniques to construct a simplicial curvature 3-form representing the class of the gerbe. Then by using a JLO formula we define a morphism from a simplicial complex twisted by this simplicial curvature 3-form to the mixed bicomplex computing the periodic cyclic cohomology of the twisted convolution algebras.

  18. Cyclic Oxonitriles: Stereodivergent Grignard Addition-Alkylations

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Fraser F.; Wei, Guoqing; Zhang, Zhiyu; Steward, Omar W.

    2008-01-01

    Sequential carbonyl addition-conjugate addition of Grignard reagents to cyclic 5–7–membered oxoalkenenitriles efficiently generates cyclic magnesiated nitriles. Alkylations of these magnesiated nitriles exhibit diastereoselectivities that depend intimately on the size of the carbocyclic ring: 5-membered oxonitriles generate magnesiated nitriles whose alkylations are controlled by steric constraints whereas 6- and 7-membered oxonitriles generate internally coordinated, C-magnesiated nitriles whose alkylations are controlled by stereoelectronic effects. Reversing the alkylation selectivity of 6-membered C-magnesiated nitriles is achieved by conversion to an N-metalated nitrile in which steric, rather than electronic, effects direct the electrophile trajectory. Collectively, the conjugate addition-alkylation generates highly substituted, cyclic 5–7-membered nitriles containing three new stereocenters with selective access to diastereomers at the quaternary nitrile-bearing carbon. PMID:17567075

  19. Facilitated thyrotropin release after retrochiasmatic hypothalamic knife cuts.

    PubMed

    Phelps, C P; Colombo, J A

    1981-03-01

    Diencephalic structures that influence plasma thyrotropin (TSH) in male rats under pentobarbital anesthesia (35 mg/kg, IP) were studied by combining medial preoptic area-suprachiasmatic nucleus (MPOA-Sch) bilateral electrical stimulation (monophasic pulses, 200 microA at 50 Hz, 30 min) with progressive midline lesions produced by a retractable Halász knife. Plasma TSH was measured by radioimmunoassay just before (0 time) and at 30, 60 and 90 min after the beginning of stimulation. Rats that had received only sham surgical procedures 90 days prior to stimulation were characterized by a more than 2-3 fold elevation in basal (0 time) plasma TSH levels when compared to those found in intact control rats and expected elevations in plasma TSH at 30 min after stimulation were eliminated. After a small frontal cut (1.3 FC), 0 time plasma TSH levels increased more tha 4-fold above those of controls in association with a facilitation of stimulated release of TSH. When the knife blade radius was 1.5 mm (1.5 FC) the facilitation of TSH release after stimulation occurred again; however, 0 time plasma TSH concentrations in 1.5 FC rats were not different from control levels. These effects of midline cortical, thalamic and hypothalamic damage on TSH release required the passage of more than 12 days after brain surgery. Collectively, these findings suggest potential neural elements that are inhibitory for 'basal' and 'phasic' TSH release which are in close proximity to a separate excitatory neural system and which can be activated by MPOA-Sch stimulation.

  20. Differential involvement of hypothalamic vasopressin neurons in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Benarroch, Eduardo E; Schmeichel, Ann M; Sandroni, Paola; Low, Phillip A; Parisi, Joseph E

    2006-10-01

    We sought to determine whether there is differential involvement of different groups of hypothalamic arginine-vasopressin (AVP) synthesizing neurons in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Hypothalamus was obtained from five subjects with clinical diagnosis of MSA confirmed neuropathologically and five age-matched controls. Sections were immunostained for AVP, and cells with visible nuclei were counted in the posterior portion of the paraventricular nucleus (PVNp), supraoptic nucleus (SON), magnocellular PVN and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Sections of the hypothalamus and medulla were also immunostained for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). There was a significant loss of AVP neurons in the PVNp in MSA compared with controls (17 +/- 3 versus 59 +/- 10 cells/section, P < 0.01). There was preservation of AVP- and TH-immunoreactive neurons in the SON and magnocellular PVN in all MSA cases. In contrast, there was marked depletion of TH-immunoreactive fibres innervating these magnocellular AVP neurons, coincident with a loss of neurons in the A1 area (6 +/- 1 versus 13 +/- 1 cells/section, P < 0.01). There was loss of AVP neurons in the SCN in MSA compared with control cases (14 +/- 3 versus 71 +/- 16 cells/section, P < 0.02). Our results indicate that, in MSA, loss of AVP neurons in the PVNp may contribute to sympathetic failure, whereas loss of catecholaminergic input from the brainstem to the magnocellular AVP neurons may contribute to impaired AVP secretion in response to orthostatic stress. Loss of AVP neurons in the SCN may contribute to impaired circadian regulation of endocrine and autonomic functions.

  1. VMN hypothalamic dopamine and serotonin in anorectic septic rats.

    PubMed

    Torelli, G F; Meguid, M M; Miyata, G; Fetissov, S O; Carter, J L; Kim, H J; Muscaritoli, M; Rossi Fanelli, F

    2000-03-01

    During sepsis, catabolism of proteins and associated changes in plasma amino acids occur. Tryptophan and tyrosine, and their derivatives serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA), influence hypothalamic feeding-related areas and are associated with the onset of anorexia. We hypothesized that anorexia of sepsis is associated with changes in serotonin and dopamine in the ventromedial nucleus (VMN) of the hypothalamus. The aim of this study was to test our hypothesis by measuring intra-VMN changes of these two neurotransmitters at the onset of anorexia during sepsis. Fischer 344 male rats had an intracerebral guide cannula stereotaxically implanted into the VMN. Ten days later, in awake, overnight-food-deprived rats, a microdialysis probe was inserted through the in situ VMN cannula. Two hours thereafter, serial baseline serotonin and dopamine concentrations were measured. Then cecal ligation and puncture to induce sepsis or a control laparotomy was performed under isoflurane anesthesia. VMN microdialysis samples were serially collected every 30 min for 8 h after the surgical procedure to determine 5-HT and DA changes in response to sepsis. During the hypermetabolic response to sepsis, a strong association occurred between anorexia and a significant reduction of VMN dopamine concentration (P < 0.05; constant rate of dopamine decrease in the Study group of 0.99 pg per 2 h); no changes occurred in 5-HT in association with anorexia of sepsis. Six hours after operation, a single meal was offered for 20 min to assess the response of neurotransmitters to food ingestion. Food intake was minimal in anorectic septic rats (mean size of the after food-deprived meal in the Septic group was 0.03+/-0.01 g, that of the Control group was 1.27+/-0.14 g; P = 0.0001), while Control rats demonstrated anticipated changes in neurotransmitters in response to eating. We conclude that the onset of anorexia in septic rats is associated with a reduction in VMN dopamine.

  2. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Imrich, R; Rovensky, J; Zlnay, M; Radikova, Z; Macho, L; Vigas, M; Koska, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess basal function and responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis during dynamic testing. Methods: Insulin induced hypoglycaemia (IIH) (Actrapid HM 0.1 IU/kg, as intravenous bolus) was induced in 17 patients and 11 healthy controls matched for age, sex, and body mass index. Concentrations of glucose, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, insulin, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) were determined in plasma. Results: Comparable basal cortisol levels were found in the two groups, with a trend to be lower in ankylosing spondylitis. In the ankylosing spondylitis group, there were higher concentrations of IL-6 (mean (SEM): 16.6 (2.8) pg/ml v 1.41 (0.66) pg/ml in controls; p<0.001) and TNFα (8.5 (1.74) pg/ml v 4.08 (0.42) pg/ml in controls; p<0.01). Glucose, insulin, ACTH, DHEAS, and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone did not differ significantly from control. The IIH test was carried out successfully in 11 of the 17 patients with ankylosing spondylitis, and the ACTH and cortisol responses were comparable with control. General linear modelling showed a different course of glycaemia (p = 0.041) in the ankylosing spondylitis patients who met the criteria for a successful IIH test compared with the controls. Conclusions: The results suggest there is no difference in basal HPA axis activity and completely preserved responsiveness of the HPA axis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The interpretation of the different course of glycaemia during IIH in ankylosing spondylitis requires further investigation. PMID:15140773

  3. Cyclic Polymer with Alternating Monomer Sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen; Li, Zi; Zhao, Youliang; Zhang, Ke

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic polymers with alternating monomer sequence are synthesized for the first time based on the ring-closure strategy. Well-defined telechelic alternating polymers are synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization by copolymerizing the electron acceptor monomer of N-benzylmaleimide and donor monomer of styrene with a feed ratio of 1 between them. The corresponding cyclic alternating polymers are then produced by the UV-induced Diels-Alder click reaction to ring-close the linear alternating polymer precursors under highly diluted reaction solution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Cyclic entropy: An alternative to inflationary cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul Howard

    2015-07-01

    We address how to construct an infinitely cyclic universe model. A major consideration is to make the entropy cyclic which requires the entropy to be reset to zero in each cycle expansion → turnaround → contraction → bounce → etc. Here, we reset entropy at the turnaround by selecting the introverse (visible universe) from the extroverse which is generated by the accelerated expansion. In the model, the observed homogeneity is explained by the low entropy at the bounce. The observed flatness arises from the contraction together with the reduction in size between the expanding and contracting universe. The present flatness is predicted to be very precise.

  5. SICLOPPS cyclic peptide libraries in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, Ali

    2017-02-28

    Cyclic peptide libraries have demonstrated significant potential when employed against challenging targets such as protein-protein interactions. While a variety of methods for library generation exist, genetically encoded libraries hold several advantages over their chemically synthesized counterparts; they are more readily accessible and allow straightforward hit deconvolution. One method for the intracellular generation of such libraries is split-intein circular ligation of peptides and proteins (SICLOPPS). Here we detail and discuss the deployment of SICLOPPS libraries for the identification of cyclic peptide inhibitors of a variety of targets.

  6. Evaluation of hypothalamic murine and human melanocortin 3 receptor transcript structure.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Douglas, Dezmond C; Basu, Arunabha; Gardner, Ryan M; Aspelund, Sender; Wen, Xin; Yanovski, Jack A

    2014-11-07

    The melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3R) is involved in regulation of energy homeostasis. However, its transcript structure is not well understood. We therefore studied initiation and termination sites for hypothalamic murine Mc3r and human MC3R transcripts. Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) was performed for the 5' and 3' ends of murine and human hypothalamic RNA. 5' RACE experiments using hypothalamic murine RNA indicated mouse hypothalamus expresses two major Mc3r transcription start sites: one with a 5' UTR approximately 368 bases in length and another previously unknown transcript with a 5' UTR approximately 440 bases in length. 5' RACE experiments using human hypothalamic RNA identified a 5' UTR beginning 533 bases upstream of the start codon with a 248 base splice. 3' RACE experiments using hypothalamic murine RNA indicated the 3' UTR terminates approximately 1286 bases after the translational stop codon, with a previously unknown 787 base splice between consensus splice donor and acceptor sites. 3' RACE experiments using human MC3R transcript indicated the 3' UTR terminates approximately 115-160 bases after the translational stop codon. These data provide insight into melanocortin 3 receptor transcript structure. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Chronic exercise reduces hypothalamic transforming growth factor-β1 in middle-aged obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Vagner R. R.; Katashima, Carlos K.; Lenhare, Luciene; Silva, Carla G. B.; Morari, Joseane; Camargo, Rafael L.; Velloso, Licio A.; Saad, Mario A.; da Silva, Adelino S. R.; Pauli, Jose Rodrigo; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and aging are associated with hypothalamic inflammation, hyperphagia and abnormalities in the thermogenesis control. It has been demonstrated that the association between aging and obesity induces hypothalamic inflammation and metabolic disorders, at least in part, through the atypical hypothalamic transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1). Physical exercise has been used to modulate several metabolic parameters. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of chronic exercise on TGF-β1 expression in the hypothalamus of Middle-Aged mice submitted to a one year of high-fat diet (HFD) treatment. We observed that long-term of HFD-feeding induced hypothalamic TGF-β1 accumulation, potentiated the hypothalamic inflammation, body weight gain and defective thermogenesis of Middle-Aged mice when compared to Middle-Aged animals fed on chow diet. As expected, chronic exercise induced negative energy balance, reduced food consumption and increasing the energy expenditure, which promotes body weight loss. Interestingly, exercise training reduced the TGF-β1 expression and IkB-α ser32 phosphorylation in the hypothalamus of Middle-Aged obese mice. Taken together our study demonstrated that chronic exercise suppressed the TGF-β1/IkB-α axis in the hypothalamus and improved the energy homeostasis in an animal model of obesity-associated to aging. PMID:28854149

  8. Role of Hypothalamic Creb-Binding Protein in Obesity and Molecular Reprogramming of Metabolic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Cesar L.; Yang, Linda; Dacks, Penny A.; Isoda, Fumiko; van Deursen, Jan M. A.; Mobbs, Charles V.

    2016-01-01

    We have reported a correlation between hypothalamic expression of Creb-binding protein (Cbp) and lifespan, and that inhibition of Cbp prevents protective effects of dietary restriction during aging, suggesting that hypothalamic Cbp plays a role in responses to nutritional status and energy balance. Recent GWAS and network analyses have also implicated Cbp as the most connected gene in protein-protein interactions in human Type 2 diabetes. The present studies address mechanisms mediating the role of Cbp in diabetes by inhibiting hypothalamic Cbp using a Cre-lox strategy. Inhibition of hypothalamic Cbp results in profound obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis, increased food intake, and decreased body temperature. In addition, these changes are accompanied by molecular evidence in the hypothalamus for impaired leptin and insulin signaling, a shift from glucose to lipid metabolism, and decreased Pomc mRNA, with no effect on locomotion. Further assessment of the significance of the metabolic switch demonstrated that enhanced expression of hypothalamic Cpt1a, which promotes lipid metabolism, similarly resulted in increased body weight and reduced Pomc mRNA. PMID:27832201

  9. Hypothalamic volume loss is associated with reduced melatonin output in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nombela, Cristina; Vuono, Romina; Jones, P. Simon; Fisher, Kate; Burn, David J.; Brooks, David J.; Reddy, Akhilesh B.; Rowe, James B.; Barker, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Recent studies have suggested that melatonin—a hormone produced by the pineal gland under circadian control—contributes to PD‐related sleep dysfunction. We hypothesized that degenerative changes to the neural structures controlling pineal function (especially the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the anterior hypothalamus) may be responsible for reduced melatonin output in these patients. We compared hypothalamic volumes in PD patients with matched controls and determined whether volume loss correlated with reduced melatonin output in the PD group. Methods A total of 12 PD patients and 12 matched controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging to determine hypothalamic volume. In addition, PD patients underwent 24‐hour blood sampling in a controlled environment to determine serum melatonin concentrations using enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assays. Results PD patients had significantly reduced hypothalamic gray matter volume when compared with matched controls. Melatonin levels were significantly associated with hypothalamic gray matter volume and disease severity in PD patients. Conclusion Melatonin levels are associated with hypothalamic gray matter volume loss and disease severity in PD patients. This provides anatomical and physiological support for an intrinsic sleep and circadian phenotype in PD. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:26971528

  10. Hypothalamic Response to the Chemo-Signal Androstadienone in Gender Dysphoric Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Sarah M.; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.; Veltman, Dick J.; Klink, Daniel T.; Bakker, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The odorous steroid androstadienone, a putative male chemo-signal, was previously reported to evoke sex differences in hypothalamic activation in adult heterosexual men and women. In order to investigate whether puberty modulated this sex difference in response to androstadienone, we measured the hypothalamic responsiveness to this chemo-signal in 39 pre-pubertal and 41 adolescent boys and girls by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. We then investigated whether 36 pre-pubertal children and 38 adolescents diagnosed with gender dysphoria (GD; DSM-5) exhibited sex-atypical (in accordance with their experienced gender), rather than sex-typical (in accordance with their natal sex) hypothalamic activations during olfactory stimulation with androstadienone. We found that the sex difference in responsiveness to androstadienone was already present in pre-pubertal control children and thus likely developed during early perinatal development instead of during sexual maturation. Adolescent girls and boys with GD both responded remarkably like their experienced gender, thus sex-atypical. In contrast, pre-pubertal girls with GD showed neither a typically male nor female hypothalamic activation pattern and pre-pubertal boys with GD had hypothalamic activations in response to androstadienone that were similar to control boys, thus sex-typical. We present here a unique data set of boys and girls diagnosed with GD at two different developmental stages, showing that these children possess certain sex-atypical functional brain characteristics and may have undergone atypical sexual differentiation of the brain. PMID:24904525

  11. Gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. An update in the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Téllez-Zenteno, José F; Serrano-Almeida, Cesar; Moien-Afshari, Farzad

    2008-12-01

    Gelastic seizures are epileptic events characterized by bouts of laughter. Laughter-like vocalization is usually combined with facial contraction in the form of a smile. Autonomic features such as flushing, tachycardia, and altered respiration are widely recognized. Conscious state may not be impaired, although this is often difficult to asses particularly in young children. Gelastic seizures have been associated classically to hypothalamic hamartomas, although different extrahypothalamic localizations have been described. Hypothalamic hamartomas are rare congenital lesions presenting with the classic triad of gelastic epilepsy, precocious puberty and developmental delay. The clinical course of patients with gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas is progressive, commencing with gelastic seizures in infancy, deteriorating into more complex seizure disorder resulting in intractable epilepsy. Electrophysiological, radiological, and pathophysiological studies have confirmed the intrinsic epileptogenicity of the hypothalamic hamartoma. Currently the most effective surgical approach is the trancallosal anterior interforniceal approach, however newer approaches including the endoscopic and other treatment such as radiosurgery and gamma knife have been used with success. This review focuses on the syndrome of gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas, but it also reviews other concepts such as status gelasticus and some aspects of gelastic seizures in other locations.

  12. Deleterious effects of lard-enriched diet on tissues fatty acids composition and hypothalamic insulin actions.

    PubMed

    Dornellas, A P S; Watanabe, R L H; Pimentel, G D; Boldarine, V T; Nascimento, C M O; Oyama, L M; Ghebremeskel, K; Wang, Y; Bueno, A A; Ribeiro, E B

    2015-12-01

    Altered tissue fatty acid (FA) composition may affect mechanisms involved in the control of energy homeostasis, including central insulin actions. In rats fed either standard chow or a lard-enriched chow (high in saturated/low in polyunsaturated FA, HS-LP) for eight weeks, we examined the FA composition of blood, hypothalamus, liver, and retroperitoneal, epididymal and mesenteric adipose tissues. Insulin-induced hypophagia and hypothalamic signaling were evaluated after intracerebroventricular insulin injection. HS-LP feeding increased saturated FA content in adipose tissues and serum while it decreased polyunsaturated FA content of adipose tissues, serum, and liver. Hypothalamic C20:5n-3 and C20:3n-6 contents increased while monounsaturated FA content decreased. HS-LP rats showed hyperglycemia, impaired insulin-induced hypophagia and hypothalamic insulin signaling. The results showed that, upon HS-LP feeding, peripheral tissues underwent potentially deleterious alterations in their FA composition, whist the hypothalamus was relatively preserved. However, hypothalamic insulin signaling and hypophagia were drastically impaired. These findings suggest that impairment of hypothalamic insulin actions by HS-LP feeding was not related to tissue FA composition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Necdin controls Foxo1 acetylation in hypothalamic arcuate neurons to modulate the thyroid axis.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Koichi; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Fujiwara, Kazushiro; Shimpuku, Mayumi; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki

    2012-04-18

    The forkhead transcription factor Foxo1 regulates energy homeostasis by modulating gene expression in the hypothalamus. Foxo1 undergoes post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation, which modulate its functional activities. Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent protein deacetylase, regulates the acetylation status of Foxo1 in mammalian cells. Necdin, a pleiotropic protein required for neuronal development and survival, interacts with both Sirt1 and p53 to facilitate p53 deacetylation. The necdin gene (Ndn), an imprinted gene transcribed only from the paternal allele, is strongly expressed in hypothalamic neurons. Here, we demonstrate that necdin controls the acetylation status of Foxo1 in vivo in hypothalamic arcuate neurons to modulate the thyroid function. Necdin forms a stable ternary complex with Sirt1 and Foxo1, diminishes Foxo1 acetylation, and suppresses the transcriptional activity of Foxo1 in vitro. Paternal Ndn mutant mice express high levels of acetylated Foxo1 and mRNAs encoding agouti-related protein and neuropeptide Y in the hypothalamus in vivo during the juvenile period. The mutant mice exhibit endocrine dysfunction characteristic of hypothalamic hypothyroidism. Chemically induced hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism lead to hypothalamic responses similar to those under necdin-deficient and excessive conditions, respectively, suggesting that thyroid hormone serves as a negative regulator of this system. These results suggest that necdin regulates Foxo1 acetylation and neuropeptide gene expression in the arcuate neurons to modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis during development.

  14. Defective regulation of POMC precedes hypothalamic inflammation in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Gabriela F. P.; Solon, Carina; Nascimento, Lucas F.; De-Lima-Junior, Jose C.; Nogueira, Guilherme; Moura, Rodrigo; Rocha, Guilherme Z.; Fioravante, Milena; Bobbo, Vanessa; Morari, Joseane; Razolli, Daniela; Araujo, Eliana P.; Velloso, Licio A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is the result of a long-term positive energy balance in which caloric intake overrides energy expenditure. This anabolic state results from the defective activity of hypothalamic neurons involved in the sensing and response to adiposity. However, it is currently unknown what the earliest obesity-linked hypothalamic defect is and how it orchestrates the energy imbalance present in obesity. Using an outbred model of diet-induced obesity we show that defective regulation of hypothalamic POMC is the earliest marker distinguishing obesity-prone from obesity-resistant mice. The early inhibition of hypothalamic POMC was sufficient to transform obesity-resistant in obesity-prone mice. In addition, the post-prandial change in the blood level of β-endorphin, a POMC-derived peptide, correlates with body mass gain in rodents and humans. Taken together, these results suggest that defective regulation of POMC expression, which leads to a change of β-endorphin levels, is the earliest hypothalamic defect leading to obesity. PMID:27373214

  15. Nutrient-sensing hypothalamic TXNIP links nutrient excess to energy imbalance in mice.

    PubMed

    Blouet, Clémence; Schwartz, Gary J

    2011-04-20

    Nutrient excess in obesity and diabetes is emerging as a common putative cause for multiple deleterious effects across diverse cell types, responsible for a variety of metabolic dysfunctions. The hypothalamus is acknowledged as an important regulator of whole-body energy homeostasis, through both detection of nutrient availability and coordination of effectors that determine nutrient intake and utilization, thus preventing cellular and whole-body nutrient excess. However, the mechanisms underlying hypothalamic nutrient detection and its impact on peripheral nutrient utilization remain poorly understood. Recent data suggest a role for thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) as a molecular nutrient sensor important in the regulation of energy metabolism, but the role of hypothalamic TXNIP in the regulation of energy balance has not been evaluated. Here we show in mice that TXNIP is expressed in nutrient-sensing neurons of the mediobasal hypothalamus, responds to hormonal and nutrient signals, and regulates adipose tissue metabolism, fuel partitioning, and glucose homeostasis. Hypothalamic expression of TXNIP is induced by acute nutrient excess and in mouse models of obesity and diabetes, and downregulation of mediobasal hypothalamic TXNIP expression prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Thus, mediobasal hypothalamic TXNIP plays a critical role in nutrient sensing and the regulation of fuel utilization.

  16. Autophagy in hypothalamic AgRP neurons regulates food intake and energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Susmita; Rodriguez-Navarro, Jose Antonio; Arias, Esperanza; Kiffin, Roberta; Sahu, Srabani; Schwartz, Gary J.; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Singh, Rajat

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Macroautophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway that maintains cellular homeostasis by turning over cellular components. Here, we demonstrate a role for autophagy in hypothalamic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons in the regulation of food intake and energy balance. We show that starvation-induced hypothalamic autophagy mobilizes neuron-intrinsic lipids to generate endogenous free fatty acids, which in turn regulate AgRP levels. The functional consequences of inhibiting autophagy are the failure to upregulate AgRP in response to starvation, and constitutive increases in hypothalamic levels of pro-opiomelanocortin and its cleavage product α-melanocyte stimulating hormone that typically contribute to a lean phenotype. We propose a new conceptual framework for considering how autophagy-regulated lipid metabolism within hypothalamic neurons may modulate neuropeptide levels to have immediate effects on food intake, as well as long-term effects on energy homeostasis. Regulation of hypothalamic autophagy could become an effective intervention in conditions such as obesity and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:21803288

  17. Role of Hypothalamic Creb-Binding Protein in Obesity and Molecular Reprogramming of Metabolic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Cesar L; Yang, Linda; Dacks, Penny A; Isoda, Fumiko; Deursen, Jan M A van; Mobbs, Charles V

    2016-01-01

    We have reported a correlation between hypothalamic expression of Creb-binding protein (Cbp) and lifespan, and that inhibition of Cbp prevents protective effects of dietary restriction during aging, suggesting that hypothalamic Cbp plays a role in responses to nutritional status and energy balance. Recent GWAS and network analyses have also implicated Cbp as the most connected gene in protein-protein interactions in human Type 2 diabetes. The present studies address mechanisms mediating the role of Cbp in diabetes by inhibiting hypothalamic Cbp using a Cre-lox strategy. Inhibition of hypothalamic Cbp results in profound obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis, increased food intake, and decreased body temperature. In addition, these changes are accompanied by molecular evidence in the hypothalamus for impaired leptin and insulin signaling, a shift from glucose to lipid metabolism, and decreased Pomc mRNA, with no effect on locomotion. Further assessment of the significance of the metabolic switch demonstrated that enhanced expression of hypothalamic Cpt1a, which promotes lipid metabolism, similarly resulted in increased body weight and reduced Pomc mRNA.

  18. Identification of hypothalamic neuron-derived neurotrophic factor as a novel factor modulating appetite.

    PubMed

    Byerly, Mardi S; Swanson, Roy D; Semsarzadeh, Nina N; McCulloh, Patrick S; Kwon, Kiwook; Aja, Susan; Moran, Timothy H; Wong, G William; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-06-15

    Disruption of finely coordinated neuropeptide signals in the hypothalamus can result in altered food intake and body weight. We identified neuron-derived neurotrophic factor (NENF) as a novel secreted protein through a large-scale screen aimed at identifying novel secreted hypothalamic proteins that regulate food intake. We observed robust Nenf expression in hypothalamic nuclei known to regulate food intake, and its expression was altered under the diet-induced obese (DIO) condition relative to the fed state. Hypothalamic Nenf mRNA was regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, itself an important regulator of appetite. Delivery of purified recombinant BDNF into the lateral cerebral ventricle decreased hypothalamic Nenf expression, while pharmacological inhibition of trkB signaling increased Nenf mRNA expression. Furthermore, recombinant NENF administered via an intracerebroventricular cannula decreased food intake and body weight and increased hypothalamic Pomc and Mc4r mRNA expression. Importantly, the appetite-suppressing effect of NENF was abrogated in obese mice fed a high-fat diet, demonstrating a diet-dependent modulation of NENF function. We propose the existence of a regulatory circuit involving BDNF, NENF, and melanocortin signaling. Our study validates the power of using an integrated experimental and bioinformatic approach to identify novel CNS-derived proteins with appetite-modulating function and reveals NENF as an important central modulator of food intake.

  19. Hypothalamic astroglial connexins are required for brain glucose sensing-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Allard, Camille; Carneiro, Lionel; Grall, Sylvie; Cline, Brandon H; Fioramonti, Xavier; Chrétien, Chloé; Baba-Aissa, Fawzia; Giaume, Christian; Pénicaud, Luc; Leloup, Corinne

    2014-02-01

    Hypothalamic glucose detection participates in maintaining glycemic balance, food intake, and thermogenesis. Although hypothalamic neurons are the executive cells involved in these responses, there is increasing evidence that astrocytes participate in glucose sensing (GS); however, it is unknown whether astroglial networking is required for glucose sensitivity. Astroglial connexins 30 and 43 (Cx30 and Cx43) form hexameric channels, which are apposed in gap junctions, allowing for the intercellular transfer of small molecules such as glucose throughout the astroglial networks. Here, we hypothesized that hypothalamic glucose sensitivity requires these connexins. First, we showed that both Cxs are enriched in the rat hypothalamus, with highly concentrated Cx43 expression around blood vessels of the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). Both fasting and high glycemic levels rapidly altered the protein levels of MBH astroglial connexins, suggesting cross talk within the MBH between glycemic status and the connexins' ability to dispatch glucose. Finally, the inhibition of MBH Cx43 (by transient RNA interference) attenuated hypothalamic glucose sensitivity in rats, which was demonstrated by a pronounced decreased insulin secretion in response to a brain glucose challenge. These results illustrate that astroglial connexins contribute to hypothalamic GS.

  20. Mutations of PKA cyclic nucleotide-binding domains reveal novel aspects of cyclic nucleotide selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Robin; Moon, Eui-Whan; Kim, Jeong Joo; Schmidt, Sven H; Sankaran, Banumathi; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Kim, Choel; Herberg, Friedrich W

    2017-07-06

    Cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP are ubiquitous second messengers that regulate the activity of effector proteins in all forms of life. The main effector proteins, the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and the 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG), are preferentially activated by cAMP and cGMP, respectively. However, the molecular basis of this cyclic nucleotide selectivity is still not fully understood. Analysis of isolated cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB) domains of PKA regulatory subunit type Iα (RIα) reveals that the C-terminal CNB-B has a higher cAMP affinity and selectivity than the N-terminal CNB-A. Here, we show that introducing cGMP-specific residues using site-directed mutagenesis reduces the selectivity of CNB-B, while the combination of two mutations (G316R/A336T) results in a cGMP-selective binding domain. Furthermore, introducing the corresponding mutations (T192R/A212T) into the PKA RIα CNB-A turns this domain into a highly cGMP-selective domain, underlining the importance of these contacts for achieving cGMP specificity. Binding data with the generic purine nucleotide 3',5'-cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP) reveal that introduced arginine residues interact with the position 6 oxygen of the nucleobase. Co-crystal structures of an isolated CNB-B G316R/A336T double mutant with either cAMP or cGMP reveal that the introduced threonine and arginine residues maintain their conserved contacts as seen in PKG I CNB-B. These results improve our understanding of cyclic nucleotide binding and the molecular basis of cyclic nucleotide specificity. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. The coefficient of cyclic variation: a novel statistic to measure the magnitude of cyclic variation.

    PubMed

    Fulford, Anthony Jc

    2014-01-01

    PERIODIC OR CYCLIC DATA OF KNOWN PERIODICITY ARE FREQUENTLY ENCOUNTERED IN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH: for instance, seasonality provides a useful experiment of nature while diurnal rhythms play an important role in endocrine secretion. There is, however, little consensus on how to analysis these data and less still on how to measure association or effect size for the often complex patterns seen. A simple statistic, readily derived from Fourier regression models, provides a readily-understood measure cyclic variation in a wide variety of situations. The coefficient of cyclic variation or similar statistics derived from the variance of a Fourier series could provide a universal means of summarising the magnitude of periodic variation.

  2. Cyclic unequal error protection codes constructed from cyclic codes of composite length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu

    1987-01-01

    The distance structure of cyclic codes of composite length was investigated. A lower bound on the minimum distance for this class of codes is derived. In many cases, the lower bound gives the true minimum distance of a code. Then the distance structure of the direct sum of two cyclic codes of composite length were investigated. It was shown that, under certain conditions, the direct-sum code provides two levels of error correcting capability, and hence is a two-level unequal error protection (UEP) code. Finally, a class of two-level UEP cyclic direct-sum codes and a decoding algorithm for a subclass of these codes are presented.

  3. Immunocytochemical evidence of hypothalamic regulation of adenohypophyseal VIP in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Carretero, J; Sánchez, F; Rubio, M; Lorenzo, M J; Francos, M; Cacicedo, L; Sánchez-Franco, F; Vázquez, R

    1992-12-01

    In order to check whether hypothalamic stimulatory or inhibitory factors exert any kind of modulation on the morphology of VIP-immunoreactive cells in the rat hypophysis, the transport of these towards the hypophyseal portal system was blocked by intraventricular administration of colchicine in adult male rats, thereafter performing a morphometric study after characterizing the VIP-immunoreactive adenohypophyseal cells by immunocytochemical techniques. Colchicine administration led to a significant increase (p < 0.01) in the number of reactive cells observed. These cells were characterized by a larger cellular area (p < 0.01), owing to increases in nuclear area (p < 0.05) and cytoplasmic area (p < 0.05). Their morphology became more regular, with a predominance of polygonal and oval cells. The results suggest that the VIP-reactive cells of the rat hypophysis are subject to a hypothalamic inhibitory influence and their activity increasing when the hypothalamic effect is interrupted by intraventricular administration of colchicine.

  4. Hypothalamic TLR2 triggers sickness behavior via a microglia-neuronal axis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sungho; Kim, Jae Geun; Park, Jeong Woo; Koch, Marco; Horvath, Tamas L.; Lee, Byung Ju

    2016-01-01

    Various pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to sickness behaviors have been proposed. For example, an inflammatory process in the hypothalamus has been implicated, but the signaling modalities that involve inflammatory mechanisms and neuronal circuit functions are ill-defined. Here, we show that toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) activation by intracerebroventricular injection of its ligand, Pam3CSK4, triggered hypothalamic inflammation and activation of arcuate nucleus microglia, resulting in altered input organization and increased activity of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. These animals developed sickness behavior symptoms, including anorexia, hypoactivity, and hyperthermia. Antagonists of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase pathway and melanocortin receptors 3/4 reversed the anorexia and body weight loss induced by TLR2 activation. These results unmask an important role of TLR2 in the development of sickness behaviors via stimulation of hypothalamic microglia to promote POMC neuronal activation in association with hypothalamic inflammation. PMID:27405276

  5. The histone acetyltransferase MOF activates hypothalamic polysialylation to prevent diet-induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brenachot, Xavier; Rigault, Caroline; Nédélec, Emmanuelle; Laderrière, Amélie; Khanam, Tasneem; Gouazé, Alexandra; Chaudy, Sylvie; Lemoine, Aleth; Datiche, Frédérique; Gascuel, Jean; Pénicaud, Luc; Benani, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Overfeeding causes rapid synaptic remodeling in hypothalamus feeding circuits. Polysialylation of cell surface molecules is a key step in this neuronal rewiring and allows normalization of food intake. Here we examined the role of hypothalamic polysialylation in the long-term maintenance of body weight, and deciphered the molecular sequence underlying its nutritional regulation. We found that upon high fat diet (HFD), reduced hypothalamic polysialylation exacerbated the diet-induced obese phenotype in mice. Upon HFD, the histone acetyltransferase MOF was rapidly recruited on the St8sia4 polysialyltransferase-encoding gene. Mof silencing in the mediobasal hypothalamus of adult mice prevented activation of the St8sia4 gene transcription, reduced polysialylation, altered the acute homeostatic feeding response to HFD and increased the body weight gain. These findings indicate that impaired hypothalamic polysialylation contribute to the development of obesity, and establish a role for MOF in the brain control of energy balance. PMID:25161885

  6. The TRPM2 channel is a hypothalamic heat sensor that limits fever and can drive hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Song, Kun; Wang, Hong; Kamm, Gretel B; Pohle, Jörg; Reis, Fernanda de Castro; Heppenstall, Paul; Wende, Hagen; Siemens, Jan

    2016-09-23

    Body temperature homeostasis is critical for survival and requires precise regulation by the nervous system. The hypothalamus serves as the principal thermostat that detects and regulates internal temperature. We demonstrate that the ion channel TRPM2 [of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family] is a temperature sensor in a subpopulation of hypothalamic neurons. TRPM2 limits the fever response and may detect increased temperatures to prevent overheating. Furthermore, chemogenetic activation and inhibition of hypothalamic TRPM2-expressing neurons in vivo decreased and increased body temperature, respectively. Such manipulation may allow analysis of the beneficial effects of altered body temperature on diverse disease states. Identification of a functional role for TRP channels in monitoring internal body temperature should promote further analysis of molecular mechanisms governing thermoregulation and foster the genetic dissection of hypothalamic circuits involved with temperature homeostasis.

  7. Giant hypothalamic hamartoma associated with an intracranial cyst in a newborn

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma with a large intracranial cyst in a neonate. On ultrasonography, the lesion presented as a lobulated, mass-like lesion with similar echogenicity to the adjacent brain parenchyma, located anterior to the underdeveloped and compressed left temporal lobe, and presenting as an intracranial cyst in the left cerebral convexity without definite internal echogenicity or septa. The presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma and intracranial neurenteric cyst were confirmed by surgical biopsy. The association of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma and a neurenteric cyst is rare. Due to the rarity of this association, the large size of the intracranial cyst, and the resulting distortion in the regional anatomy, the diagnosis of the solid mass was not made correctly on prenatal high-resolution ultrasonography. PMID:27101982

  8. Early changes in the hypothalamic region in prodromal Huntington disease revealed by MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Soneson, Charlotte; Fontes, Magnus; Zhou, Yongxia; Denisov, Vladimir; Paulsen, Jane S.; Kirik, Deniz; Petersén, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat. Its length can be used to estimate the time of clinical diagnosis, which is defined by overt motor symptoms. Non-motor symptoms begin before motor onset, and involve changes in hypothalamus-regulated functions such as sleep, emotion and metabolism. Therefore we hypothesized that hypothalamic changes occur already prior to the clinical diagnosis. We performed voxel-based morphometry and logistic regression analyses of cross-sectional MR images from 220 HD gene carriers and 75 controls in the Predict-HD study. We show that changes in the hypothalamic region are detectable before clinical diagnosis and that its grey matter contents alone is sufficient to distinguish HD gene carriers from control cases. In conclusion, our study shows, for the first time, that alterations in grey matter contents in the hypothalamic region occur at least a decade before clinical diagnosis in HD using MRI. PMID:20682340

  9. Growth factors and steroid hormones: a complex interplay in the hypothalamic control of reproductive functions.

    PubMed

    Melcangi, Roberto C; Martini, Luciano; Galbiati, Mariarita

    2002-08-01

    The mechanisms through which LHRH-secreting neurons are controlled still represent a crucial and debated field of research in the neuroendocrine control of reproduction. In the present review, we have specifically considered two potential signals reaching these hypothalamic neurons: steroid hormones and growth factors. Examples of the relevant physiological role of the interactions between these two families of biologically acting molecules have been provided. In many cases, these interactions occur at the level of hypothalamic astrocytes, which are presently accepted as functional partners of the LHRH-secreting neurons. On the basis of the observations here summarized, we have formulated the hypothesis that a functional co-operation of steroid hormones and growth factors occurring in the hypothalamic astrocytic compartment represents a key factor in the neuroendocrine control of reproductive functions.

  10. Hypothalamic serotonin-insulin signaling cross-talk and alterations in a type 2 diabetic model.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Ioannis; Berthou, Flavien; Vicaire, Nicolas; Rouch, Claude; Markaki, Eirini M; Bailbe, Danielle; Portha, Bernard; Taouis, Mohammed; Gerozissis, Kyriaki

    2012-03-05

    Serotonin and insulin are key regulators of homeostatic mechanisms in the hypothalamus. However, in type 2 diabetes, the hypothalamic responsiveness to serotonin is not clearly established. We used a diabetic model, the Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats, to explore insulin receptor expression, insulin and serotonin efficiency in the hypothalamus and liver by means of Akt phosphorylation. Insulin or dexfenfluramine (stimulator of serotonin) treatment induced Akt phosphorylation in Wistar rats but not in GK rats that exhibit down-regulated insulin receptor. Studies in a neuroblastoma cell line showed that serotonin-induced Akt phosphorylation is PI3-kinase dependent. Finally, in response to food intake, hypothalamic serotonin release was reduced in GK rats, indicating impaired responsiveness of this neurotransmitter. In conclusion, hypothalamic serotonin as insulin efficiency is impaired in diabetic GK rats. The insulin-serotonin cross-talk and impairment observed is one potential key modification in the brain during the onset of diabetes.

  11. Hypothalamic KLF4 mediates leptin's effects on food intake via AgRP

    PubMed Central

    Imbernon, Monica; Sanchez-Rebordelo, Estrella; Gallego, Rosalia; Gandara, Marina; Lear, Pamela; Lopez, Miguel; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc-finger-type transcription factor expressed in a range of tissues that plays multiple functions. We report that hypothalamic KLF4 represents a new transcription factor specifically modulating agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression in vivo. Hypothalamic KLF4 colocalizes with AgRP neurons and is modulated by nutritional status and leptin. Over-expression of KLF4 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) induces food intake and increases body weight through the specific stimulation of AgRP, as well as blunting leptin sensitivity in lean rats independent of forkhead box protein 01 (FoxO1). Down-regulation of KLF4 in the ARC inhibits fasting-induced food intake in both lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Silencing KLF4, however, does not, on its own, enhance peripheral leptin sensitivity in DIO rats. PMID:24944903

  12. Crucial role of zebrafish prox1 in hypothalamic catecholaminergic neurons development

    PubMed Central

    Pistocchi, Anna; Gaudenzi, Germano; Carra, Silvia; Bresciani, Erica; Del Giacco, Luca; Cotelli, Franco

    2008-01-01

    Background Prox1, the vertebrate homolog of prospero in Drosophila melanogaster, is a divergent homeogene that regulates cell proliferation, fate determination and differentiation during vertebrate embryonic development. Results Here we report that, in zebrafish, prox1 is widely expressed in several districts of the Central Nervous System (CNS). Specifically, we evidenced prox1 expression in a group of neurons, already positive for otp1, located in the hypothalamus at the level of the posterior tuberculum (PT). Prox1 knock-down determines the severe loss of hypothalamic catecholaminergic (CA) neurons, identified by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, and the synergistic prox1/otp1 overexpression induces the appearance of hypothalamic supernumerary TH-positive neurons and ectopic TH-positive cells on the yolk epitelium. Conclusion Our findings indicate that prox1 activity is crucial for the proper development of the otp1-positive hypothalamic neuronal precursors to their terminal CA phenotype. PMID:18331627

  13. Hypothalamic KLF4 mediates leptin's effects on food intake via AgRP.

    PubMed

    Imbernon, Monica; Sanchez-Rebordelo, Estrella; Gallego, Rosalia; Gandara, Marina; Lear, Pamela; Lopez, Miguel; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2014-07-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc-finger-type transcription factor expressed in a range of tissues that plays multiple functions. We report that hypothalamic KLF4 represents a new transcription factor specifically modulating agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression in vivo. Hypothalamic KLF4 colocalizes with AgRP neurons and is modulated by nutritional status and leptin. Over-expression of KLF4 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) induces food intake and increases body weight through the specific stimulation of AgRP, as well as blunting leptin sensitivity in lean rats independent of forkhead box protein 01 (FoxO1). Down-regulation of KLF4 in the ARC inhibits fasting-induced food intake in both lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Silencing KLF4, however, does not, on its own, enhance peripheral leptin sensitivity in DIO rats.

  14. Kisspeptins: regulators of metastasis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, K G

    2005-08-01

    The kisspeptins are the peptide products of the KiSS-1 gene and the endogenous agonists for the GPR54 receptor. Although KiSS-1 was initially discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene, recent evidence suggests the kisspeptin/GPR54 system is a key regulator of the reproductive system. Disrupted GPR54 signalling causes hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in rodents and man. Central or peripheral administration of kisspeptin potently stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, increasing circulating gonadotrophin concentrations in a number of animal models. These effects appear likely to be mediated via the hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone system, although kisspeptins may have direct effects on the anterior pituitary gland. Hypothalamic KiSS-1 expression is regulated by circulating sex steroids. The precise physiological role of the kisspeptin system in the regulation of reproductive function remains to be elucidated.

  15. Scale invariant density perturbations from cyclic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul Howard

    2016-04-01

    It is shown how quantum fluctuations of the radiation during the contraction era of a comes back empty (CBE) cyclic cosmology can provide density fluctuations which re-enter the horizon during the subsequent expansion era and at lowest order are scale invariant, in a Harrison-Zel’dovich-Peebles sense. It is necessary to be consistent with observations of large scale structure.

  16. Cyclic Cratonic Carbonates and Phanerozoic Calcite Seas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses causes of cyclicity in cratonic carbonate sequences and evidence for and potential significance of postulated primary calcite sediment components in past Paleozoic seas, outlining problems, focusing on models explaining existing data, and identifying background. Future sedimentary geologists will need to address these and related areas…

  17. Planar tetracoordinate carbons in cyclic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Perez, Nancy; Heine, Thomas; Barthel, Robert; Seifert, Gotthard; Vela, Alberto; Mendez-Rojas, Miguel Angel; Merino, Gabriel

    2005-04-14

    [structure: see text] A series of cyclic hydrocarbons containing a planar tetracoordinate carbon atom is proposed. To rationalize the electronic factors contributing to the stability of these molecules, an analysis of the molecular orbitals and the induced magnetic field is presented.

  18. Cyclic Cratonic Carbonates and Phanerozoic Calcite Seas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses causes of cyclicity in cratonic carbonate sequences and evidence for and potential significance of postulated primary calcite sediment components in past Paleozoic seas, outlining problems, focusing on models explaining existing data, and identifying background. Future sedimentary geologists will need to address these and related areas…

  19. A model for cyclic mechanical reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhai; Kong, Fang; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical force regulates a broad range of molecular interactions in biology. Three types of counterintuitive mechanical regulation of receptor–ligand dissociation have been described. Catch bonds are strengthened by constant forces, as opposed to slip bonds that are weakened by constant forces. The phenomenon that bonds become stronger with prior application of cyclic forces is termed cyclic mechanical reinforcement (CMR). Slip and catch bonds have respectively been explained by two-state models. However, they assume fast equilibration between internal states and hence are inadequate for CMR. Here we propose a three-state model for CMR where both loading and unloading regulate the transition of bonds among the short-lived, intermediate, and long-lived state. Cyclic forces favor bonds in the long-lived state, hence greatly prolonging their lifetimes. The three-state model explains the force history effect and agrees with the experimental CMR effect of integrin α5β1–fibronectin interaction. This model helps decipher the distinctive ways by which molecular bonds are mechanically strengthened: catch bonds by constant forces and CMR by cyclic forces. The different types of mechanical regulation may enable the cell to fine tune its mechanotransduction via membrane receptors. PMID:27786286

  20. Cyclic nucleotide imaging and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Berisha, Filip; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O

    2017-02-16

    The universal second messengers cyclic nucleotides 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) play central roles in cardiovascular function and disease. They act in discrete, functionally relevant subcellular microdomains which regulate, for example, calcium cycling and excitation-contraction coupling. Such localized cAMP and cGMP signals have been difficult to measure using conventional biochemical techniques. Recent years have witnessed the advent of live cell imaging techniques which allow visualization of these functionally relevant second messengers with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution at cellular, subcellular and tissue levels. In this review, we discuss these new imaging techniques and give examples how they are used to visualize cAMP and cGMP in physiological and pathological settings to better understand cardiovascular function and disease. Two primary techniques include the use of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based cyclic nucleotide biosensors and nanoscale scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM). These methods can provide deep mechanistic insights into compartmentalized cAMP and cGMP signaling.

  1. Cyclic electron flow: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Giovanni; Johnson, Giles N

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 15 years, research into the process of cyclic electron flow in photosynthesis has seen a huge resurgence. Having been considered by some in the early 1990s as a physiologically unimportant artefact, it is now recognised as essential to normal plant growth. Here, we provide an overview of the major developments covered in this special issue of photosynthesis research.

  2. One pot solution synthesis of cyclic oligodeoxyribonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Capobianco, M L; Carcuro, A; Tondelli, L; Garbesi, A; Bonora, G M

    1990-01-01

    Several cyclic oligodeoxynucleotides with different base composition and size have been prepared from 5',3'-unprotected linear precursors, using a bifunctional phosphorylating reagent. The final deprotected oligomers have been characterized by 1H- and 31P-NMR. The present procedure is particularly useful for millimolar scale syntheses. PMID:2339055

  3. Strain controlled cyclic tests on miniaturized specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, R.; Džugan, J.

    2017-02-01

    The paper is dealing with strain controlled cyclic tests using a non-contact strain measurement based on digital image correlation techniques on proportional sizes of conventional specimens. The cyclic behaviour of 34CrNiMo6 high-strength steel was investigated on miniaturized round specimens with diameter of 2mm that were compared with specimens in accordance with ASTM E606 standards. The cycle asymmetry coefficient was R= -1. This application is intended to be used for life time assessment of in service components in future work which enables to carried out a group of mechanical tests from a limited amount of the experimental material. The attention was paid to confirm the suitability of the proposed size miniaturization geometry, testing set up and procedure. The test results obtained enabled to construct Manson-Coffin curves and assess fatigue parameters. The purpose of this study is to present differences between cyclic curves and cyclic parameters which have been evaluated based on conventional and miniaturized specimens.

  4. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease.

  5. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease. PMID:26431088

  6. Research Resource: The Dexamethasone Transcriptome in Hypothalamic Embryonic Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Krystle A.; Peffer, Melanie E.; Zhang, Janie Y.; Luthra, Soumya; Chakka, Anish B.; Couger, Matthew B.; Chandran, Uma R.; Monaghan, A. Paula

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to excess glucocorticoids during fetal development has long-lasting physiological and behavioral consequences, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. The impact of prenatal glucocorticoids exposure on stress responses in juvenile and adult offspring implicates the developing hypothalamus as a target of adverse prenatal glucocorticoid action. Therefore, primary cultures of hypothalamic neural-progenitor/stem cells (NPSCs) derived from mouse embryos (embryonic day 14.5) were used to identify the glucocorticoid transcriptome in both males and females. NPSCs were treated with vehicle or the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (dex; 100nM) for 4 hours and total RNA analyzed using RNA-Sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that primary hypothalamic NPSC cultures expressed relatively high levels of a number of genes regulating stem cell proliferation and hypothalamic progenitor function. Interesting, although these cells express glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), only low levels of sex-steroid receptors are expressed, which suggested that sex-specific differentially regulated genes identified are mediated by genetic and not hormonal influences. We also identified known or novel GR-target coding and noncoding genes that are either regulated equivalently in male and female NPSCs or differential responsiveness in one sex. Using gene ontology analysis, the top functional network identified was cell proliferation and using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation observed a reduction in proliferation of hypothalamic NPSCs after dexamethasone treatment. Our studies provide the first characterization and description of glucocorticoid-regulated pathways in male and female embryonically derived hypothalamic NPSCs and identified GR-target genes during hypothalamic development. These findings may provide insight into potential mechanisms responsible for the long-term consequences of fetal glucocorticoid exposure in adulthood. PMID:26606517

  7. Hypothalamic Apelin/Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling Controls Hepatic Glucose Metabolism in the Onset of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Drougard, Anne; Duparc, Thibaut; Brenachot, Xavier; Carneiro, Lionel; Gouazé, Alexandra; Fournel, Audren; Geurts, Lucie; Cadoudal, Thomas; Prats, Anne-Catherine; Pénicaud, Luc; Vieau, Didier; Lesage, Jean; Leloup, Corinne; Benani, Alexandre; Cani, Patrice D.; Valet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: We have previously demonstrated that central apelin is implicated in the control of peripheral glycemia, and its action depends on nutritional (fast versus fed) and physiological (normal versus diabetic) states. An intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of a high dose of apelin, similar to that observed in obese/diabetic mice, increase fasted glycemia, suggesting (i) that apelin contributes to the establishment of a diabetic state, and (ii) the existence of a hypothalamic to liver axis. Using pharmacological, genetic, and nutritional approaches, we aim at unraveling this system of regulation by identifying the hypothalamic molecular actors that trigger the apelin effect on liver glucose metabolism and glycemia. Results: We show that icv apelin injection stimulates liver glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis via an over-activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), leading to fasted hyperglycemia. The effect of central apelin on liver function is dependent of an increased production of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species (ROS). These data are strengthened by experiments using lentiviral vector-mediated over-expression of apelin in hypothalamus of mice that present over-activation of SNS associated to an increase in hepatic glucose production. Finally, we report that mice fed a high-fat diet present major alterations of hypothalamic apelin/ROS signaling, leading to activation of glycogenolysis. Innovation/Conclusion: These data bring compelling evidence that hypothalamic apelin is one master switch that participates in the onset of diabetes by directly acting on liver function. Our data support the idea that hypothalamic apelin is a new potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 557–573. PMID:23879244

  8. Regulation of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone transcription by elevated glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew N; Liu, Ying; Macgregor, Robert; Huang, Victoria; Aguilera, Greti

    2013-11-01

    Negative glucocorticoid feedback is essential for preventing the deleterious effects of excessive hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis axis activation, with an important target being CRH transcription in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. The aim of these studies was to determine whether glucocorticoids repress CRH transcription directly in CRH neurons, by examining glucocorticoid effects on glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-CRH promoter interaction and the activation of proteins required for CRH transcription. Immunoprecipitation of hypothalamic chromatin from intact or adrenalectomized rats subjected to either stress or corticosterone injections showed minor association of the proximal CRH promoter with the GR compared with that with phospho-CREB (pCREB). In contrast, the Period-1 (Per1, a glucocorticoid-responsive gene) promoter markedly recruited GR. Stress increased pCREB recruitment by the CRH but not the Per1 promoter, irrespective of circulating glucocorticoids. In vitro, corticosterone pretreatment (30 minutes or 18 hours) only slightly inhibited basal and forskolin-stimulated CRH heteronuclear RNA in primary hypothalamic neuronal cultures and CRH promoter activity in hypothalamic 4B cells. In 4B cells, 30 minutes or 18 hours of corticosterone exposure had no effect on forskolin-induced nuclear accumulation of the recognized CRH transcriptional regulators, pCREB and transducer of regulated CREB activity 2. The data show that inhibition of CRH transcription by physiological glucocorticoids in vitro is minor and that direct interaction of GR with DNA in the proximal CRH promoter may not be a major mechanism of CRH gene repression. Although GR interaction with distal promoter elements may have a role, the data suggest that transcriptional repression of CRH by glucocorticoids involves protein-protein interactions and/or modulation of afferent inputs to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

  9. Hypothalamic Reactive Oxygen Species Are Required for Insulin-Induced Food Intake Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jaillard, Tristan; Roger, Michael; Galinier, Anne; Guillou, Pascale; Benani, Alexandre; Leloup, Corinne; Casteilla, Louis; Pénicaud, Luc; Lorsignol, Anne

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin plays an important role in the hypothalamic control of energy balance, especially by reducing food intake. Emerging data point to a pivotal role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in energy homeostasis regulation, but their involvement in the anorexigenic effect of insulin is unknown. Furthermore, ROS signal derived from NADPH oxidase activation is required for physiological insulin effects in peripheral cells. In this study, we investigated the involvement of hypothalamic ROS and NADPH oxidase in the feeding behavior regulation by insulin. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We first measured hypothalamic ROS levels and food intake after acute intracerebroventricular injection of insulin. Second, effect of pretreatment with a ROS scavenger or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor was evaluated. Third, we examined the consequences of two nutritional conditions of central insulin unresponsiveness (fasting or short-term high-fat diet) on the ability of insulin to modify ROS level and food intake. RESULTS In normal chow-fed mice, insulin inhibited food intake. At the same dose, insulin rapidly and transiently increased hypothalamic ROS levels by 36%. The pharmacological suppression of this insulin-stimulated ROS elevation, either by antioxidant or by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, abolished the anorexigenic effect of insulin. Finally, in fasted and short-term high-fat diet–fed mice, insulin did not promote elevation of ROS level and food intake inhibition, likely because of an increase in hypothalamic diet-induced antioxidant defense systems. CONCLUSIONS A hypothalamic ROS increase through NADPH oxidase is required for the anorexigenic effect of insulin. PMID:19389827

  10. Excitatory actions of GABA in developing rat hypothalamic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G; Trombley, P Q; van den Pol, A N

    1996-01-01

    1. Gramicidin-perforated patch clamp recording was employed to study GABA-mediated responses in rat hypothalamic neurones (n = 102) with an intracellular Cl- concentration unaltered by the pipette solution. 2. In young cultures after 1-7 days in vitro (DIV), GABA induced depolarizing membrane potentials (+16.5 +/- 1.3 mV) that often surpassed the threshold for the firing of action potentials (-42 +/- 1 mV) and resulted in an increase in neuronal activity. The depolarizing responses to GABA in young cultures were dose dependent. The concentration of GABA necessary to evoke the half-maximal depolarization (EC50) was 2.8 microM. In contrast, GABA induced hyperpolarizing membrane potentials (-12.0 +/- 1.4 mV) and a decrease in neuronal activity in older neurones (20-33 DIV). Both the depolarization and the hyperpolarization induced by GABA were blocked by bicuculline, indicating a mediation by GABAA receptors. 3. The reversal potentials of the GABA-evoked currents were between -40 to -50 mV during the first week of culture, and shifted to below -70 mV after 3 weeks of culture. In parallel, neurones that were dissociated from older animals (postnatal day 5) had a more negative reversal potential for the GABA-evoked currents than cells from younger animals (embryonic day 15), suggesting that the negative shift of the reversal potential occurs both in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the mechanism for GABA-induced depolarization is the depolarized Cl- reversal potential found in young but not older neurones. 4. Consistent with the depolarizing response to exogenous application of GABA, some spontaneous depolarizing postsynaptic potentials in young cultures were insensitive to AP5-CNQX, but were eliminated by bicuculline, indicating that synaptically released GABA mediated excitatory synaptic transmission in early development. 5. By combining a rapid computer-controlled delivery of GABA with subthreshold positive current injections into recorded neurones, we found

  11. Use of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone for Intractable Seizures in a Girl with Precocious Puberty without Hypothalamic Hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Govil-Dalela, Tuhina; Kumar, Ajay; Moltz, Kathleen C; Chugani, Harry T

    2016-07-01

    The use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs has been reported in the treatment of gelastic seizures and precocious puberty associated with hypothalamic hamartomas, but not in other seizure types without hypothalamic hamartoma. We describe a 7.5 year-old girl whose seizures subsided after gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog implant, administered for precocious puberty.

  12. Cyclic Creep of Ultrafine-Grained Pure Cu Under Cyclic Tension Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanjun; Yang, Jingwen; Shen, Xu; Zhu, Rong

    2017-02-01

    The uniaxial ratcheting behavior of ultrafine-grained pure Cu processed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) was investigated through uniaxial asymmetric cyclic stress-controlled experiments at room temperature. The effects of the mean stress and stress amplitude on the uniaxial ratcheting response and ratcheting life of the ECAP Cu were analyzed. With increasing mean stress or stress amplitude, the ratcheting strain and its rate increased, but the ratcheting life decreased. An approach based on Basquin's method was used to describe the fatigue lifetime of the ECAP pure Cu. Additionally, a power law relationship was adopted to describe the cyclic steady creep rate. Finally, the microscopic and macroscopic fracture features were examined. It was found that at high peak stresses, cyclic creep governs the overall failure process; otherwise, cyclic creep-fatigue interaction is the dominant failure mode.

  13. Involvement of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases in cyclic AMP-mediated vasorelaxation

    PubMed Central

    Eckly-Michel, Anita; Martin, Viviane; Lugnier, Claire

    1997-01-01

    The involvement of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) in the effects of cyclic AMP-elevating agents on vascular smooth muscle relaxation, cyclic nucleotide dependent-protein kinase activities and ATP-induced calcium signalling ([Ca2+]i) was studied in rat aorta. Cyclic AMP-elevating agents used were a β-adrenoceptor agonist (isoprenaline), a phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) inhibitor (SK&F 94120) and a PDE4 inhibitor (rolipram). In rat intact aorta, the relaxant effect induced by isoprenaline (0.01–0.3 μM) was decreased by a specific inhibitor of PKA, H-89, whereas a specific inhibitor of PKG, Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS, was without effect. No significant difference in PKA and PKG activity ratios was detected in aortic rings when isoprenaline 10 μM was used. At the same concentration, isoprenaline did not modify ATP-induced changes in [Ca2+]i in smooth muscle cells. Neither H-89 nor Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS modified this response. These findings suggest that PKA is only involved in the relaxant effect induced by low concentrations of isoprenaline (0.01–0.3 μM), whereas for higher concentrations, other mechanisms independent of PKA and PKG are involved. The relaxant effects induced by SK&F 94120 and rolipram were inhibited by Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS with no significant effect of H-89. Neither SK&F 94120, nor rolipram at 30 μM significantly modified the activity ratios of PKA and PKG. Rolipram inhibited the ATP-induced transient increase in [Ca2+]i. This decrease was abolished by Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS whereas H-89 had no significant effect. These results suggest that PKG is involved in the vascular effects induced by the inhibitors of PDE3 and PDE4. Moreover, since it was previously shown that PDE3 and PDE4 inhibitors only increased cyclic AMP levels with no change in cyclic GMP level, these data also suggest a cross-activation of PKG by cyclic AMP in rat aorta. The combination of 5 μM SK&F 94120 with rolipram markedly

  14. Cyclic hardening in copper described in terms of combined monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, H.D. . School of Mechanical Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    Hardening of polycrystalline copper subjected to tension-compression loading cycles in the plastic region is discussed with reference to changes in flow stress determined from equations describing dislocation glide. It is suggested that hardening is as a result of the accumulation of strain on a monotonic stress-strain curve. On initial loading, the behavior is monotonic. On stress reversal, a characteristic cyclic stress-strain curve is followed until the stress reaches a value in reverse loading corresponding to the maximum attained during the preceding half cycle. Thereafter, the monotonic path is followed until strain reversal occurs at completion of the half cycle. Repetition of the process results in cyclic hardening. Steady state cyclic behavior is reached when a stress associated with the monotonic stress-strain curve is reached which is equal to the stress associated with the cyclic stress-strain curve corresponding to the imposed strain amplitude.

  15. Hypothalamic abnormalities and Parkinsonism associated with H1N1 influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe a case of a young adult with severe H1N1 influenza illness associated with hypothalamic abnormalities and post-influenza parkinsonism. Design Case report. Patient A 22-year-old woman with H1N1 influenza infection developed encephalopathy followed by diverse hypothalamic dysfunction manifestations, sleeplessness, and persistent parkinsonian features. Results CSF analysis, brain imaging and EEG ruled out hypoxic brain injury or other illnesses. Conclusions A number of viruses have been associated with both acute and chronic parkinsonism. A link between parkinsonism and influenza viruses is somewhat controversial. This is the first reported case of parkinsonism following an H1N1 influenza infection. PMID:20716355

  16. HYPOTHALAMIC DIGOXIN AND SCHIZOPHRENIA - A MODEL FOR CONSCIOUS AND SUBLIMINAL PERCEPTION AND ITS DYSFUNCTION IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, Ravikumar A.; Augustine, Jyothi; Kurup, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    In view of reports of an upregulated cation pump in genetically related Bipolar Affective Disorders the role of hypothalamic digoxin, an endogenous regulator of the cation pump was studied with special reference to its role as a modulator of glycoprotein synthesis. The study demonstrated elevated serum digoxin levels, elevated HMG CoA reductase activity suggesting increased digoxin synthesis, reduced sodium-potassium ATPase activity and altered sugar residues of serum glycoprotein in schizophrenia. A hypothalamic digoxin mediated model for conscious and subliminal perception is proposed and the significance of its dysfunction due to abnormal glycoprotein induced synaptic connectivity defects in schizophrenia is discussed. PMID:21455390

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging-graded hypothalamic compression in surgically treated adult craniopharyngiomas determining postoperative obesity.

    PubMed

    Van Gompel, Jamie J; Nippoldt, Todd B; Higgins, Dominique M; Meyer, Fredric B

    2010-04-01

    Obesity as a consequence of management of pediatric craniopharyngioma is a well-described phenomenon related to the degree of hypothalamic involvement. However, weight change and obesity have not been analyzed in adult patients. Therefore, the purpose of this study was 1) to evaluate the pattern of postoperative weight gain related to preoperative body mass index (BMI), 2) determine if postoperative weight gain is an issue in adult patients, and 3) develop an objective MR imaging grading system to predict risk of postoperative weight gain and obesity in adults treated for craniopharyngioma. The authors retrospectively screened 296 patients with known craniopharyngioma for the following inclusion criteria: pathologically confirmed craniopharyngioma, index surgery at the authors' institution, and operative weight and height recorded with at least 3 months of follow-up including body weight measurement. Patients aged 18 years or younger were excluded, yielding 28 cases for analysis. Cases of craniopharyngiomas were compared with age- and sex-matched controls (pituitary adenoma patients) to evaluate the pattern and significance of perioperative weight changes. Mean age was 46 +/- 17 years at surgery, and 64% of the patients were male. Complete resection was achieved in 71% of cases. There was no correlation of preoperative BMI and postoperative weight gain testing in a linear model. Sixty-one percent and 46% of patients had postoperative weight gains greater than 4 and 9%, respectively. Comparing craniopharyngioma patients (cases) to age- and sex-matched controls, the preoperative BMIs were similar (p = 0.93) between cases (mean 28.9 [95% CI 30.9-26.9]) and controls (mean 29.3 [95% CI 31.9-26.7]). However, there was a trend to a greater mean postoperative weight change (percentage) in cases (10.1%) than in controls (5.6%) (p = 0.24). Hypothalamic T2 signal change and irregular contrast enhancement correlated and predicted higher-grade hypothalamic involvement

  18. Stereotactic radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartoma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Parrent, A G

    1999-11-01

    The author presents the case of a patient with gelastic seizures associated with a hypothalamic hamartoma, in whom partial resection of the hamartoma followed by temporal lobectomy and orbitofrontal corticectomy failed to reduce the seizures. Subsequent stereotactic radiofrequency ablation of the hamartoma resulted in progressive improvement in the seizure disorder during a 28-month follow-up period. There is support in the literature for the concept that gelastic seizures originate directly from the hamartoma; however, direct surgical approaches to these lesions pose significant risks. It is proposed that the technique of radiofrequency ablation provides a minimally invasive, low-risk approach for the treatment of hypothalamic hamartomas.

  19. Hypothalamic type of hypopituitarism and central diabetes insipidus probably linked to Rathke's cleft cyst.

    PubMed

    Asano, Tomoko; Yamada, Hodaka; Yoshida, Masashi; Aoki, Atsushi; Ikoma, Aki; Kusaka, Ikuyo; Toyoshima, Hideo; Kakei, Masafumi; Ishikawa, San-E

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was admitted due to weight loss and generalized malaise. The basal levels of all the anterior pituitary hormones, except for prolactin, were reduced. However, they were all elevated in response to exogenous hypothalamic hormones. After starting hydrocortisone replacement, the patient had polyuria of >5,000 mL/day. T1-weighted MRI depicted a low signal of an oval mass in the sella turcica and an iso-intense signal of another mass at the pituitary stalk. These findings indicate a hypothalamic type of hypopituitarism and masked central diabetes insipidus which possibly derived from the atypical occupation of Rathke's cleft cyst at the pituitary stalk.

  20. Increased concentration of. cap alpha. - and. gamma. -endorphin in post mortem hypothalamic tissue of schizophrenic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegant, V.M.; Verhoef, C.J.; Burbach, J.P.H.; de Wied, D.

    1988-01-01

    The concentrations of ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..- and ..gamma..-endorphin were determined by radioimmunoassay in HPLC fractionated extracts of post mortem hypothalamic tissue obtained from schizophrenic patients and controls. The hypothalamic concentration of ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-endorphin was significantly higher in patients than in controls. No difference was found in the concentration of ..beta..-endorphin, the putative precursor of ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-endorphins. These results suggest a deviant metabolism of ..beta..-endorphin in the brain of schizophrenic patients. Whether this phenomenon is related to the psychopathology, or is a consequence of ante mortem farmacotherapy, remains to be established.

  1. Thermoregulatory Instability in Childhood: Linking the Normal Brain to Hypothalamic Storm

    PubMed Central

    Fussiger, Helena; Maria Vedana, Viviane; Hemb, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Central core temperature is tightly controlled by hypothalamic centers, a feature that makes sudden changes in body temperature very unusual. A dysfunction of these hypothalamic pathways leads to Shapiro's syndrome, comprising spontaneous hypothermia, hyperhidrosis, and corpus callosum dysgenesis. Although it may affect any age, usually it presents in childhood. Variants to this syndrome with completely normal brain anatomy have been consistently reported, expanding the clinical spectrum of the syndrome. Herein, we report the case of a 4-year-old girl with Shapiro's syndrome and unaffected corpus callosum. PMID:27847661

  2. HYPOTHALAMIC DYSFUNCTION—A Review of Experimental and Clinical Observations of Cardiac and Renal Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, S. J.

    1952-01-01

    The nuclear cell masses of the hypothalamus act as autonomic regulators for visceromotor function. Through the correlation of impulses arising in or about the hypothalamus with the changes in cellular chemistry, there is provided, by mediation of the endocrines, a balanced control of water metabolism, renal function and cardiac action. Derangement of hypothalamic regulation causes specific clinical syndromes described by the general term “diencephalohypophyseal dystrophy.” Cardiac abnormalities attributable to hypothalamic dysfunction include alterations in rate and various arrhythmias. Alteration in renal function includes hematuria, polyuria or relative anuria, and specific effects on electrolyte and nitrogen output. PMID:13009469

  3. New Correlations Between Monotonic and Cyclic Properties of Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonfrillo, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of the cyclic properties of metallic materials is often critical to correctly design structural components. However, cyclic data are not easily available in the literature, while tensile test data are easier to find in specialized sites or vendor catalogs. In this study, the cyclic strength coefficient and the cyclic strain hardening exponent of the Ramberg-Osgood law were evaluated using exclusively data obtained through monotonic tensile tests. The analyses were carried out on a large set of materials. The database used is composed of 338 alloys, mainly iron alloys, but also titanium and aluminum alloys. New subdivisions of the materials were introduced. Several original relations were suggested to correlate static and cyclic strength parameters. The evaluated values of both cyclic strength coefficient and cyclic strain hardening exponent were compared with experimental values coming from cyclic test, obtaining a satisfactory agreement and a higher accuracy if compared with similar relations found in the literature.

  4. Rhodium-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Borylation of Cyclic Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, Azusa; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2010-01-01

    A rhodium-catalyzed dehydrogenative borylation of cyclic alkenes is described. This reaction provides direct access to cyclic 1-alkenylboronic acid pinacol esters, useful intermediates in organic synthesis. Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling applications are also presented. PMID:20107646

  5. FPT Algorithm for Two-Dimensional Cyclic Convolutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Trieu-Kie; Shao, Howard M.; Pei, D. Y.; Reed, Irving S.

    1987-01-01

    Fast-polynomial-transform (FPT) algorithm computes two-dimensional cyclic convolution of two-dimensional arrays of complex numbers. New algorithm uses cyclic polynomial convolutions of same length. Algorithm regular, modular, and expandable.

  6. Pregnancy Induces Resistance to the Anorectic Effect of Hypothalamic Malonyl-CoA and the Thermogenic Effect of Hypothalamic AMPK Inhibition in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B.; Lage, Ricardo; González-García, Ismael; Ruíz-Pino, Francisco; Martins, Luís; Fernández-Mallo, Diana; Gallego, Rosalía; Fernø, Johan; Señarís, Rosa; Saha, Asish K.; Tovar, Sulay; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    During gestation, hyperphagia is necessary to cope with the metabolic demands of embryonic development. There were three main aims of this study: Firstly, to investigate the effect of pregnancy on hypothalamic fatty acid metabolism, a key pathway for the regulation of energy balance; secondly, to study whether pregnancy induces resistance to the anorectic effect of fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibition and accumulation of malonyl-coenzyme A (CoA) in the hypothalamus; and, thirdly, to study whether changes in hypothalamic AMPK signaling are associated with brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis during pregnancy. Our data suggest that in pregnant rats, the hypothalamic fatty acid pathway shows an overall state that should lead to anorexia and elevated BAT thermogenesis: decreased activities of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), FAS, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, coupled with increased acetyl-CoA carboxylase function with subsequent elevation of malonyl-CoA levels. This profile seems dependent of estradiol levels but not prolactin or progesterone. Despite the apparent anorexic and thermogenic signaling in the hypothalamus, pregnant rats remain hyperphagic and display reduced temperature and BAT function. Actually, pregnant rats develop resistance to the anorectic effects of central FAS inhibition, which is associated with a reduction of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) expression and its transcription factors phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and phospho-forkhead box O1. This evidence demonstrates that pregnancy induces a state of resistance to the anorectic and thermogenic actions of hypothalamic cellular signals of energy surplus, which, in parallel to the already known refractoriness to leptin effects, likely contributes to gestational hyperphagia and adiposity. PMID:25535827

  7. Activation of neurons in the hypothalamic dorsomedial nucleus via hypothalamic projections of the nucleus of the solitary tract following refeeding of fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Renner, Eva; Szabó-Meltzer, Kinga I; Puskás, Nela; Tóth, Zsuzsanna E; Dobolyi, Arpád; Palkovits, Miklós

    2010-01-01

    We report that satiation evokes neuronal activity in the ventral subdivision of the hypothalamic dorsomedial nucleus (DMH) as indicated by increased c-fos expression in response to refeeding in fasted rats. The absence of significant Fos activation following food presentation without consumption suggests that satiation but not craving for food elicits the activation of ventral DMH neurons. The distribution pattern of the prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP)-immunoreactive (ir) network showed remarkable correlations with the distribution of activated neurons within the DMH. The PrRP-ir fibers and terminals were immunolabeled with tyrosine hydroxylase, suggesting their origin in lower brainstem instead of local, hypothalamic PrRP cells. PrRP-ir fibers arising from neurons of the nucleus of the solitary tract could be followed to the hypothalamus. Unilateral transections of these fibers at pontine and caudal hypothalamic levels resulted in a disappearance of the dense PrRP-ir network in the ventral DMH while PrRP immunoreactivity was increased in transected fibers caudal to the knife cuts as well as in perikarya of the nucleus of the solitary tract ipsilateral to the transections. In accord with these changes, the number of Fos-expressing neurons following refeeding declined in the ipsilateral but remained high in the contralateral DMH. However, the Fos response in the ventral DMH was not attenuated following chemical lesion (neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment) of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, another possible source of DMH inputs. These findings suggest that PrRP projections from the nucleus of the solitary tract contribute to the activation of ventral DMH neurons during refeeding, possibly by transferring information on cholecystokinin-mediated satiation.

  8. Cyclic stress analysis of ceramic coated gas turbine seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joe; Dougherty, Dan; Hendricks, Bob

    1985-01-01

    Through the use of the Finite Element Method, the cyclic thermomechanical response of ceramic coated gas turbine parts is considered. The analysis includes temperature dependent elastic-plastic-creep material properties and cyclic thermal loads. To demonstrate the cyclic thermomechanical response, a ceramic coated outer gas path seal is studied. The analysis will estimate the significant residual stress field created by the cyclic thermal loads.

  9. Temazepam triggers the release of vasopressin into the rat hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus: novel insight into benzodiazepine action on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system activity during stress.

    PubMed

    Welt, Tobias; Engelmann, Mario; Renner, Ulrich; Erhardt, Angelika; Müller, Marianne B; Landgraf, Rainer; Holsboer, Florian; Keck, Martin E

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the influence of a representative classical benzodiazepine on the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity both under basal conditions and stress. Adult male Wistar rats were intravenously administered with temazepam (0.5, 1, and 3 mg/kg body weight) and plasma concentrations of corticotropin (ACTH) and vasopressin (AVP) were measured in blood samples collected via chronically implanted jugular venous catheters. Simultaneously, the release of AVP within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was monitored via microdialysis. Plasma AVP levels remained unaffected by the different treatment conditions. Temazepam blunted the stressor exposure-induced secretion of ACTH in a dose-dependent manner. Concurrently, and also in a dose-dependent manner temazepam enhanced the intra-PVN release of AVP, known to originate from magnocellular neurons of the hypothalamic neurohypophyseal system. Furthermore, temazepam did not affect the in vitro secretion of ACTH from the adenohypophyseal cells. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that temazepam modulates the central nervous regulation of the HPA axis by altering intra-PVN AVP release. An increasingly released AVP of magnocellular origin seems to provide a negative tonus on ACTH secretion most probably via inhibiting the release of ACTH secretagogues from the median eminence into hypophyseal portal blood.

  10. Synthesis of cyclic sulfones by ring-closing metathesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei

    2002-02-07

    A general and highly efficient synthesis of cyclic sulfones based on ring-closing metathesis has been developed. The synthetic utility of the resulting cyclic sulfones was demonstrated by their participation in stereoselective Diels-Alder reactions and transformation to cyclic dienes by the Ramberg-Bäcklund reaction.

  11. Cyclic soft groups and their applications on groups.

    PubMed

    Aktaş, Hacı; Özlü, Serif

    2014-01-01

    In crisp environment the notions of order of group and cyclic group are well known due to many applications. In this paper, we introduce order of the soft groups, power of the soft sets, power of the soft groups, and cyclic soft group on a group. We also investigate the relationship between cyclic soft groups and classical groups.

  12. Pharmacological modulation of secondary mediator systems--cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP--on inflammatory hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Cunha, F Q; Teixeira, M M; Ferreira, S H

    1999-06-01

    1. The objective of the present paper was to evaluate the relevance of neuronal balance of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP concentration for functional regulation of nociceptor sensitivity during inflammation. 2. Injection of PGE2 (10-100 ng paw-1) evoked a dose-dependent hyperalgesic effect which was mediated via a cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase (PKA) inasmuch as hyperalgesia was blocked by the PKA inhibitor H89. 3. The PDE4 inhibitor rolipram and RP73401, but not PDE3 and PDE5 inhibitors potentiated the hyperalgesic effects of PGE2. The hyperalgesic effect of dopamine was also enhanced by rolipram. Moreover, rolipram significantly potentiated hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan, bradykinin, TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-8. This suggests that neuronal cyclic AMP mediates the prostanoid and sympathetic components of mechanical hyperalgesia. Moreover, in the neuron cyclic AMP is mainly metabolized by PDE4. 4. To examine the role of the NO/cyclic GMP pathway in modulating mechanical hyperalgesia, we tested the effects of the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ. This substance counteracts the inhibitory effects of the NO donor, SNAP, on the hyperalgesia induced by PGE2. 5. The ODQ potentiated hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan, bradykinin, TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-8. In contrast, ODQ had no significant effect on the hyperalgesia induced by PGE2 and dopamine. This indicates that the hyperalgesic cytokines may activate soluble guanylate cyclase, which down-regulate the ability of these substances to cause hyperalgesia. This event appears not to be mediated by prostaglandin or dopamine. 6. In conclusion, the results presented in this paper confirm an association between (i) hyperalgesia and elevated levels of cyclic AMP as well as (ii) antinociception and elevated levels of cyclic GMP. The intracellular levels of cyclic AMP that enhance hyperalgesia are controlled by the PDE4 isoform and appear to result in activation of protein kinase A whereas the

  13. Cyclic ADP-ribose as a universal calcium signal molecule in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Salmina, Alla B; Olovyannikova, Raissa Ya; Hashii, Minako; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Koizumi, Keita; Jin, Duo; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Lopatina, Olga; Amina, Sarwat; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Huang, Jian-Jun; Noda, Mami

    2007-01-01

    beta-NAD(+) is as abundant as ATP in neuronal cells. beta-NAD(+) functions not only as a coenzyme but also as a substrate. beta-NAD(+)-utilizing enzymes are involved in signal transduction. We focus on ADP-ribosyl cyclase/CD38 which synthesizes cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), a universal Ca(2+) mobilizer from intracellular stores, from beta-NAD(+). cADPR acts through activation/modulation of ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) releasing Ca(2+) channels. cADPR synthesis in neuronal cells is stimulated or modulated via different pathways and various factors. Subtype-specific coupling of various neurotransmitter receptors with ADP-ribosyl cyclase confirms the involvement of the enzyme in signal transduction in neurons and glial cells. Moreover, cADPR/CD38 is critical in oxytocin release from the hypothalamic cell dendrites and nerve terminals in the posterior pituitary. Therefore, it is possible that pharmacological manipulation of intracellular cADPR levels through ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity or synthetic cADPR analogues may provide new therapeutic opportunities for treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  14. Direct versus indirect actions of ghrelin on hypothalamic NPY neurons.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Hiroshi; Sheng, Zhenyu; Routh, Vanessa; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc; Bryan, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Assess direct versus indirect action(s) of ghrelin on hypothalamic NPY neurons. Electrophysiology was used to measure ion channel activity in NPY-GFP neurons in slice preparations. Ca2+ imaging was used to monitor ghrelin activation of isolated NPY GFP-labeled neurons. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize Trpm4, SUR1 and Kir6.2 in the hypothalamus. Acylated ghrelin depolarized the membrane potential (MP) of NPY-GFP neurons in brain slices. Depolarization resulted from a decreased input resistance (IR) in ~70% of neurons (15/22) or an increased IR in the remainder (7/22), consistent with the opening or closing of ion channels, respectively. Although tetrodotoxin (TTX) blockade of presynaptic action potentials reduced ghrelin-induced changes in MP and IR, ghrelin still significantly depolarized the MP and decreased IR in TTX-treated neurons, suggesting that ghrelin directly opens cation channel(s) in NPY neurons. In isolated NPY-GFP neurons, ghrelin produced a sustained rise of [Ca2+]c, with an EC50 ~110 pM. Pharmacologic studies confirmed that the direct action of ghrelin was through occupation of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHS-R, and demonstrated the importance of the adenylate cyclase/cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) and phospholipase C/inositol triphosphate (PLC/IP3) pathways as activators of 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of isolated neurons was not affected by CNQX or TTX, but reducing [Na+]o suppressed activation, suggesting a role for Na+-permeable cation channels. SUR1 and two channel partners, Kir6.2 and Trpm4, were identified immunologically in NPY-GFP neurons in situ. The actions of SUR1 and Trpm4 modulators were informative: like ghrelin, diazoxide, a SUR1 agonist, elevated [Ca2+]c and glibenclamide, a SUR1 antagonist, partially suppressed ghrelin action, while 9-phenanthrol and flufenamic acid, selective Trpm4 antagonists, blocked ghrelin actions on isolated neurons. Ghrelin activation was unaffected by nifedipine and

  15. Opioids in the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus Stimulate Ethanol Intake

    PubMed Central

    Barson, Jessica R.; Carr, Ambrose J.; Soun, Jennifer E.; Sobhani, Nasim C.; Rada, Pedro; Leibowitz, Sarah F.; Hoebel, Bartley G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Specialized hypothalamic systems that increase food intake might also increase ethanol intake. To test this possibility, morphine and receptor-specific opioid agonists were microinjected in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of rats that had learned to drink ethanol. To cross-validate the results, naloxone methiodide (m-naloxone), an opioid antagonist, was microinjected with the expectation that it would have the opposite effect of morphine and the specific opioid agonists. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were trained, without sugar, to drink 4% or 7% ethanol and were then implanted with chronic brain cannulas aimed at the PVN. After recovery, those drinking 7% ethanol, with food and water available, were injected with two doses each of morphine or m-naloxone. To test for receptor specificity, two doses each of the μ-receptor agonist [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin (DAMGO), δ-receptor agonist D-Ala-Gly-Phe-Met-NH2 (DALA), or k-receptor agonist U-50,488H were injected. DAMGO was also tested in rats drinking 4% ethanol without food or water available. As an anatomical control for drug reflux, injections were made 2 mm dorsal to the PVN. Results A main result was a significant increase in ethanol intake induced by PVN injection of morphine. The opposite effect was produced by m-naloxone. The effects of morphine and m-naloxone were exclusively on intake of ethanol, even though food and water were freely available. In the analysis with specific receptor agonists, PVN injection of the δ-agonist DALA significantly increased 7% ethanol intake without affecting food or water intake. This is in contrast to the k-agonist U-50,488H, which decreased ethanol intake, and the μ-agonist DAMGO, which had no effect on ethanol intake in the presence or absence of food and water. In the anatomical control location 2 mm dorsal to the PVN, no drug caused any significant changes in ethanol, food, or water intake, providing evidence that the active site was close to the

  16. Cyclic Polymers by Ring-Closure Strategies.

    PubMed

    Josse, Thomas; De Winter, Julien; Gerbaux, Pascal; Coulembier, Olivier

    2016-11-02

    The preparation of cyclic macromolecules has always represented a challenging task for polymer science, mainly because of difficulties in connecting chain extremities together. Initiated by the pioneering studies of Jacobson and Stockmayer, preparative pathways to cyclic polymers have been considerably improved within the last two decades thanks to the advent of both controlled polymerizations and efficient coupling reactions in organic chemistry. This Review aims to provide a critical up-to-date overview and illustrate the considerable efforts that have been made in the past few years to improve the availability of macrocycles for industrial and academic investigations through the use of the ring-closure approach. Particular attention is paid to methods for the preparation of monocycles over more complex architectures, since the latter are usually derived from the former. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Separation of isotopes by cyclical processes

    DOEpatents

    Hamrin, Jr., Charles E.; Weaver, Kenny

    1976-11-02

    Various isotopes of hydrogen are separated by a cyclic sorption process in which a gas stream containing the isotopes is periodically passed through a high pressure column containing a palladium sorbent. A portion of the product from the high pressure column is passed through a second column at lower pressure to act as a purge. Before the sorbent in the high pressure column becomes saturated, the sequence is reversed with the stream flowing through the former low-pressure column now at high pressure, and a portion of the product purging the former high pressure column now at low pressure. The sequence is continued in cyclic manner with the product being enriched in a particular isotope.

  18. Cyclic Oxidation Modeling and Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2004-01-01

    The cyclic oxidation process can be described as an iterative scale growth and spallation sequence by a number of similar models. Model input variable include oxide scale type and growth parameters, spalling geometry, spall constant, and cycle duration. Outputs include net weight change, the amounts of retained and spalled oxide, the total oxygen and metal consumed, and the terminal rates of weight loss and metal consumption. All models and their variations produce a number of similar characteristic features. In general, spalling and material consumption increase to a steady state rate, at which point the retained scale approaches a constant and the rate of weight loss becomes linear. For one model, this regularity was demonstrated as dimensionless, universal expressions, obtained by normalizing the variables by critical performance factors. These insights were enabled through the use of the COSP for Windows cyclic oxidation spalling program.

  19. A cyclic UH model for sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wan

    2015-06-01

    A simple cyclic elastoplastic constitutive model for sand is proposed based on the UH model for overconsolidated clay. The proposed model has the following features. First, in order to describe the stress-induced anisotropy in sand, a rotational hardening rule is introduced for the evolution of the yield surface axis with development of plastic deviatoric strain in the principal stress space. Second, the relationship between the rotational axis and stress-induced anisotropy is modeled by introducing the slope of rotational axis into the yield function. The flatness of the yield surface can be determined by the slope of rotational axis. Finally, a revised unified hardening parameter is proposed to incorporate the stress-induced anisotropy. The model capability in describing the cyclic response of sand is verified by comparing the simulations with available test results.

  20. Cyclic plasticity and failure of structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalev, I.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical approach for low-cycle fatigue prediction is presented. The approach combines a cyclic plasticity model with the finite element method and a damage accumulation criterion for ductile metals. The cyclic plasticity model is based on the concept of the combination of several yield surfaces. The surfaces are related to the material uniaxial stress-strain curve idealized by piecewise linear segments. The damage criterion is based on the Coffin-Manson formulae modified for the mean stress variation effect. It is extended to the multiaxial varying stress-strain field and applied for both the crack initiation and the crack growth processes. The stable slow crack growth rate is approximated by the damage accumulation gradient computed from the cracked finite element models. This procedure requires fatigue testing data of only smooth specimens under constant strain amplitudes. The present approach is illustrated by numerical examples of an aircraft wing stiffened panel subjected to compression, which causes material yielding and residual tension.

  1. Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal Axis Functioning in Reactive and Proactive Aggression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Duran, Nestor L.; Olson, Sheryl L.; Hajal, Nastassia J.; Felt, Barbara T.; Vazquez, Delia M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) reactivity and proactive and reactive aggression in pre-pubertal children. After a 30-min controlled base line period, 73 7-year-old children (40 males and 33 females) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental tasks designed to…

  2. Reduction of Hypothalamic Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Activates Browning of White Fat and Ameliorates Obesity.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Cristina; González-García, Ismael; Seoane-Collazo, Patricia; Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Liñares-Pose, Laura; Rial-Pensado, Eva; Fernø, Johan; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Casals, Núria; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; López, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The chaperone GRP78/BiP (glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa/binding immunoglobulin protein) modulates protein folding in reply to cellular insults that lead to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This study investigated the role of hypothalamic GRP78 on energy balance, with particular interest in thermogenesis and browning of white adipose tissue (WAT). For this purpose, we used diet-induced obese rats and rats administered thapsigargin, and by combining metabolic, histologic, physiologic, pharmacologic, thermographic, and molecular techniques, we studied the effect of genetic manipulation of hypothalamic GRP78. Our data showed that rats fed a high-fat diet or that were centrally administered thapsigargin displayed hypothalamic ER stress, whereas genetic overexpression of GRP78 specifically in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus was sufficient to alleviate ER stress and to revert the obese and metabolic phenotype. Those effects were independent of feeding and leptin but were related to increased thermogenic activation of brown adipose tissue and induction of browning in WAT and could be reversed by antagonism of β3 adrenergic receptors. This evidence indicates that modulation of hypothalamic GRP78 activity may be a potential strategy against obesity and associated comorbidities. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  3. Single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

    PubMed

    El-Shehaby, Amr M N; Reda, Wael A; Abdel Karim, Khaled M; Emad Eldin, Reem M; Nabeel, Ahmed M

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Because of their critical and central location, it is deemed necessary to fractionate when considering irradiating optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy is considered safer when dealing with gliomas in this location. In this study, the safety and efficacy of single-session stereotactic radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were reviewed. METHODS Between December 2004 and June 2014, 22 patients with optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were treated by single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Twenty patients were available for follow-up for a minimum of 1 year after treatment. The patients were 5 to 43 years (median 16 years) of age. The tumor volume was 0.15 to 18.2 cm(3) (median 3.1 cm(3)). The prescription dose ranged from 8 to 14 Gy (median 11.5 Gy). RESULTS The mean follow-up period was 43 months. Five tumors involved the optic nerve only, and 15 tumors involved the chiasm/hypothalamus. Two patients died during the follow-up period. The tumors shrank in 12 cases, remained stable in 6 cases, and progressed in 2 cases, thereby making the tumor control rate 90%. Vision remained stable in 12 cases, improved in 6 cases, and worsened in 2 cases in which there was tumor progression. Progression-free survival was 83% at 3 years. CONCLUSIONS The initial results indicate that single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

  4. Cyclophosphamide for rapid-onset obesity, hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Paz-Priel, Ido; Cooke, David W; Chen, Allen R

    2011-02-01

    Patients with rapid-onset obesity, hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, autonomic dysregulation, and neural crest tumor syndrome have poor long-term outcomes. We report a patient who was treated successfully with high-dose cyclophosphamide immunoablation. This experience offers a novel therapeutic approach and an indirect insight into the underlying pathogenesis of this syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cyclophosphamide for Rapid-Onset Obesity, Hypothalamic Dysfunction, Hypoventilation, and Autonomic Dysregulation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Priel, Ido; Cooke, David W.; Chen, Allen R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rapid-onset obesity, hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, autonomic dysregulation, and neural crest tumor syndrome have poor long-term outcomes. We report a patient who was treated successfully with high-dose cyclophosphamide immunoablation. This experience offers a novel therapeutic approach and an indirect insight into the underlying pathogenesis of this syndrome. PMID:20727534

  6. Paradoxical sleep deprivation activates hypothalamic nuclei that regulate food intake and stress response.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Milene de Oliveira Lara; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Kawakami, Suzi Emiko; Tufik, Sergio; Suchecki, Deborah

    2009-09-01

    A large body of evidence has shown that prolonged paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) results in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, and in loss of body weight despite an apparent increase of food intake, reflecting increased energy expenditure. The flowerpot technique for PSD is an efficient paradigm for investigating the relationships among metabolic regulation and stress response. The purpose of the present study was to examine the mechanisms involved in the effects of 96 h of PSD on metabolism regulation, feeding behaviour and stress response by studying corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and orexin (ORX) immunoreactivity in specific hypothalamic nuclei. Once-daily assessments of body weight, twice-daily measurements of (spillage-corrected) food intake, and once-daily determinations of plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone were made throughout PSD or at corresponding times in control rats (CTL). Immunoreactivity for CRH in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and for ORX in the hypothalamic lateral area was evaluated at the end of the experimental period. PSD resulted in increased diurnal, but not nocturnal, food intake, producing no significant changes in global food intake. PSD augmented the immunoreactivity for CRH and plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels, characterizing activation of the HPA axis. PSD also markedly increased the ORX immunoreactivity. The average plasma level of corticosterone correlated negatively with body weight gain throughout PSD. These results indicate that augmented ORX and CRH immunoreactivity in specific hypothalamic nuclei may underlie some of the metabolic changes consistently described in PSD.

  7. Mindful Parenting Predicts Mothers' and Infants' Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Activity during a Dyadic Stressor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Duncan, Larissa G.; Lightcap, April; Khan, Faaiza

    2017-01-01

    Mindfulness in the parenting relationship has been proposed to help both parents and children better regulate stress, though this has not yet been shown at the physiological level. In this study, we tested relations between maternal mindfulness in parenting and both mothers' and their infants' hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity…

  8. Hypothalamic hamartoma presenting with gelastic seizures, generalized convulsions, and ictal psychosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Hail, Hassan J; Sokrab, Tag-Eldin O; Al-Moslamani, Nasir J; Miyares, Francisco R

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of hypothalamic hamartoma in an adult female who presented with gelastic seizures, generalized convulsions, and ictal aggressive psychotic behavior. Anticonvulsant treatment was ineffective in controlling the epileptic seizures. Surgical excision after accurate imaging diagnosis 3 decades after the onset of symptoms markedly ameliorated her condition. Delayed and erroneous diagnosis had unnecessarily prolonged the suffering of our patient.

  9. Decreased leptin uptake in hypothalamic nuclei with ageing in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Galaz, C; Fernández-Agulló, T; Campoy, F; Arribas, C; Gallardo, N; Andrés, A; Ros, M; Carrascosa, J M

    2001-10-01

    Leptin interacts with specific receptors in hypothalamic nuclei and modulates energy balance. Growing evidence has shown the association of obesity and hyperleptinaemia with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance. The aged Wistar rat shows peripheral insulin resistance in the absence of obesity and alterations of glucose homeostasis. However, it is not known whether, in these animals, the leptin action is altered. Here we studied the effect of ageing on plasma leptin concentration and the ability of hypothalamic nuclei to capture i.c.v.-injected digoxigenin-labelled leptin. Our data indicate that 24-month-old animals are hyperleptinaemic. However, daily food intake was greater in old animals, suggesting that they are leptin resistant. Leptin uptake in the hypothalamus was reduced in old rats. This uptake was a receptor-mediated process as demonstrated by displacement. Leptin accumulation in hypothalamic nuclei was partially colocalized with neuropeptide Y fibres. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses showed a lower amount of the long form of leptin receptors in the hypothalamus of aged rats. Analysis by RT-PCR also demonstrated a decreased expression of leptin receptor mRNA in old animals. We conclude that the lower leptin uptake may be explained, at least in part, by a decreased amount of receptors in hypothalamic neurones of the aged rats.

  10. MATERNAL ATRAZINE (ATR) ALTERS HYPOTHALAMIC DOPAMINE (HYP-DA) AND SERUM PROLACTIN (SPRL) IN MALE PUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maternal Atrazine (ATR) alters hypothalamic dopamine (HYP-DA) and serum prolactin (sPRL) in male pups. 1Christopher Langdale, 2Tammy Stoker and 2Ralph Cooper. 1 Dept. of Cell Biology, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. 2 Endocrinology ...

  11. Gallium-67 breast uptake in a patient with hypothalamic granuloma (sarcoid)

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, R.; Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.; Fay, J.; Gale, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    An unusual case is presented of bilateral breast uptake of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate in a patient with a hypothalamic granuloma in the absence of galactorrhea is presented. A possible mechanism for this incidental finding is elevated prolactin levels, as other causes of gallium breast uptake such as drug therapy, and intrinsic breast disease, were not present.