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Sample records for oestrous cyclicity hypothalamic

  1. The hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis and manipulations of the oestrous cycle in the brushtail possum.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Janet L; McLeod, Bernie J; Eckery, Douglas C

    2011-02-01

    The main purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on what is known about the regulatory mechanisms of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis in the brushtail possum, and to report on the outcomes of attempts made to manipulate by hormonal means, these processes in the possum. Over the last 15 years, several unique features of possum reproductive physiology have been discovered. These include an extended follicular phase despite elevated concentrations of FSH during the luteal phase, and early expression of LH receptors on granulosa cells of small antral follicles, suggesting a different mechanism for the selection of a dominant follicle. The use of routine synchronisation protocols that are effective in eutherians has failed to be effective in possums, and so the ability to reliably synchronise oestrus in this species remains a challenge.

  2. Ovarian response to oestrous synchronization protocol based on use of reduced doses of cloprostenol in cyclic goats.

    PubMed

    Duque-Bonisoli, C; Salvador, A; Díaz, T; Contreras-Solis, I

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of two reduced doses vs a high/luteolytic dose of cloprostenol on luteolytic activity and synchronization of oestrus in cyclic goats. Experiment 1, included 24 goats randomly allocated to three groups: control group (group H) received a single high dose of cloprostenol (87.5 μg; 1.0 ml; i.m.) and M and L groups, which received half (43.75 μg; 0.5 ml) and a third (26.25 μg; 0.3 ml) of the highest dose, respectively. Experiment 2, included 24 goats randomly assigned to the same experimental groups. Each group was treated using two injections of cloprostenol administered 10 days apart to synchronize oestrus. Transrectal ultrasonographic scanning (US) was performed to detect the presence, size and development of corpora lutea and ovarian follicles. Furthermore, detection of oestrus was performed every 12 h between 24 and 72 h after the second injection of cloprostenol, and the luteolytic effect was verified by US. In Experiment 1, all goats that had corpora lutea at timing of treatment regressed their corpora lutea. In Experiment 2, the occurrence of oestrus and the interval between treatment to onset of oestrus were: 100%, 49.5 ± 3.0 h; 100%, 51.0 ± 3.0 h; and 75%, 56.0 ± 3.5 h for H, M and L groups, respectively. The development of preovulatory follicles and occurrence of subsequent corpora lutea were similar among groups. In summary, the use of 26.25 μg of cloprostenol is effective for the synchronization of oestrus in cyclic goats.

  3. Cyclic feeding behaviour and changes in hypothalamic galanin and neuropeptide Y gene expression induced by zinc deficiency in the rat.

    PubMed

    Selvais, P L; Labuche, C; Nguyen, X N; Ketelslegers, J M; Denef, J F; Maiter, D M

    1997-01-01

    Dietary zinc-deficiency induces a striking reduction and a cyclic pattern of food intake in rodents. To elucidate the mechanisms for these effects, we studied the hypothalamic content, synthesis, and distribution of galanin (GAL) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) during zinc deficiency and refeeding in the rat. In Wistar rats, three weeks of zinc-deprivation consistently induced a reduction and a cyclic pattern of night- and day-time food intake, as well as of water intake. This was accompanied in zinc-deficient (ZD) rats, and to a lesser extent in pair-fed (PF) rats, by a decrease of hypothalamic GAL mRNA concentration (CTR: 100 +/- 8, ZD: 61 +/- 4, PF: 78 +/- 2 arbitrary densitometric units, ADU, P < 0.01) and an increase of hypothalamic NPY (CTR: 100 +/- 11, ZD: 154 +/- 10, PF: 126 +/- 4 ADU, P < 0.05), without peptide modification. The two neuropeptidergic systems were not affected by the cycles of feeding, with the exception of the NPY-immunoreactivity in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (geniculo-hypothalamic tract), that was inversely correlated to the food intake in both ZD and PF animals. In a second experiment, we showed that zinc-repletion for 4 days suppressed the behaviour induced by a two-week zinc-deprivation, and reversed the increase of NPY mRNA in ZD animals. We finally demonstrated that zinc-deficiency induced a similar behaviour in Zucker rats. However, in these rats whose synthesis of NPY is constitutively up-regulated, no change of NPY synthesis was observed in ZD rats, suggesting that the increase observed in Wistar is adaptative rather than instrumental to the abnormal food intake. In conclusion, we have further characterized the cyclic feeding behaviour of the zinc-deficient Wistar rats, and shown in these animals a decreased activity of the GAL system and an increased activity of the NPY system, likely corresponding to a compensatory response of the two neuropeptidergic systems, as observed in food-deprived animals. As spontaneous food intake of ZD rats

  4. Semaphorin7A regulates neuroglial plasticity in the adult hypothalamic median eminence.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Jyoti; Messina, Andrea; Langlet, Fanny; Cimino, Irene; Loyens, Anne; Mazur, Danièle; Gallet, Sarah; Balland, Eglantine; Malone, Samuel A; Pralong, François; Cagnoni, Gabriella; Schellino, Roberta; De Marchis, Silvia; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Tamagnone, Luca; Prevot, Vincent; Giacobini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive competence in mammals depends on the projection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the hypothalamic median eminence (ME) and the timely release of GnRH into the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In adult rodents, GnRH neurons and the specialized glial cells named tanycytes periodically undergo cytoskeletal plasticity. However, the mechanisms that regulate this plasticity are still largely unknown. We demonstrate that Semaphorin7A, expressed by tanycytes, plays a dual role, inducing the retraction of GnRH terminals and promoting their ensheathment by tanycytic end feet via the receptors PlexinC1 and Itgb1, respectively. Moreover, Semaphorin7A expression is regulated during the oestrous cycle by the fluctuating levels of gonadal steroids. Genetic invalidation of Semaphorin7A receptors in mice induces neuronal and glial rearrangements in the ME and abolishes normal oestrous cyclicity and fertility. These results show a role for Semaphorin7A signalling in mediating periodic neuroglial remodelling in the adult ME during the ovarian cycle.

  5. Semaphorin7A regulates neuroglial plasticity in the adult hypothalamic median eminence

    PubMed Central

    Parkash, Jyoti; Messina, Andrea; Langlet, Fanny; Cimino, Irene; Loyens, Anne; Mazur, Danièle; Gallet, Sarah; Balland, Eglantine; Malone, Samuel A.; Pralong, François; Cagnoni, Gabriella; Schellino, Roberta; De Marchis, Silvia; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Tamagnone, Luca; Prevot, Vincent; Giacobini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive competence in mammals depends on the projection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the hypothalamic median eminence (ME) and the timely release of GnRH into the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis. In adult rodents, GnRH neurons and the specialized glial cells named tanycytes periodically undergo cytoskeletal plasticity. However, the mechanisms that regulate this plasticity are still largely unknown. We demonstrate that Semaphorin7A, expressed by tanycytes, plays a dual role, inducing the retraction of GnRH terminals and promoting their ensheathment by tanycytic end feet via the receptors PlexinC1 and Itgb1, respectively. Moreover, Semaphorin7A expression is regulated during the oestrous cycle by the fluctuating levels of gonadal steroids. Genetic invalidation of Semaphorin7A receptors in mice induces neuronal and glial rearrangements in the ME and abolishes normal oestrous cyclicity and fertility. These results show a role for Semaphorin7A signalling in mediating periodic neuroglial remodelling in the adult ME during the ovarian cycle. PMID:25721933

  6. Metabolic blood profile of beef heifers during oestrous and non-oestrous states.

    PubMed

    Crane, E M; Munro, J C; Bourgon, S L; Diel de Amorim, M; Ventura, R; Fredeen, A H; Montanholi, Y R

    2016-10-01

    Haematological metabolic profiles in heifers could contribute to the development of proxies for oestrous detection and provide clues to further characterize biological changes during oestrus. One hundred and seven beef heifers were observed for oestrous behaviour twice daily for 124 days. Feed intake and productive performance (body weight and composition) traits were measured, and feed efficiency was determined using residual feed intake (kg DM/day). Blood plasma samples were collected when signs of oestrus were observed and every 30 ± 2 days. Heifers were considered in oestrus (n = 71) when plasma progesterone concentrations were <0.6 ng/ml. Least square means of blood metabolic parameters were compared between oestrous and non-oestrous states and within oestrous groups according to performance traits and age. Heifers in oestrus exhibited higher concentrations of alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), beta-hydroxybutyric acid, creatine kinase (CK) and triiodothyronine (T3) than heifers in non-oestrus. Heifers in oestrus revealed lower osmolality and concentrations of calcium, sodium and total protein than during non-oestrus. Younger (and smaller) heifers had greater concentrations of CK, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), glucose and sodium than the older heifers. Heifers with lower fatness had increased osmolality and concentrations of cholesterol, CK, phosphorus, sodium and reduced T3 levels. Feed efficient heifers had greater levels of AST, cholesterol and GGT than inefficient heifers. Blood plasma parameters may be complementary to oestrous detection upon further validation; effects of age, feed efficiency, body size and body composition should be considered to optimize this haematological assessment. PMID:27554760

  7. Validation of bovine oestrous-specific synthetic molecules with trained scent dogs; similarities between natural and synthetic oestrous smell.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Tenhagen, C; Johnen, D; Le Danvic, C; Gatien, J; Salvetti, P; Tenhagen, B A; Heuwieser, W

    2015-02-01

    Oestrous detection is crucial for successful dairy cow reproduction. Bulls identify cows in oestrus by oestrous-specific odours especially in urine and vaginal fluid. These have been used to train dogs to detect cows in heat. To improve and simplify the dog training, a spray containing synthetic oestrous molecules was developed. The objective of this study was to test the spray on similarities to the natural substance thus to assess its suitability as a training substance for heat detection dogs. Ten privately owned dogs of various breeds were trained. Dogs should be trained either to differentiate natural vaginal fluid from cows in oestrus and dioestrus (n = 5), or spray with or without synthetic oestrous molecules (n = 5). Dogs trained on natural fluid and on spray could detect the oestrous odour they had been trained on with an overall accuracy of 69.0% and 82.4%, respectively (p = 0.019). To validate the synthetic molecules, dogs trained with synthetic molecules had to detect oestrous odour in natural fluid without further training (accuracy 37.6%). Dogs trained on natural fluid detected the synthetic molecules with an accuracy of 50.0% (50% vs 37.4%, p < 0.05). Dogs can recognize natural vaginal fluid from cows in oestrus after they have been trained with synthetic oestrous molecules, but accuracy needs to be improved.

  8. Altered hypothalamic-pituitary function in the adult female rat with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Spindler-Vomachka, M; Johnson, D C

    1985-01-01

    Infertility associated with anovulation and loss of regular oestrous cyclicity is a consequence of diabetes mellitus in the rat. In an attempt to define loci of altered function, studies were undertaken to examine various aspects of hypothalamic-pituitary function in rats treated with streptozotocin. Medial basal hypothalamic fragments from adult female diabetic rats contained the same amount of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone but, with depolarization, released slightly but insignificantly (p greater than 0.05) more than did those from control animals. Furthermore, release of luteinizing hormone from pituitaries exposed to hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone was not altered by diabetes. Removal of the negative feedback effect of gonadal steroids upon the hypothalamic-pituitary axis produced an increase in luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone concentrations in the serum of normal rats within 6h (p less than 0.05), whereas 24h were required for similar increases in diabetic rats. However, the same concentrations of gonadotrophins were found in diabetic and control animals 120 h after ovariectomy. The inhibitory action of oestradiol benzoate on the secretion of gonadotrophins was more pronounced in ovariectomized diabetic than in control rats. A 74% depression in serum luteinizing hormone (p less than 0.01) was produced by 0.5 microgram oestradiol benzoate per day in diabetic rats, while 5 micrograms was required in control animals. Similar reductions in follicle stimulating hormone concentrations (50%, p less than 0.05) were obtained by injecting 5 micrograms of the oestrogen into diabetic or 50 micrograms into control rats. Increases in serum prolactin were greater in the control animals however.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Recent developments in oestrous synchronization of postpartum dairy cows with and without ovarian disorders.

    PubMed

    Yániz, J L; Murugavel, K; López-Gatius, F

    2004-04-01

    This report reviews the most recent developments in prostaglandin-based oestrous synchronization programmes for postpartum dairy cows and addresses the efficiency of controlled breeding protocols based on such developments for cows with abnormal ovarian conditions. A double prostaglandin protocol applied 11-14 days apart seems to be capable of bringing most cows to oestrus. Because of varying oestrus onset times, improved conception rates are obtained following artificial insemination (AI) at detected oestrus rather than fixed-time AI in prostaglandin-treated cows. The administration of oestradiol or human chorionic gonadotrophin, or both these hormones, after prostaglandin treatment, improves the synchrony of oestrus yet does not enhance the conception rate. Progesterone-based treatments for oestrous synchronization are considered the most appropriate for non-cyclic or anoestrous postpartum dairy cows; prostaglandin alone being ineffective because of the absence of a mature corpus luteum in these cows. Improved oestrus synchrony and fertility rate have been reported using short-term progesterone treatment regimes (7-9 days) with or without oestradiol benzoate combined with the use of a luteolytic agent given 1 day before, or at the time of, progesterone withdrawal. The ovulation synchronization (Ovsynch) protocol, based on the use of gonadotrophin releasing hormone and prostaglandin, was developed to coordinate follicular recruitment, CL regression and the time of ovulation. This protocol allows fixed time insemination and has proved effective in improving reproductive management in postpartum dairy cows. However, timed AI following Ovsynch seems to have no beneficial effects in heifers, because of an inconsistent follicle wave pattern, and in anoestrous cows, given their lack of prostaglandin responsive CL. To date, there are several prostaglandin based, fixed-time insemination oestrous synchronization protocols for use in early postpartum dairy cows with ovarian

  10. The effects of sensorial denervation on the ovarian function, by the local administration of capsaicin, depend on the day of the oestrous cycle when the treatment was performed.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Angélica; Morales, Leticia; Domínguez, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    There is evidence that sensory innervation plays a role in the regulation of puberty. The present study investigates the effects of functional sensorial desensitisation induced by capsaicin administration to adult female rats in the days of diestrus 1, diestrus 2, pro-oestrus or oestrus on ovulation and serum oestradiol and progesterone concentration. The animals were allotted at random to one of the following groups: (1) animals with capsaicin administration into the bursa ovarica (local administration) (2) animals with vehicle administration into the bursa ovarica and (3) untreated animals group. The animals treated were killed on the day of oestrus after three consecutive 4-day oestrous cycles. No differences were observed in oestrous cyclicity or the average number of ova shed between the sensorial desensitisation animals and the vehicle-treated groups. Capsaicin administration resulted in a significant increase in the intra-ovarian noradrenaline levels in the day of diestrus 2 and pro-oestrus. Serum oestradiol and progesterone concentrations were different, depending on the day of the oestrous cycle in which the treatment was performed. These results suggest that in adult normal female rats, ovarian sensorial innervations participate together with the sympathetic innervation in the ovarian function regulating the hormone secretion and this participation varies along the oestrous cycle.

  11. Oestrous and ovarian activity in a female jaguar (Panthera onca).

    PubMed

    Wildt, D E; Platz, C C; Chakraborty, P K; Seager, S W

    1979-07-01

    The mean +/- s.e.m. duration of oestrus was 12.0 +/- 1.0 days (n = 7) and the oestrous cycle length was 47.2 +/- 5.4 days (n = 6) for a captive jaguar. Ovulation did not occur spontaneously, but was induced by treatment with hCG or LH-RH.

  12. Endocrine profiles of sows during the oestrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Enne, G; Perotti, L; Delrio, G; Inaudi, P; d'Istria, M; Pierantoni, R; Citarella, F; Musaro, M A; Monittola, C; Genazzani, A R

    1981-01-01

    We measured the plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), oestradiol (E2), progesterone (P), 17 alpha-hydroxy progesterone (17P), androstenediona (A) and testosterone (T) at oestrus and during the oestrous cycle for four consecutive cycles in a group of 15 normal sows. The results show that at oestrus the peak LH value was preceded, 24 hours earlier, by an E2 peak, and indicate that the LH rise begins when E2 concentrations reach their highest value. During diestrus, concentrations of LH and E2 were constantly low, P and 17P were characterized by lowest concentrations during the oestrous period which showed significant (p less than 0.001), progressive increases from the second day after the LH ovulatory peak, to reach their highest values after 8-14 days. The 17P decrease in proestrus precedes that of P.T and A concentrations showed a significant (p less than 0.001) increase 2 days before the LH ovulatory peak; high plasma concentrations of both androgens were maintained until the LH peak occurred. Measurements taken in consecutive cycles in the same animals showed a high reproducibility of the hormone concentrations examined, which showed similar patterns and values in each of the cycles studied. This high reproducibility suggests that these hormones have an important physiological role and may affect oestrous behaviour.

  13. Hypothalamic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, S; Swerdloff, R S

    1985-01-01

    The reproductive system consists of a series of feedback loops involving the higher centers, the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and the gonads. The factors involved in physiologic restraint of the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal axis until the time of puberty are complex. The pattern (frequency and amplitude) of GnRH signal is important in regulating pituitary LH and FSH secretion. This signal can be amplified and modulated at the pituitary level at least in part by the sex steroids. Hypothalamic hypogonadism can be considered a disorder of the hypothalamic GnRH pulse generator that results in deficient or dysrhythmic GnRH release. The mechanisms underlying the abnormal GnRH release in acquired, functional disorders such as anorexia nervosa and amenorrhea of joggers remain controversial. Evaluation of patients with hypothalamic hypogonadism involves exclusion of hyperprolactinemia, space-occupying lesions, and other systemic disorders. The pulsatile administration of GnRH for induction of fertility represents a major advance in the treatment of these patients.

  14. Circulating microRNA Profiles during the Bovine Oestrous Cycle.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Jason; Donadeu, F Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Up to 50% of ovulations go undetected in modern dairy herds due to attenuated oestrus behavior and a lack of high-accuracy methods for detection of fertile oestrus. This significantly reduces overall herd productivity and constitutes a high economic burden to the dairy industry. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ubiquitous regulators of gene expression during both health and disease and they have been shown to regulate different reproductive processes. Extracellular miRNAs are stable and can provide useful biomarkers of tissue function; changes in circulating miRNA profiles have been reported during menstrual cycles. This study sought to establish the potential of circulating miRNAs as biomarkers of oestrus in cattle. We collected plasma samples from 8 Holstein-Friesian heifers on days Days 0, 8 and 16 of an oestrous cycle and analysed small RNA populations on each Day using two independent high-throughput approaches, namely, Illumina sequencing (n = 24 samples) and Qiagen PCR arrays (n = 9 sample pools, 3-4 samples / pool). Subsequently, we used RT-qPCR (n = 24 samples) to validate the results of high-throughput analyses, as well as to establish the expression profiles of additional miRNAs previously reported to be differentially expressed during reproductive cycles. Overall, we identified four miRNAs (let-7f, miR-125b, miR-145 and miR-99a-5p), the plasma levels of which distinctly increased (up to 2.2-fold, P < 0.05) during oestrus (Day 0) relative to other stages of the cycle (Days 8 and 16). Moreover, we identified several hundred different isomiRs and established their relative abundance in bovine plasma. In summary, our results reveal the dynamic nature of plasma miRNAs during the oestrous cycle and provide evidence of the feasibility of using circulating miRNAs as biomarkers of reproductive function in livestock in the future. PMID:27340826

  15. Circulating microRNA Profiles during the Bovine Oestrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, Jason; Donadeu, F. Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Up to 50% of ovulations go undetected in modern dairy herds due to attenuated oestrus behavior and a lack of high-accuracy methods for detection of fertile oestrus. This significantly reduces overall herd productivity and constitutes a high economic burden to the dairy industry. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ubiquitous regulators of gene expression during both health and disease and they have been shown to regulate different reproductive processes. Extracellular miRNAs are stable and can provide useful biomarkers of tissue function; changes in circulating miRNA profiles have been reported during menstrual cycles. This study sought to establish the potential of circulating miRNAs as biomarkers of oestrus in cattle. We collected plasma samples from 8 Holstein-Friesian heifers on days Days 0, 8 and 16 of an oestrous cycle and analysed small RNA populations on each Day using two independent high-throughput approaches, namely, Illumina sequencing (n = 24 samples) and Qiagen PCR arrays (n = 9 sample pools, 3–4 samples / pool). Subsequently, we used RT-qPCR (n = 24 samples) to validate the results of high-throughput analyses, as well as to establish the expression profiles of additional miRNAs previously reported to be differentially expressed during reproductive cycles. Overall, we identified four miRNAs (let-7f, miR-125b, miR-145 and miR-99a-5p), the plasma levels of which distinctly increased (up to 2.2-fold, P < 0.05) during oestrus (Day 0) relative to other stages of the cycle (Days 8 and 16). Moreover, we identified several hundred different isomiRs and established their relative abundance in bovine plasma. In summary, our results reveal the dynamic nature of plasma miRNAs during the oestrous cycle and provide evidence of the feasibility of using circulating miRNAs as biomarkers of reproductive function in livestock in the future. PMID:27340826

  16. Central genomic regulation of the expression of oestrous behaviour in dairy cows: a review.

    PubMed

    Woelders, H; van der Lende, T; Kommadath, A; te Pas, M F W; Smits, M A; Kaal, L M T E

    2014-05-01

    The expression of oestrous behaviour in Holstein Friesian dairy cows has progressively decreased over the past 50 years. Reduced oestrus expression is one of the factors contributing to the current suboptimal reproductive efficiency in dairy farming. Variation between and within cows in the expression of oestrous behaviour is associated with variation in peripheral blood oestradiol concentrations during oestrus. In addition, there is evidence for a priming role of progesterone for the full display of oestrous behaviour. A higher rate of metabolic clearance of ovarian steroids could be one of the factors leading to lower peripheral blood concentrations of oestradiol and progesterone in high-producing dairy cows. Oestradiol acts on the brain by genomic, non-genomic and growth factor-dependent mechanisms. A firm base of understanding of the ovarian steroid-driven central genomic regulation of female sexual behaviour has been obtained from studies on rodents. These studies have resulted in the definition of five modules of oestradiol-activated genes in the brain, referred to as the GAPPS modules. In a recent series of studies, gene expression in the anterior pituitary and four brain areas (amygdala, hippocampus, dorsal hypothalamus and ventral hypothalamus) in oestrous and luteal phase cows, respectively, has been measured, and the relation with oestrous behaviour of these cows was analysed. These studies identified a number of genes of which the expression was associated with the intensity of oestrous behaviour. These genes could be grouped according to the GAPPS modules, suggesting close similarity of the regulation of oestrous behaviour in cows and female sexual behaviour in rodents. A better understanding of the central genomic regulation of the expression of oestrous behaviour in dairy cows may in due time contribute to improved (genomic) selection strategies for appropriate oestrus expression in high-producing dairy cows.

  17. Effect of simulated stages of the canine oestrous cycle on Escherichia coli binding to canine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Krekeler, N; Lodge, K M; Anderson, G A; Browning, G F; Charles, J A; Wright, P J

    2012-12-01

    Pyometra, a prevalent infectious uterine disease that affects intact middle-aged bitches, is typically associated with Escherichia coli. Our hypotheses were (i) that bacterial adhesion to canine endometrium differs between different stages of the oestrous cycle and (ii) that the adhesin FimH facilitates this adhesion. Twelve post-pubertal, ovariectomized greyhound bitches were treated with exogenous hormones to simulate different stages of the oestrous cycle. Tissue samples from each uterus were incubated with a pathogenic E. coli strain carrying the fimH gene, but no other adhesin genes (P4-wt)--or an E. coli strain in which fimH was insertionally inactivated (P4-∆fimH::kan)--or with phosphate-buffered saline as a negative control. After washing, tissue samples were homogenized for quantification of adherent bacteria. The differences in binding to canine endometrium at different stages of the oestrous cycle were not significant. However, the mean difference in binding of the P4-wt and the P4-∆fimH::kan across all stages of the simulated oestrous cycle was significant (p < 0.001 by paired t-test on geometric means). Individual differences in numbers of P4-wt bacteria bound between dogs might suggest genetic variations or epigenetic differences in FimH receptor expression by the endometrium, unrelated to the stage of the oestrous cycle. PMID:23279531

  18. Anandamide Levels Fluctuate in the Bovine Oviduct during the Oestrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gervasi, Maria Gracia; Marczylo, Timothy H.; Lam, Patricia M.; Rana, Shashi; Franchi, Ana M.; Konje, Justin C.; Perez-Martinez, Silvina

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian oviduct acts as a reservoir for spermatozoa and provides an environment in which they may compete for the opportunity to fertilize the oocyte. Whilst in the oviduct spermatozoa undergo capacitation essential for fertilization. Sperm-oviduct interaction is essential for sperm capacitation and is a tightly regulated process influenced by the local microenvironment. Previously we reported that the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) regulates sperm release from epithelial oviductal cells by promoting sperm capacitation. The aims of this work were to measure the AEA content and to characterize the main AEA metabolic pathway in the bovine oviduct and determine how these change through the oestrous cycle. In this study, the levels of AEA and two other N-acylethanolamines, N-oleoylethanolamine and N-palmitoylethanolamine, were measured in bovine oviduct collected during different stages of oestrous cycle by ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results indicated that intracellular oviductal epithelial levels of all three N-acylethanolamines fluctuate during oestrous cycle. Anandamide from oviductal fluid also varied during oestrous cycle, with the highest values detected during the periovulatory period. Endocannabinoid levels from ipsilateral oviduct to ovulation were higher than those detected in the contralateral one, suggesting that levels of oviductal AEA may be regulated by ovarian hormones. The expression and localization of N-acylethanolamines metabolizing enzymes in bovine oviduct were also determined by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry but no change was found during the oestrous cycle. Furthermore, nanomolar levels of AEA were detected in follicular fluids, suggesting that during ovulation the mature follicle may contribute to oviductal AEA levels to create an endocannabinoid gradient conducive to the regulation of sperm function for successful fertilization. PMID:23977311

  19. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase in the bovine endometrium during the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Parent, Marianne; Madore, Eric; MacLaren, Leslie A; Fortier, Michel A

    2006-03-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) are primary regulators of reproductive function. In ruminants, the relative production of PGE2 and PGF2alpha determines the return to a new oestrous cycle or to the establishment of pregnancy in response to a viable embryo. PG action depends on biosynthesis, transport and interaction with their receptors, which are all expressed differentially during the oestrous cycle. PGs are, however, local mediators and thus the onsite degradation by enzymes such as 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD), also known as 15-PGDH, is another factor to consider in the regulation of physiological action. Little information is available on PG catabolism in the endometrium during the oestrous cycle or early pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to clone the bovine 15-PGDH, produce the recombinant protein and generate a specific antibody to study its activity and its expression in the endometrium during the oestrous cycle. We have found that the bovine 15-PGDH is highly homologous to the rat and human isoforms. 15-PGDH is localized principally in the glandular epithelium and to a lesser extent in stromal and luminal epithelial cells. The enzyme expression is regulated during the oestrous cycle and it reaches its maximal level on days 16-18. Transient expression is observed in luminal epithelial and trophoblast cells on day 21 of pregnancy. The mRNA is expressed at a constant high level throughout the cycle. The activity of the recombinant 15-PGDH was also tested and was found comparable for PGF2alpha and PGE2. These data suggest that 15-PGDH contributes to the tight regulation of PG action in the endometrium especially at the critical period of recognition of pregnancy. PMID:16514200

  20. Oestrous cycle of captive southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons) in South Australia, Australia.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, G R; Shimmin, G A; Taggart, D A; Skinner, J F; Gilmore, A; Paris, M C J

    2006-10-01

    There is limited information available on the oestrous cycle of female southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons). This is mainly due to an extremely poor breeding success in captivity and the difficulty in routine recapturing of these cryptic, semi-fossorial animals in the wild. The aim of this study was to characterise the oestrous cycle of this species by monitoring peripheral plasma concentrations of progesterone and oestradiol, assessing changes in vaginal cytology, pouch condition and the urogenital sinus. Eight adult female wombats were monitored during the breeding season (July-December) over 2 years (2002-2003). Samples were collected up to three times a week. Vaginal smears contained several cell types, categorised by morphology, as either superficial epithelial cells or parabasal-intermediate cells. Leucocytes were also counted. Plasma progesterone profiles showed a mean oestrous cycle length of 36.33+/-0.67 days with a peak progesterone concentration of 139.53+/-10.62nmol/L. Levels of oestradiol peaked at a mean level of 467.33+/-44.32pmol/L on average 5 days before a rise in plasma progesterone values. The proportion of epithelial cells in vaginal smears varied throughout the cycle, with a high percentage of superficial epithelial cells observed during the follicular phase. During periods when progesterone concentrations were high, a greater percentage of parabasal-intermediate cells was observed. In conclusion, this study has characterised the oestrous cycle of the southern hairy-nosed wombat and confirmed that changes in vaginal smears together with pouch and urogenital sinus details could be used to determine signs of oestrus in this species. PMID:16289971

  1. Studies of the oestrous cycle, oestrus and pregnancy in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; McGowan, M R; O'Callaghan, P; Cox, R; Nicolson, V

    2000-09-01

    As an integral part of the development of an artificial insemination programme in the captive koala, female reproductive physiology and behaviour were studied. The oestrous cycle in non-mated and mated koalas was characterized by means of behavioural oestrus, morphology of external genitalia and changes in the peripheral plasma concentrations of oestradiol and progestogen. The mean (+/- SEM) duration of the non-mated oestrous cycle and duration of oestrus in 12 koalas was 32.9 +/- 1.1 (n = 22) and 10.3 +/- 0.9 (n = 24) days, respectively. Although the commencement of oestrous behaviour was associated with increasing or high concentrations of oestradiol, there were no consistent changes in the morphology or appearance of the clitoris, pericloacal region, pouch or mammary teats that could be used to characterize the non-mated cycle. As progestogen concentrations remained at basal values throughout the interoestrous period, non-mated cycles were considered non-luteal and presumed anovulatory. After mating of the 12 koalas, six females gave birth with a mean (+/- SEM) gestation of 34.8 +/- 0.3 days, whereas the remaining six non-parturient females returned to oestrus 49.5 +/- 1. 0 days later. After mating, oestrous behaviour ceased and the progestogen profile showed a significant increase in both pregnant and non-parturient females, indicating that a luteal phase had been induced by the physical act of mating. Progestogen concentrations throughout the luteal phase of the pregnant females were significantly higher than those of non-parturient females. Parturition was associated with a decreasing concentration of progestogen, which was increased above that of basal concentrations until 7 days post partum. PMID:11006145

  2. Oestrous cycle of captive southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons) in South Australia, Australia.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, G R; Shimmin, G A; Taggart, D A; Skinner, J F; Gilmore, A; Paris, M C J

    2006-10-01

    There is limited information available on the oestrous cycle of female southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons). This is mainly due to an extremely poor breeding success in captivity and the difficulty in routine recapturing of these cryptic, semi-fossorial animals in the wild. The aim of this study was to characterise the oestrous cycle of this species by monitoring peripheral plasma concentrations of progesterone and oestradiol, assessing changes in vaginal cytology, pouch condition and the urogenital sinus. Eight adult female wombats were monitored during the breeding season (July-December) over 2 years (2002-2003). Samples were collected up to three times a week. Vaginal smears contained several cell types, categorised by morphology, as either superficial epithelial cells or parabasal-intermediate cells. Leucocytes were also counted. Plasma progesterone profiles showed a mean oestrous cycle length of 36.33+/-0.67 days with a peak progesterone concentration of 139.53+/-10.62nmol/L. Levels of oestradiol peaked at a mean level of 467.33+/-44.32pmol/L on average 5 days before a rise in plasma progesterone values. The proportion of epithelial cells in vaginal smears varied throughout the cycle, with a high percentage of superficial epithelial cells observed during the follicular phase. During periods when progesterone concentrations were high, a greater percentage of parabasal-intermediate cells was observed. In conclusion, this study has characterised the oestrous cycle of the southern hairy-nosed wombat and confirmed that changes in vaginal smears together with pouch and urogenital sinus details could be used to determine signs of oestrus in this species.

  3. Pubertas praecox and hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, J; Handa, H

    1985-01-01

    Precocious puberty of cerebral origin is classified into pseudoprecocious puberty and true precocious puberty. Pseudoprecocious puberty is caused by HCG secreting tumours. True precocious puberty is caused by various hypothalamic diseases. Among them, hypothalamic hamartoma is the most common cause. Precocious puberty is caused by elevated blood pituitary gonadotropin concentration, secondary to the elevated hypothalamic LHRH secretion. The hypothalamic hamartoma is not infrequently associated with laughing (gelastic) seizures as well as convulsions. Diagnosis of a hypothalamic hamartoma is easily made by CT. Although the hypothalamic hamartoma is difficult to operate on, the value of surgery is stressed for treatment of precocious puberty. This is also confirmed by recent reports. PMID:3897897

  4. Hypothalamic obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Bereket, A; Kiess, W; Lustig, R H; Muller, H L; Goldstone, A P; Weiss, R; Yavuz, Y; Hochberg, Z

    2012-09-01

    Hypothalamic obesity is an intractable form of obesity syndrome that was initially described in patients with hypothalamic tumours and surgical damage. However, this definition is now expanded to include obesity developing after a variety of insults, including intracranial infections, infiltrations, trauma, vascular problems and hydrocephalus, in addition to acquired or congenital functional defects in central energy homeostasis in children with the so-called common obesity. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying hypothalamic obesity are complex and multifactorial. Weight gain results from damage to the ventromedial hypothalamus, which leads, variously, to hyperphagia, a low-resting metabolic rate; autonomic imbalance; growth hormone-, gonadotropins and thyroid-stimulating hormone deficiency; hypomobility; and insomnia. Hypothalamic obesity did not receive enough attention, as evidenced by rarity of studies in this group of patients. A satellite symposium was held during the European Congress of Obesity in May 2011, in Istanbul, Turkey, to discuss recent developments and concepts regarding pathophysiology and management of hypothalamic obesity in children. An international group of leading researchers presented certain aspects of the problem. This paper summarizes the highlights of this symposium. Understanding the central role of the hypothalamus in the regulation of feeding and energy metabolism will help us gain insights into the pathogenesis and management of common obesity.

  5. Endocrinological profile and follicular development in cyclic ewes subjected to repeated ovum pick-up.

    PubMed

    Valasi, I; Theodosiadou, E; Fthenakis, G C; Papanikolaou, T; Deligiannis, C; Kalogiannis, D; Chadio, S; Amiridis, G S

    2013-05-01

    Blood concentrations of progesterone, FSH and oestradiol in Karagouniko ewes subjected to laparoscopic ovum pick-up (OPU) at specific stages of induced oestrous cycle, were measured. Twenty-four cyclic ewes were randomly allocated into four equal groups (A, B, C and D). Oestrus was synchronized with progestagen intravaginal sponges and detected by teaser rams (oestrus: day 0). In group A, during the induced oestrous cycle, OPU was performed on days 4, 9 and 14 (sessions A1, A2 and A3, respectively). In group B and group D, OPU was performed once, on day 9 and 14, respectively. In group C (controls), endoscopic observation of follicular population was performed three times, as in group A. Starting at sponge removal, progesterone was measured in blood samples collected on 22 daily occasions and oestradiol in samples collected on 27 occasions collected at various time-points starting 2h before to 24h after OPU. Follicular populations did not differ among A1, A2, A3 or between C1, C2, C3 and A1, A2, A3 or A1, B, D, respectively. Oocytes of better quality (category '1' or '2') were collected at A3 session compared with A1 (P<0.05). Progesterone concentration and oestrous cycle length did not differ among groups. Decreased oestradiol concentrations followed by FSH increase were recorded 3-5h after OPU. The results confirm the regulatory role of oestradiol on FSH secretion. The quality of collected oocytes was improved in subsequent pick-up sessions in the oestrous cycle. Moreover, OPU at specific stages of the luteal phase of the cycle, even when applied repeatedly, do not affect the normal oestrous cycle length of ewes.

  6. Hypothalamic-pituitary abscess

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    A case of hypothalamic-pituitary abscess is described, and previous case reports discussed. The clinical picture is one of hypopituitarism, a fluctuating clinical course with attacks of meningism, and a background of sphenoid sinusitis. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:1187501

  7. Oestrous cycle of the common wombat, Vombatus ursinus, in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    West, M; Galloway, D; Shaw, J; Trouson, A; Paris, M C J

    2004-01-01

    Wild-caught female common wombats from Victoria, Australia, were studied in captivity to investigate the oestrous cycle by assessing vaginal cytology and peripheral plasma progesterone concentrations. Eight wombats, five adults (21-29 kg) and three subadults (19-23 kg), which were held for between 2 weeks and 11 months did not cycle in captivity. Their progesterone concentrations were consistently low (< or = 6.9 nmol L(-1)) and vaginal smears contained predominantly superficial epithelial cells. Three wombats (21-27 kg), held in captivity for >1 year, regularly cycled (when bodyweights exceeded 23.5 kg). Information gathered from four consecutive cycles in each of these three wombats revealed a follicular phase with low progesterone concentrations (< or = 6.9 nmol L(-1)) and vaginal smears with a high percentage of superficial epithelial cells alternating with periods of high progesterone concentrations (range 41.6-123.8 nmol L(-1)) and smears in which parabasal-intermediate epithelial cells predominated. The average length of the monitored oestrous cycles was 47.2 days (35-60 days). The follicular phase lasted ~19 days and the luteal phase lasted ~28 days. In conclusion, wombats can cycle regularly in captivity even under conditions of intensive monitoring. PMID:15304207

  8. The uterine vascular system of the golden hamster and its changes during the oestrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Ogura, A; Nishida, T

    1988-06-01

    The vascular pattern of the hamster uterus and its changes during the oestrous cycle were studied by using the corrosion vascular casting method. The vascular system of the hamster uterus has two main division, the circumferential division and the medial arterial division. The former consists of circumferential and radial vessels and supplies the major part of the uterus. In this system the arteries and veins run parallel to each other throughout the uterus except for the inner circumferential plexus to which veins are predominantly distributed. The latter division has a delicate arterial system which supplies the mesometrial are of the endometrium. It forms a conglomerate structure along the mesometrial surface of the circular muscle layer. The arrangement of the vessels, especially those in the circumferential division, evidently changes during the oestrous cycle. From the evening of dioestrus II to the evening of pro-oestrus most of the circumferential and radial vessels are enormously dilated and subepithelial capillaries make an elaborate network without blind endings. These changes in the vascular structure are associated with those in the external and internal (or luminal) aspects of the uterus: the uterine horns are markedly swollen and the luminal surface becomes much more irregular due to the indentations in the endometrium. No new vascular formation is found in the uterus throughout the four days cycle.

  9. Progesterone, oestradiol-17 beta and LH during the oestrous cycle of muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus).

    PubMed

    Rowell, J E; Flood, P F

    1988-09-01

    Progesterone, oestradiol-17 beta and LH were measured in plasma from 6 non-pregnant, captive, female muskoxen during the 1984 and 1985 breeding seasons. Jugular blood samples were taken on an alternating 3/4-day schedule in 1984 and daily or at 4-h intervals over oestrus, via indwelling jugular cannulae, for 6 weeks in 1985. Oestrous cycle length was 19.6 +/- 0.96 (s.d.) days (n = 19) and did not vary between the first and subsequent cycles of the season. Progesterone was lowest at oestrus (less than or equal to 0.1 ng/ml), began to rise on Days 4-5, peaked on Days 10-12 (mean = 2.6 ng/ml) and returned to baseline 2-5 days before the next oestrus. A small rise in progesterone before the first cycle of the breeding season was observed on 7 of 12 occasions. Oestradiol-17 beta was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) 1-4 days before, or coincident with, oestrus. The average duration of the LH peak was 24.6 h (n = 7) and coincided with observations of behavioural oestrus. In one animal behavioural oestrus and an LH peak preceded a small progesterone rise at the beginning of the breeding season. The temporal relationship of these three hormones during the muskox oestrous cycle is very similar to that seen in domestic ruminants. PMID:3184036

  10. Oestrous cycle of the common wombat, Vombatus ursinus, in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    West, M; Galloway, D; Shaw, J; Trouson, A; Paris, M C J

    2004-01-01

    Wild-caught female common wombats from Victoria, Australia, were studied in captivity to investigate the oestrous cycle by assessing vaginal cytology and peripheral plasma progesterone concentrations. Eight wombats, five adults (21-29 kg) and three subadults (19-23 kg), which were held for between 2 weeks and 11 months did not cycle in captivity. Their progesterone concentrations were consistently low (< or = 6.9 nmol L(-1)) and vaginal smears contained predominantly superficial epithelial cells. Three wombats (21-27 kg), held in captivity for >1 year, regularly cycled (when bodyweights exceeded 23.5 kg). Information gathered from four consecutive cycles in each of these three wombats revealed a follicular phase with low progesterone concentrations (< or = 6.9 nmol L(-1)) and vaginal smears with a high percentage of superficial epithelial cells alternating with periods of high progesterone concentrations (range 41.6-123.8 nmol L(-1)) and smears in which parabasal-intermediate epithelial cells predominated. The average length of the monitored oestrous cycles was 47.2 days (35-60 days). The follicular phase lasted ~19 days and the luteal phase lasted ~28 days. In conclusion, wombats can cycle regularly in captivity even under conditions of intensive monitoring.

  11. Plasma progesterone levels during oestrous cycle and their relationship with the ovulation rate in Red Sokoto (Maradi) goats.

    PubMed

    Pathiraja, N; Oyedipe, E O; Gyang, E O; Obasi, A

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-five 2-3-year-old cycling does weighing 17-25 kg were obtained from semi-nomadic farmers and managed under controlled conditions while simulating the traditional management system. Oestrus was synchronized using progestogen impregnated vaginal pessaries. Blood samples were collected daily for progesterone assay from the day of pessary withdrawal up to one complete oestrous cycle. Oestrus was checked twice daily using vasectomized bucks. Ovulation rate was determined by direct observation of the ovaries following laparotomy on day 5-7 of the oestrous cycle. Following oestrus synchronization, mean ovulation rate was 1.68 +/- 0.13. Mean oestrous cycle length and duration of oestrus were 21.30 +/- 0.28 days and 21.37 +/- 0.24 hours respectively. Plasma progesterone concentrations ranged from non-detectable levels on the day of oestrus to 5.2 +/- 0.28 ng ml at mid-cycle. The duration of elevated progesterone level (greater than 2 ng/ml) was about 12 days. The peak progesterone values did not differ between animals with different ovulation rates. However, the plasma progesterone concentration during the early cycle (days 0-6) was significantly lower in the single ovulators compared with others. There were no major differences in plasma progesterone levels during the oestrous cycle of Red Sokoto does with different ovulation rates. PMID:2018918

  12. Hypothalamic hypogonadism in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ulloa-Aguirre, A; Larrea, F; Shkurovich, M

    1981-06-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis function was assessed in a postpubertal female patient with myotonic dystrophy and secondary amenorrhea. The results suggested a hypothalamic basis for the amenorrhea, confirming previous reports regarding the nature of gonadal failure in women with this multisystemic disorder.

  13. Oestrous synchronisation in cattle--current options following the EU regulations restricting use of oestrogenic compounds in food-producing animals: a review.

    PubMed

    Lane, E A; Austin, E J; Crowe, M A

    2008-12-01

    Oestrous synchronisation is an important strategy to improve reproductive management of cattle. The use of oestradiol-17beta, and its related ester derivatives, in food-producing cattle for the purposes of oestrous synchronisation is prohibited in the European Union since October 2006; a serious limitation in the implementation of large-scale use of cost effective synchronisation regimens in both dairy and beef herds. This has obvious consequences within the EU and also in other countries that have restricted the use of oestradiol following the EU ban. Oestrous synchronisation is an important facilitator for the use of artificial insemination, a necessary part of any national herd genetic improvement scheme. Presently, only 35% of the Irish dairy herd is bred by artificial insemination; and facilitation rather than restriction is required to increase this percentage. Ideally synchronisation of oestrus should increase submission rates, improve or at least not affect conception rates, and thus, increase overall pregnancy rate at the end of the breeding season. This should reduce the proportion of cows to be culled. This paper aims to review the oestrous synchrony options available in EU countries and other countries affected by the European ban on oestrogenic compounds being used for oestrous synchrony protocols. Currently, the options available for oestrous synchronisation are generally not as effective, efficient or cost effective as those that incorporated use of oestrogenic compounds.

  14. Oestrous synchronisation in cattle--current options following the EU regulations restricting use of oestrogenic compounds in food-producing animals: a review.

    PubMed

    Lane, E A; Austin, E J; Crowe, M A

    2008-12-01

    Oestrous synchronisation is an important strategy to improve reproductive management of cattle. The use of oestradiol-17beta, and its related ester derivatives, in food-producing cattle for the purposes of oestrous synchronisation is prohibited in the European Union since October 2006; a serious limitation in the implementation of large-scale use of cost effective synchronisation regimens in both dairy and beef herds. This has obvious consequences within the EU and also in other countries that have restricted the use of oestradiol following the EU ban. Oestrous synchronisation is an important facilitator for the use of artificial insemination, a necessary part of any national herd genetic improvement scheme. Presently, only 35% of the Irish dairy herd is bred by artificial insemination; and facilitation rather than restriction is required to increase this percentage. Ideally synchronisation of oestrus should increase submission rates, improve or at least not affect conception rates, and thus, increase overall pregnancy rate at the end of the breeding season. This should reduce the proportion of cows to be culled. This paper aims to review the oestrous synchrony options available in EU countries and other countries affected by the European ban on oestrogenic compounds being used for oestrous synchrony protocols. Currently, the options available for oestrous synchronisation are generally not as effective, efficient or cost effective as those that incorporated use of oestrogenic compounds. PMID:18786787

  15. Relationships between behavioral rhythms, plasma corticosterone and hypothalamic circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Kafka, M S; Benedito, M A; Steele, L K; Gibson, M J; Zerbe, R L; Jacobowitz, D M; Roth, R H; Zander, K

    1986-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in physiological processes and behaviors were compared with hypothalamic circadian rhythms in norepinephrine (NE) metabolites, adrenergic transmitter receptors, cAMP, cGMP and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) arginine vasopressin (AVP) in a single population of rats under D:D conditions. Eating, drinking and locomotor activity were high during the subjective night (the time when lights were out in L:D) and low during the subjective day (the time when lights were on in L:D). Plasma corticosterone concentration rose at subjective dusk and remained high until subjective dawn. Binding to hypothalamic alpha 1- and beta-adrenergic receptors also peaked during the subjective night. Cyclic cGMP concentration was elevated throughout the 24-hr period except for a trough at dusk, whereas DHPG concentration peaked at dawn. Arginine vasopressin levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus peaked in the middle of the day. No rhythm was found either in binding to the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor, or in MHPG or cAMP concentration. Behavioral and corticosterone rhythms, therefore, are parallel to rhythms in hypothalamic alpha 1- and beta-receptor binding and NE-release. Cyclic GMP falls only at dusk, suggesting the possibility that cGMP inhibits activity much of the day and that at dusk the inhibition of nocturnal activity is removed. SCN AVP, on the other hand, peaking at 1400 hr, may play a role in the pacemaking function of the SCN that drives these other rhythms.

  16. Cyclic Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dennis H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is a simple experiment that has become popular in chemical research because it can provide useful information about redox reactions in a form which is easily obtained and interpreted. Discusses principles of the method and illustrates its use in the study of four electrode reactions. (Author/JN)

  17. Effect of oestrous synchronization with estradiol 17beta and progesterone on follicular wave dynamics in dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Garcia, A; Salaheddine, M

    2001-12-01

    An experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of estradiol-17beta (E17beta) on follicular wave dynamics and ovulatory response in Holstein heifers receiving either a progestogen ear-implant (Crestar; Intervet International b.v. Boxmeer, The Netherlands) or an intravaginal progesterone-releasing device [controlled internal drug release-bovine device (Eazibreed, CIDR-B; Bodinco BV, Alkmaar, The Netherlands)]. For comparison, another group of heifers was also synchronized using Crestar plus an injection of estradiol valerate (EV) and norgestomet as recommended by the pharmaceutical company. Twenty 20-22-month-old cycling Holstein heifers were allocated to one of the following treatment groups at random stages of the oestrous cycle: (I) simultaneous insertion of Crestar and intramuscular injection of 3 mg norgestomet and 5 mg EV (Crestar 9 + EV 9); (II) simultaneous insertion of Crestar and intramuscular injection of 5 mg E17beta (Crestar 9 + E17beta 9); (III) insertion of Crestar followed 2 days later by intramuscular injection of 5 mg E17beta (Crestar 9 + E17beta 7); or (IV) insertion of CIDR-B device followed 2 days later by intramuscular injection of 5 mg E17beta (CIDR 9 + E17beta 7). The CIDR-B or Crestar implants were removed after 9 days and all heifers received 500 microg Cloprostenol (Estrumate, Pitman-Moore Nederland BV, Houten. The Netherlands). Ovarian ultrasonographic examinations were performed once daily during the synchronization period using a B-mode scanner equipped with a 7.5 MHz linear-array transrectal transducer. In addition, heifers were scanned every 12 h after implant/device withdrawal until 3 days after ovulation in order to monitor follicular activity, detect ovulation and subsequent early luteal formation. Detection of oestrus was performed every 6 h for 4 days after device/implant removal. Oestrus was observed 24-32 h before ovulation in all heifers. The mean hours interval from treatment withdrawal to ovulation was not significantly

  18. Pregnancy diagnosis in dairy goats using progesterone assay kits and oestrous observation.

    PubMed

    Engeland, I V; Ropstad, E; Andresen, O; Eik, L O

    1997-06-01

    Two qualitative on-farm milk progesterone test kits were used for early pregnancy diagnosis in goats. One kit was based on latex agglutination (LA) and the other on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The accuracy of early pregnancy diagnosis by these two methods was compared with the accuracy of oestrous observation (OeO) and the level of plasma progesterone measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Dairy goats (n = 73) from a single herd were used for collection of milk and blood samples 20 days after breeding. Ultrasound examination 50 days after mating found that 49 (67%) goats were pregnant, and 24 (33%) were not pregnant. Using ultrasound as a reference method, the accuracy of early pregnancy diagnosis by RIA and OeO was 92% and 86%, respectively, and for non-pregnancy 100% for both RIA and OeO. The accuracy of early pregnancy diagnosis by ELISA and LA was 82% and 79% and for non-pregnancy, 88% and 100%, respectively. The kappa-statistic for RIA, OeO, ELISA and LA was 0.93, 0.84, 0.77 and 0.73, respectively. It was concluded that LA and ELISA tests can be used for early pregnancy diagnosis in dairy goats. However, in the herd studied, early pregnancy diagnosis by OeO was as good as that achieved with progesterone determination using the kits. PMID:9329865

  19. Activin A and follistatin during the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy in ewes.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Anne R; McNatty, Kenneth P; Hurst, Peter R; Spencer, Thomas E; Bazer, Fuller W; Reader, Karen L; Johnstone, Peter D; Davis, George H; Juengel, Jennifer L

    2016-03-01

    The activin pathway has been postulated to be involved in regulation of multiple reproductive processes important for survival of the conceptus. These processes include luteinisation of the follicular cells and thus function of the corpus luteum, early embryo development and uterine function including implantation of the conceptus. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine whether the concentrations of activin A and follistatin (FST), an activin-binding protein, differed between ewes with a lifetime history of enhanced or reduced embryonic survival (ES). The mRNAs encoding FST and activin A (inhibin beta A subunit; INHBA) were present in the uterus and abundant in the uterine luminal or glandular epithelia by day 18 of gestation. A peak of activin A was observed in the systemic circulation around the time of oestrus, and activin A concentrations were elevated in animals with reduced ES during the oestrous cycle and early gestation. Concentrations of activin A in uterine fluid were approximately twofold greater on day 16 of gestation in ewes with reduced ES compared to those with enhanced ES. No consistent differences in FST were observed between these groups. Treatment of luteinising ovine granulosa cells with activin A in vitro suppressed progesterone secretion providing evidence of a potential pathway whereby increased concentrations of activin A may decrease ES. PMID:26733604

  20. Changes in milk oxidative stress biomarkers in lactating dairy cows with ovulatory and an-ovulatory oestrous cycles.

    PubMed

    Talukder, S; Kerrisk, K L; Gabai, G; Fukutomi, A; Celi, P

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate changes in milk profiles of oxidative stress (OS) biomarkers in dairy cows with ovulatory and an-ovulatory oestrous cycles. Thirty healthy, cycling Holstein cows averaging 60±17 days in milk, and producing 33±6kg of milk per day (the week before commencing the study) were enrolled in this study. Composite milk samples were collected thrice weekly and assayed for the following OS biomarkers: lipoperoxides (LPO), biological advanced potential, superoxide dismutase (SOD), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), ceruloplasmin, glutathione (GSH), β-carotene and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). Milk samples were also tested for fat and protein composition and the fat:protein ratio (FPR) was categorized as low (≤1.31), medium (1.32-1.56) and high (>1.57) to evaluate their main effect and the interaction effect of FPR and the week of study on OS using linear mixed models with cow identification being a random factor. Cows with ovulatory oestrous cycles (n=20) presented significantly greater SOD levels than cows that did not ovulate ((n=10; P<0.05). On the other hand, LPO, GSH-Px and GSH concentrations were lower in ovulated cows compared to the an-ovulated cows (P<0.05). The highest level of LPO and AOPP were noted at prooestrus phase while β-carotene presented the lowest value at that phase of oestrous cycle. It could be postulated that the elevated level of milk SOD and the observed lower level of LPO, GSH-Px and GSH in ovulating cows may be an essential event preceding the ovulatory response.

  1. Oestrous cycle-related changes in production of Toll-like receptors and prostaglandins in the canine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Silva, E; Henriques, S; Brito, S; Ferreira-Dias, G; Lopes-da-Costa, L; Mateus, L

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the following events in the canine endometrium over the course of the oestrous cycle: (i) the transcriptional profiles of genes encoding the Toll-like receptors (TLR1-TLR7 and TLR9); (ii) the transcription and protein expression levels of TLR2 and TLR4; (iii) the gene transcription profile of prostaglandin synthesis enzymes (PTGS2, PGES and PGFS); (iv) the response pattern of PGF(2α) and PGE(2) following exposure of endometrial explants to LPS and LTA. TLR1-TLR7 and TLR9 genes were transcribed in the endometrium of bitches throughout the oestrous cycle, which indicates that TLR-mediated immune surveillance is an important component of the defence mechanisms within the uterus. Canine endometrial mRNA and protein expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was up-regulated at the late dioestrus and anoestrus and was the lowest in the follicular phase and early dioestrus. The decreased mRNA and protein levels observed at early dioestrus may favour implantation, but may also be linked to the high prevalence of pyometra at this stage of the oestrous cycle. After LPS and LTA stimulation, endometrial explants produced more PGF(2α) than PGE(2), which may be related to the early demise of the corpus luteum observed in vivo in canine pyometra cases. Overall, these results indicate that TLRs are involved in the activation of the inflammatory response associated with pyometra in the bitch. TLRs may therefore be therapeutic targets for the control of uterine bacterial infections in the bitch and potentially in other species. PMID:22959486

  2. Comparison of oestrous intensity between natural oestrus and oestrus induced with ovsynch based treatments in Japanese black cows.

    PubMed

    Meng Chao, Lu; Sato, S; Yoshida, K; Kawano, Y; Kojima, T; Kubota, C

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the possible differences of oestrous intensity between natural oestrus and induced oestrus using the walking activity measuring device. Walking activity was used as an evaluation index of oestrous intensity. A total of 27 Japanese Black cows, more than 40 days after calving and clinically normal, were randomly assigned to three groups. Walking activity was recorded using a commercially available computerized pedometer system. The treatment groups consisted of an Ovsynch (n = 8) and a controlled internal drugs releasing device (CIDR) + Ovsynch (n = 9) group. The control group (n = 10) received no treatment. Walking activity was examined in all groups. Timed artificial insemination (timed AI) was performed at 16 hours after the onset of oestrus in the control group and at 24 h after second administration of GnRH in the treatment groups. Duration of oestrus had a tendency to be shorter in both the Ovsynch and the CIDR + Ovsynch groups when compared with the control group. The time required from the onset of oestrus to the time showing the highest number of steps of walking (the time to peak) showed a tendency to be shorter in CIDR + Ovsynch group. The number of steps of walking at peak and overall walking activities were significantly lower in both treatment groups than in the control group. Both activity and super-activity periods of time in the treatment groups were shorter than the control group. No difference was observed in the conception rate between the control (50.0%; 10/20), Ovsynch (50.0%; 4/8) and CIDR + Ovsynch groups (66.7%; 6/9). This study demonstrates that the oestrous intensity of cows in oestrus was different between natural oestrus and induced oestrus and also between the methods of the synchronization, but no difference was observed in the conception rate among the three groups.

  3. Oestrous sheep serum balances ROS levels to supply in vitro capacitation of ram spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Del Olmo, E; García-Álvarez, O; Maroto-Morales, A; Ramón, M; Iniesta-Cuerda, M; Martinez-Pastor, F; Montoro, V; Soler, A J; Garde, J J; Fernández-Santos, M R

    2016-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are fundamental for intracellular signalling. In spermatozoa, they are involved both to apoptosis and to capacitation, and changes in ROS levels can alter the balance between these two processes. Oestrous sheep serum (OSS) is considered an efficient agent for in vitro capacitation of ram spermatozoa. We have explored the effects of OSS on ram sperm physiology, especially on ROS production, during in vitro capacitation. Semen samples from 15 rams were cryopreserved. After thawing, samples were submitted to four treatments: control (CTL), 10% OSS supplementation for in vitro sperm capacitation, caspase inhibitor (INH, Z-VAD-FMK 100 μM) and OSS (10%) plus caspase inhibitor (I + E). Sperm samples were incubated for 30 min at 38.5°C and 5% CO2 and evaluated motility and kinetic parameters by computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) and viability (propidium iodide), apoptotic-like membrane changes (YO-PRO-1), acrosomal status (PNA-FITC), intracellular calcium (FLUO-3), membrane fluidity (M540) and ROS production (CM-H2 DCFDA) by flow cytometry. OSS induced changes in kinetic parameters compatible with capacitation, with a decrease in the percentage of progressive motility and linearity, and an increase in the amplitude of the lateral displacement of the sperm head (p < .05). Moreover, OSS increased the proportion of M540+ viable spermatozoa, YO-PRO-1+ and acrosome-reacted spermatozoa (p < .05). After incubation, OSS and I+E achieved lower ROS levels (p < .05). Ca(2+) levels did not change with the incubation, but were slightly higher (p < .05) when both OSS and the inhibitor were present. We suggest that OSS may modulate ROS levels, allowing intracellular signalling for capacitation to occur while preventing higher levels that could trigger apoptosis.

  4. Oestrous sheep serum balances ROS levels to supply in vitro capacitation of ram spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Del Olmo, E; García-Álvarez, O; Maroto-Morales, A; Ramón, M; Iniesta-Cuerda, M; Martinez-Pastor, F; Montoro, V; Soler, A J; Garde, J J; Fernández-Santos, M R

    2016-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are fundamental for intracellular signalling. In spermatozoa, they are involved both to apoptosis and to capacitation, and changes in ROS levels can alter the balance between these two processes. Oestrous sheep serum (OSS) is considered an efficient agent for in vitro capacitation of ram spermatozoa. We have explored the effects of OSS on ram sperm physiology, especially on ROS production, during in vitro capacitation. Semen samples from 15 rams were cryopreserved. After thawing, samples were submitted to four treatments: control (CTL), 10% OSS supplementation for in vitro sperm capacitation, caspase inhibitor (INH, Z-VAD-FMK 100 μM) and OSS (10%) plus caspase inhibitor (I + E). Sperm samples were incubated for 30 min at 38.5°C and 5% CO2 and evaluated motility and kinetic parameters by computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) and viability (propidium iodide), apoptotic-like membrane changes (YO-PRO-1), acrosomal status (PNA-FITC), intracellular calcium (FLUO-3), membrane fluidity (M540) and ROS production (CM-H2 DCFDA) by flow cytometry. OSS induced changes in kinetic parameters compatible with capacitation, with a decrease in the percentage of progressive motility and linearity, and an increase in the amplitude of the lateral displacement of the sperm head (p < .05). Moreover, OSS increased the proportion of M540+ viable spermatozoa, YO-PRO-1+ and acrosome-reacted spermatozoa (p < .05). After incubation, OSS and I+E achieved lower ROS levels (p < .05). Ca(2+) levels did not change with the incubation, but were slightly higher (p < .05) when both OSS and the inhibitor were present. We suggest that OSS may modulate ROS levels, allowing intracellular signalling for capacitation to occur while preventing higher levels that could trigger apoptosis. PMID:27491678

  5. Cyclic multiverses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marosek, Konrad; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Balcerzak, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Using the idea of regularization of singularities due to the variability of the fundamental constants in cosmology we study the cyclic universe models. We find two models of oscillating and non-singular mass density and pressure (`non-singular' bounce) regularized by varying gravitational constant G despite the scale factor evolution is oscillating and having sharp turning points (`singular' bounce). Both violating (big-bang) and non-violating (phantom) null energy condition models appear. Then, we extend this idea on to the multiverse containing cyclic individual universes with either growing or decreasing entropy though leaving the net entropy constant. In order to get an insight into the key idea, we consider the doubleverse with the same geometrical evolution of the two `parallel' universes with their physical evolution [physical coupling constants c(t) and G(t)] being different. An interesting point is that there is a possibility to exchange the universes at the point of maximum expansion - the fact which was already noticed in quantum cosmology. Similar scenario is also possible within the framework of Brans-Dicke theory where varying G(t) is replaced by the dynamical Brans-Dicke field φ(t) though these theories are slightly different.

  6. Effects of the resin and smoke condensate of Cannabis sativa on the oestrous cycle of the rat.

    PubMed

    Lares, A; Ochoa, Y; Bolaños, A; Aponte, N; Montenegro, M

    1981-01-01

    This study is concerned with variations in the oestrous cycle of the Sprague-Dawley rat following the intraperitoneal administration of maize oil solutions of Cannabis sativa resin and smoke condensate in doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg. Oestrus was shortened with doses of both the resin and the smoke condensate, whereas dioestrus was lengthened with the 20 mg/kg smoke condensate. ALso observed was a lengthening of postoestrus following the administration of 20 mg/kg of either the resin or the smoke condensate.

  7. Endometrial oxytocin receptor and uterine prostaglandin secretion in mares during the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, G R; Stout, T A; Lamming, G E; Allen, W R; Flint, A P

    1998-07-01

    Circulating concentrations of 13,14-dihydro-15-ketoprostaglandin F2 alpha (PGFM) were measured before and after administration of oxytocin and after endometrial biopsy, with or without uterine flushing performed per vaginam, on days 10, 14 and 18 after ovulation in nine pregnant and nine cyclic mares. Concentrations of oxytocin receptor were measured in endometrial biopsy samples. Neither pregnancy status nor time after ovulation affected basal PGFM concentrations. PGFM concentrations were increased after oxytocin administration on each of the days studied in cyclic mares; on day 14 the mean response was 4.5 times higher than the mean response on days 10 and 18. In contrast, during pregnancy, responses to oxytocin administration occurred only on days 10 and 18. Marked increases in PGFM concentrations in response to endometrial biopsy occurred only on day 14 in cyclic mares and on day 18 in pregnant mares. Mean concentrations of oxytocin receptor were between 200 and 300 fmol mg-1 protein on day 10 in both pregnant and cyclic mares; in cyclic mares oxytocin receptor concentrations were increased approximately threefold on day 14 compared with days 10 and 18, but no such increase was evident during pregnancy. Total amounts of PGFM secreted after oxytocin treatment correlated with endometrial oxytocin receptor concentrations in cyclic (P < 0.001) but not in pregnant (P > 0.5) mares, and the same was true for PGFM release induced by endometrial biopsy (cyclic: P = 0.0025; pregnant: P > 0.5). The data support the hypothesis that endometrial concentrations of oxytocin receptor determine uterine prostaglandin F2 alpha secretion in cyclic mares and that endometrial oxytocin receptor concentrations are reduced in early pregnancy by a product of the conceptus. The increase in response of the pregnant uterus to oxytocin treatment or biopsy-flushing between days 14 and 18 was not due to an increase in the concentration of oxytocin receptors but presumably reflected increased

  8. Hypothalamic involvement in chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Peres, M; del Rio, M S.; Seabra, M; Tufik, S; Abucham, J; Cipolla-Neto, J; Silberstein, S; Zukerman, E

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Chronic migraine (CM), previously called transformed migraine, is a frequent headache disorder that affects 2%-3% of the general population. Analgesic overuse, insomnia, depression, and anxiety are disorders that are often comorbid with CM. Hypothalamic dysfunction has been implicated in its pathogenesis, but it has never been studied in patients with CM. The aim was to analyze hypothalamic involvement in CM by measurement of melatonin, prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol nocturnal secretion.
METHODS—A total of 338 blood samples (13/patient) from 17 patients with CM and nine age and sex matched healthy volunteers were taken. Melatonin, prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol concentrations were determined every hour for 12 hours. The presence of comorbid disorders was also evaluated.
RESULTS—An abnormal pattern of hypothalamic hormonal secretion was found in CM. This included: (1) a decreased nocturnal prolactin peak, (2) increased cortisol concentrations, (3) a delayed nocturnal melatonin peak in patients with CM, and (4) lower melatonin concentrations in patients with CM with insomnia. Growth hormone secretion did not differ from controls.
CONCLUSION—These results support hypothalamic involvement in CM, shown by a chronobiologic dysregulation, and a possible hyperdopaminergic state in patients with CM. Insomnia might be an important variable in the study findings.

 PMID:11723194

  9. Hypothalamic PKA regulates leptin sensitivity and adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linghai; McKnight, G. Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Mice lacking the RIIβ regulatory subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) display reduced adiposity and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Here we show that RIIβ knockout (KO) mice have enhanced sensitivity to leptin's effects on both feeding and energy metabolism. After administration of a low dose of leptin, the duration of hypothalamic JAK/STAT3 signalling is increased, resulting in enhanced POMC mRNA induction. Consistent with the extended JAK/STAT3 activation, we find that the negative feedback regulator of leptin receptor signalling, Socs3, is inhibited in the hypothalamus of RIIβ KO mice. During fasting, RIIβ–PKA is activated and this correlates with an increase in CREB phosphorylation. The increase in CREB phosphorylation is absent in the fasted RIIβ KO hypothalamus. Selective inhibition of PKA activity in AgRP neurons partially recapitulates the leanness and resistance to diet-induced obesity of RIIβ KO mice. Our findings suggest that RIIβ–PKA modulates the duration of leptin receptor signalling and therefore the magnitude of the catabolic response to leptin. PMID:26381935

  10. Reproductive functional anatomy and oestrous cycle pattern of the female brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus, Gray 1842) from Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mayor, P; López-Béjar, M; Jori, F; Fenech, M; López-Gatius, F

    2003-07-15

    In the present study, we examined certain features of the functional anatomy of the female genital tract of the wild brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus) to obtain data on the reproductive biology of this African forest rodent. Two consecutive experiments were performed. The aim of the first was to establish macroscopic and microscopic features of the genital organs, and to explore correlations between predominant ovarian structures and vaginal contents in 20 wild, mature females. In the second experiment, we inspected the external genitalia and vaginal smears of a further 10 females in captivity on a daily basis for 90 days. The uterus of the brush-tailed porcupine is bicornuate and composed of two separated uterine horns, a uterine body and cervix. The genital tract does not present a vaginal vestibule. Thus, there is no portion common to genital and urinary tracts. Females in the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle showed increased cornification of the vaginal epithelium and a high density of eosinophilic cells in vaginal smears. The vulva and vaginal opening were open, reddish and tumefacted. In luteal phase or in pregnancy, epithelial cornification and eosinophilic features were notably reduced and the vagina presented a pale, non-tumefacted vulva and a vaginal closure membrane. Females in captivity showed spontaneous cycles, a polyoestrous reproduction pattern and, based on features of the external genitalia and vaginal smears, their oestrous cycle length was 27.1+/-6.4 days (n=12).

  11. Investigations on the endometrial response to intrauterine administration of N-acetylcysteine in oestrous mares.

    PubMed

    Melkus, E; Witte, T; Walter, I; Heuwieser, W; Aurich, C

    2013-08-01

    In mares, mating-induced persistent endometritis contributes to low fertility. The condition is in part related to delayed clearance of mucus accumulated within the uterine lumen. The objective of this study was to investigate the endometrial response of healthy mares to intrauterine (i.u.) treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Oestrous mares (n = 12) were randomly assigned to a treatment (TM) or control (C) group and received an i.u. infusion of 5% NAC and saline (total volume 140 ml), respectively. Endometrial biopsies were collected in five of the mares 24 h after treatment, in the remaining seven mares 72 h after treatment. Endometrial biopsies were evaluated for integrity of the luminal epithelium, number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), staining for cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), staining with Kiel 67 antigen (Ki-67), lectins and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS). The integrity of endometrial epithelial cells was not affected by treatment (no statistical differences between groups or times). At 24 h after treatment, the mean number of PMN in endometrial biopsies from NAC- and C-mares did not differ, but at 72 h after treatment, number of PMN was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in C (3.9 ± 0.6 PMN/field) compared with NAC-treated mares (2.3 ± 0.2 PMN/field). At 72 h after treatment, the intensity of staining for COX2 was significantly higher after saline than after NAC treatment (p < 0.05). In the epithelium, no differences in staining for the proliferation marker Ki-67 were seen with respect to time and treatment. Score for the lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was slightly higher in NAC-treated mares than in C-mares 72 h after treatment (p < 0.05). Score for PAS staining of mucus in deep uterine glands differed significantly between groups at 24 h after treatment (p < 0.05). The present study demonstrates that NAC does not adversely affect the endometrial function. Moreover, an anti-inflammatory effect on the equine endometrium was

  12. Investigations on the endometrial response to intrauterine administration of N-acetylcysteine in oestrous mares.

    PubMed

    Melkus, E; Witte, T; Walter, I; Heuwieser, W; Aurich, C

    2013-08-01

    In mares, mating-induced persistent endometritis contributes to low fertility. The condition is in part related to delayed clearance of mucus accumulated within the uterine lumen. The objective of this study was to investigate the endometrial response of healthy mares to intrauterine (i.u.) treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Oestrous mares (n = 12) were randomly assigned to a treatment (TM) or control (C) group and received an i.u. infusion of 5% NAC and saline (total volume 140 ml), respectively. Endometrial biopsies were collected in five of the mares 24 h after treatment, in the remaining seven mares 72 h after treatment. Endometrial biopsies were evaluated for integrity of the luminal epithelium, number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), staining for cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), staining with Kiel 67 antigen (Ki-67), lectins and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS). The integrity of endometrial epithelial cells was not affected by treatment (no statistical differences between groups or times). At 24 h after treatment, the mean number of PMN in endometrial biopsies from NAC- and C-mares did not differ, but at 72 h after treatment, number of PMN was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in C (3.9 ± 0.6 PMN/field) compared with NAC-treated mares (2.3 ± 0.2 PMN/field). At 72 h after treatment, the intensity of staining for COX2 was significantly higher after saline than after NAC treatment (p < 0.05). In the epithelium, no differences in staining for the proliferation marker Ki-67 were seen with respect to time and treatment. Score for the lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was slightly higher in NAC-treated mares than in C-mares 72 h after treatment (p < 0.05). Score for PAS staining of mucus in deep uterine glands differed significantly between groups at 24 h after treatment (p < 0.05). The present study demonstrates that NAC does not adversely affect the endometrial function. Moreover, an anti-inflammatory effect on the equine endometrium was

  13. Hypothalamic neurohormones and immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Quintanar, J. Luis; Guzmán-Soto, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed. PMID:23964208

  14. Sugar expression in the mucosae of the canine uterus and vagina during the oestrous cycle and with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Y; Takeuchi, T; Shimokawa, T; Asano, A; Nabeta, M; Ohta, Y

    2013-04-01

    The pathogenesis of canine pyometra is still unclear, but bacterial infection of the endometrium, mediated by bacterial lectins, is suspected to induce pyometra. The aim of this study was to investigate sugar expression in the mucosae of the uterus and vagina of healthy dogs with normal oestrous cycles and in dogs with pyometra, using a panel of lectins to investigate the pathogenesis of pyometra. In dogs with pyometra, the uterine and vaginal mucosae were positive for lectins that selectively bind to glucose or mannose, especially during days 7-10 and 30-40 of dioestrus. These results suggest that temporal changes in sugar expression in the uterus and vagina present an opportunity for pathogens to infect the endometrium, causing pyometra. PMID:22990121

  15. Oestrous synchronization, ovarian superovulation and intraspecific transfers from a closed breeding colony of inbred SLA miniature pigs.

    PubMed

    Arlaud, J J; Baker, L; Williams, R L; French, A J

    2010-12-01

    The inbred SLA miniature pig is a unique animal model developed for organ transplantation studies and pre-clinical experimental purposes. Reported oestrous synchronization and superovulation treatments were examined in two SLA haplotypes (AA and DD) to allow collection of embryos for both practical embryo transfer and experimental technologies from a closed breeding colony. Pre-puberal miniature pigs were poor responders to oestrous synchronization treatments, while post-puberal sows were equivalent to commercial sows. Following superovulation, the ovulation number (corpora .hemorrhagica) was higher (p < 0.05) in the cycling sows when compared with non-cycling sows. Ovulations were equivalent to commercial pre-puberal gilts and non-cycling sows (p > 0.05). No difference in ovulation number between haplotypes was observed, which differs from the previous report (DD>AA). Collection of zygotes for pronuclear injection was the highest in the non-cycling post-puberal miniature pig group (p < 0.05), although significantly lower when compared with the commercial pig treatment groups (p < 0.05). The incidence of cystic endometrial hyperplasia in our colony was equivalent to rates observed in commercial pigs. Pronuclear visualization following centrifugation was the highest in the non-cycling miniature sow group and approximates to about 25% of ovulations and about half the rate observed in the commercial pigs (50%). Miniature pig embryos transferred between SLA haplotypes and transfer of DD embryos to commercial pigs resulted in live births at a higher efficiency than previously reported. This study demonstrates the feasibility of undertaking assisted reproductive technologies in a closed breeding colony of inbred SLA miniature pigs without compromise to the breeding programmes.

  16. Differential expression of the P2X7 receptor in ovarian surface epithelium during the oestrous cycle in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Cuevas, F G; Cruz-Rico, A; Garay, E; García-Carrancá, A; Pérez-Montiel, D; Juárez, B; Arellano, R O

    2013-01-01

    Purinergic signalling has been proposed as an intraovarian regulatory mechanism. Of the receptors responsible for purinergic transmission, the P2X7 receptor is an ATP-gated cationic channel that displays a broad spectrum of cellular functions ranging from apoptosis to cell proliferation and tumourigenesis. In the present study, we investigated the functional expression of P2X7 receptors in ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). P2X7 protein was detected in the OSE layer of the mouse, both in situ and in primary cultures. In cultures, 2'(3')-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl)adenosine-5'-triphosphate (BzATP) activation of P2X7 receptors increased [Ca(2+)]i and induced apoptosis. The functionality of the P2X7 receptor was investigated in situ by intrabursal injection of BzATP on each day of the oestrous cycle and evaluation of apoptosis 24h using the terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-fluorescein nick end-labelling (TUNEL) assay. Maximum effects of BzATP were observed during pro-oestrus, with the effects being blocked by A438079, a specific P2X7 receptor antagonist. Immunofluorescence staining for P2X7 protein revealed more robust expression during pro-oestrus and in OSE regions behind the antral follicles, strongly supporting the notion that the differences in apoptosis can be explained by increased receptor expression, which is regulated during the oestrous cycle. Finally, P2X7 receptor expression was detected in the OSE layer of human ovaries, with receptor expression maintained in human ovaries diagnosed with cancer, as well as in the human ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cell line.

  17. Circadian clock mutation disrupts estrous cyclicity and maintenance of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brooke H; Olson, Susan Losee; Turek, Fred W; Levine, Jon E; Horton, Teresa H; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2004-08-10

    Classic experiments have shown that ovulation and estrous cyclicity are under circadian control and that surgical ablation of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) results in estrous acyclicity in rats. Here, we characterized reproductive function in the circadian Clock mutant mouse and found that the circadian Clock mutation both disrupts estrous cyclicity and interferes with the maintenance of pregnancy. Clock mutant females have extended, irregular estrous cycles, lack a coordinated luteinizing hormone (LH) surge on the day of proestrus, exhibit increased fetal reabsorption during pregnancy, and have a high rate of full-term pregnancy failure. Clock mutants also show an unexpected decline in progesterone levels at midpregnancy and a shortened duration of pseudopregnancy, suggesting that maternal prolactin release may be abnormal. In a second set of experiments, we interrogated the function of each level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in order to determine how the Clock mutation disrupts estrous cyclicity. We report that Clock mutants fail to show an LH surge following estradiol priming in spite of the fact that hypothalamic levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), pituitary release of LH, and serum levels of estradiol and progesterone are all normal in Clock/Clock females. These data suggest that Clock mutants lack an appropriate circadian daily-timing signal required to coordinate hypothalamic hormone secretion. Defining the mechanisms by which the Clock mutation disrupts reproductive function offers a model for understanding how circadian genes affect complex physiological systems.

  18. Role of hypothalamic neurogenesis in feeding regulation.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; de Almeida, Luís Pereira; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2014-02-01

    The recently described generation of new neurons in the adult hypothalamus, the center for energy regulation, suggests that hypothalamic neurogenesis is a crucial part of the mechanisms that regulate food intake. Accordingly, neurogenesis in both the adult and embryonic hypothalamus is affected by nutritional cues and metabolic disorders such as obesity, with consequent effects on energy-balance. This review critically discusses recent findings on the contribution of adult hypothalamic neurogenesis to feeding regulation, the impact of energy-balance disorders on adult hypothalamic neurogenesis, and the influence of embryonic hypothalamic neurogenesis upon feeding regulation in the adult. Understanding how hypothalamic neurogenesis contributes to food intake control will change the paradigm on how we perceive energy-balance regulation.

  19. In vitro release of ovarian progesterone is decreased during the oestrous cycle and pregnancy of swine with obesity/leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Astiz, S; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A; Perez-Solana, M L; Sanchez-Sanchez, R; Torres-Rovira, L

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies indicate that reproductive prolificacy of obese swine breeds is markedly influenced by embryo losses in early pregnancy. In such period, adequate secretion of progesterone (P4) by the ovary is essential for pregnancy success. This study analyses the luteal functionality during the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy of Iberian sows and Large White x Landrace females, in terms of P4 secretion after in vitro culture of luteal tissue stimulated or not with luteinizing hormone (LH). The secretion of progesterone (expressed in ng/mg of luteal tissue or ng/mgLT) of the corpora lutea of obese Iberian swine was always hampered when compared to lean genotypes, either during early oestrous cycle (110.7 ± 37.8 vs 259.7 ± 10.2 ng/mgLT; p < 0.0001), late oestrous cycle (49.0 ± 3.5 vs 75.92 ± 7.14 ng/mgLT; p < 0.0001) or early pregnancy (38.4 ± 2.1 vs 70.7 ± 5.3 ng/mgLT; p < 0.0001). The differences in basal P4 secretion remained after stimulation with LH. Finally, P4 secretion during early pregnancy of Iberian sows decreased with age and, hence, with obesity features (46.6 ± 4.2 vs 65.5 ± 4.8 ng/mgLT; p < 0.001). In conclusion, the results of the present study provide convincing evidence of a reduced luteal function during oestrous cycle and early pregnancy of sows with obesity/leptin resistance like Iberian sows, which may contribute to the low reproductive efficiency reported in this breed.

  20. Oestrous behaviour and development of preovulatory follicles in goats induced to ovulate using the male effect with and without progesterone priming.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bulnes, A; Carrizosa, J A; Urrutia, B; Lopez-Sebastian, A

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to examine follicular dynamics in goats induced to ovulate by using the male effect with or without progesterone pretreatment. Ten Murcian-Granadina goats were treated with a single dose of 25 mg of progesterone in olive oil on the day of male effect induction (Day 0), whereas ten does remained untreated. Changes in the ovarian follicular population and onset of oestrous behaviour were checked daily from Day 0 to the day on which ovulation was detected by ultrasonography. All of the treated goats and only 20% of control goats (P < 0.001) showed oestrous behaviour between 72 and 96 h after the introduction of bucks. Differences in follicle growth were found between the groups. The control goats exhibiting oestrous behaviour during the first 4 days of ovarian screening and all of the goats treated with progesterone had their preovulatory follicles in growing phase. However, the largest follicles in control does not showing oestrus in these first 4 days were in regressing phase, being necessary for the emergence of new preovulatory follicles from a new follicular wave between Days 6 and 7, for exhibition of oestrous behaviour and subsequent ovulation. In conclusion, the appearance of short luteal phases and delayed ovulation in goats treated with the male effect during seasonal anoestrous depends on the stage of follicle development at the time of buck introduction. A single injection of progesterone stimulates the emergence of a new follicular wave, able to grow and give adequate ovulation after induction of the male effect. PMID:17032582

  1. The corpora lutea proangiogenic state of VEGF system components is turned to antiangiogenic at the later phase of the oestrous cycle in cows.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, A; Macías-Valencia, R; Fierro-Fierro, F; Gutiérrez, C G; Rosales-Torres, A M

    2015-02-01

    Blood vessel expansion and reduction in the corpus luteum (CL) is regulated by the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) system and linked to the maintenance of the CL. The VEGF system has both angiogenic and antiangiogenic ligands and receptors. Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between the mRNA expression of angiogenic and antiangiogenic members of the VEGF system in the CL, throughout the luteal phase of the oestrous cycle in cows. The CL of 18 cows were collected by transvaginal surgery on days 4, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 of the oestrous cycle and the mRNA expression of VEGF system components was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. The mRNA expression of VEGF ligands and receptors increased (P<0.05) from the early- and mid-luteal phase (days 4 to 12) reaching its maximum expression on day 15 of the cycle. We found no expression of VEGF164b throughout the cycle. Expression of sVEGFR1 did not change during the oestrous cycle and exceeded that of the VEGFR1 by 100 times. Nonetheless, as VEGFR1 increased, the relationship between the soluble and membrane receptor decreased (P<0.01). In contrast, the expression of VEGFR2 was higher than that of its soluble isoform for all days studied, however, the ratio between the membrane-bound and its soluble counterpart decreased continuously throughout the cycle (P<0.01). Our results show that the expression levels for VEGF ligands, receptors and their antagonistic counterparts are adjusted during CL development and regression, to upregulate angiogenesis early in the oestrous cycle and restrict it at the time of luteolysis. PMID:25229247

  2. Mammary uptake and metabolism of progesterone in goats and its effect on milk progesterone concentrations during the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, R J; Heap, R B; Goode, J; Peaker, M; Walters, D E

    1983-08-01

    Following the observation that the concentration of progesterone in goats' milk differs appreciably according to the specificity of the antiserum used in a non-extraction (direct) radioimmunoassay, experiments were carried out to find an explanation for these results. Milk and plasma samples were collected during the oestrous cycle and during an equivalent period of pregnancy after a fertile mating. Samples were analyzed by a direct radioimmunoassay using two antisera, 18/3 which is highly specific for progesterone and 465/6 which is less specific, and by radioimmunoassay of fractions isolated by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Values obtained for milk and plasma samples collected during the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy were similar, except that values for milk samples measured with antiserum 465/6 were higher in pregnancy compared to those obtained during the oestrous cycle. Values obtained for milk and plasma with antiserum 465/6 were significantly higher than those obtained with 18/3 (P less than 0.001). After TLC this difference was found to be due principally to the presence of compound(s) with chromatographic properties identical to 5-pregnanedione(s). A comparison of the concentration measured in arterial and mammary venous plasma and in milk showed that about 25% of progesterone (5.7 nmol/min) was extracted by the mammary gland, and that substantial amounts of immunoreactive metabolites of progesterone are secreted into milk with only small quantities being transferred into mammary vein plasma. PMID:6875433

  3. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis in men and women with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Holley, Jean L

    2004-10-01

    Although the precise abnormalities that lead to failure of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in men and women with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains undefined, evidence exists for defects in both the hypothalamus and the pituitary. The lack of appropriate cyclic release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) by the hypothalamus leads to loss of normal pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) release by the pituitary, which results in impaired ovulation in women and reduced testosterone and sperm production in men. The cause of impaired cyclic release of GnRH is unclear, but hyperprolactinemia, elevated endorphins, and high levels of GnRH and LH caused by reduced clearance may contribute. Perturbations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadaotropin axis in CKD lead to high rates of infertility, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, and impaired puberty in children. Only through additional study of the complex effects of CKD on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis will the precise abnormalities in hormonal control of reproduction be explained.

  4. Regulation of the hypothalamic--pituitary--ovarian axis in women.

    PubMed

    Yen, S S

    1977-09-01

    To account for the regulation of cyclic gonadotrophin release, the separate and interactive effects of the hormonal variable at the levels of CNS-hypothalamus, the pituitary and the ovary have been reviewed. The pituitary gonadotrophs, as target cells exhibited a remarkable cyclic change in their capacity which was correlated with the oestradiol levels. The ultimate release is determined by the relative size of the two pools' releasable gonadotrophins which are themselves regulated by the relative inputs of LH-RH and oestradiol, respectively. LH-RH appears to serve as a primary influence on the gonadotroph, stimulating gonadotrophin synthesis, storage and release. Oestradiol, for the most part, amplifies the action of LH-RH and induces the development of a self-priming effect of LH-RH, except that it impedes LH-RH-mediated gonadotrophin release. The pituitary capacity increases several-fold from the early to late follicular phase, and this is considered to be the prerequisite for the development of a mid-cycle surge. CNS-hypothalamic dopamine, norepinephrine, prostaglandins as well as LH-RH systems are involved in the negative and positive feedback effect of oestradiol. The possible steps and interactive elements in the triggering of LH-RH release for the initiation of the mid-cycle LH/FSH surge are considered.

  5. Neuropeptide Y stimulates autophagy in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Aveleira, Célia A; Botelho, Mariana; Carmo-Silva, Sara; Pascoal, Jorge F; Ferreira-Marques, Marisa; Nóbrega, Clévio; Cortes, Luísa; Valero, Jorge; Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; Álvaro, Ana R; Santana, Magda; Kügler, Sebastian; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2015-03-31

    Aging is characterized by autophagy impairment that contributes to age-related disease aggravation. Moreover, it was described that the hypothalamus is a critical brain area for whole-body aging development and has impact on lifespan. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the major neuropeptides present in the hypothalamus, and it has been shown that, in aged animals, the hypothalamic NPY levels decrease. Because caloric restriction (CR) delays aging, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy, and also increases hypothalamic NPY levels, we hypothesized that NPY could have a relevant role on autophagy modulation in the hypothalamus. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of NPY on autophagy in the hypothalamus. Using both hypothalamic neuronal in vitro models and mice overexpressing NPY in the hypothalamus, we observed that NPY stimulates autophagy in the hypothalamus. Mechanistically, in rodent hypothalamic neurons, NPY increases autophagy through the activation of NPY Y1 and Y5 receptors, and this effect is tightly associated with the concerted activation of PI3K, MEK/ERK, and PKA signaling pathways. Modulation of hypothalamic NPY levels may be considered a potential strategy to produce protective effects against hypothalamic impairments associated with age and to delay aging. PMID:25775546

  6. A case of idiopathic hypothalamic hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Sawa, H; Inden, M; Kosaka, Y; Takezawa, H

    1981-07-01

    The availability of thyrotropin hormone (TRH) has made it possible to determine whether tropic hormone deficiency is caused by pituitary or hypothalamic dysfunction. A case of hypothalamic hypothyroidism was described ina a 17 year old woman. This patient was admitted for the evaluation of hypothyroidism and secondary amenorrhea. Her T3 and T4 were decreased, with an undetectable level of base line thyrotropin. the TRH test revealed normal but delayed response of TSH. Her base line prolactin and its response to TRH were normal. Adenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, growth hormone (GH), and urinary 17-hydroxysteroids were also normal. ACTH response to metyrapone was normal. Evaluation of the pituitary-gonadal axis revealed a normal increase in both lutenizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) following the intravenous administration of lutenizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH). These results suggest that she had hypothalamic hypothyroidism as an isolated disturbance in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. A deficiency of TRH is probably caused by a disorder of hypothalamic function of unknown etiology since the extensive studies did not reveal any secondary causes. It is recommended that patients with amenorrhea and hypothyroidism be evaluated for possible hypothalamic hypothyroidism.

  7. Effect of a prostaglandin F2α analogue on the cyclic corpus luteum during its refractory period in cows

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to examine the response of the cyclic corpus luteum of cows to the administration of a prostaglandin F2α analogue (PGF) during the transition of refractoriness to responsiveness by investigating ultrasonographic changes in the corpus luteum and changes in plasma progesterone concentration in cows following the administration of PGF 3 and 5 days after ovulation. Results All cows that responded to PGF given on day 5 ovulated on day 9. In the cows that did not respond on day 5, the luteal cross-sectional area stagnated after treatment, whereas the plasma progesterone concentration continued to increase. In the cows that received PGF on day 3 of the oestrous cycle, the luteal cross-sectional area and the plasma progesterone concentration continued to increase. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that the transition of the bovine corpus luteum from refractoriness to responsiveness to PGF occurs during day 5 of the oestrous cycle because in 5 of 8 cows given PGF on day 5, early luteal regression was evident during the examination 24 hours after PGF administration. PMID:23151276

  8. Hypothalamic control of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Stefanidis, A; Wiedmann, N M; Adler, E S; Oldfield, B J

    2014-10-01

    A detailed appreciation of the control of adipose tissue whether it be white, brown or brite/beige has never been more important to the development of a framework on which to build therapeutic strategies to combat obesity. This is because 1) the rate of fatty acid release into the circulation from lipolysis in white adipose tissue (WAT) is integrally important to the development of obesity, 2) brown adipose tissue (BAT) has now moved back to center stage with the realization that it is present in adult humans and, in its activated form, is inversely proportional to levels of obesity and 3) the identification and characterization of "brown-like" or brite/beige fat is likely to be one of the most exciting developments in adipose tissue biology in the last decade. Central to all of these developments is the role of the CNS in the control of different fat cell functions and central to CNS control is the integrative capacity of the hypothalamus. In this chapter we will attempt to detail key issues relevant to the structure and function of hypothalamic and downstream control of WAT and BAT and highlight the importance of developing an understanding of the neural input to brite/beige fat cells as a precursor to its recruitment as therapeutic target.

  9. Supplementation of Slow-Release Melatonin Improves Recovery of Ovarian Cyclicity and Conception in Summer Anoestrous Buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Mehrotra, S; Singh, G; Maurya, V P; Narayanan, K; Mahla, A S; Chaudhari, R K; Singh, M; Soni, Y K; Kumawat, B L; Dabas, S K; Srivastava, N

    2016-02-01

    The role of melatonin as a protective neurohormone against restoring cyclicity in summer anoestrous animals in photoperiod species has gained wider acceptance. This study was designed to uncover the evidence the slow-release melatonin (MLT) has on initiation of ovarian cyclicity and conception rate (CR) in summer anoestrous buffaloes. Thus, buffaloes diagnosed as summer anoestrous (absence of overt signs of oestrus, concurrent rectal examination and radioimmunoassay for serum progesterone at 10 days interval) were grouped as untreated (Group I, sterilized corn oil, n = 8) and treated (Group II, single subcutaneous injection of MLT @18 mg/50 kg bwt in sterilized corn oil, n = 20). Animals treated and detected in oestrus were artificially inseminated (AI) followed by division into Group III (second dose of MLT on 5th day post-AI, n = 8) and Group IV (no melatonin administration, n = 10). Blood samples were collected at 4 days interval for estimation of serum MLT, progesterone and oestrogen using radioimmunoassay kit. Mean oestrous induction rate (OIR), oestrous induction interval (OII), interoestrous interval (IOI) and CR were estimated. Compared to control, concentration of melatonin was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in treated group ranging from 14.34 ± 1.72 to 412.31 ± 14.47 pg/ml whereas other two hormones did not show any concentration difference. Melatonin-administered buffaloes showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher (90%) OIR with OII of 18.06 ± 1.57 days. Results showed improvement in conception rate in buffaloes administered with post-insemination melatonin. It can be concluded from the study that slow-release melatonin supplementation restored cyclicity in summer anoestrous animals resulting in improvement in conception rate in buffaloes.

  10. Cyclic phosphonium ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Mukhlall, Joshua A; Romeo, Alicia R; Gohdo, Masao; Ramati, Sharon; Berman, Marc; Suarez, Sophia N

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ionic liquids (ILs) incorporating cyclic phosphonium cations are a novel category of materials. We report here on the synthesis and characterization of four new cyclic phosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ILs with aliphatic and aromatic pendant groups. In addition to the syntheses of these novel materials, we report on a comparison of their properties with their ammonium congeners. These exemplars are slightly less conductive and have slightly smaller self-diffusion coefficients than their cyclic ammonium congeners. PMID:24605146

  11. Expression of adiponectin and adiponectin receptors 1 (AdipoR1) and 2 (AdipoR2) in the porcine uterus during the oestrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Smolinska, Nina; Dobrzyn, Kamil; Maleszka, Anna; Kiezun, Marta; Szeszko, Karol; Kaminski, Tadeusz

    2014-04-01

    Adiponectin is a hormone secreted primarily by white adipose tissue. Recent studies have shown that adiponectin and its receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) are expressed in different reproductive tissues, including the ovary and uterus. This newly discovered endocrine system plays an important role in the regulation of reproductive processes. The expression of the adiponectin system in the porcine uterus during the oestrous cycle has not been researched to date. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence and changes in adiponectin system expression in the porcine uterus on days 2-3, 10-12, 14-16, and 17-19 of the oestrous cycle. The expression of the adiponectin gene was highest on days 14-16 and 2-3 in the endometrium and myometrium, respectively. In the endometrium, the content of AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 mRNAs was highest on days 10-12, whereas significantly higher expression levels of both genes were noted in the myometrium on days 17-19. The highest content of adiponectin and AdipoR1 protein in the endometrium was reported on days 2-3. In the myometrium, the expression levels of both receptor proteins were significantly higher on days 17-19. Adiponectin system proteins were localized in endometrial epithelial glandular cells, luminal epithelial cells and stromal cells as well as in longitudinal and circular muscles of the myometrium. This study demonstrated the presence of adiponectin, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 genes and proteins in the porcine uterus and the effect of the stage of the oestrous cycle on the expression of the adiponectin system. Our results suggest that locally synthesized adiponectin directly affects uterine functions.

  12. Are Math Grades Cyclical?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gerald J.; Dial, Micah

    1998-01-01

    The cyclical nature of mathematics grades was studied for a cohort of elementary school students from a large metropolitan school district in Texas over six years (average cohort size of 8495). The study used an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model. Results indicate that grades do exhibit a significant cyclical pattern. (SLD)

  13. Affordable Cyclic Voltammetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Greg; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Amend, John R.; Collins, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is an important component of the undergraduate chemical curriculum. Unfortunately, undergraduate students rarely have the opportunity to conduct experiments in cyclic voltammetry owing to the high cost of potentiostats, which are required to control these experiments. By using MicroLab data acquisition interfaces in conjunction…

  14. Hypothalamic and pituitary dysfunction in obese males.

    PubMed

    Amatruda, J M; Hochstein, M; Hsu, T H; Lockwood, D H

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated dysfunction of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis in obesity. We have studied 12 obese males to further characterize the extent of this dysfunction. The hypothalamic-hypophyseal-gonadal axis is normal as determined by the testicular response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), the pituitary response to 200 micrograms gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), and the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular response to clomiphene. Although L-dopa suppresses prolactin normally, the ability of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) to stimulate the release of prolactin and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is blunted. These latter responses are inversely related to the degree of obesity. The response to chlorpromazine, a hypothalamic stimulus for prolactin secretion, is also blunted, and to a greater extent than the prolactin response to TRH. These data indicate that exogenous obesity in males is associated with more extensive hypothalamic and pituitary dysfunction than previously realized. The abnormalities with regard to prolactin and TSH release become progressively worse when body weight exceeds 200 percent of ideal. In addition, when evaluating pituitary function with regard to gonadotropin release, obese males may have an abnormal response to 100 micrograms GnRH but respond normally to 200 micrograms.

  15. Hypothalamic dysfunction following whole-brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mechanick, J.I.; Hochberg, F.H.; LaRocque, A.

    1986-10-01

    The authors describe 15 cases with evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction 2 to 9 years following megavoltage whole-brain x-irradiation for primary glial neoplasm. The patients received 4000 to 5000 rads in 180- to 200-rad fractions. Dysfunction occurred in the absence of computerized tomography-delineated radiation necrosis or hypothalamic invasion by tumor, and antedated the onset of dementia. Fourteen patients displayed symptoms reflecting disturbances of personality, libido, thirst, appetite, or sleep. Hyperprolactinemia (with prolactin levels up to 70 ng/ml) was present in all of the nine patients so tested. Of seven patients tested with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, one demonstrated an abnormal pituitary gland response consistent with a hypothalamic disorder. Seven patients developed cognitive abnormalities. Computerized tomography scans performed a median of 4 years after tumor diagnosis revealed no hypothalamic tumor or diminished density of the hypothalamus. Cortical atrophy was present in 50% of cases and third ventricular dilatation in 58%. Hypothalamic dysfunction, heralded by endocrine, behavioral, and cognitive impairment, represents a common, subtle form of radiation damage.

  16. Bardoxolone methyl prevents obesity and hypothalamic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Camer, Danielle; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wang, Hongqin; Dinh, Chi H L; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-08-25

    High-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity is associated with hypothalamic leptin resistance and low grade chronic inflammation, which largely impairs the neuroregulation of negative energy balance. Neuroregulation of negative energy balance is largely controlled by the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus via leptin signal transduction. Recently, a derivative of oleanolic acid, bardoxolone methyl (BM), has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. We tested the hypothesis that BM would prevent HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation in mice fed a HF diet. Oral administration of BM via drinking water (10 mg/kg daily) for 21 weeks significantly prevented an increase in body weight, energy intake, hyperleptinemia, and peripheral fat accumulation in mice fed a HF diet. Furthermore, BM treatment prevented HF diet-induced decreases in the anorexigenic effects of peripheral leptin administration. In the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced impairments of the downstream protein kinase b (Akt) pathway of hypothalamic leptin signalling. BM treatment also prevented an increase in inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in these two hypothalamic regions. These results identify a potential novel neuropharmacological application for BM in preventing HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation. PMID:27417254

  17. Forty years of control of the oestrous cycle in ruminants: progress made, unresolved problems and the potential impact of sperm encapsulation technology.

    PubMed

    Jöchle, W

    1993-01-01

    Pharmacological control of the oestrous cycle may, with or without sperm encapsulation, remain an indispensable part of any attempt to make artificial insemination available to the ranch-cattle industry. Of the current methods, those most likely to remain acceptable with regulatory agencies and to gain acceptance with industry are those involving the short-term use (7-10 days) of minimal effective doses of progestins (preferably progesterone) and the subsequent use of an analogue of prostaglandin F2 alpha. The use of microencapsulated sperm with a long lifespan would allow artificial insemination to be achieved without reference to the time when heat and ovulation may occur. PMID:9627721

  18. Neuroanatomy and physiology of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis: clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Midge

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the anatomy of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the somatotrophic axis, and neurohypophysis.

  19. Transcriptional profiling of fetal hypothalamic TRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During murine hypothalamic development, different neuroendocrine cell phenotypes are generated in overlapping periods; this suggests that cell-type specific developmental programs operate to achieve complete maturation. A balance between programs that include cell proliferation, cell cycle withdrawal as well as epigenetic regulation of gene expression characterizes neurogenesis. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) is a peptide that regulates energy homeostasis and autonomic responses. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying TRH neuron development, we performed a genome wide study of its transcriptome during fetal hypothalamic development. Results In primary cultures, TRH cells constitute 2% of the total fetal hypothalamic cell population. To purify these cells, we took advantage of the fact that the segment spanning -774 to +84 bp of the Trh gene regulatory region confers specific expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the TRH cells. Transfected TRH cells were purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting, various cell preparations pooled, and their transcriptome compared to that of GFP- hypothalamic cells. TRH cells undergoing the terminal phase of differentiation, expressed genes implicated in protein biosynthesis, intracellular signaling and transcriptional control. Among the transcription-associated transcripts, we identified the transcription factors Klf4, Klf10 and Atf3, which were previously uncharacterized within the hypothalamus. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports identifying transcripts with a potentially important role during the development of a specific hypothalamic neuronal phenotype. This genome-scale study forms a rational foundation for identifying genes that might participate in the development and function of hypothalamic TRH neurons. PMID:21569245

  20. Genetics Home Reference: cyclic neutropenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cyclic neutropenia cyclic neutropenia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Cyclic neutropenia is a disorder that causes frequent infections and ...

  1. Hypothalamic-pituitary function in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mahler, C; Parizel, G

    1982-01-01

    Function of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis was investigated in seven patients with myotonic dystrophy (MD). HGH and ACTH secretion were normal. TSH response to TRH was impaired in about half the cases, without concomitant thyroid dysfunction. LH and FSH levels were often elevated, with inconsistent response to LH-RH stimulation, Gonadotrophin disturbances in MD have previously been attributed to a primary gonadal lesion, characteristically seen in this disease. High prolactin levels in six of our seven patients however suggest that gonadal failure may be also be due to hyperprolactinemia through the direct anti-gonadal effect of prolactin and its interference with hypothalamic-pituitary regulation of gonadotrophin secretion.

  2. Developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems.

    PubMed

    Ralevski, Alexandra; Horvath, Tamas L

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that the perinatal environment may alter the developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems in a manner that predisposes offspring to the development of metabolic syndrome. Although it is unclear how these effects might be mediated, it has been shown that changes in neuroendocrine programing during critical periods of development, either via maternal metabolic programming or other factors, can alter a fetus's metabolic fate. This review summarizes the hypothalamic circuits that mediate energy homeostasis and discusses the various factors that may influence the development and functioning of these neural systems, as well as the possible cognitive impairments that may arise as a result of these metabolic influences.

  3. Expression and localization of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors in the corpus luteum during oestrous cycle in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V S; Panda, R P; Yadav, V P; Babitha, V; Khan, F A; Das, G K; Gupta, M; Dangi, S S; Singh, G; Bag, S; Sharma, G T; Berisha, B; Schams, D; Sarkar, M

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to document the expression and localization of VEGF system comprising of VEGF isoforms (VEGF 120, VEGF 164 and VEGF 188) and their receptors (VEGFR1 and VEGFR2) in buffalo corpus luteum (CL) obtained from different stages of the oestrous cycle. Real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry were applied to investigate mRNA expression, protein expression and localization of examined factors. In general, all the components of VEGF system (the VEGF isoforms and their receptors) were found in the water buffalo CL during the oestrous cycle. The mRNA as well as protein expression of VEGF system was highest during the early and mid-luteal phase, which later steadily decreased (p < 0.05) after day 10 to reach the lowest level in regressed CL. As demonstrated by immunohistochemistry, VEGF protein was localized predominantly in luteal cells; however, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 were localized in luteal cells as well as in endothelial cells. In conclusion, the dynamics of expression and localization of VEGF system in buffalo corpora lutea during the luteal phase were demonstrated in this study, indicating the possible role of VEGF system in the regulation of luteal angiogenesis and proliferation of luteal as well as endothelial cells through their non-angiogenic function.

  4. Cyclic control stick

    DOEpatents

    Whitaker, Charles N.; Zimmermann, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclic control stick of the type used in helicopters for reducing the safety hazards associated with such a mechanism in the event of a crewman being thrown violently into contact with the cyclic control stick resulting from a crash or the like. The cyclic control stick is configured to break away upon the exertion of an impact force which exceeds a predetermined value and/or is exerted for more than a momentary time duration. The cyclic control stick is also configured to be adjustable so as to locate the grip thereof as far away from the crewman as possible for safety reasons without comprising the comfort of the crewman or the use of the control stick, and a crushable pad is provided on the top of the grip for impact energy absorbing purposes.

  5. Cyclic steps on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokawa, M.; Izumi, N.; Naito, K.; Parker, G.; Yamada, T.; Greve, R.

    2016-05-01

    Boundary waves often form at the interface between ice and fluid flowing adjacent to it, such as ripples under river ice covers, and steps on the bed of supraglacial meltwater channels. They may also be formed by wind, such as the megadunes on the Antarctic ice sheet. Spiral troughs on the polar ice caps of Mars have been interpreted to be cyclic steps formed by katabatic wind blowing over ice. Cyclic steps are relatives of upstream-migrating antidunes. Cyclic step formation on ice is not only a mechanical but also a thermodynamic process. There have been very few studies on the formation of either cyclic steps or upstream-migrating antidunes on ice. In this study, we performed flume experiments to reproduce cyclic steps on ice by flowing water, and found that trains of steps form when the Froude number is larger than unity. The features of those steps allow them to be identified as ice-bed analogs of cyclic steps in alluvial and bedrock rivers. We performed a linear stability analysis and obtained a physical explanation of the formation of upstream-migrating antidunes, i.e., precursors of cyclic steps. We compared the results of experiments with the predictions of the analysis and found the observed steps fall in the range where the analysis predicts interfacial instability. We also found that short antidune-like undulations formed as a precursor to the appearance of well-defined steps. This fact suggests that such antidune-like undulations correspond to the instability predicted by the analysis and are precursors of cyclic steps.

  6. Hyperprolactinemia from radiation-induced hypothalamic hypopituitarism

    SciTech Connect

    Corkill, G.; Hanson, F.W.; Gold, E.M.; White, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    In 1975 Samaan et al., described the effects of radiation damage of the hypothalamus in 15 patients with head and neck cancer. Shalet et al., in 1977 described endocrine morbidity in adults who as children had been irradiated for brain tumors. This report describes instances of hyperprolactinemia and associated hypothalamic, pituitary, and thyroid dysfunction following irradiation of a young adult female for brain neoplasia.

  7. Flatfish metamorphosis: a hypothalamic independent process?

    PubMed

    Campinho, Marco A; Silva, Nadia; Roman-Padilla, Javier; Ponce, Marian; Manchado, Manuel; Power, Deborah M

    2015-03-15

    Anuran and flatfish metamorphosis are tightly regulated by thyroid hormones that are the necessary and sufficient factors that drive this developmental event. In the present study whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) and quantitative PCR in sole are used to explore the central regulation of flatfish metamorphosis. Central regulation of the thyroid in vertebrates is mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Teleosts diverge from other vertebrates as hypothalamic regulation in the HPT axis is proposed to be through hypothalamic inhibition although the regulatory factor remains enigmatic. The dynamics of the HPT axis during sole metamorphosis revealed integration between the activity of the thyrotrophes in the pituitary and the thyroid follicles. No evidence was found supporting a role for thyroid releasing hormone (trh) or corticotrophin releasing hormone (crh) in hypothalamic control of TH production during sole metamorphosis. Intriguingly the results of the present study suggest that neither hypothalamic trh nor crh expression changes during sole metamorphosis and raises questions about the role of these factors and the hypothalamus in regulation of thyrotrophs.

  8. Role of developmental factors in hypothalamic function

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Jakob; Tahor, Maayan; Wircer, Einav; Levkowitz, Gil

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a brain region which regulates homeostasis by mediating endocrine, autonomic and behavioral functions. It is comprised of several nuclei containing distinct neuronal populations producing neuropeptides and neurotransmitters that regulate fundamental body functions including temperature and metabolic rate, thirst and hunger, sexual behavior and reproduction, circadian rhythm, and emotional responses. The identity, number and connectivity of these neuronal populations are established during the organism’s development and are of crucial importance for normal hypothalamic function. Studies have suggested that developmental abnormalities in specific hypothalamic circuits can lead to obesity, sleep disorders, anxiety, depression and autism. At the molecular level, the development of the hypothalamus is regulated by transcription factors (TF), secreted growth factors, neuropeptides and their receptors. Recent studies in zebrafish and mouse have demonstrated that some of these molecules maintain their expression in the adult brain and subsequently play a role in the physiological functions that are regulated by hypothalamic neurons. Here, we summarize the involvement of some of the key developmental factors in hypothalamic development and function by focusing on the mouse and zebrafish genetic model organisms. PMID:25954163

  9. Cyclic polymers from alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christopher D.; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A.; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Veige, Adam S.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer.

  10. Cyclic polymers from alkynes.

    PubMed

    Roland, Christopher D; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A; Wagener, Kenneth B; Veige, Adam S

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer. PMID:27442285

  11. Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Mediates Acupunctural Effects on Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis During Ethanol Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zheng Lin; Kim, Sang Chan; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hong Feng; Lee, Bong Hyo; Jang, Eun Young; Lee, Chul Won; Cho, Il Je; An, Won G; Yang, Chae Ha; Kim, Young Woo; Zhao, Rong Jie; Wu, Yi Yan

    2016-02-01

    A previous study demonstrated that acupuncture at ST36 (Zu-San-Li) attenuates ethanol withdrawal (EW)-induced hyperactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in rats. The current study investigated the involvement of hypothalamic norepinephrine (NE) in that process. Rats were intraperitoneally treated with 3 g/kg/d of ethanol or saline for 28 days. After 24 hours of EW, acupuncture was applied to rats at bilateral ST36 points or at nonacupoints (tail) for 1 minute. A high-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that EW significantly increased both the NE and the 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol (MHPG) levels in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Western blot analysis also revealed that EW markedly elevated the phosphorylation rates of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), but spared TH protein expression in the PVN. However, acupuncture at ST36, but not at nonacupoints, greatly inhibited the increase in the hypothalamic NE, MHPG, and phosphorylation rates of TH. Additionally, postacupuncture infusion of NE into the PVN significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of acupuncture at ST36 on the oversecretion of plasma corticosterone during EW. These results suggest that acupuncture at ST36 inhibits EW-induced hyperactivation of the hypothalamic NEergic system to produce therapeutic effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  12. Neurotensin release by rat hypothalamic fragments in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maeda, K; Frohman, L A

    1981-04-01

    The release of neurotensin by hypothalami from male rats was investigated in vitro using tissue fragments incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate-glucose buffer at 37 degrees C. Neurotensin was measured by radioimmunoassay using an antibody directed toward the C-terminal portion of the peptide. Neurotensin-like immunoreactivity released into the incubation medium eluted from Sephadex G-25 in a position identical to that of the synthetic peptide and serial dilutions of incubation medium were parallel to those of synthetic neurotensin in the radioimmunoassay. Neurotensin-like immunoreactivity released into the incubation medium was degraded during the incubation period by released hypothalamic peptidases. The addition of bacitracin (0.5 mg/ml) to the medium partially prevented this degradation. Neurotensin release was stimulated by dibutyryl cyclic AMP (10(-4) M) and by depolarizing concentrations of potassium. The latter effect was shown to be Ca2+-dependent. Dopamine (10(-4)--10(-6) M) stimulated neurotensin release in a dose-dependent manner and this effect was blocked by the dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol. Neurotensin release was not stimulated by either norepinephrine (10(-4) M) or serotonin (10(-4) M). The results indicate that neurotensin is released by the hypothalamus in vitro; its release is stimulated by membrane depolarization in a Ca2+-dependent manner and may involve an adenylate cyclase mechanism; and dopamine appears to serve as a stimulatory neurotransmitter for neurotensin-containing neurons.

  13. Faecal progesterone metabolites and behavioural observations for the non-invasive assessment of oestrous cycles in the common wombat (Vombatus ursinus) and the southern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus latifrons).

    PubMed

    Paris, M C J; White, A; Reiss, A; West, M; Schwarzenberger, F

    2002-08-15

    Wombats belong to Australia's unique marsupial species. Two of the three remaining species, the common wombat (Vombatus ursinus) and the southern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus latifrons) are abundant. The third species, the northern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus krefftii) has only about 115 individuals left in the wild. This study aimed to gain further insight into the basic reproductive biology of wombat species and evaluate the value of faecal progesterone metabolites and behavioural patterns as a means for non-invasive monitoring of the oestrous cycle in common and the southern hairy-nosed wombats. In an initial study, three different faecal steroid assays showed that 20alpha-OH-pregnanes were the main progesterone metabolites. These metabolites were examined in captive female common wombats (n = 5) and southern hairy-nosed wombats (n = 2). In one female common wombat 11.7 days with a follicular phase of 25.6 +/- 6.3 days and a luteal phase of 28.2 +/- 12.7 days. The data for faecal pregnanes obtained in the southern and in one male common wombat oestrous related behavioural data were obtained. Individual cycling females exhibited a significant relationship between plasma progesterone and faecal pregnanes. In the common wombat, the values for faecal pregnanes showed an oestrous cycle length of 55.1 +/- hairy-nosed wombat during the breeding season gave an oestrous cycle length of 41.1 +/- 12.8 days with a follicular phase of 27.9 +/- 12.3 days and a short luteal phase of 13.3 +/- 1.1 days. The behavioural data show that the faecal sniffing behaviour of the male, tended to increase around the time that oestrous was found. In conclusion, monitoring of 20alpha-OH-pregnanes in wombat faeces could be a useful methodology to monitor reproductive cycles in the wombat, and can possibly be applied to monitor the endangered northern hairy-nosed wombat. PMID:12137986

  14. Faecal progesterone metabolites and behavioural observations for the non-invasive assessment of oestrous cycles in the common wombat (Vombatus ursinus) and the southern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus latifrons).

    PubMed

    Paris, M C J; White, A; Reiss, A; West, M; Schwarzenberger, F

    2002-08-15

    Wombats belong to Australia's unique marsupial species. Two of the three remaining species, the common wombat (Vombatus ursinus) and the southern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus latifrons) are abundant. The third species, the northern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus krefftii) has only about 115 individuals left in the wild. This study aimed to gain further insight into the basic reproductive biology of wombat species and evaluate the value of faecal progesterone metabolites and behavioural patterns as a means for non-invasive monitoring of the oestrous cycle in common and the southern hairy-nosed wombats. In an initial study, three different faecal steroid assays showed that 20alpha-OH-pregnanes were the main progesterone metabolites. These metabolites were examined in captive female common wombats (n = 5) and southern hairy-nosed wombats (n = 2). In one female common wombat 11.7 days with a follicular phase of 25.6 +/- 6.3 days and a luteal phase of 28.2 +/- 12.7 days. The data for faecal pregnanes obtained in the southern and in one male common wombat oestrous related behavioural data were obtained. Individual cycling females exhibited a significant relationship between plasma progesterone and faecal pregnanes. In the common wombat, the values for faecal pregnanes showed an oestrous cycle length of 55.1 +/- hairy-nosed wombat during the breeding season gave an oestrous cycle length of 41.1 +/- 12.8 days with a follicular phase of 27.9 +/- 12.3 days and a short luteal phase of 13.3 +/- 1.1 days. The behavioural data show that the faecal sniffing behaviour of the male, tended to increase around the time that oestrous was found. In conclusion, monitoring of 20alpha-OH-pregnanes in wombat faeces could be a useful methodology to monitor reproductive cycles in the wombat, and can possibly be applied to monitor the endangered northern hairy-nosed wombat.

  15. The localization of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in the endometrium and the cervix of dogs at different stages of the oestrous cycle and with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Chotimanukul, S; Sirivaidyapong, S

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to localize and evaluate the role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in the endometrium and cervix of bitches at different stages of the oestrous cycle and in bitches with pyometra. Sixty-seven nulliparous dogs, ranging in age from 1 to 13 years, were allocated amongst five groups (pro-oestrus; n = 7, oestrus; n = 10, dioestrus; n = 16, anoestrus; n = 11, pyometra; n = 23). Blood samples were collected for the measurement of progesterone concentration. The mean progesterone concentration was analysed as a parameter for validating the stage of the oestrous cycle in bitches. Tissues collected from uterine horn and cervix were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde for immunohistochemical examination of TLR2. The expression of TLR2 was assessed semi-quantitatively. No pathological changes were found in the uterine samples of healthy dogs. In bitches with pyometra, the glandular epithelium expressed TLR2 more intensely than the surface epithelium. The expression of TLR2 in the glandular epithelium was also significantly higher in healthy dogs at oestrus, dioestrus and dogs with pyometra compared with anoestrous dogs (p < 0.01). The expression of TLR2 in the stroma was not observed in the group of healthy dogs at all stages. The surface epithelium of cervix in dogs with pyometra expressed TLR2 significantly more intensely than did the stoma, whereas the expression of TLR2 during oestrus and dioestrus was absent in the stroma of cervix. This study provides the first report of immunohistochemical localization of TLR2 in the canine reproductive tract. In the present study, TLR2 was expressed in endometrial epithelium but was absent in the endometrial stroma of healthy dogs at all oestrous cycle stages. These findings suggest differential expression of TLR in endometrial cells. On the other hand, the lack of TLR2 in the stroma of healthy uteri of dogs may predispose to infection from the invading pathogens once the epithelial cells have been destroyed by the

  16. Random cyclic matrices.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sudhir R; Srivastava, Shashi C L

    2008-09-01

    We present a Gaussian ensemble of random cyclic matrices on the real field and study their spectral fluctuations. These cyclic matrices are shown to be pseudosymmetric with respect to generalized parity. We calculate the joint probability distribution function of eigenvalues and the spacing distributions analytically and numerically. For small spacings, the level spacing distribution exhibits either a Gaussian or a linear form. Furthermore, for the general case of two arbitrary complex eigenvalues, leaving out the spacings among real eigenvalues, and, among complex conjugate pairs, we find that the spacing distribution agrees completely with the Wigner distribution for a Poisson process on a plane. The cyclic matrices occur in a wide variety of physical situations, including disordered linear atomic chains and the Ising model in two dimensions. These exact results are also relevant to two-dimensional statistical mechanics and nu -parametrized quantum chromodynamics. PMID:18851127

  17. Flow in cyclic cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, William H.; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, we use a known duality between expanding and contracting cosmologies to construct a dual of the inflationary flow hierarchy applicable to contracting cosmologies such as ekpyrotic and cyclic models. We show that the inflationary flow equations are invariant under the duality and therefore apply equally well to inflation or to cyclic cosmology. We construct a self-consistent small-parameter approximation dual to the slow-roll approximation in inflation, and calculate the power spectrum of perturbations in this limit. We also recover the matter-dominated contracting solution of Wands, and the recently proposed adiabatic ekpyrosis solution.

  18. Cyclic membrane separation process

    DOEpatents

    Nemser, Stuart M.

    2005-05-03

    A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In the first part of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the second part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. In one aspect of this invention, a vacuum is drawn in the membrane separation unit thus reducing overall VOC emissions.

  19. Realistic Cyclic Magnetic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, L. G.

    2012-09-01

    This work presents a complete cyclic cosmological scenario based on nonlinear magnetic field. It is constructed from a model composed of five fluids, namely baryonic matter, dark matter, radiation, neutrinos and a cosmological magnetic field. The first four fluids are treated in the standard way and the fifth fluid, the magnetic field, is described by a nonlinear electrodynamics. The free parameters are fitted by observational data (SNIa, CMB, extragalactic magnetic fields, etc.) and by simple theoretical considerations. As a result arises a cyclic cosmological model that preserves the main successes of the standard Big Bang model and solves some other problems such as the initial singularity, the present acceleration and the Big Rip.

  20. Hypothalamic and pituitary function in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Paulson, D F; Wiebe, H R; Hammond, C B

    1975-09-01

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism has been identified as a cause of partial or complete failure of puberty, may be familial and may have other associated abnormalities of hyposmia, intellectual retardation, perceptive deafness, color blindness, skeletal deformities, and gynecomastia. Pituitary function is usually normal with the primary defect believed to be hypothalamic. A twenty-year-old white male with a clinical diagnosis of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia under-went complete endocrine evaluation with evaluation of the pituitary response to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) and LH (luteinizing hormone) release after luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone did occur, but the response was less than that seen in normal controls. Evaluation demonstrated that the pituitary-gonadal axis was intact with the hypothalamic-pituitary axis being defective. Therapy with the synthetic decapeptide (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone) is correct theoretically and may be superior to therapy with exogenous gonadotropins.

  1. Developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems.

    PubMed

    Ralevski, Alexandra; Horvath, Tamas L

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that the perinatal environment may alter the developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems in a manner that predisposes offspring to the development of metabolic syndrome. Although it is unclear how these effects might be mediated, it has been shown that changes in neuroendocrine programing during critical periods of development, either via maternal metabolic programming or other factors, can alter a fetus's metabolic fate. This review summarizes the hypothalamic circuits that mediate energy homeostasis and discusses the various factors that may influence the development and functioning of these neural systems, as well as the possible cognitive impairments that may arise as a result of these metabolic influences. PMID:26391503

  2. Semiquantitative analysis of hypothalamic damage on MRI predicts risk for hypothalamic obesity

    PubMed Central

    Eslamy, Hedieh; Werny, David; Elfers, Clinton; Shaffer, Michele L.; Pihoker, Catherine; Ojemann, Jeffrey; Dobyns, William B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Excessive weight gain frequently occurs in patients with hypothalamic tumors and lesions leading to hypothalamic obesity (HO). Methods Digital brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical outcomes were studied retrospectively in a single center, including 45 children with postoperative lesions in the sellar region (41 craniopharyngiomas, 4 with Rathke's cleft cysts), ∼5 years post‐surgery, mean age 13.9 years. Four standard sections covering hypothalamic areas critical to energy homeostasis were used to assess lesions and calculate a hypothalamic lesion score (HLS); the association with HO was examined. Results Compared to subjects who did not develop HO (n = 23), subjects with HO (n = 22) showed more frequently lesions affecting the third ventricular floor, mammillary bodies, and anterior, medial (all P < 0.05), and most importantly posterior hypothalamus (P < 0.01). The HLS correlated significantly with BMI z‐score changes 12 and 30 months post‐surgery, even after adjusting for potential confounders of gender, age at surgery, surgery date, surgery BMI z‐score, hydrocephalus, and residual hypothalamic tumor (r = 0.34, P = 0.03; r = 0.40, P = 0.02, respectively). Diabetes insipidus was found to be an endocrine marker for HO risk. Conclusions The extent of damage following surgery in the sellar region can be assessed by MRI using a novel scoring system for early HO risk assessment. PMID:25884561

  3. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways. PMID:26786898

  4. Hypothalamic NUCKS regulates peripheral glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Beiying; Shi, Xiaohe; Zhou, Qiling; Chen, Hui Shan; Lim, Joy; Han, Weiping; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate (NUCKS) is highly expressed in the brain and peripheral metabolic organs, and regulates transcription of a number of genes involved in insulin signalling. Whole-body depletion of NUCKS (NKO) in mice leads to obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. However, a tissue-specific contribution of NUCKS to the observed phenotypes remains unknown. Considering the pivotal roles of insulin signalling in the brain, especially in the hypothalamus, we examined the functions of hypothalamic NUCKS in the regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism. Insulin signalling in the hypothalamus was impaired in the NKO mice when insulin was delivered through intracerebroventricular injection. To validate the hypothalamic specificity, we crossed transgenic mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the Nkx2.1 promoter with floxed NUCKS mice to generate mice with hypothalamus-specific deletion of NUCKS (HNKO). We fed the HNKO and littermate control mice with a normal chow diet (NCD) and a high-fat diet (HFD), and assessed glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and metabolic parameters. HNKO mice showed mild glucose intolerance under an NCD, but exacerbated obesity and insulin resistance phenotypes under an HFD. In addition, NUCKS regulated levels of insulin receptor in the brain. Unlike HNKO mice, mice with immune-cell-specific deletion of NUCKS (VNKO) did not develop obesity or insulin-resistant phenotypes under an HFD. These studies indicate that hypothalamic NUCKS plays an essential role in regulating glucose homoeostasis and insulin signalling in vivo.

  5. Cytokines and hypothalamic-pituitary function.

    PubMed

    Jones, T H; Kennedy, R L

    1993-11-01

    Several cytokines are now known to affect the release of anterior pituitary hormones by an action on the hypothalamus and/or the pituitary gland. The major cytokines involved are IL-1, IL-2, IL-6, TNF-alpha and interferon-tau. Their predominant effects are to stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and to suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid and gonadal axes, and growth hormone release. The relative importance of systemically and locally produced cytokines in achieving these responses and their precise sites of action have not been fully established. There are indeed conflicting reports on the individual effects of each cytokine which need to be clarified. There is now cumulating evidence that there are important interactions between the immune and neuroendocrine systems which may explain in part, some of the effects on growth, thyroid, adrenal and reproductive functions which occur in acute and chronic disease. This article reviews the current knowledge of the effects of some cytokines on hypothalamic-pituitary function.

  6. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and the regulation of appetite.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jennifer A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2012-07-01

    Neuropeptides released by hypothalamic neurons play a major role in the regulation of feeding, acting both within the hypothalamus, and at other appetite regulating centres throughout the brain. Where classical neurotransmitters signal only within synapses, neuropeptides diffuse over greater distances affecting both nearby and distant neurons expressing the relevant receptors, which are often extrasynaptic. As well as triggering a behavioural output, neuropeptides also act as neuromodulators: altering the response of neurons to both neurotransmitters and circulating signals of nutrient status. The mechanisms of action of hypothalamic neuropeptides with established roles in feeding, including melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), the orexins, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), agouti-gene related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y, and oxytocin, are reviewed in this article, with emphasis laid on both their effects on appetite regulating centres throughout the brain, and on examining the evidence for their physiological roles. In addition, evidence for the involvement of several putative appetite regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides is assessed including, ghrelin, cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), neuropeptide W and the galanin-like peptides. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central control of Food Intake'.

  7. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways.

  8. Hypothalamic-endocrine aspects in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Petersén, Asa; Björkqvist, Maria

    2006-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary and fatal disorder caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat in the HD gene, resulting in a mutant form of the protein huntingtin. Wild-type and mutant huntingtin are expressed in most tissues of the body but the normal function of huntingtin is not fully known. In HD, the neuropathology is characterized by intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions of huntingtin aggregates, and cell death primarily in striatum and cerebral cortex. However, hypothalamic atrophy occurs at early stages of HD with loss of orexin- and somatostatin-containing cell populations. Several symptoms of HD such as sleep disturbances, alterations in circadian rhythm, and weight loss may be due to hypothalamic dysfunction. Endocrine changes including increased cortisol levels, reduced testosterone levels and increased prevalence of diabetes are found in HD patients. In HD mice, alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs as well as pancreatic beta-cell and adipocyte dysfunction. Increasing evidence points towards important pathology of the hypothalamus and the endocrine system in HD. As many neuroendocrine factors are secreted into the cerebrospinal fluid, blood and urine, it is possible that their levels may reflect the disease state in the central nervous system. Investigating neuroendocrine changes in HD opens up the possibility of finding biomarkers to evaluate future therapies for HD, as well as of identifying novel targets for therapeutic interventions.

  9. Effects of Hypothalamic Neurodegeneration on Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Normal aging in humans and rodents is accompanied by a progressive increase in adiposity. To investigate the role of hypothalamic neuronal circuits in this process, we used a Cre-lox strategy to create mice with specific and progressive degeneration of hypothalamic neurons that express agouti-related protein (Agrp) or proopiomelanocortin (Pomc), neuropeptides that promote positive or negative energy balance, respectively, through their opposing effects on melanocortin receptor signaling. In previous studies, Pomc mutant mice became obese, but Agrp mutant mice were surprisingly normal, suggesting potential compensation by neuronal circuits or genetic redundancy. Here we find that Pomc-ablation mice develop obesity similar to that described for Pomc knockout mice, but also exhibit defects in compensatory hyperphagia similar to what occurs during normal aging. Agrp-ablation female mice exhibit reduced adiposity with normal compensatory hyperphagia, while animals ablated for both Pomc and Agrp neurons exhibit an additive interaction phenotype. These findings provide new insight into the roles of hypothalamic neurons in energy balance regulation, and provide a model for understanding defects in human energy balance associated with neurodegeneration and aging. PMID:16296893

  10. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Benschoten, James J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-part experiment designed to introduce cyclic voltammetry to graduate/undergraduate students. Part 1 demonstrates formal reduction potential, redox electron transfer, diffusion coefficient, and electrochemical reversibility. Part 2 investigates electrochemical behavior of acetaminophen. Part 3 examines such experimental variables…

  11. Radioimmunoassay for cyclic nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.S.

    1984-02-21

    An improved radioimmunoassay for the determination of cyclic nucleotides in body fluids which comprises adding a source of divalent cation prior to assay minimizes the effects of both endogenous calcium ion and EDTA used as an anticoagulant in blood plasma samples.

  12. Paraventricular hypothalamic lesions and medial hypothalamic knife cuts produce similar hyperphagia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Aravich, P F; Sclafani, A

    1983-12-01

    The hyperphagia/obesity syndrome produced by paraventricular hypothalamic (PVH) lesions and that produced by medial hypothalamic (MH) knife cuts were compared in adult female rats. Each treatment produced hyperphagia and overweight on a chow diet, although the PVH effect was less than the knife-cut effect. Each treatment also produced qualitatively similar ingestive responses to unpalatable quinine- and sucrose octaacetate-adulterated diets and to palatable dextrose and fat diets during the dynamic and static weight-gain phases. The PVH lesions and MH cuts disrupted day/night feeding patterns and elevated water intakes but not water/food intake ratios. However, PVH lesions, unlike MH cuts, did not increase emotional reactivity. The relation of the PVH syndrome to the classic hypothalamic hyperphagia syndrome is discussed. Also considered is the neuroanatomical substrate responsible for the PVH hyperphagic effect.

  13. Radiation and hypothalamic-pituitary function.

    PubMed

    Littley, M D; Shalet, S M; Beardwell, C G

    1990-03-01

    In adults, hypopituitarism is a common consequence of external radiotherapy. The clinical manifestations may be subtle and develop insidiously many years after radiotherapy. Anterior pituitary deficiencies can therefore only be detected by regular testing, including dynamic tests of GH and ACTH reserve. Although the deficiencies most commonly develop in the order GH, gonadotrophins, ACTH then TSH, this sequence may not be predictable in an individual patient and comprehensive testing is therefore required. The tests should ideally be performed annually for at least 10 years after treatment or until deficiency has been detected and treated. It is not only the patients with pituitary disease who are at risk of developing hypopituitarism after radiotherapy. Any patient who receives a total dose of irradiation of 20 Gy or more to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is at risk of hypopituitarism, although the threshold dose may be lower than this. This is particularly important in the long-term survivors of malignant disease in whom endocrine morbidity may be relatively common and in whom this can be easily treated, with consequent improvement in quality of life. Whilst patients who receive a high total dose of irradiation are at increased risk of developing multiple deficiencies, a higher fraction size also increases the risk of anterior pituitary failure. There is good evidence that the earliest damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis after external radiotherapy is at the level of the hypothalamus. However, patients who undergo pituitary ablation with interstitial radiotherapy or heavy particle beams are likely to sustain direct damage to the pituitary. In these patients, the sequence in which individual pituitary hormone deficiencies develop is generally the same as that observed with the hypothalamic damage after conventional external radiotherapy. The increasing use of radiotherapy as a means of treatment for malignant disease means that new groups of patients with

  14. Activation of nuclear factor kappa B pathway and reduction of hypothalamic oxytocin following hypothalamic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Christian L.; D’Ambrosio, Gabrielle; Elfers, Clinton

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothalamic obesity (HO) occurs in patients with tumors and lesions in the medial hypothalamic region. In this study, a hyperphagic rat model of combined medial hypothalamic lesions (CMHL) was used to test which specific inflammatory molecules are involved. Methods In order to target specific homeostatic medial hypothalamic nuclei (arcuate, ventromedial, and dorsomedial nuclei), male Sprague-Dawley rats (age of 8 weeks, ~250 g body weight) received four electrolytic lesions or sham surgery. Post-surgery food intake and weight changes were tracked and hypothalamic gene expression for inflammatory molecules as well as anorexigenic peptide oxytocin 7 days and 7 months post-surgery were tested. Results Seven days post-surgery, average food intake increased by 23%, and body weight gain had increased by 68%. Toll-like 4 receptor/nuclear factor–κB (TLR4/NF–κB)—pathway was specifically activated in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), resulting in 3-fold higher tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, 10-fold higher interleukin (IL) 1-β mRNA levels, and higher expression of suppression of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 3, while oxytocin mRNA levels were significantly reduced in CMHL rats versus sham surgery rats 7 days post-surgery. At 7 months, inflammation was less stimulated in MBH of CMHL rats compared to 7 days post-surgery and SOCS 3 as well as oxytocin mRNA levels were comparable between the two groups. Conclusion Medial hypothalamic lesions are associated with strong post-surgery hyperphagia and activation of TLR4/NF–κB—pathway as well as reduced expression of oxytocin in the hypothalamus. PMID:27512604

  15. Leptin signaling in astrocytes regulates hypothalamic neuronal circuits and feeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Geun; Suyama, Shigetomo; Koch, Marco; Jin, Sungho; Argente-Arizon, Pilar; Argente, Jesús; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Zimmer, Marcelo R; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Gao, Yuanqing; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Yi, Chun-Xia; Salmaso, Natalina; Vaccarino, Flora M; Chowen, Julie; Diano, Sabrina; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Tschöp, Matthias H; Horvath, Tamas L

    2014-07-01

    We found that leptin receptors were expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes and that their conditional deletion led to altered glial morphology and synaptic inputs onto hypothalamic neurons involved in feeding control. Leptin-regulated feeding was diminished, whereas feeding after fasting or ghrelin administration was elevated in mice with astrocyte-specific leptin receptor deficiency. These data reveal an active role of glial cells in hypothalamic synaptic remodeling and control of feeding by leptin.

  16. Hypothalamic glucose sensing: making ends meet

    PubMed Central

    Routh, Vanessa H.; Hao, Lihong; Santiago, Ammy M.; Sheng, Zhenyu; Zhou, Chunxue

    2014-01-01

    The neuroendocrine system governs essential survival and homeostatic functions. For example, growth is needed for development, thermoregulation maintains optimal core temperature in a changing environment, and reproduction ensures species survival. Stress and immune responses enable an organism to overcome external and internal threats while the circadian system regulates arousal and sleep such that vegetative and active functions do not overlap. All of these functions require a significant portion of the body's energy. As the integrator of the neuroendocrine system, the hypothalamus carefully assesses the energy status of the body in order to appropriately partition resources to provide for each system without compromising the others. While doing so the hypothalamus must ensure that adequate glucose levels are preserved for brain function since glucose is the primary fuel of the brain. To this end, the hypothalamus contains specialized glucose sensing neurons which are scattered throughout the nuclei controlling distinct neuroendocrine functions. We hypothesize that these neurons play a key role in enabling the hypothalamus to partition energy to meet these peripheral survival needs without endangering the brain's glucose supply. This review will first describe the varied mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in neurons within discrete hypothalamic nuclei. We will then evaluate the way in which peripheral energy status regulates glucose sensitivity. For example, during energy deficit such as fasting specific hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons become sensitized to decreased glucose. This increases the gain of the information relay when glucose availability is a greater concern for the brain. Finally, changes in glucose sensitivity under pathological conditions (e.g., recurrent insulin-hypoglycemia, diabetes) will be addressed. The overall goal of this review is to place glucose sensing neurons within the context of hypothalamic control of neuroendocrine function

  17. Engineering cyclic peptide toxins.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard J; Craik, David J

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-based toxins have attracted much attention in recent years for their exciting potential applications in drug design and development. This interest has arisen because toxins are highly potent and selectively target a range of physiologically important receptors. However, peptides suffer from a number of disadvantages, including poor in vivo stability and poor bioavailability. A number of naturally occurring cyclic peptides have been discovered in plants, animals, and bacteria that have exceptional stability and potentially ameliorate these disadvantages. The lessons learned from studies of the structures, stabilities, and biological activities of these cyclic peptides can be applied to the reengineering of toxins that are not naturally cyclic but are amenable to cyclization. In this chapter, we describe solid-phase chemical synthetic methods for the reengineering of peptide toxins to improve their suitability as therapeutic, diagnostic, or imaging agents. The focus is on small disulfide-rich peptides from the venoms of cone snails and scorpions, but the technology is potentially widely applicable to a number of other peptide-based toxins. PMID:22230565

  18. Hypothalamic control of sleep in aging.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Asya

    2012-09-01

    The timing of sleep and its duration are affected by circadian and homeostatic factors. Physiological and behavioral attributes such as the duration of previous wake period, food availability, temperature, and stress all affect sleep and its quality. As many of these physiological inputs are integrated in the hypothalamus, it is not surprising that this brain structure plays a crucial role in the regulation of sleep. I will discuss this role also in the context of aging, which is associated with changes in both hypothalamic function and the composition of sleep.

  19. [The effect of low dose gestagens on the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, E

    1977-08-01

    The contraceptive effect of continuous treatment with low dose progestogens (minipill) has been attributed mainly to alterations of the cervical mucus and the endometrium. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of low dose progestogens on hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian function. Plasma concentrations of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteininzing hormone (LH), estradiol-17 beta (E-2) and Progesterone were measured daily during apparently ovulatory menstrual cycles and during treatment cycles with different low dose progestogens. From the results obtained it was concluded that the minipill has a clear-cut effect on the LH/FSH peak at midcycle and on corpus luteum function. A cyclic secretion of E-2 is maintained in the majority of cases. In a few treatment cycles however, follicular maturation was suppressed as indicated by low E-2 concentrations. It was concluded that the minipill exerts a profound effect at the central and ovarian level which contributes to its satisfactory contraceptive efficacy.

  20. Effects of 0.5 mg. of lynestrenol daily on hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian function.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, E; Keller, E; Jaeger-Whitegiver, E R; Joel, E W; Schindler, A E

    1975-07-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of daily ingestion of 0.5 mg. of lynestrenol on some parameters of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Daily plasma concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol-17-beta (estradiol; E2-17beta), and progesterone (P) were determined by specific radioimmunoassays during one control and one treatment cycle of seven normally ovulating women. One of the volunteers was followed throughout 84 days of treatment. The following changes were observed during medication: (1) the midcycle FSH/LH peak was abolished, with a trend toward reduced LH values during the second half of the treatment cycles; (2) progesterone was significantly, though variably, reduced whereas estradiol showed little difference between control and treatment cycles; (3) during prolonged treatment two difference cyclic response patterns were observed in the same individual. It is concluded that daily administration of 0.5 mg. of lynestrenol exerts a profound effect at the central level, which contributes to the satisfactory contraceptive efficacy of this compound. A hypothetic blockade of estradiol receptors at the pituitary and/or hypothalamic level is discussed.

  1. Masculine-liky hypothalamic-pituitary axis in the androgen-insensitive genetically male rat pseudohermaphrodite.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, B H; Goldman, A S; Gustafsson, J A

    1975-08-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary sex of the androgen insensitive, genetically male rat pseudohermaphrodite was studied by examining its vaginal cytology, response to ovarian transplants and urinary steroidal excretion patterns. More than half the pseudohermaphrodites studied were in constant vaginal estrus, while the remaining rats displayed either persistent diestrus or irregular cyclicity tending towards lengthened estrus. Following gonadectomy and ovarian transplantation, normal females displayed regular 14-day cycles while pseudohermaphrodites remained in constant vaginal estrus. In pseudohermaphrodites with ovarian transplants, only C19 steroids were detected in the urine while females excreted both C21 and C19 steroids. Indicative of the urinary findings, transplants in females had corpora lutea and maturing follicles while grafts from pseudohermaphrodites and males contained follicular cysts and luteinized theca. In addition, distribution and activity of histochemical 3beta-hydroxy-delta5 steroid oxidoreductase were similar in the grafts from pseudohermaphrodites and males, but unlike the females. Although previous reports have shown that much of the sex-dependent differentiation of the genetic male rat pseudohermaphrodite is phenotypically female, our results suggest that the phenotype of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of this animal is, at least in certain respects, male.

  2. Lateral hypothalamic circuits for feeding and reward.

    PubMed

    Stuber, Garret D; Wise, Roy A

    2016-02-01

    In experiments conducted over 60 years ago, the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) was identified as a critical neuroanatomical substrate for motivated behavior. Electrical stimulation of the LHA induces voracious feeding even in well-fed animals. In the absence of food, animals will work tirelessly, often lever-pressing thousands of times per hour, for electrical stimulation at the same site that provokes feeding, drinking and other species-typical motivated behaviors. Here we review the classic findings from electrical stimulation studies and integrate them with more recent work that has used contemporary circuit-based approaches to study the LHA. We identify specific anatomically and molecularly defined LHA elements that integrate diverse information arising from cortical, extended amygdala and basal forebrain networks to ultimately generate a highly specified and invigorated behavioral state conveyed via LHA projections to downstream reward and feeding-specific circuits. PMID:26814589

  3. Lateral Hypothalamic Circuits for Feeding and Reward

    PubMed Central

    Stuber, Garret D.; Wise, Roy A.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments conducted over 60 years ago, the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) was identified as a critical neuroanatomical substrate for motivated behavior. Electrical stimulation of the LHA induces voracious feeding even in non-restricted animals. In the absence of food, animals will work tirelessly, often lever-pressing 1000’s of times per hour, for electrical stimulation at the same site that provokes feeding, drinking, and other species-typical motivated behaviors. Here we review the classic findings from electrical stimulation studies and integrate them with more recent work that has utilized contemporary circuit-based approaches to study the LHA. We identify specific anatomically and molecularly defined LHA elements that integrate diverse information arising from cortical, extended amygdala, and basal forebrain networks to ultimately generate a highly specified and invigorated behavioral state conveyed via LHA projections to downstream reward and feeding specific circuits. PMID:26814589

  4. Melatonin and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Shi, L; Li, N; Bo, L; Xu, Z

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxy-tryptamine), a principal product of the pineal gland, is produced mainly during the dark phase of the circadian cycle. This hormone plays a crucial role in the regulation of circadian and seasonal changes in various aspects of physiology and neuroendocrine functions. In mammals, melatonin can influence sexual maturation and reproductive functions via activation of its receptors and binding sites in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. This review summarizes current knowledge of melatonin on the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and gonads. We also review recent progress in clinical applications of melatonin or potentials of using melatonin, as a reducer of oxidative stress, to improve reproductive functions for the diseases such as women infertility.

  5. Use of cognitive behavior therapy for functional hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Berga, Sarah L; Loucks, Tammy L

    2006-12-01

    Behaviors that chronically activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and/or suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroidal (HPT) axis disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in women and men. Individuals with functional hypothalamic hypogonadism typically engage in a combination of behaviors that concomitantly heighten psychogenic stress and increase energy demand. Although it is not widely recognized clinically, functional forms of hypothalamic hypogonadism are more than an isolated disruption of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) drive and reproductive compromise. Indeed, women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea display a constellation of neuroendocrine aberrations that reflect allostatic adjustments to chronic stress. Given these considerations, we have suggested that complete neuroendocrine recovery would involve more than reproductive recovery. Hormone replacement strategies have limited benefit because they do not ameliorate allostatic endocrine adjustments, particularly the activation of the adrenal and the suppression of the thyroidal axes. Indeed, the rationale for the use of sex steroid replacement is based on the erroneous assumption that functional forms of hypothalamic hypogonadism represent only or primarily an alteration in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Potential health consequences of functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, often termed stress-induced anovulation, may include an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, depression, other psychiatric conditions, and dementia. Although fertility can be restored with exogenous administration of gonadotropins or pulsatile GnRH, fertility management alone will not permit recovery of the adrenal and thyroidal axes. Initiating pregnancy with exogenous means without reversing the hormonal milieu induced by chronic stress may increase the likelihood of poor obstetrical, fetal, or neonatal outcomes. In contrast, behavioral and psychological interventions that

  6. Hypothalamic obesity in children: pathophysiology to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Haliloglu, Belma; Bereket, Abdullah

    2015-05-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HyOb) is a complex neuroendocrine disorder caused by damage to the hypothalamus, which results in disruption of energy regulation. The key hypothalamic areas of energy regulation are the ARC (arcuate nucleus), the VMH (ventromedial hypothalamus), the PVN (paraventriculer nuclei) and the LHA (lateral hypothalamic area). These pathways can be disrupted mechanically by hypothalamic tumors, neurosurgery, inflammatory disorders, radiotherapy and trauma or functionally as such seen in genetic diseases. Rapid weight gain and severe obesity are the most striking features of HyOb and caused by hyperphagia, reduced basal metabolic rate (BMR) and decreased physical activity. HyOb is usually unresponsive to diet and exercise. Although, GLP-1 and its anologs seem to be a new agent, there is still no curative treatment. Thus, prevention is of prime importance and the clinicians should be alert and vigilant in patients at risk for development of HyOb.

  7. Corticosterone Blocks Ovarian Cyclicity and the LH Surge via Decreased Kisspeptin Neuron Activation in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Elena; Stephens, Shannon B Z; Chaing, Sharon; Munaganuru, Nagambika; Kauffman, Alexander S; Breen, Kellie M

    2016-03-01

    Stress elicits activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which leads to enhanced circulating glucocorticoids, as well as impaired gonadotropin secretion and ovarian cyclicity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that elevated, stress-levels of glucocorticoids disrupt ovarian cyclicity by interfering with the preovulatory sequence of endocrine events necessary for the LH surge. Ovarian cyclicity was monitored in female mice implanted with a cholesterol or corticosterone (Cort) pellet. Cort, but not cholesterol, arrested cyclicity in diestrus. Subsequent studies focused on the mechanism whereby Cort stalled the preovulatory sequence by assessing responsiveness to the positive feedback estradiol signal. Ovariectomized mice were treated with an LH surge-inducing estradiol implant, as well as Cort or cholesterol, and assessed several days later for LH levels on the evening of the anticipated surge. All cholesterol females showed a clear LH surge. At the time of the anticipated surge, LH levels were undetectable in Cort-treated females. In situ hybridization analyses the anteroventral periventricular nucleus revealed that Cort robustly suppressed the percentage of Kiss1 cells coexpressing cfos, as well as reduced the number of Kiss1 cells and amount of Kiss1 mRNA per cell, compared with expression in control brains. In addition, Cort blunted pituitary expression of the genes encoding the GnRH receptor and LHβ, indicating inhibition of gonadotropes during the blockage of the LH surge. Collectively, our findings support the hypothesis that physiological stress-levels of Cort disrupts ovarian cyclicity, in part, through disruption of positive feedback mechanisms at both the hypothalamic and pituitary levels which are necessary for generation of the preovulatory LH surge.

  8. Cyclic AMP in prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Botsford, J L; Harman, J G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is found in a variety of prokaryotes including both eubacteria and archaebacteria. cAMP plays a role in regulating gene expression, not only for the classic inducible catabolic operons, but also for other categories. In the enteric coliforms, the effects of cAMP on gene expression are mediated through its interaction with and allosteric modification of a cAMP-binding protein (CRP). The CRP-cAMP complex subsequently binds specific DNA sequences and either activates or inhibits transcription depending upon the positioning of the complex relative to the promoter. Enteric coliforms have provided a model to explore the mechanisms involved in controlling adenylate cyclase activity, in regulating adenylate cyclase synthesis, and in performing detailed examinations of CRP-cAMP complex-regulated gene expression. This review summarizes recent work focused on elucidating the molecular mechanisms of CRP-cAMP complex-mediated processes. For other bacteria, less detail is known. cAMP has been implicated in regulating antibiotic production, phototrophic growth, and pathogenesis. A role for cAMP has been suggested in nitrogen fixation. Often the only data that support cAMP involvement in these processes includes cAMP measurement, detection of the enzymes involved in cAMP metabolism, or observed effects of high concentrations of the nucleotide on cell growth. PMID:1315922

  9. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Initially described in children, cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is an idiopathic disorder that affects patients of all ages and is characterized by recurrent episodes of vomiting separated by symptom-free intervals or baseline health. Frequent misdiagnoses and delays in diagnosis often lead to years of recurrent vomiting. Similarities in the clinical features and symptoms of children and adults with CVS are often linked to migraines. Association with mitochondrial disorders and neuroendocrine dysfunction have been described in the pediatric CVS literature, whereas migraines, anxiety, and panic are common in adults with CVS. Various psychological, infectious, and physical stressors commonly precipitate episodes of CVS. Treatment is mostly empiric, with few controlled therapeutic studies conducted thus far. Associations with migraines have aided in developing pharmacologic treatment strategies for prophylaxis as well as abortive therapy during episodes, including the use of trip-tans. Most children outgrow CVS with time, though some children transition to migraine headaches or continue to have CVS as adults. Improved recognition of CVS in adults, along with the emergence of data in the use of anticonvulsants and antiemetics, may help further delineate pathophysiologic connections and therapeutic options for this debilitating disorder.

  10. On Cyclically Symmetrical Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, A.

    2001-07-01

    In a recent paper Carot et al. considered the definition of cylindrical symmetry as a specialisation of the case of axial symmetry. One of their propositions states that if there is a second Killing vector, which together with the one generating the axial symmetry, forms the basis of a two-dimensional Lie algebra, then the two Killing vectors must commute, thus generating an Abelian group. In this paper a similar result, valid under considerably weaker assumptions, is derived: any two-dimensional Lie transformation group which contains a one-dimensional subgroup whose orbits are circles, must be Abelian. The method used to prove this result is extended to apply to three-dimensional Lie transformation groups. It is shown that the existence of a one-dimensional subgroup with closed orbits restricts the Bianchi type of the associated Lie algebra to be I, II, III, VIIq = 0, VIII or IX. Some results on n-dimensional Lie groups are also derived and applied to show there are severe restrictions on the structure of the allowed four-dimensional Lie transformation groups compatible with cyclic symmetry.

  11. Ada and cyclic runtime scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Philip E.

    1986-01-01

    An important issue that must be faced while introducing Ada into the real time world is efficient and prodictable runtime behavior. One of the most effective methods employed during the traditional design of a real time system is the cyclic executive. The role cyclic scheduling might play in an Ada application in terms of currently available implementations and in terms of implementations that might be developed especially to support real time system development is examined. The cyclic executive solves many of the problems faced by real time designers, resulting in a system for which it is relatively easy to achieve approporiate timing behavior. Unfortunately a cyclic executive carries with it a very high maintenance penalty over the lifetime of the software that is schedules. Additionally, these cyclic systems tend to be quite fragil when any aspect of the system changes. The findings are presented of an ongoing SofTech investigation into Ada methods for real time system development. The topics covered include a description of the costs involved in using cyclic schedulers, the sources of these costs, and measures for future systems to avoid these costs without giving up the runtime performance of a cyclic system.

  12. Hypothalamic-endocrine dysfunction in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hurd, H P; Palumbo, P J; Gharib, H

    1977-11-01

    Multiple endocrine determinations were carried out on 101 patients with anorexia nervosa. Ninety-five percent of the patients studied were female, and in 94% of patients the anorexia nervosa began before 30 years of age. Evidence of gonadal dysfunction was the predominant manifestation, both clinically and by laboratory studies. Amenorrhea occurred before or concurrent with onset of weight loss in 65% of the women. The average weight loss was 28% of the weight before illness began. In an additional 11%, the disease began before menarche. The mean age of menarche in patients with secondary amenorrhea was 13 years. Urinary excretion of pituitary gonadotropin was undetectable in 44 of 65 patients and was below 19 rat units per 24 hours in the remaining patients. Serum luteinizing hormone level was below 8 microgram/dl in 15 of 27 patients studied and serum follicle-stimulating hormone was below 10 microgram/dl in 7 of 27 patients studied. Mean serum or urinary estrogens, or both, were low in more than 50% of the patients. Elevation of serum corticosteroids or loss or reversal of diurnal variation, or both, was noted in 50% of patients. Fasting serum growth hormone levels were elevated in 45% of the patients. Mean total and free serum thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and triiodothyronine levels were low. These hormonal alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in patients with anorexia nervosa probably represent adaptive and protective mechanisms for chronic starvation and weight loss.

  13. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis: neuropsychiatric aspects.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-04-01

    Evidence of aberrant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) activity in many psychiatric disorders, although not universal, has sparked long-standing interest in HPA hormones as biomarkers of disease or treatment response. HPA activity may be chronically elevated in melancholic depression, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia. The HPA axis may be more reactive to stress in social anxiety disorder and autism spectrum disorders. In contrast, HPA activity is more likely to be low in PTSD and atypical depression. Antidepressants are widely considered to inhibit HPA activity, although inhibition is not unanimously reported in the literature. There is evidence, also uneven, that the mood stabilizers lithium and carbamazepine have the potential to augment HPA measures, while benzodiazepines, atypical antipsychotics, and to some extent, typical antipsychotics have the potential to inhibit HPA activity. Currently, the most reliable use of HPA measures in most disorders is to predict the likelihood of relapse, although changes in HPA activity have also been proposed to play a role in the clinical benefits of psychiatric treatments. Greater attention to patient heterogeneity and more consistent approaches to assessing treatment effects on HPA function may solidify the value of HPA measures in predicting treatment response or developing novel strategies to manage psychiatric disease.

  14. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and spirituality.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-03-01

    The isoprenoid pathway was assessed in atheistic and spiritually inclined individuals. The pathway was also assessed in individuals with differing hemispheric dominance to assess whether hemispheric dominance has a correlation with spiritual and atheistic tendency. HMG CoA reductase activity, serum digoxin, RBC membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, serum magnesium, and tyrosine/tryptophan catabolic patterns were assessed in spiritual/atheistic individuals and in those differing hemispheric dominance. In spiritually-inclined individuals, there was increased digoxin synthesis, decreased membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, increased tryptophan catabolites (serotonin, quinolinic acid, and nicotine), and decreased tyrosine catabolites (dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine). The pattern in spiritually-inclined individuals correlated with right hemispheric chemical dominance. In atheistic individuals there was decreased digoxin synthesis, increased membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, decreased tryptophan catabolities (serotonin, quinolinic acid, and nicotine), and increased tyrosine catabolites (dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine). This pattern in atheistic individuals correlated with that obtained in left hemispheric chemical dominance. Hemispheric chemical dominance and hypothalamic digoxin could regulate the predisposition to spirituality or atheism.

  15. Hypothalamic control of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, Sebastien M.; Caron, Alexandre; Lanfray, Damien; Monge-Rofarello, Boris; Bartness, Timothy J.; Richard, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known, in large part from animal studies, that the control of brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis is insured by the central nervous system (CNS), which integrates several stimuli in order to control BAT activation through the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). SNS-mediated BAT activity is governed by diverse neurons found in brain structures involved in homeostatic regulations and whose activity is modulated by various factors including oscillations of energy fluxes. The characterization of these neurons has always represented a challenging issue. The available literature suggests that the neuronal circuits controlling BAT thermogenesis are largely part of an autonomic circuitry involving the hypothalamus, brainstem and the SNS efferent neurons. In the present review, we recapitulate the latest progresses in regards to the hypothalamic regulation of BAT metabolism. We briefly addressed the role of the thermoregulatory pathway and its interactions with the energy balance systems in the control of thermogenesis. We also reviewed the involvement of the brain melanocortin and endocannabinoid systems as well as the emerging role of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) neurons in BAT thermogenesis. Finally, we examined the link existing between these systems and the homeostatic factors that modulate their activities. PMID:26578907

  16. The role of oestradiol in sexually dimorphic hypothalamic-pituitary-adrena axis responses to intracerebroventricular ethanol administration in the rat.

    PubMed

    Larkin, J W; Binks, S L; Li, Y; Selvage, D

    2010-01-01

    Systemic ethanol (EtOH) administration activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis of rats in a sexually dimorphic manner. The present studies tested the role played by the central nervous system (CNS) in this phenomenon. To localise the effects of the drug to the brain, we utilised an experimental paradigm whereby a small, nontoxic amount of the drug was delivered via intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection. EtoH administered i.c.v. rapidly diffuses throughout the cerebrospinal fluid and brain, and does not cause neuronal damage or have any long-term physiological or behavioural effects. Experimental groups included intact males, intact cycling females, and ovariectomised (OVX) animals with or without replacement oestradiol (E(2)). Intracerebroventricular EtOH-induced HPA hormonal activation was determined by measuring plasma adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) levels. Activation of brain areas that both regulate HPA function and are responsive to gonadal hormones was determined using expression of the transcription factor c-fos (Fos) as a marker of neuronal activity. We observed sex- and oestrous cycle- dependent differences in HPA activation by EtOH as measured by both these parameters. ACTH secretion was highest in females in pro-oestrus or oestrus, just prior to or after the endogenous peak of E(2), as was Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the locus coreuleus (LC) of the brainstem. In OVX animals, E(2) replacement caused an increase in PVN and LC Fos expression in response to i.c.v. EtOH compared to OVX controls, but a decrease in ACTH secretion. Taken together, these results indicate that at the level of the CNS, EtOH stimulates HPA activity more robustly at times when the effects of E(2) are high, but that E(2) alone is not responsible for this effect. The data further suggest that the LC plays an important role in the circuitry, which appears to be different from that activated following the systemic

  17. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and the hypothalamic- pituitary-gonadal axes interplay.

    PubMed

    Mastorakos, George; Pavlatou, Maria G; Mizamtsidi, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Vertebrates respond to stress with activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the adrenergic and the autonomic nervous systems. The principal central nervous system regulators of the HPA axis are corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and antidiuretic hormone (AVP). Apart from in the central nervous system, CRH has been found in the adrenal medulla, ovaries, myometrium, endometrium, placenta, testis and elsewhere. The activation of the HPA axis during stress affects all body systems. The reproductive axis is inhibited by the HPA axis for the sake of saving energy. The changes to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis during stress are species-specific, and depend on the type and duration of the stimulus. Several conditions may be associated with altered regulation of the HPA axis. Polycystic ovary syndrome, anorexia nervosa and pregnancy in the third trimester are all characterized by HPA axis activation. In contrast, during the postpartum period, HPA axis suppression is implicated in the "postpartum blues". The actions of CRH are also essential in fetal development and neonatal survival.

  18. Algebraic curves of maximal cyclicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caubergh, Magdalena; Dumortier, Freddy

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with analytic families of planar vector fields, studying methods to detect the cyclicity of a non-isolated closed orbit, i.e. the maximum number of limit cycles that can locally bifurcate from it. It is known that this multi-parameter problem can be reduced to a single-parameter one, in the sense that there exist analytic curves in parameter space along which the maximal cyclicity can be attained. In that case one speaks about a maximal cyclicity curve (mcc) in case only the number is considered and of a maximal multiplicity curve (mmc) in case the multiplicity is also taken into account. In view of obtaining efficient algorithms for detecting the cyclicity, we investigate whether such mcc or mmc can be algebraic or even linear depending on certain general properties of the families or of their associated Bautin ideal. In any case by well chosen examples we show that prudence is appropriate.

  19. Nonsurgical treatment of cyclic esotropia.

    PubMed

    Voide, Nathalie; Presset, Claudine; Klainguti, Georges; Kaeser, Pierre-François

    2015-04-01

    Cyclic esotropia is characterized by a 24-hour period of straight eye position followed by 24 hours of large-angle esotropia. Possible mechanisms include notably progressive loss of compensation of a latent strabismus. The classic treatment is surgical correction of the angle measured on the days with manifest deviation. We report the first case of cyclic esotropia successfully treated by prismatic correction of the latent strabismus present on "straight" days. PMID:25828819

  20. Dorsomedial hypothalamic NPY and energy balance control.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sheng; Kim, Yonwook J; Zheng, Fenping

    2012-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a potent hypothalamic orexigenic peptide. Within the hypothalamus, Npy is primarily expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH). While the actions of ARC NPY in energy balance control have been well studied, a role for DMH NPY is still being unraveled. In contrast to ARC NPY that serves as one of downstream mediators of actions of leptin in maintaining energy homeostasis, DMH NPY is not under the control of leptin. Npy gene expression in the DMH is regulated by brain cholecystokinin (CCK) and other yet to be identified molecules. The findings of DMH NPY overexpression or induction in animals with increased energy demands and in certain rodent models of obesity implicate a role for DMH NPY in maintaining energy homeostasis. In support of this view, adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated overexpression of NPY in the DMH causes increases in food intake and body weight and exacerbates high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia and obesity. Knockdown of NPY in the DMH via AAV-mediated RNAi ameliorates hyperphagia, obesity and glucose intolerance of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats in which DMH NPY overexpression has been proposed to play a causal role. NPY knockdown in the DMH also prevents high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia, obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis. A detailed examination of actions of DMH NPY reveals that DMH NPY specifically affects nocturnal meal size and produces an inhibitory action on within meal satiety signals. In addition, DMH NPY modulates energy expenditure likely through affecting brown adipocyte formation and thermogenic activity. Overall, the recent findings provide clear evidence demonstrating critical roles for DMH NPY in energy balance control, and also imply a potential role for DMH NPY in maintaining glucose homeostasis.

  1. Hypothalamic integration of body fluid regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Denton, D A; McKinley, M J; Weisinger, R S

    1996-01-01

    The progression of animal life from the paleozoic ocean to rivers and diverse econiches on the planet's surface, as well as the subsequent reinvasion of the ocean, involved many different stresses on ionic pattern, osmotic pressure, and volume of the extracellular fluid bathing body cells. The relatively constant ionic pattern of vertebrates reflects a genetic "set" of many regulatory mechanisms--particularly renal regulation. Renal regulation of ionic pattern when loss of fluid from the body is disproportionate relative to the extracellular fluid composition (e.g., gastric juice with vomiting and pancreatic secretion with diarrhea) makes manifest that a mechanism to produce a biologically relatively inactive extracellular anion HCO3- exists, whereas no comparable mechanism to produce a biologically inactive cation has evolved. Life in the ocean, which has three times the sodium concentration of extracellular fluid, involves quite different osmoregulatory stress to that in freshwater. Terrestrial life involves risk of desiccation and, in large areas of the planet, salt deficiency. Mechanisms integrated in the hypothalamus (the evolutionary ancient midbrain) control water retention and facilitate excretion of sodium, and also control the secretion of renin by the kidney. Over and above the multifactorial processes of excretion, hypothalamic sensors reacting to sodium concentration, as well as circumventricular organs sensors reacting to osmotic pressure and angiotensin II, subserve genesis of sodium hunger and thirst. These behaviors spectacularly augment the adaptive capacities of animals. Instinct (genotypic memory) and learning (phenotypic memory) are melded to give specific behavior apt to the metabolic status of the animal. The sensations, compelling emotions, and intentions generated by these vegetative systems focus the issue of the phylogenetic emergence of consciousness and whether primal awareness initially came from the interoreceptors and vegetative

  2. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Stranahan, Alexis M.; Martin, Bronwen; Chadwick, Wayne; Park, Sung-Soo; Wang, Liyun; Becker, Kevin G.; WoodIII, William H.; Zhang, Yongqing; Maudsley, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db) and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6) animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds. PMID:22934110

  3. Hypothalamic Obesity in Craniopharyngioma Patients: Disturbed Energy Homeostasis Related to Extent of Hypothalamic Damage and Its Implication for Obesity Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Christian L.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HO) occurs in patients with tumors and lesions in the medial hypothalamic region. Hypothalamic dysfunction can lead to hyperinsulinemia and leptin resistance. This review is focused on HO caused by craniopharyngiomas (CP), which are the most common childhood brain tumors of nonglial origin. Despite excellent overall survival rates, CP patients have substantially reduced quality of life because of significant long-term sequelae, notably severe obesity in about 50% of patients, leading to a high rate of cardiovascular mortality. Recent studies reported that both hyperphagia and decreased energy expenditure can contribute to severe obesity in HO patients. Recognized risk factors for severe obesity include large hypothalamic tumors or lesions affecting several medial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei that impact satiety signaling pathways. Structural damage in these nuclei often lead to hyperphagia, rapid weight gain, central insulin and leptin resistance, decreased sympathetic activity, low energy expenditure, and increased energy storage in adipose tissue. To date, most efforts to treat HO have shown disappointing long-term success rates. However, treatments based on the distinct pathophysiology of disturbed energy homeostasis related to CP may offer options for successful interventions in the future. PMID:26371051

  4. The role of NPY in hypothalamic mediated food intake.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Rebecca E; Chee, Melissa J S; Colmers, William F

    2011-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a highly conserved neuropeptide with orexigenic actions in discrete hypothalamic nuclei that plays a role in regulating energy homeostasis. NPY signals via a family of high affinity receptors that mediate the widespread actions of NPY in all hypothalamic nuclei. These actions are also subject to tight, intricate regulation by numerous peripheral and central energy balance signals. The NPY system is embedded within a densely-redundant network designed to ensure stable energy homeostasis. This redundancy may underlie compensation for the loss of NPY or its receptors in germline knockouts, explaining why conventional knockouts of NPY or its receptors rarely yield a marked phenotypic change. We discuss insights into the hypothalamic role of NPY from studies of its physiological actions, responses to genetic manipulations and interactions with other energy balance signals. We conclude that numerous approaches must be employed to effectively study different aspects of NPY action.

  5. Hypothalamic AMPK as a Regulator of Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, My Khanh Q.; Kinyua, Ann W.; Yang, Dong Joo

    2016-01-01

    Activated in energy depletion conditions, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a cellular energy sensor and regulator in both central nervous system and peripheral organs. Hypothalamic AMPK restores energy balance by promoting feeding behavior to increase energy intake, increasing glucose production, and reducing thermogenesis to decrease energy output. Besides energy state, many hormones have been shown to act in concert with AMPK to mediate their anorexigenic and orexigenic central effects as well as thermogenic influences. Here we explore the factors that affect hypothalamic AMPK activity and give the underlying mechanisms for the role of central AMPK in energy homeostasis together with the physiological effects of hypothalamic AMPK on energy balance restoration. PMID:27547453

  6. The Role of Hypothalamic Neuropeptides in Neurogenesis and Neuritogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bakos, Jan; Zatkova, Martina; Bacova, Zuzana; Ostatnikova, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a source of neural progenitor cells which give rise to different populations of specialized and differentiated cells during brain development. Newly formed neurons in the hypothalamus can synthesize and release various neuropeptides. Although term neuropeptide recently undergoes redefinition, small-size hypothalamic neuropeptides remain major signaling molecules mediating short- and long-term effects on brain development. They represent important factors in neurite growth and formation of neural circuits. There is evidence suggesting that the newly generated hypothalamic neurons may be involved in regulation of metabolism, energy balance, body weight, and social behavior as well. Here we review recent data on the role of hypothalamic neuropeptides in adult neurogenesis and neuritogenesis with special emphasis on the development of food intake and social behavior related brain circuits. PMID:26881105

  7. Gelastic epilepsy without hypothalamic hamartoma: three additional cases.

    PubMed

    Savasta, Salvatore; Budetta, Mauro; Spartà, Maria Valentina; Carpentieri, Maria Luisa; Trasimeni, Guido; Zavras, Niki; Villa, Maria Pia; Parisi, Pasquale

    2014-08-01

    We describe three children with gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartoma whose seizures were characterized by typical laughing attacks associated or not with other seizure types. Ictal/interictal EEG and magnetic resonance imaging were performed. All three subjects showed a good response to carbamazepine therapy with complete seizure control in addition to a benign clinical and cognitive outcome. These three cases confirm that gelastic epilepsy without hypothalamic hamartoma, both in cryptogenic or symptomatic patients (one child showed a dysplastic right parietotemporal lesion), usually has a more benign natural history, and carbamazepine seems to be the most efficacious therapy to obtain both immediate and long-term seizure control. These findings need to be confirmed in a larger sample of children affected by gelastic epilepsy without hypothalamic hamartoma.

  8. Hypothalamic AMPK as a Regulator of Energy Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Huynh, My Khanh Q; Kinyua, Ann W; Yang, Dong Joo; Kim, Ki Woo

    2016-01-01

    Activated in energy depletion conditions, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a cellular energy sensor and regulator in both central nervous system and peripheral organs. Hypothalamic AMPK restores energy balance by promoting feeding behavior to increase energy intake, increasing glucose production, and reducing thermogenesis to decrease energy output. Besides energy state, many hormones have been shown to act in concert with AMPK to mediate their anorexigenic and orexigenic central effects as well as thermogenic influences. Here we explore the factors that affect hypothalamic AMPK activity and give the underlying mechanisms for the role of central AMPK in energy homeostasis together with the physiological effects of hypothalamic AMPK on energy balance restoration. PMID:27547453

  9. Investigation of hypothalamic-pituitary disease.

    PubMed

    Lamberton, R P; Jackson, I M

    1983-11-01

    It can be readily appreciated from the preceding discussion that many endocrine and non-endocrine tests are available for the evaluation of patients with suspected hypothalamic-pituitary disease. The endocrine evaluation of these subjects should be tailored according to the type and extent of pathology suspected (see Tables 2 and 3). For patients with pituitary adenomas and clinical features of hyperpituitarism, such as hyperprolactinaemia, Cushing's disease or acromegaly, the initial tests should be directed at the hormone whose excess is suspected. For example, a glucose suppression test for acromegaly or dexamethasone suppression test for Cushing's disease should be performed early in the evaluation. The possibility of deficiencies of the other pituitary hormones should then be addressed in patients with secretory tumours, but initially in those with apparent non-functioning adenomas. In patients with large macroadenomas pituitary hormone deficiencies are almost invariable with GH and FSH/LH being the most commonly affected, followed by TSH and ACTH in that order (Snyder et al, 1979a; Valenta et al, 1982). Basal thyroid function tests, serum oestradiol or testosterone, and basal gonodotrophins should be routinely obtained in patients with macroadenomas. Additionally, the integrity of the pituitary-adrenal axis should be determined and an overnight water deprivation test for assessment of neurohypophyseal function is also recommended. GH stimulation testing is valuable as a test of pituitary function in patients with suspected pituitary tumours since GH reserve is lost very early in the development of hypopituitarism. Evaluation of the pituitary-thyroid axis with TRH or the pituitary gonadal axis with LHRH generally provides limited additional information of diagnostic value in individual patients with macroadenomas. However, the 'paradoxical' responses to TRH and LHRH may be useful as a biological marker following therapy in patients with GH- or ACTH

  10. Programmed hyperphagia secondary to increased hypothalamic SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mina; Li, Tie; Han, Guang; Ross, Michael G

    2014-11-17

    Small for gestational age (SGA) offspring exhibit reduced hypothalamic neural satiety pathways leading to programmed hyperphagia and adult obesity. Appetite regulatory site, the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) contains appetite (NPY/AgRP) and satiety (POMC) neurons. Using in vitro culture of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells (NPC) which form the ARC, we demonstrated that SGA offspring exhibit reduced NPC proliferation and neuronal differentiation. bHLH protein Hes1 promotes NPC self-renewal and inhibits differentiation by repressing neuronal differentiation genes (Mash1, neurogenin3). We hypothesized that Hes1/Mash1 and ultimately ARC neuronal differentiation and expression of NPY/POMC neurons are influenced by SIRT1 which is a nutrient sensor and a histone deacetylase. Control dams received ad libitum food, whereas study dams were 50% food-restricted from pregnancy day 10 to 21 (SGA). In vivo studies showed that SGA newborns and adult offspring had increased protein expression of hypothalamic/ARC SIRT1 and AgRP with decreased POMC. Additionally, SGA newborns had decreased expression of hypothalamic neurogenic factors with reduced in vivo NPC proliferation. In vitro culture of hypothalamic NPCs showed similar changes with elevated SIRT1 binding to Hes1 in SGA newborn. Silencing SIRT1 increased NPC proliferation and Hes1 and Tuj1expression in both Control and SGA NPCs. Although SGA NPC proliferation remained below that of Controls, it was higher than Control NPCs in the absence of SIRT1 siRNA. The direct impact of SIRT1 on NPC proliferation and differentiation were further confirmed with pharmacologic SIRT1 inhibitor and activator. Thus, in SGA newborns elevated SIRT1 induces premature differentiation of NPCs, reducing the NPC pool and cell proliferation.

  11. Hypocretin/orexin loss changes the hypothalamic immune response.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Susumu; Takizawa, Nae; Honda, Yoshiko; Koike, Taro; Oe, Souichi; Toyoda, Hiromi; Kodama, Tohru; Yamada, Hisao

    2016-10-01

    Hypocretin, also known as orexin, maintains the vigilance state and regulates various physiological processes, such as arousal, sleep, food intake, energy expenditure, and reward. Previously, we found that when wild-type mice and hypocretin/ataxin-3 littermates (which are depleted of hypothalamic hypocretin-expressing neurons postnatally) were administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the two genotypes exhibited significant differences in their sleep/wake cycle, including differences in the degree of increase in sleep periods and in recovery from sickness behaviour. In the present study, we examined changes in the hypothalamic vigilance system and in the hypothalamic expression of inflammatory factors in response to LPS in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice. Peripheral immune challenge with LPS affected the hypothalamic immune response and vigilance states. This response was altered by the loss of hypocretin. Hypocretin expression was inhibited after LPS injection in both hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice and their wild-type littermates, but expression was completely abolished only in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice. Increases in the number of histidine decarboxylase (HDC)-positive cells and in Hdc mRNA expression were found in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice, and this increase was suppressed by LPS. Hypocretin loss did not impact the change in expression of hypothalamic inflammatory factors in response to LPS, except for interferon gamma and colony stimulating factor 3. The number of c-Fos-positive/HDC-positive cells in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice administered LPS injections was elevated, even during the rest period, in all areas, suggesting that there is an increase in the activity of histaminergic neurons in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice following LPS injection. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for hypocretin in the hypothalamic response to peripheral immune challenge. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the pathophysiology of narcolepsy.

  12. Orexin A attenuates palmitic acid-induced hypothalamic cell death.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Cayla M; Nixon, Joshua P; Butterick, Tammy A

    2016-09-01

    Palmitic acid (PA), an abundant dietary saturated fatty acid, contributes to obesity and hypothalamic dysregulation in part through increase in oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and neuroinflammation. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of PA exposure contributes to the onset of neuronal apoptosis. Additionally, high fat diets lead to changes in hypothalamic gene expression profiles including suppression of the anti-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 associated X protein (Bax). Orexin A (OXA), a hypothalamic peptide important in obesity resistance, also contributes to neuroprotection. Prior studies have demonstrated that OXA attenuates oxidative stress induced cell death. We hypothesized that OXA would be neuroprotective against PA induced cell death. To test this, we treated an immortalized hypothalamic cell line (designated mHypoA-1/2) with OXA and PA. We demonstrate that OXA attenuates PA-induced hypothalamic cell death via reduced caspase-3/7 apoptosis, stabilization of Bcl-2 gene expression, and reduced Bax/Bcl-2 gene expression ratio. We also found that OXA inhibits ROS production after PA exposure. Finally, we show that PA exposure in mHypoA-1/2 cells significantly reduces basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. However, OXA treatment reverses PA-induced changes in intracellular metabolism, increasing basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. Collectively, these results support that OXA protects against PA-induced hypothalamic dysregulation, and may represent one mechanism through which OXA can ameliorate effects of obesogenic diet on brain health. PMID:27449757

  13. Hypocretin/orexin loss changes the hypothalamic immune response.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Susumu; Takizawa, Nae; Honda, Yoshiko; Koike, Taro; Oe, Souichi; Toyoda, Hiromi; Kodama, Tohru; Yamada, Hisao

    2016-10-01

    Hypocretin, also known as orexin, maintains the vigilance state and regulates various physiological processes, such as arousal, sleep, food intake, energy expenditure, and reward. Previously, we found that when wild-type mice and hypocretin/ataxin-3 littermates (which are depleted of hypothalamic hypocretin-expressing neurons postnatally) were administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the two genotypes exhibited significant differences in their sleep/wake cycle, including differences in the degree of increase in sleep periods and in recovery from sickness behaviour. In the present study, we examined changes in the hypothalamic vigilance system and in the hypothalamic expression of inflammatory factors in response to LPS in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice. Peripheral immune challenge with LPS affected the hypothalamic immune response and vigilance states. This response was altered by the loss of hypocretin. Hypocretin expression was inhibited after LPS injection in both hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice and their wild-type littermates, but expression was completely abolished only in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice. Increases in the number of histidine decarboxylase (HDC)-positive cells and in Hdc mRNA expression were found in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice, and this increase was suppressed by LPS. Hypocretin loss did not impact the change in expression of hypothalamic inflammatory factors in response to LPS, except for interferon gamma and colony stimulating factor 3. The number of c-Fos-positive/HDC-positive cells in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice administered LPS injections was elevated, even during the rest period, in all areas, suggesting that there is an increase in the activity of histaminergic neurons in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice following LPS injection. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for hypocretin in the hypothalamic response to peripheral immune challenge. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the pathophysiology of narcolepsy. PMID:27318095

  14. Influence of heat stress on the cortisol and oxidant-antioxidants balance during oestrous phase in buffalo-cows (Bubalus bubalis): thermo-protective role of antioxidant treatment.

    PubMed

    Megahed, G A; Anwar, M M; Wasfy, S I; Hammadeh, M E

    2008-12-01

    In the present study, the effect of heat stress, which is commonly observed in the animals of Upper Egypt area in summer, as well as the effect of antioxidant treatment as a thermo-protective was examined. In this study, the animals (n = 120) were divided into winter group (n = 40, bred during winter) and summer group (n = 80, bred during summer) as well as, animals in the summer group were divided into first subgroup animals (n = 40) and injected with Viteselen intramuscularly (15 ml) twice weekly for 10 weeks and second subgroup animals (n = 40) were not treated (as control). Serum levels of progesterone (P4), oestradiol (E2), cortisol, superoxide dismutase (SOD), lipid peroxidase (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO) were measured. The pregnancy rate of all animals was detected rectally. The levels of oestradiol and the activity of the antioxidant SOD were decreased in serum of animals in behavioural oestrus during summer as compared with those in winter. During the same time period the levels of oxidants such as LPO and NO were increased in the serum of animals again in the phase of oestrus. In another group of animals treated by intramuscular injection with 15 ml viteselen (antioxidant) twice weekly for 6 weeks during hot months, the activities of serum SOD showed an increase and the levels of oxidants and cortisol decreased. Moreover, the levels of oestradiol were increased during the oestrous behaviour. The pregnancy rate was decreased in animals under heat stress and the pregnancy rate was enhanced dramatically when these animals received antioxidants during the heat stress. This means that the heat-stress in Upper Egypt may affect the fertility of animals and pregnancy rate and this effect may be through an increased production of free radicals and decreased production of antioxidants as well as increased levels of cortisol. Treatment of animals or supplementation with antioxidants before the beginning of months of heat-stress and also during the stress period may

  15. Experiments on egg transfer in the cow and ewe: dependence of conception rate on the transfer procedure and stage of the oestrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Lawson, R A; Rowson, L E; Moor, R M; Tervit, H R

    1975-10-01

    The effects on embryo survival of procedures used in transferring eggs non-surgically were investigated in three experiments in ewes and heifers. In Exp. 1, two techniques for introducing eggs into the uterus through the cervix in heifers were compared; namely (i) deposition of the eggs high into the uterine horn or (ii) into the body of the uterus. Both methods were followed by inflation of the uterus with carbon dioxide. Out of a total of 34 heifers, only one became pregnant by the use of Method (i). Non-surgical egg tansfers early (Days 3 to 5) or later (Days 6 to 9) in the oestrous cycles of heifers were carried out in Exp. 2. Three transfer procedures were compared: (i) pipette transfer of an egg into the body of the uterus through the cervix (control), (ii) the control procedure performed under Fluothane anaesthesia, or (iii) followed by inflation of the uterus with carbon dioxide. Wide transfers carried out early in the cycle, pregnancies resulted in 1/10, 0/10 and 1/10 of the heifers in the control, carbon dioxide and Fluothane groups, respectively. With late transfers, 7/20, 1/10 and 8/20 heifers became pregnant in the respective treatment groups. This trend for pregnancy rate to be improved when late transfers were done in the control and Fluothane groups was significant only at the 10% level of probability when both groups were pooled. It was tentatively concluded, however, that non-surgical transfers of fertilized eggs to heifers may be best done during mid-cycle, after Day 6. Fluothane anaesthesia did not improve conception rate. Inflation of the uterus with carbon dioxide appeared to be deleterious when used at the mid-cycle stage in heifers. In Exp. 3, it was found that inflation of the ewe's uterus with carbon dioxide or nitrogen following the surgical thansfer of an egg did not affect the incidence of pregnancy. The introduction of 50 mul liquid Fluothane into the lumen of the uterus was embryotoxic.

  16. Regulation of Blood Glucose by Hypothalamic Pyruvate Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Tony K. T.; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Pocai, Alessandro; Rossetti, Luciano

    2005-08-01

    The brain keenly depends on glucose for energy, and mammalians have redundant systems to control glucose production. An increase in circulating glucose inhibits glucose production in the liver, but this negative feedback is impaired in type 2 diabetes. Here we report that a primary increase in hypothalamic glucose levels lowers blood glucose through inhibition of glucose production in rats. The effect of glucose requires its conversion to lactate followed by stimulation of pyruvate metabolism, which leads to activation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels. Thus, interventions designed to enhance the hypothalamic sensing of glucose may improve glucose homeostasis in diabetes.

  17. Effect of insulin on LHRH release by perifused hypothalamic fragments.

    PubMed

    Arias, P; Rodríguez, M; Szwarcfarb, B; Sinay, I R; Moguilevsky, J A

    1992-09-01

    Insulin-deficient states are associated with an impaired function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, but the mechanisms underlying hypothalamic alterations in experimental diabetes are still unknown. We investigated the effect of glucose concentrations, in the presence and absence of insulin, on LHRH release from perifused hypothalamic fragments from female adult ovariectomized rats. Glucose and insulin were added to the perifusion medium (Earle's, pH 7.4, gassed with 95% O2/5% CO2, flow rate 50 microliters/min). When glucose was absent (in the presence of insulin 10 mU/l), LHRH release was reduced, peak levels being < 5 pg/100 microliters. The addition of glucose (100 and 300 mg/dl), in the absence of insulin, resulted in peak LHRH levels fluctuating around 35 pg/100 microliters (p < 0.05 vs. glucose 0 mg/dl). When glucose (100 or 300 mg/dl) and insulin (10 mU/l) were combined, an eightfold increase in peak LHRH values was observed, and peak levels reached 300 pg/100 microliters (p < 0.05 vs. glucose 100 and 300 mg/dl alone). In conclusion, LHRH release by perifused hypothalamic fragments is dramatically increased by low concentrations of insulin; this occurs only when glucose is available. Acutely elevated glucose levels (from 100 to 300 mg/dl) do not affect LHRH release.

  18. Hypothalamic-pituitary function in the Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leroith, D; Farkash, Y; Bar-Ziev, J; Spitz, I M

    1980-07-01

    Four siblings with classic Bardet-Biedl syndrome were studied. The brother had hypogonadism of testiculr origin, with high gonadotropin levels and exaggerated responses to luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone, whereas the three sisters showed a normal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The remaining pituitary hormone function was intact.

  19. Aging attenuates acquired heat tolerance and hypothalamic neurogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Katakura, Masanori; Inoue, Takayuki; Hara, Toshiko; Hashimoto, Michio; Shido, Osamu

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated age-dependent changes in heat exposure-induced hypothalamic neurogenesis and acquired heat tolerance in rats. We previously reported that neuronal progenitor cell proliferation and neural differentiation are enhanced in the hypothalamus of long-term heat-acclimated (HA) rats. Male Wistar rats, 5 weeks (Young), 10-11 months (Adult), or 22-25 months (Old) old, were subjected to an ambient temperature of 32°C for 40-50 days (HA rats). Rats underwent a heat tolerance test. In HA rats, increases in abdominal temperature (Tab ) in the the Young, Adult, and Old groups were significantly smaller than those in their respective controls. However, the increase in Tab of HA rats became greater with advancing age. The number of hypothalamic bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-immunopositive cells double stained with a mature neuron marker, neuronal nuclei (NeuN), of HA rats was significantly higher in the Young group than that in the control group. In Young HA, BrdU/NeuN-immunopositive cells of the preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus appeared to be the highest among regions examined. Large numbers of newborn neurons were also located in the ventromedial and dorsomedial nuclei, as well as the posterior hypothalamic area, whereas heat exposure did not increase such numbers in the Adult and Old groups. Aging may interfere with heat exposure-induced hypothalamic neurogenesis and acquired heat tolerance in rats.

  20. The effect of spaceflight on retino-hypothalamic tract development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, D. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Tang, I. H.; Fuller, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers examined the effect of late prenatal exposure to microgravity on the development of the retina, retinohypothalamic tract, geniculo-hypothalamic tract, and suprachiasmatic nucleus. Results indicate an effect on c-fos activity in the intergeniculate leaflet between gestational day 20 and postnatal day 8, suggesting a delay in development of the circadian timing system.

  1. Hypothalamic subependymal niche: a novel site of the adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rojczyk-Gołębiewska, Ewa; Pałasz, Artur; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2014-07-01

    The discovery of undifferentiated, actively proliferating neural stem cells (NSCs) in the mature brain opened a brand new chapter in the contemporary neuroscience. Adult neurogenesis appears to occur in specific brain regions (including hypothalamus) throughout vertebrates' life, being considered an important player in the processes of memory, learning, and neural plasticity. In the adult mammalian brain, NSCs are located mainly in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle ependymal wall. Besides these classical regions, hypothalamic neurogenesis occurring mainly along and beneath the third ventricle wall seems to be especially well documented. Neurogenic zones in SGZ, SVZ, and in the hypothalamus share some particular common features like similar cellular cytoarchitecture, vascularization pattern, and extracellular matrix properties. Hypothalamic neurogenic niche is formed mainly by four special types of radial glia-like tanycytes. They are characterized by distinct expression of some neural progenitor and stem cell markers. Moreover, there are numerous suggestions that newborn hypothalamic neurons have a significant ability to integrate into the local neural pathways and to play important physiological roles, especially in the energy balance regulation. Newly formed neurons in the hypothalamus can synthesize and release food intake regulating neuropeptides and they are sensitive to the leptin. On the other hand, high-fat diet positively influences hypothalamic neurogenesis in rodents. The nature of this intriguing new site of adult neurogenesis is still so far poorly studied and requires further investigations.

  2. Hypothalamic mass and gigantism in neurofibromatosis: treatment with bromocriptine.

    PubMed

    Duchowny, M S; Katz, R; Bejar, R L

    1984-03-01

    A child with neurofibromatosis exhibited gigantism and acromegaly in association with a hypothalamic mass lesion. Bromocriptine, 5 mg daily, reduced somatic growth rate and restored biochemical homeostasis but had no effect on tumor growth. Radiation therapy arrested tumor enlargement and stabilized deteriorating visual function. PMID:6426370

  3. Buffering in cyclic gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyzin, S. D.; Kolesov, A. Yu.; Rozov, N. Kh.

    2016-06-01

    We consider cyclic chains of unidirectionally coupled delay differential-difference equations that are mathematical models of artificial oscillating gene networks. We establish that the buffering phenomenon is realized in these system for an appropriate choice of the parameters: any given finite number of stable periodic motions of a special type, the so-called traveling waves, coexist.

  4. Cyclical magnetic field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, T. O.; Johnson, W. P.; Gale, B. K.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new magnetic field flow fractionation (FFF) system was designed and modeled by using finite element simulations. Other than current magnetic FFF systems, which use static magnetic fields, our system uses cyclical magnetic fields. Results of the simulations show that our cyclical magnetic FFF system can be used effectively for the separation of magnetic nanoparticles. Cyclical magnetic FFF system is composed of a microfluidic channel (length = 5 cm, height = 30 μm) and 2 coils. Square wave currents of 1 Hz (with 90 deg of phase difference) were applied to the coils. By using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a, magnetic field profile and corresponding magnetic force exerted on the magnetite nanoparticles were calculated. The magnetic force data were exported from Comsol to Matlab. In Matlab, a parabolic flow profile with maximum flow speed of 0.4 mL/h was defined. Particle trajectories were obtained by the calculation of the particle speeds resulted from both magnetic and hydrodynamic forces. Particle trajectories of the particles with sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm were simulated and elution times of the particles were calculated. Results show that there is a significant difference between the elution times of the particles so that baseline separation of the particles can be obtained. In this work, it is shown that by the application of cyclical magnetic fields, the separation of magnetic nanoparticles can be done efficiently.

  5. Color visualization of cyclic magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Alfredo; Estupiñán, Viviana

    2014-02-01

    We exploit the perceptual, circular ordering of the hues in a technique for the visualization of cyclic variables. The hue is thus meaningfully used for the indication of variables such as the azimuth and the units of the measurement of time. The cyclic (or circular) variables may be both of the continuous type or the discrete type; among the first there is azimuth and among the last you find the musical notes and the days of the week. A correspondence between the values of a cyclic variable and the chromatic hues, where the natural circular ordering of the variable is respected, is called a color code for the variable. We base such a choice of hues on an assignment of of the unique hues red, yellow, green and blue, or one of the 8 even permutations of this ordered list, to 4 cardinal values of the cyclic variable, suitably ordered; color codes based on only 3 cardinal points are also possible. Color codes, being intuitive, are easy to remember. A possible low accuracy when reading instruments that use this technique is compensated by fast, ludic and intuitive readings; also, the use of a referential frame makes readings precise. An achromatic version of the technique, that can be used by dichromatic people, is proposed.

  6. Steroidal regulation of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y release and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sahu, A; Phelps, C P; White, J D; Crowley, W R; Kalra, S P; Kalra, P S

    1992-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) readily stimulates the release of hypothalamic LHRH and pituitary LH release in intact and gonadal steroid-primed gonadectomized rats. We have now tested the hypothesis that the release and synthesis of hypothalamic NPY may be regulated by gonadal steroids. To measure the effects of gonadal hormones on NPY release, a permanent push-pull cannula was implanted in the anterior pituitary (AP) of sham castrated (controls) or castrated (CAST) male rats, and 1 week later, the AP was perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid over a 3-4 h period. NPY concentrations in the perfusates collected at 10-min intervals were measured by RIAs. The NPY release pattern in the AP was episodic in both intact and CAST rats, and the frequency of NPY episodes was similar in two groups. However, the amount of NPY detected in the AP of CAST rats was significantly less than that of intact rats because the mean rate of release and the amplitude of NPY episodes in the perfusates of CAST rats were significantly reduced. This observation of attenuated hypothalamic NPY output in vivo and previous evidence of decreased hypothalamic NPY contents after CAST implied that the synthesis of hypothalamic NPY may be regulated by testicular secretions. Therefore, the effects of testosterone (T)-replacement on preproNPY messenger RNA (mRNA) in the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) was evaluated. Rats were CAST and received either empty or T-filled Silastic capsules sc. Two weeks later, the level of perproNPY mRNA in the MBH was determined by solution hybridization/ribonuclease protection assay using a complementary RNA probe complementary to the rat NPY precursor mRNA. We observed that the levels of preproNPY mRNA were 2-fold higher in the MBH of T-replaced CAST as compared to control CAST rats. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that gonadal steroids enhance the neurosecretory activity of hypothalamic NPYergic neurons, and for the first time reveal a coupling between the

  7. Relaxin-3 stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    McGowan, B M; Stanley, S A; Donovan, J; Thompson, E L; Patterson, M; Semjonous, N M; Gardiner, J V; Murphy, K G; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R

    2008-08-01

    The hypothalamus plays a key role in the regulation of both energy homeostasis and reproduction. Evidence suggests that relaxin-3, a recently discovered member of the insulin superfamily, is an orexigenic hypothalamic neuropeptide. Relaxin-3 is thought to act in the brain via the RXFP3 receptor, although the RXFP1 receptor may also play a role. Relaxin-3, RXFP3, and RXFP1 are present in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, an area with a well-characterized role in the regulation of energy balance that also modulates reproductive function by providing inputs to hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. Other members of the relaxin family are known to play a role in the regulation of reproduction. However, the effects of relaxin-3 on reproductive function are unknown. We studied the role of relaxin-3 in the regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Intracerebroventricular (5 nmol) and intraparaventricular (540-1,620 pmol) administration of human relaxin-3 (H3) in adult male Wistar rats significantly increased plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) 30 min postinjection. This effect was blocked by pretreatment with a peripheral GnRH antagonist. Central administration of human relaxin-2 showed no significant effect on plasma LH. H3 dose-dependently stimulated the release of GnRH from hypothalamic explants and GT(1)-7 cells, which express RXFP1 and RXFP3, but did not influence LH or follicle-stimulating hormone release from pituitary fragments in vitro. We have demonstrated a novel role for relaxin-3 in the stimulation of the HPG axis, putatively via hypothalamic GnRH neurons. Relaxin-3 may act as a central signal linking nutritional status and reproductive function.

  8. A case for hypothalamic acromegaly: a clinicopathological study of six patients with hypothalamic gangliocytomas producing growth hormone-releasing factor.

    PubMed

    Asa, S L; Scheithauer, B W; Bilbao, J M; Horvath, E; Ryan, N; Kovacs, K; Randall, R V; Laws, E R; Singer, W; Linfoot, J A

    1984-05-01

    We report the histological, ultrastructural, and immunocytochemical features of six hypothalamic gangliocytomas associated with pituitary GH cell adenomas and/or acromegaly. In four patients, the gangliocytoma was intrasellar, and no hypothalamic investigation was performed; in two patients, autopsy confirmed hypothalamic involvement. Four patients had a gangliocytoma associated with pituitary GH cell adenoma and acromegaly; electron microscopy demonstrated an intimate association between neurons and adenomatous GH cells. One patient had a gangliocytoma and a GH cell adenoma but no clinical evidence of acromegaly. In the sixth patient, clinical and biochemical acromegaly was manifest, but no pituitary adenoma was demonstrated. Using immunocytochemistry, human pancreatic tumor GRF (hptGRF-40) was localized in the majority of neurons of all six gangliocytomas. The pituitary adenomas and nontumorous adenohypophyses were negative for hptGRF-40. In addition, somatostatin, glucagon, and GnRH were demonstrated within some neurons of several tumors; insulin and gastrin stains were equivocal. These findings confirm previous proposals of production of a GRF by such gangliocytomas. While the significance of other peptides found in some of the tumors is uncertain, the presence of hptGRF-40 in neurons of these gangliocytomas supports the theory that GRF excess is the mechanism responsible for over-production of GH and provides evidence for a syndrome of hypothalamic acromegaly.

  9. Synthesis of cyclic disulfide-rich peptides.

    PubMed

    Akcan, Muharrem; Craik, David J

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we describe two SPPS approaches for producing cyclic disulfide-rich peptides in our laboratory, including cyclotides from plants, cyclic conotoxins from cone snail venoms, chlorotoxin from scorpion venom, and the sunflower trypsin inhibitor peptide, SFTI-1.

  10. Sequencing Cyclic Peptides by Multistage Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mohimani, Hosein; Yang, Yu-Liang; Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most effective antibiotics (e.g., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. While hundreds of biomedically important cyclic peptides have been sequenced, the computational techniques for sequencing cyclic peptides are still in their infancy. Previous methods for sequencing peptide antibiotics and other cyclic peptides are based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and require large amount (miligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Recently, development of mass spectrometry based methods has provided some hope for accurate sequencing of cyclic peptides using picograms of materials. In this paper we develop a method for sequencing of cyclic peptides by multistage mass spectrometry, and show its advantages over single stage mass spectrometry. The method is tested on known and new cyclic peptides from Bacillus brevis, Dianthus superbus and Streptomyces griseus, as well as a new family of cyclic peptides produced by marine bacteria. PMID:21751357

  11. Cyclic AMP in cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    Póvoa, H; Figueira, D R; Campos da Paz, A; Spichler, E R; Lopes, E R

    1981-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate normally stimulates motility of spermatozoa. Its concentration in cervical mucus was studied by an isotopic competitive method in 15 normal women aged between 20 and 50 years. Values were very high, particularly in the periovulatory period, with a mean (+/-SD) value of 167.90 +/- 154.96 nmol/l. These are very high when compared with values in other biological fluids (blood serum and urine).

  12. Cytokines and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Hermus, A R; Sweep, C G

    1990-12-20

    After administration of the cytokines interleukin 1 (IL1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin 2 and interleukin 6 to laboratory animals or humans, plasma levels of glucocorticoids are elevated. This effect is mediated by activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary unit. IL1 and TNF inhibit aldosterone production by rat adrenocortical cells in vitro and stimulate renin release by rat renal cortical cells. Administration of IL1 or TNF in rats suppresses hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid function, whereas IL1 acts at the level of the brain and the gonads to interfere with gonadotropin and sex steroid secretion. During stimulation of the immune system (e.g. during infectious diseases), peculiar alterations in hormone secretion occur (hypercortisolism, hyperreninemic hypoaldosteronism, euthyroid sick syndrome, hypogonadism). The role of cytokines in these alterations remains to be established.

  13. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadotropic function in girls with premature thelarche.

    PubMed

    Pasquino, A M; Piccolo, F; Scalamandre, A; Malvaso, M; Ortolani, R; Boscherini, B

    1980-12-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadotropic activity was investigated in 9 girls with premature thelarche, and compared with that in 9 healthy girls and 6 girls with true precocious puberty. The gonadotropin stimulation test with luteinising hormone-releasing hormone was used. Girls with premature thelarche showed luteinising hormone response resembling that of normal girls, and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) response quite similar to that of girls with precocious puberty. This suggests that in premature thelarche there is a partial activation of the diencephalic-hypophyseal-gonadal axis, which affects FSH only. Premature thelarche therefore, should be considered as one of the disorders due to altered sensitivity of the hypothalamic receptors which regulate sex maturation.

  14. Involvement of dopaminergic systems in the ventromedial hypothalamic hyperphagia.

    PubMed

    Najam, N

    1988-10-01

    The effect of chronic dopamine receptor blockage on ventro-medial hypothalamic lesion induced hyperphagia and obesity was studied. Rats with electrolytic ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) lesions were treated chronically with either haloperidol (DA antagonist) or vehicle solution. Food intake of rats with VMH lesions fell well below baseline levels. Additionally, these animals started losing body weight within 24 hours of the initiation of treatment and continued to lose weight throughout the treatment period. When the treatment was discontinued these animals resumed overeating and regained body weights. The food intakes and body weights of unlesioned rats treated with either haloperidol or vehicle, and VMH lesioned rats treated with vehicle, were not affected by these treatments.

  15. Hypothalamic and dietary control of temperature-mediated longevity

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, Iustin; Morrison, Brad; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia; Bartfai, Tamas; Conti, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Temperature is an important modulator of longevity and aging in both poikilotherms and homeotherm animals. In homeotherms, temperature homeostasis is regulated primarily in the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus. This region receives and integrates peripheral, central and environmental signals and maintains a nearly constant core body temperature (Tcore) by regulating the autonomic and hormonal control of heat production and heat dissipation. Temperature sensitive neurons found in the POA are considered key elements of the neuronal circuitry modulating these effects. Nutrient homeostasis is also a hypothalamically regulated modulator of aging as well as one of the signals that can influence Tcore in homeotherms. Investigating the mechanisms of the regulation of nutrient and temperature homeostasis in the hypothalamus is important to understand how these two elements of energy homeostasis influence longevity and aging as well as how aging can affect hypothalamic homeostatic mechanisms. PMID:19631766

  16. Endocrine changes in histiocytosis of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

    PubMed

    Toro Galván, Silvia; Planas Vilaseca, Alejandra; Michalopoulou Alevras, Theodora; Torres Díaz, Alberto; Suárez Balaguer, Javier; Villabona Artero, Carles

    2015-02-01

    Histiocytosis is characterized by proliferation of cells from the mononuclear phagocyte system, and may be divided into Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis (including Erdheim-Chester disease [ECD]). While diabetes insipidus (DI) is the most common hypothalamic-pituitary consequence, anterior pituitary deficiencies are less known. This study analyzed the frequency and progression of pituitary hormone deficiencies and the radiographic findings in 9 patients (7 with LCH and 2 with ECD) with hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) axis. Eighty-nine percent of patients had DI (62% at diagnosis), and 78% had one or more anterior pituitary deficiencies (71% at diagnosis). HP involvement is relatively common in patients diagnosed with histiocytosis and hormone deficiencies may be present at diagnosis or appear gradually during the course of disease. Regular monitoring of these patients is recommended.

  17. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  18. [Neurovegetative and hypothalamic syndromes in children with infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Maslova, O I; Lebedev, B V

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the neuropsychic and vegetative status of 108 children aged 3 months to 7 years suffering from infantile cerebral paralysis has shown that in a great part of the patients a neurovegetative or hypothalamic syndrome can be additionally specified. An analysis of the totality of the background vegetative characteristics shows that the effection of this division of the nervous system is of a mixed character. Different direction of the vegetative reactions, i.e. sympathetic or parasympathetic, can be noted in different forms of the paralysis. The neurovegetative syndrome can be discerned in children with a noticeable psychic defect, while the hypothalamic one in children with a good psychic development. PMID:7435028

  19. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zorzano, Antonio; Claret, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1) cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA). Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction. PMID:26113818

  20. Physiology of the Hypothalamic Pituitary Gonadal Axis in the Male.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Patricia Freitas; Corradi, Renato B; Greene, Loren Wissner

    2016-05-01

    Testosterone synthesis and male fertility are the results of the perfect coordination of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. A negative feedback finely controls the secretion of hormones at the 3 levels. Congenital or acquired disturbance at any level leads to an impairment of reproductive function and the clinical syndrome of hypogonadism. In some cases, this condition is reversible. Once the diagnosis is made, testosterone replacement therapy is the standard therapy; however, novel therapies may improve spermatogenesis while elevating testosterone levels.

  1. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  2. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Masumi

    2013-12-30

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates). Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrates known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates), the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol) feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir) GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTHβ mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  3. Hypothalamic leptin action is mediated by histone deacetylase 5.

    PubMed

    Kabra, Dhiraj G; Pfuhlmann, Katrin; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Schriever, Sonja C; Casquero García, Veronica; Kebede, Adam Fiseha; Fuente-Martin, Esther; Trivedi, Chitrang; Heppner, Kristy; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Legutko, Beata; Kabra, Uma D; Gao, Yuanqing; Yi, Chun-Xia; Quarta, Carmelo; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Finan, Brian; Müller, Timo D; Meyer, Carola W; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stemmer, Kerstin; Woods, Stephen C; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Schneider, Robert; Olson, Eric N; Tschöp, Matthias H; Pfluger, Paul T

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic leptin signalling has a key role in food intake and energy-balance control and is often impaired in obese individuals. Here we identify histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) as a regulator of leptin signalling and organismal energy balance. Global HDAC5 KO mice have increased food intake and greater diet-induced obesity when fed high-fat diet. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of HDAC5 activity in the mediobasal hypothalamus increases food intake and modulates pathways implicated in leptin signalling. We show HDAC5 directly regulates STAT3 localization and transcriptional activity via reciprocal STAT3 deacetylation at Lys685 and phosphorylation at Tyr705. In vivo, leptin sensitivity is substantially impaired in HDAC5 loss-of-function mice. Hypothalamic HDAC5 overexpression improves leptin action and partially protects against HFD-induced leptin resistance and obesity. Overall, our data suggest that hypothalamic HDAC5 activity is a regulator of leptin signalling that adapts food intake and body weight to our dietary environment. PMID:26923837

  4. Effect of cancer treatment on hypothalamic-pituitary function.

    PubMed

    Crowne, Elizabeth; Gleeson, Helena; Benghiat, Helen; Sanghera, Paul; Toogood, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    The past 30 years have seen a great improvement in survival of children and young adults treated for cancer. Cancer treatment can put patients at risk of health problems that can develop many years later, most commonly affecting the endocrine system. Patients treated with cranial radiotherapy often develop dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. A characteristic pattern of hormone deficiencies develops over several years. Growth hormone is disrupted most often, followed by gonadal, adrenal, and thyroid hormones, leading to abnormal growth and puberty in children, and affecting general wellbeing and fertility in adults. The severity and rate of development of hypopituitarism is determined by the dose of radiotherapy delivered to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Individual growth hormone deficiencies can develop after a dose as low as 10 Gy, whereas multiple hormone deficiencies are common after 60 Gy. New techniques in radiotherapy aim to reduce the effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis by minimising the dose received. Patients taking cytotoxic drugs do not often develop overt hypopituitarism, although the effect of radiotherapy might be enhanced. The exception is adrenal insufficiency caused by glucocorticosteroids which, although transient, can be life-threatening. New biological drugs to treat cancer can cause autoimmune hypophysitis and hypopituitarism; therefore, oncologists and endocrinologists should be vigilant and work together to optimise patient outcomes.

  5. Effect of cancer treatment on hypothalamic-pituitary function.

    PubMed

    Crowne, Elizabeth; Gleeson, Helena; Benghiat, Helen; Sanghera, Paul; Toogood, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    The past 30 years have seen a great improvement in survival of children and young adults treated for cancer. Cancer treatment can put patients at risk of health problems that can develop many years later, most commonly affecting the endocrine system. Patients treated with cranial radiotherapy often develop dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. A characteristic pattern of hormone deficiencies develops over several years. Growth hormone is disrupted most often, followed by gonadal, adrenal, and thyroid hormones, leading to abnormal growth and puberty in children, and affecting general wellbeing and fertility in adults. The severity and rate of development of hypopituitarism is determined by the dose of radiotherapy delivered to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Individual growth hormone deficiencies can develop after a dose as low as 10 Gy, whereas multiple hormone deficiencies are common after 60 Gy. New techniques in radiotherapy aim to reduce the effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis by minimising the dose received. Patients taking cytotoxic drugs do not often develop overt hypopituitarism, although the effect of radiotherapy might be enhanced. The exception is adrenal insufficiency caused by glucocorticosteroids which, although transient, can be life-threatening. New biological drugs to treat cancer can cause autoimmune hypophysitis and hypopituitarism; therefore, oncologists and endocrinologists should be vigilant and work together to optimise patient outcomes. PMID:25873572

  6. Effects of undernourishment on the hypothalamic orexinergic system.

    PubMed

    Pinos, H; Pérez-Izquierdo, M A; Carrillo, B; Collado, P

    2011-01-10

    The present study examined the effects of a severely restricted diet during the pre- and postnatal periods with later nutritional rehabilitation on orexin hypothalamic neurons in male and female Wistar rats. Immunocytochemistry was used to reveal orexin-immunoreactive (orexin-ir) cells in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), lateral hypothalamic area (LH) and the perifornical nucleus (PF). Dietary restriction decreased the number of orexin-ir cells in the LH, whereas DMH or PF orexin-ir populations were not affected in either male or female rats. Nutritional rehabilitation resulted in a differential recovery that depended on the period during which rehabilitation occurred and on the sex of the animal. In summary, our study suggests that the hypothalamic nuclei implicated in eating behavior present a differential vulnerability to adverse environmental conditions during development. Specifically, among the studied nuclei only the LH orexin-ir cells were sensitive to severe food deprivation during development in male and female rats. These results suggest that starvation interferes with developmental events that occur during CNS sexual differentiation.

  7. Hypothalamic leptin action is mediated by histone deacetylase 5

    PubMed Central

    Kabra, Dhiraj G.; Pfuhlmann, Katrin; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Schriever, Sonja C.; Casquero García, Veronica; Kebede, Adam Fiseha; Fuente-Martin, Esther; Trivedi, Chitrang; Heppner, Kristy; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Legutko, Beata; Kabra, Uma D.; Gao, Yuanqing; Yi, Chun-Xia; Quarta, Carmelo; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Finan, Brian; Müller, Timo D.; Meyer, Carola W.; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stemmer, Kerstin; Woods, Stephen C.; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Schneider, Robert; Olson, Eric N.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Pfluger, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic leptin signalling has a key role in food intake and energy-balance control and is often impaired in obese individuals. Here we identify histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) as a regulator of leptin signalling and organismal energy balance. Global HDAC5 KO mice have increased food intake and greater diet-induced obesity when fed high-fat diet. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of HDAC5 activity in the mediobasal hypothalamus increases food intake and modulates pathways implicated in leptin signalling. We show HDAC5 directly regulates STAT3 localization and transcriptional activity via reciprocal STAT3 deacetylation at Lys685 and phosphorylation at Tyr705. In vivo, leptin sensitivity is substantially impaired in HDAC5 loss-of-function mice. Hypothalamic HDAC5 overexpression improves leptin action and partially protects against HFD-induced leptin resistance and obesity. Overall, our data suggest that hypothalamic HDAC5 activity is a regulator of leptin signalling that adapts food intake and body weight to our dietary environment. PMID:26923837

  8. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea — diagnostic challenges, monitoring, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sowińska-Przepiera, Elżbieta; Andrysiak-Mamos, Elżbieta; Jarząbek-Bielecka, Grażyna; Walkowiak, Aleksandra; Osowicz-Korolonek, Lilianna; Syrenicz, Małgorzata; Kędzia, Witold; Syrenicz, Anhelli

    2015-01-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea (FHA) is associated with functional inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Causes of FHA can be classified into the three groups: 1) stress-related factors, 2) consequences of weight loss and/or underweight, and 3) consequences of physical exercise or practicing sports. Diagnosis of FHA should be based on a history of menstrual disorders. During physical examination, patients with FHA present with secondary and tertiary sex characteristics specific for the pubertal stage preceding development of the condition and with the signs of hypoestrogenism. Laboratory results determine further management of patients with amenorrhea, and thus their correct interpretation is vital for making appropriate therapeutic decisions. Treatment of chronic anovulation, menstrual disorders, and secondary amenorrhea resulting from hypothalamic disorders should be aimed at the elimination of the primary cause, i.e. a decrease in psycho-emotional strain, avoidance of chronic stressors, reduction of physical exercise level, or optimisation of BMI in patients who lose weight. If menses do not resume after a period of six months or primary causative treatment is not possible, neutralisation of hypoestrogenism consequences, especially unfavourable effects on bone metabolism, become the main issue. Previous studies have shown that oestroprogestagen therapy is useful in both the treatment of menstrual disorders and normalisation of bone mineral density. Hormonal preparations should be introduced into therapeutic protocol on an individualised basis. PMID:26136135

  9. Effects of sugar solutions on hypothalamic appetite regulation.

    PubMed

    Colley, Danielle L; Castonguay, Thomas W

    2015-02-01

    Several hypotheses for the causes of the obesity epidemic in the US have been proposed. One such hypothesis is that dietary intake patterns have significantly shifted to include unprecedented amounts of refined sugar. We set out to determine if different sugars might promote changes in the hypothalamic mechanisms controlling food intake by measuring several hypothalamic peptides subsequent to overnight access to dilute glucose, sucrose, high fructose corn syrup, or fructose solutions. Rats were given access to food, water and a sugar solution for 24h, after which blood and tissues were collected. Fructose access (as opposed to other sugars that were tested) resulted in a doubling of circulating triglycerides. Glucose consumption resulted in upregulation of 7 satiety-related hypothalamic peptides whereas changes in gene expression were mixed for remaining sugars. Also, following multiple verification assays, 6 satiety related peptides were verified as being affected by sugar intake. These data provide evidence that not all sugars are equally effective in affecting the control of intake. PMID:25449399

  10. Facilitatory effects of caerulein on hypothalamic defensive attack in cats.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Maki, S; Uchimura, H

    1988-09-01

    Effects of intraventricularly microinjected caerulein (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 micrograms) on the thresholds for hypothalamically elicited defensive attack and influences of haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) on the effects were studied in chronic cats. Directed attack and hissing were selected for threshold determination, and thresholds for these responses were measured under two situations: one with provocations by a human, and the other without such provocation. Results were as follows. (1) Caerulein lowered all thresholds in generally equal decrements and in a dose-related manner, accompanied by a general behavioral arousal. (2) Prior injection of haloperidol prevented the effects of caerulein, suggesting an antagonism-like interaction between haloperidol and caerulein. (3) Observed facilitatory effects of caerulein on the hypothalamic defensive attack were very similar to those observed with dopamine (DA) agonists such as methamphetamine and apomorphine and opposite to those with DA antagonists such as haloperidol and chlorpromazine. These findings suggest that caerulein exerts its facilitatory effects on the excitability of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus through its synergistic interaction with DA. PMID:3179708

  11. Effects of sugar solutions on hypothalamic appetite regulation.

    PubMed

    Colley, Danielle L; Castonguay, Thomas W

    2015-02-01

    Several hypotheses for the causes of the obesity epidemic in the US have been proposed. One such hypothesis is that dietary intake patterns have significantly shifted to include unprecedented amounts of refined sugar. We set out to determine if different sugars might promote changes in the hypothalamic mechanisms controlling food intake by measuring several hypothalamic peptides subsequent to overnight access to dilute glucose, sucrose, high fructose corn syrup, or fructose solutions. Rats were given access to food, water and a sugar solution for 24h, after which blood and tissues were collected. Fructose access (as opposed to other sugars that were tested) resulted in a doubling of circulating triglycerides. Glucose consumption resulted in upregulation of 7 satiety-related hypothalamic peptides whereas changes in gene expression were mixed for remaining sugars. Also, following multiple verification assays, 6 satiety related peptides were verified as being affected by sugar intake. These data provide evidence that not all sugars are equally effective in affecting the control of intake.

  12. Neurotensin in the lateral hypothalamic area: origin and function.

    PubMed

    Allen, G V; Cechetto, D F

    1995-11-01

    The origin of neurotensin in the lateral hypothalamus was investigated by means of fluorescent retrograde tract tracing and neurotensin-like immunoreactivity. Following fluorescent retrograde tract tracing with FluoroGold combined with neurotensin immunohistochemistry in the rat brain, numerous neurotensin-immunoreactive neurons with projections to the posterior lateral hypothalamic area were identified in the central nucleus of the amygdala, perifornical area and the parabrachial nucleus. Fewer numbers of neurotensin-positive neurons with projections to the lateral hypothalamic area were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, lateral septal nucleus, medial preoptic area, peri- and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, anterior lateral hypothalamic area and dorsal raphe nucleus. In addition, the role of neurotensin in the modulation of autonomic regulatory input from the insula was investigated. The lateral hypothalamic area was surveyed for single units responding to electrical stimulation (500-900 microA, 0.5 Hz) of sites in the insular cortex from which cardiovascular pressor or depressor responses could be elicited. These units were tested for the influence of neurotensin on responses to stimulation of the insular cortex. Of 60 spontaneously firing neurons, 27 units responded to electrical stimulation of cardiovascular sites in the insula. Of the units responding to stimulation of cardiovascular sites in the insula, 14 units showed excitation only, 10 units showed excitation followed by inhibition and three units showed inhibition. Iontophoresis of 0.1-1.0 mM neurotensin (25-100 nA, pH 5.0-6.0) potentiated six of the excitatory responses and showed no effect on the inhibitory responses. In addition, nine neurons showed an increase in spontaneous activity with iontophoresis of neurotensin. Of these neurons, three were excited by insular stimulation and six did not respond. These findings indicate the likely origin of neurotensin in the

  13. Cyclic GMP and Cilia Motility

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia of the lungs respond to environmental challenges by increasing their ciliary beat frequency in order to enhance mucociliary clearance as a fundamental tenant of innate defense. One important second messenger in transducing the regulable nature of motile cilia is cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP). In this review, the history of cGMP action is presented and a survey of the existing data addressing cGMP action in ciliary motility is presented. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of cGMP in ciliated cells is presented in the context of alcohol-induced cilia function and dysfunction. PMID:26264028

  14. Cyclic voltammetry of supported BLMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgasova, Renata; Sabo, Jan; Ottova, Angelica L.; Tien, H. T.

    1996-06-01

    The transfer of an electron across a bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) is one of the BLMs most exciting processes. A number of well known electron mediators have been investigated using the method of cyclic voltammetry on a Teflon coated platinum wire, the tip of which has been modified by a self-assembled bilayer lipid membrane (s-BLM). The electrical capacitance of the s-BLM system was measured as a function of frequency. The results are discussed in terms of electron transfer and redox reactions.

  15. [Conditioning of emotional behavior caused by hypothalamic stimulation (3): The learned behavior caused by hypothalamic stimulation in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Yanaura, S; Funada, K; Abe, Y; Hosokawa, T

    1976-09-01

    In the present study, the learned behavior caused by hypothalamic electrical stimulation was examined in order to determine the effects of psychotropic drugs. Subjects were albino male rabbits with electrodes chronically implanted in the hypothalamic area. A shuttle box, which was adjusted for behavioral pharmacological estimation of drugs in rabbits, was used. A buzzer sound (85dB) and electrical stimulation of hypothalamus (100 HZ, 1 msec, 1.2-2.0V) were used as the conditional stimulation (CS) and unconditional stimulation (UCS), respectively. The same animal was trained in habituation to a buzzer sound as the CS. For avoidance conditioning in a two-compartment situation, the animal was placed in a shuttle box divided by a hurdle situated at the middle of two-compartments. After the CS was presented for 10 sec, the UCS was given. The animals were subjected to 15 conditioning trials per day. The avoidance and escape behavior model became as distinct by hypothalamic stimulation as by UCS. After termination of the experiments, extinction trials were carried out after which the animals were sacrificed, and localization of the stimulating electrodes was determined histologically.

  16. Cyclic statistics in rolling bearing diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Qu, Liangsheng

    2003-10-01

    Mechanical signals with amplitude modulated are characterized by periodic time-varying ensemble statistics and can be considered as cyclostationary. In this paper, the second order cyclic statistics, i.e. cyclic autocorrelation and cyclic spectrum, are introduced. A method of demodulation based on cyclic autocorrelation is derived from a signal model. The modulators and carrier are exhibited, respectively, in low- and high-frequency band of cyclic frequency domain. The three-dimensional spectral correlation figure, which represents cyclic frequency, frequency and spectral correlation strength simultaneously, is developed to express the demodulation results clearly. The method is tested by simulation signal and applied to diagnose rolling bearing faults. It obtained more information than other conventional methods, such as the frequency domain and the envelop detection. Furthermore, its effect is demonstrated by comparing with the wavelet envelope demodulation.

  17. Advances in targeting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Donald H; Ke, Hengming; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Wang, Yousheng; Chung, Jay; Manganiello, Vincent C

    2014-04-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyse the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, thereby regulating the intracellular concentrations of these cyclic nucleotides, their signalling pathways and, consequently, myriad biological responses in health and disease. Currently, a small number of PDE inhibitors are used clinically for treating the pathophysiological dysregulation of cyclic nucleotide signalling in several disorders, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pharmaceutical interest in PDEs has been reignited by the increasing understanding of the roles of individual PDEs in regulating the subcellular compartmentalization of specific cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways, by the structure-based design of novel specific inhibitors and by the development of more sophisticated strategies to target individual PDE variants.

  18. Cyclic fatigue in silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, G.; Kawabe, Y. . Tsukuba Lab.); Horibe, S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Static and cyclic fatigue behavior was investigated for two kinds of silicon nitride with different microstructures. These materials hardly show rising R-curve behavior. Nevertheless the considerable cyclic loading effect is obviously recognized in them. There has been observed an insignificant difference in the pure cyclic loading effect between coarse grained silicon nitride (SSN-1) and fine grained one (SSN-2). In addition, crack growth rate shows a transient acceleration or retardation when variable-amplitude cyclic loading is applied to SSN-1. Such a result implies the existence of a process zone near a crack tip which has a similar function to plastic zone in metals. Since the above cyclic crack behavior is inexplicable by the grain bridging degradation mechanisms, possible cyclic fatigue mechanisms are, thus, discussed.

  19. Cyclic Imide Dioxime: Formation and Hydrolytic Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.O.; Vukovic, Sinisa; Custelcean, Radu; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Poly(acrylamidoximes) play an important role in the uranium extraction from seawater. The present work reports solution studies of simple analogs to address the formation and stability of two binding sites present in these polymers, open-chain amidoximes and cyclic imide dioximes, including: 1) conditions that maximize the formation of the cyclic form, 2) existence of a base-induced conversion from open-chain to cyclic form, and 3) degradation under acid and base conditions.

  20. [Cyclic Cushing's Syndrome - rare or rarely recognized].

    PubMed

    Kiałka, Marta; Doroszewska, Katarzyna; Mrozińska, Sandra; Milewicz, Tomasz; Stochmal, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic Cushing's syndrome is a type of Cushing's disease which is characterized by alternating periods of increasing and decreasing levels of cortisol in the blood. The diagnostic criteria for cyclic Cushing's syndrome are at least three periods of hypercortisolism alternating with at least two episodes of normal levels of serum cortisol concentration. The epidemiology, signs, symptoms, pathogenesis and treatment of cyclic Cushing's syndrome have been discussed.

  1. Diurnal regulation of hypothalamic kisspeptin is disrupted during mouse pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yap, Cassandra C; Wharfe, Michaela D; Mark, Peter J; Waddell, Brendan J; Smith, Jeremy T

    2016-06-01

    Kisspeptin, the neuropeptide product of the Kiss1 gene, is critical in driving the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Kisspeptin neurons in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and arcuate nucleus (Arc) of the hypothalamus mediate differential effects, with the Arc regulating negative feedback of sex steroids and the AVPV regulating positive feedback, vital for the preovulatory surge and gated under circadian control. We aimed to characterize hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA expression in nonpregnant and pregnant mice, and investigate potential circadian regulation. Anterior and posterior hypothalami were collected from C57BL/6J mice at diestrus, proestrus, and days 6, 10, 14, and 18 of pregnancy, at six time points across 24h, for real-time PCR analysis of gene expression. Analysis confirmed that Kiss1 mRNA expression in the AVPV increased at ZT13 during proestrus, with a luteinizing hormone surge observed thereafter. No diurnal regulation was seen at diestrus or at any stage of pregnancy. Anterior hypothalamic Avp mRNA expression exhibited no diurnal variation, but Avpr1a peaked at 12:00h during proestrus, possibly reflecting the circadian input from the suprachiasmatic nucleus to AVPV Kiss1 neurons. Rfrp (Npvf) expression in the posterior hypothalamus did not demonstrate diurnal variation at any stage. Clock genes Bmal1 and Rev-erbα were strongly diurnal, but there was little change between diestrus/proestrus and pregnancy. Our data indicate the absence of the circadian input to Kiss1 in pregnancy, despite high gestational estradiol levels and normal clock gene expression, and may suggest a disruption of a kisspeptin-specific diurnal rhythm that operates in the nonpregnant state.

  2. Thyroid hormone activation of retinoic acid synthesis in hypothalamic tanycytes

    PubMed Central

    Stoney, Patrick N.; Helfer, Gisela; Rodrigues, Diana; Morgan, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for adult brain function and its actions include several key roles in the hypothalamus. Although TH controls gene expression via specific TH receptors of the nuclear receptor class, surprisingly few genes have been demonstrated to be directly regulated by TH in the hypothalamus, or the adult brain as a whole. This study explored the rapid induction by TH of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (Raldh1), encoding a retinoic acid (RA)‐synthesizing enzyme, as a gene specifically expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, cells that mediate a number of actions of TH in the hypothalamus. The resulting increase in RA may then regulate gene expression via the RA receptors, also of the nuclear receptor class. In vivo exposure of the rat to TH led to a significant and rapid increase in hypothalamic Raldh1 within 4 hours. That this may lead to an in vivo increase in RA is suggested by the later induction by TH of the RA‐responsive gene Cyp26b1. To explore the actions of RA in the hypothalamus as a potential mediator of TH control of gene regulation, an ex vivo hypothalamic rat slice culture method was developed in which the Raldh1‐expressing tanycytes were maintained. These slice cultures confirmed that TH did not act on genes regulating energy balance but could induce Raldh1. RA has the potential to upregulate expression of genes involved in growth and appetite, Ghrh and Agrp. This regulation is acutely sensitive to epigenetic changes, as has been shown for TH action in vivo. These results indicate that sequential triggering of two nuclear receptor signalling systems has the capability to mediate some of the functions of TH in the hypothalamus. GLIA 2016;64:425–439 PMID:26527258

  3. Hypothalamic neuropeptide systems and anticipatory weight change in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Adam, C L; Mercer, J G

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal animals are able both to programme changes in body weight in response to annual changes in photoperiod (anticipatory regulation) and to correct changes in body weight caused by imposed energetic demand (compensatory regulation). Experimental evidence from the Siberian hamster suggests that seasonally appropriate body weight is continually reset according to photoperiodic history, even when actual body weight is driven away from this target weight by manipulation of energy intake. These characteristics constitute the "sliding set point" of seasonal body weight regulation. To define the mechanisms and molecules underlying anticipatory body weight regulation, we are investigating the involvement of hypothalamic systems with an established role in the compensatory defence of body weight. Weight loss or restricted growth induced by short days (SD) results in low circulating leptin compared with long day (LD) controls. However, this chronic low leptin signal is read differently from acute low leptin resulting from food deprivation; leptin receptor gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) is lower in SD, whereas food deprivation increases expression levels, suggesting changes in sensitivity to leptin feedback. SD alterations in mRNA levels for a number of hypothalamic neuropeptide and receptor genes appear counter-intuitive for a SD body weight trajectory. However, early increases in ARC cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) gene expression in SDs could be involved in driving body weight loss or growth restriction. The sites of photoperiod interaction with energy balance neuronal circuitry and the neurochemical encoding of body weight set point require full characterisation. Study of anticipatory regulation in seasonal animals offers new insight into body weight regulation across mammalian species, including man.

  4. Effects of estrogens and progesterone on the synaptic organization of the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sá, S I; Lukoyanova, E; Madeira, M D

    2009-08-18

    The majority of the studies on the actions of estrogens in the ventrolateral part of the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMNvl) concern the factors that modulate the receptive component of the feminine sexual behavior and the expression of molecular markers of neuronal activation. To further our understanding of the factors that regulate synaptic plasticity in the female VMNvl, we have examined the effects of estradiol and progesterone, and of estrogen receptor (ER) subtype selective ligands on the number of dendritic and spine synapses established by individual VMNvl neurons and on sexual behavior. In contrast to earlier studies that analyzed synapse densities, our results show that exogenous estradiol increases the number of spine as well as of dendritic synapses, irrespective of the dose and regimen of administration. They also reveal that an effective dose of estradiol administered as one single pulse induces the formation of more synapses than the same dose administered as two pulses on consecutive days. Our results further show that both ER subtypes are involved in the mediation of the synaptogenic effects of estrogens on VMNvl neurons since the administration of the selective ERalpha, propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT), and ERbeta, diarylpropionitrile (DPN), agonists induced a significant increase in the number of synapses that, however, was more exuberant for PPT. Despite its relevant role in feminine sexual behavior, progesterone had no synaptogenic effect in the VMNvl as no changes in synapse numbers were noticed in rats treated with progesterone alone, with estradiol followed by progesterone or with the antiprogestin mifepristone (RU486). Except for the sequential administration of estradiol and progesterone, none of the regimens was associated with lordosis response to vaginocervical stimulation. Therefore, from the sex steroids that undergo cyclic variations over the estrous cycle, only estrogens, acting through both ERalpha and ERbeta, play a key role in

  5. The effects of clomiphene citrate on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Wakeling, A; Marshall, J C; Beardwood, C J; Souza, V F; Russell, G F

    1976-08-01

    Serum luteinizing hormone (LH) responses to a course of clomiphene citrate were studied in eleven patients with anorexia nervosa at different stages of the illness. In malnourished patients basal levels of LH were invariably low. With the resumption of a normal weight a small but definite rise in LH levels was observed but this spontaneous response to weight gain was variable in that many patients continued to exhibit abnormally low LH levels. The response to clomiphene in terms of a rise in basal LH levels after administration of the drug, followed by a second peak of LH and subsequent menstrual bleeding, was clearly dependent in part on the patient's nutritional state. In the malnourished state the response to clomiphene was usually either absent or incomplete. After the resumption of a more normal weight, the patients invariably showed an initial rise in LH after the clomiphene, but the second LH peak and subsequent menstruation were frequently not demonstrated. Six patients maintained a normal body weight for at least six months after a course of clomiphene, but only three of them resumed cyclical menstrual bleeding. It was concluded that factors additional to the nutritional state contribute to the prolonged amenorrhoea in anorexia nervosa and that clomiphene appears to have only a limited role in the treatment and management of patients with the disorder. Some aspects of current knowledge of the endocrine mechanisms that regulate normal menstruation and of the mode of action of clomiphene are outlined. The results of the present study are discussed against this background in an attempt to elucidate further the hypothalamic disorder underlying the amenorrhoea in anorexia nervosa.

  6. Female hypogonadism: evaluation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Micol S; Wierman, Margaret E

    2008-01-01

    Female hypogonadism refers to deficient or abnormal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis that clinically presents with menstrual cycle disturbances. Female hypogonadism can be due to a congenital or acquired cause, and the defect can be at the level of the hypothalamus, pituitary or ovary. A careful history, physical exam and selected laboratory testing can often determine the locus of the defect and whether it results from a structural or hormonal problem. Laboratory testing generally relies on basal hormone levels; however, timing of blood sampling in relation to menses is important to interpretation of the data.

  7. Acupuncture normalizes dysfunction of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis.

    PubMed

    Chen, B Y

    1997-01-01

    This article summarizes the studies of the mechanism of electroacupuncture (EA) in the regulation of the abnormal function of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis (HPOA) in our laboratory. Clinical observation showed that EA with the effective acupoints could cure some anovulatory patients in a highly effective rate and the experimental results suggested that EA might regulate the dysfunction of HPOA in several ways, which means EA could influence some gene expression of brain, thereby, normalizing secretion of some hormones, such as GnRH, LH and E2. The effects of EA might possess a relative specificity on acupoints.

  8. [Hypothalamic-hypophyseal-gonadal axis in chronic alcoholic patients].

    PubMed

    Rallo, R; Fermoso, J; Ramos, F; González-Calvo, V; Marañón, Y A

    1979-01-01

    Eleven male chronic alcoholics without cirrhosis but with clinical features of alcoholism were studied. Ten healthy men of similar age served as controls. After suppressing hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), 17-beta-oestradiol (E2) and testosterone were determined in basal conditions and after administration of clomiphene citrate in each case. Basal levels of FSH, LH and E2 were higher and the testosterone level lower in the alcoholic group. After stimulation, there was no difference in gonadal hormone levels between both groups, suggesting a normal hypothalamic-pituitary axis with an adequate gonadal response.

  9. Regulation of Prolactin in Mice with Altered Hypothalamic Melanocortin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dutia, Roxanne; Kim, Andrea J.; Mosharov, Eugene; Savontaus, Eriika; Chua, Streamson C.; Wardlaw, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    This study used two mouse models with genetic manipulation of the melanocortin system to investigate prolactin regulation. Mice with overexpression of the melanocortin receptor (MC-R) agonist, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (Tg-MSH) or deletion of the MC-R antagonist agouti-related protein (AgRP KO) were studied. Male Tg-MSH mice had lower blood prolactin levels at baseline (2.9±0.3 vs 4.7±0.7 ng/ml) and after restraint stress(68 ±6.5 vs 117±22 ng/ml) versus WT (p<0.05); however, pituitary prolactin content was not different. Blood prolactin was also decreased in male AgRP KO mice at baseline (4.2±0.5 vs 7.6±1.3 ng/ml) and after stress (60±4.5 vs 86.1±5.7 ng/ml) vs WT (p <0.001). Pituitary prolactin content was lower in male AgRP KO mice (4.3±0.3 vs 6.7±0.5 μg/pituitary, p <0.001) versus WT. No differences in blood or pituitary prolactin levels were observed in female AgRP KO mice versus WT. Hypothalamic dopamine activity was assessed as the potential mechanism responsible for changes in prolactin levels. Hypothalamic tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA was measured in both genetic models versus WT mice and hypothalamic dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) content were measured in male AgRP KO and WT mice but neither were significantly different. However, these results do not preclude changes in dopamine activity as dopamine turnover was not directly investigated. This is the first study to show that baseline and stress-induced prolactin release and pituitary prolactin content are reduced in mice with genetic alterations of the melanocortin system and suggests that changes in hypothalamic melanocortin activity may be reflected in measurements of serum prolactin levels. PMID:22800691

  10. Regulation of prolactin in mice with altered hypothalamic melanocortin activity.

    PubMed

    Dutia, Roxanne; Kim, Andrea J; Mosharov, Eugene; Savontaus, Eriika; Chua, Streamson C; Wardlaw, Sharon L

    2012-09-01

    This study used two mouse models with genetic manipulation of the melanocortin system to investigate prolactin regulation. Mice with overexpression of the melanocortin receptor (MC-R) agonist, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (Tg-MSH) or deletion of the MC-R antagonist agouti-related protein (AgRP KO) were studied. Male Tg-MSH mice had lower blood prolactin levels at baseline (2.9±0.3 vs. 4.7±0.7ng/ml) and after restraint stress (68±6.5 vs. 117±22ng/ml) vs. WT (p<0.05); however, pituitary prolactin content was not different. Blood prolactin was also decreased in male AgRP KO mice at baseline (4.2±0.5 vs. 7.6±1.3ng/ml) and after stress (60±4.5 vs. 86.1±5.7ng/ml) vs. WT (p<0.001). Pituitary prolactin content was lower in male AgRP KO mice (4.3±0.3 vs. 6.7±0.5μg/pituitary, p<0.001) vs. WT. No differences in blood or pituitary prolactin levels were observed in female AgRP KO mice vs. WT. Hypothalamic dopamine activity was assessed as the potential mechanism responsible for changes in prolactin levels. Hypothalamic tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA was measured in both genetic models vs. WT mice and hypothalamic dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) content were measured in male AgRP KO and WT mice but neither were significantly different. However, these results do not preclude changes in dopamine activity as dopamine turnover was not directly investigated. This is the first study to show that baseline and stress-induced prolactin release and pituitary prolactin content are reduced in mice with genetic alterations of the melanocortin system and suggests that changes in hypothalamic melanocortin activity may be reflected in measurements of serum prolactin levels.

  11. Alterations in the hypothalamic melanocortin pathway in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; El Oussini, Hajer; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Dengler, Reinhard; Meyer, Thomas; Zierz, Stephan; Kassubek, Jan; Fischer, Wilhelm; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Grehl, Torsten; Hermann, Andreas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Witting, Anke; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease, leads to death within 3 to 5 years after onset. Beyond progressive motor impairment, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis suffer from major defects in energy metabolism, such as weight loss, which are well correlated with survival. Indeed, nutritional intervention targeting weight loss might improve survival of patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying metabolic impairment in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis remain elusive, in particular due to the lack of longitudinal studies. Here we took advantage of samples collected during the clinical trial of pioglitazone (GERP-ALS), and characterized longitudinally energy metabolism of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in response to pioglitazone, a drug with well-characterized metabolic effects. As expected, pioglitazone decreased glycaemia, decreased liver enzymes and increased circulating adiponectin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, showing its efficacy in the periphery. However, pioglitazone did not increase body weight of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis independently of bulbar involvement. As pioglitazone increases body weight through a direct inhibition of the hypothalamic melanocortin system, we studied hypothalamic neurons producing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and the endogenous melanocortin inhibitor agouti-related peptide (AGRP), in mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutant SOD1(G86R). We observed lower Pomc but higher Agrp mRNA levels in the hypothalamus of presymptomatic SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistently, numbers of POMC-positive neurons were decreased, whereas AGRP fibre density was elevated in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistent with a defect in the hypothalamic melanocortin system, food intake after short term fasting was increased in SOD1(G86R) mice. Importantly, these findings were replicated in two other amyotrophic

  12. Nonlinear, nonbinary cyclic group codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, G.

    1992-01-01

    New cyclic group codes of length 2(exp m) - 1 over (m - j)-bit symbols are introduced. These codes can be systematically encoded and decoded algebraically. The code rates are very close to Reed-Solomon (RS) codes and are much better than Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem (BCH) codes (a former alternative). The binary (m - j)-tuples are identified with a subgroup of the binary m-tuples which represents the field GF(2 exp m). Encoding is systematic and involves a two-stage procedure consisting of the usual linear feedback register (using the division or check polynomial) and a small table lookup. For low rates, a second shift-register encoding operation may be invoked. Decoding uses the RS error-correcting procedures for the m-tuple codes for m = 4, 5, and 6.

  13. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    PubMed Central

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations – cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell’s passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells, measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity. PMID:24875391

  14. Cyclic malyl anthocyanins in Dianthus caryophyllus.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, M; Koshioka, M; Yoshida, H; Kan, Y; Fukui, Y; Koike, A; Yamaguchi, M

    2000-12-01

    3,5-Di-O-(beta-glucopyranosyl) pelargonidin 6''-O-4,6'''-O-1-cyclic malate and a previously reported cyanidin equivalent, 3,5-di-O-(beta-glucopyranosyl) cyanidin 6''-O-4,6'''-O-1-cyclic malate were identified from petals of deep pink and red-purple flower cultivars of Dianthus caryophyllus, respectively.

  15. Cyclic Linearization and Island Repair in Sluicing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Chunan

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic Linearization is adopted to account for the island repair of Sluicing in English. The extraction of wh-phrase out of certain islands undergoes non-successive-cyclic movement, which yields conflicting ordering statements. The derivation can be rescued by deleting all ordering statements in IP, including those conflicting ones. Two arguments…

  16. Phase behaviors of cyclic diblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojie; Fan, Zhongyong; Yang, Yuliang; Qiu, Feng

    2011-11-01

    A spectral method of self-consistent field theory has been applied to AB cyclic block copolymers. Phase behaviors of cyclic diblock copolymers, such as order-disorder transition, order-order transition, and domain spacing size, have been studied, showing good consistency with previous experimental and theoretical results. Compared to linear diblocks, cyclic diblocks are harder to phase separate due to the topological constraint of the ring structure. A direct disorder-to-cylinder transition window is observed in the phase diagram, which is significantly different from the mean field phase diagram of linear diblock copolymers. The domain spacing size ratio between cyclic and linear diblock copolymers is typically close to 0.707, indicating in segregation that the cyclic polymer can be considered to be made up of linear diblocks with half of the original chain length. PMID:22070321

  17. Extraction, purification, identification and metabolism of 3',5'-cyclic UMP, 3',5'-cyclic IMP and 3',5'-cyclic dTMP from rat tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Newton, R P; Kingston, E E; Hakeem, N A; Salih, S G; Beynon, J H; Moyse, C D

    1986-01-01

    The large-scale extraction and partial purification of endogenous 3',5'-cyclic UMP, 3',5'-cyclic IMP and 3',5'-cyclic dTMP are described. Rat liver, kidney, heart, spleen and lung tissues were subjected to a sequential purification procedure involving freeze-clamping, perchlorate extraction, alumina and Sephadex ion-exchange chromatography and preparative electrophoresis. The samples thus obtained co-chromatographed with authentic cyclic UMP, cyclic IMP and cyclic dTMP on t.l.c. and h.p.l.c. and the u.v. spectra of the extracted samples were identical with those of the standards. Fast atom bombardment of the three cyclic nucleotide standards yielded mass spectra containing a molecular protonated ion in each case; mass-analysed ion kinetic-energy spectrometry ('m.i.k.e.s') of these ions produced a spectrum unique to the parent cyclic nucleotide. The extracted putative cyclic UMP, cyclic IMP and cyclic dTMP each produced a m.i.k.e.s. identical with that obtained with the corresponding cyclic nucleotide standard. Rat liver, heart, kidney, brain, intestine, spleen, testis and lung protein preparations were each found capable of the synthesis of cyclic UMP, cyclic IMP and cyclic dTMP from the corresponding nucleoside triphosphate, of the hydrolysis of these cyclic nucleotides and of their binding, with the exception that cyclic dTMP was not synthesized by the kidney preparation. PMID:3019316

  18. Childhood maltreatment and adult psychopathology: pathways to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Marcelo F.; Faria, Alvaro A.; Mello, Andrea F.; Carpenter, Linda L.; Tyrka, Audrey R.; Price, Lawrence H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this paper was to examine the relationship between childhood maltreatment and adult psychopathology, as reflected in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction. Method A selective review of the relevant literature was undertaken in order to identify key and illustrative research findings. Results There is now a substantial body of preclinical and clinical evidence derived from a variety of experimental paradigms showing how early-life stress is related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function and psychological state in adulthood, and how that relationship can be modulated by other factors. Discussion The risk for adult psychopathology and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction is related to a complex interaction among multiple experiential factors, as well as to susceptibility genes that interact with those factors. Although acute hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responses to stress are generally adaptive, excessive responses can lead to deleterious effects. Early-life stress alters hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function and behavior, but the pattern of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal dysfunction and psychological outcome in adulthood reflect both the characteristics of the stressor and other modifying factors. Conclusion Research to date has identified multiple determinants of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction seen in adults with a history of childhood maltreatment or other early-life stress. Further work is needed to establish whether hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis abnormalities in this context can be used to develop risk endophenotypes for psychiatric and physical illnesses. PMID:19967199

  19. Surgical excision of hypothalamic hamartoma in a twenty months old boy with precocious puberty

    PubMed Central

    Ghanta, Rajesh K.; Koti, Kalyan; Kongara, Srikanth; Meher, Gautham E.

    2011-01-01

    A twenty months old boy presented to our department with true precocious puberty due to hypothalamic hamartoma. Total surgical excision of pedunculated hypothalamic hamartoma was done successfully by the pterional trans-sylvian approach as he could not afford medical management. Patient had uneventful post-operative course with normalization of serum testosterone levels and regression of secondary sexual characters. PMID:22029036

  20. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the night eating syndrome.

    PubMed

    Birketvedt, Grethe S; Sundsfjord, Johan; Florholmen, Jon R

    2002-02-01

    The typical neuroendocrine characteristics of the night eating syndrome have previously been described as changes in the circadian rhythm by an attenuation in the nocturnal rise of the plasma concentrations of melatonin and leptin and an increased circadian secretion of cortisol. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that night eaters have an overexpressed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis with an attenuated response to stress. Five female subjects with the night-eating syndrome and five sex-, age-, and weight-matched controls performed a 120-min corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) test (100 microg iv). Blood samples were drawn intravenously for measurements of the plasma concentrations of ACTH and cortisol. The results showed that, in night eaters compared with controls, the CRH-induced ACTH and cortisol response was significantly decreased to 47 and 71%, respectively. In conclusion, disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis with an attenuated ACTH and cortisol response to CRH were found in subjects with night-eating syndrome.

  1. Functional Interrogation of Adult Hypothalamic Neurogenesis with Focal Radiological Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel A.; Salvatierra, Juan; Velarde, Esteban; Wong, John; Ford, Eric C.; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-01-01

    The functional characterization of adult-born neurons remains a significant challenge. Approaches to inhibit adult neurogenesis via invasive viral delivery or transgenic animals have potential confounds that make interpretation of results from these studies difficult. New radiological tools are emerging, however, that allow one to noninvasively investigate the function of select groups of adult-born neurons through accurate and precise anatomical targeting in small animals. Focal ionizing radiation inhibits the birth and differentiation of new neurons, and allows targeting of specific neural progenitor regions. In order to illuminate the potential functional role that adult hypothalamic neurogenesis plays in the regulation of physiological processes, we developed a noninvasive focal irradiation technique to selectively inhibit the birth of adult-born neurons in the hypothalamic median eminence. We describe a method for Computer tomography-guided focal irradiation (CFIR) delivery to enable precise and accurate anatomical targeting in small animals. CFIR uses three-dimensional volumetric image guidance for localization and targeting of the radiation dose, minimizes radiation exposure to nontargeted brain regions, and allows for conformal dose distribution with sharp beam boundaries. This protocol allows one to ask questions regarding the function of adult-born neurons, but also opens areas to questions in areas of radiobiology, tumor biology, and immunology. These radiological tools will facilitate the translation of discoveries at the bench to the bedside. PMID:24300415

  2. Nutritional recovery promotes hypothalamic inflammation in rats during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Silva, Hellen Barbosa Farias; de Almeida, Ana Paula Carli; Cardoso, Katarine Barbosa; Ignacio-Souza, Letícia Martins; Reis, Silvia Regina de Lima; Reis, Marise Auxiliadora de Barros; Latorraca, Márcia Queiroz; Milanski, Marciane; Arantes, Vanessa Cristina

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated whether protein restriction in fetal life alters food intake and glucose homeostasis in adulthood by interfering with insulin signal transduction through proinflammatory mechanisms in the hypothalamus and peripheral tissues. Rats were divided into the following: a control group (C); a recovered group (R); and a low protein (LP) group. Relative food intake was greater and serum leptin was diminished in LP and R compared to C rats. Proinflammatory genes and POMC mRNA were upregulated in the hypothalamus of R group. Hypothalamic NPY mRNA expression was greater but AKT phosphorylation was diminished in the LP than in the C rats. In muscle, AKT phosphorylation was higher in restricted than in control animals. The HOMA-IR was decreased in R and C compared to the LP group. In contrast, the K(itt) in R was similar to that in C and both were lower than LP rats. Thus, nutritional recovery did not alter glucose homeostasis but produced middle hyperphagia, possibly due to increased anorexigenic neuropeptide expression that counteracted the hypothalamic inflammatory process. In long term protein deprived rats, hyperphagia most likely resulted from increased orexigenic neuropeptide expression, and glucose homeostasis was maintained, at least in part, at the expense of increased muscle insulin sensitivity.

  3. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function in anorexia nervosa and bulimia.

    PubMed

    Devlin, M J; Walsh, B T; Katz, J L; Roose, S P; Linkie, D M; Wright, L; Vande Wiele, R; Glassman, A H

    1989-04-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) exhibit neuroendocrine abnormalities that may result solely from emaciation or may reflect defective endocrine mechanisms which are intrinsic to disordered eating even in the absence of starvation. To distinguish these possibilities, we have studied indices of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) function in 9 patients with AN, 12 normal weight patients with bulimia and recent or current oligomenorrhea, and 8 normal weight controls. Measurement of 24-hour luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion with 30-min sampling revealed significantly fewer LH secretory spikes and a trend toward lower mean 24-hour LH levels in both bulimic and anorectic patients than in controls. Stimulation with gonadotropin releasing hormone produced elevated LH responses in the bulimic group and blunted LH responses in the anorectic group. Stimulation with estradiol revealed diminished LH augmentative responses and a trend toward diminished follicle stimulating hormone augmentative responses among bulimic as well as AN patients compared to controls. In each instance, the bulimic group tended to show within-group heterogeneity, with some individuals falling within the AN range. These findings suggest that HPG axis abnormalities in eating disordered patients cannot entirely be attributed to emaciation and that factors other than subnormal weight contribute to disturbed hypothalamic-pituitary functioning in these patients.

  4. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical and gonadal functions in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, M; Sulli, A; Pizzorni, C; Craviotto, C; Straub, R H

    2003-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as well as most autoimmune disorders results from a combination of several predisposing factors including the relations between epitopes of the trigger agent (i.e., virus, self-antigens) and histocompatibility epitopes (i.e., HLA), the status of the stress response system including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPA) and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), as well as the gonadal hormones (hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, HPG), with estrogens implicated as enhancers of the immune response and androgens and progesterone as natural suppressors. The regular observation of reduced cortisol and adrenal androgen secretion during testing in RA patients not treated with glucocorticoids should clearly be regarded as "relative adrenal insufficiency" in the setting of a sustained inflammatory process, as shown by high interleukin (IL)-6 levels. In polymyalgia rheumatica, several pathogenetic and clinical aspects of the disease might well overlap RA, at least with elderly onset RA (EORA). Therefore, reduced production of adrenal hormones (i.e., cortisol, DHEAS) at baseline in active and untreated patients with polymyalgia rheumatica was detected. The defect was mainly related to altered adrenal responsiveness to ACTH stimulation (i.e., increased 17-OHP), at least in untreated patients with polymyalgia rheumatica. Finally, normal serum estrogen and low androgen levels, but high synovial fluid estrogen and much lower androgen levels, have been found in RA patients, supporting the fundamental role of the peripheral sex hormone metabolism in the manifestations of the disease.

  5. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Hypothalamic Insulin and Leptin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Dodd, Garron T; Tiganis, Tony

    2015-10-01

    The hypothalamus is critical to the coordination of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. It responds to peripheral factors, such as insulin and leptin, that convey to the brain the degree of adiposity and the metabolic status of the organism. The development of leptin and insulin resistance in hypothalamic neurons appears to have a key role in the exacerbation of diet-induced obesity. In rodents, this has been attributed partly to the increased expression of the tyrosine phosphatases Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), which attenuate leptin and insulin signaling. Deficiencies in PTP1B and TCPTP in the brain, or specific neurons, promote insulin and leptin signaling and prevent diet-induced obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and fatty liver disease. Although targeting phosphatases and hypothalamic circuits remains challenging, recent advances indicate that such hurdles might be overcome. Here, we focus on the roles of PTP1B and TCPTP in insulin and leptin signaling and explore their potential as therapeutic targets.

  6. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  7. Nutritional recovery promotes hypothalamic inflammation in rats during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Silva, Hellen Barbosa Farias; de Almeida, Ana Paula Carli; Cardoso, Katarine Barbosa; Ignacio-Souza, Letícia Martins; Reis, Silvia Regina de Lima; Reis, Marise Auxiliadora de Barros; Latorraca, Márcia Queiroz; Milanski, Marciane; Arantes, Vanessa Cristina

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated whether protein restriction in fetal life alters food intake and glucose homeostasis in adulthood by interfering with insulin signal transduction through proinflammatory mechanisms in the hypothalamus and peripheral tissues. Rats were divided into the following: a control group (C); a recovered group (R); and a low protein (LP) group. Relative food intake was greater and serum leptin was diminished in LP and R compared to C rats. Proinflammatory genes and POMC mRNA were upregulated in the hypothalamus of R group. Hypothalamic NPY mRNA expression was greater but AKT phosphorylation was diminished in the LP than in the C rats. In muscle, AKT phosphorylation was higher in restricted than in control animals. The HOMA-IR was decreased in R and C compared to the LP group. In contrast, the K(itt) in R was similar to that in C and both were lower than LP rats. Thus, nutritional recovery did not alter glucose homeostasis but produced middle hyperphagia, possibly due to increased anorexigenic neuropeptide expression that counteracted the hypothalamic inflammatory process. In long term protein deprived rats, hyperphagia most likely resulted from increased orexigenic neuropeptide expression, and glucose homeostasis was maintained, at least in part, at the expense of increased muscle insulin sensitivity. PMID:25258479

  8. Nutritional Recovery Promotes Hypothalamic Inflammation in Rats during Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Hellen Barbosa Farias; de Almeida, Ana Paula Carli; Cardoso, Katarine Barbosa; Ignacio-Souza, Letícia Martins; Reis, Silvia Regina de Lima; Reis, Marise Auxiliadora de Barros; Milanski, Marciane; Arantes, Vanessa Cristina

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated whether protein restriction in fetal life alters food intake and glucose homeostasis in adulthood by interfering with insulin signal transduction through proinflammatory mechanisms in the hypothalamus and peripheral tissues. Rats were divided into the following: a control group (C); a recovered group (R); and a low protein (LP) group. Relative food intake was greater and serum leptin was diminished in LP and R compared to C rats. Proinflammatory genes and POMC mRNA were upregulated in the hypothalamus of R group. Hypothalamic NPY mRNA expression was greater but AKT phosphorylation was diminished in the LP than in the C rats. In muscle, AKT phosphorylation was higher in restricted than in control animals. The HOMA-IR was decreased in R and C compared to the LP group. In contrast, the Kitt in R was similar to that in C and both were lower than LP rats. Thus, nutritional recovery did not alter glucose homeostasis but produced middle hyperphagia, possibly due to increased anorexigenic neuropeptide expression that counteracted the hypothalamic inflammatory process. In long term protein deprived rats, hyperphagia most likely resulted from increased orexigenic neuropeptide expression, and glucose homeostasis was maintained, at least in part, at the expense of increased muscle insulin sensitivity. PMID:25258479

  9. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-03-30

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons.

  10. Hypothalamic POMC neurons promote cannabinoid-induced feeding.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marco; Varela, Luis; Kim, Jae Geun; Kim, Jung Dae; Hernández-Nuño, Francisco; Simonds, Stephanie E; Castorena, Carlos M; Vianna, Claudia R; Elmquist, Joel K; Morozov, Yury M; Rakic, Pasko; Bechmann, Ingo; Cowley, Michael A; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Diano, Sabrina; Horvath, Tamas L

    2015-03-01

    Hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons promote satiety. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is critical for the central regulation of food intake. Here we test whether CB1R-controlled feeding in sated mice is paralleled by decreased activity of POMC neurons. We show that chemical promotion of CB1R activity increases feeding, and notably, CB1R activation also promotes neuronal activity of POMC cells. This paradoxical increase in POMC activity was crucial for CB1R-induced feeding, because designer-receptors-exclusively-activated-by-designer-drugs (DREADD)-mediated inhibition of POMC neurons diminishes, whereas DREADD-mediated activation of POMC neurons enhances CB1R-driven feeding. The Pomc gene encodes both the anorexigenic peptide α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, and the opioid peptide β-endorphin. CB1R activation selectively increases β-endorphin but not α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone release in the hypothalamus, and systemic or hypothalamic administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks acute CB1R-induced feeding. These processes involve mitochondrial adaptations that, when blocked, abolish CB1R-induced cellular responses and feeding. Together, these results uncover a previously unsuspected role of POMC neurons in the promotion of feeding by cannabinoids. PMID:25707796

  11. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Autoimmunity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Guaraldi, Federica; Grottoli, Silvia; Arvat, Emanuela; Ghigo, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of secondary hypopituitarism in children and adults, and is responsible for impaired quality of life, disabilities and compromised development. Alterations of pituitary function can occur at any time after the traumatic event, presenting in various ways and evolving during time, so they require appropriate screening for early detection and treatment. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, several mechanisms have been hypothesized, including hypothalamic-pituitary autoimmunity (HP-A). The aim of this study was to systematically review literature on the association between HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Major pitfalls related to the HP-A investigation were also discussed. Methods: The PubMed database was searched with a string developed for this purpose, without temporal or language limits, for original articles assessing the association of HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Results: Three articles from the same group met the inclusion criteria. Anti-pituitary and anti-hypothalamic antibodies were detected using indirect immunofluorescence in a significant number of patients with acute and chronic TBI. Elevated antibody titer was associated with an increased risk of persistent hypopituitarism, especially somatotroph and gonadotroph deficiency, while no correlations were found with clinical parameters. Conclusion: HPA seems to contribute to TBI-induced pituitary damage, although major methodological issues need to be overcome and larger studies are warranted to confirm these preliminary data. PMID:26239463

  12. Hypothalamic POMC neurons promote cannabinoid-induced feeding

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Marco; Varela, Luis; Kim, Jae Geun; Kim, Jung Dae; Hernandez, Francisco; Simonds, Stephanie E; Castorena, Carlos M; Vianna, Claudia R; Elmquist, Joel K; Morozov, Yury M; Rakic, Pasko; Bechmann, Ingo; Cowley, Michael A; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Diano, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons promote satiety. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is critical for central regulation of food intake. We interrogated whether CB1R-controlled feeding is paralleled by decreased activity of POMC neurons. Chemical promotion of CB1R activity increased feeding, and strikingly, CB1R activation also promoted neuronal activity of POMC cells. This paradoxical increase in POMC activity was crucial for CB1R-induced feeding, because Designer-Receptors-Exclusively-Activated-by-Designer-Drugs (DREADD)-mediated inhibition of POMC neurons diminished, while DREADD-mediated activation of POMC neurons enhanced CB1R-driven feeding. The Pomc gene encodes both the anorexigenic peptide, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and the peptide, β-endorphin. CB1R activation selectively increased β-endorphin but not α-MSH release in the hypothalamus, and, systemic or hypothalamic administration of the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, blocked acute CB1R-induced feeding. These processes involved mitochondrial adaptations, which, when blocked, abolished CB1R-induced cellular responses and feeding. Together, these results unmasked a previously unsuspected role of POMC neurons in promotion of feeding by cannabinoids. PMID:25707796

  13. Oestrogen Modulates Hypothalamic Control of Energy Homeostasis Through Multiple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Roepke, Troy A.

    2009-01-01

    The control of energy homeostasis in women is correlated with the anorectic effects of oestrogen, which can attenuate body weight gain and reduce food intake in rodent models. This review will investigate the multiple signalling pathways and cellular targets that oestrogen utilises to control energy homeostasis in the hypothalamus. Oestrogen affects all of the hypothalamic nuclei that control energy homeostasis. Oestrogen controls the activity of hypothalamic neurones through gene regulation and neuronal excitability. Oestrogen’s primary cellular pathway is the control of gene transcription through the classical ERs (ERα and ERβ) with ERα having the primary role in energy homeostasis. Oestrogen also controls energy homeostasis through membrane-mediated events via membrane-associated ERs or a novel, putative membrane ER that is coupled to G-proteins. Therefore, oestrogen has at least two receptors with multiple signalling and transcriptional pathways to activate during immediate and long-term anorectic effects. Ultimately, it is the interactions of all the receptor-mediated processes in hypothalamus and other areas of the CNS that will determine the anorectic effects of oestrogen and its control of energy homeostasis. PMID:19076267

  14. Hypothalamic leptin-neurotensin-hypocretin neuronal networks in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levitas-Djerbi, Talia; Yelin-Bekerman, Laura; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-04-01

    Neurotensin (NTS) is a 13 amino acid neuropeptide that is expressed in the hypothalamus. In mammals, NTS-producing neurons that express leptin receptor (LepRb) regulate the function of hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) and dopamine neurons. Thus, the hypothalamic leptin-NTS-HCRT neuronal network orchestrates key homeostatic output, including sleep, feeding, and reward. However, the intricate mechanisms of the circuitry and the unique role of NTS-expressing neurons remain unclear. We studied the NTS neuronal networks in zebrafish and cloned the genes encoding the NTS neuropeptide and receptor (NTSR). Similar to mammals, the ligand is expressed primarily in the hypothalamus, while the receptor is expressed widely throughout the brain in zebrafish. A portion of hypothalamic nts-expressing neurons are inhibitory and some coexpress leptin receptor (lepR1). As in mammals, NTS and HCRT neurons are localized adjacently in the hypothalamus. To track the development and axonal projection of NTS neurons, the NTS promoter was isolated. Transgenesis and double labeling of NTS and HCRT neurons showed that NTS axons project toward HCRT neurons, some of which express ntsr. Moreover, another target of NTS neurons is ntsr-expressing dopaminergeric neurons. These findings suggest structural circuitry between leptin, NTS, and hypocretinergic or dopaminergic neurons and establish the zebrafish as a model to study the role of these neuronal circuits in the regulation of feeding, sleep, and reward.

  15. Mixed Strategies in cyclic competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intoy, Ben; Pleimling, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Physicists have been using evolutionary game theory to model and simulate cyclically competing species, with applications to lizard mating strategies and competing bacterial strains. However these models assume that each agent plays the same strategy, which is called a pure strategy in game theory, until they are beaten by a better strategy which they immediately adopt. We relax this constraint of an agent playing a single strategy by instead letting the agent pick its strategy randomly from a probability distribution, which is called a mixed strategy in game theory. This scheme is very similar to multiple occupancy models seen in the literature, the major difference being that interactions happen between sites rather than within them. Choosing strategies out of a distribution also has applications to economic/social systems such as the public goods game. We simulate a model of mixed strategy and cylic competition on a one-dimensional lattice with three and four strategies and find interesting spatial and stability properties depending on how discretized the choice of strategy is for the agents. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR-1205309.

  16. Sweet Taste Signaling Functions as a Hypothalamic Glucose Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xueying; Zhou, Ligang; Terwilliger, Rose; Newton, Samuel S.; de Araujo, Ivan E.

    2009-01-01

    Brain glucosensing is essential for normal body glucose homeostasis and neuronal function. However, the exact signaling mechanisms involved in the neuronal sensing of extracellular glucose levels remain poorly understood. Of particular interest is the identification of candidate membrane molecular sensors that would allow neurons to change firing rates independently of intracellular glucose metabolism. Here we describe for the first time the expression of the taste receptor genes Tas1r1, Tas1r2 and Tas1r3, and their associated G-protein genes, in the mammalian brain. Neuronal expression of taste genes was detected in different nutrient-sensing forebrain regions, including the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei of the hypothalamus, the CA fields and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, the habenula, and cortex. Expression was also observed in the intra-ventricular epithelial cells of the choroid plexus. These same regions were found to express the corresponding gene products that form the heterodimeric T1R2/T1R3 and T1R1/T1R3 sweet and l-amino acid taste G-protein coupled receptors, respectively, along with the taste G-protein α-gustducin. Moreover, in vivo studies in mice demonstrated that the hypothalamic expression of taste-related genes is regulated by the nutritional state of the animal, with food deprivation significantly increasing expression levels of Tas1r1 and Tas1r2 in hypothalamus, but not in cortex. Furthermore, exposing mouse hypothalamic cells to a low-glucose medium, while maintaining normal l-amino acid concentrations, specifically resulted in higher expression levels of the sweet-associated gene Tas1r2. This latter effect was reversed by adding the non-metabolizable artificial sweetener sucralose to the low-glucose medium, indicating that taste-like signaling in hypothalamic neurons does not require intracellular glucose oxidation. Taken together, our findings suggest that the heterodimeric G-protein coupled sweet receptor T1R2/T1R3 is a candidate

  17. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in the mutant weaver mouse.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, N B; Szabo, M; Verina, T; Wei, J; Dlouhy, S R; Won, L; Heller, A; Hodes, M E; Ghetti, B

    1998-12-01

    The weaver (wv) mutant mouse manifests severe locomotor defects, a deficiency in granule cells of the cerebellum, and cellular deficits in the midbrain dopaminergic system. The wv phenotype is associated with a missense mutation in the pore region of the G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channel, GIRK2. The homozygous male wv mouse is essentially infertile due to an inadequate level of sperm production. Females are fertile although they also manifest the neurological phenotype. Homozygotes of both sexes have reduced body weight. We have evaluated the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in heterozygote and homozygote male and female wv mutants in comparison with wild-type controls. Testicular weight was significantly reduced in the homozygous males, due to degenerative changes of seminiferous epithelium. Serum and pituitary content of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and prolactin were normal in all groups, and the normal sex differences were noted (FSH and LH higher in males, prolactin higher in females). Pituitary growth hormone (GH) concentration was normal, with control and mutant males showing higher GH than females. Serum testosterone levels were normal in the mutants, as was testicular testosterone. Testicular alpha-inhibin content was mildly reduced, but high in proportion to testicular weight. The defect in spermatogenesis appeared predominantly in the postmeiotic stages. In situ hybridization was consistent with expression of some GIRK2 mRNA isoforms in seminiferous epithelium. There were no significant differences between genotypes in the levels of dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the mediobasal and preoptic hypothalamic regions. Homovanillic acid levels in these two areas were, however, reduced in wv homozygotes compared to wild-type animals. In the light of normal pituitary hormone levels, normal hypothalamic monoamine concentrations and normal sex differences in

  18. Computational Analysis of the Hypothalamic Control of Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Tabe-Bordbar, Shayan; Anastasio, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Food-intake control is mediated by a heterogeneous network of different neural subtypes, distributed over various hypothalamic nuclei and other brain structures, in which each subtype can release more than one neurotransmitter or neurohormone. The complexity of the interactions of these subtypes poses a challenge to understanding their specific contributions to food-intake control, and apparent consistencies in the dataset can be contradicted by new findings. For example, the growing consensus that arcuate nucleus neurons expressing Agouti-related peptide (AgRP neurons) promote feeding, while those expressing pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC neurons) suppress feeding, is contradicted by findings that low AgRP neuron activity and high POMC neuron activity can be associated with high levels of food intake. Similarly, the growing consensus that GABAergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus suppress feeding is contradicted by findings suggesting the opposite. Yet the complexity of the food-intake control network admits many different network behaviors. It is possible that anomalous associations between the responses of certain neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with known interactions, but their effect on feeding depends on the responses of the other neural subtypes in the network. We explored this possibility through computational analysis. We made a computer model of the interactions between the hypothalamic and other neural subtypes known to be involved in food-intake control, and optimized its parameters so that model behavior matched observed behavior over an extensive test battery. We then used specialized computational techniques to search the entire model state space, where each state represents a different configuration of the responses of the units (model neural subtypes) in the network. We found that the anomalous associations between the responses of certain hypothalamic neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with the known structure

  19. Computational Analysis of the Hypothalamic Control of Food Intake.

    PubMed

    Tabe-Bordbar, Shayan; Anastasio, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Food-intake control is mediated by a heterogeneous network of different neural subtypes, distributed over various hypothalamic nuclei and other brain structures, in which each subtype can release more than one neurotransmitter or neurohormone. The complexity of the interactions of these subtypes poses a challenge to understanding their specific contributions to food-intake control, and apparent consistencies in the dataset can be contradicted by new findings. For example, the growing consensus that arcuate nucleus neurons expressing Agouti-related peptide (AgRP neurons) promote feeding, while those expressing pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC neurons) suppress feeding, is contradicted by findings that low AgRP neuron activity and high POMC neuron activity can be associated with high levels of food intake. Similarly, the growing consensus that GABAergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus suppress feeding is contradicted by findings suggesting the opposite. Yet the complexity of the food-intake control network admits many different network behaviors. It is possible that anomalous associations between the responses of certain neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with known interactions, but their effect on feeding depends on the responses of the other neural subtypes in the network. We explored this possibility through computational analysis. We made a computer model of the interactions between the hypothalamic and other neural subtypes known to be involved in food-intake control, and optimized its parameters so that model behavior matched observed behavior over an extensive test battery. We then used specialized computational techniques to search the entire model state space, where each state represents a different configuration of the responses of the units (model neural subtypes) in the network. We found that the anomalous associations between the responses of certain hypothalamic neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with the known structure

  20. Asymmetric cyclic evolution in polymerised cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hrycyna, Orest; Mielczarek, Jakub; Szydłowski, Marek E-mail: jakub.mielczarek@uj.edu.pl

    2009-12-01

    The dynamical systems methods are used to study evolution of the polymerised scalar field cosmologies with the cosmological constant. We have found all evolutional paths admissible for all initial conditions on the two-dimensional phase space. We have shown that the cyclic solutions are generic. The exact solution for polymerised cosmology is also obtained. Two basic cases are investigated, the polymerised scalar field and the polymerised gravitational and scalar field part. In the former the division on the cyclic and non-cyclic behaviour is established following the sign of the cosmological constant. The value of the cosmological constant is upper bounded purely from the dynamical setting.

  1. Processable Cyclic Peptide Nanotubes with Tunable Interiors

    SciTech Connect

    Hourani, Rami; Zhang, Chen; van der Weegen, Rob; Ruiz, Luis; Li, Changyi; Keten, Sinan; Helms, Brett A.; Xu, Ting

    2011-09-06

    A facile route to generate cyclic peptide nanotubes with tunable interiors is presented. By incorporating 3-amino-2-methylbenzoic acid in the d,l-alternating primary sequence of a cyclic peptide, a functional group can be presented in the interior of the nanotubes without compromising the formation of high aspect ratio nanotubes. The new design of such a cyclic peptide also enables one to modulate the nanotube growth process to be compatible with the polymer processing window without compromising the formation of high aspect ratio nanotubes, thus opening a viable approach toward molecularly defined porous membranes.

  2. Role of orexins in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian relationships.

    PubMed

    Silveyra, P; Cataldi, N I; Lux-Lantos, V A; Libertun, C

    2010-03-01

    Appropriate nutritional and vigilance states are needed for reproduction. In previous works, we described the influence of the hormonal milieu of proestrus on the orexinergic system and we found that orexin receptor 1 expression in the hypothalamus, but not other neural areas, and the adenohypophysis was under the influence of oestradiol and the time of the day. Information from the sexual hormonal milieu of proestrous afternoon impacts on various components of the orexinergic system and alertness on this particular night of proestrus would be of importance for successful reproduction. In this review, we summarize the available experimental data supporting the participation of orexins in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian relationships. All together, these results suggest a role of the orexinergic system as an integrative link among vital functions such as reproduction, food intake, alertness and the inner biological clock.

  3. Cytokines and the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian-endometrial axis.

    PubMed

    Tabibzadeh, S

    1994-05-01

    Recently, the demarcating boundaries that allowed separation of the fields of reproductive biology, endocrinology, immunology and neurobiology have faded. The missing link that now ties these disciplines together is the understanding that the language by which cells communicate within these diverse systems is unanimous. This language is the network of products collectively called cytokines. The effect of these factors spans from the hypothalamus to the endometrium and is undoubtedly involved in the maintenance of the delicate balance within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal-endometrial axis. Orchestrated networks of these cytokines also seem to be linked to the steroid hormone signals, an essential feature for maintenance of normal menstrual cycles. Evidence in favour of these emerging concepts is discussed. Major emphasis is placed on interferons, interleukins, tumour necrosis factor, transforming growth factors and colony-stimulating factors.

  4. Pubertal maturation and programming of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal reactivity.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Russell D

    2010-04-01

    Modifications in neuroendocrine function are a hallmark of pubertal development. These changes have many short- and long-term implications for the physiological and neurobehavioral function of an individual. The purpose of the present review is to discuss our current understanding of how pubertal development and stress interact to affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the major neuroendocrine axis that controls the hormonal stress response. A growing body of literature indicates that puberty is marked by dramatic transitions in stress reactivity. Moreover, recent studies indicate that exposure to stressors during pubertal maturation may result in enduring changes in HPA responsiveness in adulthood. As puberty is marked by a substantial increase in many stress-related psychological and physiological disorders (e.g., depression, anxiety, drug abuse), it is essential to understand the factors that regulate and modulate HPA function during this crucial period of development.

  5. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal dysfunction in men using cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Van Thiel, D H; Gavaler, J S; Smith, W I; Paul, G

    1979-05-01

    We studied the effect of cimetidine therapy (1200 mg per day by mouth for nine weeks) on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of seven men. There was a 43 per cent mean reduction in sperm count after therapy. The luteinizing hormone response to luteinizing hormone releasing factor was also reduced, and a statistically significnat rise in plasma testosterone occurred, although it was less than that before therapy. Gonadotropin responses to provocative clomiphene stimulation were inadequate when compared with those of controls. Cimetidine did not affect the responses of thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, growth hormone and thyroxine to thyrotropin releasing factor. Caution is advisable in administration of cimetidine for prolonged periods to young men.

  6. Trilostane and the normal hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis.

    PubMed

    Semple, C G; Weir, S W; Thomson, J A; Beastall, G H

    1982-07-01

    Trilostane, a competitive inhibitor of the 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme system, has adrenal blocking activity and has been used to treat Cushing's syndrome and other disease. To investigate is effect on the normal human hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, trilostane (initially 240 mg/day) was given to ten healthy adult males, the dose increasing at weekly intervals by 240 mg/day up to 960 mg/day. When chromatography was used to remove trilostane and metabolites from the assay system, serum testosterone was found to fall on trilostane therapy (P less than 0.01) and this was accompanied by a rise in LH (P less than 0.01). The responses of FSH and LH to LHRH were unaffected by treatment. It is concluded that trilostane inhibits human testicular 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and male patients on trilostane should be monitored for sexual dysfunction and impairment of testicular steroidogenesis.

  7. Organotypic slice culture of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of rat

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Seong; Lee, So Yeong; Park, Jae-Yong; Hong, Seong-Geun

    2007-01-01

    Organotypic slice cultures have been developed as an alternative to acute brain slices because the neuronal viability and synaptic connectivity in these cultures can be preserved well for a prolonged period of time. This study evaluated a stationary organotypic slice culture developed for the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of rat. The results showed that the slice cultures maintain the typical shape of the nucleus, the immunocytochemical signals for oxytocin, vasopressin, and corticotropin-releasing hormone, and the electrophysiological properties of PVN neurons for up to 3 weeks in vitro. The PVN neurons in the culture expressed the green fluorescent protein gene that had been delivered by the adenoviral vectors. The results indicate that the cultured slices preserve the properties of the PVN neurons, and can be used in longterm studies on these neurons in vitro. PMID:17322769

  8. NEUROENDOCRINE ACTIONS AND REGULATION OF HYPOTHALAMIC NEUROPEPTIDE Y DURING LACTATION

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, W,R.; Ramoz, G.; Torto, R.; Keefe, K.A.; Wang, J. J.; Kalra, S. P.

    2007-01-01

    The expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its co-messenger, agouti-related peptide (AgRP), in arcuate neurons of the hypothalamus is increased during lactation in rats. Our research has been addressing the questions of the physiological actions of these peptides during lactation and the physiological signals associated with lactation that result in increased expression of their genes. Our studies indicate that NPY and AgRP exert pleiotropic actions during lactation that help integrate neuroendocrine regulation of energy balance with controls over anterior and posterior pituitary hormone secretion. Further, reciprocal signaling to the NPY/AgRP system by leptin and ghrelin is responsible for the changes in expression of these hypothalamic peptides in lactating animals, and thus, may contribute to regulation of food intake and the various neuroendocrine adaptations of lactation. PMID:17241697

  9. Genetic Approaches to Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Regulation.

    PubMed

    Arnett, Melinda G; Muglia, Lisa M; Laryea, Gloria; Muglia, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    The normal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and resultant glucocorticoid (GC) secretion, is essential for human health. Disruption of GC regulation is associated with pathologic, psychological, and physiological disease states such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, hypertension, diabetes, and osteopenia, among others. As such, understanding the mechanisms by which HPA output is tightly regulated in its responses to environmental stressors and circadian cues has been an active area of investigation for decades. Over the last 20 years, however, advances in gene targeting and genome modification in rodent models have allowed the detailed dissection of roles for key molecular mediators and brain regions responsible for this control in vivo to emerge. Here, we summarize work done to elucidate the function of critical neuropeptide systems, GC-signaling targets, and inflammation-associated pathways in HPA axis regulation and behavior, and highlight areas for future investigation.

  10. Effects of dopamine agonists on hypothalamic defensive attack in cats.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Sato, T; Maki, S

    1985-07-01

    The effects of methamphetamine (MAT) and apomorphine (APO), dopamine agonists, were studied in 16 cats to evaluate their effects on threshold for defensive attack behavior elicited by electrical stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH). Directed attack and hissing were selected from elementary responses as constituting a defensive attack. Hissing threshold was measured in two situations, one with human provocation and the other without provocation. MAT administered systemically lowered the thresholds for all three types of responses in a dose-related manner (0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg). The effects of 1.0 mg/kg of APO were almost identical to those observed with 0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg of MAT. These results suggest that MAT-induced aggressive behavior may be mediated by a dopamine-induced increase in the excitability of the VMH. PMID:4059404

  11. Hypothalamic CRH neurons orchestrate complex behaviours after stress

    PubMed Central

    Füzesi, Tamás; Daviu, Nuria; Wamsteeker Cusulin, Jaclyn I.; Bonin, Robert P.; Bains, Jaideep S.

    2016-01-01

    All organisms possess innate behavioural and physiological programmes that ensure survival. In order to have maximum adaptive benefit, these programmes must be sufficiently flexible to account for changes in the environment. Here we show that hypothalamic CRH neurons orchestrate an environmentally flexible repertoire of behaviours that emerge after acute stress in mice. Optical silencing of CRH neurons disrupts the organization of individual behaviours after acute stress. These behavioural patterns shift according to the environment after stress, but this environmental sensitivity is blunted by activation of PVN CRH neurons. These findings provide evidence that PVN CRH cells are part of a previously unexplored circuit that matches precise behavioural patterns to environmental context following stress. Overactivity in this network in the absence of stress may contribute to environmental ambivalence, resulting in context-inappropriate behavioural strategies. PMID:27306314

  12. The recreational drug ecstasy disrupts the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal reproductive axis in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Sarah M; Walker, Deena M; Reveron, Maria E; Duvauchelle, Christine L; Gore, Andrea C

    2008-01-01

    Reproductive function involves an interaction of three regulatory levels: hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonad. The primary drive upon this system comes from hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretory cells, which receive afferent inputs from other neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system to result in the proper coordination of reproduction and the environment. Here, we hypothesized that the recreational drug (+/-)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; 'ecstasy'), which acts through several of the neurotransmitter systems that affect GnRH neurons, suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal reproductive axis of male rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered saline or MDMA either once (acute) or for 20 days (chronic) and were euthanized 7 days following the last administration. We quantified hypothalamic GnRH mRNA, serum luteinizing hormone concentrations, and serum testosterone levels as indices of hypothalamic, pituitary, and gonadal functions, respectively. The results indicate that the hypothalamic and gonadal levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are significantly altered by MDMA, with GnRH mRNA and serum testosterone levels suppressed in rats administered MDMA compared to saline. Furthermore, our finding that hypothalamic GnRH mRNA levels are suppressed in the context of low testosterone concentrations suggests that the central GnRH neurosecretory system may be a primary target of inhibitory regulation by MDMA usage.

  13. Desipramine Inhibits Histamine H1 Receptor-Induced Ca2+ Signaling in Rat Hypothalamic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Min; Cho, Sukhee; Seo, Jinsoo; Hur, Eun-Mi; Park, Chul-Seung; Baik, Ja-Hyun; Choi, Se-Young

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus in the brain is the main center for appetite control and integrates signals from adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. Antidepressants are known to modulate the activities of hypothalamic neurons and affect food intake, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which antidepressants modulate hypothalamic function remain unclear. Here we have investigated how hypothalamic neurons respond to treatment with antidepressants, including desipramine and sibutramine. In primary cultured rat hypothalamic cells, desipramine markedly suppressed the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ evoked by histamine H1 receptor activation. Desipramine also inhibited the histamine-induced Ca2+ increase and the expression of corticotrophin-releasing hormone in hypothalamic GT1-1 cells. The effect of desipramine was not affected by pretreatment with prazosin or propranolol, excluding catecholamine reuptake activity of desipramine as an underlying mechanism. Sibutramine which is also an antidepressant but decreases food intake, had little effect on the histamine-induced Ca2+ increase or AMP-activated protein kinase activity. Our results reveal that desipramine and sibutramine have different effects on histamine H1 receptor signaling in hypothalamic cells and suggest that distinct regulation of hypothalamic histamine signaling might underlie the differential regulation of food intake between antidepressants. PMID:22563449

  14. Effect of dehydration on hypothalamic control of evaporation in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M A; Doris, P A

    1982-01-01

    1. Cats were surgically prepared with intracranial thermodes for heating of the hypothalamic thermosensitive area or with venous cannulae for measurement of blood volume and plasma osmolality. They were kept in an environmental chamber in which the ambient temperature was cycled between 25 and 38 degrees C on an 18:6 hr diurnal schedule. 2. Measurements of blood volume and plasma osmolality and of the evaporative response to hypothalamic heating were made during the 38 degrees C phase of the diurnal temperature cycle in animals when they were hydrated ad lib and in the same animals after 72--96 hr of water deprivation. 3. Water deprivation produced a loss of 10% of the body weight, a significant rise in plasma osmolality and a significant fall in blood volume. 4. Hypothalamic heating in hydrated animals generated a highly significant, positive, linear relationship between hypothalamic temperature and evaporative heat loss in every case. 5. In dehydrated animals, the evaporative response to hypothalamic heating was reduced. Rates of evaporation at a given hypothalamic temperature were lower and the slopes of the lines relating evaporative heat loss to hypothalamic temperature were significantly reduced. 6. It is concluded that dehydration reduces the thermal responsiveness of central neural structures controlling evaporation in the cat. PMID:7069627

  15. Estrogen depletion increases blood pressure and hypothalamic norepinephrine in middle-aged spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ning; Clark, John T; Wei, Chi-Chang; Wyss, J Michael

    2003-05-01

    In male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) a high NaCl diet increases arterial pressure via a reduction in anterior hypothalamic nucleus norepinephrine release. Young female SHR are relatively well protected from this NaCl-sensitive hypertension, but depletion of both endogenous and dietary estrogens greatly exacerbates NaCl-sensitive hypertension. This study tests the hypothesis that estrogen also protects late middle-aged female SHR from NaCl-sensitive hypertension and that this effect is mediated by an estrogen-related effect on hypothalamic norepinephrine release. Ten-month-old female SHR were ovariectomized and placed on a phytoestrogen-free diet containing either basal or high NaCl. Each rat was implanted with a silastic tube containing 17beta estradiol or vehicle. Three months later, arterial pressure and hypothalamic norepinephrine metabolite levels (MOPEG) were measured. On the basal NaCl diet, estrogen-depleted rats displayed increased arterial pressure (12 mm Hg) and decreased anterior hypothalamic nucleus MOPEG (20%). Both effects were reversed by estrogen treatment. In all groups, the high NaCl diet increased arterial pressure by over 35 mm Hg and reduced anterior hypothalamic nucleus MOPEG by >60%. Across all groups, there was a significant inverse correlation between arterial pressure and anterior hypothalamic nucleus MOPEG. These data suggest that both dietary NaCl excess and estrogen depletion raise arterial pressure in middle-aged female SHR by a decreasing hypothalamic norepinephrine.

  16. Hypothalamic inflammation and energy homeostasis: resolving the paradox.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Joshua P; Choi, Sun Ju; Schwartz, Michael W; Wisse, Brent E

    2010-01-01

    Determining the effect of hypothalamic inflammatory signals on energy balance presents a paradox. On the one hand, a large body of work has identified inflammatory signaling in the hypothalamus as an essential mediator of the sickness response--the anorexia, cachexia, fever, inactivity, lethargy, anhedonia and adipsia that are triggered by systemic inflammatory stimuli and promote negative energy balance. On the other hand, numerous recent studies implicate inflammatory activation within the hypothalamus as a key factor whereby high-fat diets--and saturated fats in particular--cause central leptin and insulin resistance and thereby promote the defense of elevated body weight. This paradox will likely remain unresolved until several issues have been addressed. Firstly, the hypothalamus--unlike many peripheral inflamed tissues--is an extremely heterogeneous tissue comprised of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, endothelial cells, ependymal cells as well as numerous neuronal subgroups. Determining exactly which cells activate defined inflammatory signals in response to a particular stimulus--i.e. sepsis vs. nutrient excess--may yield critical clues. Secondly, for the sake of simplicity many studies evaluate inflammation as an on/off phenomenon. More realistically, inflammatory signaling occurs as a cascade or cycle that changes and progresses over time. Accordingly, even within the same cell type, the low-grade, chronic signal induced by nutrient excess may invoke a different cascade of signals than a strong, acute signal such as sepsis. In addition, because tolerance can develop to certain inflammatory mediators, physiological outcomes may not correlate with early biochemical markers. Lastly, the neuroanatomical location, magnitude, and duration of the inflammatory stimulus can undoubtedly influence the net CNS response. Rigorously evaluating the progression of the inflammatory signaling cascade within specific hypothalamic cell types is a key next step towards

  17. Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons have a cholinergic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Meister, Björn; Gömüç, Burçak; Suarez, Elisabet; Ishii, Yuko; Dürr, Katrin; Gillberg, Linda

    2006-11-01

    Neuronal networks originating in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus play fundamental roles in the control of energy balance. Neuropeptide Y (NPY)-producing neurons in the arcuate nucleus stimulate food intake, whereas arcuate nucleus neurons that release the proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptide alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) potently reduce food intake. Relatively little attention has been focused on classical neurotransmitters in regulation of food intake. Here, we have investigated the potential presence of acetylcholine (ACh) in NPY- and POMC-containing neuronal populations of the arcuate nucleus. Antisera to proteins required for cholinergic neurotransmission, including choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), were employed in double-labeling immunohistochemical experiments. In colchicine-treated rats, ChAT- and VAChT-immunopositive cell bodies were located in the ventral aspect of the arcuate nucleus. ChAT and VAChT immunoreactivities were demonstrated in alpha-MSH- and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART)-containing cell bodies of the arcuate nucleus, whereas cell bodies containing NPY or agouti-related peptide (AGRP) were distinct from VAChT-immunoreactive neuronal perikarya. VAChT immunoreactivity was also present in a large number of alpha-MSH-containing nerve fiber varicosities throughout the central nervous system. In the commissural part of the nucleus tractus solitarius, no alpha-MSH-containing cell bodies were found to have ChAT or VAChT immunoreactivity. The presence of markers for cholinergic neurotransmission in a subpopulation of hypothalamic POMC/CART neurons suggests co-release of ACh with peptides derived from the POMC precursor and CART. The results indicate a role for ACh in control of energy balance, mediating the effects of peripheral hormones such as leptin and insulin.

  18. The hypothalamic neuropeptide FF network is impaired in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Goncharuk, Valeri D; Buijs, Ruud M; Jhamandas, Jack H; Swaab, Dick F

    2014-01-01

    Background The human hypothalamus contains the neuropeptide FF (NPFF) neurochemical network. Animal experiments demonstrated that NPFF is implicated in the central cardiovascular regulation. We therefore studied expression of this peptide in the hypothalamus of individuals who suffered from essential hypertension (n = 8) and died suddenly due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and compared to that of healthy individuals (controls) (n = 6) who died abruptly due to mechanical trauma of the chest. Methods The frozen right part of the hypothalamus was cut coronally into serial sections of 20 μm thickness, and each tenth section was stained immunohistochemically using antibody against NPFF. The central section through each hypothalamic nucleus was characterized by the highest intensity of NPFF immunostaining and thus was chosen for quantitative densitometry. Results In hypertensive patients, the area occupied by NPFF immunostained neuronal elements in the central sections through the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (Pa), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST), perinuclear zone (PNZ) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), dorso- (DMH), ventromedial (VMH) nuclei, and perifornical nucleus (PeF) was dramatically decreased compared to controls, ranging about six times less in the VMH to 15 times less in the central part of the BST (BSTC). The NPFF innervation of both nonstained neuronal profiles and microvasculature was extremely poor in hypertensive patients compared to control. Conclusions The decreased NPFF expression in the hypothalamus of hypertensive patients might be a cause of impairment of its interaction with other neurochemical systems, and thereby might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:25161813

  19. Evaluation of hypothalamic dopaminergic function in patients with pituitary prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Xia, P; Shi, Y F

    1989-01-01

    This study was carried out using a dopaminergic agonist (carbidopa plus levodopa, CD + LD) and antagonist (metoclopramide, MCP) respectively for dynamic tests to observe the variations of serum prolactin (PRL), thyrotropin (TSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels in 7 normal women and 11 women with pituitary prolactinoma. It was shown that CD + LD resulted in minimal suppression of serum PRL (18.4 +/- 3.4%) in tumor patients, with this being significantly less than that in normal women (80.7 +/- 4.6%). However, similar degrees of TSH and LH suppression were observed after CD + LD in patients (23.8 +/- 4.2% and 28.2 +/- 2.1%, respectively) and in normal women (27.9 +/- 2.4% and 34.7 +/- 9.0%, respectively). MCP greatly increased PRL levels in the normal women as compared with the patients (892.1 +/- 195.3%, 16.4 +/- 6.5%), but increased TSH and LH levels were much higher in the patients than in the normal women (291.4 +/- 36.1% vs 19.9 +/- 3.3% and 96.9 +/- 7.4% vs 24.9 +/- 5.5%, respectively). It was also found that the levels of TSH or LH after MCP strongly correlated with basal PRL levels in the patients (r = 0.858, P less than 0.001 and r = 0.737, P less than 0.01, respectively). These results indicate that synthesis, turnover and release of hypothalamic dopamine are normal and the hypothalamic tone is relatively high in patients with PRL-secreting pituitary tumors.

  20. Regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical stress response

    PubMed Central

    Herman, James P.; McKlveen, Jessica M.; Ghosal, Sriparna; Kopp, Brittany; Wulsin, Aynara; Makinson, Ryan; Scheimann, Jessie; Myers, Brent

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis) is required for stress adaptation. Activation of the HPA axis causes secretion of glucocorticoids, which act on multiple organ systems to redirect energy resources to meet real or anticipated demand. The HPA stress response is driven primarily by neural mechanisms, invoking corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) release from hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) neurons. Pathways activating CRH release are stressor dependent: reactive responses to homeostatic disruption frequently involve direct noradrenergic or peptidergic drive of PVN neurons by sensory relays, whereas anticipatory responses use oligosynaptic pathways originating in upstream limbic structures. Anticipatory responses are driven largely by disinhibition, mediated by trans-synaptic silencing of tonic PVN inhibition via GABAergic neurons in the amygdala. Stress responses are inhibited by negative feedback mechanisms, whereby glucocorticoids act to diminish drive (brainstem), promote trans-synaptic inhibition by limbic structures (e.g, hippocampus). Glucocorticoids also act at the PVN to rapidly inhibit CRH neuronal activity via membrane glucocorticoid receptors. Chronic stress-induced activation of the HPA axis takes many forms (chronic basal hypersecretion, sensitized stress responses, even adrenal exhaustion), with manifestation dependent upon factors such as stressor chronicity, intensity, frequency and modality. Neural mechanisms driving chronic stress responses can be distinct from those controlling acute reactions, including recruitment of novel limbic, hypothalamic and brainstem circuits. Importantly, an individual’s response to acute or chronic stress is determined by numerous factors, including genetics, early life experience, environmental conditions, sex and age. The context in which stressors occur will determine whether an individual’s acute or chronic stress responses are adaptive or maladaptive (pathological). PMID:27065163

  1. Hypoxia reduces the hypothalamic thermogenic threshold and thermosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Glenn J; Milsom, William K

    2009-11-01

    Hypoxia is well known to reduce the body temperature (T(b)) of mammals, although the neural origins of this response remain uncertain. Short-term hypoxic exposure causes a reduction in the lower critical temperature of the thermal neutral zone and a reduction in whole body thermal conductance of rodents, providing indirect support that hypoxia lowers T(b) in a regulated manner. In this study, we examined directly the potential for changes in central thermosensitivity to evoke the hypoxic metabolic response by heating and cooling the preoptic area of the hypothalamus (the area which integrates thermoreceptor input and regulates thermoeffector outputs) using chronic, indwelling thermodes in ground squirrels during normoxia and hypoxia (7, 10 and 12% O(2)). We found that the threshold hypothalamic temperature for the metabolic response to cooling (T(th)) of approximately 38 degrees C in normoxia was proportionately reduced in hypoxia (down to 28-31 degrees C at 7% O(2)) and that the metabolic thermosensitivity (alpha; the change in metabolic rate for any given change in hypothalamic temperature below the lower critical temperature) was comparatively reduced by 5 to 9 times. This provides strong support for the hypothesis that the fall in temperature that occurs during hypoxia is the result of a reduction in the activation of thermogenic mechanisms. The decrease in the central thermosensitivity in hypoxia, however, appears to be a critical factor in the alteration of mammalian T(b). We suggest, therefore, that an altered central thermosensitivity may provide a proximate explanation of how low oxygen and similar stressors reduce normal fluctuations in T(b) (i.e. circadian), in addition to the depression in regulated T(b).

  2. Functional rundown of GABAA receptors in human hypothalamic hamartomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guohui; Yang, Kechun; Zheng, Chao; Liu, Qiang; Chang, Yongchang; Kerrigan, John F.; Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Objective Human hypothalamic hamartomas (HH) are highly associated with treatment-resistant gelastic seizures. HH are intrinsically epileptogenic, although the basic cellular mechanisms responsible for seizure activity are unknown. Altered gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) function can contribute to epileptogenesis in humans and animal models. Recently, functional GABAA receptor (GABAAR) rundown has been described in surgically-resected human temporal lobe epilepsy tissue. We asked whether functional GABAAR rundown also occurs in human HH neurons. Methods GABAAR-mediated currents were measured using perforated patch-clamp recordings in single neurons acutely dissociated from surgically-resected HH tissue. In addition, functional GABAARs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes after microinjection with membrane fractions from either HH or control hypothalamus, and were studied with two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings. Results Perforated patch-clamp recordings in dissociated HH neurons showed that repetitive exposure to GABA (5 consecutive exposures to 0.1 mM GABA with 1 sec duration and at 20 sec intervals) induced a time-dependent rundown of whole-cell currents in small HH neurons, while large HH neurons showed much less rundown using the same protocol. Functional rundown was not observed in HH neurons with repetitive exposure to glycine or glutamate. Two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings (6 consecutive exposures to 1 mM GABA with 10 sec duration and at 40 sec intervals) induced GABA-current rundown in Xenopus oocytes microinjected with HH membrane proteins, but not in the oocytes expressing hypothalamic membrane proteins derived from human autopsy controls. Functional rundown of GABA-currents was significantly attenuated by intracellular application of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or the non-specific phosphatase inhibitor, okadaic acid. Interpretation Neurons from surgically-resected human HH demonstrate functional rundown of GABAAR-mediated transmembrane currents in

  3. Thiamine deficiency induces anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Alimov, A P; Wang, H; Frank, J A; Katz, W; Xu, M; Ke, Z-J; Luo, J

    2014-05-16

    Obesity and eating disorders are prevailing health concerns worldwide. It is important to understand the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential nutrient. Thiamine deficiency (TD) can cause a number of disorders in humans, such as Beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We demonstrated here that TD caused anorexia in C57BL/6 mice. After feeding a TD diet for 16days, the mice displayed a significant decrease in food intake and an increase in resting energy expenditure (REE), which resulted in a severe weight loss. At the 22nd day, the food intake was reduced by 69% and 74% for male and female mice, respectively in TD group. The REE increased by ninefolds in TD group. The loss of body weight (17-24%) was similar between male and female animals and mainly resulted from the reduction of fat mass (49% decrease). Re-supplementation of thiamine (benfotiamine) restored animal's appetite, leading to a total recovery of body weight. The hypothalamic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical regulator of food intake. TD inhibited the phosphorylation of AMPK in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus without affecting its expression. TD-induced inhibition of AMPK phosphorylation was reversed once thiamine was re-supplemented. In contrast, TD increased AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle and upregulated the uncoupling protein (UCP)-1 in brown adipose tissues which was consistent with increased basal energy expenditure. Re-administration of thiamine stabilized AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle as well as energy expenditure. Taken together, TD may induce anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK activity. With a simultaneous increase in energy expenditure, TD caused an overall body weight loss. The results suggest that the status of thiamine levels in the body may affect food intake and body weight.

  4. Role of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Sapru, Hreday N

    2013-04-01

    Recently the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) has been implicated in cardiovascular regulation. Both pressor and depressor responses can be elicited by the chemical stimulation of the Arc. The direction of cardiovascular responses (increase or decrease) elicited from the Arc depends on the baseline blood pressure. The pressor responses are mediated via increase in sympathetic nerve activity and involve activation of the spinal ionotropic glutamate receptors. Arc-stimulation elicits tachycardic responses which are mediated via inhibition of vagal input and excitation of sympathetic input to the heart. The pathways within the brain mediating the pressor and tachycardic responses elicited from the Arc have not been delineated. The depressor responses to the Arc-stimulation are mediated via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptors, neuropeptide Y1 receptors, and opiate receptors in the PVN mediate the depressor responses elicited from the Arc. Some circulating hormones (e.g., leptin and insulin) may reach the Arc via the leaky blood-brain barrier and elicit their cardiovascular effects. Although the Arc is involved in mediating the cardiovascular responses to intravenously injected angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-12), these effects may not be due to leakage of these peptides across the blood-brain barrier in the Arc; instead, circulating angiotensins may act on neurons in the SFO and mediate cardiovascular actions via the projections of SFO neurons to the Arc. Cardiovascular responses elicited by acupuncture have been reported to be mediated by direct and indirect projections of the Arc to the RVLM. PMID:23260431

  5. Paraventricular hypothalamic regulation of trigeminovascular mechanisms involved in headaches.

    PubMed

    Robert, Claude; Bourgeais, Laurence; Arreto, Charles-Daniel; Condes-Lara, Miguel; Noseda, Rodrigo; Jay, Thérèse; Villanueva, Luis

    2013-05-15

    While functional imaging and deep brain stimulation studies point to a pivotal role of the hypothalamus in the pathophysiology of migraine and trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, the circuitry and the mechanisms underlying the modulation of medullary trigeminovascular (Sp5C) neurons have not been fully identified. We investigated the existence of a direct anatomo-functional relationship between hypothalamic excitability disturbances and modifications of the activities of Sp5C neurons in the rat. Anterograde and retrograde neuronal anatomical tracing, intrahypothalamic microinjections, extracellular single-unit recordings of Sp5C neurons, and behavioral trials were used in this study. We found that neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) send descending projections to the superior salivatory nucleus, a region that gives rise to parasympathetic outflow to cephalic and ocular/nasal structures. PVN cells project also to laminae I and outer II of the Sp5C. Microinjections of the GABAA agonist muscimol into PVN inhibit both basal and meningeal-evoked activities of Sp5C neurons. Such inhibitions were reduced in acutely restrained stressed rats. GABAA antagonist gabazine infusions into the PVN facilitate meningeal-evoked responses of Sp5C neurons. PVN injections of the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP38) enhance Sp5C basal activities, whereas the antagonist PACAP6-38 depresses all types of Sp5C activities. 5-HT1B/D receptor agonist naratriptan infusion confined to the PVN depresses both basal and meningeal-evoked Sp5C activities. Our findings suggest that paraventricular hypothalamic neurons directly control both spontaneous and evoked activities of Sp5C neurons and could act either as modulators or triggers of migraine and/or trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias by integrating nociceptive, autonomic, and stress processing mechanisms.

  6. MRI-guided stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation for 100 hypothalamic hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Shigeki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Ito, Yosuke; Sonoda, Masaki; Akazawa, Kohei

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to elucidate the invasiveness, effectiveness, and feasibility of MRI-guided stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation (SRT) for hypothalamic hamartoma (HH). METHODS The authors examined the clinical records of 100 consecutive patients (66 male and 34 female) with intractable gelastic seizures (GS) caused by HH, who underwent SRT as a sole surgical treatment between 1997 and 2013. The median duration of follow-up was 3 years (range 1-17 years). Seventy cases involved pediatric patients. Ninety percent of patients also had other types of seizures (non-GS). The maximum diameter of the HHs ranged from 5 to 80 mm (median 15 mm), and 15 of the tumors were giant HHs with a diameter of 30 mm or more. Comorbidities included precocious puberty (33.0%), behavioral disorder (49.0%), and mental retardation (50.0%). RESULTS A total of 140 SRT procedures were performed. There was no adaptive restriction for the giant or the subtype of HH, regardless of any prior history of surgical treatment or comorbidities. Patients in this case series exhibited delayed precocious puberty (9.0%), pituitary dysfunction (2.0%), and weight gain (7.0%), besides the transient hypothalamic symptoms after SRT. Freedom from GS was achieved in 86.0% of patients, freedom from other types of seizures in 78.9%, and freedom from all seizures in 71.0%. Repeat surgeries were not effective for non-GS. Seizure freedom led to disappearance of behavioral disorders and to intellectual improvement. CONCLUSIONS The present SRT procedure is a minimally invasive and highly effective surgical procedure without adaptive limitations. SRT involves only a single surgical procedure appropriate for all forms of epileptogenic HH and should be considered in patients with an early history of GS. PMID:26587652

  7. Paraventricular hypothalamic regulation of trigeminovascular mechanisms involved in headaches.

    PubMed

    Robert, Claude; Bourgeais, Laurence; Arreto, Charles-Daniel; Condes-Lara, Miguel; Noseda, Rodrigo; Jay, Thérèse; Villanueva, Luis

    2013-05-15

    While functional imaging and deep brain stimulation studies point to a pivotal role of the hypothalamus in the pathophysiology of migraine and trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, the circuitry and the mechanisms underlying the modulation of medullary trigeminovascular (Sp5C) neurons have not been fully identified. We investigated the existence of a direct anatomo-functional relationship between hypothalamic excitability disturbances and modifications of the activities of Sp5C neurons in the rat. Anterograde and retrograde neuronal anatomical tracing, intrahypothalamic microinjections, extracellular single-unit recordings of Sp5C neurons, and behavioral trials were used in this study. We found that neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) send descending projections to the superior salivatory nucleus, a region that gives rise to parasympathetic outflow to cephalic and ocular/nasal structures. PVN cells project also to laminae I and outer II of the Sp5C. Microinjections of the GABAA agonist muscimol into PVN inhibit both basal and meningeal-evoked activities of Sp5C neurons. Such inhibitions were reduced in acutely restrained stressed rats. GABAA antagonist gabazine infusions into the PVN facilitate meningeal-evoked responses of Sp5C neurons. PVN injections of the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP38) enhance Sp5C basal activities, whereas the antagonist PACAP6-38 depresses all types of Sp5C activities. 5-HT1B/D receptor agonist naratriptan infusion confined to the PVN depresses both basal and meningeal-evoked Sp5C activities. Our findings suggest that paraventricular hypothalamic neurons directly control both spontaneous and evoked activities of Sp5C neurons and could act either as modulators or triggers of migraine and/or trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias by integrating nociceptive, autonomic, and stress processing mechanisms. PMID:23678125

  8. The structures of cyclic dihydronium cations.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Sonjae; Huang, Lulu; Massa, Lou; Mukhopadhyay, Uday; Bernal, Ivan; Karle, Jerome

    2007-10-23

    Recent experimental discoveries have revealed the existence of hitherto unexpected cyclic hydronium di-cations trapped within crystal structures. The molecular formulas are (H(14)O(6))(2+), present as two isomers, four- and six-member cyclic structures, and (H(18)O(8))(2+), an eight-member cyclic structure. As these unprecedented hydronium species are stabilized by the crystal structures in which they are captured, the question arises whether they could be stable as independent species as, for example, in solution or gas phase. Quantum mechanical density functional theory calculations are used to investigate this question. We find these doubly charged cyclic hydronium structures to be energetically stable and, as between the four- and six-member structures, the former has more binding energy than the latter. We also determine the theoretically optimized structures for all three ions and give their calculated atomic charges for both their crystal and optimized geometries.

  9. Synchronization in chaotic oscillators by cyclic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olusola, O. I.; Njah, A. N.; Dana, S. K.

    2013-07-01

    We introduce a type of cyclic coupling to investigate synchronization of chaotic oscillators. We derive analytical solutions of the critical coupling for stable synchronization under the cyclic coupling for the Rössler system and the Lorenz oscillator as paradigmatic illustration. Based on the master stability function (MSF) approach, the analytical results on critical coupling are verified numerically. An enhancing effect in terms of lowering the critical coupling or enlarging the synchronization window in a critical coupling space is noticed. The cyclic coupling is also applied in other models, Hindmarsh-Rose model, Sprott system, Chen system and forced Duffing system to confirm the enhancing effect. The cyclic coupling allows tuning of two coupling constants in reverse directions when an optimal control of synchronization is feasible.

  10. Mortar constituent of concrete under cyclic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, A.; Darwin, D.

    1980-10-01

    The behavior of the mortar constituent of concrete under cyclic compression was studied and a simple analytic model was developed to represent its cyclic behavior. Experimental work consisted of monotonic and cyclic compressive loading of mortar. Two mixes were used, with proportions corresponding to concretes having water cement ratios of 0.5 and 0.6. Forty-four groups of specimens were tested at ages ranging from 5 to 70 days. complete monotonic and cyclic stress strain envelopes were obtained. A number of loading regimes were investigated, including cycles to a constant maximum strain. Major emphasis was placed on tests using relatively high stress cycles. Degradation was shown to be a continuous process and a function of both total strain and load history. No stability or fatigue limit was apparent.

  11. Cyclic loading in knee ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Weisman, G; Pope, M H; Johnson, R J

    1980-01-01

    The effect of cyclic loading on knee ligaments was studied both in vivo and in vitro. The compliance of the medial collateral ligaments of athletes participating in hockey, basketball, soccer, and downhill skiing was determined by using a specially built machine. Tests were conducted before and after participation in the various sports. Most subjects tested showed an increased compliance after their respective sporting activities. This observation was confirmed in the laboratory by imparting cyclic loading to 10 people under controlled conditions. The in vitro studies were conducted on the medial collateral ligaments of rats. These were tested to determine the effect of cyclic loading on the strength and stiffness of the ligaments. Results show a clear relationship between decreased stiffness or softening and a reduction in strength of the ligament. The amount of softening was related to the cyclic stress in the ligament.

  12. Diet-induced obesity impairs hypothalamic glucose sensing but not glucose hypothalamic extracellular levels, as measured by microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, I S; Zemdegs, J C S; de Souza, A P; Watanabe, R L H; Telles, M M; Nascimento, C M O; Oyama, L M; Ribeiro, E B

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Glucose from the diet may signal metabolic status to hypothalamic sites controlling energy homeostasis. Disruption of this mechanism may contribute to obesity but its relevance has not been established. The present experiments aimed at evaluating whether obesity induced by chronic high-fat intake affects the ability of hypothalamic glucose to control feeding. We hypothesized that glucose transport to the hypothalamus as well as glucose sensing and signaling could be impaired by high-fat feeding. Subjects/methods: Female Wistar rats were studied after 8 weeks on either control or high-lard diet. Daily food intake was measured after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) glucose. Glycemia and glucose content of medial hypothalamus microdialysates were measured in response to interperitoneal (i.p.) glucose or meal intake after an overnight fast. The effect of refeeding on whole hypothalamus levels of glucose transporter proteins (GLUT) 1, 2 and 4, AMPK and phosphorylated AMPK levels was determined by immunoblotting. Results: High-fat rats had higher body weight and fat content and serum leptin than control rats, but normal insulin levels and glucose tolerance. I.c.v. glucose inhibited food intake in control but failed to do so in high-fat rats. Either i.p. glucose or refeeding significantly increased glucose hypothalamic microdialysate levels in the control rats. These levels showed exacerbated increases in the high-fat rats. GLUT1 and 4 levels were not affected by refeeding. GLUT2 levels decreased and phosphor-AMPK levels increased in the high-fat rats but not in the controls. Conclusions: The findings suggest that, in the high-fat rats, a defective glucose sensing by decreased GLUT2 levels contributed to an inappropriate activation of AMPK after refeeding, despite increased extracellular glucose levels. These derangements were probably involved in the abolition of hypophagia in response to i.c.v. glucose. It is proposed that ‘glucose resistance

  13. Time course of the estradiol-dependent induction of oxytocin receptor binding in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.E.; Ball, G.F.; Coirini, H.; Harbaugh, C.R.; McEwen, B.S.; Insel, T.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Oxytocin (OT) transmission is involved in the steroid-dependent display of sexual receptivity in rats. One of the biochemical processes stimulated by the ovarian steroid 17 beta-estradiol (E2) that is relevant to reproduction is the induction of OT receptor binding in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN). The purpose of these experiments was to determine if E2-induced changes in OT receptor binding in the VMN occur within a time frame relevant to cyclic changes in ovarian steroid secretion. OT receptor binding was measured in the VMN of ovariectomized rats implanted for 0-96 h with E2-containing Silastic capsules. The rate of decay of OT receptor binding was measured in another group of animals 6-48 h after capsule removal. Receptors were labeled with the specific OT receptor antagonist ({sup 125}I)d(CH2)5(Tyr(Me)2,Thr4,Tyr-NH2(9))OVT, and binding was measured with quantitative autoradiographic methods. In addition, plasma E2 levels and uterine weights were assessed in animals from each treatment condition. Significant increases in E2-dependent OT receptor binding and uterine weight occurred within 24 h of steroid treatment. After E2 withdrawal, OT receptor binding and uterine weight decreased significantly within 24 h. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that steroid modulation of OT receptor binding is necessary for the induction of sexual receptivity.

  14. Acute Effect of Manganese on Hypothalamic Luteinizing Hormone Releasing Hormone Secretion in Adult Male Rats: Involvement of Specific Neurotransmitter Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prestifilippo, Juan Pablo; Fernández-Solari, Javier; De Laurentiis, Andrea; Mohn, Claudia Ester; de la Cal, Carolina; Reynoso, Roxana; Dees, W. Les; Rettori, Valeria

    2008-01-01

    Manganese chloride (MnCl2) is capable of stimulating luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats through the activation of the hypothalamic nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)/protein kinase G pathway. The present study aimed to determine the involvement of specific neurotransmitters involved in this action. Our results indicate that dopamine, but not glutamic acid and prostaglandinds, mediates the MnCl2 stimulated secretion of LHRH from medial basal hypothalami in vitro, as well as increases the activity of nitric oxide synthase. Furthermore, a biphasic response was observed in that gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) release was also increased, which acts to attenuate the MnCl2 action to stimulate LHRH secretion. Although it is clear that manganese (Mn+2) can acutely induce LHRH secretion in adult males, we suggest that the additional action of MnCl2 to release GABA, a LHRH inhibitor, may ultimately contribute to suppressed reproductive function observed in adult animals following exposure to high chromic levels of Mn+2. PMID:18603625

  15. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides for plant disease control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wan; Kim, Beom Seok

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from microbes bind stably with target sites, have a tolerance to hydrolysis by proteases, and a favorable degradability under field conditions, which make them an attractive proposition for use as agricultural fungicides. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides are classified according to the types of bonds within the ring structure; homodetic, heterodetic, and complex cyclic peptides, which in turn reflect diverse physicochemical features. Most antimicrobial cyclic peptides affect the integrity of the cell envelope. This is achieved through direct interaction with the cell membrane or disturbance of the cell wall and membrane component biosynthesis such as chitin, glucan, and sphingolipid. These are specific and selective targets providing reliable activity and safety for non-target organisms. Synthetic cyclic peptides produced through combinatorial chemistry offer an alternative approach to develop antimicrobials for agricultural uses. Those synthesized so far have been studied for antibacterial activity, however, the recent advancements in powerful technologies now promise to provide novel antimicrobial cyclic peptides that are yet to be discovered from natural resources.

  16. Antimicrobial Cyclic Peptides for Plant Disease Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Wan; Kim, Beom Seok

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from microbes bind stably with target sites, have a tolerance to hydrolysis by proteases, and a favorable degradability under field conditions, which make them an attractive proposition for use as agricultural fungicides. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides are classified according to the types of bonds within the ring structure; homodetic, heterodetic, and complex cyclic peptides, which in turn reflect diverse physicochemical features. Most antimicrobial cyclic peptides affect the integrity of the cell envelope. This is achieved through direct interaction with the cell membrane or disturbance of the cell wall and membrane component biosynthesis such as chitin, glucan, and sphingolipid. These are specific and selective targets providing reliable activity and safety for non-target organisms. Synthetic cyclic peptides produced through combinatorial chemistry offer an alternative approach to develop antimicrobials for agricultural uses. Those synthesized so far have been studied for antibacterial activity, however, the recent advancements in powerful technologies now promise to provide novel antimicrobial cyclic peptides that are yet to be discovered from natural resources. PMID:25774105

  17. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time. PMID:26924339

  18. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time.

  19. Mutations along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis affecting male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Alevizaki, Maria

    2007-12-01

    Disorders in male reproductive function are caused by mutations of key genes at all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary- testicular axis. They may affect the ontogeny and function of the hypothalamic centres governing gonadotrophin synthesis and secretion, the development of the anterior pituitary gland, the production of gonadotrophins and the function of their receptor genes, and finally the genes responsible for testicular hormone production and gametogenesis. This review focuses on mutations that affect the synthesis and secretion of hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone, pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone, as well as their testicular receptors, thus covering a selected group of genetic causes of hypo- and hypergonadotrophic male hypogonadism.

  20. Cyclic estradiol treatment normalizes body weight and restores physiological patterns of spontaneous feeding and sexual receptivity in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Asarian, Lori; Geary, Nori

    2002-12-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function strongly influences feeding and body weight in cycling females in many species. To test the sufficiency of cyclic variations in plasma estradiol to reproduce normal patterns of spontaneous feeding, food intake, and body weight, ovariectomized Long-Evans rats were subcutaneously injected every fourth day with 2 microg estradiol benzoate or with the oil vehicle alone. Cyclic estradiol treatment completely normalized the trajectory of body weight gain and total food intake through seven treatment cycles. The hyperphagia of ovariectomized rats was expressed as an increase in spontaneous meal size. Meal frequency decreased, but not enough to compensate for the increase in meal size. Estradiol treatment normalized both parameters. In addition, cyclic estradiol treatment produced a further phasic decrease in meal size (and increase in meal frequency) and a decrease in food intake during the second night after injection. This phasic change is similar to the feeding changes occurring during estrus in intact rats. Sexual receptivity was measured during the eighth estradiol treatment cycle, 4 h after injection of 0.5 mg progesterone. Lordosis scores at the time of the treatment cycle modeling estrus were maximal, and scores at the time modeling diestrus were slightly increased over those of rats that did not receive estradiol. Finally, plasma estradiol levels, measured during the ninth treatment cycle, revealed a near-normal cyclic pattern of plasma estradiol levels. These results provide the first demonstration that the induction of a cyclic, near-physiological pattern of plasma estradiol is sufficient to maintain normal levels of body weight, spontaneous feeding patterns, total food intake, and (together with progesterone) sexual receptivity in ovariectomized rats.

  1. Acute effects of exogenous progesterone on follicular steroidogenesis in the cyclic rat.

    PubMed

    Taya, K; Terranova, P F; Greenwald, G S

    1981-06-01

    The effects of exogenous progesterone (P) on follicular steroidogenesis and serum gonadotropins in the cyclic rat were determined using in vivo and in vitro approaches. A single sc injection of 800 micrograms progesterone at 0900 h on diestrus II (day 0) consistently postponed ovulation by 24 h in 4-day cyclic rats, with no change in the ovulation rate. The preovulatory surges in serum LH and FSH were delayed by 1 day and occurred on day 2 in the P-treated animals. After the injection of 800 micrograms P at 0900 h on diestrus II, peak serum levels of P were reached 3 h later and thereafter decreased to basal levels by 1500 h on day 1. Within 1 h after injecting P, serum LH and FSH decreased to values below control levels; serum LH did not recover during the next 48 h, whereas serum FSH returned to basal levels within 6 h. An abrupt fall in serum 17 beta-estradiol occurred within 1 h after the administration of P. This drastic decline in serum estradiol was paralleled by temporally related decreases in serum LH and FSH but not by changes in serum testosterone. By 0900 h on day 1 (24 h after P injection), serum and estradiol returned to values within the range observed on diestrus II, then gradually increased to proestrous values by day 2. Within 3 h after the administration of P, the initial content and the in vitro production rate of P, testosterone, and 17 beta-estradiol by antral follicles decreased in the P-treated animals compared to that in follicles of control animals, whereas the follicular content the production rate of 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone were unaffected. Thus, in the cyclic rat, the inhibitory effects of exogenous P on follicular steroidogenesis are mediated in this dose range through the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, especially via lowering serum LH.

  2. The envelope-based cyclic periodogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, P.

    2015-06-01

    Cyclostationary analysis has proven effective in identifying signal components for diagnostic purposes. A key descriptor in this framework is the cyclic power spectrum, traditionally estimated by the averaged cyclic periodogram and the smoothed cyclic periodogram. A lengthy debate about the best estimator finally found a solution in a cornerstone work by Antoni, who proposed a unified form for the two families, thus allowing a detailed statistical study of their properties. Since then, the focus of cyclostationary research has shifted towards algorithms, in terms of computational efficiency and simplicity of implementation. Traditional algorithms have proven computationally inefficient and the sophisticated "cyclostationary" definition of these estimators slowed their spread in the industry. The only attempt to increase the computational efficiency of cyclostationary estimators is represented by the cyclic modulation spectrum. This indicator exploits the relationship between cyclostationarity and envelope analysis. The link with envelope analysis allows a leap in computational efficiency and provides a "way in" for the understanding by industrial engineers. However, the new estimator lies outside the unified form described above and an unbiased version of the indicator has not been proposed. This paper will therefore extend the analysis of envelope-based estimators of the cyclic spectrum, proposing a new approach to include them in the unified form of cyclostationary estimators. This will enable the definition of a new envelope-based algorithm and the detailed analysis of the properties of the cyclic modulation spectrum. The computational efficiency of envelope-based algorithms will be also discussed quantitatively for the first time in comparison with the averaged cyclic periodogram. Finally, the algorithms will be validated with numerical and experimental examples.

  3. Measuring Cyclic Error in Laser Heterodyne Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Abramovici, Alexander; Zhao, Feng; Dekens, Frank; An, Xin; Azizi, Alireza; Chapsky, Jacob; Halverson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus have been devised for measuring cyclic errors in the readouts of laser heterodyne interferometers that are configured and operated as displacement gauges. The cyclic errors arise as a consequence of mixing of spurious optical and electrical signals in beam launchers that are subsystems of such interferometers. The conventional approach to measurement of cyclic error involves phase measurements and yields values precise to within about 10 pm over air optical paths at laser wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. The present approach, which involves amplitude measurements instead of phase measurements, yields values precise to about .0.1 microns . about 100 times the precision of the conventional approach. In a displacement gauge of the type of interest here, the laser heterodyne interferometer is used to measure any change in distance along an optical axis between two corner-cube retroreflectors. One of the corner-cube retroreflectors is mounted on a piezoelectric transducer (see figure), which is used to introduce a low-frequency periodic displacement that can be measured by the gauges. The transducer is excited at a frequency of 9 Hz by a triangular waveform to generate a 9-Hz triangular-wave displacement having an amplitude of 25 microns. The displacement gives rise to both amplitude and phase modulation of the heterodyne signals in the gauges. The modulation includes cyclic error components, and the magnitude of the cyclic-error component of the phase modulation is what one needs to measure in order to determine the magnitude of the cyclic displacement error. The precision attainable in the conventional (phase measurement) approach to measuring cyclic error is limited because the phase measurements are af-

  4. Leptin signaling in GFAP-expressing adult glia cells regulates hypothalamic neuronal circuits and feeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim1, Jae Geun; Suyama, Shigetomo; Koch, Marco; Jin, Sungho; Argente-Arizon, Pilar; Argente, Jesus; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Zimmer, Marcelo R.; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Gao, Yuanqing; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Yi, Chun-Xia; Salmaso, Natalina; Vaccarino, Flora M.; Chowen, Julie; Diano, Sabrina; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that synaptic re-organization of hypothalamic feeding circuits in response to metabolic shifts involves astrocytes, cells that can directly respond to the metabolic hormone, leptin, in vitro. It is not known whether the role of glia cells in hypothalamic synaptic adaptions is active or passive. Here we show that leptin receptors are expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes and that conditional, adult deletion of leptin receptors in astrocytes leads to altered glial morphology, decreased glial coverage and elevated synaptic inputs onto pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)- and Agouti-related protein (AgRP)-producing neurons. Leptin-induced suppression of feeding was diminished, while rebound feeding after fasting or ghrelin administration was elevated in mice with astrocyte-specific leptin receptor deficiency. These data unmask an active role of glial cells in the initiation of hypothalamic synaptic plasticity and neuroendocrine control of feeding by leptin. PMID:24880214

  5. Effects of inhaled (S)-linalool on hypothalamic gene expression in rats under restraint stress.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoto; Fujiwara, Satoshi; Saito-Iizumi, Kana; Kamei, Asuka; Shinozaki, Fumika; Watanabe, Yuki; Abe, Keiko; Nakamura, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Linalool has two enantiomers, (R)-linalool and (S)-linalool. Both are known to possess several biological activities in stressed animals. Our previous work revealed that inhalation of (R)-linalool altered hypothalamic gene expression in rats under stress. In the present study, we monitored hypothalamic gene expression in restrained rats with and without (S)-linalool inhalation by DNA microarray. The entire gene expression profile showed that inhalation of (S)-linalool significantly changed the expression levels of 316 hypothalamic genes in the restrained rats. The differentially expressed genes (e.g., App, Avp, Igf2, Igfbp2, Sst and Syt5) were found to relate to cell-to-cell signaling and nervous system development. These results indicate that (S)-linalool influences hypothalamic gene expression in restrained rats, and that inhalation of (S)-linalool under the stressed condition has some effects on stress-related biological responses.

  6. Growth, Hypothalamic Function, and Brain Ventricle Size in Mentally Retarded Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leisti, S.; Iianainen, M.

    1978-01-01

    To determine whether moderate enlargement of the third brain ventricle or the temporal horns of the lateral ventricles was associated with hypothalamic dysfunction, 15 mentally retarded Ss (ages 12-25 years) with such characteristics were studies. (DLS)

  7. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells.

    PubMed

    Breit, Andreas; Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27144291

  8. Hypothalamic hamartoma associated with central precocious puberty and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rousseau-Nepton, Isabelle; Kaduri, Sagi; Garfield, Natasha; Krishnamoorthy, Preetha

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are tumors generally associated with isolated central precocious puberty (CPP). To our knowledge, we report a unique case of a girl with HH associated with CPP and growth hormone deficiency. This case highlights the complex interaction between HHs and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. It also emphasizes the value of close follow-up of growth velocity in these patients even after treatment of the CPP.

  9. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells.

    PubMed

    Breit, Andreas; Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction.

  10. Hypothalamic thyroid hormone feedback in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Fliers, Eric; Alkemade, Anneke; Wiersinga, Wilmar M; Swaab, Dick F

    2006-01-01

    The role of the human hypothalamus in the neuroendocrine response to illness has only recently begun to be explored. Extensive changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis occur within the framework of critical illness. The best-documented change in the HPT axis is a decrease in serum concentrations of the biologically active thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3). From studies in post-mortem human hypothalamus it appeared that low serum T3 and thyrotropin (TSH) during illness (nonthyroidal illness, NTI) are paralleled by decreased thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)mRNA expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), pointing to a major alteration in HPT axis setpoint regulation. A strong decrease in TRHmRNA expression is also present in the PVN of patients with major depression as well as in glucocorticoid-treated patients. By inference, hypercortisolism in hospitalized patients with severe depression or in critical illness may induce down-regulation of the HPT axis at the level of the hypothalamus. In order to start defining the determinants and mechanisms of these setpoint changes in various clinical conditions, it is important to note that an increasing number of hypothalamic proteins appears to be involved in central thyroid hormone metabolism. In recent studies, we have investigated the distribution and expression of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, type 2 and type 3 deiodinase (D2 and D3), and the thyroid hormone transporter monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) in the human hypothalamus by a combination of immunocytochemistry, mRNA in situ hybridization and enzyme activity assays. Both D2 and D3 enzyme activities are detectable in the mediobasal hypothalamus. D2 immunoreactivity is prominent in glial cells of the infundibular nucleus/median eminence region and in tanycytes lining the third ventricle. Combined D2, D3, MCT8 or TR immunocytochemistry and TRHmRNA in situ hybridization indicates that D3, MCT8 and TRs are all

  11. Atrazine disrupts the hypothalamic control of pituitary-ovarian function.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R L; Stoker, T E; Tyrey, L; Goldman, J M; McElroy, W K

    2000-02-01

    days; and (3) atrazine (administered in vivo or in vitro) to suppress LH and prolactin secretion from pituitaries, using a flow-through perifusion procedure. In conclusion, the results of these studies demonstrate that atrazine alters LH and prolactin serum levels in the LE and SD female rats by altering the hypothalamic control of these hormones. In this regard, the LE female appeared to be more sensitive to the hormone suppressive effects of atrazine, as indicated by the decreases observed on treatment-day 3. These experiments support the hypothesis that the effect of atrazine on LH and prolactin secretion is mediated via a hypothalamic site of action.

  12. Hypothalamic dysfunction in "cured" acromegaly is treatment modality dependent.

    PubMed

    Peacey, S R; Toogood, A A; Shalet, S M

    1998-05-01

    The current definition of cure after treatment for acromegaly stipulates a reduction in GH levels to less than 2 ng/mL (< 5 mU/L), as such GH concentrations are believed to be associated with normalization of long term survival. We sought to further define the nature of the cure in such patients, when cure has been achieved by alternative therapeutic modalities, in the expectation that hypothalamic neuroregulatory control of GH secretion might be affected differently by radiotherapy or surgery. In particular we wished to determine the effect of therapy modality on endogenous somatostatin (SMS) tone, using the GH response to i.v. arginine as a paradigm. We studied 20 patients with cured acromegaly (mean 24-h GH concentration, < 2 ng/mL). Eight patients had been cured by surgery only (S; 4 women and 4 men; mean +/- SEM age, 52 +/- 5 yr), and 12 patients had been cured by radiotherapy (R; 4 women and 8 men; age, 52 +/- 3 yr). Sixteen healthy subjects were studied as a control group (C; 6 women and 10 men; age 53 +/- 3]. The median (range) GH during 24-h profiles was similar in each group: S, 1.3 (0.7-1.8) ng/mL; R, 0.6 (0.4-1.8) ng/mL; and C, 0.7 (0.4-3.2) ng/mL (P = 0.57). The median incremental GH responses to arginine were significantly lower in the R group compared with those in the S and C groups: S, 6.4 (2.1-16.6) ng/mL; R, 0.1 (0-1.7) ng/mL; and C, 9.2 (0-16.1) ng/mL (P = 0.0002; S vs. R, P < 0.01; S vs. C, P > 0.05; R vs. C, P < 0.001). We conclude that in acromegalic patients deemed to be cured (GH, < 2 ng/mL), the mode of therapy has considerable influence on the remaining hypothalamic-somatotroph function. In view of the putative mechanism by which arginine releases GH, we suggest that radiotherapy leads to a reduction or complete loss of endogenous SMS tone. This may have implications for the treatment of those acromegalic patients who are not cured (GH, > 2 ng/mL) and who require SMS analog therapy. PMID:9589676

  13. Aircraft control by propeller cyclic blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, J.

    1979-01-01

    A theory is developed for aircraft control obtained from the propeller forces and moments generated by blade angle variation during a blade revolution. The propeller blade is pitched harmonically one cycle per propeller revolution which results in vehicle control forces and moments, termed cyclic-control. Using a power series respresentation of an arbitrary function of cyclic-blade angle, cyclic-control theory is developed which leads to exact solutions in terms of derivatives of steady-state thrust and power with respect to blade angle. An alternative solution, when the cyclic-blade angle function is limited to a sinusoidal cycle, is in terms of Bessel functions. An estimate of non-steady azimuth angle change or lag is presented. Cyclic-control analysis applied to the counter-rotating propeller shows that control forces or moments can be uniquely isolated from each other. Thus the dual rotor, in hovering mode, has propulsion without rotor tilt or moments, or, when in propeller mode at the tail of an air ship or submarine, vehicle control with no vehicle movement. Control isolation is also attainable from three or more propellers in-line.

  14. Novel pH-Sensitive Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Weerakkody, Dhammika; Moshnikova, Anna; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Adochite, Ramona-Cosmina; Slaybaugh, Gregory; Golijanin, Jovana; Tiwari, Rakesh K; Andreev, Oleg A; Parang, Keykavous; Reshetnyak, Yana K

    2016-01-01

    A series of cyclic peptides containing a number of tryptophan (W) and glutamic acid (E) residues were synthesized and evaluated as pH-sensitive agents for targeting of acidic tissue and pH-dependent cytoplasmic delivery of molecules. Biophysical studies revealed the molecular mechanism of peptides action and localization within the lipid bilayer of the membrane at high and low pHs. The symmetric, c[(WE)4WC], and asymmetric, c[E4W5C], cyclic peptides translocated amanitin, a polar cargo molecule of similar size, across the lipid bilayer and induced cell death in a pH- and concentration-dependent manner. Fluorescently-labelled peptides were evaluated for targeting of acidic 4T1 mammary tumors in mice. The highest tumor to muscle ratio (5.6) was established for asymmetric cyclic peptide, c[E4W5C], at 24 hours after intravenous administration. pH-insensitive cyclic peptide c[R4W5C], where glutamic acid residues (E) were replaced by positively charged arginine residues (R), did not exhibit tumor targeting. We have introduced a novel class of cyclic peptides, which can be utilized as a new pH-sensitive tool in investigation or targeting of acidic tissue. PMID:27515582

  15. Novel pH-Sensitive Cyclic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Weerakkody, Dhammika; Moshnikova, Anna; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Adochite, Ramona-Cosmina; Slaybaugh, Gregory; Golijanin, Jovana; Tiwari, Rakesh K.; Andreev, Oleg A.; Parang, Keykavous; Reshetnyak, Yana K.

    2016-01-01

    A series of cyclic peptides containing a number of tryptophan (W) and glutamic acid (E) residues were synthesized and evaluated as pH-sensitive agents for targeting of acidic tissue and pH-dependent cytoplasmic delivery of molecules. Biophysical studies revealed the molecular mechanism of peptides action and localization within the lipid bilayer of the membrane at high and low pHs. The symmetric, c[(WE)4WC], and asymmetric, c[E4W5C], cyclic peptides translocated amanitin, a polar cargo molecule of similar size, across the lipid bilayer and induced cell death in a pH- and concentration-dependent manner. Fluorescently-labelled peptides were evaluated for targeting of acidic 4T1 mammary tumors in mice. The highest tumor to muscle ratio (5.6) was established for asymmetric cyclic peptide, c[E4W5C], at 24 hours after intravenous administration. pH-insensitive cyclic peptide c[R4W5C], where glutamic acid residues (E) were replaced by positively charged arginine residues (R), did not exhibit tumor targeting. We have introduced a novel class of cyclic peptides, which can be utilized as a new pH-sensitive tool in investigation or targeting of acidic tissue. PMID:27515582

  16. Cyclic transformation of orbital angular momentum modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlederer, Florian; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Malik, Mehul; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-04-01

    The spatial modes of photons are one realization of a QuDit, a quantum system that is described in a D-dimensional Hilbert space. In order to perform quantum information tasks with QuDits, a general class of D-dimensional unitary transformations is needed. Among these, cyclic transformations are an important special case required in many high-dimensional quantum communication protocols. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a cyclic transformation in the high-dimensional space of photonic orbital angular momentum (OAM). Using simple linear optical components, we show a successful four-fold cyclic transformation of OAM modes. Interestingly, our experimental setup was found by a computer algorithm. In addition to the four-cyclic transformation, the algorithm also found extensions to higher-dimensional cycles in a hybrid space of OAM and polarization. Besides being useful for quantum cryptography with QuDits, cyclic transformations are key for the experimental production of high-dimensional maximally entangled Bell-states.

  17. Recovery of cyclic antidepressants with gastric lavage.

    PubMed

    Watson, W A; Leighton, J; Guy, J; Bergman, R; Garriott, J C

    1989-01-01

    The role of lavage fluid volume in recovery of cyclic antidepressant with gastric lavage was determined in 13 patients treated for moderate to severe cyclic antidepressant intoxication. An orogastric tube was placed, gastric contents aspirated, and gastric lavage performed with 60 to 180 mL aliquots of tap water or 0.9% NaCl for irrigation. A volume of 12.8 +/- 4.4 liters of lavage fluid was instilled, and 97.6 +/- 6.9% of this volume was recovered. The recovered aspirate and lavage fluid were inspected for the presence of particulate matter and saved in 4 to 5 liter collections. Determination of cyclic antidepressant and metabolite concentrations was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the amount of cyclic antidepressant recovered was calculated. The mean total amount recovered was 110 mg and ranged from 2.4 mg to 342 mg. Of the total amount recovered, 88% +/- 13% was recovered in the first 4 to 5 liters of lavage fluid. An estimate of the dose ingested was available in 7 patients, with 8.7% (0.4% to 21.7%) of the estimated dose recovered by lavage. There were no cases of significant drug recovery in clear lavage fluid. We conclude that if gastric lavage is undertaken in cyclic antidepressant intoxications, it should utilize 5 liters initially and then continue only if particulate matter is seen.

  18. Activation of Strychnine-Sensitive Glycine Receptors by Shilajit on Preoptic Hypothalamic Neurons of Juvenile Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Janardhan Prasad; Cho, Dong Hyu; Han, Seong Kyu

    2016-02-29

    Shilajit, a mineral pitch, has been used in Ayurveda and Siddha system of medicine to treat many human ailments, and is reported to contain at least 85 minerals in ionic form. This study examined the possible mechanism of Shilajit action on preoptic hypothalamic neurons using juvenile mice. The hypothalamic neurons are the key regulator of many hormonal systems. In voltage clamp mode at a holding potential of -60 mV, and under a high chloride pipette solution, Shilajit induced dose-dependent inward current. Shilajit-induced inward currents were reproducible and persisted in the presence of 0.5 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX) suggesting a postsynaptic action of Shilajit on hypothalamic neurons. The currents induced by Shilajit were almost completely blocked by 2 μM strychnine (Stry), a glycine receptor antagonist. In addition, Shilajit-induced inward currents were partially blocked by bicuculline. Under a gramicidin-perforated patch clamp mode, Shilajit induced membrane depolarization on juvenile neurons. These results show that Shilajit affects hypothalamic neuronal activities by activating the Stry-sensitive glycine receptor with α₂/α₂β subunit. Taken together, these results suggest that Shilajit contains some ingredients with possible glycine mimetic activities and might influence hypothalamic neurophysiology through activation of Stry-sensitive glycine receptor-mediated responses on hypothalamic neurons postsynaptically. PMID:26875561

  19. Role of Hypothalamic VGF in Energy Balance and Metabolic Adaption to Environmental Enrichment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Foglesong, Grant D; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xianglan; Slater, Andrew M; Siu, Jason; Yildiz, Vedat; Salton, Stephen R J; Cao, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE), a housing condition providing complex physical, social, and cognitive stimulation, leads to improved metabolic health and resistance to diet-induced obesity and cancer. One underlying mechanism is the activation of the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis with hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as the key mediator. VGF, a peptide precursor particularly abundant in the hypothalamus, was up-regulated by EE. Overexpressing BDNF or acute injection of BDNF protein to the hypothalamus up-regulated VGF, whereas suppressing BDNF signaling down-regulated VGF expression. Moreover, hypothalamic VGF expression was regulated by leptin, melanocortin receptor agonist, and food deprivation mostly paralleled to BDNF expression. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer of Cre recombinase to floxed VGF mice specifically decreased VGF expression in the hypothalamus. In contrast to the lean and hypermetabolic phenotype of homozygous germline VGF knockout mice, specific knockdown of hypothalamic VGF in male adult mice led to increased adiposity, decreased core body temperature, reduced energy expenditure, and impaired glucose tolerance, as well as disturbance of molecular features of brown and white adipose tissues without effects on food intake. However, VGF knockdown failed to block the EE-induced BDNF up-regulation or decrease of adiposity indicating a minor role of VGF in the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis. Taken together, our results suggest hypothalamic VGF responds to environmental demands and plays an important role in energy balance and glycemic control likely acting in the melanocortin pathway downstream of BDNF.

  20. Role of Hypothalamic VGF in Energy Balance and Metabolic Adaption to Environmental Enrichment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Foglesong, Grant D; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xianglan; Slater, Andrew M; Siu, Jason; Yildiz, Vedat; Salton, Stephen R J; Cao, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE), a housing condition providing complex physical, social, and cognitive stimulation, leads to improved metabolic health and resistance to diet-induced obesity and cancer. One underlying mechanism is the activation of the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis with hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as the key mediator. VGF, a peptide precursor particularly abundant in the hypothalamus, was up-regulated by EE. Overexpressing BDNF or acute injection of BDNF protein to the hypothalamus up-regulated VGF, whereas suppressing BDNF signaling down-regulated VGF expression. Moreover, hypothalamic VGF expression was regulated by leptin, melanocortin receptor agonist, and food deprivation mostly paralleled to BDNF expression. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer of Cre recombinase to floxed VGF mice specifically decreased VGF expression in the hypothalamus. In contrast to the lean and hypermetabolic phenotype of homozygous germline VGF knockout mice, specific knockdown of hypothalamic VGF in male adult mice led to increased adiposity, decreased core body temperature, reduced energy expenditure, and impaired glucose tolerance, as well as disturbance of molecular features of brown and white adipose tissues without effects on food intake. However, VGF knockdown failed to block the EE-induced BDNF up-regulation or decrease of adiposity indicating a minor role of VGF in the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis. Taken together, our results suggest hypothalamic VGF responds to environmental demands and plays an important role in energy balance and glycemic control likely acting in the melanocortin pathway downstream of BDNF. PMID:26730934

  1. Cyclic nucleotides of cone-dominant retinas. Reduction of cyclic AMP levels by light and by cone degeneration.

    PubMed

    Farber, D B; Souza, D W; Chase, D G; Lolley, R N

    1981-01-01

    Dark-adapted retinas or whole eyes of 13-line ground squirrels (Citellus tridecemlineatus) and western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis) contain higher levels of cyclic AMP than of cyclic GMP. In these cone-dominant retinas, light reduces cyclic AMP content selectively. Freezing of dark- or light-adapted retinas or eyes also reduces cyclic AMP content, with only minimal changes in cyclic GMP levels. In addition, exposure of frozen retinas of dark-adapted ground squirrel to light results in a significant decrease in cyclic AMP content. The destruction of cone visual cells of ground squirrel retina by iodoacetic acid injection decreases the cyclic nucleotide content of the dark-adapted retina. Considering the relative loss of cyclic nucleotides from cone degeneration, we estimate that the content of cyclic AMP in visual cells of ground squirrel retina is about four times greater than that of cyclic GMP. PMID:6256308

  2. Cyclic and low temperature effects on microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissflug, V. A.; Sisul, E. V.

    1977-01-01

    Cyclic temperature and low temperature operating life tests, and pre-/post-life device evaluations were used to determine the degrading effects of thermal environments on microcircuit reliability. Low power transistor-transistor-logic gates and linear devices were included in each test group. Device metallization systems included aluminum metallization/aluminum wire, aluminum metallization/gold wire, and gold metallization/gold wire. Fewer than 2% electrical failures were observed during the cyclic and low temperature life tests and the post-life evaluations revealed approximately 2% bond pull failures. Reconstruction of aluminum die metallization was observed in all devices and the severity of the reconstruction appeared to be directly related to the magnitude of the temperature excursion. All types of bonds except the gold/gold bonds were weakened by exposure to repeated cyclic temperature stress.

  3. Holographic dark energy in a cyclic universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingfei; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Hongya

    2007-11-01

    In this paper we study the cosmological evolution of the holographic dark energy in a cyclic universe, generalizing the model of holographic dark energy proposed by Li. The holographic dark energy with c<1 can realize a quintom behavior; namely, it evolves from a quintessence-like component to a phantom-like one. The holographic phantom energy density grows rapidly and dominates the late-time expanding phase, helping to realize a cyclic universe scenario in which the high energy regime is modified by the effects of quantum gravity, causing a turn-around (and a bounce) of the universe. The dynamical evolution of holographic dark energy in the regimes of low energy and high energy is governed by two differential equations, respectively. It is of importance to link the two regimes for this scenario. We propose a link condition giving rise to a complete picture of holographic evolution of a cyclic universe.

  4. Decoding Ventromedial Hypothalamic Neural Activity during Male Mouse Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Dollar, Piotr; Perona, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The ventromedial hypothalamus, ventrolateral area (VMHvl) was identified recently as a critical locus for inter-male aggression. Optogenetic stimulation of VMHvl in male mice evokes attack toward conspecifics and inactivation of the region inhibits natural aggression, yet very little is known about its underlying neural activity. To understand its role in promoting aggression, we recorded and analyzed neural activity in the VMHvl in response to a wide range of social and nonsocial stimuli. Although response profiles of VMHvl neurons are complex and heterogeneous, we identified a subpopulation of neurons that respond maximally during investigation and attack of male conspecific mice and during investigation of a source of male mouse urine. These “male responsive” neurons in the VMHvl are tuned to both the inter-male distance and the animal's velocity during attack. Additionally, VMHvl activity predicts several parameters of future aggressive action, including the latency and duration of the next attack. Linear regression analysis further demonstrates that aggression-specific parameters, such as distance, movement velocity, and attack latency, can model ongoing VMHvl activity fluctuation during inter-male encounters. These results represent the first effort to understand the hypothalamic neural activity during social behaviors using quantitative tools and suggest an important role for the VMHvl in encoding movement, sensory, and motivation-related signals. PMID:24760856

  5. Hypothalamic gene expression underlying pre-hibernation satiety.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, C; Hampton, M; Andrews, M T

    2015-03-01

    Prior to hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) enter a hypophagic period where food consumption drops by an average of 55% in 3 weeks. This occurs naturally, while the ground squirrels are in constant environmental conditions and have free access to food. Importantly, this transition occurs before exposure to hibernation conditions (5°C and constant darkness), so the ground squirrels are still maintaining a moderate level of activity. In this study, we used the Illumina HiSeq 2000 system to sequence the hypothalamic transcriptomes of ground squirrels before and after the autumn feeding transition to examine the genes underlying this extreme change in feeding behavior. The hypothalamus was chosen because it is known to play a role in the control and regulation of food intake and satiety. Overall, our analysis identified 143 genes that are significantly differentially expressed between the two groups. Specifically, we found five genes associated with feeding behavior and obesity (VGF, TRH, LEPR, ADIPOR2, IRS2) that are all upregulated during the hypophagic period, after the feeding transition has occurred. We also found that serum leptin significantly increases in the hypophagic group. Several of the genes associated with the natural autumnal feeding decline in 13-lined ground squirrels show parallels to signaling pathways known to be disrupted in human metabolic diseases, like obesity and diabetes. In addition, many other genes were identified that could be important for the control of food consumption in other animals, including humans.

  6. Involvement of hypothalamic dopamine in the regulation of prolactin secretion.

    PubMed

    Reymond, M J; Porter, J C

    1985-01-01

    The neuroendocrine control of prolactin (PRL) secretion is known to be a multifactorial process, but dopamine (DA) secreted by the tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) neurons of the hypothalamus is believed to exert a predominant inhibitory control on the secretion of PRL. The secretory activity of the TIDA neurons, including the rate of biosynthesis of DA and the rate of release of the neurohormone into hypophysial portal blood, can be readily evaluated in the rat. In most conditions in which an altered secretion of PRL has been documented, an altered secretory activity of the TIDA neurons has been found. When an acute reduction in the secretion of DA is observed, an increased secretion of PRL is associated, with an inverse relationship between DA and PRL concentrations in hypophysial portal and systemic blood, respectively. However, the secretion of PRL can be regulated by PRL itself through stimulation of the secretory activity of the TIDA neurons, and consequently hyperprolactinemia can be observed concomitantly with a sustained high secretion of DA, as seen after treatment with estrogen. The short loop feedback of PRL secretion seems to be impaired in the aging rat, since a sustained reduced hypothalamic secretion of DA is observed in spite of long-term hyperprolactinemia.

  7. [Clinical and electroencephalogram study of 5 children with hypothalamic hamartoma].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Eiko; Oguni, Hirokazu; Funatsuka, Makoto; Usugi, Tomoko; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Kitami; Nagaki, Shigeru; Osawa, Makiko; Ono, Yuko; Yamane, Fumitaka; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2005-09-01

    We retrospectively studied 5 children with hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) to elucidate the clinical, neuroimaging and electroencephalogram (EEG) characteristics of this disorder. In all cases, high resolution MRI scans demonstrated an intrahypothalamic mass protruding into the 3rd ventricle. An initial symptom was epileptic attack in 4 cases and precocious puberty in the remaining one. Gelastic seizures developed in 4 of 5 patients at ranging from 2 days to 11 years of age. The ictal EEGs during the gelastic seizures showed diffuse attenuation of background activity, followed by rhythmic slow discharges either diffusely or in the central area. Gamma-knife radiosurgery was performed on 2 cases whose seizures were resistant to available antiepileptic drugs. One of the 2 patients was responded significantly to this treatment, showing the disappearance of combined attacks and a marked reduction of the generalized spike-waves discharges. A more aggressive therapy, including gamma-knife radiosurgery and surgical treatment, should be considered for patients whose seizures are resistant to the medical treatment and causing deterioration of intelligence and behavioral problem.

  8. Hypothalamic gene expression underlying pre-hibernation satiety

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Christine; Hampton, Marshall; Andrews, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Prior to hibernation, thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) enter a hypophagic period where food consumption drops by an average of 55% in 3 weeks. This occurs naturally, while the ground squirrels are in constant environmental conditions and have free access to food. Importantly, this transition occurs before exposure to hibernation conditions (5°C and constant darkness), so the ground squirrels are still maintaining a moderate level of activity. In this study, we used the Illumina HiSeq 2000 system to sequence the hypothalamic transcriptomes of ground squirrels before and after the autumn feeding transition to examine the genes underlying this extreme change in feeding behavior. The hypothalamus was chosen because it is known to play a role in the control and regulation of food intake and satiety. Overall, our analysis identified 143 genes that are significantly differentially expressed between the two groups. Specifically, we found five genes associated with feeding behavior and obesity (VGF, TRH, LEPR, ADIPOR2, IRS2) that are all upregulated during the hypophagic period, after the feeding transition has occurred. We also found that serum leptin significantly increases in the hypophagic group. Several of the genes associated with the natural autumnal feeding decline in thirteen-lined ground squirrels show parallels to signaling pathways known to be disrupted in human metabolic diseases, like obesity and diabetes. Additionally, many other genes were identified that could be important for the control of food consumption in other animals, including humans. PMID:25640202

  9. Tests of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis.

    PubMed

    Shaw, R W

    1976-12-01

    The availability of RIA to measure the pituitary gonadotropins and ovarian sex steroids has greatly helped in the development of tests of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian function. The use of estimates of basal gonadotrophin and sex steroid hormones together with dynamic tests such as the LH-RH test, oestrogen provocation test, clomiphene tests and exogenous gonadotrophins can now test the integrity and functional capacity of each of the components of the HPO axis. Figure 4 demonstrates how these tests can be used in a logical sequence to investigate patients with a disorder of the HPO axis after having first excluded any other endocrine abnormality. Screening of serum for elevated levels of gonadotrophins, prolactin and progesterone is an important initial step. Interpretation of the oestrogen provocation and clomiphene tests requires a normally functioning pituitary gland and hence the response to an LH-RH test also plays a ket role. The flow chart also demonstrates the points at which specific ovulation induction treatment can be instituted and should be useful in saving patient and doctor investigative time. Using these types of tests it should be possible to reclassify disorders of the HPO axis on the basis of their underlying pathology.

  10. Hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis in uremic women.

    PubMed

    Swamy, A P; Woolf, P D; Cestero, R V

    1979-06-01

    Menstrual abnormalities are common with decreasing renal function and uremia. Maintenance hemodialysis therapy partially corrects some of the abnormalities. Since the pathophysiology of the menstural irregularities is unknown, the secretion of LH, FSH, estrogen, and PRL was studied under basal conditions and after provocative testing in 13 women undergoing chronic maintenance hemodialysis. Elevated LH concentrations were found in all six premenopausal (44.1 +/- 26.4 mlU/ml, normal follicular phase 4 to 30) and seven postmenopausal (246.1 +/- 171.4 mlU/ml, normal 35 to 200) women studied. FSH values were normal both in the premenopausal women (7.9 +/- 4.1 mlU/ml, normal 2 to 20) and in postmenopausal women (88.0 +/- 69.0 mlU/ml, normal 40 to 200). FSH and LH levels did not show typical ovulatory spikes in three of four women studied. Pulsatile hormonal release was absent. The pituitary response to LH-RH was adequate and prolonged, but the response to clomiphene citrate was variable. The study documents the existence of abnormalities at various levels of the hypothalamic-putuitary-ovarian axis.

  11. Developmental aspects of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Wintour, E M

    1984-06-01

    The ovine fetal adrenal cortex and pituitary are functional secretory organs by the end of the first third of gestation (term is 142-152 days). By half-way through gestation the zona glomerulosa is mature morphologically, more than 80% of the aldosterone in fetal blood is of fetal adrenal origin, but conventional stimuli, for example, increased plasma K+ or angiotensin II, do not increase aldosterone secretion until near term. The zona fasciculata is immature histologically, relatively unresponsive to ACTH, and contributes less than 10% of the cortisol in fetal blood between 100 and 120 days of gestation. After this time the zona fasciculata cells begin to mature, to respond to ACTH and to produce an increasing proportion of the cortisol in fetal blood. A functional relationship between hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal cortex matures over the last fifth of gestation. It is hypothesized that cortisol exerts a local effect in maturation of fetal zona fasciculata cells, such that low concentrations of ACTH have increasingly larger effects on growth and secretion of the fasciculata and that the level of negative feedback by cortisol on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is reset. The analogy is drawn between the changes in gonadotrophin and gonadal hormones which culminates in puberty in man and the changes in ACTH and cortisol which culminate in parturition in sheep.

  12. Development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis.

    PubMed

    Apter, D

    1997-06-17

    The onset of puberty is a centrally driven process, the detailed mechanisms of which are not known. It is translated into an increased activity of the hypothalamic GnRH pulse generator. This in turn is seen as increased pituitary pulsatile secretion of LH and FSH. LH pulses are observed even in midchildhood, particularly after the onset of sleep. Onset of puberty is associated with a greater increase in LH pulse amplitude than frequency and a much greater increase in LH and FSH. A progressive increase in daytime pulsatility occurs, with a gradual reduction of sleep-entrained amplification. Prepubertal FSH concentrations are relatively high in girls, and continous ovarian follicular growth and atresia take place, with estradiol concentrations being higher than in boys. Only after the steep early pubertal increase in LH, ovarian steroidogenesis is activated, with increases in androgen and estrogen secretion. Under further FSH stimulation, follicular growth and maturation proceed. The first menstrual cycles are mostly anovulatory for 1 to 2 years. Luteal phase insufficiency is common the first five years after menarche.

  13. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis homeostasis predicts longevity.

    PubMed

    Yonker, James A; Chang, Vicky; Roetker, Nicholas S; Hauser, Taissa S; Hauser, Robert M; Atwood, Craig S

    2013-02-01

    The reproductive-cell cycle theory of aging posits that reproductive hormone changes associated with menopause and andropause drive senescence via altered cell cycle signaling. Using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (n = 5,034), we analyzed the relationship between longevity and menopause, including other factors that impact "ovarian lifespan" such as births, oophorectomy, and hormone replacement therapy. We found that later onset of menopause was associated with lower mortality, with and without adjusting for additional factors (years of education, smoking status, body mass index, and marital status). Each year of delayed menopause resulted in a 2.9% reduction in mortality; after including a number of additional controls, the effect was attenuated modestly but remained statistically significant (2.6% reduction in mortality). We also found that no other reproductive parameters assessed added to the prediction of longevity, suggesting that reproductive factors shown to affect longevity elsewhere may be mediated by age of menopause. Thus, surgical and natural menopause at age 40, for example, resulted in identical survival probabilities. These results support the maintenance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in homeostasis in prolonging human longevity, which provides a coherent framework for understanding the relationship between reproduction and longevity.

  14. Hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in patients with hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Röjdmark, S; Berg, A; Kallner, G

    1988-01-01

    To test whether chronic thyroid hormone excess influences the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, 8 hyperthyroid men were given two identical intravenous GnRH tests. The first test was performed before any treatment had been instituted, the second 6-13 months later, when medical treatment had made the patients euthyroid. Although basal serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T) levels were of similar magnitudes before and after the medical treatment, LH and FSH responsiveness to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), as reflected by the hormone incremental areas (U/l X min), were significantly larger in the thyrotoxic state compared with the euthyroid state (LH incremental areas: 3,999 +/- 665 vs. 2,640 +/- 430, p less than 0.02; FSH incremental areas: 825 +/- 193 vs. 542 +/- 98, p less than 0.05). Furthermore, serum T increased significantly in response to GnRH when the patients were hyperthyroid (T incremental area: 162 +/- 51, p less than 0.02), but failed to do so when they were euthyroid (T incremental area: 92 +/- 53, NS). These results imply that chronic thyroid hormone excess makes the pituitary gonadotrophs 'hypersensitive' to exogenous GnRH. This may in turn explain why human Leydig cells respond more powerful to exogenous GnRH in thyrotoxic patients than in euthyroid subjects.

  15. Visualization of Kisspeptin Binding to Rat Hypothalamic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Norio; Takumi, Ken; Matsumoto, Keisuke; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2015-12-25

    The neuropeptide kisspeptin plays an important role in fertility and the onset of puberty, stimulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Several studies have demonstrated a morphological interaction between kisspeptin- and GnRH-expressing neurons; however, few have addressed the interaction of kisspeptin with other neuronal subtypes. We recently showed that fibers immunoreactive for kisspeptin were densely distributed in the dorsal part of the arcuate nucleus. These fibers were found in close proximity to GnRH and tuberoinfundibular dopamine (TIDA) neurons. In the present study, using biotinylated kisspeptin, we established a visualization method for identifying kisspeptin binding sites on TIDA neurons. Biotinylated kisspeptin bound to the cell bodies of TIDA neurons and surrounding fibers, suggesting that TIDA neurons express sites of action for kisspeptin. Our assay also detected biotinylation signals from kisspeptin binding to GnRH fibers in the median eminence, but not to cell bodies of GnRH neurons in the medial preoptic area. Positive signals were completely eliminated by addition of excess non-labeled kisspeptin. This method enabled us to detect kisspeptin binding sites on specific neural structures and neuronal fibers.

  16. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Young, Elizabeth A; Korszun, Ania

    2002-03-01

    This article has demonstrated that stress and HPA axis activation affect the reproductive axis. Despite similarities in the HPA axis picture between women with major depression and those with hypothalamic amenorrhea and exercise or nutritional amenorrhea, no abnormalities in LH secretion have been documented in major depression. Lower estradiol in the follicular phase in depressed women and lower testosterone in depressed men however, have been observed [81, 92]. Although PMS would appear to be the best candidate for a mood disorder associated with abnormalities in reproductive hormones, no abnormalities in LH, estradiol or progesterone have been documented in PMS either [62]. Similarly, blockade of progesterone appears to be ineffective as a treatment for PMS [79]. Complete elimination of monthly cycling with leuprolide improves mood, however. No published studies have examined women with major depression to determine whether leuprolide will exacerbate or improve depressive symptoms. Some studies suggest beneficial effects of estrogen on mood in postmenopausal women, but no placebo controlled studies have explored estrogen augmentation in the treatment of major depression in either post- or premenopausal women, although estrogen is beneficial in women with perimenopause-related mood disorders [78].

  17. Ventromedial hypothalamic neurons control a defensive emotion state

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Prabhat S; Zelikowsky, Moriel; Remedios, Ryan; Cai, Haijiang; Yilmaz, Melis; Meister, Markus; Anderson, David J

    2015-01-01

    Defensive behaviors reflect underlying emotion states, such as fear. The hypothalamus plays a role in such behaviors, but prevailing textbook views depict it as an effector of upstream emotion centers, such as the amygdala, rather than as an emotion center itself. We used optogenetic manipulations to probe the function of a specific hypothalamic cell type that mediates innate defensive responses. These neurons are sufficient to drive multiple defensive actions, and required for defensive behaviors in diverse contexts. The behavioral consequences of activating these neurons, moreover, exhibit properties characteristic of emotion states in general, including scalability, (negative) valence, generalization and persistence. Importantly, these neurons can also condition learned defensive behavior, further refuting long-standing claims that the hypothalamus is unable to support emotional learning and therefore is not an emotion center. These data indicate that the hypothalamus plays an integral role to instantiate emotion states, and is not simply a passive effector of upstream emotion centers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06633.001 PMID:25748136

  18. Paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus: axonal projections to the brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Geerling, Joel C.; Shin, Jung-Won; Chimenti, Peter C.; Loewy, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    The paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) contains many neurons that innervate the brainstem, but information regarding their target sites remains incomplete. Here, we labeled neurons in the rat PVH with an anterograde axonal tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHAL) and studied their descending projections in reference to specific neuronal subpopulations throughout the brainstem. While many of their target sites were identified previously, numerous new observations were made. Major findings include: (1) In the midbrain, the PVH projects lightly to the ventral tegmental area, Edinger-Westphal nucleus, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter, reticular formation, pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, and dorsal raphe nucleus. (2) In the dorsal pons, the PVH projects heavily to the pre-locus coeruleus, yet very little to the catecholamine neurons in the locus coeruleus, and selectively targets the viscerosensory subregions of the parabrachial nucleus; (3) In the ventral medulla, the superior salivatory nucleus, retrotrapezoid nucleus, compact and external formations of the nucleus ambiguus, A1 and caudal C1 catecholamine neurons, and caudal pressor area receive dense axonal projections, generally exceeding the PVH projection to the rostral C1 region; (4) The medial nucleus of the solitary tract (including A2 noradrenergic and aldosterone-sensitive neurons) receives the most extensive projections of the PVH, substantially more than the dorsal vagal nucleus or area postrema. Our findings suggest that the PVH may modulate a range of homeostatic functions, including cerebral and ocular blood flow, corneal and nasal hydration, ingestive behavior, sodium intake, and glucose metabolism, as well as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and respiratory activities. PMID:20187136

  19. Hypothalamic substrates of self-stimulation in cats.

    PubMed

    Wyrwicka, W; Clemente, C D; Chase, M H

    1986-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather anatomical data concerning sites for self-stimulation in the lateral hypothalamus in the cat. The study was conducted on 25 adult cats. In each cat, one to three monopolar stimulating electrodes were implanted bilaterally in the lateral hypothalamus in a region between sections Fr 10.0 and Fr 13.0, L 2.0 and L 5.0, and H -2.0 and H -6.0. A reference electrode was placed in the calvaria over the frontal sinus. Twenty-two of these cats learned to press a lever when each press was rewarded by a brief (0.3 s) electrical stimulus (2.0 to 7.0 V, 100/s, 1 ms duration per pulse) delivered to the hypothalamus. Postmortem anatomical analysis of the brains revealed that most of the positive rewarding sites were located in a midlateral hypothalamic zone, which included the medial forebrain bundle, and were localized to section Fr 11.5, between L 2.0 and L. 5.0, and H -3.0 and H -5.5. PMID:3743701

  20. Hypothalamic gene expression underlying pre-hibernation satiety.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, C; Hampton, M; Andrews, M T

    2015-03-01

    Prior to hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) enter a hypophagic period where food consumption drops by an average of 55% in 3 weeks. This occurs naturally, while the ground squirrels are in constant environmental conditions and have free access to food. Importantly, this transition occurs before exposure to hibernation conditions (5°C and constant darkness), so the ground squirrels are still maintaining a moderate level of activity. In this study, we used the Illumina HiSeq 2000 system to sequence the hypothalamic transcriptomes of ground squirrels before and after the autumn feeding transition to examine the genes underlying this extreme change in feeding behavior. The hypothalamus was chosen because it is known to play a role in the control and regulation of food intake and satiety. Overall, our analysis identified 143 genes that are significantly differentially expressed between the two groups. Specifically, we found five genes associated with feeding behavior and obesity (VGF, TRH, LEPR, ADIPOR2, IRS2) that are all upregulated during the hypophagic period, after the feeding transition has occurred. We also found that serum leptin significantly increases in the hypophagic group. Several of the genes associated with the natural autumnal feeding decline in 13-lined ground squirrels show parallels to signaling pathways known to be disrupted in human metabolic diseases, like obesity and diabetes. In addition, many other genes were identified that could be important for the control of food consumption in other animals, including humans. PMID:25640202

  1. Molecular features of hypothalamic plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Standaert, D. G.; Lee, V. M.; Greenberg, B. D.; Lowery, D. E.; Trojanowski, J. Q.

    1991-01-01

    The pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves subcortical as well as cortical structures. The authors have used immunohistochemical methods to study the molecular composition of AD plaques in the hypothalamus. In contrast to previous studies using histochemical methods, the authors observed large numbers of diffuse plaques in the AD hypothalamus labeled with an antiserum to the beta-amyloid, or A4 peptide, of the beta-amyloid precursor proteins (beta APPs), whereas A4-immunoreactive plaques were uncommon in the hypothalamus of patients without AD. Unlike plaques in the cortex and hippocampus of AD patients, hypothalamic plaques did not contain epitopes corresponding to other regions of the beta APPs, nor did they contain tau-, neurofilament-, or microtubule-associated protein-reactive epitopes, and did not disrupt the neuropil or produce astrogliosis. These findings demonstrate that there are substantial molecular and cellular differences in the pathologic features of AD in the hypothalamus compared with those observed in hippocampal and cortical structures, which may provide insight into the pathogenetic mechanisms of AD. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1653521

  2. Dopamine Autoreceptor Regulation of a Hypothalamic Dopaminergic Network

    PubMed Central

    Stagkourakis, Stefanos; Kim, Hoseok; Lyons, David J.; Broberger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Summary How autoreceptors contribute to maintaining a stable output of rhythmically active neuronal circuits is poorly understood. Here, we examine this issue in a dopamine population, spontaneously oscillating hypothalamic rat (TIDA) neurons, that underlie neuroendocrine control of reproduction and neuroleptic side effects. Activation of dopamine receptors of the type 2 family (D2Rs) at the cell-body level slowed TIDA oscillations through two mechanisms. First, they prolonged the depolarizing phase through a combination of presynaptic increases in inhibition and postsynaptic hyperpolarization. Second, they extended the discharge phase through presynaptic attenuation of calcium currents and decreased synaptic inhibition. Dopamine reuptake blockade similarly reconfigured the oscillation, indicating that ambient somatodendritic transmitter concentration determines electrical behavior. In the absence of D2R feedback, however, discharge was abolished by depolarization block. These results indicate the existence of an ultra-short feedback loop whereby neuroendocrine dopamine neurons tune network behavior to echoes of their own activity, reflected in ambient somatodendritic dopamine, and also suggest a mechanism for antipsychotic side effects. PMID:27149844

  3. ADHD-like behavior in a patient with hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Koujyu; Yamashita, Yushiro; Yatsuga, Shuichi; Koga, Yasutoshi; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2016-01-01

    We report a male patient with hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) who manifested central precocious puberty (CPP) at 4 years of age. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue treatment was started at 6 years of age and his pubertal signs were suppressed. At 9 years of age, the patient was emotionally unstable, aggressive, and antisocial. He had severe attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-like behavior and conduct disorder. No seizure activity was observed. GnRH analogue treatment was discontinued for 8 months from 9 years and 4 months of age due to his mother's illness. During this period sexual urges were observed. Treatment with daily methylphenidate markedly improved his behavioral problems. However, his sexual urges were not suppressed until 3 months after the GnRH analogue treatment was restarted. The present case is unique because the patient's behavioral problems were observed despite the parahypothalamic type of HH and absence of seizures. This case is also rare because behavioral problems were observed without seizures, and no ADHD cases with hamartoma have been reported previously. Recently, clinical studies have described an association between psychiatric morbidity, including ADHD, and hyperandrogenism disorders. Our patient's ADHD-like symptoms might be due to hyperandrogenism. In such cases, GnRH analogue with methylphenidate could be effective for improving ADHD-like symptoms.

  4. Hypothalamic hamartomas: optimal approach to clinical evaluation and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wilfong, Angus A; Curry, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) present a difficult medical problem, manifested by gelastic seizures, which are often medically intractable. Although existing techniques offer modest surgical outcomes with the potential for significant morbidity, the relatively novel technique of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided stereotactic laser ablation (SLA) offers a potentially safer, minimally invasive method with high efficacy for the HH treatment. We report here on 14 patients with medically refractory gelastic epilepsy who underwent stereotactic frame-based placement of an MR-compatible laser catheter (1.6 mm diameter) through a 3.2-mm twist drill hole. A U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared laser surgery system (Visualase, Inc.) was utilized to ablate the HH, using real-time MRI thermometry. Seizure freedom was obtained in 12 (86%) of 14 cases, with mean follow-up of 9 months. There were no permanent surgical complications, neurologic deficits, or neuroendocrine disturbances. One patient had a minor subarachnoid hemorrhage that was asymptomatic. Most patients were discharged home within 1 day. SLA was demonstrated to be a safe and effective minimally invasive tool in the ablation of epileptogenic HH. Because use of SLA for HH is being adopted by other medical centers, further data will be acquired to help treat this difficult disorder.

  5. Telemetric control of peripheral lipophagy by hypothalamic autophagy.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Singh, Rajat

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy maintains cellular quality control by degrading organelles, and cytosolic proteins and their aggregates in lysosomes. Autophagy also degrades lipid droplets (LD) through a process termed lipophagy. During lipophagy, LD are sequestered within autophagosomes and degraded by lysosomal acid lipases to generate free fatty acids that are β-oxidized for energy. Lipophagy was discovered in hepatocytes, and since then has been shown to function in diverse cell types. Whether lipophagy degrades LD in the major fat storing cell-the adipocyte-remained unclear. We have found that blocking autophagy in brown adipose tissues (BAT) by deleting the autophagy gene Atg7 in BAT MYF5 (myogenic factor 5)-positive progenitors increases basal lipid content in BAT and decreases lipid utilization during cold exposure-indicating that lipophagy contributes to lipohomeostasis in the adipose tissue. Surprisingly, knocking out Atg7 in hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons also blocks lipophagy in BAT and liver suggesting that specific neurons within the central nervous system (CNS) exert telemetric control over lipophagy in BAT and liver. PMID:27341145

  6. Bacteria, viruses, and hypothalamic inflammation: potential new players in obesity.

    PubMed

    Wierucka-Rybak, Magdalena; Bojanowska, Ewa

    2014-03-12

    Being overweight and obese has become an increasingly serious clinical and socioeconomic problem worldwide. The rapidly rising prevalence of obesity has prompted studies on modifiable, causative factors and novel treatment options for this disorder. Recent evidence indicates that excessive weight gain that leads to being overweight and obese may result from alterations in gut microflora. Studies in humans and animals demonstrated that the composition of gut microbiota may differ in lean and obese subjects, suggesting that these differences result in the increased efficiency of caloric extraction from food, enhanced lipogenesis, and impaired central and peripheral regulation of energy balance. Other studies revealed an excessive increase in body weight in a significant percentage of people infected with human adenoviruses SMAM-1 and Ad-36. Dysregulation of adipocyte function by viruses appears to be the most likely cause of excessive fat accumulation in these individuals. Studies on the pathomechanisms related to the pathogenesis of obesity indicated that a high-fat diet triggers the inflammatory response in the hypothalamus, an event that promotes weight gain and further defends elevated body weight through the initiation of central leptin and insulin resistance and impairment of regenerative capacity of hypothalamic neurons. Exposure to a high-calorie diet appears to predispose individuals to obesity not only because of excessive caloric intake but also because of the induction of microbiota- and central inflammatory response-dependent changes that lead to a dysregulation of energy balance.

  7. Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and prolactin abnormalities in suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Maurizio; Serafini, Gianluca; Palermo, Mario; Seretti, Maria Elena; Stefani, Henry; Angeletti, Gloria; Lester, David; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity measured with the dexamethasone suppression test and the dexamethesone/CRH test may have some predictive power for suicidal behavior in patients with mood disorders. Increased prolactin (PRL) levels may be related both to physiological and pathological conditions. HPA-axis abnormalities and increased levels of PRL may coexist, and common neuroendocrine changes may activate both HPA axis and PRL release. HPA-axis hyperactivity is presumably present in a large subpopulation of depressed subjects. Suicidal behavior is considered to be a form of inward-directed aggression, and aggressive behavior has been connected to high androgen levels. However, lower plasma total testosterone levels have also been reported in subjects with depression and higher suicidality. Lipid/immune dysregulations, the increased ratio of blood fatty acids, and increased PRL levels may each be associated with the increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which have been reported in patients with major depression and patients engaging in suicidal behavior. Although no studies have been done to determine whether ante-mortem physical stress may be detected by raised post-mortem PRL, this would be of great interest for physicians.

  8. Weanling ventromedial hypothalamic syndrome. bone geometry and biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Bernardis, L L; Ziv, I

    The effect of growth-retarding, obesifying lesions in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN) on bone geometry and biomechanics was investigated in male weanling rats. The animals received bilateral, symmetrical, electrolytic lesions (VMNL rats) shortly after weanling (age 27 days); sham-operated rats served as controls (SCON). The rats were maintained for 42 postoperative days and then terminated. Body weight, nose-tail length, food intake, carcass water, and lean body mass were all significantly (p < 0.001) reduced in the VMNL group compared to SCON rats. Carcass fat, lipogenic efficiency (carcass fat % laid down/mean food intake) (both p < 0.001) and epididymal fat pad weight (p < 0.01) were significantly increased in VMNL versus SCON. Femur length, anteroposterior diameter (both p < 0.001), and mediolateral femur diameter (p < 0.01) were significantly reduced in VMNL versus SCON rats, but torque and angle of torque were comparable among the groups. VMNL rats femora also showed a significant greater maximum shear stress compared to the control animals. The reduced parameters in the VMNL rats are in good agreement with the previously demonstrated reduced plasma and pituitary growth hormone levels found in this hypothalamus preparation.

  9. Hypothalamic Regulation of Brown Adipose Tissue Thermogenesis and Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bi, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, but the strategies for the prevention and treatment of these disorders remain inadequate. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is important for cold protection by producing heat using lipids and glucose as metabolic fuels. This thermogenic action causes increased energy expenditure and significant lipid/glucose disposal. In addition, BAT in white adipose tissue (WAT) or beige cells have been found and they also exhibit the thermogenic action similar to BAT. These data provide evidence indicating BAT/beige cells as a potential target for combating obesity and diabetes. Recent discoveries of active BAT and beige cells in adult humans have further highlighted this potential. Growing studies have also shown the importance of central nervous system in the control of BAT thermogenesis and WAT browning using animal models. This review is focused on central neural thermoregulation, particularly addressing our current understanding of the importance of hypothalamic neural signaling in the regulation of BAT/beige thermogenesis and energy homeostasis. PMID:26379628

  10. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    PubMed Central

    Muindi, Fanuel; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Heller, Horace Craig

    2014-01-01

    The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages. PMID:25140132

  11. Somatostatin triggers rhythmic electrical firing in hypothalamic GHRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Osterstock, Guillaume; Mitutsova, Violeta; Barre, Alexander; Granier, Manon; Fontanaud, Pierre; Chazalon, Marine; Carmignac, Danielle; Robinson, Iain C. A. F.; Low, Malcolm J.; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Hodson, David J.; Mollard, Patrice; Méry, Pierre-François

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons orchestrate body growth/maturation and have been implicated in feeding responses and ageing. However, the electrical patterns that dictate GHRH neuron functions have remained elusive. Since the inhibitory neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) is considered to be a primary oscillator of the GH axis, we examined its acute effects on GHRH neurons in brain slices from male and female GHRH-GFP mice. At the cellular level, SST irregularly suppressed GHRH neuron electrical activity, leading to slow oscillations at the population level. This resulted from an initial inhibitory action at the GHRH neuron level via K+ channel activation, followed by a delayed, sst1/sst2 receptor-dependent unbalancing of glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs. The oscillation patterns induced by SST were sexually dimorphic, and could be explained by differential actions of SST on both GABAergic and glutamatergic currents. Thus, a tripartite neuronal circuit involving a fast hyperpolarization and a dual regulation of synaptic inputs appeared sufficient in pacing the activity of the GHRH neuronal population. These “feed-forward loops” may represent basic building blocks involved in the regulation of GHRH release and its downstream sexual specific functions. PMID:27072430

  12. Cyclic entropy: An alternative to inflationary cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul Howard

    2015-07-01

    We address how to construct an infinitely cyclic universe model. A major consideration is to make the entropy cyclic which requires the entropy to be reset to zero in each cycle expansion → turnaround → contraction → bounce → etc. Here, we reset entropy at the turnaround by selecting the introverse (visible universe) from the extroverse which is generated by the accelerated expansion. In the model, the observed homogeneity is explained by the low entropy at the bounce. The observed flatness arises from the contraction together with the reduction in size between the expanding and contracting universe. The present flatness is predicted to be very precise.

  13. Cyclic Polymer with Alternating Monomer Sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen; Li, Zi; Zhao, Youliang; Zhang, Ke

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic polymers with alternating monomer sequence are synthesized for the first time based on the ring-closure strategy. Well-defined telechelic alternating polymers are synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization by copolymerizing the electron acceptor monomer of N-benzylmaleimide and donor monomer of styrene with a feed ratio of 1 between them. The corresponding cyclic alternating polymers are then produced by the UV-induced Diels-Alder click reaction to ring-close the linear alternating polymer precursors under highly diluted reaction solution.

  14. Therapeutic Neuroendocrine Agonist and Antagonist Analogs of Hypothalamic Neuropeptides as Modulators of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis.

    PubMed

    Newton, Claire L; Anderson, Ross C; Millar, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive hormones play a role at all stages of life and affect most tissues of the body. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) synthesized in the hypothalamus stimulates the secretion of gonadotropins which in turn stimulate gonadal sex hormone production and gamete formation. This hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis has, therefore, been the target for the development of numerous drugs which regulate it at various points. These include sex steroid agonists and antagonists, inhibitors of sex steroid biosynthesis, and GnRH agonists and antagonists, which have found extensive applications in treating numerous conditions such as precocious puberty, delayed puberty, prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia, endometriosis, uterine fibroids and also in in vitro fertilization protocols. The novel neuroendocrine peptides, kisspeptin (KP) and neurokinin B (NKB), were recently discovered as upstream regulators of GnRH, and inactivating mutations of KP and NKB ligands or receptors result in a failure to progress through puberty. Agonists and antagonists of KP and NKB are being developed as more subtle modulators of the HPG axis. These new drugs offer additional and alternative therapeutic options in pediatric and adult hormone-dependent diseases.

  15. GABAergic activation inhibits the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovaric axis and sexual development in the immature female rat. Associated changes in hypothalamic glutamatergic and taurinergic systems.

    PubMed

    Feleder, C; Ginzburg, M; Wuttke, W; Moguilevsky, J A; Arias, P

    1999-09-01

    The aim of the present studies was to assess, in immature female rats, the effect of the GABAergic system on the reproductive axis and on pubertal development. With this purpose we initially evaluated, in 30-day-old female rats, the effect of persistently enhanced GABAergic activity (aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA) 10 mg/kg per day i.p., during postnatal days 23-29) on hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and amino acid neurotransmitter (AANT; glutamate or GLU, and taurine or TAU) concentrations, on circulating luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol levels, and on ovaric weight. In a second group of similarly treated rats, the date of vaginal opening (VO) was recorded. Complementary in vitro experiments (superfusion of anterior/mediobasal hypothalamic fragments obtained from rats aged 30 days) were performed to evaluate the effect of the short-term activation of the GABAergic system (by means of AOAA, muscimol or baclofen) on hypothalamic GnRH and AANT release. Prolonged treatment with AOAA led to a marked increase in hypothalamic gamma-aminobutyric-acid (GABA) concentrations (p<0.002), and to a significant decrease in hypothalamic GnRH and GLU content (p<0.05 and <0.02, respectively). Furthermore, treated animals showed diminished serum LH (p<0.05) and estradiol (p<0.005) levels, and a clear reduction in ovaric weight (p<0.002). Mean age at VO was 30. 8+/-0.6 days in control animals (range: 29-34 days), and 36.7+/-0.98 days in AOAA-treated rats (range: 33-40 days; p<0.0001). Acute treatment with AOAA resulted in a decreased GnRH and GLU output, and in an increased TAU release from superfused hypothalamic fragments. This effect was mimicked by the GABA-A and GABA-B agonists. Our results show that the activation of the GABAergic system during postnatal days 23-29 significantly restrains the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovaric axis, resulting in a clear-cut delay in sexual development. This can be attributed to the inhibitory effect exerted by GABA (acting on both

  16. Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into hypothalamic and pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Suga, Hidetaka

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is essential to maintain life and control systemic homeostasis, but it is negatively affected by various diseases, leading to serious symptoms. Embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiate into neuroectodermal progenitors when cultured as floating aggregates under serum-free conditions. Recently, our colleagues have shown that strict removal of exogenous patterning factors during early differentiation steps induced efficient generation of rostral hypothalamic-like progenitors from mouse ES cell-derived neuroectodermal cells. The use of growth factor-free chemically defined medium was critical for this induction. The ES cell-derived hypothalamic-like progenitors generated rostral-dorsal hypothalamic neurons, especially magnocellular vasopressinergic neurons that release the hormone upon stimulation. Subsequently, we reported efficient self-formation of 3-dimensional adenohypophysis tissues in aggregate cultures of mouse ES cells. The ES cells were stimulated to differentiate into nonneural head ectoderm and hypothalamic neuroectoderm in adjacent layers within the aggregate and then treated with hedgehog. Self-organization of Rathke's pouch-like structures occurred at the interface of the two epithelia, as observed in vivo, and various endocrine cells including corticotrophs and somatotrophs were subsequently produced. The corticotrophs efficiently secreted adrenocorticotropic hormone in response to corticotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, when engrafted in vivo, these cells rescued the systemic glucocorticoid level in hypopituitary mice. Our present research aims are to prepare hypothalamic and pituitary tissues from human induced pluripotent stem cells and establish effective transplantation techniques with clinical applications. To replicate the complex and precise control of the hypothalamic-pituitary system, regenerative medicine using pluripotent cells may be a hopeful option. PMID:25428763

  17. Growth hormone modulates hypothalamic inflammation in long-lived pituitary dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Sadagurski, Marianna; Landeryou, Taylor; Cady, Gillian; Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Bartke, Andrzej; Miller, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Mice in which the genes for growth hormone (GH) or GH receptor (GHR(-/-) ) are disrupted from conception are dwarfs, possess low levels of IGF-1 and insulin, have low rates of cancer and diabetes, and are extremely long-lived. Median longevity is also increased in mice with deletion of hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), which leads to isolated GH deficiency. The remarkable extension of longevity in hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice can be reversed by a 6-week course of GH injections started at the age of 2 weeks. Here, we demonstrate that mutations that interfere with GH production or response, in the Snell dwarf, Ames dwarf, or GHR(-/-) mice lead to reduced formation of both orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) projections to the main hypothalamic projection areas: the arcuate nucleus (ARH), paraventricular nucleus (PVH), and dorsomedial nucleus (DMH). These mutations also reduce hypothalamic inflammation in 18-month-old mice. GH injections, between 2 and 8 weeks of age, reversed both effects in Ames dwarf mice. Disruption of GHR specifically in liver (LiGHRKO), a mutation that reduces circulating IGF-1 but does not lead to lifespan extension, had no effect on hypothalamic projections or inflammation, suggesting an effect of GH, rather than peripheral IGF-1, on hypothalamic development. Hypothalamic leptin signaling, as monitored by induction of pStat3, is not impaired by GHR deficiency. Together, these results suggest that early-life disruption of GH signaling produces long-term hypothalamic changes that may contribute to the longevity of GH-deficient and GH-resistant mice.

  18. Growth hormone modulates hypothalamic inflammation in long-lived pituitary dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Sadagurski, Marianna; Landeryou, Taylor; Cady, Gillian; Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Bartke, Andrzej; Miller, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Mice in which the genes for growth hormone (GH) or GH receptor (GHR(-/-) ) are disrupted from conception are dwarfs, possess low levels of IGF-1 and insulin, have low rates of cancer and diabetes, and are extremely long-lived. Median longevity is also increased in mice with deletion of hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), which leads to isolated GH deficiency. The remarkable extension of longevity in hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice can be reversed by a 6-week course of GH injections started at the age of 2 weeks. Here, we demonstrate that mutations that interfere with GH production or response, in the Snell dwarf, Ames dwarf, or GHR(-/-) mice lead to reduced formation of both orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) projections to the main hypothalamic projection areas: the arcuate nucleus (ARH), paraventricular nucleus (PVH), and dorsomedial nucleus (DMH). These mutations also reduce hypothalamic inflammation in 18-month-old mice. GH injections, between 2 and 8 weeks of age, reversed both effects in Ames dwarf mice. Disruption of GHR specifically in liver (LiGHRKO), a mutation that reduces circulating IGF-1 but does not lead to lifespan extension, had no effect on hypothalamic projections or inflammation, suggesting an effect of GH, rather than peripheral IGF-1, on hypothalamic development. Hypothalamic leptin signaling, as monitored by induction of pStat3, is not impaired by GHR deficiency. Together, these results suggest that early-life disruption of GH signaling produces long-term hypothalamic changes that may contribute to the longevity of GH-deficient and GH-resistant mice. PMID:26268661

  19. Cyclic Cratonic Carbonates and Phanerozoic Calcite Seas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses causes of cyclicity in cratonic carbonate sequences and evidence for and potential significance of postulated primary calcite sediment components in past Paleozoic seas, outlining problems, focusing on models explaining existing data, and identifying background. Future sedimentary geologists will need to address these and related areas…

  20. A model for cyclic mechanical reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhai; Kong, Fang; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical force regulates a broad range of molecular interactions in biology. Three types of counterintuitive mechanical regulation of receptor–ligand dissociation have been described. Catch bonds are strengthened by constant forces, as opposed to slip bonds that are weakened by constant forces. The phenomenon that bonds become stronger with prior application of cyclic forces is termed cyclic mechanical reinforcement (CMR). Slip and catch bonds have respectively been explained by two-state models. However, they assume fast equilibration between internal states and hence are inadequate for CMR. Here we propose a three-state model for CMR where both loading and unloading regulate the transition of bonds among the short-lived, intermediate, and long-lived state. Cyclic forces favor bonds in the long-lived state, hence greatly prolonging their lifetimes. The three-state model explains the force history effect and agrees with the experimental CMR effect of integrin α5β1–fibronectin interaction. This model helps decipher the distinctive ways by which molecular bonds are mechanically strengthened: catch bonds by constant forces and CMR by cyclic forces. The different types of mechanical regulation may enable the cell to fine tune its mechanotransduction via membrane receptors. PMID:27786286

  1. Scale invariant density perturbations from cyclic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul Howard

    2016-04-01

    It is shown how quantum fluctuations of the radiation during the contraction era of a comes back empty (CBE) cyclic cosmology can provide density fluctuations which re-enter the horizon during the subsequent expansion era and at lowest order are scale invariant, in a Harrison-Zel’dovich-Peebles sense. It is necessary to be consistent with observations of large scale structure.

  2. Effects of chronic exposure to estradiol on ovarian cyclicity in C57BL/6J mice: potentiation at low doses and only partial suppression at high doses.

    PubMed

    Jesionowska, H; Karelus, K; Nelson, J F

    1990-08-01

    Long-term exposure to ovarian hormones contributes to age-related changes in estrous cyclicity in rodents. Estrogens are implicated in this process, but the concentration of estrogen required to exert these effects is not well established. Also, although estrogens are presumed to alter vaginal cyclicity by affecting the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, they may also impair the ability of the vaginal epithelium to cornify. To address these issues, young and middle-aged ovariectomized (ovx) C57BL/6J mice were exposed for 7-10 wk to plasma levels of estradiol (E2) at one of three ranges (30-40, 50-80, or 120-160 pg/ml). Ovaries from young mice were then transplanted under the renal capsule, and vaginal cyclicity was monitored for 4 mo. Mice exposed to the lowest level of E2 not only failed to stop cycling, but had a higher monthly frequency of estrous cycles than did controls (nearly 1 extra cycle/mo). Mice exposed to the intermediate level of E2 showed no impairment in cyclicity. Although mice exposed to the highest concentrations of E2 showed no vaginal cyclicity, they continued to ovulate as evidenced by fresh, albeit reduced, numbers of corpora lutea. These results indicate that, in ovx mice, (1) chronic exposure to relatively low concentrations of E2 potentiates cyclicity, (2) very high levels of E2 are required to induce acyclicity, and (3) this acyclicity reflects vaginal as well as neuroendocrine alterations. The results also indicate that vaginal acylicity may be a poor indicator of ovulatory acyclicity in mice that have been chronically exposed to E2.

  3. Somatosensory and hypothalamic inhibitions of baroreflex vagal bradycardia in rats.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, S; Nakase, N; Murata, K

    1989-04-01

    Somatosensory and forebrain mechanisms inhibiting arterial baroreflexes were investigated in chloralose-urethane anesthetized and artificially ventilated rats. Electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve (ScN) and the hypothalamic pressor area (HP) suppressed baroreflex vagal bradycardia (BVB) and hypotension provoked by electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN). Suppression of BVB was more marked, but inhibitory potencies of ScN and HP were not different. These two inhibitions were considered to have a functional implication in common, since both were accompanied by increase in hindlimb vascular conductance. A variety of experiments were conducted to localize the target site of ScN and HP inhibitions of BVB. Either ScN or HP stimulations was without effect on antidromic compound spike potentials along ADN evoked by microstimulation of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), precluding the possibility of these inhibitions being presynaptic. Both ScN and HP stimulation suppressed ADN-induced field potentials in the NA region which provoked vagal bradycardia upon microstimulation, but failed to affect ADN-induced responses, either field or unitary, in the NTS region. Antidromic unitary responses in the NA region to vagus cardiac branch stimulation were suppressed by ScN and HP stimulations in NTS-lesioned rats. Intracisternal bicuculline, a GABA antagonist, was found to abolish both ScN and HP inhibitions of BVB, while intracisternal muscimol, a GABA agonist, eliminated bradycardia. These findings suggest that somatosensory and forebrain inhibition of BVB occur principally at the preganglionic cell level and are probably mediated by a GABAergic mechanism. PMID:2726429

  4. Psychiatric implications of altered limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical activity.

    PubMed

    Holsboer, F

    1989-01-01

    Hormones of the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (LHPA) system are much involved in central nervous system regulation. The major LHPA neuropeptides, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), vasopressin (AVP) and corticotropin (ACTH) do not only coordinate the neuroendocrine response to stress, but also induce behavioral adaptation. Transcription and post-translational processing of these neuropeptides is regulated by corticosteroids secreted from the adrenal cortex after stimulation by ACTH and other proopiomelanocortin derived peptides. These steroids play a key role as regulators of cell development, homeostatic maintenance and adaptation to environmental challenges. They execute vitally important actions through genomic effects resulting in altered gene expression and nongenomic effects leading to altered neuronal excitability. Since excessive secretory activity of this particular neuroendocrine system is part of an acute stress response or depressive symptom pattern, there is good reason to suspect that central actions of these steroids and peptides are involved in pathophysiology determining the clinical phenotype, drug response and relapse liability. This overview summarizes the clinical neuroendocrine investigations of the author and his collaborators, while they worked at the Department of Psychiatry in Mainz. The major conclusions from this work were: (1) aberrant hormonal responses to challenges with dexamethasone, ACTH or CRH are reflecting altered brain physiology in affective illness and related disorders; (2) hormones of the LHPA axis influence also nonendocrine behavioral systems such as sleep EEG; (3) physiologically significant interactions exist between LHPA hormones, the thyroid, growth hormone, gonadal and other neuroendocrine systems; (4) hormones of the LHPA axis constitute a bidirectional link between immunoregulation and brain activity; and (5) future psychiatric research topics such as molecular genetics of affective disorders

  5. The hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Kidd, G S; Glass, A R; Vigersky, R A

    1979-05-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis was evaluated in seven men with thyrotoxicosis due to Graves' disease. Loss of libido and decreased potency were present in 71% and 56%, respectively. All patients had normal testicular volume (25 ml in all) and gynecomastia was detected in two of seven patients. Total sperm counts were less than 40 million in four of the five men tested. There was an inverse correlation between basal serum 17 beta-estradiol (E2) levels and total sperm count (r = -0.87; P less than 0.05). Mean (+/- SE) total testosterone (T) and E2 levels (1008 +/- 104 ng/100 ml and 104 +/- 16 pg/ml) were significantly higher than in normal men (P less than 0.05). Free T (13.6 +/- 2.4 ng/100 ml) was indistinguishable from normal (15.3 +/- 1.5 ng/100 ml). The mean (+/- SE) response of serum T to hCG administration was blunted (80 +/- 40%) compared to controls (193 +/- 19%; P less than 0.02). Basal plasma LH levels (15.5 +/- 1.5 mIU/ml) were significantly higher (P less than 0.05) than in normal men (9.1 +/- 0.6 mIU/ml) and hyperresponded to 100 microgram LRH iv in five of seven patients. Basal plasma FSH levels and the FSH response to LRH were normal. These results suggest that men with hyperthyroidism have 1) partial Leydig cell failure, 2) impairment of spermatogenesis, and 3) blunting of the feedback effects of E2.

  6. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Imrich, R; Rovensky, J; Zlnay, M; Radikova, Z; Macho, L; Vigas, M; Koska, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess basal function and responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis during dynamic testing. Methods: Insulin induced hypoglycaemia (IIH) (Actrapid HM 0.1 IU/kg, as intravenous bolus) was induced in 17 patients and 11 healthy controls matched for age, sex, and body mass index. Concentrations of glucose, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, insulin, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) were determined in plasma. Results: Comparable basal cortisol levels were found in the two groups, with a trend to be lower in ankylosing spondylitis. In the ankylosing spondylitis group, there were higher concentrations of IL-6 (mean (SEM): 16.6 (2.8) pg/ml v 1.41 (0.66) pg/ml in controls; p<0.001) and TNFα (8.5 (1.74) pg/ml v 4.08 (0.42) pg/ml in controls; p<0.01). Glucose, insulin, ACTH, DHEAS, and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone did not differ significantly from control. The IIH test was carried out successfully in 11 of the 17 patients with ankylosing spondylitis, and the ACTH and cortisol responses were comparable with control. General linear modelling showed a different course of glycaemia (p = 0.041) in the ankylosing spondylitis patients who met the criteria for a successful IIH test compared with the controls. Conclusions: The results suggest there is no difference in basal HPA axis activity and completely preserved responsiveness of the HPA axis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The interpretation of the different course of glycaemia during IIH in ankylosing spondylitis requires further investigation. PMID:15140773

  7. A cyclic GMP-dependent signalling pathway regulates bacterial phytopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    An, Shi-Qi; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Febrer, Melanie; McCarthy, Yvonne; Yang, Jauo-Guey; Liu, Chung-Liang; Swarbreck, David; Rogers, Jane; Maxwell Dow, J; Chou, Shan-Ho; Ryan, Robert P

    2013-09-11

    Cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic GMP) is a second messenger whose role in bacterial signalling is poorly understood. A genetic screen in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (Xcc) identified that XC_0250, which encodes a protein with a class III nucleotidyl cyclase domain, is required for cyclic GMP synthesis. Purified XC_0250 was active in cyclic GMP synthesis in vitro. The linked gene XC_0249 encodes a protein with a cyclic mononucleotide-binding (cNMP) domain and a GGDEF diguanylate cyclase domain. The activity of XC_0249 in cyclic di-GMP synthesis was enhanced by addition of cyclic GMP. The isolated cNMP domain of XC_0249 bound cyclic GMP and a structure-function analysis, directed by determination of the crystal structure of the holo-complex, demonstrated the site of cyclic GMP binding that modulates cyclic di-GMP synthesis. Mutation of either XC_0250 or XC_0249 led to a reduced virulence to plants and reduced biofilm formation in vitro. These findings describe a regulatory pathway in which cyclic GMP regulates virulence and biofilm formation through interaction with a novel effector that directly links cyclic GMP and cyclic di-GMP signalling.

  8. Cyclic hardening in copper described in terms of combined monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, H.D. . School of Mechanical Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    Hardening of polycrystalline copper subjected to tension-compression loading cycles in the plastic region is discussed with reference to changes in flow stress determined from equations describing dislocation glide. It is suggested that hardening is as a result of the accumulation of strain on a monotonic stress-strain curve. On initial loading, the behavior is monotonic. On stress reversal, a characteristic cyclic stress-strain curve is followed until the stress reaches a value in reverse loading corresponding to the maximum attained during the preceding half cycle. Thereafter, the monotonic path is followed until strain reversal occurs at completion of the half cycle. Repetition of the process results in cyclic hardening. Steady state cyclic behavior is reached when a stress associated with the monotonic stress-strain curve is reached which is equal to the stress associated with the cyclic stress-strain curve corresponding to the imposed strain amplitude.

  9. Deleterious effects of lard-enriched diet on tissues fatty acids composition and hypothalamic insulin actions.

    PubMed

    Dornellas, A P S; Watanabe, R L H; Pimentel, G D; Boldarine, V T; Nascimento, C M O; Oyama, L M; Ghebremeskel, K; Wang, Y; Bueno, A A; Ribeiro, E B

    2015-12-01

    Altered tissue fatty acid (FA) composition may affect mechanisms involved in the control of energy homeostasis, including central insulin actions. In rats fed either standard chow or a lard-enriched chow (high in saturated/low in polyunsaturated FA, HS-LP) for eight weeks, we examined the FA composition of blood, hypothalamus, liver, and retroperitoneal, epididymal and mesenteric adipose tissues. Insulin-induced hypophagia and hypothalamic signaling were evaluated after intracerebroventricular insulin injection. HS-LP feeding increased saturated FA content in adipose tissues and serum while it decreased polyunsaturated FA content of adipose tissues, serum, and liver. Hypothalamic C20:5n-3 and C20:3n-6 contents increased while monounsaturated FA content decreased. HS-LP rats showed hyperglycemia, impaired insulin-induced hypophagia and hypothalamic insulin signaling. The results showed that, upon HS-LP feeding, peripheral tissues underwent potentially deleterious alterations in their FA composition, whist the hypothalamus was relatively preserved. However, hypothalamic insulin signaling and hypophagia were drastically impaired. These findings suggest that impairment of hypothalamic insulin actions by HS-LP feeding was not related to tissue FA composition. PMID:26525379

  10. Defective regulation of POMC precedes hypothalamic inflammation in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Gabriela F. P.; Solon, Carina; Nascimento, Lucas F.; De-Lima-Junior, Jose C.; Nogueira, Guilherme; Moura, Rodrigo; Rocha, Guilherme Z.; Fioravante, Milena; Bobbo, Vanessa; Morari, Joseane; Razolli, Daniela; Araujo, Eliana P.; Velloso, Licio A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is the result of a long-term positive energy balance in which caloric intake overrides energy expenditure. This anabolic state results from the defective activity of hypothalamic neurons involved in the sensing and response to adiposity. However, it is currently unknown what the earliest obesity-linked hypothalamic defect is and how it orchestrates the energy imbalance present in obesity. Using an outbred model of diet-induced obesity we show that defective regulation of hypothalamic POMC is the earliest marker distinguishing obesity-prone from obesity-resistant mice. The early inhibition of hypothalamic POMC was sufficient to transform obesity-resistant in obesity-prone mice. In addition, the post-prandial change in the blood level of β-endorphin, a POMC-derived peptide, correlates with body mass gain in rodents and humans. Taken together, these results suggest that defective regulation of POMC expression, which leads to a change of β-endorphin levels, is the earliest hypothalamic defect leading to obesity. PMID:27373214

  11. Central and peripheral administration of kisspeptin-10 stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, E L; Patterson, M; Murphy, K G; Smith, K L; Dhillo, W S; Todd, J F; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R

    2004-10-01

    Kisspeptin is the peptide product of the KiSS-1 gene and the endogenous agonist for the GPR54 receptor. Recent evidence suggests the kisspeptin/GPR54 system is a key regulator of the reproductive system. We examined the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and peripheral administration of the active kisspeptin fragment, kisspeptin-10, on circulating gonadotrophins and total testosterone levels in adult male rats. The effect of kisspeptin-10 in vitro on the release of hypothalamic peptides from hypothalamic explants and gonadotrophins from anterior pituitary fragments was also determined. The i.c.v. administration of kisspeptin-10 dose-dependently increased plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) and increased plasma follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and total testosterone at 60 min postinjection. In a separate study investigating the time course of this response, i.c.v. administered kisspeptin-10 (3 nmol) significantly increased plasma LH at 10, 20 and 60 min, FSH at 60 min and total testosterone at 20 and 60 min postinjection. Kisspeptin-10 stimulated the release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) from in vitro hypothalamic explants. Peripheral administration of kisspeptin-10 increased plasma LH, FSH and total testosterone. However, doses of 100-1000 nM kisspeptin-10 did not influence LH or FSH release from pituitary fragments in vitro. Kisspeptin therefore potently stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. These effects are likely to be mediated via the hypothalamic LHRH system.

  12. Hypothalamic volume loss is associated with reduced melatonin output in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nombela, Cristina; Vuono, Romina; Jones, P. Simon; Fisher, Kate; Burn, David J.; Brooks, David J.; Reddy, Akhilesh B.; Rowe, James B.; Barker, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Recent studies have suggested that melatonin—a hormone produced by the pineal gland under circadian control—contributes to PD‐related sleep dysfunction. We hypothesized that degenerative changes to the neural structures controlling pineal function (especially the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the anterior hypothalamus) may be responsible for reduced melatonin output in these patients. We compared hypothalamic volumes in PD patients with matched controls and determined whether volume loss correlated with reduced melatonin output in the PD group. Methods A total of 12 PD patients and 12 matched controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging to determine hypothalamic volume. In addition, PD patients underwent 24‐hour blood sampling in a controlled environment to determine serum melatonin concentrations using enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assays. Results PD patients had significantly reduced hypothalamic gray matter volume when compared with matched controls. Melatonin levels were significantly associated with hypothalamic gray matter volume and disease severity in PD patients. Conclusion Melatonin levels are associated with hypothalamic gray matter volume loss and disease severity in PD patients. This provides anatomical and physiological support for an intrinsic sleep and circadian phenotype in PD. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:26971528

  13. Inhibition of dehydration-induced water intake by glucocorticoids is associated with activation of hypothalamic natriuretic peptide receptor-A in rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Guan, Jing; Kang, Yunxiao; Xiu, Heming; Chen, Ying; Deng, Bao; Liu, Kunshen

    2010-12-20

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) provides a potent defense mechanism against volume overload in mammals. Its primary receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), is localized mostly in the kidney, but also is found in hypothalamic areas involved in body fluid volume regulation. Acute glucocorticoid administration produces potent diuresis and natriuresis, possibly by acting in the renal natriuretic peptide system. However, chronic glucocorticoid administration attenuates renal water and sodium excretion. The precise mechanism underlying this paradoxical phenomenon is unclear. We assume that chronic glucocorticoid administration may activate natriuretic peptide system in hypothalamus, and cause volume depletion by inhibiting dehydration-induced water intake. Volume depletion, in turn, compromises renal water excretion. To test this postulation, we determined the effect of dexamethasone on dehydration-induced water intake and assessed the expression of NPR-A in the hypothalamus. The rats were deprived of water for 24 hours to have dehydrated status. Prior to free access to water, the water-deprived rats were pretreated with dexamethasone or vehicle. Urinary volume and water intake were monitored. We found that dexamethasone pretreatment not only produced potent diuresis, but dramatically inhibited the dehydration-induced water intake. Western blotting analysis showed the expression of NPR-A in the hypothalamus was dramatically upregulated by dexamethasone. Consequently, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (the second messenger for the ANP) content in the hypothalamus was remarkably increased. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on water intake presented in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which emerged at least after 18-hour dexamethasone pretreatment. This effect was glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mediated and was abolished by GR antagonist RU486. These results indicated a possible physiologic role for glucocorticoids in the hypothalamic control of water intake

  14. Male sexual development in the monkey. II. Cross-sectional analysis of pulsatile hypothalamic-pituitary secretion in castrated males.

    PubMed

    Bercu, B B; Lee, B C; Spiliotis, B E; Pineda, J L; Denman, D W; Hoffman, H J; Brown, T J

    1983-06-01

    Pulsatile secretion of serum gonadotropins was studied in 16 castrated monkeys from 4 weeks of age through adult life. Animals were castrated at various ages from birth through adult life. Although some studies of the gonadotropin-secretory patterns were longitudinal in nature, most comparisons were cross-sectional. On the basis of our observations, we have arbitrarily grouped the animals into 4 developmental ages: postnatal (less than 7 months), prepubertal or juvenile (7-27 months), pubertal (28-59 months), and adult (greater than or equal to 60 months). In carrying out these studies, blood was withdrawn at 15-min intervals over 24 h without anesthesia using a mobile vest and tether assembly to support an indwelling catheter. GnRH challenge tests were done on 1 or more occasions on all animals. Plasma samples were analyzed for concentrations of FSH and LH by established RIAs and an in vitro bioassay for LH. During the frequent sampling period (24 h for all except postnatal animals), the amplitude of gonadotropin pulses was greatest in adult animals followed by postnatal and pubertal monkeys. During pubertal development, there was a marked increase in the magnitude of gonadotropin pulses, and remarkedly, there was a substantial increase in the LH bioassay: RIA (greater than 5:1) by adult life. GnRH challenge tests of gonadotropins correlated with these observations. Time series analysis was applied to the data for objective statistical characterization of cyclic patterns. Our findings can be summarized: 1) during pubertal maturation there is a change in amplitude but not frequency of gonadotropin pulses, 2) pubertal development of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis advances in the absence of gonadal feedback, and 3) there is a significant increase in the LH bioassay: RIA during pubertal development. We conclude that the castrate monkey is a valuable adjunct to direct clinical investigations of the mechanisms controlling human sexual development.

  15. Control and localization of rat adrenal cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate. Comparison with adrenal cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, T H; Stowe, N W; Ong, S H; ey, R L; Steiner, A L

    1975-01-01

    Cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP were measured in rat adrenal glands after either hypophysectomy alone or after hypophysectomy and treatment with ACTH. Adrenal cyclic GMP levels rise in acutely hypophysectomized rats to a maximum at 1 h of approximately 200% of control levels; there is a return to base line at 4-12 h after hypophysectomy. In contrast, adrenal cyclic AMP falls immediately to about 50% of control levels after hypophysectomy and remains at approximately 1 pmol per mg tissue. Doses of ACTH beyond the physiological range markedly suppress adrenal cyclic GMP while producing a 50-fold or greater rise in cyclic AMP in hypophysectomized rats. This pattern of adrenal cyclic GMP rise was unchanged in acutely hypophysectomized animals treated with desamethasone. N-6-2'-0 dibutyryl cyclic AMP acted similarly to the effect of ACTH in bringing about a suppression of adrenal cyclic GMP levels. Physiological i.v. pulse doses of ACTH produced a rapid dose related increase in adrenal cyclic GMP. In vitro incubation of quartered adrenal pairs with 500 mU ACTH produced elevated cyclic AMP levels and suppression of cyclic GMP. Whereas adrenal cyclic AMP fell rapidly to 50% of control levels after hypophysectomy and remained at about 1 pmol per mg tissue for 7 days, adrenal cyclic GMP showed a biphasic rhythm in long-term hypophysectomized animals. After an initial peak at 1 h after hypophysectomy, adrenal cyclic GMP declined to baseline at 4-12 h but thereafter progressively rose with time, eventually reaching levels over 1 pmol per mg tissue. Fluorescent immunocytochemical staining of rat adrenal zona fasciculata showed cyclic AMP largely confined to cytoplasmic elements with little fluorescence contained in nuclei. In constant, cyclic GMP was found discretely positioned in nuclei with prominent fluorescence in nucleoli in addition to cytoplasmic localization. It is concluded that in hypophysectomized rats ACTH, either directly or in conjunction with altertion of adrenal

  16. Synthesis of cyclic sulfones by ring-closing metathesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei

    2002-02-01

    A general and highly efficient synthesis of cyclic sulfones based on ring-closing metathesis has been developed. The synthetic utility of the resulting cyclic sulfones was demonstrated by their participation in stereoselective Diels-Alder reactions and transformation to cyclic dienes by the Ramberg-Bäcklund reaction. PMID:11820896

  17. Synthesis of cyclic sulfones by ring-closing metathesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei

    2002-02-01

    A general and highly efficient synthesis of cyclic sulfones based on ring-closing metathesis has been developed. The synthetic utility of the resulting cyclic sulfones was demonstrated by their participation in stereoselective Diels-Alder reactions and transformation to cyclic dienes by the Ramberg-Bäcklund reaction.

  18. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1230 Cyclic AMP test system. (a) Identification. A cyclic AMP test system is a device intended...

  19. 40 CFR 721.3440 - Haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers... Substances § 721.3440 Haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers (PMN P-85-368 and...

  20. 40 CFR 721.3440 - Haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers... Substances § 721.3440 Haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances haloalkyl substituted cyclic ethers (PMN P-85-368 and...

  1. Hypothalamic TLR2 triggers sickness behavior via a microglia-neuronal axis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sungho; Kim, Jae Geun; Park, Jeong Woo; Koch, Marco; Horvath, Tamas L.; Lee, Byung Ju

    2016-01-01

    Various pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to sickness behaviors have been proposed. For example, an inflammatory process in the hypothalamus has been implicated, but the signaling modalities that involve inflammatory mechanisms and neuronal circuit functions are ill-defined. Here, we show that toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) activation by intracerebroventricular injection of its ligand, Pam3CSK4, triggered hypothalamic inflammation and activation of arcuate nucleus microglia, resulting in altered input organization and increased activity of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. These animals developed sickness behavior symptoms, including anorexia, hypoactivity, and hyperthermia. Antagonists of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase pathway and melanocortin receptors 3/4 reversed the anorexia and body weight loss induced by TLR2 activation. These results unmask an important role of TLR2 in the development of sickness behaviors via stimulation of hypothalamic microglia to promote POMC neuronal activation in association with hypothalamic inflammation. PMID:27405276

  2. Hypothalamic hyperphagia despite imposed diurnal or nocturnal feeding and drinking rhythms.

    PubMed

    Gold, R M; Sumprer, G; Ueberacher, H M; Kapatos, G

    1975-06-01

    Rats normally do most of their eating at night. When ad lib fed rats are made hyperphagic with lesions or parasagittal hypothalamic knife cuts the increases in eating occur primarily during the day. This suggests that a disruption of circadian rhythms may mediate the overeating. However, when knife cut rats were food and water deprived all day excessive eating occurred at night. Similarly, when they were deprived all night overeating occurred during the day. Under both conditions od deprivation the food intakes and rapid weight gains of the ad lib fed knife cut group were defended. It was concluded that: (1) in hypothalamic hyperphagia either the excessive food intake or the excessive weight gain is defended when food and water are available only half of each day, and (2) disruption of nocturnal feeding and drinking rhythms is not the cause of hypothalamic hyperhagia.

  3. Kisspeptins: regulators of metastasis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, K G

    2005-08-01

    The kisspeptins are the peptide products of the KiSS-1 gene and the endogenous agonists for the GPR54 receptor. Although KiSS-1 was initially discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene, recent evidence suggests the kisspeptin/GPR54 system is a key regulator of the reproductive system. Disrupted GPR54 signalling causes hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in rodents and man. Central or peripheral administration of kisspeptin potently stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, increasing circulating gonadotrophin concentrations in a number of animal models. These effects appear likely to be mediated via the hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone system, although kisspeptins may have direct effects on the anterior pituitary gland. Hypothalamic KiSS-1 expression is regulated by circulating sex steroids. The precise physiological role of the kisspeptin system in the regulation of reproductive function remains to be elucidated.

  4. Hypothalamic hamartoma: a source of luteinizing-hormone-releasing factor in precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Judge, D M; Kulin, H E; Page, R; Santen, R; Trapukdi, S

    1977-01-01

    The presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma and precocious puberty in a 19-month-old boy provided an opportunity to study their relation. Excised tissue had the ultrastructural characteristics of an independent neuroendocrine unit -- i.e., neurons containing neurosecretory granules and blood vessels with fenestrated endothelium and double basement membranes. Immunofluorescence studies using specific antibody to luteinizing-hormone-releasing factor showed antigenicity to the factor in the hamartoma. The testicular-hypothalamic-pituitary axis was tested. Clomiphene unresponsiveness suggested a lack of maturation of central-nervous-system events characteristic of normal puberty. The negative feedback system between gonad and brain was intact but partially resistant to steroid suppression. These studies suggest that hypothalamic hamartomas may cause precocious puberty by autonomous production and release of luteinizing-hormone-releasing factor into vessels that communicate with the pituitary portal blood system.

  5. Cadmium effects on hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Márquez, N; Pérez-Lorenzo, M; Pazo, D; Esquifino, A I

    2001-06-01

    This study analyzes cadmium effects at the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. Male rats were given cadmium during puberty or adulthood. Cadmium exposure through puberty increased norepinephrine content in all hypothalamic areas studied, but not in the median eminence. Metal exposure increased serotonin turnover in median eminence and the anterior hypothalamus, while decreased it in mediobasal hypothalamus. Also, decreased plasma levels of testosterone were found. Cadmium exposure during adulthood increased norepinephrine content in posterior hypothalamus and decreased the neuro-transmitter content in anterior and mediobasal hypothalamus. Decreased circulating levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone and increased plasma follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were also observed. Cadmium accumulated in all analyzed tissues. Various parameters showed age-dependent changes. These data suggest that cadmium globally effects hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis function by acting at the three levels analyzed and that an interaction between cadmium exposure and age emerge.

  6. Hypothalamic-pituitary hormones during critical illness: a dynamic neuroendocrine response.

    PubMed

    Langouche, Lies; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2014-01-01

    Independent of the underlying condition, critical illness is characterized by a uniform dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-peripheral axes. In most axes a clear biphasic pattern can be distinguished. The acute phase of critical illness is characterized by low peripheral effector hormone levels such as T3, IGF-1 and testosterone, despite an actively secreting pituitary. The adrenal axis with high cortisol levels in the presence of low ACTH levels is a noteworthy exception. In the prolonged phase of critical illness, low peripheral effector hormone levels coincide with a uniform suppression of the neuroendocrine axes, predominantly of hypothalamic origin. The severity of the alterations in the different neuroendocrine axes is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality, but it remains unknown whether the observed changes are cause or consequence of adverse outcome. Several studies have identified therapeutic potential of hypothalamic releasing factors, but clinical outcome remains to be investigated with sufficiently powered randomized controlled trials.

  7. Giant hypothalamic hamartoma associated with an intracranial cyst in a newborn

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma with a large intracranial cyst in a neonate. On ultrasonography, the lesion presented as a lobulated, mass-like lesion with similar echogenicity to the adjacent brain parenchyma, located anterior to the underdeveloped and compressed left temporal lobe, and presenting as an intracranial cyst in the left cerebral convexity without definite internal echogenicity or septa. The presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma and intracranial neurenteric cyst were confirmed by surgical biopsy. The association of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma and a neurenteric cyst is rare. Due to the rarity of this association, the large size of the intracranial cyst, and the resulting distortion in the regional anatomy, the diagnosis of the solid mass was not made correctly on prenatal high-resolution ultrasonography. PMID:27101982

  8. Hypothalamic function in women with secondary hypogonadism and unresponsive to clomiphene therapy.

    PubMed

    Vaughan Williams, C A

    1987-01-01

    Seven women with secondary hypogonadism who had been previously unresponsive to two 5-d courses of clomiphene citrate, were treated with clomiphene citrate 100 mg daily for 10 d. LH and FSH concentrations were measured in serum collected at 15-min intervals for 5 h before and on the 10th day of treatment and oestradiol was measured in the first two samples on each day. Four women responded with an increase in the amplitude of LH pulses and in mean LH values and in three there was a marked increase in serum oestradiol concentrations. Three women who showed no gonadotrophin response were subsequently unresponsive to pulsatile LHRH therapy. These preliminary data are consistent with the hypothesis that hypothalamic hypogonadotrophism may result from hypersensitivity of the hypothalamus to oestrogen negative feedback and that the hypothalamic potential for secretion of LHRH is unimpaired. Prolonged treatment with clomiphene may provide a simple test of hypothalamic function in women with normal pituitary function.

  9. Early changes in the hypothalamic region in prodromal Huntington disease revealed by MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Soneson, Charlotte; Fontes, Magnus; Zhou, Yongxia; Denisov, Vladimir; Paulsen, Jane S.; Kirik, Deniz; Petersén, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat. Its length can be used to estimate the time of clinical diagnosis, which is defined by overt motor symptoms. Non-motor symptoms begin before motor onset, and involve changes in hypothalamus-regulated functions such as sleep, emotion and metabolism. Therefore we hypothesized that hypothalamic changes occur already prior to the clinical diagnosis. We performed voxel-based morphometry and logistic regression analyses of cross-sectional MR images from 220 HD gene carriers and 75 controls in the Predict-HD study. We show that changes in the hypothalamic region are detectable before clinical diagnosis and that its grey matter contents alone is sufficient to distinguish HD gene carriers from control cases. In conclusion, our study shows, for the first time, that alterations in grey matter contents in the hypothalamic region occur at least a decade before clinical diagnosis in HD using MRI. PMID:20682340

  10. Effects of substantia nigra stimulation on hypothalamic rage reaction in cats.

    PubMed

    Crescimanno, G; Piazza, P; Benigno, A; Amato, G

    1986-01-01

    The effects of substantia nigra (SN) (pars compacta) stimulation on the rage reaction elicited by ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) were investigated in the cat. The studied parameters of the rage reaction were: the current and the frequency threshold for the appearance of the hissing and the hissing latency. A facilitatory effect induced by the SN on the hypothalamic rage reaction was observed in the form of a decrease in the hypothalamic stimulus threshold for the hissing appearance and a decrease in the hissing latency. Moreover, when the VMH was stimulated with parameters below the threshold for the hissing display, simultaneous nigral activation determined its appearance. The excitatory influence exerted by the SN on the affective component of the aggressive behavior is discussed. PMID:3737710

  11. Experimental uremia affects hypothalamic amino acid neurotransmitter milieu.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, F; Vogel, M; Kerkhoff, G; Woitzik, J; Daschner, M; Mehls, O

    2001-06-01

    Chronic renal failure is associated with delayed puberty and hypogonadism. To investigate the mechanisms subserving the reported reduced pulsatile release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in chronic renal failure, this study examined the amino acid neurotransmitter milieu in the medial preoptic area (MPOA), the hypothalamic region where the GnRH-secreting neurons reside, in 5/6-nephrectomized male rats and in ad libitum-fed or pair-fed controls. All rats were castrated and received either a testosterone or a vehicle implant to evaluate additional effects of the prevailing sex steroid milieu. Local excitatory (essential amino acids: aspartate, glutamate) and inhibitory (gamma-aminobutyric acid [GABA], taurine) amino acid transmitter outflow in the MPOA was measured by microdialysis via stereotactically implanted cannulae in the awake, freely moving rats. In addition to basal extracellular concentrations, the neurosecretory capacity was assessed by the addition of 100 mM KCl to the dialysis fluid. The mechanisms of neurosecretion were evaluated further by inhibition of vesicular release with the use of Ca(2+)-free, Mg(2+)-enriched dialysis fluid and by local perfusion with inhibitors of voltage-dependent synaptic release (1 microM tetrodotoxin) and of GABA reuptake (0.5 mM nipecotic acid). In the uremic rats, basal outflow of GABA, glutamate and aspartate, and K(+)-stimulated aspartate outflow were increased. K(+)-stimulated GABA and glutamate release was less sensitive to Ca(2+) depletion in the uremic than in the control rats. The elevated basal GABA and essential amino acid outflow in the uremic rats was due to a voltage- and Ca(2+)-independent mechanism. GABA reuptake was inhibited proportionately by nipecotic acid in uremic and pair-fed control rats. Testosterone supplementation had no independent effects on neurotransmitter outflow. In summary, the amino acid neurotransmitter milieu is altered in the MPOA of uremic rats by a nonsynaptic, nonvesicular

  12. The minimal model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Vinther, Frank; Andersen, Morten; Ottesen, Johnny T

    2011-10-01

    This paper concerns ODE modeling of the hypothalamic-pituitary- adrenal axis (HPA axis) using an analytical and numerical approach, combined with biological knowledge regarding physiological mechanisms and parameters. The three hormones, CRH, ACTH, and cortisol, which interact in the HPA axis are modeled as a system of three coupled, nonlinear differential equations. Experimental data shows the circadian as well as the ultradian rhythm. This paper focuses on the ultradian rhythm. The ultradian rhythm can mathematically be explained by oscillating solutions. Oscillating solutions to an ODE emerges from an unstable fixed point with complex eigenvalues with a positive real parts and a non-zero imaginary parts. The first part of the paper describes the general considerations to be obeyed for a mathematical model of the HPA axis. In this paper we only include the most widely accepted mechanisms that influence the dynamics of the HPA axis, i.e. a negative feedback from cortisol on CRH and ACTH. Therefore we term our model the minimal model. The minimal model, encompasses a wide class of different realizations, obeying only a few physiologically reasonable demands. The results include the existence of a trapping region guaranteeing that concentrations do not become negative or tend to infinity. Furthermore, this treatment guarantees the existence of a unique fixed point. A change in local stability of the fixed point, from stable to unstable, implies a Hopf bifurcation; thereby, oscillating solutions may emerge from the model. Sufficient criteria for local stability of the fixed point, and an easily applicable sufficient criteria guaranteeing global stability of the fixed point, is formulated. If the latter is fulfilled, ultradian rhythm is an impossible outcome of the minimal model and all realizations thereof. The second part of the paper concerns a specific realization of the minimal model in which feedback functions are built explicitly using receptor dynamics. Using

  13. Combustion oscillation control by cyclic fuel injection

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J.; Robey, E.; Cowell, L.; Rawlins, D.

    1995-04-01

    A number of recent articles have demonstrated the use of active control to mitigate the effects of combustion instability in afterburner and dump combustor applications. In these applications, cyclic injection of small quantities of control fuel has been proposed to counteract the periodic heat release that contributes to undesired pressure oscillations. This same technique may also be useful to mitigate oscillations in gas turbine combustors, especially in test rig combustors characterized by acoustic modes that do not exist in the final engine configuration. To address this issue, the present paper reports on active control of a subscale, atmospheric pressure nozzle/combustor arrangement. The fuel is natural gas. Cyclic injection of 14% control fuel in a premix fuel nozzle is shown to reduce oscillating pressure amplitude by a factor of 0.30 (i.e., {approximately}10 dB) at 300 Hz. Measurement of the oscillating heat release is also reported.

  14. Cyclic ethers adsorbed on Ru(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, M. M.; Thiel, P. A.

    1990-11-01

    The three cyclic ethers 1,3-dioxane. 1,4-dioxane and 1,3,5-trioxane all exhibit multiple desorption states from Ru(001) between 200 and 310 K, in addition to the multilayer and metastable states at lower temperature. Most distinctive are the two low-temperature α-states. which are similar in shape, position, and relative population for all three compounds. This suggests that these states are associated with configurations which are accessible to all three molecules. The data also indicate that there is some molecular decomposition to gaseous CO and H 2. 1,4-Dioxane yields the largest amounts of these decomposition products, suggesting that this molecule is most susceptible to surface-catalyzed decomposition. The desorption data for the three cyclic ethers are grossly similar to each other, and also to the straight-chain diethers which we have previously studied.

  15. Universal Cyclic Topology in Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Johnson, Jeremiah A.; Olsen, Bradley D.

    2016-05-01

    Polymer networks invariably possess topological defects: loops of different orders which have profound effects on network properties. Here, we demonstrate that all cyclic topologies are a universal function of a single dimensionless parameter characterizing the conditions for network formation. The theory is in excellent agreement with both experimental measurements of hydrogel loop fractions and Monte Carlo simulations without any fitting parameters. We demonstrate the superposition of the dilution effect and chain-length effect on loop formation. The one-to-one correspondence between the network topology and primary loop fraction demonstrates that the entire network topology is characterized by measurement of just primary loops, a single chain topological feature. Different cyclic defects cannot vary independently, in contrast to the intuition that the densities of all topological species are freely adjustable. Quantifying these defects facilitates studying the correlations between the topology and properties of polymer networks, providing a key step in overcoming an outstanding challenge in polymer physics.

  16. Cyclic nucleotide signalling in kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schinner, Elisabeth; Wetzl, Veronika; Schlossmann, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Kidney fibrosis is an important factor for the progression of kidney diseases, e.g., diabetes mellitus induced kidney failure, glomerulosclerosis and nephritis resulting in chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) were implicated to suppress several of the above mentioned renal diseases. In this review article, identified effects and mechanisms of cGMP and cAMP regarding renal fibrosis are summarized. These mechanisms include several signalling pathways of nitric oxide/ANP/guanylyl cyclases/cGMP-dependent protein kinase and cAMP/Epac/adenylyl cyclases/cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Furthermore, diverse possible drugs activating these pathways are discussed. From these diverse mechanisms it is expected that new pharmacological treatments will evolve for the therapy or even prevention of kidney failure. PMID:25622251

  17. Separation of isotopes by cyclical processes

    DOEpatents

    Hamrin, Jr., Charles E.; Weaver, Kenny

    1976-11-02

    Various isotopes of hydrogen are separated by a cyclic sorption process in which a gas stream containing the isotopes is periodically passed through a high pressure column containing a palladium sorbent. A portion of the product from the high pressure column is passed through a second column at lower pressure to act as a purge. Before the sorbent in the high pressure column becomes saturated, the sequence is reversed with the stream flowing through the former low-pressure column now at high pressure, and a portion of the product purging the former high pressure column now at low pressure. The sequence is continued in cyclic manner with the product being enriched in a particular isotope.

  18. Universal Cyclic Topology in Polymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Johnson, Jeremiah A; Olsen, Bradley D

    2016-05-01

    Polymer networks invariably possess topological defects: loops of different orders which have profound effects on network properties. Here, we demonstrate that all cyclic topologies are a universal function of a single dimensionless parameter characterizing the conditions for network formation. The theory is in excellent agreement with both experimental measurements of hydrogel loop fractions and Monte Carlo simulations without any fitting parameters. We demonstrate the superposition of the dilution effect and chain-length effect on loop formation. The one-to-one correspondence between the network topology and primary loop fraction demonstrates that the entire network topology is characterized by measurement of just primary loops, a single chain topological feature. Different cyclic defects cannot vary independently, in contrast to the intuition that the densities of all topological species are freely adjustable. Quantifying these defects facilitates studying the correlations between the topology and properties of polymer networks, providing a key step in overcoming an outstanding challenge in polymer physics.

  19. Cyclic debonding of adhesively bonded composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of a simple composite to composite bonded joint was analyzed. The cracked lap shear specimen subjected to constant amplitude cyclic loading was studied. Two specimen geometries were tested for each bonded system: (1) a strap adherend of 16 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 8 plies; and (2) a strap adherend of 8 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 16 plies. In all specimens the fatigue failure was in the form of cyclic debonding with some 0 deg fiber pull off from the strap adherend. The debond always grew in the region of adhesive that had the highest mode (peel) loading and that region was close to the adhesive strap interface.

  20. Cosmic evolution in a cyclic universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turok, Neil

    2002-06-01

    Based on concepts drawn from the ekpyrotic scenario and M theory, we elaborate our recent proposal of a cyclic model of the universe. In this model, the universe undergoes an endless sequence of cosmic epochs which begin with the universe expanding from a ``big bang'' and end with the universe contracting to a ``big crunch.'' Matching from ``big crunch'' to ``big bang'' is performed according to the prescription recently proposed with Khoury, Ovrut and Seiberg. The expansion part of the cycle includes a period of radiation and matter domination followed by an extended period of cosmic acceleration at low energies. The cosmic acceleration is crucial in establishing the flat and vacuous initial conditions required for ekpyrosis and for removing the entropy, black holes, and other debris produced in the preceding cycle. By restoring the universe to the same vacuum state before each big crunch, the acceleration ensures that the cycle can repeat and that the cyclic solution is an attractor.

  1. Total parenteral nutrition-induced cyclic hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Jannace, P W; Lerman, R H; Dennis, R C; Aalyson, M; Yeston, N S

    1988-07-01

    Excessive rates of carbohydrate infusion during total parenteral nutrition (TPN) have been reported to cause hypercapnia leading to respiratory failure or inability to wean from a ventilator. This case history illustrates the hitherto unreported syndrome of cyclic hypercapnia resulting from high rates of carbohydrate infusion during peak TPN flow rates when TPN was provided in a cyclic fashion. The patient was given TPN daily over an 18 1/2-h period followed by 5 1/2 h without nutritional support. Elevated CO2 production, increased respiratory quotient, hypercapnia, and inability to wean from a ventilator occurred during peak cycle TPN flow rates. When the same carbohydrate load was infused continuously over a 24-h period, CO2 production, respiratory quotient and PaCO2 were reduced. The patient was then able to tolerate periods of unassisted ventilation.

  2. Research Resource: The Dexamethasone Transcriptome in Hypothalamic Embryonic Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Frahm, Krystle A; Peffer, Melanie E; Zhang, Janie Y; Luthra, Soumya; Chakka, Anish B; Couger, Matthew B; Chandran, Uma R; Monaghan, A Paula; DeFranco, Donald B

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to excess glucocorticoids during fetal development has long-lasting physiological and behavioral consequences, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. The impact of prenatal glucocorticoids exposure on stress responses in juvenile and adult offspring implicates the developing hypothalamus as a target of adverse prenatal glucocorticoid action. Therefore, primary cultures of hypothalamic neural-progenitor/stem cells (NPSCs) derived from mouse embryos (embryonic day 14.5) were used to identify the glucocorticoid transcriptome in both males and females. NPSCs were treated with vehicle or the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (dex; 100nM) for 4 hours and total RNA analyzed using RNA-Sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that primary hypothalamic NPSC cultures expressed relatively high levels of a number of genes regulating stem cell proliferation and hypothalamic progenitor function. Interesting, although these cells express glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), only low levels of sex-steroid receptors are expressed, which suggested that sex-specific differentially regulated genes identified are mediated by genetic and not hormonal influences. We also identified known or novel GR-target coding and noncoding genes that are either regulated equivalently in male and female NPSCs or differential responsiveness in one sex. Using gene ontology analysis, the top functional network identified was cell proliferation and using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation observed a reduction in proliferation of hypothalamic NPSCs after dexamethasone treatment. Our studies provide the first characterization and description of glucocorticoid-regulated pathways in male and female embryonically derived hypothalamic NPSCs and identified GR-target genes during hypothalamic development. These findings may provide insight into potential mechanisms responsible for the long-term consequences of fetal glucocorticoid exposure in adulthood.

  3. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease.

  4. Impaired hypothalamic insulin signaling in CUMS rats: restored by icariin and fluoxetine through inhibiting CRF system.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying; Hong, Ye; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence demonstrates the neuroendocrine link between stress, depression and diabetes. This study observed glucose intolerance of rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) in oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). CUMS procedure significantly up-regulated corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-related peptide urocortin 2 expression and elevated cAMP production, resulting in over-expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) of rats. Furthermore, SOCS3 activation blocked insulin signaling pathway through the suppression of insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) phosphotyrosine and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3-K) activation in hypothalamic ARC of CUMS rats after high-level of insulin stimulation. These data indicated that CUMS procedure induced the hyperactivity of CRF system, and subsequently produced conditional loss of insulin signaling in hypothalamic ARC of rats. More importantly, icariin and fluoxetine with the ability to restrain CRF system hyperactivity improved insulin signaling in hypothalamic ARC of CUMS rats, which were consistent with the enhancement of glucose tolerance in OGTT, showing anti-diabetic efficacy. Although effective in OGTT, anti-diabetic drug pioglitazone failed to restore hypothalamic ARC CRF system hyperactivity, paralleling with its inability to ameliorate the loss of insulin signaling and depression-like behavior in CUMS rats. These observations support the hypothesis that signal cross-talk between hypothalamic CRF system and insulin may be impaired in depression with glucose intolerance and suggest that icarrin and fluoxetine aiming at CRF system may have great potential in the prevention and treatment of depression with comorbid diabetes.

  5. Heme oxygenase-derived carbon monoxide modulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone release in immortalized hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Errico, Stefania; Shohreh, Rugia; Barone, Eugenio; Pusateri, Angela; Mores, Nadia; Mancuso, Cesare

    2010-03-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), the main enzyme deputed to heme metabolism, has been identified as two main isoforms called HO-1 and HO-2 both present in the central nervous system. Heme oxygenase has been shown to regulate the hypothalamic release of neuropeptides such as corticotrophin-releasing hormone and arginin-vasopressin. The aim of this study was to investigate and further characterize the presence of HO in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secreting hypothalamic neurons, GT1-7 and the role of HO by-products on GnRH secretion. The pulsatile release of GnRH from scattered hypothalamic neurons is the key regulator of mammalian fertility in the central nervous system. GT1-7 cells are immortalized hypothalamic neurons, characterized by spontaneous electrical activity and pulsatile GnRH release, resembling the central control pathway of the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal axis (HPG) in mammals. Hemin, the substrate of HO, significantly stimulated HO activity in static cultures, causing a rapid increase in GnRH release. Neither biliverdin nor bilirubin were able to mimic this rapid stimulatory effect, which was instead caused by carbon monoxide. Evidence of a possible involvement of prostaglandin E(2) in the HO by-product modulated GnRH secretion was reported. The hemin-evoked effect on GT1-7 neurons suggests a direct activity of HO by-products on the hypothalamic neuropeptide secretion, and claims for a possible role of CO in both the modulation of gonadotropin secretion and crosstalk among HPG and stress axis within the mammalian hypothalamus.

  6. Cyclic electron flow: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Giovanni; Johnson, Giles N

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 15 years, research into the process of cyclic electron flow in photosynthesis has seen a huge resurgence. Having been considered by some in the early 1990s as a physiologically unimportant artefact, it is now recognised as essential to normal plant growth. Here, we provide an overview of the major developments covered in this special issue of photosynthesis research. PMID:27623779

  7. General solution of the cyclic Leibniz rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadoh, Daisuke; Ukita, Naoya

    2015-10-01

    We study the cyclic Leibniz rule (CLR) which was recently proposed as a new approach to the realization of supersymmetric quantum mechanics on the lattice. The CLR has an infinite number of solutions that give the different definitions of the lattice supersymmetric quantum mechanics. We show the general form of the solution for the naive symmetric difference operator and reveal the differences between the lattice models.

  8. Cyclic universe from Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfrani, Francesco; Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy; Rosati, Giacomo

    2016-02-01

    We discuss how a cyclic model for the flat universe can be constructively derived from Loop Quantum Gravity. This model has a lower bounce, at small values of the scale factor, which shares many similarities with that of Loop Quantum Cosmology. We find that Quantum Gravity corrections can be also relevant at energy densities much smaller than the Planckian one and that they can induce an upper bounce at large values of the scale factor.

  9. Asymmetric Redox-Annulation of Cyclic Amines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic amines such as 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline undergo regiodivergent annulation reactions with 4-nitrobutyraldehydes. These redox-neutral transformations enable the asymmetric synthesis of highly substituted polycyclic ring systems in just two steps from commercial materials. The utility of this process is illustrated in a rapid synthesis of (−)-protoemetinol. Computational studies provide mechanistic insights and implicate the elimination of acetic acid from an ammonium nitronate intermediate as the rate-determining step. PMID:26348653

  10. Cyclic spectrum based carrier recovery for OQPSK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hua; Li, Jing

    2011-10-01

    A union carrier synchronization scheme of feed-forward frequency offset estimation and PLL for OQPSK signals is discussed in this paper. A feed-forward frequency offset estimator is developed based on the cyclic spectrum of the received signal. In order to suppress channel noise, an improved strategy is proposed. Simulations show that the presented scheme can achieve steady state much more quickly than conventional Costas loop. At the same time, the steady error of the union scheme is also smaller.

  11. Cyclic change in late triassic lacustrine communities.

    PubMed

    Olsen, P E; Remington, C L; Cornet, B; Thomson, K S

    1978-08-25

    A new type of lake and shore assemblage has been found in the Late Triassic age rocks of North Carolina and Virginia (Dan River group). It includes abundant aquatic reptiles, fishes, at least seven orders of insects, crustaceans, and a diverse flora. Cyclic changes in the fauna and flora correlate with sedimentary cycles, which together reflect the repetitive development and extinction of large meromictic lakes.

  12. Cosmic perturbations through the cyclic ages

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Joel K.; Gratton, Steven; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turok, Neil

    2007-06-15

    We analyze the evolution of cosmological perturbations in the cyclic model, paying particular attention to their behavior and interplay over multiple cycles. Our key results are: (1) galaxies and large scale structure present in one cycle are generated by the quantum fluctuations in the preceding cycle without interference from perturbations or structure generated in earlier cycles and without interfering with structure generated in later cycles; (2) the ekpyrotic phase, an epoch of gentle contraction with equation of state w>>1 preceding the hot big bang, makes the universe homogeneous, isotropic and flat within any given observer's horizon; and (3) although the universe is uniform within each observer's horizon, the structure of the cyclic universe on very large scales is more complex, owing to the effects of superhorizon length perturbations, and cannot be described globally as a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology. In particular, we show that the ekpyrotic contraction phase is so effective in smoothing, flattening and isotropizing the universe within the horizon that this phase alone suffices to solve the horizon and flatness problems even without an extended period of dark energy domination (a kind of low energy inflation). Instead, the cyclic model rests on a genuinely novel, noninflationary mechanism (ekpyrotic contraction) for resolving the classic cosmological conundrums.

  13. Cyclic dominance in evolutionary games: a review

    PubMed Central

    Szolnoki, Attila; Mobilia, Mauro; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Szczesny, Bartosz; Rucklidge, Alastair M.; Perc, Matjaž

    2014-01-01

    Rock is wrapped by paper, paper is cut by scissors and scissors are crushed by rock. This simple game is popular among children and adults to decide on trivial disputes that have no obvious winner, but cyclic dominance is also at the heart of predator–prey interactions, the mating strategy of side-blotched lizards, the overgrowth of marine sessile organisms and competition in microbial populations. Cyclical interactions also emerge spontaneously in evolutionary games entailing volunteering, reward, punishment, and in fact are common when the competing strategies are three or more, regardless of the particularities of the game. Here, we review recent advances on the rock–paper–scissors (RPS) and related evolutionary games, focusing, in particular, on pattern formation, the impact of mobility and the spontaneous emergence of cyclic dominance. We also review mean-field and zero-dimensional RPS models and the application of the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation, and we highlight the importance and usefulness of statistical physics for the successful study of large-scale ecological systems. Directions for future research, related, for example, to dynamical effects of coevolutionary rules and invasion reversals owing to multi-point interactions, are also outlined. PMID:25232048

  14. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  15. Cyclic viscoelastoplasticity of polypropylene/nanoclay composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A. D.; deC. Christiansen, J.

    2012-11-01

    Observations are reported on isotactic polypropylene/organically modified nanoclay hybrids with concentrations of filler ranging from 0 to 5 wt.% in cyclic tensile tests with a stress-controlled program (oscillations between various maximum stresses and the zero minimum stress). A pronounced effect of nanofiller is demonstrated: reinforcement with 2 wt.% of clay results in strong reduction of maximum and minimum strains per cycle and growth of number of cycles to failure compared with neat polypropylene. To rationalize these findings, a constitutive model is developed in cyclic viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity of polymer nanocomposites. Adjustable parameters in the stress-strain relations are found by fitting experimental data. The model correctly describes the growth of the ratcheting strain and shows that fatigue failure is driven by a pronounced increase in plastic strain in the crystalline phase. To assess the influence of loading conditions on the changes in the material parameters, experimental data on polypropylene are studied in cyclic tests with a strain-controlled program (oscillations between fixed maximum and minimum strains) and a mixed program (oscillations between various maximum strains and the zero minimum stress). Numerical simulation confirms the ability of the model to predict the evolution of stress-strain diagrams with the number of cycles.

  16. Cyclic debonding of adhesively bonded composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To analyze the fatigue behavior of a simple composite-to-composite bonded joint, a combined experimental and analytical study of the cracked-lap-shear specimen subjected to constant-amplitude cyclic loading was undertaken. Two bonded systems were studied: T300/5208 graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with adhesives EC 3445 and with FM-300. For each bonded system, two specimen geometries were tested: (1) a strap adherend of 16 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 8 plies, and (2) a strap adherend of 8 plies bonded to a lap adherend of 16 plies. In all specimens tested, the fatigue failure was in the form of cyclic debonding with some 0 deg fiber pull-off from the strap adherend. The debond always grew in the region of adhesive that had the highest mode I (peel) loading and that region was close to the adhesive-strap interface. Furthermore, the measured cyclic debond growth rates correlated well with total strain energy release rates G(T) as well as with its components G(I) (peel) and G(II) (shear) for the mixed-mode loading in the present study.

  17. Cyclical period changes in Z Chamaeleontis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, R.; Jablonski, F.; Oliveira, E.; Vrielmann, S.; Woudt, P. A.; Catalán, M. S.

    2002-09-01

    We report the identification of cyclical changes in the orbital period of the eclipsing dwarf nova Z Cha. We used times of mid-eclipse collected from the literature and our new eclipse timings to construct an observed-minus-calculated diagram covering 30 yr of observations (1972-2002). The data present cyclical variations that can be fitted by a linear plus sinusoidal function with period 28 +/- 2 yr and amplitude 1.0 +/- 0.2 min. The statistical significance of this period by an F-test is larger than 99.9 per cent. The derived fractional period change, ΔP/P= 4.4 × 10-7, is comparable to that of other short-period cataclysmic variables (CVs), but is one order of magnitude smaller than those of the long-period CVs. Separate fits to the first and second halves of the data lead to ephemerides with quite different cycle periods and amplitudes, indicating that the variation is not sinusoidal or, most probably, is not strictly periodic. The observed cyclical period change is possibly caused by a solar-type magnetic activity cycle in the secondary star. An incremental variation in the Roche lobe of the secondary star of is required in order to explain both the observed period change and the modulation of the quiescent brightness previously reported by Ak, Ozkan & Mattei.

  18. Chronic kidney disease and hypothalamic-pituitary axis dysfunction: the chicken or the egg?

    PubMed

    Meuwese, Christiaan Lucas; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2013-11-01

    Hormonal derangements at the level of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are often seen with the worsening of kidney function. This may not be surprising given the role of the kidney in synthesis, metabolism and elimination of many of these hormones. Traditionally, these derangements have been understood as a consequence of kidney failure. Conversely, recent evidence points towards the implication of such hormonal disorders in the genesis of CKD. In this review we present arguments supporting both the role of hypothalamic-pituitary axis dysfunction as a consequence of uremic complications and a culprit in disease incidence and progression. Focus is given to evidence regarding thyroidal, adrenal and gonadal axes.

  19. Impotence is not always psychogenic. Newer insights into hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Spark, R F; White, R A; Connolly, P B

    The concept that impotence is psychogenic in 95% of cases is reconsidered. Screening serum testosterone levels of 105 consecutive patients with impotence showed that 37 patients had previously unsuspected disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Twenty patients had hypogonadotropic-hypogonadism, seven had hypergonadotropic-hypogonadism, eight had hyperprolactinemia, and two had occult hyperthyroidism. Once the specific defect was defined, appropriate therapy was instituted, and potency was restored in 33 patients. Screening serum testosterone levels is useful in identifying hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal dysfunction in patients with impotence.

  20. The aging male hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis: pulsatility and feedback.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, Johannes D; Keenan, Daniel M; Liu, Peter Y; Iranmanesh, Ali; Takahashi, Paul Y; Nehra, Ajay X

    2009-02-01

    Aging results in insidious decremental changes in hypothalamic, pituitary and gonadal function. The foregoing three main anatomic loci of control are regulated by intermittent time-delayed signal exchange, principally via gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone/estradiol (Te/E(2)). A mathematical framework is required to embody these dynamics. The present review highlights integrative adaptations in the aging male hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, as assessed by recent objective ensemble models of the axis as a whole.

  1. Is there hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal dysfunction in paedophilia? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, G R; Berlin, F S

    1984-12-01

    The hypothalamic - pituitary - gonadal axis was evaluated in men with paedophilia and non-paedophilic paraphilia, and in normal male controls, by infusion of 100 mcg. of synthetic luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH). There were no significant differences among groups in age, height, weight, testosterone, baseline luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and FSH response to LHRH. However, there was a significant difference between the paedophilic group and the other two groups in the LH response to LHRH. The paedophiles responded with a marked elevation of LH, when compared with the non-paedophilic paraphiliacs and controls. These data indicate a hypothalamic - pituitary - gonadal dysfunction in paedophiles.

  2. Increased concentration of. cap alpha. - and. gamma. -endorphin in post mortem hypothalamic tissue of schizophrenic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegant, V.M.; Verhoef, C.J.; Burbach, J.P.H.; de Wied, D.

    1988-01-01

    The concentrations of ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..- and ..gamma..-endorphin were determined by radioimmunoassay in HPLC fractionated extracts of post mortem hypothalamic tissue obtained from schizophrenic patients and controls. The hypothalamic concentration of ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-endorphin was significantly higher in patients than in controls. No difference was found in the concentration of ..beta..-endorphin, the putative precursor of ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-endorphins. These results suggest a deviant metabolism of ..beta..-endorphin in the brain of schizophrenic patients. Whether this phenomenon is related to the psychopathology, or is a consequence of ante mortem farmacotherapy, remains to be established.

  3. HYPOTHALAMIC DIGOXIN AND SCHIZOPHRENIA - A MODEL FOR CONSCIOUS AND SUBLIMINAL PERCEPTION AND ITS DYSFUNCTION IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, Ravikumar A.; Augustine, Jyothi; Kurup, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    In view of reports of an upregulated cation pump in genetically related Bipolar Affective Disorders the role of hypothalamic digoxin, an endogenous regulator of the cation pump was studied with special reference to its role as a modulator of glycoprotein synthesis. The study demonstrated elevated serum digoxin levels, elevated HMG CoA reductase activity suggesting increased digoxin synthesis, reduced sodium-potassium ATPase activity and altered sugar residues of serum glycoprotein in schizophrenia. A hypothalamic digoxin mediated model for conscious and subliminal perception is proposed and the significance of its dysfunction due to abnormal glycoprotein induced synaptic connectivity defects in schizophrenia is discussed. PMID:21455390

  4. The obesity‐associated gene Negr1 regulates aspects of energy balance in rat hypothalamic areas

    PubMed Central

    Boender, Arjen J.; van Gestel, Margriet A.; Garner, Keith M.; Luijendijk, Mieneke C. M.; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Neural growth regulator 1 (Negr1) is among the first common variants that have been associated with the regulation of body mass index. Using AAV technology directed to manipulate Negr1 expression in vivo, we find that decreased expression of Negr1 in periventricular hypothalamic areas leads to increases in body weight, presumably via increased food intake. Moreover, we observed that both increased and decreased levels of Negr1 lead to reduced locomotor activity and body temperature. In sum, our results provide further support for a role of hypothalamic expressed Negr1 in the regulation of energy balance. PMID:25077509

  5. The Aging Male Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis: pulsatility and feedback

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Keenan, Daniel M.; Liu, Peter Y.; Iranmanesh, Ali; Takahashi, Paul Y.; Nehra, Ajay X.

    2009-01-01

    Aging results in insidious decremental changes in hypothalamic, pituitary and gonadal function. The foregoing three main anatomic loci of control are regulated by intermittent time-delayed signal exchange, principally via gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone/estradiol (Te/E2). A mathematical framework is required to embody these dynamics. The present review highlights integrative adaptations in the aging male hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, as assessed by recent objective ensemble models of the axis as a whole. PMID:18838102

  6. Modification of radiosensitivity of mammalian cells by cyclic nucleotides. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, D.; Prasad, K.N.

    1981-07-06

    Some in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) may be one of the important factors in determining the radiosensitivity of certain mammalian cells; however, the role of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) in radiosensitivity of mammalian cells is completely unknown. Recent data also suggest that the mechanism of radiation protection afforded by moderate hypoxia and SH-containing compounds may involve an alteration in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP. At least one in vivo study shows that cyclic AMP protects hair follicles and gut epithelial cells against radiation damage; however, it does not protect lymphosarcoma and breast carcinoma in mice. If a similar phenomenon is found in humans, an elevation of the intracellular level of cyclic AMP during radiation exposure may improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy in those cases where the radiation damage of normal tissue becomes the limiting factor for a continuation of the therapy program.

  7. Cyclic aristeromycin diphosphate ribose: a potent and poorly hydrolysable Ca(2+)-mobilising mimic of cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose.

    PubMed

    Bailey, V C; Fortt, S M; Summerhill, R J; Galione, A; Potter, B V

    1996-02-01

    Cyclic aristeromycin diphosphate ribose, a carbocyclic analogue of cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose, was synthesised using a chemo-enzymatic route involving activation of aristeromycin 5'-phosphate by diphenyl phosphochloridate. The calcium-releasing properties of this novel analogue were investigated in sea urchin egg homogenates. While cyclic aristeromycin diphosphate ribose has a calcium release profile similar to that of cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (EC50 values are 80 nM and 30 nM, respectively), it is degraded significantly more slowly (t1/2 values are 170 min and 15 min, respectively) and may, therefore, be a useful tool to investigate the activities of cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose. PMID:8603694

  8. Efficient Synthesis of Cyclic Block Copolymers by Rotaxane Protocol by Linear/Cyclic Topology Transformation.

    PubMed

    Valentina, Stephanie; Ogawa, Takahiro; Nakazono, Kazuko; Aoki, Daisuke; Takata, Toshikazu

    2016-06-20

    High-yielding synthesis of cyclic block copolymer (CBC) using the rotaxane protocol by linear-cyclic polymer topology transformation was first demonstrated. Initial complexation of OH-terminated sec-ammonium salt and a crown ether was followed by the successive living ring-opening polymerizations of two lactones to a linear block copolymer having a rotaxane structure by the final capping of the propagation end. CBC was obtained in a high yield by an exploitation of the mechanical linkage through the translational movement of the rotaxane component to transform polymer structure from linear to cyclic. Furthermore, the change of the polymer topology was translated into a macroscopic change in crystallinity of the block copolymer. PMID:27037975

  9. Efficient Synthesis of Cyclic Block Copolymers by Rotaxane Protocol by Linear/Cyclic Topology Transformation.

    PubMed

    Valentina, Stephanie; Ogawa, Takahiro; Nakazono, Kazuko; Aoki, Daisuke; Takata, Toshikazu

    2016-06-20

    High-yielding synthesis of cyclic block copolymer (CBC) using the rotaxane protocol by linear-cyclic polymer topology transformation was first demonstrated. Initial complexation of OH-terminated sec-ammonium salt and a crown ether was followed by the successive living ring-opening polymerizations of two lactones to a linear block copolymer having a rotaxane structure by the final capping of the propagation end. CBC was obtained in a high yield by an exploitation of the mechanical linkage through the translational movement of the rotaxane component to transform polymer structure from linear to cyclic. Furthermore, the change of the polymer topology was translated into a macroscopic change in crystallinity of the block copolymer.

  10. Intensity of nematode infections in cyclic and non-cyclic rock partridge (Alectoris graeca saxatilis) populations.

    PubMed

    Rizzoli, A; Manfredi, M T; Rosso, F; Rosà, R; Cattadori, I; Hudson, P

    1999-12-01

    Populations of rock partridge (Alectoris graeca saxatilis), in the Trentino province of Italy, exhibit cyclic fluctuations in abundance associated with relatively dry habitat. One of the hypothesis to explain these cycles is that survival of some free living parasitic stages and rates of infection are greater in these areas leading to higher parasite burden. This hypothesis was examined by investigating the intensity of parasite infection in cyclic and non cyclic rock partridge populations. Analyses of 87 intestine samples collected from shot rock partridges during 1994 and 1995 identified 8 species of helminths parasites: Ascaridia compar (P = 33.33%; I = 9.28 +/- 1.78), Heterakis tenuicauda (P = 19.54%; I = 10.29 +/- 4.58), Heterakis gallinarum (P = 1.15%; I = 1.0 +/- 0.0), Heterakis altaica (P = 1.15%; I = 17 +/- 0.0), Aonchoteca caudinflata (P = 6.89; I = 2.17 +/- 0.65), Postharmostomum commutatum (P = 5.75; I = 7.0 +/- 3.48), Brachylaema fuscata (P = 1.15; I = 7.0 +/- 0.0), Platynosomum alectoris (P = 2.29; I = 5.5 +/- 1.5). Cestoda, recorded with a prevalence of 5.75, were not identified to species level. A. compar and H. tenuicauda were prevalent in the rock partridge populations and there was no positive association between these species. Intensity of infection in both species was not influenced by host age, sex or year of study but levels of infection with A. compar burdens were significantly greater in cyclic populations than in non cyclic populations and there was a tendency for H. tenuicauda to be greater in cyclic populations. There was no negative relationship between intensity of infection with A. compar or H. tenuicauda and host body mass. These data provide some support for the hypothesis that these parasites may play a role in generating rock partridge population cycles. PMID:10870561

  11. Interactions of cyclic and non-cyclic naphthalene diimide derivatives with different nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Czerwinska, Izabella; Sato, Shinobu; Juskowiak, Bernard; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2014-05-01

    Recently, strategy based on stabilization of G-quadruplex telomeric DNA by small organic molecule has been realized by naphthalene diimide derivatives (NDIs). At the same time NDIs bind to DNA duplex as threading intercalators. Here we present cyclic derivative of naphthalene diimide (ligand 1) as DNA-binding ligand with ability to recognition of different structures of telomeric G-quadruplexes and ability to bis-intercalate to double-stranded helixes. The results have been compared to non-cyclic derivative (ligand 2) and revealed that preferential binding of ligands to nucleic acids strongly depends on their topology and structural features of ligands. PMID:24726302

  12. N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-5-methoxytryptamine, a novel melatonin antagonist: effects on sexual maturation of the male and female rat and on oestrous cycles of the female rat [corrected].

    PubMed

    Laudon, M; Yaron, Z; Zisapel, N

    1988-01-01

    N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-5-methoxytryptamine [corrected] has recently been synthesized and shown to antagonize the inhibitory effect of melatonin on the release of dopamine in vitro from the hypothalamus of female rats. In the present study the ability of N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-5-methoxytryptamine [corrected] to inhibit in vivo the following melatonin-mediated effects was investigated: (1) delayed sexual maturation of young male rats, (2) delayed sexual maturation of young female rats, (3) inhibition of ovulation in mature female rats and (4) re-establishment of oestrous cycles in adult female rats maintained in continuous light. The inhibitory effect of daily melatonin injections, given in the afternoon, on the growth of the prostate gland and seminal vesicles and on serum testosterone concentrations in young male rats was prevented by daily injections of N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-5-methoxytryptamine [corrected]. Daily injections of N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-5-methoxytryptamine [corrected] alone did not affect sexual maturation of young rats. In young male rats treated through the drinking water with melatonin, the growth of the accessory sex organs, but not that of the testes, was delayed and serum concentrations of testosterone were lower than in untreated rats. Administration of N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-5-methoxytryptamine [corrected] through the drinking water increased serum concentrations of testosterone but did not significantly affect the weights of the accessory sex organs. Simultaneous administration of N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-5-methoxytryptamine [corrected] and melatonin through the drinking water prevented completely, in a dose-dependent manner, the melatonin-mediated decrease in epididymal weights and in serum concentrations of testosterone and partially inhibited the delayed growth of the prostate glands and seminal vesicles. In young female rats treated with melatonin through the drinking water for 30 days, the growth of the ovaries was inhibited and serum

  13. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure in the Hypothalamic-Pituitary Gonadal Axis of Fathead Minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We are developing a mechanistic mathematical model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predict doseresponse and time-course ...

  14. MATERNAL ATRAZINE (ATR) ALTERS HYPOTHALAMIC DOPAMINE (HYP-DA) AND SERUM PROLACTIN (SPRL) IN MALE PUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maternal Atrazine (ATR) alters hypothalamic dopamine (HYP-DA) and serum prolactin (sPRL) in male pups. 1Christopher Langdale, 2Tammy Stoker and 2Ralph Cooper. 1 Dept. of Cell Biology, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. 2 Endocrinology ...

  15. Effects of exogenous and endogenous opiates on the hypothalamic--pituitary--gonadal axis in the male.

    PubMed

    Cicero, T J

    1980-06-01

    Narcotics acutely depress serum testosterone levels in the male. Three mechanisms could be involved: an enhancement of the degradation of testosterone; a direct inhibition of testicular steroidogenesis; or, finally, an inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-luteinizing hormone (LH) axis resulting in a reduction in LH-dependent testicular steroidogenesis. The currently available evidence indicates that narcotics do not affect the catabolism of testosterone by the liver or testicular steroidogenesis. Rather, the data favor a direct action on the hypothalamic--pituitary--LH axis, probably by inhibiting the secretion of LH-releasing hormone (LH-RH) from the hypothalamus. The effects of narcotics on serum LH appear to be mediated via specific opioid receptors, suggesting that a naturally occurring opioid-like substance exists that normally inhibits LH. In support of this conclusion, opiate receptor blockers markedly increase serum LH levels shortly after their subcutaneous administration. In addition, endogenous opioids also seem to participate in testosterone's negative feedback control of the hypothalamic--pituitary--LH axis. Thus, it appears that opiate drugs inhibit the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by occupying opiate receptors in the hypothalamus and, moreover, that endogenous opioids exist that normally bind to these receptors and regulate activity in this axis.

  16. Prenatal melatonin and its interaction with tachykinins in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Díaz López, B; Debeljuk, L

    2007-01-01

    The pineal gland, through its hormone melatonin, influences the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Tachykinins are bioactive peptides whose presence has been demonstrated in the pineal gland, hypothalamus, anterior pituitary gland and the gonads, in addition to other central and peripheral structures. Tachykinins have been demonstrated to influence the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, acting as paracrine factors at each of these levels. In the present review, we examine the available evidence supporting a role for melatonin in the regulation of reproductive functions, the possible role of tachykinins in pineal function and the possible interactions between melatonin and tachykinins in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Evidence is presented showing that melatonin, given to pregnant rats, influences the developmental pattern of tachykinins in the hypothalamus and the anterior pituitary gland of the offspring during postnatal life. In the gonads, the effects of melatonin on the tachykinin developmental pattern were rather modest. In particular, in the present review, we have included a summary of our own work performed in the past few years on the effect of melatonin on tachykinin levels in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  17. [Functional changes of hypothalamic-pituitary target gland axes and their clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Sun, Z J; Huang, X H; Wang, M X

    1993-11-01

    We examined the function of hypothalamic-pituitary target gland axes in 88 cases with epidemic hemorrhagic fever (EHF). It was found that all the three endocrine axes i.e. hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and hypothalamic- pituitary-gonadal axis showed some functional impairment. In acute phase there were increased plasma ACTH, FSH and LH levels, which might be attributed to stress reaction in EHF patients. Most cases showed low or weak response of TSH to TRH and delayed response of LH to LHRH; some of the cases did not respond to 1mg of glucagon. These manifestations might be related with poor reserve of anterior pituitary or to disordered regulation of endocrine axes. The increased plasma cortisol and estradiol and the decreased plasma T3, T4 as well as testosterone during acute phase may have important clinical significance. Hence we suggest that in any case glucocorticosteroids should not be abused and that in severe patients thyroxine and durabolin should be administered to improve immunity and hepato-renal function.

  18. [Possibility of ovulation induction using naloxone in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea].

    PubMed

    Krause, B; Möller, S; Göretzlehner, G

    1991-01-01

    Within the study we treated 6 women suffering from hypothalamic amenorrhea with 4 mg naloxone intravenous daily. The duration of the study was at most 30 days. The estimation of hormonal baseline and changes occurs daily, furthermore everyday sonographic folliculometry. In 2 patients the chronic opiate receptor blockade leads to a drastic stimulation of gonadotropin secretion. One of these women (responder in Naloxone-Test) has a long standing elevation of LH and FSH resulting in an ovulation 2 days past end of the therapy. The other women (non-responder in Naloxone-Test) reaches a follicular growth till 17 mm follicle diameter following in preterm atresia during therapy. In another woman (minimal-responder in Naloxone-Test) occurs a short and weak elevation of gonadotropins without any basic stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovary axis. The results of this study show that: 1. it's possible to discern an opioid mediated hypothalamic amenorrhea and 2. a Naloxone-Test or Naloxone-Stimulation-Test should be put before starting a therapy with opiate antagonists in hypothalamic amenorrhea.

  19. Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal Axis Functioning in Reactive and Proactive Aggression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Duran, Nestor L.; Olson, Sheryl L.; Hajal, Nastassia J.; Felt, Barbara T.; Vazquez, Delia M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) reactivity and proactive and reactive aggression in pre-pubertal children. After a 30-min controlled base line period, 73 7-year-old children (40 males and 33 females) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental tasks designed to…

  20. Gallium-67 breast uptake in a patient with hypothalamic granuloma (sarcoid)

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, R.; Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.; Fay, J.; Gale, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    An unusual case is presented of bilateral breast uptake of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate in a patient with a hypothalamic granuloma in the absence of galactorrhea is presented. A possible mechanism for this incidental finding is elevated prolactin levels, as other causes of gallium breast uptake such as drug therapy, and intrinsic breast disease, were not present.

  1. Feed intake of gilts following intracerebroventicular injection of the novel hypothalamic RFamide (RFa) neuropeptide, 26RFa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RFamide (RFa) peptides have been implicated in a broad spectrum of biological processes including energy expenditure and feed intake. 26RFa is a recently discovered hypothalamic neuropeptide that altered the release of pituitary hormones and stimulated feed intake via a NPY-specific mechanism in rat...

  2. An indirect action contributes to c-fos induction in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus by neuropeptide Y

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well-established orexigenic peptide and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is one major brain site that mediates the orexigenic action of NPY. NPY induces abundant expression of C-Fos, an indicator for neuronal activation, in the PVH, which has been used extensively...

  3. Adolescent Survivors of Hurricane Katrina: A Pilot Study of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Tucker, Phebe; Nitiéma, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background: The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis constitutes an important biological component of the stress response commonly studied through the measurement of cortisol. Limited research has examined HPA axis dysregulation in youth exposed to disasters. Objective: This study examined HPA axis activation in adolescent Hurricane Katrina…

  4. A neuroendocrine role for chemerin in hypothalamic remodelling and photoperiodic control of energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Helfer, Gisela; Ross, Alexander W.; Thomson, Lynn M.; Mayer, Claus D.; Stoney, Patrick N.; McCaffery, Peter J.; Morgan, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term and reversible changes in body weight are typical of seasonal animals. Thyroid hormone (TH) and retinoic acid (RA) within the tanycytes and ependymal cells of the hypothalamus have been implicated in the photoperiodic response. We investigated signalling downstream of RA and how this links to the control of body weight and food intake in photoperiodic F344 rats. Chemerin, an inflammatory chemokine, with a known role in energy metabolism, was identified as a target of RA. Gene expression of chemerin (Rarres2) and its receptors were localised within the tanycytes and ependymal cells, with higher expression under long (LD) versus short (SD) photoperiod, pointing to a physiological role. The SD to LD transition (increased food intake) was mimicked by 2 weeks of ICV infusion of chemerin into rats. Chemerin also increased expression of the cytoskeletal protein vimentin, implicating hypothalamic remodelling in this response. By contrast, acute ICV bolus injection of chemerin on a 12 h:12 h photoperiod inhibited food intake and decreased body weight with associated changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in growth and feeding after 24 hr. We describe the hypothalamic ventricular zone as a key site of neuroendocrine regulation, where the inflammatory signal, chemerin, links TH and RA signaling to hypothalamic remodeling. PMID:27225311

  5. Direct stimulation of BAT thermogenesis does not affect hypothalamic neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Bing, C; Hopkins, D; Wang, Q; Frankish, H; Buckingham, R; Williams, G

    1998-01-01

    Acute cold exposure which significantly stimulated thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), also increased neuropeptide Y (NPY) levels in its hypothalamic sites of release without affecting NPY synthesis, suggesting that NPY release is acutely inhibited. To clarify whether these changes in NPY are the cause or consequence of BAT activation, we studied whether hypothalamic NPY and NPY mRNA levels in rats were affected by acute intraperitoneal injection of the beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist BRL 35135 (500 micrograms/kg), which directly activates BAT thermogenesis. BRL 35135 treatment doubled BAT uncoupling protein mRNA levels (p < 0.05), and increased core temperature by 0.4 degree C (p < 0.05), but neither hypothalamic regional NPY levels nor hypothalamic NPY mRNA levels were affected by BRL 35135. This suggests that the NPY changes induced by cold exposure are not the result of BAT activation, and is consistent with the hypothesis that decreased NPY release during cold exposure might disinhibit the sympathetic innervation that drives BAT thermogenesis.

  6. Hypothalamic obesity after treatment for craniopharyngioma: the importance of the home environment.

    PubMed

    Meijneke, Ruud W H; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y N; de Boer, Nienke Y; van Zundert, Suzanne; van Trotsenburg, Paul A S; Stoelinga, Femke; van Santen, Hanneke M

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic obesity after treatment for craniopharyngioma is a well-recognized, severe problem. Treatment of hypothalamic obesity is difficult and often frustrating for the patient, the parents and the professional care-giver. Because hypothalamic obesity is caused by an underlying medical disorder, it is often assumed that regular diet and exercise are not beneficial to reduce the extraordinarily high body mass index, and in fact, lifestyle interventions have been shown to be insufficient in case of extreme hypothalamic obesity. Nevertheless, it is important to realize that also in this situation, informal care delivered by the family and appropriate parenting styles are required to minimize the obesity problem. We present a case in which weight gain in the home situation was considered unstoppable, and a very early mortality due to complications of the severe increasing obesity was considered inevitable. A permissive approach toward food intake became leading with rapid weight increase since a restrictive lifestyle was considered a senseless burden for the child. By admission to our hospital for a longer period of time, weight reduction was realized, and the merely permissive approach could be changed into active purposeful care by adequate information, instruction, guidance and encouragement of the affected child and her parents. This case illustrates that, although this type of obesity has a pathological origin, parental and environmental influences remain of extreme importance.

  7. Fluoxetine Induces Proliferation and Inhibits Differentiation of Hypothalamic Neuroprogenitor Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; Aveleira, Célia; Botelho, Mariana; Álvaro, Ana Rita; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    A significant number of children undergo maternal exposure to antidepressants and they often present low birth weight. Therefore, it is important to understand how selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect the development of the hypothalamus, the key center for metabolism regulation. In this study we investigated the proliferative actions of fluoxetine in fetal hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells and demonstrate that fluoxetine induces the proliferation of these cells, as shown by increased neurospheres size and number of proliferative cells (Ki-67+ cells). Moreover, fluoxetine inhibits the differentiation of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells, as demonstrated by decreased number of mature neurons (Neu-N+ cells) and increased number of undifferentiated cells (SOX-2+ cells). Additionally, fluoxetine-induced proliferation and maintenance of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells leads to changes in the mRNA levels of appetite regulator neuropeptides, including Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Cocaine-and-Amphetamine-Regulated-Transcript (CART). This study provides the first evidence that SSRIs affect the development of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells in vitro with consequent alterations on appetite neuropeptides. PMID:24598761

  8. Hypothalamic neuronal hamartoma associated with pituitary growth hormone cell adenoma and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Asa, S L; Bilbao, J M; Kovacs, K; Linfoot, J A

    1980-01-01

    A hypothalamic neuronal hamartoma associated with a sparsely granulated growth hormone cell adenoma of the pituitary and acromegaly is reported. It is suggested that the patient had a primary neuronal tumor, whose neurosecretory activity promoted the development of the growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma causing acromegaly.

  9. Nicotine induces negative energy balance through hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Whittle, Andrew J; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; López, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Smokers around the world commonly report increased body weight after smoking cessation as a major factor that interferes with their attempts to quit. Numerous controlled studies in both humans and rodents have reported that nicotine exerts a marked anorectic action. The effects of nicotine on energy homeostasis have been mostly pinpointed in the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms controlling its action are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on energy balance. Here we demonstrate that nicotine-induced weight loss is associated with inactivation of hypothalamic AMPK, decreased orexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus, increased energy expenditure as a result of increased locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and alterations in fuel substrate utilization. Conversely, nicotine withdrawal or genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus reversed nicotine-induced negative energy balance. Overall these data demonstrate that the effects of nicotine on energy balance involve specific modulation of the hypothalamic AMPK-BAT axis. These targets may be relevant for the development of new therapies for human obesity. PMID:22315316

  10. A mapping study of hypothalamic defensive attack and related responses in cats.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Maki, S

    1989-06-01

    Effective stimulation sites for the hypothalamic defensive attach and its related responses were mapped in 65 tame adult cats (107 sites). The hypothalamic defensive attack was classified into two types according to its locomotion component: one with only directed attack and the other with retreat. The retreat appeared accompanied by back arching and intermingled with the directed attack. Otherwise, the directed attack and the retreat were accompanied by the same kinds of threat responses, including piloerection, ear retraction, growling and hissing. Stimulation sites for the directed attack with thresholds under 100 microA were located at the dorsal half of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VM) and areas just rostral to it. Directed attack with thresholds above 100 microA was elicited by stimulation of the marginal portion of the VM and adjacent areas, especially those rostral to it. Stimulation sites for the directed attack, which was replaced by stereotyped circling at higher intensities, were located at the part of the above-mentioned areas most distant from the VM. The retreat was elicited from the ventral half of the VM. Stimulation sites which evoked stereotyped circling with threat responses were distributed in a wider area of the medial hypothalamic area outside the VM. PMID:2771201

  11. Hypothalamic deep brain stimulation in the treatment of chronic cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Massimo; Franzini, Angelo; Cecchini, Alberto Proietti; Broggi, Giovanni; Bussone, Gennaro

    2010-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) is a short-lasting unilateral headache associated with ipsilateral craniofacial autonomic manifestations. A positron emission tomography (PET) study has shown that the posterior hypothalamus is activated during CH attacks, suggesting that hypothalamic hyperactivity plays a key role in CH pathophysiology. On this basis, stimulation of the ipsilateral posterior hypothalamus was hypothesized to counteract such hyperactivity to prevent intractable CH. Ten years after its introduction, hypothalamic stimulation has been proved to successfully prevent attacks in more than 60% of 58 hypothalamic implanted drug-resistant chronic CH patients. The implantation procedure has generally been proved to be safe, although it carries a small risk of brain haemorrhage. Long-term stimulation is safe, and nonsymptomatic impairment of orthostatic adaptation is the only noteworthy change. Microrecording studies will make it possible to better identify the target site. Neuroimaging investigations have shown that hypothalamic stimulation activates ipsilateral trigeminal complex, but with no immediate perceived sensation within the trigeminal distribution. Other studies on the pain threshold in chronically stimulated patients showed increased threshold for cold pain in the distribution of the first trigeminal branch ipsilateral to stimulation. These studies suggest that activation of the hypothalamus and of the trigeminal system are both necessary, but not sufficient to generate CH attacks. In addition to the hypothalamus, other unknown brain areas are likely to play a role in the pathophysiology of this illness. Hypothalamus implantation is associated with a small risk of intracerebral haemorrhage and must be performed by an expert neurosurgical team, in selected patients. PMID:21179610

  12. Regulation of Energy Balance via BDNF Expressed in Nonparaventricular Hypothalamic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haili; An, Juan Ji; Sun, Chao; Xu, Baoji

    2016-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expressed in the paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) has been shown to play a key role in regulating energy intake and energy expenditure. BDNF is also expressed in other hypothalamic nuclei; however, the role in the control of energy balance for BDNF produced in these structures remains largely unknown. We found that deleting the Bdnf gene in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) during embryogenesis using the Sf1-Cre transgene had no effect on body weight in mice. In contrast, deleting the Bdnf gene in the adult VMH using Cre-expressing virus led to significant hyperphagia and obesity. These observations indicate that the lack of a hyperphagia phenotype in the Sf1-Cre/Bdnf mutant mice is likely due to developmental compensation. To investigate the role of BDNF expressed in other hypothalamic areas, we employed the hypothalamus-specific Nkx2.1-Cre transgene to delete the Bdnf gene. We found that the Nkx2.1-Cre transgene could abolish BDNF expression in many hypothalamic nuclei, but not in the PVH, and that the resulting mutant mice developed modest obesity due to reduced energy expenditure. Thus, BDNF produced in the VMH plays a role in regulating energy intake. Furthermore, BDNF expressed in hypothalamic areas other than PVH and VMH is also involved in the control of energy expenditure.

  13. Hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1 axis controls energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vagner R R; Micheletti, Thayana O; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Katashima, Carlos K; Lenhare, Luciene; Morari, Joseane; Mendes, Maria Carolina S; Razolli, Daniela S; Rocha, Guilherme Z; de Souza, Claudio T; Ryu, Dongryeol; Prada, Patrícia O; Velloso, Lício A; Carvalheira, José B C; Pauli, José Rodrigo; Cintra, Dennys E; Ropelle, Eduardo R

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) that has a role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that the S1P/S1PR1 signalling pathway in hypothalamic neurons regulates energy homeostasis in rodents. We demonstrate that S1PR1 protein is highly enriched in hypothalamic POMC neurons of rats. Intracerebroventricular injections of the bioactive lipid, S1P, reduce food consumption and increase rat energy expenditure through persistent activation of STAT3 and the melanocortin system. Similarly, the selective disruption of hypothalamic S1PR1 increases food intake and reduces the respiratory exchange ratio. We further show that STAT3 controls S1PR1 expression in neurons via a positive feedback mechanism. Interestingly, several models of obesity and cancer anorexia display an imbalance of hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 axis, whereas pharmacological intervention ameliorates these phenotypes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the neuronal S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 signalling axis plays a critical role in the control of energy homeostasis in rats. PMID:25255053

  14. Nicotine induces negative energy balance through hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Whittle, Andrew J; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; López, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Smokers around the world commonly report increased body weight after smoking cessation as a major factor that interferes with their attempts to quit. Numerous controlled studies in both humans and rodents have reported that nicotine exerts a marked anorectic action. The effects of nicotine on energy homeostasis have been mostly pinpointed in the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms controlling its action are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on energy balance. Here we demonstrate that nicotine-induced weight loss is associated with inactivation of hypothalamic AMPK, decreased orexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus, increased energy expenditure as a result of increased locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and alterations in fuel substrate utilization. Conversely, nicotine withdrawal or genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus reversed nicotine-induced negative energy balance. Overall these data demonstrate that the effects of nicotine on energy balance involve specific modulation of the hypothalamic AMPK-BAT axis. These targets may be relevant for the development of new therapies for human obesity.

  15. Adaptive Response in Female Modeling of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal Axis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We are developing a mechanistic computational model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predict dose-response and time-course ...

  16. Differential Acute and Chronic Effects of Leptin on Hypothalamic Astrocyte Morphology and Synaptic Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Granado, Miriam; Frago, Laura M.; Barrios, Vicente; Horvath, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in neuroendocrine functions partially through modulation of synaptic input density in the hypothalamus. Indeed, glial ensheathing of neurons is modified by specific hormones, thus determining the availability of neuronal membrane space for synaptic inputs, with the loss of this plasticity possibly being involved in pathological processes. Leptin modulates synaptic inputs in the hypothalamus, but whether astrocytes participate in this action is unknown. Here we report that astrocyte structural proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are induced and astrocyte morphology modified by chronic leptin administration (intracerebroventricular, 2 wk), with these changes being inversely related to modifications in synaptic protein densities. Similar changes in glial structural proteins were observed in adult male rats that had increased body weight and circulating leptin levels due to neonatal overnutrition (overnutrition: four pups/litter vs. control: 12 pups/litter). However, acute leptin treatment reduced hypothalamic GFAP levels and induced synaptic protein levels 1 h after administration, with no effect on vimentin. In primary hypothalamic astrocyte cultures leptin also reduced GFAP levels at 1 h, with an induction at 24 h, indicating a possible direct effect of leptin. Hence, one mechanism by which leptin may affect metabolism is by modifying hypothalamic astrocyte morphology, which in turn could alter synaptic inputs to hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, the responses to acute and chronic leptin exposure are inverse, raising the possibility that increased glial activation in response to chronic leptin exposure could be involved in central leptin resistance. PMID:21343257

  17. Expanding indications for the extended endoscopic endonasal approach to hypothalamic gliomas: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Zoli, Matteo; Mazzatenta, Diego; Valluzzi, Adelaide; Marucci, Gianluca; Acciarri, Nicola; Pasquini, Ernesto; Frank, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Object In the last decade the indications for the endoscopic endonasal approach have been progressively expanded to include lesions that have not been traditionally considered amenable to resection through the transsphenoidal route. In this study, the authors analyze their experience with hypothalamic gliomas treated via the endoscopic endonasal approach. Methods Consecutive cases of hypothalamic gliomas treated since 2007 via an endoscopic endonasal approach were reviewed. Preoperative and postoperative neuroimaging as well as endocrinological, neurological, and visual symptoms were analyzed to assess the surgical outcome. Signs and symptoms of hypothalamic dysfunction including body mass index (BMI), memory, sleep-wake rhythm, and polyphagia were prospectively collected pre- and postoperatively to assess hypothalamic function. Quality of life was evaluated using the Katz scale. Results In the initial phase the endoscopic endonasal approach was adopted in 3 cases with a palliative intent, to obtain a biopsy sample or for debulking of the mass followed by radio- or chemotherapy. In 2 later cases it was successfully adopted to achieve gross-total tumor resection. Complications consisted of 2 postoperative CSF leaks, which required an endoscopic endonasal reintervention. Visual deficit improved in 3 cases and normalized in the other 2. Four patients developed diabetes insipidus, and 3 an anterior panhypopituitarism. All patients had a moderate increase in BMI. No patients presented with any other signs of hypothalamic damage, and their quality of life at follow-up is normal. Conclusions Despite the limitations of a short follow-up and small sample, the authors' early experience with the endoscopic endonasal approach has revealed it to be a direct, straightforward, and safe approach to third ventricle astrocytomas. It allowed the authors to perform tumor resection with the same microsurgical technique: dissecting the tumor with 2 hands, performing a central debulking

  18. Modelling water molecules inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiangtrong, Prangsai; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic peptide nanotubes occur during the self-assembly process of cyclic peptides. Due to the ease of synthesis and ability to control the properties of outer surface and inner diameter by manipulating the functional side chains and the number of amino acids, cyclic peptide nanotubes have attracted much interest from many research areas. A potential application of peptide nanotubes is their use as artificial transmembrane channels for transporting ions, biomolecules and waters into cells. Here, we use the Lennard-Jones potential and a continuum approach to study the interaction of a water molecule in a cyclo[(- D-Ala- L-Ala)_4-] peptide nanotube. Assuming that each unit of a nanotube comprises an inner and an outer tube and that a water molecule is made up of a sphere of two hydrogen atoms uniformly distributed over its surface and a single oxygen atom at the centre, we determine analytically the interaction energy of the water molecule and the peptide nanotube. Using this energy, we find that, independent of the number of peptide units, the water molecule will be accepted inside the nanotube. Once inside the nanotube, we show that a water molecule prefers to be off-axis, closer to the surface of the inner nanotube. Furthermore, our study of two water molecules inside the peptide nanotube supports the finding that water molecules form an array of a 1-2-1-2 file inside peptide nanotubes. The theoretical study presented here can facilitate thorough understanding of the behaviour of water molecules inside peptide nanotubes for applications, such as artificial transmembrane channels.

  19. Cyclic motor activity; migrating motor complex: 1985.

    PubMed

    Sarna, S K

    1985-10-01

    Most of the gastrointestinal tract and the biliary tract have a cyclic motor activity. The electric counterpart of this motor activity is called cyclic myoelectric activity. A typical motor cycle in the LES, stomach, and small intestine is composed of a quiescent state, followed by progressively increasing amplitude and frequency of contractions culminating in a state of maximal contractile activity. The colonic motor cycle has only the quiescent and the contractile states. In the small intestine, these motor complexes migrate in an aborad direction, and in the colon in both orad and aborad directions. The mechanisms of initiation and migration of these complexes are best understood in the small intestine. Both the initiation and migration of these complexes seem to be controlled by enteric neural mechanisms. The functions of the enteric mechanisms may be modulated by the central nervous system and by circulating endogenous substances. The mechanisms of initiation of these complexes are not completely understood in the rest of the gastrointestinal tract and in the biliary tract. The physiologic function of these motor complexes that occur only after several hours of fast in the upper gastrointestinal tract of nonruminants may be to clean the digestive tract of residual food, secretions, and cellular debris. This function is aided by a coordinated secretion of enzymes, acid, and bicarbonate. In ruminants, phase III activity is associated with the distal propulsion of ingested food. The function of colonic motor complexes that are not coordinated with the cyclic motor activities of the rest of the gastrointestinal tract may be only to move contents back and forth for optimal absorption. PMID:3896912

  20. Universal Behavior of a Cyclic Oxidation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model has been generated to represent the iterative, discrete growth and spallation processes associated with cyclic oxidation. Parabolic growth kinetics (k(sub p)) over and a constant spall area (F(sub A)) were assumed, with spalling occurring interfacially at the thickest regions of the scale. Although most models require numerical techniques, the regularity and simplicity of this progression permitted an approximation by algebraic expressions. Normalization could now be performed to reflect all parametric effects, and a universal cyclic oxidation response was generated: W(sub u) = 1/2 {3J(sub u)(sup 1/2)+ J(sub u)(sup 3/2)} where W, is weight change normalized by the maximum and J(sub u) is the cycle number normalized by the number to reach maximum. Similarly, the total amount of metal consumed was represented by a single normalized curve. The factor [(S(sub c)-l)(raised dot)sqrt(F(sub A)k(sub p)DELTAt)] was identified as a general figure of merit, where S(sub c) is the mass ratio of oxide to oxygen and DELTAt is the cycle duration. A cyclic oxidation failure map was constructed, in normalized k(sub p)-F(sub A) space, as defined by the locus of points corresponding to a critical amount of metal consumption in a given time. All three constructions describe behavior for every value of growth rate, spall fraction, and cycle duration by means of single curves, but with two branches corresponding to the times before and after steady state is achieved.

  1. Cyclical konzo epidemics and climate variability.

    PubMed

    Oluwole, Olusegun Steven A

    2015-03-01

    Konzo epidemics have occurred during droughts in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo) for >70 years, but also in Mozambique, Tanzania, and the Central African Republic. The illness is attributed to exposure to cyanide from cassava foods, on which the population depends almost exclusively during droughts. Production of cassava, a drought-resistant crop, has been shown to correlate with cyclical changes in precipitation in konzo-affected countries. Here we review the epidemiology of konzo as well as models of its pathogenesis. A spectral analysis of precipitation and konzo is performed to determine whether konzo epidemics are cyclical and whether there is spectral coherence. Time series of environmental temperature, precipitation, and konzo show cyclical changes. Periodicities of dominant frequencies in the spectra of precipitation and konzo range from 3 to 6 years in DR Congo. There is coherence of the spectra of precipitation and konzo. The magnitude squared coherence of 0.9 indicates a strong relationship between variability of climate and konzo epidemics. Thus, it appears that low precipitation phases of climate variability reduce the yield of food crops except cassava, upon which the population depends for supply of calories during droughts. Presence of very high concentrations of thiocyanate (SCN(-) ), the major metabolite of cyanide, in the bodily fluids of konzo subjects is a consequence of dietary exposure to cyanide, which follows intake of poorly processed cassava roots. Because cyanogens and minor metabolites of cyanide have not induced konzo-like illnesses, SCN(-) remains the most likely neurotoxicant of konzo. Public health control of konzo will require food and water programs during droughts. [Correction added on 26 February 2015, after first online publication: abstract reformatted per journal style

  2. Cyclic groups and quantum logic gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourkia, Arash; Batle, J.; Raymond Ooi, C. H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a formula for an infinite number of universal quantum logic gates, which are 4 by 4 unitary solutions to the Yang-Baxter (Y-B) equation. We obtain this family from a certain representation of the cyclic group of order n. We then show that this discrete family, parametrized by integers n, is in fact, a small sub-class of a larger continuous family, parametrized by real numbers θ, of universal quantum gates. We discuss the corresponding Yang-Baxterization and related symmetries in the concomitant Hamiltonian.

  3. Star-shaped cyclic-twinning nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Cao, Minghe; Sun, Yuekui; Wu, Peiwen; Yuan, Jun

    2006-04-01

    We report the discovery of a new class of nanowires with a star-shaped cross section. Unlike most nanowires, it shows a prominent regular reentrant surface profile. The electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy analyses indicate that the nanowire is composed of superhard boron suboxide (B6O). The fivefold symmetry of the star-shaped nanowire could be understood as a cyclic twinning structure. The crystallographic analysis further suggested that it could be a common occurrence in boron-rich compounds. Star-shaped nanowires with regular reentrant surfaces are attractive for applications in nanotechnology.

  4. A cyclic universe approach to fine tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Stephon; Cormack, Sam; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2016-06-01

    We present a closed bouncing universe model where the value of coupling constants is set by the dynamics of a ghost-like dilatonic scalar field. We show that adding a periodic potential for the scalar field leads to a cyclic Friedmann universe where the values of the couplings vary randomly from one cycle to the next. While the shuffling of values for the couplings happens during the bounce, within each cycle their time-dependence remains safely within present observational bounds for physically-motivated values of the model parameters. Our model presents an alternative to solutions of the fine tuning problem based on string landscape scenarios.

  5. Intercalation of cyclic ketones into vanadyl phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Zima, Vitezslav . E-mail: vitezslav.zima@upce.cz; Melanova, Klara; Benes, Ludvik; Trchova, Miroslava; Dybal, Jiri

    2005-01-15

    Intercalation compounds of vanadyl phosphate with cyclic ketones (cyclopentanone, cyclohexanone, 4-methylcyclohexanone, and 1,4-cyclohexanedione) were prepared from corresponding propanol or ethanol intercalates by a molecular exchange. The intercalates prepared were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The intercalates are stable in dry environment and decompose slowly in humid air. Infrared and Raman spectra indicate that carbonyl oxygens of the guest molecules are coordinated to the vanadium atoms of the host layers. The local structure and interactions in the cyclopentanone intercalate have been suggested on the basis of quantum chemical calculations.

  6. Remote effects of hypothalamic lesions in the prefrontal cortex of craniopharygioma patients.

    PubMed

    Ozyurt, Jale; Lorenzen, Anna; Gebhardt, Ursel; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Müller, Hermann L; Thiel, Christiane M

    2014-05-01

    Albeit histologically low grade (WHO I(o)) brain tumors, craniopharyngiomas and/or their surgical removal frequently affect the hypothalamus, amongst other brain regions at risk. Due to rich hypothalamic connections with prefrontal and limbic regions, hypothalamic injury may adversely affect neural substrates of emotion processing and higher cognitive control, including memory and executive functions. The current study is the first to investigate the consequences of hypothalamic involvement on neural substrates of emotional and cognitive functioning. Ten patients with childhood craniopharyngioma and known hypothalamic involvement and fifteen age- and intelligence matched control subjects (median age: 17.8 and 17.3 yrs.) were studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging and an emotional face recognition task. During encoding, participants were asked to classify neutral and emotional faces. In a subsequent recognition phase, participants had to recognize these old faces within a set of new faces. Behavioral performance was comparable between patients and controls. Neural activity revealed, however, differential recruitment of fronto-limbic brain regions during recognition. Patients exhibited an abnormal pattern of task-induced activation and deactivation in the anterior and posterior rostral medial prefrontal cortex and a higher functional coupling between anterior rostral medial prefrontal cortex and the thalamus. Additionally, we found a higher reactivity in the patients' amygdala to emotional relative to neutral faces when compared to healthy controls. Our data provide first evidence that hypothalamic damage impacts neural correlates of memory retrieval in medial prefrontal cortex, indicating a less efficient use of an area involved in executive control processes. We propose that the deactivation failure in the patients' anterior rostral medial prefrontal cortex is related to an increased coupling with the thalamus and reflects a reduced efficiency to

  7. Effects of aproteic diet on hypothalamic-pituitary- gonadal regulation in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Ponzo, Osvaldo J.; Rondina, Dora; Szwarcfarb, Berta; Carbone, Silvia; Moguilevsky, Jaime; Scacchi, Pablo

    1999-01-01

    The effect of an aproteic diet (Ap) on the reproductive axis in young male rats was studied. Also the refeeding effect at different times after the aproteic diet was studied. The Ap diet was given during 21 days. In refeeding groups, the control diet was given during 2, 4 and 6 weeks after the aproteic diet. We studied the plasmatic testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels. Also the hypothalamic GnRH concentration and in vitro hypothalamic GnRH secretion in basal and induced condition was studied. The total protein deficit produced significant reduction in body, testis, seminal vesicles and prostate weights. This was accompanied with decreased levels of plasmatic testosterone (P<0.02). In this aproteic group there was a significant reduction in LH (P<0.05) and FSH (P<0.05) plasmatic levels. Refeeding with control diet reversed this situation, producing significant increment in LH (P<0.05) and FSH levels (P<0.01) at the fourth and second weeks, respectively. The basal hypothalamic GnRH secretion did not differ from the control; nevertheless the induced secretion was significantly (P<0.05) greater in the aproteic group. Also the hypothalamic GnRH concentration was increased (P<0.05) in animals fed with the aproteic diet. The minor testis, prostate, and seminal vesicles" weight, and a decreased plasmatic testosterone in rats fed with an aproteic diet, are produced by a decrease in gonadotrophin secretion. This decrease in turn is caused by a reduction in GnRH secretion, since hypothalamic GnRH concentration is increased in rats fed with the aproteic group, and induced secretion is greater in this group. All these alterations produced by an aproteic diet are reversible, since-with contol diet refeeding-the gonadotrophin secretion returned at control levels.

  8. Activation of hypothalamic gono-like neurons in female rats during estrus☆

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Shaojun; Rong, Peijing; Zhu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, gonadal function is controlled by the activity of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons, which control the secretion of adenohypophyseal and gonadal hormones. However, there are a number of unanswered questions in relation to gonadal function. It is currently unknown how erotogenic stimulation of the genitals influences the subpopulation of hypothalamic medial preoptic area neurons, antidromically identified as projecting to the median eminence at different periods of the estrous cycle. Additionally, the distinctiveness of hypothalamic medial preoptic area neurons, with respect to methods of feedback control by exogenous hormones, is also unknown. In this study, spontaneous discharges from individual neurons encountered within the medial preoptic area, gono-like neurons, were recorded extracellularly using glass microelectrodes. To confirm the cellular and histochemical properties of the recording units, antidromic stimulation was performed using a side-by-side bipolar stimulating electrode placed into the median eminence, alongside microiontophoretic injections of the conventional tracer, horseradish peroxidase. In addition, further immunohistochemical analyses were performed. Results showed that elevated gono-neuron activity was accompanied by increased background activity and greater responses to erotogenic stimuli during estrus. Application of clitoral traction stimulation resulted in increased activation of the gono-like neurons. This neuronal activity was noticeably inhibited by β-estradiol administration. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the presence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-reactive protein in hypothalamic cells in which electrophysiological recordings were taken. Thus, medial preoptic area neurons represent the subset of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons described from brain slices in vitro, and might serve as a useful physiological model to form the basis of future in vivo studies. PMID:25337091

  9. Dorsomedial hindbrain catecholamine regulation of hypothalamic astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme protein expression: Impact of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, P; Shrestha, P K; Briski, K P

    2015-04-30

    The brain astrocyte glycogen reservoir is a vital energy reserve and, in the cerebral cortex, subject among other factors to noradrenergic control. The ovarian steroid estradiol potently stimulates nerve cell aerobic respiration, but its role in glial glycogen metabolism during energy homeostasis or mismatched substrate supply/demand is unclear. This study examined the premise that estradiol regulates hypothalamic astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme protein expression during normo- and hypoglycemia in vivo through dorsomedial hindbrain catecholamine (CA)-dependent mechanisms. Individual astrocytes identified in situ by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunolabeling were laser-microdissected from the ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH), arcuate hypothalamic (ARH), and paraventricular hypothalamic (PVH) nuclei and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) of estradiol (E)- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) rats after insulin or vehicle injection, and pooled within each site. Stimulation [VMH, LHA] or suppression [PVH, ARH] of basal glycogen synthase (GS) protein expression by E was reversed in the former three sites by caudal fourth ventricular pretreatment with the CA neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). E diminished glycogen phosphorylase (GP) protein profiles by CA-dependent [VMH, PVH] or -independent mechanisms [LHA]. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) increased GS expression in the PVH in OVX+E, but reduced this protein in the PVH, ARH, and LHA in OVX+O. Moreover, IIH augmented GP expression in the VMH, LHA, and ARH in OVX+E and in the ARH in OVX+O, responses that normalized by 6-OHDA. Results demonstrate site-specific effects of E on astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme expression in the female rat hypothalamus, and identify locations where dorsomedial hindbrain CA input is required for such action. Evidence that E correspondingly increases and reduces basal GS and GP in the VMH and LHA, but augments the latter protein during IIH suggests that E regulates

  10. High-dose glucocorticoid aggravates TBI-associated corticosteroid insufficiency by inducing hypothalamic neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Zhao, Zilong; Zhou, Yuan; Chen, Xin; Li, Ying; Liu, Xiao; Lu, Hujie; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Jianning

    2013-12-01

    Emerging experimental and clinical data suggest that severe illness, such as traumatic brain injury (TBI), can induce critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI). However, underlying mechanisms of this TBI-associated CIRCI remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that dexamethasone (DXM), a synthetic glucocorticoid, which was widely used to treat TBI, induces hypothalamic neuronal apoptosis to aggravate CIRCI. To test this hypothesis, we have evaluated the dose effect of DXM (1 or 10mg/kg) on the development of acute CIRCI in rats with fluid percussion injury-induced TBI and on cultured rat hypothalamic neurons in vitro (DXM, 10(-5)-10(-8)mol/L). Corticosterone Increase Index was recorded as the marker for CIRCI. In addition, MTT and TUNEL assays were used to measure the viability and apoptosis of hypothalamic neurons in primary culture. Moreover, high-resolution hopping probe ion conductance microscopy (HPICM) was used to monitor the DXM-induced morphological changes in neurons. The incidence of acute CIRCI was significantly higher in the high-dose DXM group on post-injury day 7. Cellular viability was significantly decreased from 12h to 24h after the treatment with a high-dose of DXM. A significantly increase in TUNEL positive cells were detected in cultured cells treated with a high-dose of DXM after 18h. Neurites of hypothalamic neuron were dramatically thinner and the numbers of dendritic beadings increased in neurons treated with the high dose of DXM for 12h. In conclusion, high-dose DXM induced hypothalamic neurons to undergo apoptosis in vivo and in vitro, which may aggravate TBI-associated CIRCI.

  11. Control of energy balance by hypothalamic gene circuitry involving two nuclear receptors, neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 and glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Gyun; Lee, Bora; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kim, Juhee; Lee, Seunghee; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Jae W

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate diverse physiological processes, including the central nervous system control of energy balance. However, the molecular mechanisms for the central actions of NRs in energy balance remain relatively poorly defined. Here we report a hypothalamic gene network involving two NRs, neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (NOR1) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which directs the regulated expression of orexigenic neuropeptides agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in response to peripheral signals. Our results suggest that the anorexigenic signal leptin induces NOR1 expression likely via the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), while the orexigenic signal glucocorticoid mobilizes GR to inhibit NOR1 expression by antagonizing the action of CREB. Also, NOR1 suppresses glucocorticoid-dependent expression of AgRP and NPY. Consistently, relative to wild-type mice, NOR1-null mice showed significantly higher levels of AgRP and NPY and were less responsive to leptin in decreasing the expression of AgRP and NPY. These results identify mutual antagonism between NOR1 and GR to be a key rheostat for peripheral metabolic signals to centrally control energy balance.

  12. Perinatal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in the lamb. IV. Testicular responsiveness to hCG from 1 through 28 days of life.

    PubMed

    Hamel, R; Forest, M G; Haour, F; Polychronakos, C; Charpenet, G; Gibb, W; Collu, R; Durcharme, J R

    1981-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have shown the existence of an early postnatal activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPGA) in the male lamb which was present at 2 and 4 weeks of age. In order to define more precisely the time sequence of HPGA activity, we have studied the in vivo and in vitro testicular responsiveness to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) of the immature lamb at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of life. Plasma testosterone (T) increments (delta) after hCG were lower in 1-day-old animals than in other age groups. Testicular concentrations of T, dehydroepiandrosterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone increased from 1 to 14 days. Testicular 17, 20 lyase activity rose significantly with age but was not influenced by hCG. hCG and dibutyryl cyclic AMP increased significantly the T production by enriched interstitial cell preparation at 1, 3, and 7 days, the greatest response being found at 7 days. hCG also increased significantly the T production at 14 days. These data suggest that the lamb testis has the capacity to respond to hCG in vivo and to various stimuli vitro from the 1st day of life and that the response reaches a plateau from 2 to 4 weeks after birth.

  13. Hypothalamic orexin, OX1, alphaMSH, NPY and MCRs expression in dopaminergic D2R knockout mice.

    PubMed

    García-Tornadú, I; Díaz-Torga, G; Risso, G S; Silveyra, P; Cataldi, N; Ramirez, M C; Low, M J; Libertun, C; Becu-Villalobos, D

    2009-08-01

    In 5-month-old male and female dopamine receptor 2 (D2R) knockout mice food intake per animal was unaltered while food per g BW was increased. We wished to evaluate the effect of D2R disruption on different components of energy balance and food intake regulation. We determined hypothalamic orexin precursor (PPO) expression, its receptor OX1, serum leptin levels, hypothalamic leptin receptor (OBR), circulating and pituitary alpha MSH levels, as well as central MC3 and MC4 receptors and NPY mRNA in wildtype and D2R knockout mice (KO). Loss of D2R caused a marked increase in serum prolactin levels, to higher levels in females compared to male KO mice. On the other hand, it produced a female-specific increase in circulating alphaMSH, and hypothalamic alphaMSH content, while neurointermediate alphaMSH content was decreased in both sexes. No differences were found in hypothalamic NPY, MC3R or MC4R concentration. Hypothalamic PPO mRNA expression was significantly decreased only in female KOs, while OX1 mRNA was not different between genotypes. Serum leptin levels were also similar in both genotypes. Our results show that in female and not in male mice disruption of the D2R produces two potentially anorexigenic events: an increase in serum and hypothalamic alphaMSH, and a decrease in hypothalamic orexin expression. Very high prolactin levels, which are orexigenic, probably counterbalance these effects, so that food intake is slightly altered. In males, on the other hand, hypothalamic PPO, and serum or hypothalamic alphaMSH are not modified, and increased prolactin levels may account for increased food intake per g BW. These results suggest a sexually dimorphic participation of the D2R in food intake regulation.

  14. Inter-rater reliability of cyclic and non-cyclic task assessment using the hand activity level in appliance manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Robert; Schwatka, Natalie; Gober, Jennifer; Gilkey, David; Anton, Dan; Gerr, Fred; Rosecrance, John

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the inter-rater reliability of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) hand activity level (HAL), an observational ergonomic assessment method used to estimate physical exposure to repetitive exertions during task performance. Video recordings of 858 cyclic and non-cyclic appliance manufacturing tasks were assessed by sixteen pairs of raters using the HAL visual-analog scale. A weighted Pearson Product Moment-Correlation Coefficient was used to evaluate the agreement between the HAL scores recorded by each rater pair, and the mean weighted correlation coefficients for cyclic and non-cyclic tasks were calculated. Results indicated that the HAL is a reliable exposure assessment method for cyclic (r̄-barw = 0.69) and non-cyclic work tasks (r̄-barw = 0.68). When the two reliability scores were compared using a two-sample Student's t-test, no significant difference in reliability (p = 0.63) between these work task categories was found. This study demonstrated that the HAL may be a useful measure of exposure to repetitive exertions during cyclic and non-cyclic tasks. Relevance to industry Exposure to hazardous levels of repetitive action during non-cyclic task completion has traditionally been difficult to assess using simple observational techniques. The present study suggests that ergonomists could use the HAL to reliably and easily evaluate exposures associated with some non-cyclic work tasks. PMID:26120222

  15. Investigation of Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue of Polycrystalline Cu under Pure Compression Cyclic Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tzu-Yin Jean

    It is commonly accepted that fatigue crack is initiated under tensile fatigue stresses. However, practical examples demonstrate that cracks may also initiate under pure compressive fluctuating loads such as the failures observed in aircraft landing gear frames. However, the mechanism of such failures is rarely investigated. Furthermore, knowledge on cyclic deformation response under pure compressive fatigue condition is also very limited or non-existent. Our recent work already verified that fatigue cracks may nucleate from stress concentration sites under pure compression fatigue, but whether or not a form of stress concentration is always needed to initiate a crack under pure compression fatigue remains uncertain. In this study, compression fatigue tests under different peak stresses were carried out on smooth bars of fully annealed OFHC Copper. The purpose of these tests is to investigate not only the cyclic deformation response but also the possibility of crack nucleation without the stress concentrator. Results showed that overall the cyclic stress-strain response and microstructural evolution of OFHC Copper under pure compression fatigue exhibits rather dissimilar behaviour compared to those under symmetrical fatigue. The specimens hardened rapidly within 10 cycles under pure compression fatigue unlike the gradual cyclic hardening behaviour in symmetrical fatigue with the same peak stress amplitude. Compressive cyclic creep behaviour was also observed under the same testing conditions. Moreover, unlike conventional tension-compression fatigue, only moderate slip activity was detectable on the surface instead of typical PSB features detected from TEM observations. The surface observations has revealed that surface slip bands did not increase in number nor did they become more pronounced in height with increasing number of cycles. In addition, surface roughening by grain boundary extrusion was detected to become more severe as the cycling progressed. Therefore

  16. Effect of Registration on Cyclical Kinematic Data

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Elizabeth A.; Cassidy, Ruth B.; Rothman, Edward D.; Gerstner, Geoffrey E.

    2010-01-01

    Given growing interest in Functional Data Analysis (FDA) as a useful method for analyzing human movement data, it is critical to understand the effects of standard FDA procedures, including registration, on biomechanical analyses. Registration is used to reduce phase variability between curves while preserving the individual curves shape and amplitude. The application of three methods available to assess registration could benefit those in the biomechanics community using FDA techniques: comparison of mean curves, comparison of average RMS values, and assessment of time-warping functions. Therefore, the present study has two purposes. First, the necessity of registration applied to cyclical data after time normalization is assessed. Second, we illustrate the three methods for evaluating registration effects. Masticatory jaw movements of 22 healthy adults (2 males, 21 females) were tracked while subjects chewed a gum-based pellet for 20 seconds. Motion data were captured at 60 Hz with two gen-locked video cameras. Individual chewing cycles were time normalized and then transformed into functional observations. Registration did not affect mean curves and warping functions were linear. Although registration decreased the RMS, indicating a decrease in inter-subject variability, the difference was not statistically significant. Together these results indicate that registration may not always be necessary for cyclical chewing data. An important contribution of this paper is the illustration of three methods for evaluating registration that are easy to apply and useful for judging whether the extra data manipulation is necessary. PMID:20537335

  17. Radioiodination of Aryl-Alkyl Cyclic Sulfates

    PubMed Central

    Mushti, Chandra; Papisov, Mikhail I.

    2015-01-01

    Among the currently available positron emitters suitable for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), 124I has the longest physical half-life (4.2 days). The long half-life and well-investigated behavior of iodine in vivo makes 124I very attractive for pharmacological studies. In this communication, we describe a simple yet effective method for the synthesis of novel 124I labeled compounds intended for PET imaging of arylsulfatase activity in vivo. Arylsulfatases have important biological functions, and genetic deficiencies of such functions require pharmacological replacement, the efficacy of which must be properly and non-invasively evaluated. These enzymes, even though their natural substrates are mostly of aliphatic nature, hydrolyze phenolic sulfates to phenol and sulfuric acid. The availability of [124I]iodinated substrates is expected to provide a PET-based method for measuring their activity in vivo. The currently available methods of synthesis of iodinated arylsulfates usually require either introducing of a protected sulfate ester early in the synthesis or introduction of sulfate group at the end of synthesis in a separate step. The described method gives the desired product in one step from an aryl-alkyl cyclic sulfate. When treated with iodide, the source cyclic sulfate opens with substitution of iodide at the alkyl center and gives the desired arylsulfate monoester. PMID:23135631

  18. Effect of registration on cyclical kinematic data.

    PubMed

    Crane, Elizabeth A; Cassidy, Ruth B; Rothman, Edward D; Gerstner, Geoffrey E

    2010-08-26

    Given growing interest in functional data analysis (FDA) as a useful method for analyzing human movement data, it is critical to understand the effects of standard FDA procedures, including registration, on biomechanical analyses. Registration is used to reduce phase variability between curves while preserving the individual curve's shape and amplitude. The application of three methods available to assess registration could benefit those in the biomechanics community using FDA techniques: comparison of mean curves, comparison of average RMS values, and assessment of time-warping functions. Therefore, the present study has two purposes. First, the necessity of registration applied to cyclical data after time normalization is assessed. Second, we illustrate the three methods for evaluating registration effects. Masticatory jaw movements of 22 healthy adults (2 males, 21 females) were tracked while subjects chewed a gum-based pellet for 20s. Motion data were captured at 60 Hz with two gen-locked video cameras. Individual chewing cycles were time normalized and then transformed into functional observations. Registration did not affect mean curves and warping functions were linear. Although registration decreased the RMS, indicating a decrease in inter-subject variability, the difference was not statistically significant. Together these results indicate that registration may not always be necessary for cyclical chewing data. An important contribution of this paper is the illustration of three methods for evaluating registration that are easy to apply and useful for judging whether the extra data manipulation is necessary.

  19. Rethinking progesterone regulation of female reproductive cyclicity

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kaiyu; Cui, Wei; Dhakal, Pramod; Wolfe, Michael W.; Rumi, M. A. Karim; Vivian, Jay L.; Roby, Katherine F.; Soares, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PGR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor with key roles in the regulation of female fertility. Much has been learned of the actions of PGR signaling through the use of pharmacologic inhibitors and genetic manipulation, using mouse mutagenesis. Characterization of rats with a null mutation at the Pgr locus has forced a reexamination of the role of progesterone in the regulation of the female reproductive cycle. We generated two Pgr mutant rat models, using genome editing. In both cases, deletions yielded a null mutation resulting from a nonsense frame-shift and the emergence of a stop codon. Similar to Pgr null mice, Pgr null rats were infertile because of deficits in sexual behavior, ovulation, and uterine endometrial differentiation. However, in contrast to the reported phenotype of female mice with disruptions in Pgr signaling, Pgr null female rats exhibit robust estrous cycles. Cyclic changes in vaginal cytology, uterine histology, serum hormone levels, and wheel running activity were evident in Pgr null female rats, similar to wild-type controls. Furthermore, exogenous progesterone treatment inhibited estrous cycles in wild-type female rats but not in Pgr-null female rats. As previously reported, pharmacologic antagonism supports a role for PGR signaling in the regulation of the ovulatory gonadotropin surge, a result at variance with experimentation using genetic ablation of PGR signaling. To conclude, our findings in the Pgr null rat challenge current assumptions and prompt a reevaluation of the hormonal control of reproductive cyclicity. PMID:27035990

  20. Cyclical components of local rainfall data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentz, R. P.; D'Urso, M. A.; Jarma, N. M.; Mentz, G. B.

    2000-02-01

    This paper reports on the use of a comparatively simple statistical methodology to study local short time series rainfall data. The objective is to help in agricultural planning, by diminishing the risks associated with some uncertainties affecting this business activity.The analysis starts by assuming a model of unobservable components, trend, cycle, seasonal and irregular, that is well known in many areas of application. When series are in the realm of business and economics, the statistical methods popularized by the US Census Bureau US National Bureau of Economic Research are used for seasonal and cyclical estimation, respectively. The flexibility of these methods makes them good candidates to be applied in the meteorological context, and this is done in this paper for a selection of monthly rainfall time series.Use of the results to help in analysing and forecasting cyclical components is emphasized. The results are interesting. An agricultural entrepreneur, or a group of them located in a single geographical region, will profit by systematically collecting information (monthly in our work) about rainfall, and adopting the scheme of analysis described in this paper.

  1. Geometric phases and cyclic isotropic cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banchi, Leonardo; Caravelli, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper we study the evolution of the modes of a scalar field in a cyclic cosmology. In order to keep the discussion clear, we study the features of a scalar field in a toy model, a Friedman-Robertson-Walker Universe with a periodic scale factor, in which the Universe expands, contracts and bounces infinite times, in the approximation in which the dynamic features of this Universe are driven by some external factor, without the backreaction of the scalar field under study. In particular, we show that particle production exhibits features of the cyclic cosmology. Also, by studying the Berry phase of the scalar field, we show that contrary to what is commonly believed, the scalar field carries information from one bounce to another in the form of a global phase which occurs as generically non-zero. The Berry phase is then evaluated numerically in the case of the effective loop quantum cosmology closed Universe. We observe that Berry’s phase is non-zero, but that in the quantum regime the particle content is non-negligible.

  2. Superplastic deformation induced by cyclic hydrogen charging

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Heeman; Schuh, Christopher A.; Dunand, David C.

    2008-05-15

    Deformation under the combined action of external stress and cyclic hydrogen charging/discharging is studied in a model material, titanium. Cyclic charging with hydrogen is carried out at 860 deg. C, which repeatedly triggers the transformation between hydrogen-lean {alpha}-Ti and hydrogen-rich {beta}-Ti. Due to bias from the externally applied tensile stress, the internal mismatch strains produced by this isothermal {alpha}-{beta} transformation accumulate preferentially along the loading axis. These strain increments are linearly proportional to the applied stress, i.e., flow is ideally Newtonian, at small stress levels (below {approx}2 MPa). Therefore, after multiple chemical cycles, a tensile engineering strain of 100% is achieved without fracture, with an average strain rate of 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}, which demonstrates for the first time that superplastic elongations can be achieved by chemical cycling. The effect of hydrogen partial pressure, cycle time, and external stress on the value of the superplastic strain increments is experimentally measured and discussed in light of a diffusional phase transformation model. Special attention is paid to understanding the two contributions to the internal mismatch strains from the phase transformation and lattice swelling.

  3. The role of peel stresses in cyclic debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    When an adhesively bonded joint is undergoing cyclic loading, one of the possible damage modes that occurs is called cyclic debonding - progressive separation of the adherends by failure of the adhesive bond under cyclic loading. In most practical structures, both peel and shear stresses exist in the adhesive bonding during cyclic loading. The results of an experimental and analytical study to determine the role of peel stresses on cyclic debonding in a mixed mode specimen are presented. Experimentally, this was done by controlling the forces that create the peel stresses by applying a clamping force to oppose the peel stresses. Cracked lap shear joints were chosen for this study. A finite element analysis was developed to assess the effect of the clamping force on the strain energy release rates due to shear and peel stresses. The results imply that the peel stress is the principal stress causing cyclic debonding.

  4. Interpretation of tandem mass spectra obtained from cyclic nonribosomal peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Ting; Ng, Julio; Meluzzi, Dario; Bandeira, Nuno; Gutierrez, Marcelino; Simmons, Thomas L; Schultz, Andrew W; Linington, Roger G; Moore, Bradley S; Gerwick, William H; Pevzner, Pavel A; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2009-06-01

    Natural and non-natural cyclic peptides are a crucial component in drug discovery programs because of their considerable pharmaceutical properties. Cyclosporin, microcystins, and nodularins are all notable pharmacologically important cyclic peptides. Because these biologically active peptides are often biosynthesized nonribosomally, they often contain nonstandard amino acids, thus increasing the complexity of the resulting tandem mass spectrometry data. In addition, because of the cyclic nature, the fragmentation patterns of many of these peptides showed much higher complexity when compared to related counterparts. Therefore, at the present time it is still difficult to annotate cyclic peptides MS/MS spectra. In this current work, an annotation program was developed for the annotation and characterization of tandem mass spectra obtained from cyclic peptides. This program, which we call MS-CPA is available as a web tool (http://lol.ucsd.edu/ms-cpa_v1/Input.py). Using this program, we have successfully annotated the sequence of representative cyclic peptides, such as seglitide, tyrothricin, desmethoxymajusculamide C, dudawalamide A, and cyclomarins, in a rapid manner and also were able to provide the first-pass structure evidence of a newly discovered natural product based on predicted sequence. This compound is not available in sufficient quantities for structural elucidation by other means such as NMR. In addition to the development of this cyclic annotation program, it was observed that some cyclic peptides fragmented in unexpected ways resulting in the scrambling of sequences. In summary, MS-CPA not only provides a platform for rapid confirmation and annotation of tandem mass spectrometry data obtained with cyclic peptides but also enables quantitative analysis of the ion intensities. This program facilitates cyclic peptide analysis, sequencing, and also acts as a useful tool to investigate the uncommon fragmentation phenomena of cyclic peptides and aids the

  5. May Cyclic Nucleotides Be a Source for Abiotic RNA Synthesis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Pino, Samanta; Botta, Giorgia; Saladino, Raffaele; di Mauro, Ernesto

    2011-12-01

    Nucleic bases are obtained by heating formamide in the presence of various catalysts. Formamide chemistry also allows the formation of acyclonucleosides and the phosphorylation of nucleosides in every possible position, also affording 2',3' and 3',5' cyclic forms. We have reported that 3',5' cyclic GMP and 3',5' cyclic AMP polymerize in abiotic conditions yielding short oligonucleotides. The characterization of this reaction is being pursued, several of its parameters have been determined and experimental caveats are reported. The yield of non-enzymatic polymerization of cyclic purine nucleotides is very low. Polymerization is strongly enhanced by the presence of base-complementary RNA sequences.

  6. Empty sella in children and adolescents with possible hypothalamic-pituitary disorders.

    PubMed

    Cacciari, E; Zucchini, S; Ambrosetto, P; Tani, G; Carlà, G; Cicognani, A; Pirazzoli, P; Sganga, T; Balsamo, A; Cassio, A

    1994-03-01

    Several computed tomographic scan studies have described empty sellae in children with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, is a more precise technique for visualizing the intrasellar content, such as the stalk and pituitary lobes. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we studied 339 children and adolescents (mean age +/- SD, 12.7 +/- 4.5 yr) with possible hypothalamic-pituitary disorders to ascertain the frequency of primary empty sella and examine its relationships with other intrasellar abnormalities, pituitary function, and adverse perinatal events. One hundred and ninety-three patients had isolated GH deficiency, 43 had multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, 10 had diabetes insipidus, 17 had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, 5 had idiopathic delayed puberty, 47 had precocious puberty, and 24 had other hypothalamic pituitary disorders of hyperfunction. One tenth (10.9%) of the patients (37 cases) had empty sella, with a marked variation of incidences among the disorders listed above. A statistically higher frequency of subjects with empty sellae was found only in patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency. Patients with and without empty sellae were not different in regard to age or sex. The incidence of empty sella in the various groups of patients was as follows: isolated GH deficiency, 8.8% (17 cases); multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, 34.9% (15 cases); hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, 5.9% (1 case); idiopathic delayed puberty, 40% (2 cases); and precocious puberty, 4.2% (2 cases). No patients with isolated diabetes insipidus or other hypothalamic-pituitary disorders had empty sellae. In the patients with empty sellae, abnormalities of the stalk or posterior lobe were found in 1 patient with isolated GH deficiency (5.9%), 13 patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (86.7%), and no patients with puberty disorders. Likewise, adverse perinatal events were found only in 1 patient with isolated GH deficiency and 9

  7. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism integrates nutrient and hormonal feedback to regulate energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stark, Romana; Reichenbach, Alex; Andrews, Zane B

    2015-12-15

    The maintenance of energy homeostasis requires the hypothalamic integration of nutrient feedback cues, such as glucose, fatty acids, amino acids, and metabolic hormones such as insulin, leptin and ghrelin. Although hypothalamic neurons are critical to maintain energy homeostasis research efforts have focused on feedback mechanisms in isolation, such as glucose alone, fatty acids alone or single hormones. However this seems rather too simplistic considering the range of nutrient and endocrine changes associated with different metabolic states, such as starvation (negative energy balance) or diet-induced obesity (positive energy balance). In order to understand how neurons integrate multiple nutrient or hormonal signals, we need to identify and examine potential intracellular convergence points or common molecular targets that have the ability to sense glucose, fatty acids, amino acids and hormones. In this review, we focus on the role of carnitine metabolism in neurons regulating energy homeostasis. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a novel means for neurons to facilitate and control both nutrient and hormonal feedback. In terms of nutrient regulation, carnitine metabolism regulates hypothalamic fatty acid sensing through the actions of CPT1 and has an underappreciated role in glucose sensing since carnitine metabolism also buffers mitochondrial matrix levels of acetyl-CoA, an allosteric inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase and hence glucose metabolism. Studies also show that hypothalamic CPT1 activity also controls hormonal feedback. We hypothesis that hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a key molecular target that can concurrently integrate nutrient and hormonal information, which is critical to maintain energy homeostasis. We also suggest this is relevant to broader neuroendocrine research as it predicts that hormonal signaling in the brain varies depending on current nutrient status. Indeed, the metabolic action of ghrelin, leptin or insulin

  8. Investigation of Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue of Polycrystalline Cu under Pure Compression Cyclic Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tzu-Yin Jean

    It is commonly accepted that fatigue crack is initiated under tensile fatigue stresses. However, practical examples demonstrate that cracks may initiate under pure compressive fluctuating loads, e.g. the failures observed in aircraft landing gear frames. As the mechanism of such failures is rarely investigated, there is very limited or non-existent knowledge pool on cyclic deformation response under pure compressive fatigue condition. Our recent work verified that fatigue cracks may nucleate from stress concentration sites under pure compression fatigue, but whether or not a form of stress concentration is always needed to initiate a crack remains uncertain. In this study, compression fatigue tests under different peak stresses were carried out on smooth bars of fully annealed OFHC Copper. The purpose of these tests is to investigate not only the cyclic deformation response but also the possibility of crack nucleation without the stress concentrator. Results showed that overall the cyclic stress-strain response and microstructural evolution of OFHC Copper under pure compression fatigue exhibits rather dissimilar behaviour compared to those under symmetrical fatigue. The specimens hardened rapidly within 10 cycles under pure compression fatigue unlike the gradual cyclic hardening behaviour in symmetrical fatigue with the same peak stress amplitude. Compressive cyclic creep behaviour was also observed. Moreover, TEM observation showed that only moderate slip activity was detectable on the surface instead of typical PSB features. The surface observations revealed that surface slip bands did not increase in number nor height as cycling progressed. In addition, surface roughening by grain boundary extrusion was detected to become more severe with further cycling. Therefore, the plastic strain accommodated within the samples was not mainly related to dislocation activities. Instead, the mechanism of cyclic creep response for pure compression fatigue was correlated and

  9. Monitoring thermoplastic composites under cyclic bending tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardi, Simone; Meola, Carosena; Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; Simeoli, Giorgio; Acierno, Domenico; Russo, Pietro

    2016-05-01

    This work is concerned with the use of infrared thermography to visualize temperature variations linked to thermo-elastic effects developing over the surface of a specimen undergoing deflection under bending tests. Several specimens are herein considered, which involve change of matrix and/or reinforcement. More specifically, the matrix is either a pure polypropylene, or a polypropylene added with a certain percentage of compatibilizing agent; the reinforcement is made of glass, or jute. Cyclic bending tests are carried out by the aid of an electromechanical actuator. Each specimen is viewed, during deflection, from one surface by an infrared imaging device. As main finding the different specimens display surface temperature variations which depend on the type of material in terms of both matrix and reinforcement.

  10. Statistical cyclicity of the supercontinent cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolf, T.; Coltice, N.; Tackley, P. J.

    2014-04-01

    Supercontinents like Pangea impose a first-order control on Earth's evolution as they modulate global heat loss, sea level, climate, and biodiversity. In a traditional view, supercontinents form and break up in a regular, perhaps periodic, manner in a cycle lasting several 100 Myr as reflected in the assembly times of Earth's major continental aggregations: Columbia, Rodinia, and Pangea. However, modern views of the supercontinent cycle propose a more irregular evolution on the basis of an improved understanding of the Precambrian geologic record. Here we use fully dynamic spherical mantle convection models featuring plate-like behavior and continental drift to investigate supercontinent formation and breakup. We further dismiss the concept of regularity but suggest a statistical cyclicity in which the supercontinent cycle may have a characteristic period imposed by mantle and lithosphere properties, but this is hidden in immense fluctuations between different cycles that arise from the chaotic nature of mantle flow.

  11. Cyclic covers that are not stably rational

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliot-Thélène, J.-L.; Pirutka, A.

    2016-08-01

    Using methods developed by Kollár, Voisin, ourselves and Totaro, we prove that a cyclic cover of P C^n, n≥ 3, of prime degree p, ramified along a very general hypersurface f(x_0,\\dots , x_n)=0 of degree mp, is not stably rational if m(p-1) . In dimension 3 we recover double covers of P^3 C ramified along a very general surface of degree 4 (Voisin) and double covers of P^3 C ramified along a very general surface of degree 6 (Beauville). We also find double covers of P^4 C ramified along a very general hypersurface of degree 6. This method also enables us to produce examples over a number field.

  12. Cyclic Vomiting Presentations Following Marijuana Liberalization in Colorado

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Howard S.; Anderson, John D.; Saghafi, Omeed; Heard, Kennon J.; Monte, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Case reports have described a syndrome of cyclic vomiting associated with chronic marijuana use, termed cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. The primary objective was to determine the prevalence of patients presenting with cyclic vomiting before and after the liberalization of medical marijuana in Colorado in 2009. The secondary objective was to describe the odds of marijuana use among cyclic vomiting visits in these same time periods. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of cyclic vomiting visits to the emergency department (ED) before and after marijuana liberalization. ED visits with International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, coding for cyclic vomiting or that met diagnostic criteria for cyclic vomiting by the Rome III criteria were included. Results The authors reviewed 2,574 visits and identified 36 patients diagnosed with cyclic vomiting over 128 visits. The prevalence of cyclic vomiting visits increased from 41 per 113,262 ED visits to 87 per 125,095 ED visits after marijuana liberalization, corresponding to a prevalence ratio of 1.92 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.33 to 2.79). Patients with cyclic vomiting in the postliberalization period were more likely to have marijuana use documented than patients in the preliberalization period (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% CI = 1.44 to 9.00). Conclusions The prevalence of cyclic vomiting presentations nearly doubled after the liberalization of medical marijuana. Patients presenting with cyclic vomiting in the postliberalization period were more likely to endorse marijuana use, although it is unclear whether this was secondary to increased marijuana use, more accurate marijuana reporting, or both. PMID:25903855

  13. Hypothalamic neuron projection to autonomic preganglionic levels related with glucose metabolism: a fluorescent labelling study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Portillo, F; Carrasco, M; Vallo, J J

    1996-06-01

    The location of hypothalamic paraventricular neurons projecting to sympathetic preganglionic levels and related to the autonomic regulation of various organs involved in glucose metabolism (OGM) was determined by ipsilateral injections of two fluorescent tracers, Diamidino Yellow into the left dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and Fast Blue into the left intermediolateral cell column of the T8-T9 spinal cord. Hypothalamospinal neurons were mainly located in the dorsal part of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) and the hypothalamobulbar neurons were most abundant in the ventral, medial and extreme lateral parts of the PVH. No double-labelled neurons were found in the hypothalamus. These results can help the knowledge of the neural hypothalamic network related with the autonomic hypothalamic control.

  14. [Effects of stimulation of the substantia nigra on the rage reaction evoked in the cat by hypothalamic stimulation].

    PubMed

    Benigno, A; Crescimanno, G; Piazza, P; Amato, G

    1984-10-30

    The effects of substantia nigra stimulation on the rage reaction evoked by hypothalamic activation were studied. The reference value of the rage reaction was the latency of the hissing, which was constant in all animals when hypothalamic stimulation was performed with the same parameters. Simultaneous activation of substantia nigra and hypothalamus determined a significant decrease of the hissing latency. The influence of the substantia nigra on the affective components of the aggressive behaviour in underlined. PMID:6518105

  15. The role of the substantia nigra on the rage reaction elicited by hypothalamic stimulation, in the cat.

    PubMed

    Piazza, P; Benigno, A; Crescimanno, G; Amato, G

    1985-06-15

    The effects of substantia nigra stimulation on the rage reaction evoked by hypothalamic activation were studied. The reference value of the rage reaction was the latency of the hissing, which was constant in all animals when hypothalamic stimulation was performed with the same parameters. Simultaneous activation of substantia nigra and hypothalamus determined a significant decrease in hissing latency. The influence of the substantia nigra on the affective components of the aggressive behavior is underlined. PMID:4040035

  16. Regulation of hypothalamic somatostatin and growth hormone releasing hormone mRNA levels by inhibin.

    PubMed

    Carro, E; Señarís, R M; Mallo, F; Diéguez, C

    1999-03-20

    Although it is well established that inhibin plays a major role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, its influence in the regulation of other neuroendocrine functions is still poorly understood. Recent results indicate that inhibin suppresses plasma GH levels, but its site of action is yet unknown. Therefore, in the present work we investigated the effects of inhibin on somatostatin and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) mRNA levels in the hypothalamus by 'in situ' hybridization. We found that inhibin administration (4, 12 and 24 h, i.c.v.) led to an increase in somatostatin mRNA levels in the periventricular nucleus, and to a decrease in GHRH mRNA content in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. These findings indicate that inhibin regulates the hypothalamic levels of somatostatin and GHRH mRNA.

  17. The impact of adipose tissue-derived factors on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis.

    PubMed

    Tsatsanis, Christos; Dermitzaki, Eirini; Avgoustinaki, Pavlina; Malliaraki, Niki; Mytaras, Vasilis; Margioris, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue produces factors, including adipokines, cytokines and chemokines which, when released, systemically exert endocrine effects on multiple tissues thereby affecting their physiology. Adipokines also affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis both centrally, at the hypothalamic-pituitary level, and peripherally acting on the gonads themselves. Among the adipokines, leptin, adiponectin, resistin, chemerin and the peptide kisspeptin have pleiotropic actions on the HPG axis affecting male and female fertility. Furthermore, adipokines and adipose tissue-produced factors readily affect the immune system resulting in inflammation, which in turn impact the HPG axis, thus evidencing a link between metabolic inflammation and fertility. In this review we provide an overview of the existing extensive bibliography on the crosstalk between adipose tissue-derived factors and the HPG axis, with particular focus on the impact of obesity and the metabolic syndrome on gonadal function and fertility.

  18. Effect of chronic D-fenfluramine administration on rat hypothalamic serotonin levels and release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of administering to rats (in doses of 1.25, 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg/day for 10 days) of an anorectic agent, D-fenfluramine, on the serotonin levels in hypothalamic tissue and on the in vitro release of serotonin by hypothalamic slices was investigated in rats which were sacrificed six days after the end of treatment. It was found that D-fenfuramine had no effect on tissue serotonin in doses from 1.25 to 5 mg/kg. However, given at 10 mg/kg level, serotonin led to a 22 percent decrease. The release of serotonin was found to be not affected by D-fenfluramine.

  19. Dynamic testing of hypothalamic-pituitary function in abnormalities of ovulation.

    PubMed

    Jones, G E; Wentz, A C; Rosenwaks, Z; Shoemaker, J

    1977-12-01

    A review of 26 unusual patients indicates that a combined luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LRH)-clomiphene test in conjunction with an estrogen provocation test not only was helpful in identifying underlying pathophysiology of anovulation but also proved useful in the clinical management of the patients. Dynamic testing per se does not establish a diagnosis but, in conjunction with history and other laboratory findings, it does make possible further subdivisions of groups of patients who otherwise appear similar, both clinically and from routine laboratory evaluations. It, therefore, tends to pinpoint a lesion and establish the area in which further tests should be made. It is concluded that the value of such investigations will be more evident as gynecologic endocrinology moves into investigation of the supratentorial control of hypothalamic function and as hypothalamic LRH becomes available as a therapeutic agent.

  20. In situ hybridization of oxytocin messenger RNA: macroscopic distribution and quantitation in rat hypothalamic cell groups

    SciTech Connect

    Burbach, J.P.; Voorhuis, T.A.; van Tol, H.H.; Ivell, R.

    1987-05-29

    Oxytocin mRNA was detected in the rat hypothalamus by in situ hybridization to a single stranded /sup 35/S-labelled DNA probe and the distribution of oxytocin mRNA-containing cell groups was studied at the macroscopic level. Specificity of hybridization was confirmed by comparison to vasopressin mRNA hybridization in parallel tissue sections. Cell groups containing oxytocin mRNA were confined to a set of hypothalamic cell groups, i.c. the supraoptic, paraventricular, anterior commissural nuclei, nucleus circularis and scattered hypothalamic islets. These cell groups displayed similar densities of autoradiographic signals indicating that the oxytocin gene is expressed at approximately the same average level at these various sites.

  1. Early life origins of metabolic disease: Developmental programming of hypothalamic pathways controlling energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dearden, Laura; Ozanne, Susan E

    2015-10-01

    A wealth of animal and human studies demonstrate that perinatal exposure to adverse metabolic conditions - be it maternal obesity, diabetes or under-nutrition - results in predisposition of offspring to develop obesity later in life. This mechanism is a contributing factor to the exponential rise in obesity rates. Increased weight gain in offspring exposed to maternal obesity is usually associated with hyperphagia, implicating altered central regulation of energy homeostasis as an underlying cause. Perinatal development of the hypothalamus (a brain region key to metabolic regulation) is plastic and sensitive to metabolic signals during this critical time window. Recent research in non-human primate and rodent models has demonstrated that exposure to adverse maternal environments impairs the development of hypothalamic structure and consequently function, potentially underpinning metabolic phenotypes in later life. This review summarizes our current knowledge of how adverse perinatal environments program hypothalamic development and explores the mechanisms that could mediate these effects.

  2. Hypothalamic, rectal, and muscle temperatures in exercising dogs - Effect of cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, B.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Kozlowski, S.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the mechanisms of performance prolongation during exercise is presented. Measurements were obtained of the rectal, muscle, and hypothalamic temperature of dogs during treadmill exercise at an ambient temperature of 22 + or - 1 C, with and without cooling by use of ice packs. In comparison with exercise without cooling, exercise with cooling was found to: (1) increase exercise duration from 90 + or - 14 to 145 + or - 15 min; (2) attenuate increases in hypothalamic, rectal and muscle temperature; (3) decrease respiratory and heart rates; and (4) lower blood lactic acid content. It is shown that although significant differences were found between the brain, core, and muscle temperatures during exercise with and without cooling, an inverse relation was observed between muscle temperature and the total duration of exercise. It is suggested that sustained muscle hyperthermia may have contributed to the limitation of working ability in exercise with and without cooling.

  3. Retino-hypothalamic-pineal hypothesis in the pathophysiology of primary headaches.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Vinod D

    2006-01-01

    Primary headaches include migraine, tension, cluster headaches, paroxysmal hemicrania and miscellaneous headaches unassociated with structural lesions. A putative role of the retino-hypothalamic-pineal (RHP) axis in the pathophysiology of primary headaches is reviewed in terms of (1) retinal dysfunction, (2) hypothalamic dysfunction and human circadian desynchrony, (3) pineal melatonin dysfunction and (4) rostral limbic dysfunction mediating the human stress response. Unified RHP hypothesis is proposed, suggesting that an acute, periodic or chronic, circadian desynchrony and dysfunction of the whole or part of the RHP axis is implicated in the pathophysiology of primary headaches. Supportive evidence for the RHP hypothesis, including recent PET studies showing changes in dorsal pons, hypothalamus and rostral limbic structures, is presented.

  4. The contribution of hypothalamic macroglia to the regulation of energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Buckman, Laura B.; Ellacott, Kate L. J.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamus is critical for the regulation of energy homeostasis. Genetic and pharmacologic studies have identified a number of key hypothalamic neuronal circuits that integrate signals controlling food intake and energy expenditure. Recently, studies have begun to emerge demonstrating a role for non-neuronal cell types in the regulation of energy homeostasis. In particular the potential importance of different glial cell types is increasingly being recognized. A number of studies have described changes in the activity of hypothalamic macroglia (principally astrocytes and tanycytes) in response to states of positive and negative energy balance, such as obesity and fasting. This article will review these studies and discuss how these findings are changing our understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which energy homeostasis is regulated. PMID:25374514

  5. High-Temperature Cyclic Oxidation Data, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Garlick, R. G.; Lowell, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    This first in a series of cyclic oxidation handbooks contains specific-weight-change-versus-time data and X-ray diffraction results derived from high-temperature cyclic tests on high-temperature, high-strength nickel-base gamma/gamma' and cobalt-base turbine alloys. Each page of data summarizes a complete test on a given alloy sample.

  6. Variation potential influence on photosynthetic cyclic electron flow in pea

    PubMed Central

    Sukhov, Vladimir; Surova, Lyubov; Sherstneva, Oksana; Katicheva, Lyubov; Vodeneev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow is an important component of the total photosynthetic electron flow and participates in adaptation to the action of stressors. Local leaf stimulation induces electrical signals, including variation potential (VP), which inactivate photosynthesis; however, their influence on cyclic electron flow has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate VP's influence on cyclic electron flow in pea (Pisum sativum L.). VP was induced in pea seedling leaves by local heating and measured in an adjacent, undamaged leaf by extracellular electrodes. CO2 assimilation was measured using a portable gas exchange measuring system. Photosystem I and II parameters were investigated using a measuring system for simultaneous assessment of P700 oxidation and chlorophyll fluorescence. Heating-induced VP reduced CO2 assimilation and electron flow through photosystem II. In response, cyclic electron flow rapidly decreased and subsequently slowly increased. Slow increases in cyclic flow were caused by decreased electron flow through photosystem II, which was mainly connected with VP-induced photosynthetic dark stage inactivation. However, direct influence by VP on photosystem I also participated in activation of cyclic electron flow. Thus, VP, induced by local leaf-heating, activated cyclic electron flow in undamaged leaves. This response was similar to photosynthetic changes observed under the direct action of stressors. Possible mechanisms of VP's influence on cyclic flow were discussed. PMID:25610447

  7. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED PREPARATION OF CYCLIC UREAS FROM DIAMINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rajender S. Varma* and Yong-Jin Kim
    Cyclic ureas are useful intermediates for a variety of pharmaceuticals and pesticides. One of the attractive approaches for the synthesis of cyclic ureas uses condensation of diamines with urea as a carbonyl source under dynamic evacuation. ...

  8. Advanced Developments in Cyclic Polymers: Synthesis, Applications, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yinghuai; Hosmane, Narayan S

    2015-01-01

    Due to the topological effect, cyclic polymers demonstrate different and unique physical and biological properties in comparison with linear counterparts having the same molecular-weight range. With advanced synthetic and analytic technologies, cyclic polymers with different topologies, e.g. multicyclic polymers, have been reported and well characterized. For example, various cyclic DNA and related structures, such as cyclic duplexes, have been prepared conveniently by click chemistry. These types of DNA have increased resistance to enzymatic degradation and have high thermodynamic stability, and thus, have potential therapeutic applications. In addition, cyclic polymers have also been used to prepare organic–inorganic hybrids for applications in catalysis, e.g. catalyst supports. Due to developments in synthetic technology, highly pure cyclic polymers could now be produced in large scale. Therefore, we anticipate discovering more applications in the near future. Despite their promise, cyclic polymers are still less explored than linear polymers like polyolefins and polycarbonates, which are widely used in daily life. Some critical issues, including controlling the molecular weight and finding suitable applications, remain big challenges in the cyclic-polymer field. This review briefly summarizes the commonly used synthetic methodologies and focuses more on the attractive functional materials and their biological properties and potential applications. PMID:26478835

  9. Modeling the involvement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axes in autoimmune and stress-related rheumatic syndromes in women.

    PubMed

    Crofford, L J; Jacobson, J; Young, E

    1999-03-01

    Autoimmune and stress-related rheumatic diseases are significantly more common in women than in men. Our group has focused on the role of two principal neuroendocrine axes, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, in this increased susceptibility to rheumatic disease. We review the physiology of the HPA and HPG axes and discuss their reciprocal interactions. Mechanisms by which hormones of the HPA and HPG axes influence the immune system and modulate the course of autoimmune inflammatory diseases in animal models of rheumatic disease are described. In addition, we review the data suggesting the importance of these neurohormonal systems in rheumatic diseases. These data provide insights into why women may be at increased risk and how we might better understand the mechanisms that provoke expression of rheumatic diseases in women. To advance research in this area, it is critical to develop methods to evaluate the function of the neuroendocrine axes. Secretion of both HPA and HPG axis hormones, particularly the hormones of the hypothalamus and anterior pituitary, is largely by intermittent pulses. In addition, the HPA axis exhibits a profound circadian, or near 24-hour, variation, and HPG axis hormones fluctuate over the monthly cycle. These factors make meaningful analysis of these axes quite complex. We discuss models used in the analyses of neuroendocrine axes and the use of challenge testing to assess the integrity of neuroendocrine axes.

  10. A time-course transcriptional kinetics of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes in zebrafish eleutheroembryos after exposure to norgestrel.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan-Qiu; Huang, Guo-Yong; Ying, Guang-Guo; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Jiang, Yu-Xia; Liu, Shan; Peng, Feng-Jiao

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of norgestrel on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axes in zebrafish eleutheroembryos. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to different concentrations of norgestrel (0 ng L(-1) , 5 ng L(-1) , 50 ng L(-1) , and 100 ng L(-1) ) for 144 h post fertilization (hpf), and the transcriptional profiles of the HPG and HPA axes were examined every day. Norgestrel modulated the expression of Pgr and Vtg1 messenger (m)RNAs mainly at 96 hpf for all treatment groups. In addition, norgestrel strongly altered the expression of Cyp11a1 mRNA above 5 ng L(-1) (significant upregulation from 48 hpf to 120 hpf and significant downregulation for 144 hpf). Norgestrel treatment could significantly induce expression of Cyp19a1a, Cyp11b, Gnrh2, Gnrh3, and Lhb mRNAs but inhibit transcripts of Hsd11b2 and Crh genes above 5 ng L(-1) at different time points. The transcriptional expression levels of Esr1, Ar, Star, Hsd17b3, Fshb, and Pomc were also mediated by 5 ng L(-1) norgestrel or higher during different exposure periods. Taken together, the overall results imply that the transcriptional changes in zebrafish eleutheroembryos may pose a potential effect on embryonic development, in particular in the brain and gonadogenesis.

  11. Impact of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake

    PubMed Central

    Drougard, Anne; Fournel, Audren; Valet, Philippe; Knauf, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamus is a key area involved in the control of metabolism and food intake via the integrations of numerous signals (hormones, neurotransmitters, metabolites) from various origins. These factors modify hypothalamic neurons activity and generate adequate molecular and behavioral responses to control energy balance. In this complex integrative system, a new concept has been developed in recent years, that includes reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a critical player in energy balance. ROS are known to act in many signaling pathways in different peripheral organs, but also in hypothalamus where they regulate food intake and metabolism by acting on different types of neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related protein (AgRP)/neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons. Hypothalamic ROS release is under the influence of different factors such as pancreatic and gut hormones, adipokines (leptin, apelin,…), neurotransmitters and nutrients (glucose, lipids,…). The sources of ROS production are multiple including NADPH oxidase, but also the mitochondria which is considered as the main ROS producer in the brain. ROS are considered as signaling molecules, but conversely impairment of this neuronal signaling ROS pathway contributes to alterations of autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine function, leading to metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review we focus our attention on factors that are able to modulate hypothalamic ROS release in order to control food intake and energy metabolism, and whose deregulations could participate to the development of pathological conditions. This novel insight reveals an original mechanism in the hypothalamus that controls energy balance and identify hypothalamic ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:25759638

  12. Endocrinology of the ageing female; the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis.

    PubMed

    Harris, I D; Santoro, N

    2011-09-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis goes through a series of complicated, but well coordinated changes as a women enters the menopausal transition. The reproductive consequences of these changes are obvious, but there are also a number of general health consequences as well. As our understanding of the complex inter-workings of the HPO axis evolves, we will be better able to predict menopausal events and create strategies and treatments to optimize women's health as the progress through the menopausal transition.

  13. Neuromedin B stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Boughton, C K; Patel, S A; Thompson, E L; Patterson, M; Curtis, A E; Amin, A; Chen, K; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R; Murphy, K G

    2013-11-10

    Neuromedin B (NMB) is a highly conserved bombesin-related peptide found in mammals. NMB mRNA is detected in the central nervous system (CNS) and is highly expressed in the rat hypothalamus, in particular the medial preoptic area and the arcuate nucleus. The mammalian bombesin family of receptors consists of three closely related G protein coupled receptors, BB1, BB2 and BB3. The BB1 receptor subtype has the highest affinity for NMB. NMB has well documented roles in the regulation of the thyroid axis and the stress axis in rats. However, there is little available data regarding the role of NMB in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. It is known that the NMB receptor is expressed in immortalised gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) releasing GT1-7 cells and murine forebrain GnRH neurons, and that anterior pituitary NMB-immunoreactivity is altered by changes in the sex steroid environment. The objective of these studies was thus to further investigate the effects of NMB on the HPG axis. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of NMB (10 nmol) to adult male rats significantly increased plasma luteinising hormone (LH) levels 30 min after injection (plasma LH ng/ml; saline 0.69±0.07, 10 nmol NMB 1.33±0.17, P<0.01). In vitro, NMB stimulated GnRH release from hypothalamic explants from male rats and from hypothalamic GT1-7 cells. NMB had no significant effect on LH release from anterior pituitary explants from male rats, or from pituitary LβT2 cells in vitro. These results suggest a previously unreported role for NMB in the stimulation of the HPG axis via hypothalamic GnRH. Further work is now required to determine the receptor mediating the effects of NMB on the reproductive axis and the physiological role of NMB in reproduction.

  14. Decreased hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion in male marathon runners.

    PubMed

    MacConnie, S E; Barkan, A; Lampman, R M; Schork, M A; Beitins, I Z

    1986-08-14

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to a deficiency in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone is common in female athletes ("hypothalamic amenorrhea"). It is not known, however, whether a similar phenomenon occurs in male athletes. We investigated the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in six highly trained male marathon runners (who were running 125 to 200 km per week). The mean (+/- SEM) frequency of spontaneous luteinizing hormone pulses was diminished in the runners, as compared with healthy controls (2.2 +/- 0.48 vs. 3.6 +/- 0.24 pulses per eight hours, P less than 0.05). The amplitude of the pulses was also low in the runners (0.9 +/- 0.24 vs. 1.6 +/- 0.15 mlU per milliliter; P less than 0.05), and the responses of luteinizing hormone to gradually increasing doses of exogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone were decreased. Plasma testosterone levels were similar in the two groups and increased equally in response to an intramuscular injection of 2000 units of human chorionic gonadotropin. During short-term intense physical exercise (a treadmill run at 72 percent of maximal oxygen consumption for two hours), the plasma gonadotropin levels in the athletes remained stable, but significant elevations in plasma levels of cortisol, prolactin, and testosterone occurred. We conclude that highly trained male athletes, like their female counterparts, may have a deficiency of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone. This condition may be caused by the prolonged, repetitive elevations of gonadal steroids and other hormones known to suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion that are elicited by their daily exercise.

  15. Autoimmune diseases of the adrenal glands, parathyroid glands, gonads, and hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

    PubMed

    Muir, A; Maclaren, N K

    1991-09-01

    Autoimmunity directed against the adrenal glands, parathyroid glands, gonads, and hypothalamic-pituitary axis can arise in isolation or as part of a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. Affected patients can be asymptomatic, but they may also suffer significant morbidity or even mortality. Currently, treatment is restricted largely to hormone replacement when end-organ destruction is almost complete. As our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune endocrinopathies improves, it is probable that early patient detection will become practical and trials of protective immunotherapies entertained.

  16. Sex and alcohol: the effects of alcohol on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Greene, L W; Hollander, C S

    1980-01-01

    Effects of alcohol on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are complex. Those at the gonadal level are best defined in studies such as those presented in this issue. However, there is an accumulating body of data supporting central effects of alcohol. The precise locus or loci is not certain. Further investigations probably including in vitro methodologies are likely to enhance our knowledge in this area. Our understanding of the effects of alcohol in the human female is especially limited.

  17. Social regulation of gene expression in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Maruska, Karen P; Fernald, Russell D

    2011-12-01

    Reproduction is a critically important event in every animals' life and in all vertebrates is controlled by the brain via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. In many species, this axis, and hence reproductive fitness, can be profoundly influenced by the social environment. Here, we review how the reception of information in a social context causes genomic changes at each level of the HPG axis.

  18. Hypothalamic suppression decreases bone strength before and after puberty in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Yingling, Vanessa; Elle Saine, McKayla; Joshi, Rupali

    2009-06-01

    The incidence of menstrual irregularities, both primary and secondary amenorrhea, has been reported to be as high as 60%, with the highest incidence in younger athletes, suggesting possible adverse effects on bone development. It was hypothesized that in a rat model, suppressed hypothalamic activity via a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist (GnRH-a) before onset of puberty would result in a relatively larger bone strength deficit compared with suppression after puberty. Hypothalamic suppression was achieved by providing GnRH injections. Animals received injections for 25 days either before puberty (pre group) (age 23-46 days) or after puberty (post group) (age 65-90 days). Body weights and uterine weights were measured. Serum estradiol was assayed. Mechanical strength of the right femora and histomorphometry of the left femur were measured. Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis was confirmed by significant atrophy of uterine tissue and suppressed estradiol levels. The peak moment was significantly lower in the pre and post GnRH-a groups compared with control. The percentage difference of the average peak moment and stiffness values from the respective age-matched control groups yielded a greater percentage difference in the pre group. The cortical area was less in the GnRH-a-treated groups, but no significant difference between the relative deficits between pre and post groups were found. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis suppression before puberty resulted in a significantly larger deficit in mechanical strength compared with postpubertal animals. The time before puberty may represent a time when skeletal strength is more compromised. Women experience both primary and secondary amenorrhea; however, the treatment may need to be different for each condition.

  19. Aminoprocalcitonin-mediated suppression of feeding involves the hypothalamic melanocortin system.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Eva; Maldonado, Rosario; Miñano, Francisco J

    2013-06-15

    Aminoprocalcitonin (N-PCT), a neuroendocrine peptide encoded by the calcitonin-I (CALC-I) gene, suppresses food intake when administered centrally in rats. However, the neural pathways underlying this effect remain unclear. N-PCT and calcitonin receptors (CT-R) have been identified in hypothalamic regions involved in energy homeostasis, including the arcuate nucleus (ARC). Here, we hypothesized an involvement of the hypothalamic ARC in mediating the anorexic effects of central N-PCT based on its content of peptidergic neurons involved in feeding and its expression of N-PCT and CT-R. Fasting strongly reduced expression of the N-PCT precursor gene CALC-I in the ARC, and central immunoneutralization of endogenous N-PCT increased food intake. Intracerebroventricular administration of N-PCT reduced food intake in fed and fasted rats, and its effect was attenuated by a neutralizing anti-N-PCT antibody. Immunohistochemistry for N-PCT showed that it is expressed in astrocytes and neurons in the ARC and is colocalized with anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. Fasting reduced coexpression of N-PCT and POMC, and N-PCT administration activated hypothalamic neurons, including rostral POMC neurons. We also found that N-PCT stimulates POMC mRNA expression in fed and fasted rats, whereas it reduced the expression of orexigenic peptides neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) only in fasted rats in which those mRNAs are normally elevated. Finally, we showed that the melanocortin-3/4 receptor antagonist SHU 9119 attenuates the intake-suppressive effect of N-PCT. These data demonstrate that hypothalamic N-PCT is involved in control of energy balance and that its anorexigenic effects are mediated through the melanocortin system.

  20. Endotoxemia-induced muscle wasting is associated with the change of hypothalamic neuropeptides in rats.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kaipeng; Yu, Wenkui; Lin, Zhiliang; Tan, Shanjun; Bai, Xiaowu; Gao, Tao; Xi, Fengchan; Li, Ning

    2014-12-01

    In critical patients, sepsis-induced muscle wasting is considered to be an important contributor to complications and mortality. Previous work mainly focuses on the peripheral molecular mechanism of muscle degradation, however little evidence exists for the role of central nervous system in the process. In the present study, we, for the first time, characterized the relationship between muscle wasting and central neuropeptide changes in a septic model. Thirty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline. Twelve, 24 and 48 hrs after injection, skeletal muscle and hypothalamus tissues were harvested. Muscle wasting was measured by the mRNA expression of two E3 ubiquitin ligases, muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF-1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), as well as 3-methyl-histidine (3-MH) and tyrosine release. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and inflammatory marker expressions were also measured in three time points. LPS injection caused an increase expression of MuRF-1 and MAFbx, and a significant higher release of 3-MH and tyrosine. Hypothalamic neuropeptides, proopiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) presented a dynamic change after LPS injection. Also, hypothalamic inflammatory markers, interleukin-1 β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) increased substantially after LPS administration. Importantly, the expressions of POMC, AgRP and CART were well correlated with muscle atrophy gene, MuRF-1 expression. These findings suggest hypothalamic peptides and inflammation may participate in the sepsis-induced muscle wasting, but the exact mechanism needs further study.