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Sample records for off-shell axial anomaly

  1. Conformal anomaly and off-shell extensions of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Krzysztof A.; Nicolai, Hermann

    2017-08-01

    The gauge dependence of the conformal anomaly for spin-3/2 and spin-2 fields in nonconformal supergravities has been a long standing puzzle. In this paper we argue that the "correct" gauge choice is the one that follows from requiring all terms that would imply a violation of the Wess-Zumino consistency condition to be absent in the counterterm, because otherwise the usual link between the anomaly and the one-loop divergence becomes invalid. Remarkably, the "good" choice of gauge is the one that confirms our previous result [K. A. Meissner and H. Nicolai, Phys. Lett. B 772, 169 (2017)., 10.1016/j.physletb.2017.06.031] that a complete cancellation of conformal anomalies in D =4 can only be achieved for N -extended (Poincaré) supergravities with N ≥5 .

  2. Axial vector Z‧ and anomaly cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Keung, Wai-Yee; Tsao, Kuo-Hsing; Unwin, James

    2017-05-01

    Whilst the prospect of new Z‧ gauge bosons with only axial couplings to the Standard Model (SM) fermions is widely discussed, examples of anomaly-free renormalisable models are lacking in the literature. We look to remedy this by constructing several motivated examples. Specifically, we consider axial vectors which couple universally to all SM fermions, as well as those which are generation-specific, leptophilic, and leptophobic. Anomaly cancellation typically requires the presence of new coloured and charged chiral fermions, and we argue that in a large class of models masses of these new states are expected to be comparable to that of the axial vector. Finally, an axial vector mediator could provide a portal between SM and hidden sector states, and we also consider the possibility that the axial vector couples to dark matter. If the dark matter relic density is set due to freeze-out via the axial vector, this strongly constrains the parameter space.

  3. Axial gravity, massless fermions and trace anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Cvitan, M.; Prester, P. Dominis; Pereira, A. Duarte; Giaccari, S.; Štemberga, T.

    2017-08-01

    This article deals with two main topics. One is odd parity trace anomalies in Weyl fermion theories in a 4d curved background, the second is the introduction of axial gravity. The motivation for reconsidering the former is to clarify the theoretical background underlying the approach and complete the calculation of the anomaly. The reference is in particular to the difference between Weyl and massless Majorana fermions and to the possible contributions from tadpole and seagull terms in the Feynman diagram approach. A first, basic, result of this paper is that a more thorough treatment, taking account of such additional terms and using dimensional regularization, confirms the earlier result. The introduction of an axial symmetric tensor besides the usual gravitational metric is instrumental to a different derivation of the same result using Dirac fermions, which are coupled not only to the usual metric but also to the additional axial tensor. The action of Majorana and Weyl fermions can be obtained in two different limits of such a general configuration. The results obtained in this way confirm the previously obtained ones.

  4. The off-shell axial anomaly via the {gamma}*{pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma} transition

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Frank, M.R.; Mitchell, K.L.; Tandy, P.C.

    1995-08-01

    The {gamma}*{pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma} form factor, F{sup {pi}0{gamma}{gamma}}(s), including the extension off the pion mass-shell, is calculated in generalized impulse approximation within the Dyson-Schwinger Equation framework used to provide an excellent description of the pion charge form factor, described above. This anomalous process is a fundamentally important characteristic of the quantum field theoretical structure of QCD because it signals the breaking of the U{sub A}(1) symmetry by quantization. This form factor was measured by the CELLO collaboration at the PETRA storage ring using the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}. There is a letter-of-intent at CEBAF to remeasure this form factor in virtual Compton scattering from a proton target. In this case a (virtual) pion is supplied by the target and a final real photon selected through the excellent missing mass spectrometry available at CEBAF. An extrapolation to the pion mass shell will be needed to deduce the physical transition form factor. Our calculation shows that the dependence on the virtual-pion momentum is smooth and well described by a simple suppression factor, which is qualitatively independent of the details of the pion interpolating field. The correct mass-shell value of this form factor is naturally generated in our approach and the q{sup 2} dependence is in accord with the available CELLO data. No parameters are adjusted to achieve this; the are fixed at the values derived in the study of F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}). A significant result of our study is that for this anomalous process, soft nonperturbative effects remain significant for Q{sup 2} < 20 GeV{sup 2}. A paper describing this work was submitted for publication.

  5. Off-shell amplitudes and Grassmannians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, L. V.; Onishchenko, A. I.

    2017-09-01

    The Grassmannian representation for gauge-invariant amplitudes for arbitrary number of legs with one of them being off-shell is derived for the case of N = 4 SYM. The obtained formula are successfully checked against known BCFW results for MHV n , NMHV4 and NMHV5 amplitudes.

  6. Off-shell Poincaré supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Daniel Z.; Roest, Diederik; Van Proeyen, Antoine

    2017-02-01

    We present the action and transformation rules of Poincaré supergravity coupled to chiral multiplets ( z α , χ α , h α ) with off-shell auxiliary fields. Starting from the geometric formulation of the superconformal theory with auxiliary fields, we derive the Poincaré counterpart by gauge-fixing the Weyl and chiral symmetry and S-supersymmetry. We show how this transition is facilitated by retaining explicit target-space covariance. Our results form a convenient starting point to study models with constrained superfields, including general matter-coupled de Sitter supergravity.

  7. BEC-BCS crossover driven by the axial anomaly in the NJL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuki, Hiroaki; Baym, Gordon; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2010-12-01

    We study the QCD phase structure in the three-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, incorporating the chiral-diquark interplay due to the axial anomaly. We demonstrate that for a certain range of model parameters, the low temperature critical point predicted by a Ginzburg-Landau analysis appears in the phase diagram. In addition, we show that the axial anomaly presents a new scenario for a possible BEC-BCS crossover in the color-flavor locked phase of QCD.

  8. Off-shell hydrodynamics from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, Michael; Glorioso, Paolo; Liu, Hong; Wang, Yifan

    2016-02-18

    In this article, we outline a program for obtaining an action principle for dissipative fluid dynamics by considering the holographic Wilsonian renormalization group applied to systems with a gravity dual. As a first step, in this paper we restrict to systems with a non-dissipative horizon. By integrating out gapped degrees of freedom in the bulk gravitational system between an asymptotic boundary and a horizon, we are led to a formulation of hydrodynamics where the dynamical variables are not standard velocity and temperature fields, but the relative embedding of the boundary and horizon hypersurfaces. At zeroth order, this action reduces to that proposed by Dubovsky et al. as an off-shell formulation of ideal fluid dynamics.

  9. Off-shell hydrodynamics from holography

    DOE PAGES

    Crossley, Michael; Glorioso, Paolo; Liu, Hong; ...

    2016-02-18

    In this article, we outline a program for obtaining an action principle for dissipative fluid dynamics by considering the holographic Wilsonian renormalization group applied to systems with a gravity dual. As a first step, in this paper we restrict to systems with a non-dissipative horizon. By integrating out gapped degrees of freedom in the bulk gravitational system between an asymptotic boundary and a horizon, we are led to a formulation of hydrodynamics where the dynamical variables are not standard velocity and temperature fields, but the relative embedding of the boundary and horizon hypersurfaces. At zeroth order, this action reduces tomore » that proposed by Dubovsky et al. as an off-shell formulation of ideal fluid dynamics.« less

  10. Electromagnetic axial anomaly in a generalized linear sigma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariborz, Amir H.; Jora, Renata

    2017-06-01

    We construct the electromagnetic anomaly effective term for a generalized linear sigma model with two chiral nonets, one with a quark-antiquark structure, the other one with a four-quark content. We compute in the leading order of this framework the decays into two photons of six pseudoscalars: π0(137 ), π0(1300 ), η (547 ), η (958 ), η (1295 ) and η (1760 ). Our results agree well with the available experimental data.

  11. Experimental signatures of the mixed axial-gravitational anomaly in the Weyl semimetal NbP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooth, Johannes; Niemann, Anna C.; Meng, Tobias; Grushin, Adolfo G.; Landsteiner, Karl; Gotsmann, Bernd; Menges, Fabian; Schmidt, Marcus; Shekhar, Chandra; Süß, Vicky; Hühne, Ruben; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2017-07-01

    The conservation laws, such as those of charge, energy and momentum, have a central role in physics. In some special cases, classical conservation laws are broken at the quantum level by quantum fluctuations, in which case the theory is said to have quantum anomalies. One of the most prominent examples is the chiral anomaly, which involves massless chiral fermions. These particles have their spin, or internal angular momentum, aligned either parallel or antiparallel with their linear momentum, labelled as left and right chirality, respectively. In three spatial dimensions, the chiral anomaly is the breakdown (as a result of externally applied parallel electric and magnetic fields) of the classical conservation law that dictates that the number of massless fermions of each chirality are separately conserved. The current that measures the difference between left- and right-handed particles is called the axial current and is not conserved at the quantum level. In addition, an underlying curved space-time provides a distinct contribution to a chiral imbalance, an effect known as the mixed axial-gravitational anomaly, but this anomaly has yet to be confirmed experimentally. However, the presence of a mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly has recently been tied to thermoelectrical transport in a magnetic field, even in flat space-time, suggesting that such types of mixed anomaly could be experimentally probed in condensed matter systems known as Weyl semimetals. Here, using a temperature gradient, we observe experimentally a positive magneto-thermoelectric conductance in the Weyl semimetal niobium phosphide (NbP) for collinear temperature gradients and magnetic fields that vanishes in the ultra-quantum limit, when only a single Landau level is occupied. This observation is consistent with the presence of a mixed axial-gravitational anomaly, providing clear evidence for a theoretical concept that has so far eluded experimental detection.

  12. Experimental signatures of the mixed axial-gravitational anomaly in the Weyl semimetal NbP.

    PubMed

    Gooth, Johannes; Niemann, Anna C; Meng, Tobias; Grushin, Adolfo G; Landsteiner, Karl; Gotsmann, Bernd; Menges, Fabian; Schmidt, Marcus; Shekhar, Chandra; Süß, Vicky; Hühne, Ruben; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2017-07-19

    The conservation laws, such as those of charge, energy and momentum, have a central role in physics. In some special cases, classical conservation laws are broken at the quantum level by quantum fluctuations, in which case the theory is said to have quantum anomalies. One of the most prominent examples is the chiral anomaly, which involves massless chiral fermions. These particles have their spin, or internal angular momentum, aligned either parallel or antiparallel with their linear momentum, labelled as left and right chirality, respectively. In three spatial dimensions, the chiral anomaly is the breakdown (as a result of externally applied parallel electric and magnetic fields) of the classical conservation law that dictates that the number of massless fermions of each chirality are separately conserved. The current that measures the difference between left- and right-handed particles is called the axial current and is not conserved at the quantum level. In addition, an underlying curved space-time provides a distinct contribution to a chiral imbalance, an effect known as the mixed axial-gravitational anomaly, but this anomaly has yet to be confirmed experimentally. However, the presence of a mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly has recently been tied to thermoelectrical transport in a magnetic field, even in flat space-time, suggesting that such types of mixed anomaly could be experimentally probed in condensed matter systems known as Weyl semimetals. Here, using a temperature gradient, we observe experimentally a positive magneto-thermoelectric conductance in the Weyl semimetal niobium phosphide (NbP) for collinear temperature gradients and magnetic fields that vanishes in the ultra-quantum limit, when only a single Landau level is occupied. This observation is consistent with the presence of a mixed axial-gravitational anomaly, providing clear evidence for a theoretical concept that has so far eluded experimental detection.

  13. Off-shell two-loop QCD vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracey, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    We calculate the triple gluon, ghost-gluon and quark-gluon vertex functions at two loops in the MS¯ scheme in the chiral limit for an arbitrary linear covariant gauge when the external legs are all off shell.

  14. Off-Shell Amplitudes for Nonoriented Closed Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappiello, Luigi; Marotta, Raffaele; Pettorino, Roberto; Pezzella, Franco

    In the context of the bosonic closed string theory, by using the operatorial formalism, we give a simple expression of the off-shell amplitude with an arbitrary number of external massless states inserted on the Klein bottle.

  15. Off-shell massive N = 1 supermultiplets in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzenko, Sergei M.; Tsulaia, Mirian

    2017-01-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the construction of new off-shell higher spin N = 1 supermultiplets in three spacetime dimensions. We elaborate on the gauge prepotentials and linearised super-Cotton tensors for higher spin N = 1 superconformal geometry and propose compensating superfields required to formulate off-shell massless higher spin supermultiplets. The corresponding gauge-invariant actions are worked out explicitly using an auxiliary oscillator realisation. We construct, for the first time, off-shell massive higher spin supermultiplets. The gauge-invariant actions for these supermultiplets are obtained by adding Chern-Simons like mass terms (that is, higher spin extensions of the linearised action for N = 1 conformal supergravity) to the actions for the massless supermultiplets. For each of the massive gravitino and supergravity multiplets, we propose two dually equivalent formulations.

  16. A Wide Spectrum of Axial Mesodermal Dysplasia Complex With Rhombencephalic Anomaly: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang-Won; Seo, Jeoung-Hwan; Ko, Myoung-Hwan; Won, Yu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Axial mesodermal dysplasia complex (AMDC) arises in variable combinations of craniocaudal anomalies such as musculoskeletal deformities, neuroschisis, or rhombencephalic developmental disorders. To the best of our knowledge, the co-existence of AMDC with associated musculoskeletal anomalies, medullary neuroschisis with mirror movements, and cranial nerve anomalies has not yet been reported. Here, we report the case of a 4-year-old boy whose clinical features were suggestive of Goldenhar syndrome and Poland syndrome with Sprengel deformity. Moreover, he showed mirror movements in his hands suspected of rhombencephalic malformation, and infranuclear-type facial nerve palsy of the left side of his face, the opposite side to the facial anomalies of Goldenhar syndrome. After conducting radiological studies, he was diagnosed with medullary neuroschisis without pontine malformations and Klippel-Feil syndrome with rib anomalies. Based on these findings, we propose that clinical AMDC can be accompanied by a wide variety of musculoskeletal defects and variable degrees of central nervous system malformations. Therefore, in addition to detailed physical and neurological examinations, imaging studies should be considered in AMDC. PMID:26949683

  17. Off-Shell Supersymmetry versus Hermiticity in Superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Berkovits, N.

    1996-09-01

    We point out that off-shell four-dimensional spacetime supersymmetry implies strange Hermiticity properties for the {ital N}=1 Ramond-Neveu-Schwarz superstring. However, these Hermiticity properties become natural when the {ital N}=1 superstring is embedded into an {ital N}=2 superstring. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Coexistence of extra-axial cavernous malformation and cerebellar developmental venous anomaly in the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Liu, Weidong; Zhao, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The coexistence of cavernous malformations (CMs) and developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) is exceedingly rare. To the authors' knowledge, only one case of CPA CM with concurrence of a neighboring DVA has been reported to date. The authors presented such vascular malformations in a 36-year-old man with progressive CPA syndrome during the course of six weeks. Preoperative neuroimaging suggested the diagnosis of an extra-axial hemorrhagic lesion in the CPA cistern with a cerebellar DVA in the close vicinity. The lesion was totally removed with the DVA untouched and was confirmed to be extra-axial in intimate contact with only the VII-VIII complex and the draining veins of DVA. Pathology revealed a CM. The patient underwent partial improvement in neurological function postoperatively. The radiographic follow-up at one year revealed no recurrence. CMs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any extra-axial hemorrhagic mass, especially with a DVA in the proximity. The coexistence of CM and DVA in CPA, although maybe just a coincidence, suggests the possibility of a new subtype of extra-axial CPA CM secondary to a preexisting DVA. A long-term follow-up is justified in discovering the potential mechanism and biology of such uncommon vascular malformations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Halden In-Reactor Test to Exhibit PWR Axial Offset Anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    P.Bennett, B. Beverskog, R.Suther

    2004-12-01

    Many PWRs have encountered the axial offset anomaly (AOA) since the early 1990s, and these experiences have been reported widely. AOA is a phenomenon associated with localized boron hideout in corrosion product deposits (crud) on fuel surfaces. Several mitigation approaches have been developed or are underway to either delay the onset of AOA or avoid it entirely. This study describes the first phase of an experimental program designed to investigate whether the use of enriched boric acid (EBA) in the reactor coolant can mitigate AOA.

  20. Malformations of the axial skeleton in Museum Vrolik I: homeotic transformations and numerical anomalies.

    PubMed

    Oostra, Roelof-Jan; Hennekam, Raoul C M; de Rooij, Laurens; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2005-04-30

    The Museum Vrolik collection of anatomical specimens in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, comprises over 5,000 specimens of human and animal anatomy, embryology, pathology, and congenital anomalies. Recently, we rediagnosed a subset of the collection comprising dried human trunk skeletons and cranial base preparations presenting with homeotic transformations (vertebral phenotypic shifts) and numerical vertebral anomalies. We identified 11 trunk skeletons with either anterior or posterior homeotic transformations (AHT or PHT), 5 trunk skeletons with either less or more than the normal number of vertebrae, and well over a hundred cranial base preparations with either AHT (atlas-assimilation) or PHT (occipital vertebra). We found that, although homeotic transformations and numerical anomalies are distinct conditions, both can be described in terms of mismatch between homeotic patterning and morphological segmentation of the paraxial mesoderm. Therefore these two processes are perhaps not as tightly linked as they may seem on the basis of recent molecular studies. In homeotic transformations there is a constant mismatch between homeotic patterning and morphological segmentation throughout the affected region of the vertebral column. In numerical anomalies there is a variable mismatch between homeotic patterning and morphological segmentation, either because of stretching or squeezing of the homeotic pattern or because of oligo- or polysegmentation of the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Homeotic transformations of the axial skeleton have an incidence of about 1%-5%, apart from their occurrence in malformation syndromes. Of the various etiological possibilities, explaining their frequent but mostly sporadic occurrence, maternal hyperthermia seems an attractive candidate.

  1. Off-shell superconformal higher spin multiplets in four dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzenko, Sergei M.; Manvelyan, Ruben; Theisen, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    We formulate off-shell N = 1 superconformal higher spin multiplets in four spacetime dimensions and briefly discuss their coupling to conformal supergravity. As an example, we explicitly work out the coupling of the superconformal gravitino multiplet to conformal supergravity. The corresponding action is super-Weyl invariant for arbitrary supergravity backgrounds. However, it is gauge invariant only if the supersymmetric Bach tensor vanishes. This is similar to linearised conformal supergravity in curved background.

  2. Off-shell covariantization of algebroid gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, Ursula; Heller, Marc Andre; Ikeda, Noriaki; Kaneko, Tomokazu; Watamura, Satoshi

    2017-08-01

    We present a generalized method to construct field strengths and gauge symmetries that yield a Yang-Mills-type action with Lie n-algebroid gauge symmetry. The procedure makes use of off-shell covariantization in a supergeometric setting. We apply this method to the system of a 1-form gauge field and scalar fields with Lie n-algebroid gauge symmetry. We work out some characteristic examples.

  3. Phase structure, collective modes, and the axial anomaly in dense QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Tachibana, Motoi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Baym, Gordon

    2007-10-01

    Using a general Ginzburg-Landau effective Lagrangian, we study the topological structure and low-lying collective modes of dense QCD having both chiral and diquark condensates, for two and three massless flavors. As we found earlier, the QCD axial anomaly acts as an external field applied to the chiral condensate in a color superconductor and, as a new critical point emerges, leads to a crossover between the broken chiral symmetry and color superconducting phases. At intermediate densities where both chiral and diquark condensates are present, we derive a generalized Gell-Mann Oakes-Renner relation between the masses of pseudoscalar bosons and the magnitude of the chiral and diquark condensates. We show explicitly the continuity of the ordinary pion at low densities to a generalized pion at high densities.

  4. Weak coupling expansion of massless QCD with a Ginsparg-Wilson fermion and axial U(1) anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikukawa, Yoshio; Yamada, Atsushi

    1999-02-01

    We discuss the weak coupling expansion of massless QCD with the Dirac operator which is derived by Neuberger based on the overlap formalism and satisfies the Ginsparg-Wilson relation. The axial U(1) anomaly associated to the chiral transformation proposed by Lüscher is calculated as an application and is shown to have the correct form of the topological charge density for perturbative backgrounds. The coefficient of the anomaly is evaluated as a winding number related to a certain five-dimensional fermion propagator.

  5. Leading singularities and off-shell conformal integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, James; Duhr, Claude; Eden, Burkhard; Heslop, Paul; Pennington, Jeffrey; Smirnov, Vladimir A.

    2013-08-01

    The three-loop four-point function of stress-tensor multiplets in super Yang-Mills theory contains two so far unknown, off-shell, conformal integrals, in addition to the known, ladder-type integrals. In this paper we evaluate the unknown integrals, thus obtaining the three-loop correlation function analytically. The integrals have the generic structure of rational functions multiplied by (multiple) polylogarithms. We use the idea of leading singularities to obtain the rational coefficients, the symbol — with an appropriate ansatz for its structure — as a means of characterising multiple polylogarithms, and the technique of asymptotic expansion of Feynman integrals to obtain the integrals in certain limits. The limiting behaviour uniquely fixes the symbols of the integrals, which we then lift to find the corresponding polylogarithmic functions. The final formulae are numerically confirmed. The techniques we develop can be applied more generally, and we illustrate this by analytically evaluating one of the integrals contributing to the same four-point function at four loops. This example shows a connection between the leading singularities and the entries of the symbol.

  6. Leading singularities and off-shell conformal integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, James; Duhr, Claude; Eden, Burkhard; Heslop, Paul; Pennington, Jeffrey; Smirnov, Vladimir A.

    2013-08-29

    The three-loop four-point function of stress-tensor multiplets in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory contains two so far unknown, off-shell, conformal integrals, in addition to the known, ladder-type integrals. In our paper we evaluate the unknown integrals, thus obtaining the three-loop correlation function analytically. The integrals have the generic structure of rational functions multiplied by (multiple) polylogarithms. We use the idea of leading singularities to obtain the rational coefficients, the symbol — with an appropriate ansatz for its structure — as a means of characterising multiple polylogarithms, and the technique of asymptotic expansion of Feynman integrals to obtain the integrals in certain limits. The limiting behaviour uniquely fixes the symbols of the integrals, which we then lift to find the corresponding polylogarithmic functions. The final formulae are numerically confirmed. Furthermore, we develop techniques that can be applied more generally, and we illustrate this by analytically evaluating one of the integrals contributing to the same four-point function at four loops. This example shows a connection between the leading singularities and the entries of the symbol.

  7. Anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Anomalies have a diverse impact on many aspects of physical phenomena. The role of anomalies in determining physical structure from the amplitude for decay to the foundations of superstring theory will be reviewed. 36 refs.

  8. Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

  9. Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

  10. All (4,0): Sigma models with (4,0) off-shell supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Chris; Lindström, Ulf

    2017-08-01

    Off-shell (4, 0) supermultiplets in 2-dimensions are formulated. These are used to construct sigma models whose target spaces are vector bundles over manifolds that are hyperkähler with torsion. The off-shell supersymmetry implies that the complex structures are simultaneously integrable and allows us to write actions using extended superspace and projective superspace, giving an explicit construction of the target space geometries.

  11. Experimental Investigation of the Root Cause Mechanism and Effectiveness of Mitigating Actions for Axial Offset Anomaly in Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Said Abdel-Khalik

    2005-07-02

    Axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors refers to the presence of a significantly larger measured negative axial offset deviation than predicted by core design calculations. The neutron flux depression in the upper half of high-power rods experiencing significant subcooled boiling is believed to be caused by the concentration of boron species within the crud layer formed on the cladding surface. Recent investigations of the root-cause mechanism for AOA [1,2] suggest that boron build-up on the fuel is caused by precipitation of lithium metaborate (LiBO2) within the crud in regions of subcooled boiling. Indirect evidence in support of this hypothesis was inferred from operating experience at Callaway, where lithium return and hide-out were, respectively, observed following power reductions and power increases when AOA was present. However, direct evidence of lithium metaborate precipitation within the crud has, heretofore, not been shown because of its retrograde solubility. To this end, this investigation has been undertaken in order to directly verify or refute the proposed root-cause mechanism of AOA, and examine the effectiveness of possible mitigating actions to limit its impact in high power PWR cores.

  12. Boundary behaviors for general off-shell amplitudes in Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Chen, Gang

    2013-07-01

    The boundary behavior of amplitudes—the amplitudes’ behavior under a large Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten (BCFW) momenta deformation for a pair of legs—in Yang-Mills theory is of great interest recently. In this article we analyze the boundary behavior of off-shell Yang-Mills amplitudes in Feynman gauge. The deformed legs can be either adjacent or nonadjacent. We find that a set of reduced vertices can be used to simplify the analysis and calculation of the boundary behavior of amplitudes. Boundary behavior for amplitudes with adjacent BCFW deformation is read off from the reduced vertices. Then we discover a relationship between a permutation sum with fixed color ordering of the legs and the improved boundary behavior for the off-shell amplitudes with a nonadjacent BCFW momenta deformation. Based on the boundary behavior, we generalize the BCFW recursion relation to calculate general tree-level off-shell amplitudes and analyze the relations between them.

  13. Axial anomaly and energy dependence of hyperon polarization in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorin, Alexander; Teryaev, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    We address the issue of energy and charge dependence of global polarization of Λ hyperons in peripheral Au-Au collisions recently observed by the STAR Collaboration at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We compare different contributions to the anomalous mechanism relating polarization to vorticity and hydrodynamic helicity in QCD matter. We stress that the suppression of the gravitational anomaly contribution in strongly correlated matter observed in lattice simulations confirms our earlier prediction of rapid decrease of polarization with increasing collision energy. Our mechanism leads to polarization of Λ ¯ of the same sign and larger magnitude than the polarization of Λ. The energy and charge dependence of polarization is suggested as a sensitive probe of fine details of QCD matter structure.

  14. Off-shell Jost solutions for Coulomb and Coulomb-like interactions in all partial waves

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, U.; Bhoi, J.

    2013-01-15

    By exploiting the theory of ordinary differential equations, with judicious use of boundary conditions, interacting Green's functions and their integral transforms together with certain properties of higher transcendental functions, useful analytical expressions for the off-shell Jost solutions for motion in Coulomb and Coulomb-nuclear potentials are derived in maximal reduced form through different approaches to the problem in the representation space. The exact analytical expressions for the off-shell Jost solutions for Coulomb and Coulomb-like potentials are believed to be useful for the description of the charged particle scattering/reaction processes.

  15. One-loop pentagon integral with one off-shell leg in 6 -2 ɛ dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Mikhail G.

    2017-02-01

    We apply the differential equations technique to the calculation of the one-loop massless diagram with one off-shell leg. Using a reduction to the ɛ -form, we managed to obtain a simple onefold integral representation exact in space-time dimensionality. Expansion of the obtained result in ɛ and an analytical continuation to the physical region are discussed.

  16. Off-shell amplitudes as boundary integrals of analytically continued Wilson line slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotko, P.; Serino, M.; Stasto, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    One of the methods to calculate tree-level multi-gluon scattering amplitudes is to use the Berends-Giele recursion relation involving off-shell currents or off-shell amplitudes, if working in the light cone gauge. As shown in recent works using the light-front perturbation theory, solutions to these recursions naturally collapse into gauge invariant and gauge-dependent components, at least for some helicity configurations. In this work, we show that such structure is helicity independent and emerges from analytic properties of matrix elements of Wilson line operators, where the slope of the straight gauge path is shifted in a certain complex direction. This is similar to the procedure leading to the Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten (BCFW) recursion, however we apply a complex shift to the Wilson line slope instead of the external momenta. While in the original BCFW procedure the boundary integrals over the complex shift vanish for certain deformations, here they are non-zero and are equal to the off-shell amplitudes. The main result can thus be summarized as follows: we derive a decomposition of a helicity-fixed off-shell current into gauge invariant component given by a matrix element of a straight Wilson line plus a reminder given by a sum of products of gauge invariant and gauge dependent quantities. We give several examples realizing this relation, including the five-point next-to-MHV helicity configuration.

  17. Off-shell invariant D = N = 2 twisted super Yang-Mills theory with a gauged central charge without constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Keisuke; Kato, Junji; Kawamoto, Noboru; Miyake, Akiko

    2013-11-01

    We formulate N=2 twisted super Yang-Mills theory with a gauged central charge by superconnection formalism in two dimensions. We obtain off-shell invariant supermultiplets and actions with and without constraints, which is in contrast with the off-shell invariant D=N=4 super Yang-Mills formulation with unavoidable constraints.

  18. Ginzburg-Landau phase diagram for dense matter with axial anomaly, strange quark mass, and meson condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Andreas; Stetina, Stephan; Tachibana, Motoi

    2011-02-01

    We discuss the phase structure of dense matter, in particular, the nature of the transition between hadronic and quark matter. Calculations within a Ginzburg-Landau approach show that the axial anomaly can induce a critical point in this transition region. This is possible because in three-flavor quark matter with instanton effects a chiral condensate can be added to the color-flavor locked phase without changing the symmetries of the ground state. In (massless) two-flavor quark matter such a critical point is not possible since the corresponding color superconductor (2SC) does not break chiral symmetry. We study the effects of a nonzero but finite strange quark mass which interpolates between these two cases. Since at ultrahigh density the first reaction of the color-flavor locked phase to a nonzero strange quark mass is to develop a kaon condensate, we extend previous Ginzburg-Landau studies by including such a condensate. We discuss the fate of the critical point systematically and show that the continuity between hadronic and quark matter can be disrupted by the onset of a kaon condensate. Moreover, we identify the mass terms in the Ginzburg-Landau potential which are needed for the 2SC phase to occur in the phase diagram.

  19. Holomorphic Chern-Simons theory coupled to off-shell Kodaira-Spencer gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusto, Stefano; Imbimbo, Camillo; Rosa, Dario

    2012-10-01

    We construct an action for holomorphic Chern-Simons theory that couples the gauge field to off-shell gravitational backgrounds, comprising the complex structure and the (3,0)-form of the target space. Gauge invariance of the off-shell action is achieved by enlarging the field space to include an appropriate system of Lagrange multipliers, ghost and ghost-for-ghost fields. Both the BRST transformations and the BV action are compactly and neatly written in terms of superfields which include fields, backgrounds and their antifields. We show that the anti-holomorphic target space derivative can be written as a BRST-commutator on a functional space containing the anti-fields of both the dynamical fields and the gravitational backgrounds. We derive from this result a Ward identity that determines the anti-holomorphic dependence of physical correlators.

  20. Off-shell spinor-helicity amplitudes from light-cone deformation procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Dmitry

    2016-12-01

    We study the consistency conditions for interactions of massless fields of any spin in four-dimensional flat space using the light-cone approach. We show that they can be equivalently rewritten as the Ward identities for the off-shell light-cone amplitudes built from the light-cone Hamiltonian in the standard way. Then we find a general solution of these Ward identities. The solution admits a compact representation when written in the spinor-helicity form and is given by an arbitrary function of spinor products, satisfying wellknown homogeneity constraints. Thus, we show that the light-cone consistent deformation procedure inevitably leads to a certain off-shell version of the spinor-helicity approach. We discuss how the relation between the two approaches can be employed to facilitate the search of consistent interaction of massless higher-spin fields.

  1. Off-shell higher spin N =2 supermultiplets in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzenko, Sergei M.; Ogburn, Daniel X.

    2016-11-01

    Off-shell higher spin N =2 supermultiplets in three spacetime dimensions (3D) are presented in this paper. We propose gauge prepotentials for higher spin superconformal gravity and construct the corresponding gauge-invariant field strengths, which are proved to be conformal primary superfields. These field strengths are higher spin generalizations of the (linearized) N =2 super-Cotton tensor, which controls the superspace geometry of conformal supergravity. We also construct the higher spin extensions of the linearized N =2 conformal supergravity action. We provide two dually equivalent off-shell formulations for massless higher spin N =2 supermultiplets. They involve one and the same superconformal prepotential but differ in the compensators used. For the lowest superspin value 3 /2 , these higher spin series terminate at the linearized actions for the (1,1) minimal and w =-1 nonminimal N =2 Poincaré supergravity theories constructed in S. M. Kuzenko and G. Tartaglino-Mazzucchelli, arXiv:1109.0496. Similar to the pure 3D supergravity actions, their higher spin counterparts propagate no degrees of freedom. However, the massless higher spin supermultiplets are used to construct off-shell massive N =2 supermultiplets by combining the massless actions with those describing higher spin extensions of the linearized N =2 conformal supergravity. We also demonstrate that every higher spin super-Cotton tensor can be represented as a linear superposition of the equations of motion for the corresponding massless higher spin supermultiplet, with the coefficients being higher-derivative linear operators.

  2. Off-shell and nonlocal effects in proton-nucleus elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picklesimer, A.; Tandy, P. C.; Thaler, R. M.; Wolfe, D. H.

    1984-04-01

    The influence of off-shell and nonlocal effects in the first-order nonrelativistic microscopic optical potential is investigated for elastic proton scattering above 100 MeV. With the free nucleon-nucleon t matrix taken from the model of Love and Franey, these effects are significant only for scattering angles greater than about 60° and energies below about 300 MeV. The inadequacy of the standard first-order theory for predictions of spin observables at forward scattering angles remains unchanged when these effects are included and the need for higher order processes including medium and relativistic effects is reinforced.

  3. Normalization of off-shell boundary state, g-function and zeta function regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoyama, H.; Oota, T.

    2002-11-01

    We consider the model in two dimensions with boundary quadratic deformation (BQD), which has been discussed in tachyon condensation. The partition function of this model (BQD) on a cylinder is determined using the method of zeta function regularization. We show that, for closed channel partition function, a subtraction procedure must be introduced in order to reproduce the correct results at conformal points. The boundary entropy (g-function) is determined from the partition function and the off-shell boundary state. We propose and consider a supersymmetric generalization of the BQD model, which includes a boundary fermion mass term, and check the validity of the subtraction procedure.

  4. A Coulomb-Like Off-Shell T-Matrix with the Correct Coulomb Phase Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oryu, Shinsho; Watanabe, Takashi; Hiratsuka, Yasuhisa; Togawa, Yoshio

    2017-03-01

    We confirm the reliability of the well-known Coulomb renormalization method (CRM). It is found that the CRM is only available for a very-long-range screened Coulomb potential (SCP). However, such an SCP calculation in momentum space is considerably difficult because of the cancelation of significant digits. In contrast to the CRM, we propose a new method by using an on-shell equivalent SCP and the rest term. The two-potential theory with r-space is introduced, which defines fully the off-shell Coulomb amplitude.

  5. Off-shell behavior of relativistic NN effective interactions and charge symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersten, A.; Thomas, A. W.; Weyrauch, M.

    1990-04-01

    We examine in detail the suggestion of Iqbal et al. for calculating the class-four charge symmetry breaking amplitude in n-p scattering. By simplifying to a model problem, we show explicitly that the approximation scheme is unreliable if a phenomenological, effective nucleon-nucleon T matrix is used. Our results have wider implications for observables calculated in relativistic impulse approximation calculations. They reinforce the observation made in the literature that the procedure of fitting only positive energy matrix elements can lead to an NN interaction whose off-shell behavior is incorrect.

  6. Off-shell dark matter: A cosmological relic of quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravani, Mehdi; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2017-02-01

    We study a novel proposal for the origin of cosmological cold dark matter (CDM) which is rooted in the quantum nature of spacetime. In this model, off-shell modes of quantum fields can exist in asymptotic states as a result of spacetime nonlocality (expected in generic theories of quantum gravity) and play the role of CDM, which we dub off-shell dark matter (O f DM ). However, their rate of production is suppressed by the scale of nonlocality (e.g. Planck length). As a result, we show that O f DM is only produced in the first moments of big bang, and then effectively decouples (except through its gravitational interactions). We examine the observational predictions of this model: In the context of cosmic inflation, we show that this proposal relates the reheating temperature to the inflaton mass, which narrows down the uncertainty in the number of e -foldings of specific inflationary scenarios. We also demonstrate that O f DM is indeed cold, and discuss potentially observable signatures on small scale matter power spectrum.

  7. Bordered surfaces, off-shell amplitudes, sewing, and string field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlip, Steven

    1989-04-01

    These lectures will deal with the current status of the sewing problem. The rationale for this approach is that any nonperturbative string theory must reproduce the Polyakov path integral as a perturbation series. If our experience in ordinary field theory is a guide, and admittedly it may not be, the terms in such a perturbation series, like Feynman diagrams, are likely to be built up from simple vertices and propagators, which can themselves be represented as (off-shell) Polyakov amplitudes. Hence an understanding of how to put together simple components into more complicated world sheet amplitudes is likely to give us much-needed information about the structure of nonperturbative string theory. To understand sewing, we must first understand the building blocks, off-shell Polyakov amplitudes. This is the subject of my first lecture. Next, we will explore the sewing of conformal field theories at a fixed conformal structure, that is, the reconstruction of correlation functions for a fixed surface (Sigma) from those on a pair of surfaces (Sigma)(sub 1) and (Sigma)(sub 2) obtained by cutting (Sigma) along a closed curve. We will then look at the problem of sewing amplitudes, integrals of correlation functions over moduli space. This will necessitate an understanding of how to build the moduli space of a complicated surface from simpler moduli spaces. Finally, we will briefly examine vertices and string field theories.

  8. Bordered surfaces, off-shell amplitudes, sewing, and string field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Carlip, S.

    1989-04-01

    These lectures will deal with the current status of the sewing problem. The rationale for this approach is that any nonperturbative string theory must reproduce the Polyakov path integral as a perturbation series. If our experience in ordinary field theory is a guide --- and admittedly it may not be --- the terms in such a perturbation series, like Feynman diagrams, are likely to be built up from simple ''vertices'' and ''propagators,'' which can themselves be represented as (off-shell) Polyakov amplitudes. Hence an understanding of how to put together simple components into more complicated world sheet amplitudes is likely to give us much-needed information about the structure of nonperturbative string theory. To understand sewing, we must first understand the building blocks, off-shell Polyakov amplitudes. This is the subject of my first lecture. Next, we will explore the sewing of conformal field theories at a fixed conformal structure, that is, the reconstruction of correlation functions for a fixed surface /Sigma/ from those on a pair of surfaces /Sigma//sub 1/ and /Sigma//sub 2/ obtained by cutting /Sigma/ along a closed curve. We will then look at the problem of sewing amplitudes, integrals of correlation functions over moduli space. This will necessitate an understanding of how to build the moduli space of a complicated surface from simpler moduli spaces. Finally, we will briefly examine vertices and string field theories. 48 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Role of two-flavor color superconductor pairing in a three-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with axial anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, H.; Buballa, M.

    2010-11-01

    The phase diagram of strongly interacting matter is studied within a three-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, which contains the coupling between chiral and diquark condensates through the axial anomaly. Our results show that it is essential to include the two-flavor color superconducting (2SC) phase in the analysis. While this is expected for realistic strange-quark masses, we find that even for equal up, down, and strange bare quark masses 2SC pairing can be favored due to spontaneous flavor symmetry breaking by the axial anomaly. This can lead to a rich phase structure, including BCS- and Bose-Einstein condensate-like 2SC and color-flavor locked phases and new endpoints. On the other hand, the low-temperature critical endpoint, which was found earlier in the same model without 2SC pairing, is almost removed from the phase diagram and cannot be reached from the low-density chirally broken phase without crossing a preceding first-order phase boundary. For physical quark masses no additional critical endpoint is found.

  10. Off-shell single-top production at NLO matched to parton showers

    SciTech Connect

    Frederix, R.; Frixione, S.; Papanastasiou, A. S.; Prestel, S.; Torrielli, P.

    2016-06-06

    We study the hadroproduction of a Wb pair in association with a light jet, focusing on the dominant t-channel contribution and including exactly at the matrix-element level all non-resonant and off-shell effects induced by the finite top-quark width. Our simulations are accurate to the next-to-leading order in QCD, and are matched to the Herwig6 and Pythia8 parton showers through the MC@NLO method. We present phenomenological results relevant to the 8 TeV LHC, and carry out a thorough comparison to the case of on-shell t-channel single-top production. Furthermore, we formulate our approach so that it can be applied to the general case of matrix elements that feature coloured intermediate resonances and are matched to parton showers.

  11. Higher gauge theories from Lie n-algebras and off-shell covariantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, Ursula; Heller, Marc Andre; Ikeda, Noriaki; Kaneko, Yukio; Watamura, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    We analyze higher gauge theories in various dimensions using a supergeometric method based on a differential graded symplectic manifold, called a QP-manifold, which is closely related to the BRST-BV formalism in gauge theories. Extensions of the Lie 2-algebra gauge structure are formulated within the Lie n-algebra induced by the QP-structure. We find that in 5 and 6 dimensions there are special extensions of the gauge algebra. In these cases, a restriction of the gauge symmetry by imposing constraints on the auxiliary gauge fields leads to a covariantized theory. As an example we show that we can obtain an off-shell covariantized higher gauge theory in 5 dimensions, which is similar to the one proposed in [1].

  12. Off-shell single-top production at NLO matched to parton showers

    DOE PAGES

    Frederix, R.; Frixione, S.; Papanastasiou, A. S.; ...

    2016-06-06

    We study the hadroproduction of a Wb pair in association with a light jet, focusing on the dominant t-channel contribution and including exactly at the matrix-element level all non-resonant and off-shell effects induced by the finite top-quark width. Our simulations are accurate to the next-to-leading order in QCD, and are matched to the Herwig6 and Pythia8 parton showers through the MC@NLO method. We present phenomenological results relevant to the 8 TeV LHC, and carry out a thorough comparison to the case of on-shell t-channel single-top production. Furthermore, we formulate our approach so that it can be applied to the generalmore » case of matrix elements that feature coloured intermediate resonances and are matched to parton showers.« less

  13. Off-Shell Green Functions: One-Loop with Growing Legs

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Concha-Sanchez, Y.; Delbourgo, R.; Tejeda-Yeomans, M. E.

    2008-07-02

    One loop calculations in gauge theories in arbitrary gauge and dimensions become exceedingly hard with growing number of external off-shell legs. Let alone higher point functions, such a calculation for even the three point one-loop vertices for quantum electrodynamics (QED) and quantum chromodynamics (QCD) has been made available only recently. In this article, we discuss how Ward-Fradkin-Green-Takahashi identities (WFGTI) may provide a helpful tool in these computations. After providing a glimpse of our suggestion for the case of the 3-point vertex, we present our preliminary findings towards our similar efforts for the 4-point function. We restrict ourselves to the example of scalar quantum electrodynamics (SQED)

  14. Form factor of the B meson off-shell for the vertex B{sub s}*BK

    SciTech Connect

    Cerqueira, A. Jr.; Bracco, M. E.

    2010-11-12

    In this work we evaluate the coupling constant and the form factor for the vertex B{sub s}*BK using the QCD Sum Rules. In this case we consider the B meson off shell. The only theoretical evaluation for the coupling constant was made using the Heavy Hadron Chiral Perturbation Theory (HHChPT) and we made comparison with this result.

  15. General N=2 supersymmetric quantum mechanical model: Supervariable approach to its off-shell nilpotent symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, S.; Shukla, A.; Malik, R.P.

    2014-12-15

    Using the supersymmetric (SUSY) invariant restrictions on the (anti-)chiral supervariables, we derive the off-shell nilpotent symmetries of the general one (0+1)-dimensional N=2 SUSY quantum mechanical (QM) model which is considered on a (1, 2)-dimensional supermanifold (parametrized by a bosonic variable t and a pair of Grassmannian variables θ and θ-bar with θ{sup 2}=(θ-bar){sup 2}=0,θ(θ-bar)+(θ-bar)θ=0). We provide the geometrical meanings to the two SUSY transformations of our present theory which are valid for any arbitrary type of superpotential. We express the conserved charges and Lagrangian of the theory in terms of the supervariables (that are obtained after the application of SUSY invariant restrictions) and provide the geometrical interpretation for the nilpotency property and SUSY invariance of the Lagrangian for the general N=2 SUSY quantum theory. We also comment on the mathematical interpretation of the above symmetry transformations. - Highlights: • A novel method has been proposed for the derivation of N=2 SUSY transformations. • General N=2 SUSY quantum mechanical (QM) model with a general superpotential, is considered. • The above SUSY QM model is generalized onto a (1, 2)-dimensional supermanifold. • SUSY invariant restrictions are imposed on the (anti-)chiral supervariables. • Geometrical meaning of the nilpotency property is provided.

  16. A Lorentz covariant holoraumy-induced "gadget" from minimal off-shell 4D, N=1 supermultiplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, S. James; Grover, Tyler; Miller-Dickson, Miles David; Mondal, Benedict A.; Oskoui, Amir; Regmi, Shirash; Ross, Ethan; Shetty, Rajath

    2015-11-01

    Starting from three minimal off-shell 4D, N=1 supermultiplets, using constructions solely defined within the confines of the four dimensional field theory we show the existence of a "gadget" — a member of a class of metrics on the representation space of the supermultiplets — whose values directly and completely correspond to the values of a metric defined on the 1d, N = 4 adinkra networks adjacency matrices corresponding to the projections of the four dimensional supermultiplets.

  17. On the Green-functions of the classical off-shell electrodynamics under the manifestly covariant relativistic dynamics of Stueckelberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonovich, I.; Horwitz, L. P.

    2011-08-01

    In previous papers derivations of the Green function have been given for 5D off-shell electrodynamics in the framework of the manifestly covariant relativistic dynamics of Stueckelberg (with invariant evolution parameter τ). In this paper, we reconcile these derivations resulting in different explicit forms, and relate our results to the conventional fundamental solutions of linear 5D wave equations published in the mathematical literature. We give physical arguments for the choice of the Green function retarded in the fifth variable τ.

  18. Higgs production in association with off-shell top-antitop pairs at NLO EW and QCD at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Ansgar; Lang, Jean-Nicolas; Pellen, Mathieu; Uccirati, Sandro

    2017-02-01

    We present NLO electroweak corrections to Higgs production in association with off-shell top-antitop quark pairs. The full process ppto {e}+{ν}e{μ}-{overline{ν}}_{μ}boverline{b}H is considered, and hence all interference, off-shell, and non-resonant contributions are taken into account. The electroweak corrections turn out to be below one per cent for the integrated cross section but can exceed 10% in certain phase-space regions. In addition to its phenomenological relevance, the computation constitutes a major technical achievement as the full NLO virtual corrections involving up to 9-point functions have been computed exactly. The results of the full computation are supported by two calculations in the double-pole approximation. These also allow to infer the effect of off-shell contributions and emphasise their importance especially for the run II of the LHC. Finally, we present combined predictions featuring both NLO electroweak and QCD corrections in a common set-up that will help the experimental collaborations in their quest of precisely measuring the aforementioned process.

  19. Sensitivity of nucleon-nucleus scattering to the off-shell behavior of on-shell equivalent {ital NN} potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Arellano, H.F.; Brieva, F.A.; Sander, M.; von Geramb, H.V. |

    1996-11-01

    The sensitivity of nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering to the off-shell behavior of realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions is investigated when on-shell equivalent nucleon-nucleon potentials are used. The study is based on applications of the full-folding optical model potential for an explicit treatment of the off-shell behavior of the nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. Applications were made at beam energies between 40 and 500 MeV for proton scattering from {sup 40}Ca and {sup 208}Pb. We use the momentum-dependent Paris potential and its local on-shell equivalent as obtained with the Gelfand-Levitan and Marchenko inversion formalism for the two nucleon Schr{umlt o}dinger equation. Full-folding calculations for nucleon-nucleus scattering show moderate fluctuations in the corresponding observables. This sets narrow margins within which off-shell features of the nucleon-nucleon interaction can be resolved. Based on these results, inversion potentials were also constructed directly from phenomenological phase shifts (SM94). Their use in nucleon-nucleus scattering at intermediate energies provides an improved description of the data relative to those obtained from current realistic potential models. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high-mass ZZ and WW final states with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The measurements of the ZZ and WW final states in the mass range above the \\(2m_Z\\) and \\(2m_W\\) thresholds provide a unique opportunity to measure the off-shell coupling strength of the Higgs boson. This paper presents constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson event yields normalised to the Standard Model prediction (signal strength) in the \\(ZZ \\rightarrow 4\\ell \\), \\(ZZ\\rightarrow 2\\ell 2\

  1. Constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high-mass ZZ and WW final states with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The measurements of the ZZ and WW final states in the mass range above the \\(2m_Z\\) and \\(2m_W\\) thresholds provide a unique opportunity to measure the off-shell coupling strength of the Higgs boson. This paper presents constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson event yields normalised to the Standard Model prediction (signal strength) in the \\(ZZ \\rightarrow 4\\ell \\), \\(ZZ\\rightarrow 2\\ell 2\

  2. NLO QCD+EW predictions for V + jets including off-shell vector-boson decays and multijet merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallweit, S.; Lindert, J. M.; Maierhöfer, P.; Pozzorini, S.; Schönherr, M.

    2016-04-01

    We present next-to-leading order (NLO) predictions including QCD and electroweak (EW) corrections for the production and decay of off-shell electroweak vector bosons in association with up to two jets at the 13 TeV LHC. All possible dilepton final states with zero, one or two charged leptons that can arise from off-shell W and Z bosons or photons are considered. All predictions are obtained using the automated implementation of NLO QCD+EW corrections in the O penLoops matrix-element generator combined with the Munich and Sherpa Monte Carlo frameworks. Electroweak corrections play an especially important role in the context of BSM searches, due to the presence of large EW Sudakov logarithms at the TeV scale. In this kinematic regime, important observables such as the jet transverse momentum or the total transverse energy are strongly sensitive to multijet emissions. As a result, fixed-order NLO QCD+EW predictions are plagued by huge QCD corrections and poor theoretical precision. To remedy this problem we present an approximate method that allows for a simple and reliable implementation of NLO EW corrections in the MePs@Nlo multijet merging framework. Using this general approach we present an inclusive simulation of vector-boson production in association with jets that guarantees NLO QCD+EW accuracy in all phase-space regions involving up to two resolved jets.

  3. Similarity and differences between the radion and Higgs boson production and decay processes involving off-shell fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Boos, E. E.; Keizerov, S. I.; Rahmetov, E. R.; Svirina, K. S.

    2015-12-15

    The radion is a scalar particle that occurs in brane world models and interacts with the trace of the energy–momentum tensor of the Standard Model (SM). The radion–SM fermion interaction Lagrangian differs from the Higgs boson–fermion interaction Lagrangian for off-shell fermions. It is shown that all additional, as compared to the Higgs boson, contributions to the amplitudes of radion production and decay processes involving off-shell fermions are canceled out for both massless and massive fermions. Thus, additional terms in the interaction Lagrangian do not change properties of these processes for the radion and the Higgs boson, except for the general normalization factors. This similarity is a consequence of gauge invariance for the processes with production of gauge bosons. When an additional scalar particle is produced, there are no apparent reasons for the above cancellation, as confirmed, for example, by the process with production of two scalar particles, which features an additional contribution of the radion in comparison with the Higgs boson.

  4. Top Quark Pair Production in Association with a Jet with Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Off-Shell Effects at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, G; Hartanto, H B; Kraus, M; Worek, M

    2016-02-05

    We present a complete description of top quark pair production in association with a jet in the dilepton channel. Our calculation is accurate to next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD and includes all nonresonant diagrams, interferences, and off-shell effects of the top quark. Moreover, nonresonant and off-shell effects due to the finite W gauge boson width are taken into account. This calculation constitutes the first fully realistic NLO computation for top quark pair production with a final state jet in hadronic collisions. Numerical results for differential distributions as well as total cross sections are presented for the Large Hadron Collider at 8 TeV. With our inclusive cuts, NLO predictions reduce the unphysical scale dependence by more than a factor of 3 and lower the total rate by about 13% compared to leading-order QCD predictions. In addition, the size of the top quark off-shell effects is estimated to be below 2%.

  5. Off-shell extrapolation of Regge-model NN scattering amplitudes describing final state interactions in 2H(e,e'p)

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, William Paul; van Orden, Wally

    2013-11-25

    In this work, an off-shell extrapolation is proposed for the Regge-model NN amplitudes presented in a paper by Ford and Van Orden [ Phys. Rev. C 87 014004 (2013)] and in an eprint by Ford (arXiv:1310.0871 [nucl-th]). The prescriptions for extrapolating these amplitudes for one nucleon off-shell in the initial state are presented. Application of these amplitudes to calculations of deuteron electrodisintegration are presented and compared to the limited available precision data in the kinematical region covered by the Regge model.

  6. Off-shell extrapolation of Regge-model NN scattering amplitudes describing final state interactions in 2H(e,e'p)

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, William Paul; van Orden, Wally

    2013-11-25

    In this work, an off-shell extrapolation is proposed for the Regge-model NN amplitudes presented in a paper by Ford and Van Orden [ Phys. Rev. C 87 014004 (2013)] and in an eprint by Ford (arXiv:1310.0871 [nucl-th]). The prescriptions for extrapolating these amplitudes for one nucleon off-shell in the initial state are presented. Application of these amplitudes to calculations of deuteron electrodisintegration are presented and compared to the limited available precision data in the kinematical region covered by the Regge model.

  7. Galilean anomalies and their effect on hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Akash

    2016-03-01

    We study flavor and gravitational anomalies in Galilean theories coupled to torsional Newton-Cartan backgrounds. We establish that the relativistic anomaly inflow mechanism with an appropriately modified anomaly polynomial can be used to generate these anomalies. Similar to the relativistic case, we find that Galilean anomalies also survive only in even dimensions. Further, these anomalies only effect the flavor and rotational symmetries of a Galilean theory; in particular, the Milne boost symmetry remains nonanomalous. We also extend the transgression machinery used in relativistic fluids to Galilean fluids, and use it to determine how these anomalies affect the constitutive relations of a Galilean fluid. Unrelated to the Galilean fluids, we propose an analogue of the off-shell second law of thermodynamics for relativistic fluids, to include torsion and a conserved spin current in the vielbein formalism. Interestingly, we find that even in the absence of spin current and torsion the entropy currents in the two formalisms are different: while the usual entropy current gets a contribution from the gravitational anomaly, the entropy current in the vielbein formalism does not have any anomaly-induced part.

  8. Optically active N-acetyldopamine dimer of the crude drug "Zentai," the cast-off shell of the Cicada, Cryptotympana sp.

    PubMed

    Noda, N; Kubota, S; Miyata, Y; Miyahara, K

    2000-11-01

    Two optically active N-acetyldopamine dimers together with four phenolic monomers were isolated from the crude drug "Zentai," a cast-off shell of the cicada of Cryptotympana sp. (Cicadidae). The former two were 2-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl)-1,4-benzodioxane derivatives carrying substituents at the 3 and 6 (or 7) positions, which are known to be components of sclerotized insect cuticles. Their structures including absolute configurations were determined on the basis of NMR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic data.

  9. Constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high-mass ZZ and WW final states with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turecek, D; Turra, R; Turvey, A J; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ughetto, M; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Unverdorben, C; Urban, J; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Usanova, A; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valderanis, C; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Den Wollenberg, W; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; Van Der Leeuw, R; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vannucci, F; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; 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Wasicki, C; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, A; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yakabe, R; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yao, L; Yao, W-M; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    Measurements of the ZZ and WW final states in the mass range above the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] thresholds provide a unique opportunity to measure the off-shell coupling strength of the Higgs boson. This paper presents constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson event yields normalised to the Standard Model prediction (signal strength) in the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] final states. The result is based on pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb[Formula: see text] at a collision energy of [Formula: see text] TeV. Using the [Formula: see text] method, the observed 95 [Formula: see text] confidence level (CL) upper limit on the off-shell signal strength is in the range 5.1-8.6, with an expected range of 6.7-11.0. In each case the range is determined by varying the unknown [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] background K-factor from higher-order quantum chromodynamics corrections between half and twice the value of the known signal K-factor. Assuming the relevant Higgs boson couplings are independent of the energy scale of the Higgs boson production, a combination with the on-shell measurements yields an observed (expected) 95 [Formula: see text] CL upper limit on [Formula: see text] in the range 4.5-7.5 (6.5-11.2) using the same variations of the background K-factor. Assuming that the unknown [Formula: see text] background K-factor is equal to the signal K-factor, this translates into an observed (expected) 95 [Formula: see text] CL upper limit on the Higgs boson total width of 22.7 (33.0) MeV.

  10. Axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sieper, Joachim; Braun, Jürgen; Dougados, Maxime; Baeten, Dominique

    2015-07-09

    The term axial spondyloarthritis covers both non-radiographic disease and radiographic disease (also known as ankylosing spondylitis). Some studies have been performed to investigate the prevalence of axial spondyloarthritis, although most are limited to patients with radiographic disease. A strong genetic association has been shown between axial spondyloarthritis and human leukocyte antigen-B27 (HLA-B27), but the pathogenetic role of HLA-B27 has not yet been clarified. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IL-17, IL-23 and downstream pathways also seem to be important - based on the good results of therapies directed against these molecules - but their exact role in the inflammatory process is also not yet clear. Elucidating the interaction between osteoproliferation and inflammation will be crucial for the prevention of long-term structural damage of the bone. The development of new criteria for classification, diagnosis and screening of patients with axial spondyloarthritis will enable earlier intervention for this chronic inflammatory disease. MRI has become an important tool for the early detection of axial spondyloarthritis. NSAIDs and TNF blockers are effective therapies, including in the early non-radiographic stage. Therapeutic blockade of IL-17 or IL-23 seems to be a promising new treatment option. Tools for measuring quality of life in axial spondyloarthritis have become relevant to assess the impact that the disease has on patients. These diagnostic and therapeutic advances will continue to change the management of axial spondyloarthritis, and new insights into the disease pathogenesis will hopefully accelerate this process. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/51b1af.

  11. Anomalies and graded coisotropic branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi

    2006-03-01

    We compute the anomaly of the axial U(1) current in the A-model on a Calabi-Yau manifold, in the presence of coisotropic branes discovered by Kapustin and Orlov. Our results relate the anomaly-free condition to a recently proposed definition of graded coisotropic branes in Calabi-Yau manifolds. More specifically, we find that a coisotropic brane is anomaly-free if and only if it is gradable. We also comment on a different grading for coisotropic submanifolds introduced recently by Oh.

  12. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  13. Axial superchargers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A

    1944-01-01

    Improvements, however, have been attained which permit a shortening of the structure without any impairment of the efficiency. The axial supercharger has a better efficiency and a simpler design than the radial supercharger. The relatively narrow range in which it operates satisfactorily should not be a very disturbing factor for practical flight problems. The length of this type of supercharger may be reduced considerably if some impairment in the efficiency is permitted.

  14. Fully analytical O( α s ) results for on-shell and off-shell polarized W-boson decays into massive quark pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groote, S.; Körner, J. G.; Tuvike, P.

    2013-05-01

    We provide analytical O( α s ) results for the three polarized decay structure functions H ++, H 00 and H - that describe the decay of a polarized W boson into massive quark-antiquark pairs. As an application we consider the decay t→ b+ W + involving the helicity fractions ρ mm of the W + boson followed by the polarized decay W+(\\uparrow)to q1bar{q}2 described by the polarized decay structure functions H mm . We thereby determine the O( α s ) polar angle decay distribution of the cascade decay process tto b+W+(to q1bar{q}2). As a second example we analyze quark mass and off-shell effects in the cascade decays Hto W-+W^{ast+}(to q1bar{q}2) and Hto Z+Z^{ast}(to qbar{q}). For the decays Hto W-+W^{ast+}(to cbar{b}) and Hto Z+Z^{ast}(to bbar{b}) we find substantial deviations from the mass-zero approximation in particular in the vicinity of the threshold region.

  15. Holonomy anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Bagger, J.; Nemeschansky, D.; Yankielowicz, S.

    1985-05-01

    A new type of anomaly is discussed that afflicts certain non-linear sigma models with fermions. This anomaly is similar to the ordinary gauge and gravitational anomalies since it reflects a topological obstruction to the reparametrization invariance of the quantum effective action. Nonlinear sigma models are constructed based on homogeneous spaces G/H. Anomalies arising when the fermions are chiral are shown to be cancelled sometimes by Chern-Simons terms. Nonlinear sigma models are considered based on general Riemannian manifolds. 9 refs. (LEW)

  16. Bangui Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    Bangui anomaly is the name given to one of the Earth s largest crustal magnetic anomalies and the largest over the African continent. It covers two-thirds of the Central African Republic and therefore the name derives from the capitol city-Bangui that is also near the center of this feature. From surface magnetic survey data Godivier and Le Donche (1962) were the first to describe this anomaly. Subsequently high-altitude world magnetic surveying by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (Project Magnet) recorded a greater than 1000 nT dipolar, peak-to-trough anomaly with the major portion being negative (figure 1). Satellite observations (Cosmos 49) were first reported in 1964, these revealed a 40nT anomaly at 350 km altitude. Subsequently the higher altitude (417-499km) POGO (Polar Orbiting Geomagnetic Observatory) satellite data recorded peak-to-trough anomalies of 20 nT these data were added to Cosmos 49 measurements by Regan et al. (1975) for a regional satellite altitude map. In October 1979, with the launch of Magsat, a satellite designed to measure crustal magnetic anomalies, a more uniform satellite altitude magnetic map was obtained. These data, computed at 375 km altitude recorded a -22 nT anomaly (figure 2). This elliptically shaped anomaly is approximately 760 by 1000 km and is centered at 6%, 18%. The Bangui anomaly is composed of three segments; there are two positive anomalies lobes north and south of a large central negative field. This displays the classic pattern of a magnetic anomalous body being magnetized by induction in a zero inclination field. This is not surprising since the magnetic equator passes near the center of this body.

  17. GEOS axial booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    A booms and mechanisms subsystem was designed, developed, and qualified for the geostationary scientific satellite GEOS. Part of this subsystem consist of four axial booms consisting of one pair of 1 m booms and one pair of 2.5 m booms. Each of these booms is carrying one bird cage electric field sensor. Alignment accuracy requirements led to a telescopic type solution. Deployment is performed by pressurized nitrogen. At deployment in orbit two of these booms showed some anomalies and one of these two deployed only about 80%. Following this malfunction a detailed failure investigation was performed resulting in a design modification of some critical components as release mechanism, guide sleeves of the telescopic elements, and pressure system.

  18. Gravity Anomalies

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-15

    Analysis of radio tracking data have enabled maps of the gravity field of Mercury to be derived. In this image, overlain on a mosaic obtained by MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System and illuminated with a shape model determined from stereo-photoclinometry, Mercury's gravity anomalies are depicted in colors. Red tones indicate mass concentrations, centered on the Caloris basin (center) and the Sobkou region (right limb). Such large-scale gravitational anomalies are signatures of subsurface structure and evolution. The north pole is near the top of the sunlit area in this view. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19285

  19. DOWN'S ANOMALY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PENROSE, L.S.; SMITH, G.F.

    BOTH CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND MATHEMATICAL ELABORATIONS OF DOWN'S ANOMALY, KNOWN ALSO AS MONGOLISM, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS REFERENCE MANUAL FOR PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL. INFORMATION PROVIDED CONCERNS (1) HISTORICAL STUDIES, (2) PHYSICAL SIGNS, (3) BONES AND MUSCLES, (4) MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, (5) DERMATOGLYPHS, (6) HEMATOLOGY, (7)…

  20. DOWN'S ANOMALY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PENROSE, L.S.; SMITH, G.F.

    BOTH CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND MATHEMATICAL ELABORATIONS OF DOWN'S ANOMALY, KNOWN ALSO AS MONGOLISM, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS REFERENCE MANUAL FOR PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL. INFORMATION PROVIDED CONCERNS (1) HISTORICAL STUDIES, (2) PHYSICAL SIGNS, (3) BONES AND MUSCLES, (4) MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, (5) DERMATOGLYPHS, (6) HEMATOLOGY, (7)…

  1. Schwinger credited with finding anomaly, exploring cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, K.A.

    1997-06-01

    This letter points out that Julian Schwinger was first to identify the axial vector anomaly in the context of neutral pion decay into two photons. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics}

  2. Search for Higgs boson off-shell production in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV and derivation of constraints on its total decay width

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2016-09-09

    A search is presented for the Higgs boson off-shell production in gluon fusion and vector boson fusion processes with the Higgs boson decaying into a WW pair and the W bosons decaying leptonically. The data observed in this analysis are used to constrain the Higgs boson total decay width. The analysis is based on the data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.9 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.4 inverse femtobarns at 8 TeV, respectively. An observed (expected) upper limit on the off-shell Higgs boson event yield normalisedmore » to the standard model prediction of 2.4 (6.2) is obtained at the 95% CL for the gluon fusion process and of 19.3 (34.4) for the vector boson fusion process. Observed and expected limits on the total width of 26 and 66 MeV are found, respectively, at the 95% confidence level (CL). These limits are combined with the previous result in the ZZ channel leading to observed and expected 95% CL upper limits on the width of 13 and 26 MeV, respectively.« less

  3. Search for Higgs boson off-shell production in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV and derivation of constraints on its total decay width

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; El Sawy, M.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. 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V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Korneeva, N.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R. -S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. 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T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Jung, A. W.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. 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F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O’Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y. -J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; SalfeldNebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. -J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. 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    2016-09-09

    A search is presented for the Higgs boson off-shell production in gluon fusion and vector boson fusion processes with the Higgs boson decaying into a WW pair and the W bosons decaying leptonically. The data observed in this analysis are used to constrain the Higgs boson total decay width. The analysis is based on the data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.9 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.4 inverse femtobarns at 8 TeV, respectively. An observed (expected) upper limit on the off-shell Higgs boson event yield normalised to the standard model prediction of 2.4 (6.2) is obtained at the 95% CL for the gluon fusion process and of 19.3 (34.4) for the vector boson fusion process. Observed and expected limits on the total width of 26 and 66 MeV are found, respectively, at the 95% confidence level (CL). These limits are combined with the previous result in the ZZ channel leading to observed and expected 95% CL upper limits on the width of 13 and 26 MeV, respectively.

  4. Search for Higgs boson off-shell production in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV and derivation of constraints on its total decay width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. 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D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Jesus, O.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; McLean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; MacNeill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lewis, J.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes de Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; McBrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Rupprecht, N.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. T.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.

    2016-09-01

    A search is presented for the Higgs boson off-shell production in gluon fusion and vector boson fusion processes with the Higgs boson decaying into a W+W- pair and the W bosons decaying leptonically. The data observed in this analysis are used to constrain the Higgs boson total decay width. The analysis is based on the data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.9 fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.4 fb-1 at 8 TeV, respectively. An observed (expected) upper limit on the off-shell Higgs boson event yield normalised to the standard model prediction of 2.4 (6.2) is obtained at the 95% CL for the gluon fusion process and of 19.3 (34.4) for the vector boson fusion process. Observed and expected limits on the total width of 26 and 66 MeV are found, respectively, at the 95% confidence level (CL). These limits are combined with the previous result in the ZZ channel leading to observed and expected 95% CL upper limits on the width of 13 and 26 MeV, respectively. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Non-standard symmetries and quantum anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Visinescu, Anca; Visinescu, Mihai

    2008-08-31

    Quantum anomalies are investigated on curved spacetimes. The intimate relation between Killing-Yano tensors and non-standard symmetries is pointed out. The gravitational anomalies are absent if the hidden symmetry is associated to a Killing-Yano tensor. The axial anomaly in a background gravitational field is directly related with the index of the Dirac operator. In the Dirac theory on curved spaces, Killing-Yano tensors generate Dirac-type operators involved in interesting algebraic structures. The general results are applied to the 4-dimensional Euclidean Taub-NUT space.

  6. Light axial vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kan; Pang, Cheng-Qun; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the abundant experimental observation of axial-vector states, we study whether the observed axial-vector states can be categorized into the conventional axial-vector meson family. In this paper we carry out an analysis based on the mass spectra and two-body Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed decays. Besides testing the possible axial-vector meson assignments, we also predict abundant information for their decays and the properties of some missing axial-vector mesons, which are valuable for further experimental exploration of the observed and predicted axial-vector mesons.

  7. Congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Kunisaki, Shaun M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, amniotic fluid-derived stem cells have emerged as a novel, experimental approach for the treatment of a wide variety of congenital anomalies diagnosed either in utero or postnatally. There are a number of unique properties of amniotic fluid stem cells that have allowed it to become a major research focus. These include the relative ease of accessing amniotic fluid cells in a minimally invasive fashion by amniocentesis as well as the relatively rich population of progenitor cells obtained from a small aliquot of fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells, c-kit positive stem cells, as well as induced pluripotent stem cells have all been derived from human amniotic fluid in recent years. This article gives a pediatric surgeon’s perspective on amniotic fluid stem cell therapy for the management of congenital anomalies. The current status in the use of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells, particularly as they relate as substrates in tissue engineering-based applications, is described in various animal models. A roadmap for further study and eventual clinical application is also proposed. PMID:22986340

  8. Bilateral macrodactyly of the hands and feet with post-axial involvement - a case report.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A K; Bhaskaranand, K; Kanna, R

    2005-12-01

    Macrodactyly is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by large digits. The usual involvement of macrodactyly is on the pre-axial side of the limb. There has been only one case report to date with involvement of both hands and feet in a child with post-axial upper limb involvement. We report an adult male who has macrodactyly of both hands and feet with post-axial involvement of both hands and pre and post- axial involvement of both feet.

  9. Gauge anomalies, gravitational anomalies, and superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    The structure of gauge and gravitational anomalies will be reviewed. The impact of these anomalies on the construction, consistency, and application of the new superstring theories will be discussed. 25 refs.

  10. The elliptic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janin, G.; Bond, V. R.

    1980-01-01

    An independent variable different from the time for elliptic orbit integration is used. Such a time transformation provides an analytical step-size regulation along the orbit. An intermediate anomaly (an anomaly intermediate between the eccentric and the true anomaly) is suggested for optimum performances. A particular case of an intermediate anomaly (the elliptic anomaly) is defined, and its relation with the other anomalies is developed.

  11. Chiral symmetry, axial anomaly and the structure of hot QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hatsuda, Tetsuo.

    1991-10-01

    This lecture is composed of three parts. (1) Heavy quark and gluon contents of light hadrons, (II) anomalous gluon content of the nucleon, and (III) hot and dense QCD. Non-valence structures of nucleon due to the OZI violation are extensively discussed in (I) and (II), and non-perturbative aspects of the quark-gluon plasma are reviewed in (III). 41 refs.

  12. Chiral symmetry, axial anomaly and the structure of hot QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hatsuda, Tetsuo

    1991-10-01

    This lecture is composed of three parts. [1] Heavy quark and gluon contents of light hadrons, [II] anomalous gluon content of the nucleon, and [III] hot and dense QCD. Non-valence structures of nucleon due to the OZI violation are extensively discussed in [I] and [II], and non-perturbative aspects of the quark-gluon plasma are reviewed in [III]. 41 refs.

  13. Chiral anomalies and differential geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zumino, B.

    1983-10-01

    Some properties of chiral anomalies are described from a geometric point of view. Topics include chiral anomalies and differential forms, transformation properties of the anomalies, identification and use of the anomalies, and normalization of the anomalies. 22 references. (WHK)

  14. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    J. Huffer

    2004-09-28

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I.

  15. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  16. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  17. Computerised Axial Tomography (CAT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Ministry of’ Defence, Defence Research Information Centre, UK. Computerised Axial Tomography ( CAT ) Report Secufty C"uMiauion tide Onadtiicadon (U. R, Cor S...DRIC T 8485 COMPUTERISED AXIAL TOMOGRAPHY ( CAT ) F.P. GENTILE, F. SABETTA, V. TRO1* ISS R 78/4.Rome, 1.5 Mlarch 1978 (from Italian) B Distribution(f...dello Radiazioni ISSN 0390--6477 F.P. GENTILE, F. SABETTA. V. TROI Computerised Axial Tomography ( CAT ) March 15, 1978). This paper is a review of

  18. [Management of axial spondyloarthritis].

    PubMed

    Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2016-11-01

    The term spondyloarthritis (SpA) is now increasingly used to classify and diagnose patients who are characterized by inflammation in the axial skeleton and peripheral manifestations (arthritis and enthesitis). The management of SpA should be tailored according to the current manifestations of the disease, the disease activity and functional impairment. The current article focuses on diagnosis and therapy in patients with axial SpA. Diagnostic procedures are discussed in light of diagnostic utility and feasibility in daily routine care. Cornerstones of treatment in patients with axial SpA are a combination of regular exercise and pharmacological treatment options aiming at anti-inflammatory strategies.

  19. Axial static mixer

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, H.E.

    1982-05-06

    Static axial mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The axial mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.

  20. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  1. Chiral anomalies in the reduced model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikukawa, Yoshio; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2002-09-01

    On the basis of an observation due to Kiskis, Narayanan and Neuberger, we show that there is a remnant of chiral anomalies in the reduced model when a Dirac operator which obeys the Ginsparg-Wilson relation is employed for the fermion sector. We consider fermions belonging to the fundamental representation of the gauge group U(N) or SU(N). For vector-like theories, we determine a general form of the axial anomaly or the topological charge within a framework of a U(1) embedding. For chiral gauge theories with the gauge group U(N), a remnant of gauge anomaly emerges as an obstruction to a smooth fermion integration measure. The pure gauge action of gauge-field configurations which cause these non-trivial phenomena always diverges in the 't Hooft N→∞ limit when d > 2.

  2. Two-dimensional chiral anomaly in differential regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. F.

    1999-07-01

    The two-dimensional chiral anomaly is calculated using differential regularization. It is shown that the anomaly emerges naturally in the vector and axial Ward identities on the same footing as the four-dimensional case. The vector gauge symmetry can be achieved by an appropriate choice of the mass scales without introducing the seagull term. We have analyzed the reason why such a universal result can be obtained in differential regularization.

  3. Coronary Artery Anomalies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center for Coronary Artery Anomalies Doctors at the Texas Heart Institute's Center for Coronary Artery Anomalies (CCAA) ... comments. Terms of Use and Privacy Policy © Copyright Texas Heart Institute All rights reserved.

  4. Lymphatic Anomalies Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Lymphatic Malformation; Generalized Lymphatic Anomaly (GLA); Central Conducting Lymphatic Anomaly; CLOVES Syndrome; Gorham-Stout Disease ("Disappearing Bone Disease"); Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome; Kaposiform Lymphangiomatosis; Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma/Tufted Angioma; Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome; Lymphangiomatosis

  5. Ebstein anomaly: a review.

    PubMed

    Galea, Joseph; Ellul, Sarah; Schembri, Aaron; Schembri-Wismayer, Pierre; Calleja-Agius, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac congenital abnormalities are a leading cause in neonatal mortality occurring in up to 1 in 200 of live births. Ebstein anomaly, also known as Kassamali anomaly, accounts for 1 percent of all congenital cardiac anomalies. This congenital abnormality involves malformation of the tricuspid valve and of the right ventricle. In this review, the causes of the anomaly are outlined and the pathophysiology is discussed, with a focus on the symptoms, management, and treatments available to date.

  6. Analysis of spacecraft anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. E.; Graham, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    The anomalies from 316 spacecraft covering the entire U.S. space program were analyzed to determine if there were any experimental or technological programs which could be implemented to remove the anomalies from future space activity. Thirty specific categories of anomalies were found to cover nearly 85 percent of all observed anomalies. Thirteen experiments were defined to deal with 17 of these categories; nine additional experiments were identified to deal with other classes of observed and anticipated anomalies. Preliminary analyses indicate that all 22 experimental programs are both technically feasible and economically viable.

  7. Topological responses from chiral anomaly in multi-Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ze-Min; Zhou, Jianhui; Shen, Shun-Qing

    2017-08-01

    Multi-Weyl semimetals are a kind of topological phase of matter with discrete Weyl nodes characterized by multiple monopole charges, in which the chiral anomaly, the anomalous nonconservation of an axial current, occurs in the presence of electric and magnetic fields. Electronic transport properties related to the chiral anomaly in the presence of both electromagnetic fields and axial electromagnetic fields in multi-Weyl semimetals are systematically studied. It has been found that the anomalous Hall conductivity has a modification linear in the axial vector potential from inhomogeneous strains. The axial electric field leads to an axial Hall current that is proportional to the distance of Weyl nodes in momentum space. This axial current may generate chirality accumulation of Weyl fermions through delicately engineering the axial electromagnetic fields even in the absence of external electromagnetic fields. Therefore this work provides a nonmagnetic mechanism of generation of chirality accumulation in Weyl semimetals and might shed new light on the application of Weyl semimetals in the emerging field of valleytronics.

  8. Investigation of Axial Electric Field Measurements with Grounded-Wire TEM Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nan-nan; Xue, Guo-qiang; Li, Hai; Hou, Dong-yang

    2017-09-01

    The grounded-wire transient electromagnetic (TEM) surveying is often performed along the equatorial direction with its observation lines paralleling to the transmitting wire with a certain transmitter-receiver distance. However, such method takes into account only the equatorial component of the electromagnetic field, and a little effort has been made on incorporating the other major component along the transmitting wire, here denoted as axial field. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of its fundamental characteristics and guide the designing of the corresponding observation system for reliable anomaly detection, this study for the first time investigates the axial electric field from three crucial aspects, including its decay curve, plane distribution, and anomaly sensitivity, through both synthetic modeling and real application to one major coal field in China. The results demonstrate a higher sensitivity to both high- and low-resistivity anomalies by the electric field in axial direction and confirm its great potentials for robust anomaly detection in the subsurface.

  9. Altered Axial Skeletal Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The axial skeleton is routinely examined in standard developmental toxicity bioassays and has proven to be sensitive to a wide variety of chemical agents. Dysmorphogenesis in the skull, vertebral column and ribs has been described in both human populations and in laboratory anima...

  10. Altered Axial Skeletal Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The axial skeleton is routinely examined in standard developmental toxicity bioassays and has proven to be sensitive to a wide variety of chemical agents. Dysmorphogenesis in the skull, vertebral column and ribs has been described in both human populations and in laboratory anima...

  11. Light weakly coupled axial forces: models, constraints, and projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; Tait, Tim M. P.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the effects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a dark photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, briefly commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in π0 and 8Be∗ decay.

  12. Light Weakly Coupled Axial Forces: Models, Constraints, and Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; Tait, Tim P.

    2016-09-28

    We investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the effects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a dark photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, briefly commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in pi^0 and 8-Be* decay.

  13. Light weakly coupled axial forces: models, constraints, and projections

    DOE PAGES

    Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; ...

    2017-05-01

    Here, we investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the e ects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a darkmore » photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, brie y commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in π0 and 8Be* decay.« less

  14. Taussig-Bing Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Igor E.

    2009-01-01

    Taussig-Bing anomaly is a rare congenital heart malformation that was first described in 1949 by Helen B. Taussig (1898–1986) and Richard J. Bing (1909–). Although substantial improvement has since been achieved in surgical results of the repair of the anomaly, management of the Taussig-Bing anomaly remains challenging. A history of the original description of the anomaly, the life stories of the individuals who first described it, and the current outcomes of its surgical management are reviewed herein. PMID:20069085

  15. Competing Orders and Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-08

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation "laws" could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the 't Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  16. Competing Orders and Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation “laws” could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the ’t Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  17. Competing Orders and Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-01-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation “laws” could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the ’t Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed. PMID:27499184

  18. Fetal sonographic diagnosis of aortic arch anomalies.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S-J; Min, J-Y; Lee, Y-H; Roman, K; Jaeggi, E; Smallhorn, J

    2003-11-01

    Aortic arch anomalies refer to congenital abnormalities of the position or branching pattern, or both of the aortic arch. Although aortic arch anomalies are not uncommon, reports on their prenatal diagnosis are scarce. Insight into the hypothetical arch model is crucial to understanding anomalies of the aortic arch in the fetus. Recognition of the trachea, three major vessels, ductus arteriosus and descending aorta in the axial views of the upper mediastinum is necessary for a complete fetal cardiac assessment. Clues to aortic arch anomalies include abnormal position of the descending aorta, absence of the normal 'V'-shaped confluence of the ductal and aortic arches, a gap between the ascending aorta and main pulmonary artery in the three-vessel view, and an abnormal vessel behind the trachea with or without a vascular loop or ring around the trachea. Meticulous attention to anatomic landmarks will lead to successful prenatal diagnosis of important vascular rings making early postnatal management possible. Copyright 2003 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues. PMID:25434770

  20. Behavioral economics without anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Rachlin, H

    1995-01-01

    Behavioral economics is often conceived as the study of anomalies superimposed on a rational system. As research has progressed, anomalies have multiplied until little is left of rationality. Another conception of behavioral economics is based on the axiom that value is always maximized. It incorporates so-called anomalies either as conflicts between temporal patterns of behavior and the individual acts comprising those patterns or as outcomes of nonexponential time discounting. This second conception of behavioral economics is both empirically based and internally consistent. PMID:8551195

  1. Vascular anomalies in children.

    PubMed

    Weibel, L

    2011-11-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided in two major categories: tumours (such as infantile hemangiomas) and malformations. Hemangiomas are common benign neoplasms that undergo a proliferative phase followed by stabilization and eventual spontaneous involution, whereas vascular malformations are rare structural anomalies representing morphogenetic errors of developing blood vessels and lymphatics. It is important to properly diagnose vascular anomalies early in childhood because of their distinct differences in morbidity, prognosis and need for a multidisciplinary management. We discuss a number of characteristic clinical features as clues for early diagnosis and identification of associated syndromes.

  2. Anomalies on orbifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cohen, Andrew G.; Georgi, Howard

    2001-03-16

    We discuss the form of the chiral anomaly on an S1/Z2 orbifold with chiral boundary conditions. We find that the 4-divergence of the higher-dimensional current evaluated at a given point in the extra dimension is proportional to the probability of finding the chiral zero mode there. Nevertheless the anomaly, appropriately defined as the five dimensional divergence of the current, lives entirely on the orbifold fixed planes and is independent of the shape of the zero mode. Therefore long distance four dimensional anomaly cancellation ensures the consistency of the higher dimensional orbifold theory.

  3. Lithium and Ebstein's anomaly.

    PubMed

    Sípek, A

    1989-01-01

    The article deals with Ebstein's anomaly, lithium and their relationship. Some studies suggest that lithium might be involved as a teratogen increasing the incidence of Ebstein's anomaly in the offspring of female patients with manio-depressive psychosis and lithium-administered during pregnancy. The second part of the article contains data on the incidence of Ebstein's anomaly in the Czech Socialist Republic between 1960 and 1985. The results indicate a steady rise in the incidence of this congenital malformation over the above period of time.

  4. Dual diaphragmatic anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Arjun; Thomas, Abin Varghese

    2016-01-01

    Although diaphragmatic anomalies such as an eventration and hiatus hernia are commonly encountered in incidental chest X-ray imaging, the presence of concomitant multiple anomalies is extremely rare. This is all the more true in adults. Herein, we present the case of a 75-year-old female, while undergoing a routine chest X-ray imaging, was found to have eventration of right hemidiaphragm along with a hiatus hernia as well. PMID:27625457

  5. Anomalies and entanglement entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Tatsuma; Yarom, Amos

    2016-03-01

    We initiate a systematic study of entanglement and Rényi entropies in the presence of gauge and gravitational anomalies in even-dimensional quantum field theories. We argue that the mixed and gravitational anomalies are sensitive to boosts and obtain a closed form expression for their behavior under such transformations. Explicit constructions exhibiting the dependence of entanglement entropy on boosts is provided for theories on spacetimes with non-trivial magnetic fluxes and (or) non-vanishing Pontryagin classes.

  6. Superstrings, anomalies and unification

    SciTech Connect

    Martinis, M.

    1986-01-01

    This recently concluded Adriatic Meeting provides coverage on the theoretical and experimental aspects of particle physics. Contents: Differential Geometry and String Theory; Supergravity from Superstrings; Gravitational Collapse and Quantum Mechanics; Interacting String Field Theory; Superstrings from 26 Dimensions and Superstring Field Theory and the Covariant Fermion Emission Vertex; Unification of Families; Phenomenology and Cosmology with Superstring Models; Effective Lagrangian Anomalies and Spontaneous Symmetry; Anomalies and Schwinger Terms and others.

  7. On isostatic geoid anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haxby, W. F.; Turcotte, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    In regions of slowly varying lateral density changes, the gravity and geoid anomalies may be expressed as power series expansions in topography. Geoid anomalies in isostatically compensated regions can be directly related to the local dipole moment of the density-depth distribution. This relationship is used to obtain theoretical geoid anomalies for different models of isostatic compensation. The classical Pratt and Airy models give geoid height-elevation relationships differing in functional form but predicting geoid anomalies of comparable magnitude. The thermal cooling model explaining ocean floor subsidence away from mid-ocean ridges predicts a linear age-geoid height relationship of 0.16 m/m.y. Geos 3 altimetry profiles were examined to test these theoretical relationships. A profile over the mid-Atlantic ridge is closely matched by the geoid curve derived from the thermal cooling model. The observed geoid anomaly over the Atlantic margin of North America can be explained by Airy compensation. The relation between geoid anomaly and bathymetry across the Bermuda Swell is consistent with Pratt compensation with a 100-km depth of compensation.

  8. Dandy-Walker anomaly in Meckel-Gruber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cincinnati, P; Neri, M E; Valentini, A

    2000-01-01

    We report a fetus affected by Meckel-Gruber syndrome whose phenotype was characterized by macrocephaly, frontal bossing, a saddle nose, marked micrognathia, a distended abdomen, omphalocele, post-axial polydactyly and talipes equinovarus. The main neuropathological finding at autopsy was in a very large cyst located in an abnormally wide posterior cranial fossa consistent with a Dandy-Walker anomaly. Intestinal malrotation, enlarged cystic dysplastic kidneys and hepatic portal fibrosis coexisted. The occurrence of a Dandy-Walker malformation in Meckel-Gruber syndrome confirms a disturbance in rhombencephalon development. Although uncommon, it should be included among the central nervous anomalies representative of the syndrome.

  9. Astrometric solar system anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, John D

    2009-01-01

    There are at least four unexplained anomalies connected with astrometric data. perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital energy per unit mass. next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm yr{sup -1}. The other two anomalies are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth anomaly is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported unexplained increase that is significant at the three-sigma level. It is produent to suspect that all four anomalies have mundane explanations, or that one or more anomalies are a result of systematic error. Yet they might eventually be explained by new physics. For example, a slightly modified theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation for the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.

  10. Axial movements in ideomotor apraxia

    PubMed Central

    Poeck, K; Lehmkuhl, G; Willmes, K

    1982-01-01

    Non-symbolic axial movements were examined and compared to oral and limb movements in a group of 60 aphasic patients (15 of each major subgroup) with exclusively left-sided brain damage. The contention in the literature that axial movements are preserved in patients with ideomotor limb apraxia was not confirmed. PMID:6186771

  11. Axial disease in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gladman, Dafna D

    2007-12-01

    The definition of axial disease in psoriatic arthritis has varied from isolated unilateral grade 2 sacroiliitis to criteria similar to those used for ankylosing spondylitis. Depending on the definition used, the prevalence of axial disease varies from 25% to 70% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. This article reviews the prevalence, clinical and radiologic features, pathogenesis, prognosis, and treatment of psoriatic spondylitis.

  12. Magnetic anomalies. [Magsat studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A.

    1983-01-01

    The implications and accuracy of anomaly maps produced using Magsat data on the scalar and vector magnetic field of the earth are discussed. Comparisons have been made between the satellite maps and aeromagnetic survey maps, showing smoother data from the satellite maps and larger anomalies in the aircraft data. The maps are being applied to characterize the structure and tectonics of the underlying regions. Investigations are still needed regarding the directions of magnetization within the crust and to generate further correlations between anomaly features and large scale geological structures. Furthermore, an increased data base is recommended for the Pacific Ocean basin in order to develop a better starting model for Pacific tectonic movements. The Pacific basin was large farther backwards in time and subduction zones surround the basin, thereby causing difficulties for describing the complex break-up scenario for Gondwanaland.

  13. Anomalies and asymmetries in quark-gluon matter

    SciTech Connect

    Teryaev, O. V.

    2012-06-15

    The manifestations of axial anomaly and related effects in heavy-ion collisions are considered. Special role is played by various asymmetries. The azimuthal correlational asymmetries of neutron pairs at NICA/FAIR energy range may probe the global rotation of strongly interacting matter. The conductivity is related to the angular asymmetries of dilepton pairs. The strong magnetic field generated in heavy-ion collisions leads to the excess of soft dileptons flying predominantly in the scattering plane.

  14. Common Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Congenital anomalies account for a substantial proportion of childhood morbidity and mortality. They have become proportionately larger because of the decline of such other categories as infections or birth trauma. Approximately 3% of newborns have a serious handicapping or potentially lethal condition; in longterm studies the frequency is much higher. There is no good evidence to suggest that the rates of congenital anomalies are increasing, although this is a common perception. This article discusses diagnosis and management (especially genetic implications) of heart defects, neural tube defects, orofacial clefting, dislocated hip, clubfoot, and hypospadias. PMID:21274150

  15. GRAIL Spots Gravity Anomaly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-05

    A 300-mile-long linear gravity anomaly on the far side of the moon has been revealed by gravity gradients measured by NASA GRAIL mission. GRAIL data are shown on the left, with red and blue corresponding to stronger gravity gradients.

  16. [Ebstein anomaly and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Riesgo, Carmen Armida Iñigo; Gómez, Luis Guillermo Torres; Higareda, Salvador Hernández; Vargas, Juan Rafael Gómez

    2008-08-01

    The Ebstein's anomaly is a congenital malformation of the tricuspid valve and of the right ventricle that usually is associated with interauricular communication, foramen oval, and arrhythmias of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type. To analyze the association between Ebstein's anomaly and pregnancy. A prospective study was made in five pregnant women's with Ebstein's anomaly without surgery. We analyzed the clinical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, x-ray of thorax, Doppler color heart ultrasound, and fetal valoration by means of pelvic ecosonogram and cardiotocographic registry, and routinely prenatal paraclinic tests. We observed severe expansion of the ventricle and 3rd degree index of atrialization in two patients. In two pregnancies there were interatrial communication (patients with cyanosis) and in three was detected severe tricuspid insufficiency. The average of gestacional age was of 36.4 +/- 1.8 weeks. Two of the five pregnancies has preterm birth. Only one childbirth was short weight to gestational age. The rest stayed within percentile 10. There were no obits or neonatal deaths, either congenital abnormality by Doppler heart ultrasound. The pregnancy is well tolerated in patients with Ebstein's anomaly; nevertheless, participation of multidisciplinary team is recommended to establish the treatment.

  17. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  18. Study of axial magnetic effect

    SciTech Connect

    Braguta, Victor; Chernodub, M. N.; Goy, V. A.; Landsteiner, K.; Ulybyshev, M.

    2016-01-22

    The Axial Magnetic Effect manifests itself as an equilibrium energy flow of massless fermions induced by the axial (chiral) magnetic field. Here we study the Axial Magnetic Effect in the quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with massless overlap fermions at finite temperature. We numerically observe that in the low-temperature hadron phase the effect is absent due to the quark confinement. In the high-temperature deconfinement phase the energy flow is an increasing function of the temperature which reaches the predicted asymptotic T{sup 2} behavior at high temperatures. We find, however, that energy flow is about one order of magnitude lower compared to a theoretical prediction.

  19. The Pioneer Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Turyshev, Slava G; Toth, Viktor T

    2010-01-01

    Radio-metric Doppler tracking data received from the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft from heliocentric distances of 20-70 AU has consistently indicated the presence of a small, anomalous, blue-shifted frequency drift uniformly changing with a rate of ∼ 6 × 10(-9) Hz/s. Ultimately, the drift was interpreted as a constant sunward deceleration of each particular spacecraft at the level of aP = (8.74 ± 1.33) × 10(-10) m/s(2). This apparent violation of the Newton's gravitational inverse-square law has become known as the Pioneer anomaly; the nature of this anomaly remains unexplained. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the physical properties of the anomaly and the conditions that led to its detection and characterization. We review various mechanisms proposed to explain the anomaly and discuss the current state of efforts to determine its nature. A comprehensive new investigation of the anomalous behavior of the two Pioneers has begun recently. The new efforts rely on the much-extended set of radio-metric Doppler data for both spacecraft in conjunction with the newly available complete record of their telemetry files and a large archive of original project documentation. As the new study is yet to report its findings, this review provides the necessary background for the new results to appear in the near future. In particular, we provide a significant amount of information on the design, operations and behavior of the two Pioneers during their entire missions, including descriptions of various data formats and techniques used for their navigation and radio-science data analysis. As most of this information was recovered relatively recently, it was not used in the previous studies of the Pioneer anomaly, but it is critical for the new investigation.

  20. Boundary Weyl anomaly of N = (2, 2) superconformal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachas, Constantin; Plencner, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the trace and axial anomalies of N = (2, 2) superconformal theories with exactly marginal deformations, on a surface with boundary. Extending recent work by Gomis et al, we derive the boundary contribution that captures the anomalous scale dependence of the one-point functions of exactly marginal operators. Integration of the bulk super-Weyl anomaly shows that the sphere partition function computes the Kähler potential K(λ, \\overline{λ}) on the superconformal manifold. Likewise, our results confirm the conjecture that the partition function on the supersymmetric hemisphere computes the holomorphic central charge, c Ω(λ), associated with the boundary condition Ω. The boundary entropy, given by a ratio of hemispheres and sphere, is therefore fully determined by anomalies.

  1. Appropriate management of axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    LaSalle, Sean P; Deodhar, Atul A

    2007-10-01

    The management of axial spondyloarthritis includes a structured baseline assessment of the disease and follow-up of treatment efficacy using validated instruments. The treatment will depend on the severity and predominant manifestations of the disease. The cornerstone of management remains physical therapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs such as sulfasalazine have shown efficacy only in treating peripheral arthritis, whereas thalidomide and pamidronate have shown some efficacy in treating axial inflammation. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha agents are an efficacious option for treating signs and symptoms of axial disease, peripheral arthritis, and enthesitis, and for improving functional outcomes. They have not shown efficacy in reducing radiographic progression in axial disease. Recent evidence suggests that the new bone formation in ankylosing spondylitis may be due to upregulation of Wnt signaling in the osteoblastic pathway secondary to low serum DKK-1 levels, which are further suppressed by tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy.

  2. Gravity Anomaly Intersects Moon Basin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-05

    A linear gravity anomaly intersecting the Crisium basin on the nearside of the moon has been revealed by NASA GRAIL mission. The GRAIL gravity gradient data are shown at left, with the location of the anomaly indicated.

  3. Hawking radiation and covariant anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kulkarni, Shailesh

    2008-01-15

    Generalizing the method of Wilczek and collaborators we provide a derivation of Hawking radiation from charged black holes using only covariant gauge and gravitational anomalies. The reliability and universality of the anomaly cancellation approach to Hawking radiation is also discussed.

  4. XYY chromosome anomaly and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, M; MacBeth, R; Varma, S L

    1998-02-07

    Sex chromosome anomalies have been associated with psychoses, and most of the evidence is linked to the presence of an additional X chromosome. We report a patient with XYY chromosome anomaly who developed schizophrenia.

  5. Dissipative axial inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notari, Alessio; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2016-12-01

    We analyze in detail the background cosmological evolution of a scalar field coupled to a massless abelian gauge field through an axial term phi/fγ F ~F, such as in the case of an axion. Gauge fields in this case are known to experience tachyonic growth and therefore can backreact on the background as an effective dissipation into radiation energy density ρR, which can lead to inflation without the need of a flat potential. We analyze the system, for momenta k smaller than the cutoff fγ, including the backreaction numerically. We consider the evolution from a given static initial condition and explicitly show that, if fγ is smaller than the field excursion phi0 by about a factor of at least Script O (20), there is a friction effect which turns on before the field can fall down and which can then lead to a very long stage of inflation with a generic potential. In addition we find superimposed oscillations, which would get imprinted on any kind of perturbations, scalars and tensors. Such oscillations have a period of 4-5 efolds and an amplitude which is typically less than a few percent and decreases linearly with fγ. We also stress that the curvature perturbation on uniform density slices should be sensitive to slow-roll parameters related to ρR rather than dot phi2/2 and we discuss the existence of friction terms acting on the perturbations, although we postpone a calculation of the power spectrum and of non-gaussianity to future work and we simply define and compute suitable slow roll parameters. Finally we stress that this scenario may be realized in the axion case, if the coupling 1/fγ to U(1) (photons) is much larger than the coupling 1/fG to non-abelian gauge fields (gluons), since the latter sets the range of the potential and therefore the maximal allowed phi0~ fG.

  6. Antler anomalies in tule elk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gogan, Peter J.P.; Jessup, David A.; Barrett, Reginald H.

    1988-01-01

    Antler anomalies were evident in tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) within 1 yr of reintroduction to Point Reyes, California (USA). These anomalies are consistent with previously described mineral deficiency-induced anomalies in cervids. The elk were judged deficient in copper. Low levels of copper in soils and vegetation at the release site, exacerbated by possible protein deficiency due to poor range conditions, are postulated as likely causes of the antler anomalies.

  7. Axial Torsion of Gangrenous Meckel's Diverticulum Causing Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sasikumar, K.; Noonavath, Ravinder Naik; Sreenath, G. S.; Maroju, Nanda Kishore

    2013-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum (MD) is a commonly encountered congenital anomaly of the small intestine. We report an extremely unusual case of an axially torted, gangrenous MD presenting as acute intestinal obstruction. A 26-year-old male patient presented to our emergency department with 3 days history of abdominal pain, distention and bilious vomiting. On laparotomy, there was minimal hemorrhagic fluid localized in right iliac fossa and small bowel loops were dilated. A MD was seen attached to the mesentery of nonadjacent small bowel by a peritoneal band. The diverticulum was axially torted and gangrenous. In addition, there was compression of ileum by the peritoneal band resulting in intestinal obstruction, which was relieved on dividing the band. Resection and anastomosis of the small bowel including the MD was performed. We hereby report a rare and unusual complication of a MD. Although treatment outcome is generally good, pre-operative diagnosis is often difficult. PMID:24741431

  8. Differential occupation of axial morphospace.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrea B; Mehta, Rita S

    2014-02-01

    The postcranial system is composed of the axial and appendicular skeletons. The axial skeleton, which consists of serially repeating segments commonly known as vertebrae, protects and provides leverage for movement of the body. Across the vertebral column, much numerical and morphological diversity can be observed, which is associated with axial regionalization. The present article discusses this basic diversity and the early developmental mechanisms that guide vertebral formation and regionalization. An examination of vertebral numbers across the major vertebrate clades finds that actinopterygian and chondrichthyan fishes tend to increase vertebral number in the caudal region whereas Sarcopterygii increase the number of vertebrae in the precaudal region, although exceptions to each trend exist. Given the different regions of axial morphospace that are occupied by these groups, differential developmental processes control the axial patterning of actinopterygian and sarcopterygian species. It is possible that, among a variety of factors, the differential selective regimes for aquatic versus terrestrial locomotion have led to the differential use of axial morphospace in vertebrates.

  9. Ebstein Anomaly in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rusdi, Lusiani; Azizi, Syahrir; Suwita, Christopher; Karina, Astrid; Nasution, Sally A

    2016-10-01

    A 27-year-old primiparous woman with 28 weeks gestational age was admitted to our hospital with worsening shortness of breath. She was diagnosed with Ebstein's anomaly three years ago, but preferred to be left untreated. The patient was not cyanotic and her vital signs were stable. Her ECG showed incomplete RBBB and prolonged PR-interval. Blood tests revealed mild anemia. Observation of two-dimensional echo with color flow Doppler study showed Ebstein's anomaly with PFO as additional defects, EF of 57%, LV and LA dilatation, RV atrialization, severe TR, and moderate PH with RVSP of 44.3 mmHg. The patient then underwent elective sectio caesaria at 30 weeks of gestational age; both the mother and her baby were alive and were in good conditions.

  10. Creating chiral anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradlyn, Barry; Cano, Jennifer; Wang, Zhijun; Hirschberger, Max; Ong, N. Phuan; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    Materials with intrinsic Weyl points should present exotic magnetotransport phenomena due to spectral flow between Weyl nodes of opposite chirality - the so-called ``chiral anomaly''. However, to date, the most definitive transport data showing the presence of a chiral anomaly comes from Dirac (not Weyl) materials. These semimetals develop Weyl fermions only in the presence of an externally applied magnetic field, when the four-fold degeneracy is lifted. In this talk we examine Berry phase effects on transport due to the emergence of these field-induced Weyl point and (in some cases) line nodes. We pay particular attention to the differences between intrinsic and field-induced Weyl fermions, from the point of view of kinetic theory. Finally, we apply our analysis to a particular material relevant to current experiments performed at Princeton.

  11. Ferret Workflow Anomaly Detection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-28

    The Ferret workflow anomaly detection system project 2003-2004 has provided validation and anomaly detection in accredited workflows in secure...completed to accomplish a goal. Anomaly detection is the determination that a condition departs from the expected. The baseline behavior from which the

  12. Sharing AIS Related Anomalies (SARA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    related anomalies they uncover. This document proposes a taxonomy and a representation of the metadata and information ele- ments of the AIS-related...13 2.4 Potential Collaborators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3 Taxonomy of AIS...related Anomaly Types 15 3.1 AIS Anomalies Levels 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3.2 Taxonomy

  13. Anomalies, gauge field topology, and the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, Michael

    2011-04-15

    Motivated by the connection between gauge field topology and the axial anomaly in fermion currents, I suggest that the fourth power of the naive Dirac operator can provide a natural method to define a local lattice measure of topological charge. For smooth gauge fields this reduces to the usual topological density. For typical gauge field configurations in a numerical simulation, however, quantum fluctuations dominate, and the sum of this density over the system does not generally give an integer winding. On cooling with respect to the Wilson gauge action, instanton like structures do emerge. As cooling proceeds, these objects tend shrink and finally 'fall through the lattice.' Modifying the action can block the shrinking at the expense of a loss of reflection positivity. The cooling procedure is highly sensitive to the details of the initial steps, suggesting that quantum fluctuations induce a small but fundamental ambiguity in the definition of topological susceptibility.

  14. Pathogenesis of Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Laurence M.; Ballieux, Fanny; Vikkula, Miikka

    2010-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are localized defects of vascular development. Most of them occur sporadically, i.e. there is no familial history of lesions, yet in a few cases clear inheritance is observed. These inherited forms are often characterized by multifocal lesions that are mainly small in size and increase in number with patient’s age. On the basis of these inherited forms, molecular genetic studies have unraveled a number of inherited mutations giving direct insight into the pathophysiological cause and the molecular pathways that are implicated. Genetic defects have been identified for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), inherited cutaneomucosal venous malformation (VMCM), glomuvenous malformation (GVM), capillary malformation - arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM), cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) and some isolated and syndromic forms of primary lymphedema. We focus on these disorders, the implicated mutated genes and the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. We also call attention to the concept of Knudson’s double-hit mechanism to explain incomplete penetrance and the large clinical variation in expressivity of inherited vascular anomalies. This variability renders the making of correct diagnosis of the rare inherited forms difficult. Yet, the identification of the pathophysiological causes and pathways involved in them has had an unprecedented impact on our thinking of their etiopathogenesis, and has opened the doors towards a more refined classification of vascular anomalies. It has also made it possible to develop animal models that can be tested for specific molecular therapies, aimed at alleviating the dysfunctions caused by the aberrant genes and proteins. PMID:21095468

  15. Physicochemical isotope anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Esat, T.M.

    1988-06-01

    Isotopic composition of refractory elements can be modified, by physical processes such as distillation and sputtering, in unexpected patterns. Distillation enriches the heavy isotopes in the residue and the light isotopes in the vapor. However, current models appear to be inadequate to describe the detailed mass dependence, in particular for large fractionations. Coarse- and fine-grained inclusions from the Allende meteorite exhibit correlated isotope effects in Mg both as mass-dependent fractionation and residual anomalies. This isotope pattern can be duplicated by high temperature distillation in the laboratory. A ubiquitous property of meteoritic inclusions for Mg as well as for most of the other elements, where measurements exist, is mass-dependent fractionation. In contrast, terrestrial materials such as microtektites, tektite buttons as well as lunar orange and green glass spheres have normal Mg isotopic composition. A subset of interplanetary dust particles labelled as chondritic aggregates exhibit excesses in {sup 26}Mg and deuterium anomalies. Sputtering is expected to be a dominant mechanism in the destruction of grains within interstellar dust clouds. An active proto-sun as well as the present solar-wind and solar-flare flux are of sufficient intensity to sputter significant amounts of material. Laboratory experiments in Mg show widespread isotope effects including residual {sup 26}Mg excesses and mass dependent fractionation. It is possible that the {sup 26}Mg excesses in interplanetary dust is related to sputtering by energetic solar-wind particles. The implication if the laboratory distillation and sputtering effects are discussed and contrasted with the anomalies in meteoritic inclusions the other extraterrestrial materials the authors have access to.

  16. Detecting Patterns of Anomalies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    ct)P (bt|ct) , where A,B and C are mutually exclusive subsets of attributes with at most k elements . This ratio is similar to the previous formula , but...AND SUBTITLE Detecting Patterns of Anomalies 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...to be dependent if, µ(A,B) ≥ βµ (2.1) where, βµ is a threshold parameter, set to a low value of 0.1 ( empirically ) in our experi- ments. Thus, for a

  17. Hypercharged Anomaly Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Dermisek, Radovan; Verlinde, Herman; Wang, L.-T.

    2008-04-04

    We show that, in string models with the minimal supersymmetric standard model residing on D-branes, the bino mass can be generated in a geometrically separated hidden sector. Hypercharge mediation thus naturally teams up with anomaly mediation. The mixed scenario predicts a distinctive yet viable superpartner spectrum, provided that the ratio {alpha} between the bino and gravitino mass lies in the range 0.05 < or approx. |{alpha}| < or approx. 0.25 and m{sub 3/2} > or approx. 35 TeV. We summarize some of the experimental signatures of this scenario.

  18. The diphoton anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardecchia, M.

    2017-07-01

    In December 2015, the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations presented results from data taken at the LHC with pp collisions at the center-of-mass energy of √{s} = 13{ TeV} . In the search for resonances decaying into two photons, both experiments observed a tantalising excess of events at an invariant mass of the photon pair of 750GeV. In this contribution, I will summarise some of the main phenomenological and theoretical aspects of this anomaly in terms of New Physics.

  19. When do anomalies begin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightman, Alan; Gingerich, Owen

    1992-02-01

    The present historical and methodological consideration of scientific anomalies notes that some of these are recognized as such, after long neglect, only after the emergence of compelling explanations for their presence in the given theory in view of an alternative conceptual framework. These cases of 'retrorecognition' are indicative not merely of a significant characteristic of the process of conceptual development and scientific discovery, but of the bases for such process in human psychology. Attention is given to the illustrative cases of the 'flatness problem' in big bang theory, the perigee-opposition problem in Ptolemaic astronomy, the continental-fit problem in geology, and the equality of inertial and gravitational mass.

  20. Detecting Biosphere anomalies hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guanche-Garcia, Yanira; Mahecha, Miguel; Flach, Milan; Denzler, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    The current amount of satellite remote sensing measurements available allow for applying data-driven methods to investigate environmental processes. The detection of anomalies or abnormal events is crucial to monitor the Earth system and to analyze their impacts on ecosystems and society. By means of a combination of statistical methods, this study proposes an intuitive and efficient methodology to detect those areas that present hotspots of anomalies, i.e. higher levels of abnormal or extreme events or more severe phases during our historical records. Biosphere variables from a preliminary version of the Earth System Data Cube developed within the CAB-LAB project (http://earthsystemdatacube.net/) have been used in this study. This database comprises several atmosphere and biosphere variables expanding 11 years (2001-2011) with 8-day of temporal resolution and 0.25° of global spatial resolution. In this study, we have used 10 variables that measure the biosphere. The methodology applied to detect abnormal events follows the intuitive idea that anomalies are assumed to be time steps that are not well represented by a previously estimated statistical model [1].We combine the use of Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) models with a distance metric like Mahalanobis distance to detect abnormal events in multiple biosphere variables. In a first step we pre-treat the variables by removing the seasonality and normalizing them locally (μ=0,σ=1). Additionally we have regionalized the area of study into subregions of similar climate conditions, by using the Köppen climate classification. For each climate region and variable we have selected the best ARMA parameters by means of a Bayesian Criteria. Then we have obtained the residuals by comparing the fitted models with the original data. To detect the extreme residuals from the 10 variables, we have computed the Mahalanobis distance to the data's mean (Hotelling's T^2), which considers the covariance matrix of the joint

  1. Satellite magnetic anomalies over subduction zones - The Aleutian Arc anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. C.; Frey, H.; Thomas, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Positive magnetic anomalies seen in MAGSAT average scalar anomaly data overlying some subduction zones can be explained in terms of the magnetization contrast between the cold subducted oceanic slab and the surrounding hotter, nonmagnetic mantle. Three-dimensional modeling studies show that peak anomaly amplitude and location depend on slab length and dip. A model for the Aleutian Arc anomaly matches the general trend of the observed MAGSAT anomaly if a slab thickness of 7 km and a relatively high (induced plus viscous) magnetization contrast of 4 A/m are used. A second source body along the present day continental margin is required to match the observed anomaly in detail, and may be modeled as a relic slab from subduction prior to 60 m.y. ago.

  2. The XXXXY Chromosome Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Zaleski, Witold A.; Houston, C. Stuart; Pozsonyi, J.; Ying, K. L.

    1966-01-01

    The majority of abnormal sex chromosome complexes in the male have been considered to be variants of Klinefelter's syndrome but an exception should probably be made in the case of the XXXXY individual who has distinctive phenotypic features. Clinical, radiological and cytological data on three new cases of XXXXY syndrome are presented and 30 cases from the literature are reviewed. In many cases the published clinical and radiological data were supplemented and re-evaluated. Mental retardation, usually severe, was present in all cases. Typical facies was observed in many; clinodactyly of the fifth finger was seen in nearly all. Radiological examination revealed abnormalities in the elbows and wrists in all the 19 personally evaluated cases, and other skeletal anomalies were very frequent. Cryptorchism is very common and absence of Leydig's cells may differentiate the XXXXY chromosome anomaly from polysomic variants of Klinefelter's syndrome. The relationship of this syndrome to Klinefelter's syndrome and to Down's syndrome is discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15 PMID:4222822

  3. Automated anomaly detection processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraiman, James B.; Arouh, Scott L.; Webb, Michael L.

    2002-07-01

    Robust exploitation of tracking and surveillance data will provide an early warning and cueing capability for military and civilian Law Enforcement Agency operations. This will improve dynamic tasking of limited resources and hence operational efficiency. The challenge is to rapidly identify threat activity within a huge background of noncombatant traffic. We discuss development of an Automated Anomaly Detection Processor (AADP) that exploits multi-INT, multi-sensor tracking and surveillance data to rapidly identify and characterize events and/or objects of military interest, without requiring operators to specify threat behaviors or templates. The AADP has successfully detected an anomaly in traffic patterns in Los Angeles, analyzed ship track data collected during a Fleet Battle Experiment to detect simulated mine laying behavior amongst maritime noncombatants, and is currently under development for surface vessel tracking within the Coast Guard's Vessel Traffic Service to support port security, ship inspection, and harbor traffic control missions, and to monitor medical surveillance databases for early alert of a bioterrorist attack. The AADP can also be integrated into combat simulations to enhance model fidelity of multi-sensor fusion effects in military operations.

  4. Einstein, Entropy and Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirtes, Daniel; Oberheim, Eric

    2006-11-01

    This paper strengthens and defends the pluralistic implications of Einstein's successful, quantitative predictions of Brownian motion for a philosophical dispute about the nature of scientific advance that began between two prominent philosophers of science in the second half of the twentieth century (Thomas Kuhn and Paul Feyerabend). Kuhn promoted a monistic phase-model of scientific advance, according to which a paradigm driven `normal science' gives rise to its own anomalies, which then lead to a crisis and eventually a scientific revolution. Feyerabend stressed the importance of pluralism for scientific progress. He rejected Kuhn's model arguing that it fails to recognize the role that alternative theories can play in identifying exactly which phenomena are anomalous in the first place. On Feyerabend's account, Einstein's predictions allow for a crucial experiment between two incommensurable theories, and are an example of an anomaly that could refute the reigning paradigm only after the development of a competitor. Using Kuhn's specification of a disciplinary matrix to illustrate the incommensurability between the two paradigms, we examine the different research strategies available in this peculiar case. On the basis of our reconstruction, we conclude by rebutting some critics of Feyerabend's argument.

  5. Axial phase measurements of light interacting with microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myun-Sik; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2012-03-01

    We present an experimental method to study field structures of highly confined light after interaction with microstructures. A high-resolution interference microscope (HRIM) allows us to measure the three-dimensional (3D) amplitude and phase distributions of light emerging from the sample. While the amplitude fields represent conventional pictures of light confinements like a hotspot, the phase fields exhibit peculiar behaviors, which are of significant interest. Longitudinal-differential interferometry can directly visualize and quantify phase deviations in 3D space with respect to a plane wave of the same frequency serving as a reference. The phase fields near the confinement exhibits particular phase features, e.g., axial phase anomaly and superluminal phase velocity. As example of the light interaction with microstructures, two specific optical phenomena have been investigated here: Gouy phase anomaly in the photonic nanojet and superluminal phase propagation of the spot of Arago. For the first time, we could experimentally demonstrate high-resolution axial phase measurements of such phenomena generated by microstructures of wavelengthscale size and at visible light with 642-nm wavelength.

  6. Anomaly detection: eye movement patterns.

    PubMed

    Ni, W; Fodor, J D; Crain, S; Shankweiler, D

    1998-09-01

    The symptom of a garden path in sentence processing is an important anomaly in the input string. This anomaly signals to the parser that an error has occurred, and provides cues for how to repair it. Anomaly detection is thus an important aspect of sentence processing. In the present study, we investigated how the parser responds to unambiguous sentences that contain syntactic anomalies and pragmatic anomalies, examining records of eye movement during reading. While sensitivity to the two kinds of anomaly was very rapid and essentially simultaneous, qualitative differences existed in the patterns of first-pass reading times and eye regressions. The results are compatible with the proposal that syntactic information and pragmatic information are used differently in garden-path recovery.

  7. Vertebral column anomalies in Indo-Pacific and Atlantic humpback dolphins Sousa spp.

    PubMed

    Weir, Caroline R; Wang, John Y

    2016-08-09

    Conspicuous vertebral column abnormalities in humpback dolphins (genus Sousa) were documented for the first time during 3 photo-identification field studies of small populations in Taiwan, Senegal and Angola. Seven Taiwanese humpback dolphins S. chinensis taiwanensis with vertebral column anomalies (lordosis, kyphosis or scoliosis) were identified, along with 2 possible cases of vertebral osteomyelitis. There was evidence from several individuals photographed over consecutive years that the anomalies became more pronounced with age. Three Atlantic humpback dolphins S. teuszii were observed with axial deviations of the vertebral column (lordosis and kyphosis). Another possible case was identified in a calf, and 2 further animals were photographed with dorsal indents potentially indicative of anomalies. Vertebral column anomalies of humpback dolphins were predominantly evident in the lumbo-caudal region, but one Atlantic humpback dolphin had an anomaly in the cervico-thoracic region. Lordosis and kyphosis occurred simultaneously in several individuals. Apart from the described anomalies, all dolphins appeared in good health and were not obviously underweight or noticeably compromised in swim speed. This study presents the first descriptions of vertebral column anomalies in the genus Sousa. The causative factors for the anomalies were unknown in every case and are potentially diverse. Whether these anomalies result in reduced fitness of individuals or populations merits attention, as both the Taiwanese and Atlantic humpback dolphin are species of high conservation concern.

  8. Anomaly Detection at Multiple Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-07

    Arlington, VA November 7, 2011 Anomaly Detection at Multiple Scales Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden...AND SUBTITLE Anomaly Detection at Multiple Scales 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...Personal temperament and mental health • Distress, instability, or other vulnerability Anomaly Detection at Multiple Scales (ADAMS) Detect

  9. Thermophoresis of Axially Symmetric Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Sweden Abstract. Thermophoresis of axially symmetric bodies is investigated to first order in the Knudsen-mimber, Kn. The study is made in the limit...derived. Asymptotic solutions are studied. INTRODUCTION Thermophoresis as a phenomenon has been known for a long time, and several authors have approached

  10. Axial pumps for propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppert, M. C.; Rothe, K.

    1974-01-01

    The development of axial flow hydrogen pumps is examined. The design features and the performance data obtained during the course of the development programs are discussed. The problems created by the pump characteristics are analyzed. Graphs of four stage pump performance for various turbine blade configurations are developed. The characteristics and performance of a variety of pumps are included.

  11. Axial structure of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Veronique Bernard; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Ulf-G Meissner

    2002-01-01

    We review the current status of experimental and theoretical understanding of the axial nucleon structure at low and moderate energies. Topics considered include (quasi)elastic (anti)neutrino-nucleon scattering, charged pion electroproduction off nucleons and ordinary as well as radiative muon capture on the proton.

  12. Anomalies and entanglement renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgeman, Jacob C.; Williamson, Dominic J.

    2017-09-01

    We study 't Hooft anomalies of discrete groups in the framework of (1+1)-dimensional multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz states on the lattice. Using matrix product operators, general topological restrictions on conformal data are derived. An ansatz class allowing for optimization of MERA with an anomalous symmetry is introduced. We utilize this class to numerically study a family of Hamiltonians with a symmetric critical line. Conformal data is obtained for all irreducible projective representations of each anomalous symmetry twist, corresponding to definite topological sectors. It is numerically demonstrated that this line is a protected gapless phase. Finally, we implement a duality transformation between a pair of critical lines using our subclass of MERA.

  13. Genetics of lymphatic anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Brouillard, Pascal; Boon, Laurence; Vikkula, Miikka

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic anomalies include a variety of developmental and/or functional defects affecting the lymphatic vessels: sporadic and familial forms of primary lymphedema, secondary lymphedema, chylothorax and chylous ascites, lymphatic malformations, and overgrowth syndromes with a lymphatic component. Germline mutations have been identified in at least 20 genes that encode proteins acting around VEGFR-3 signaling but also downstream of other tyrosine kinase receptors. These mutations exert their effects via the RAS/MAPK and the PI3K/AKT pathways and explain more than a quarter of the incidence of primary lymphedema, mostly of inherited forms. More common forms may also result from multigenic effects or post-zygotic mutations. Most of the corresponding murine knockouts are homozygous lethal, while heterozygotes are healthy, which suggests differences in human and murine physiology and the influence of other factors. PMID:24590274

  14. [Developmental venous anomaly (DVA)].

    PubMed

    Zimmer, A; Hagen, T; Ahlhelm, F; Viera, J; Reith, W; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G

    2007-10-01

    As congenital anatomic variants of venous drainage, developmental venous anomalies (DVA) represent up to 60% of all cerebral vascular malformations. The prior term "venous angioma" is a misnomer implicating an abnormal vascular structure with an increased bleeding risk. They are often found incidentally and are hardly ever symptomatic. Their morphologic characteristics are dilated vessels in the white matter, which converge on a greater collector vein, forming the typical caput medusae. They drain into the superficial or deep venous system. The frequent association with other, potentially bleeding-prone vascular malformations is clinically relevant, in particular cavernous angioma, which might require therapeutic action. Therefore, coincident vascular lesions need to be actively sought by appropriate additional imaging techniques.

  15. Nolen-Schiffer anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, S.C.; Wiringa, R.B.

    1995-08-01

    The Argonne v{sub 18} potential contains a detailed treatment of the pp, pn and nn electromagnetic potential, including Coulomb, vacuum polarization, Darwin Foldy and magnetic moment terms, all with suitable form factors and was fit to pp and pn data using the appropriate nuclear masses. In addition, it contains a nuclear charge-symmetry breaking (CSB) term adjusted to reproduce the difference in the experimental pp and nn scattering lengths. We have used these potential terms to compute differences in the binding energies of mirror isospin-1/2 nuclei (Nolen-Schiffer [NS] anomaly). Variational Monte Carlo calculations for the {sup 3}He-{sup 3}H system and cluster variational Monte Carlo for the {sup 15}O-{sup 15}N and {sup 17}F-{sup 17}O systems were made. In the first case, the best variational wave function for the A = 3 nuclei was used. However, because our {sup 16}O wave function does not reproduce accurately the {sup 16}O rms radius, to which the NS anomaly is very sensitive, we adjusted the A = 15 and A = 17 wave functions to reproduce the experimental density profiles. Our computed energy differences for these three systems are 0.757 {plus_minus} .001, 3.544 {plus_minus} .018 and 3.458 {plus_minus} .040 MeV respectively, which are to be compared with the experimental differences of 0.764, 3.537, and 3.544 MeV. Most of the theoretical uncertainties are due to uncertainties in the experimental rms radii. The nuclear CSB potential contributes 0.066, 0.188, and 0.090 MeV to these totals. We also attempted calculations for A = 39 and A = 41. However, in these cases, the experimental uncertainties in the rms radius make it impossible to extract useful information about the contribution of the nuclear CSB potential.

  16. The Kenya rift axial gravity high: a re-interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, C. J.

    1992-03-01

    Since KRISP 85 did not provide overwhelming evidence for the massive intrusion that was originally suggested to explain the axial gravity high yet did provide a velocity section for the upper crust along the axis of the Kenya Rift, it is appropriate to use this section to control a re-interpretation of the gravity anomalies. A 2 {1}/{2} D inversion procedure has been used to model a number of isostatic anomaly profiles between Lake Baringo and Suswa. There are too many unknowns and gravity station coverage is too sparse for the results to be unique. Nevertheless, certain conclusions can be drawn. One of those is that some relatively dense material exists within the basement all along the Rift axis, since the axial isostatic anomalies are positive even though they occur where there are several thousand metres of Cenozoic volcanics of relatively low density (inferred from their seismic velocity of 3.7-5.1 km/s). The dense material is envisaged as a zone of dyke injection and assigned a density of 2.75-2.76 g/cm 3 (corresponding to its 6.05 km/s velocity) compared to a normal basement density of 2.70 g/cm 3. It is assumed to extend down to 22 km—the top of the 7.1 km/s layer. The KRISP 85 line passed just east of Menengai, where the basement velocity increases to about 6.6 km/s over a distance of about 20 km. On an east-west gravity profile through Menengai there is a gravity high corresponding to this velocity increase which has been modelled as a basic intrusion (density 2.93 g/cm 3) underlying the caldera.

  17. [Individual variation in the development of the common toad, Bufo bufo (Anura, Bufonidae): 2. Diagnostic characters of the axial skeleton].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, E E; Kruzhkova, Iu I

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of individual variation in diagnostic characters of the axial skeleton has been performed in all offspring (1633 ind.) from the same spawn of one pair of common toads under conditions of laboratory rearing, with natural elimination being reduced to a minimum. More than 50 skeletal anomalies have been recorded. Factual data are presented that characterize deviations from the species norm in the frequency of "background anomalies" (Kovalenko, 2003). Correlations between manifestations of different variants of character states are considered. The problem of norm and anomaly in individual variation is discussed.

  18. Seismic data fusion anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrity, Kyle; Blasch, Erik; Alford, Mark; Ezekiel, Soundararajan; Ferris, David

    2014-06-01

    Detecting anomalies in non-stationary signals has valuable applications in many fields including medicine and meteorology. These include uses such as identifying possible heart conditions from an Electrocardiography (ECG) signals or predicting earthquakes via seismographic data. Over the many choices of anomaly detection algorithms, it is important to compare possible methods. In this paper, we examine and compare two approaches to anomaly detection and see how data fusion methods may improve performance. The first approach involves using an artificial neural network (ANN) to detect anomalies in a wavelet de-noised signal. The other method uses a perspective neural network (PNN) to analyze an arbitrary number of "perspectives" or transformations of the observed signal for anomalies. Possible perspectives may include wavelet de-noising, Fourier transform, peak-filtering, etc.. In order to evaluate these techniques via signal fusion metrics, we must apply signal preprocessing techniques such as de-noising methods to the original signal and then use a neural network to find anomalies in the generated signal. From this secondary result it is possible to use data fusion techniques that can be evaluated via existing data fusion metrics for single and multiple perspectives. The result will show which anomaly detection method, according to the metrics, is better suited overall for anomaly detection applications. The method used in this study could be applied to compare other signal processing algorithms.

  19. Anomaly detection in clinical processes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhengxing; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2012-01-01

    Meaningful anomalies in clinical processes may be related to caring performance or even the patient survival. It is imperative that the anomalies be timely detected such that useful and actionable knowledge of interest could be extracted to clinicians. Many previous approaches assume prior knowledge about the structure of clinical processes, using which anomalies are detected in a supervised manner. For a majority of clinical settings, however, clinical processes are complex, ad hoc, and even unknown a prior. In this paper, we investigate how to facilitate detection of anomalies in an unsupervised manner. An anomaly detection model is presented by applying a density-based clustering method on patient careflow logs. Using the learned model, it is possible to detect whether a particular patient careflow trace is anomalous with respect to normal traces in the logs. The approach has been validated over real data sets collected from a Chinese hospital.

  20. Chiral anomaly in Dirac semimetals due to dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernodub, M. N.; Zubkov, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    The dislocation in Dirac semimetal carries an emergent magnetic flux parallel to the dislocation axis. We show that due to the emergent magnetic field, the dislocation accommodates a single fermion massless mode of the corresponding low-energy one-particle Hamiltonian. The mode is propagating along the dislocation with its spin directed parallel to the dislocation axis. In agreement with the chiral anomaly observed in Dirac semimetals, an external electric field results in the spectral flow of the one-particle Hamiltonian, in pumping of the fermionic quasiparticles out from vacuum, and in creating a nonzero axial (chiral) charge in the vicinity of the dislocation.

  1. System for closure of a physical anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, Jane P; Maitland, Duncan J; Schumann, Daniel L; Wilson, Thomas S

    2014-11-11

    Systems for closure of a physical anomaly. Closure is accomplished by a closure body with an exterior surface. The exterior surface contacts the opening of the anomaly and closes the anomaly. The closure body has a primary shape for closing the anomaly and a secondary shape for being positioned in the physical anomaly. The closure body preferably comprises a shape memory polymer.

  2. Axially grooved heat pipes - 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, P. J.; Kroliczek, E. J.; Jen, H.; Mcintosh, R.

    1977-01-01

    This paper summarizes the 'state-of-the-art' of axially grooved heat pipes. Applications are identified and the related heat pipe design and performance are defined. Recent developments in the analysis, design and fabrication of axially grooved hardware are also discussed. A mathematical model which predicts the hydrodynamic behavior and accounts for liquid recession, liquid/vapor shear interaction and 1-g puddle flow is also presented. Performance data for various fluids in the 100-500 K range is compared to predictions from the Groove Analysis Program (GAP). Finally, a simplified closed form solution which accounts for gravity effects, self-priming and composite pumping by the grooves as well as all of the hydrodynamic losses is also discussed.

  3. Ultrasonic measurement of axial stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.; Chern, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of acoustic propagation in strained media is examined, with particular emphasis on rod (bolt) geometries. The continuous wave (CW) approach is the basis of the study, and the theory is developed from a frequency domain analysis standpoint in order to obtain an applied stress/normalized frequency shift relationship. CW measurements may be influenced by such factors as propagation effects, mode conversion, frequency, material properties, and geometry. After the first loading cycle, axial stress measurements for a preloading with an initial frequency of 4.995 36 MHz dropped to 4.989 19 MHz, indicating a 6.17 kHz change. CW and pseudo-CW ultrasonic techniques are found to be reliable for axial stress measurements, and acoustic attenuation measurements correlated to residual stress fields may possibly involve transducer phase cancellation. It is thus concluded that signal drop is an artifact of the transducer directivity, rather than an actual acoustic power decrease.

  4. [Axial spondyloarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Nordström, Dan; Kauppi, Markku

    2010-01-01

    Current classification criteria for ankylosing spondylitis do not allow diagnosis before radiographic changes are visible in sacroiliacal joints. The the new axial spondyloarthropathy (SpA) criteria include axial SpA without radiographic changes as well as established ankylosing spondylitis, recognizing them as a continuum of the same disease. This is of major importance as the burden of early SpA is comparable to that of later stage disease. Diagnosis relies on inflammatory MRI findings which is the most significant change compared to earlier criteria. Emerging data on the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha blocking therapies already in early but also in established disease have given new promising alternatives for treatment of this often very cumbersome disease, that rarely responds to classic DMARDs.

  5. Analysis of axial flow turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, V. K.

    A variety of steady and time-dependent, two and three dimensional numerical techniques for axial-flow turbulent design and analysis is reviewed. Meridional flow solutions are discussed, including the streamline curvature method, the matrix method, and finite element methods. Blade-to-blade flow solutions are considered, including singularity methods, field methods, and transonic blade-to-blade calculations. Three-dimensional flow solutions are briefly examined.

  6. SEISMIC DISCRIMINATION OF THERMAL AND MAGNETIC ANOMALIES IN SUNSPOT UMBRAE

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.; Cally, P. S.; Rempel, M.

    2010-08-20

    Efforts to model sunspots based on helioseismic signatures need to discriminate between the effects of (1) a strong magnetic field that introduces time-irreversible, vantage-dependent phase shifts, apparently connected to fast- and slow-mode coupling and wave absorption and (2) a thermal anomaly that includes cool gas extending an indefinite depth beneath the photosphere. Helioseismic observations of sunspots show travel times considerably reduced with respect to equivalent quiet-Sun signatures. Simulations by Moradi and Cally of waves skipping across sunspots with photospheric magnetic fields of order 3 kG show travel times that respond strongly to the magnetic field and relatively weakly to the thermal anomaly by itself. We note that waves propagating vertically in a vertical magnetic field are relatively insensitive to the magnetic field, while remaining highly responsive to the attendant thermal anomaly. Travel-time measurements for waves with large skip distances into the centers of axially symmetric sunspots are therefore a crucial resource for discrimination of the thermal anomaly beneath sunspot umbrae from the magnetic anomaly. One-dimensional models of sunspot umbrae based on compressible-radiative-magnetic-convective simulations such as by Rempel et al. can be fashioned to fit observed helioseismic travel-time spectra in the centers of sunspot umbrae. These models are based on cooling of the upper 2-4 Mm of the umbral subphotosphere with no significant anomaly beneath 4.5 Mm. The travel-time reductions characteristic of these models are primarily a consequence of a Wilson depression resulting from a strong downward buoyancy of the cooled umbral medium.

  7. Reliability of CHAMP Anomaly Continuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Kim, Hyung Rae; Taylor, Patrick T.; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad F.

    2003-01-01

    CHAMP is recording state-of-the-art magnetic and gravity field observations at altitudes ranging over roughly 300 - 550 km. However, anomaly continuation is severely limited by the non-uniqueness of the process and satellite anomaly errors. Indeed, our numerical anomaly simulations from satellite to airborne altitudes show that effective downward continuations of the CHAMP data are restricted to within approximately 50 km of the observation altitudes while upward continuations can be effective over a somewhat larger altitude range. The great unreliability of downward continuation requires that the satellite geopotential observations must be analyzed at satellite altitudes if the anomaly details are to be exploited most fully. Given current anomaly error levels, joint inversion of satellite and near- surface anomalies is the best approach for implementing satellite geopotential observations for subsurface studies. We demonstrate the power of this approach using a crustal model constrained by joint inversions of near-surface and satellite magnetic and gravity observations for Maude Rise, Antarctica, in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Our modeling suggests that the dominant satellite altitude magnetic anomalies are produced by crustal thickness variations and remanent magnetization of the normal polarity Cretaceous Quiet Zone.

  8. Golimumab for treatment of axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rios Rodriguez, Valeria; Poddubnyy, Denis

    2016-02-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis comprises two forms: nonradiographic (nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis) and radiographic (better known as ankylosing spondylitis), which are often considered as two stages of one disease. Historically, all currently available TNF-α inhibitors were first investigated in ankylosing spondylitis and later on in nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis. This year, EMA has granted golimumab approval for the treatment of active nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis based on the recently published data from the GO-AHEAD study. This article summarizes recent data on efficacy and safety of golimumab in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis.

  9. Gravitational anomaly and transport phenomena.

    PubMed

    Landsteiner, Karl; Megías, Eugenio; Pena-Benitez, Francisco

    2011-07-08

    Quantum anomalies give rise to new transport phenomena. In particular, a magnetic field can induce an anomalous current via the chiral magnetic effect and a vortex in the relativistic fluid can also induce a current via the chiral vortical effect. The related transport coefficients can be calculated via Kubo formulas. We evaluate the Kubo formula for the anomalous vortical conductivity at weak coupling and show that it receives contributions proportional to the gravitational anomaly coefficient. The gravitational anomaly gives rise to an anomalous vortical effect even for an uncharged fluid.

  10. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and the assessment of ebstein anomaly in adults.

    PubMed

    Yalonetsky, Sergey; Tobler, Daniel; Greutmann, Matthias; Crean, Andrew M; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Nguyen, Elsie T; Oechslin, Erwin N; Silversides, Candice K; Wald, Rachel M

    2011-03-01

    No published studies have evaluated the role of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging for the assessment of Ebstein anomaly. Our objective was to evaluate the right heart characteristics in adults with unrepaired Ebstein anomaly using contemporary CMR imaging techniques. Consecutive patients with unrepaired Ebstein anomaly and complete CMR studies from 2004 to 2009 were identified (n = 32). Volumetric measurements were obtained from the short-axis and axial views, including assessment of the functional right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume. The volume of the atrialized portion of the right ventricle in end-diastole was calculated as the difference between the total RVEDV and the functional RVEDV. The reproducibility of the measurements in the axial and short-axis views was determined within and between observers. The median value derived from the short-axis and axial views was 136 ml/m(2) (range 59 to 347) and 136 ml/m(2) (range 63 to 342) for the functional RVEDV, 153 ml/m(2) (range 64 to 441) and 154 ml/m(2) (range 67 to 436) for the total RVEDV, 49% (range 32% to 46%) and 50% (range 40% to 64%) for the functional RV ejection fraction, respectively. The axial measurements demonstrated lower intraobserver and interobserver variability than the short-axis approach for all values, with the exception of the intraobserver functional RVEDV and interobserver total RVEDV for which the limits of agreement and variance were not significantly different between the 2 views. In conclusion, measurements of right heart size and systolic function in patients with Ebstein anomaly can be reliably achieved using CMR imaging. Axial imaging appeared to provide more reproducible data than that obtained from the short-axis views.

  11. Axial Hall effect and universality of holographic Weyl semi-metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copetti, Christian; Fernández-Pendás, Jorge; Landsteiner, Karl

    2017-02-01

    The holographic Weyl semimetal is a model of a strongly coupled topological semi-metal. A topological quantum phase transition separates a topological phase with non-vanishing anomalous Hall conductivity from a trivial state. We investigate how this phase transition depends on the parameters of the scalar potential (mass and quartic self coupling) finding that the quantum phase transition persists for a large region in parameter space. We then compute the axial Hall conductivity. The algebraic structure of the axial anomaly predicts it to be 1/3 of the electric Hall conductivity. We find that this holds once a non-trivial renormalization effect on the external axial gauge fields is taken into account. Finally we show that the phase transition also occurs in a top-down model based on a consistent truncation of type IIB supergravity.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Peters anomaly

    MedlinePlus

    ... the anterior segment is abnormal, leading to incomplete separation of the cornea from the iris or the ... anomaly type I is characterized by an incomplete separation of the cornea and iris and mild to ...

  13. A global magnetic anomaly map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, R. D.; Davis, W. M.; Cain, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    A subset of Pogo satellite magnetometer data has been formed that is suitable for analysis of crustal magnetic anomalies. Through the use of a thirteenth-order field model fit to these data, magnetic residuals have been calculated over the world to latitude limits of plus or minus 50 deg. These residuals, averaged over 1-degree latitude-longitude blocks, represent a detailed global magnetic anomaly map derived solely from satellite data. The occurrence of these anomalies on all individual satellite passes independent of local time and their decay as altitude increases imply a definite internal origin. Their wavelength structure and their correlation with known tectonic features further suggest that these anomalies are primarily of geologic origin and have their sources in the lithosphere.

  14. Classifying sex biased congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Lubinsky, M.S.

    1997-03-31

    The reasons for sex biases in congenital anomalies that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue anomalies are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some anomalies explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital anomalies. 42 refs., 7 tabs.

  15. Twin-Axial Wire Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-06

    08-2015 Publication Twin-Axial Wire Antenna David A. Tonn Naval Under Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell St., Code 00L, Bldg 102T...A An antenna includes a polymer coating having a VLF/LF element and an HF/VHF element embedded therein. A blocking choke is interposed between the...VLF/LF element and the antenna feed t block HF/VHF signals. Small chokes are regularly positioned on the VLF/LF element to eliminate resonances caused

  16. Anomaly detection on cup anemometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Enrique; Pindado, Santiago; Martínez, Alejandro; Meseguer, Encarnación; García, Luis

    2014-12-01

    The performances of two rotor-damaged commercial anemometers (Vector Instruments A100 LK) were studied. The calibration results (i.e. the transfer function) were very linear, the aerodynamic behavior being more efficient than the one shown by both anemometers equipped with undamaged rotors. No detection of the anomaly (the rotors’ damage) was possible based on the calibration results. However, the Fourier analysis clearly revealed this anomaly.

  17. Spinal anomalies in Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moore, M H; Lodge, M L; Clark, B E

    1995-05-01

    Review of the spinal radiographs of a consecutive series of 11 patients with Pfeiffer syndrome presenting to the Australian Craniofacial Unit was performed. The prevalence of cervical spine fusions was high, and the pattern of fusion complex. Isolated anomalies were evident at lower levels, including two cases of sacrococcygeal eversion. Spinal anomalies occur more frequently in the more severely involved cases of Pfeiffer syndrome emphasizing the generalized dysostotic nature of this condition.

  18. Spacecraft Environmental Anomalies Expert System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-23

    An expert system has been developed by The Aerospace Corporation, Space and Environment Technology Center for use in the diagnosis of satellite...anomalies caused by the space environment. The expert system is designed to determine the probable cause of an anomaly from the following candidates...in the satellite. The expert system is a rule-based system that uses the Texas Instrument’s Personal Consultant Plus expert - system shell. The expert

  19. Situs anomalies on prenatal MRI.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Stefan F; Brugger, Peter C; Nemec, Ursula; Bettelheim, Dieter; Kasprian, Gregor; Amann, Gabriele; Rimoin, David L; Graham, John M; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-04-01

    Situs anomalies refer to an abnormal organ arrangement, which may be associated with severe errors of development. Due regard being given to prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US), this study sought to demonstrate the in utero visualization of situs anomalies on MRI, compared to US. This retrospective study included 12 fetuses with situs anomalies depicted on fetal MRI using prenatal US as a comparison modality. With an MRI standard protocol, the whole fetus was assessed for anomalies, with regard to the position and morphology of the following structures: heart; venous drainage and aorta; stomach and intestines; liver and gallbladder; and the presence and number of spleens. Situs inversus totalis was found in 3/12 fetuses; situs inversus with levocardia in 1/12 fetuses; situs inversus abdominis in 2/12 fetuses; situs ambiguous with polysplenia in 3/12 fetuses, and with asplenia in 2/12 fetuses; and isolated dextrocardia in 1/12 fetuses. Congenital heart defects (CHDs), vascular anomalies, and intestinal malrotations were the most frequent associated malformations. In 5/12 cases, the US and MRI diagnoses were concordant. Compared to US, in 7/12 cases, additional MRI findings specified the situs anomaly, but CHDs were only partially visualized in six cases. Our initial MRI results demonstrate the visualization of situs anomalies and associated malformations in utero, which may provide important information for perinatal management. Using a standard protocol, MRI may identify additional findings, compared to US, which confirm and specify the situs anomaly, but, with limited MRI visualization of fetal CHDs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Aeromagnetic anomalies over faulted strata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Hudson, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic surveys are now an industry standard and they commonly detect anomalies that are attributed to faults within sedimentary basins. However, detailed studies identifying geologic sources of magnetic anomalies in sedimentary environments are rare in the literature. Opportunities to study these sources have come from well-exposed sedimentary basins of the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico and Colorado. High-resolution aeromagnetic data from these areas reveal numerous, curvilinear, low-amplitude (2–15 nT at 100-m terrain clearance) anomalies that consistently correspond to intrasedimentary normal faults (Figure 1). Detailed geophysical and rock-property studies provide evidence for the magnetic sources at several exposures of these faults in the central Rio Grande rift (summarized in Grauch and Hudson, 2007, and Hudson et al., 2008). A key result is that the aeromagnetic anomalies arise from the juxtaposition of magnetically differing strata at the faults as opposed to chemical processes acting at the fault zone. The studies also provide (1) guidelines for understanding and estimating the geophysical parameters controlling aeromagnetic anomalies at faulted strata (Grauch and Hudson), and (2) observations on key geologic factors that are favorable for developing similar sedimentary sources of aeromagnetic anomalies elsewhere (Hudson et al.).

  1. Marine Magnetic Anomalies, Oceanic Crust Magnetization, and Geomagnetic Time Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Arkani-Hamed, J.

    2005-12-01

    and pass through serpentinization to bear a significant magnetization. Our analysis of the amplitude of Anomaly 25 shows a sharp threshold at the spreading rate of 30 km/Ma, which corresponds to the transition between oceanic lithosphere built at axial domes and axial valleys. The twice lower amplitudes are in agreement with a much disrupted and altered basaltic layer at slow rates and a significant contribution from the deeper layers. Oceanic lithosphere created at fast and slow spreading rates therefore exhibits contrasted magnetic structures. High resolution magnetic anomaly measurements carried out with deep tows and submersibles show that the magmatic (fast spreading and parts of the slow spreading) crust is a good recorder of short-term geomagnetic time variations, such as short polarity intervals, excursions, or paleointensity variations. Surface and deep-sea magnetic anomalies therefore help to confirm or infirm geomagnetic findings obtained by other means. Many excursions and paleointensity variations within Brunhes and Matuyama periods are confirmed, but the "saw tooth pattern" inferred from sediment cores - a possible candidate to explain the anomalous skewness - is not, which suggests a bias in the sedimentary approach.

  2. Axial Globe Length in Congenital Ptosis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Kang, Hyera; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    To compare axial globe length between affected and unaffected sides in patients with unilateral congenital ptosis. This prospective observational study included 37 patients (age range: 7 months to 58 years). The axial globe length, margin reflex distance-1 (MRD-1), and refractive power were measured. The axial globe length difference was calculated by subtracting the axial globe length on the unaffected side from that of the affected side. The relationships among axial globe length differences, MRD-1 on the affected sides, and patient ages were analyzed using multiple regression analysis. No significant differences were found in the axial globe length between sides (P = .677). The axial globe length difference was 0.17 ± 0.30 mm (mean ± standard deviation), and two patients (5.4%), aged 32 to 57 years, showed axial globe length more than 0.67 mm longer (corresponding to a refractive power of 2 diopters) on the affected side compared to the unaffected side. The multiple regression model between axial globe length difference, patient age, and MRD-1 on the affected sides was less appropriate (YAGL = 0.003XAGE-0.048XMRD-1 +0.112; r = 0.338; adjusted r2 = 0.062; P = .127). The cylindrical power was greater on the affected side (P = .046), although the spherical power was not different between sides (P = .657). No significant difference was identified in the axial globe length between sides, and only 5% of non-pediatric patients showed an axial globe length more than 0.67 mm longer on the affected side. Congenital ptosis may have little effect on axial globe length elongation, and the risk of axial myopia-induced anisometropic amblyopia may be low in patients with unilateral congenital ptosis. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Extra-Axial Cavernous Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, Imad; Jallu, Ashraf; Alwatban, Jehad; Patay, Zoltan; Hessler, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Two patients with extra-axial cavernous hemangioma who presented with headache and oculovisual disturbances were investigated with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The lesions masqueraded as basal meningioma, but this diagnosis was not supported by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in one patient. Cerebral angiography with embolization was indicated in one patient, but embolization was not justified in the other. Both patients underwent a pterional craniotomy. The lesions were extradural and highly vascular, necessitating excessive transfusion in one patient in whom gross total resection was achieved, and precluding satisfactory removal in the other. There was no mortality. Transient ophthalmoplegia, the only complication in one patient, was due to surgical manipulation of the cavernous sinus; it resolved progressively over 3 months. Extra-axial skull base cavernous hemangiomas are distinct entities with clinical and radiological characteristics that differ from those of intraparenchymal cavernous malformations. They can mimic meningiomas or pituitary tumors. In some cases, magnetic resonance spectroscopy may narrow the differential diagnoses. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice, facilitated by preoperative embolization to reduce intraoperative bleeding and by the application of the principles of skull base surgery. Fractionated radiotherapy is an alternative in partial or difficult resections and in high-risk and elderly patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17167631

  4. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Acaglione

    2003-09-17

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B&W 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001).

  5. MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemouel, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

  6. Relationship Between Seismic Velocity Anomalies and Rheological Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karato, S.

    2001-05-01

    One of the ultimate goals of high-resolution Earth models is to reveal anomalies (lateral variations) in thermal and rheological structures. Although such a relationship has been well known at a qualitative level, no quantitative relationship has been established to allow estimate of anomalies in viscosity from seismological data. In this presentation, I formulate such a relationship for Earth's upper mantle, based on the latest mineral physics observations. The key in doing this is the quantitative analysis of the effects of water on seismic wave velocities. Earlier analysis indicated the importance of water on seismic wave velocities through enhanced attenuation (Karato, 1995). I have quantified this notion by combining laboratory observations on attenuation at limited conditions (Jackson et al., 1992) with the recent quantitative data on the effects of water on rheology at wider conditions (Karato and Jung, 2001). I show that both seismic wave velocities and rheology (viscosity) of Earth materials are controlled by "rheologically effective temperature (Teff)" that depends on temperature as well as water content. Such an analysis allows us to define the relationships between velocity anomalies and anomalies in Teff and hence anomalies in viscosity. The present formulation has been applied to the upper mantle beneath northeastern Japan where the high-resolution tomographic images are available. The results show that anomalies in effective temperatures of ~+400 K occur in these regions indicating that viscosity there could be lower than the average values by a factor of ~10 to ~1000. References Jackson, I. et al. (1992), Geophys. J. Int., 108: 517-534. Karato, S. (1995), Proc. Japan Academy, B71: 61-66. Karato, S. and Jung, H. (2001), submitted to Philos. Mag.

  7. System Study for Axial Vane Engine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badley, Patrick R.; Smith, Michael R.; Gould, Cedric O.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this engine feasibility study was to determine the benefits that can be achieved by incorporating positive displacement axial vane compression and expansion stages into high bypass turbofan engines. These positive-displacement stages would replace some or all of the conventional compressor and turbine stages in the turbine engine, but not the fan. The study considered combustion occurring internal to an axial vane component (i.e., Diesel engine replacing the standard turbine engine combustor, burner, and turbine); and external continuous flow combustion with an axial vane compressor and an axial vane turbine replacing conventional compressor and turbine systems.

  8. Resolution of axial shear strain elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thitaikumar, Arun; Righetti, Raffaella; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Ophir, Jonathan

    2006-10-01

    The technique of mapping the local axial component of the shear strain due to quasi-static axial compression is defined as axial shear strain elastography. In this paper, the spatial resolution of axial shear strain elastography is investigated through simulations, using an elastically stiff cylindrical lesion embedded in a homogeneously softer background. Resolution was defined as the smallest size of the inclusion for which the strain value at the inclusion/background interface was greater than the average of the axial shear strain values at the interface and inside the inclusion. The resolution was measured from the axial shear strain profile oriented at 45° to the axis of beam propagation, due to the absence of axial shear strain along the normal directions. The effects of the ultrasound system parameters such as bandwidth, beamwidth and transducer element pitch along with signal processing parameters such as correlation window length (W) and axial shift (ΔW) on the estimated resolution were investigated. The results show that the resolution (at 45° orientation) is determined by the bandwidth and the beamwidth. However, the upper bound on the resolution is limited by the larger of the beamwidth and the window length, which is scaled inversely to the bandwidth. The results also show that the resolution is proportional to the pitch and not significantly affected by the axial window shift.

  9. Axial U(1) current in Grabowska and Kaplan's formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Yu; Kawai, Hikaru

    2017-06-01

    Recently, Grabowska and Kaplan [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 211602 (2016); Phys. Rev. D 94, 114504 (2016)] suggested a nonperturbative formulation of a chiral gauge theory, which consists of the conventional domain-wall fermion and a gauge field that evolves by gradient flow from one domain wall to the other. We introduce two sets of domain-wall fermions belonging to complex conjugate representations so that the effective theory is a 4D vector-like gauge theory. Then, as a natural definition of the axial-vector current, we consider a current that generates simultaneous phase transformations for the massless modes in 4 dimensions. However, this current is exactly conserved and does not reproduce the correct anomaly. In order to investigate this point precisely, we consider the mechanism of the conservation. We find that this current includes not only the axial current on the domain wall but also a contribution from the bulk, which is nonlocal in the sense of 4D fields. Therefore, the local current is obtained by subtracting the bulk contribution from it.

  10. Axial cylinder internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.

    1992-03-10

    This patent describes improvement in a barrel type internal combustion engine including an engine block having axial-positioned cylinders with reciprocating pistons arranged in a circular pattern: a drive shaft concentrically positioned within the cylinder block having an offset portion extending outside the cylinder block; a wobble spider rotatably journaled to the offset portion; connecting rods for each cylinder connecting each piston to the wobble spider. The improvement comprising: a first sleeve bearing means supporting the drive shaft in the engine block in a cantilevered manner for radial loads; a second sleeve bearing means rotatably supporting the wobble spider on the offset portion of the drive shaft for radial loads; a first roller bearing means positioned between the offset portion of the drive shaft and the wobble spider carrying thrust loadings only; a second roller bearing means carrying thrust loads only reacting to the first roller bearing located on the opposite end of the driveshaft between the shaft and the engine block.

  11. Axially grooved heat pipe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A technology evaluation study on axially grooved heat pipes is presented. The state-of-the-art is reviewed and present and future requirements are identified. Analytical models, the Groove Analysis Program (GAP) and a closed form solution, were developed to facilitate parametric performance evaluations. GAP provides a numerical solution of the differential equations which govern the hydrodynamic flow. The model accounts for liquid recession, liquid/vapor shear interaction, puddle flow as well as laminar and turbulent vapor flow conditions. The closed form solution was developed to reduce computation time and complexity in parametric evaluations. It is applicable to laminar and ideal charge conditions, liquid/vapor shear interaction, and an empirical liquid flow factor which accounts for groove geometry and liquid recession effects. The validity of the closed form solution is verified by comparison with GAP predictions and measured data.

  12. Unsteady Flows in Axial Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, F. E.; Rannie, W. D.

    1957-01-01

    Of the various unsteady flows that occur in axial turbomachines certain asymmetric disturbances, of wave length large in comparison with blade spacing, have become understood to a certain extent. These disturbances divide themselves into two categories: self-induced oscillations and force disturbances. A special type of propagating stall appears as a self-induced disturbance; an asymmetric velocity profile introduced at the compressor inlet constitutes a forced disturbance. Both phenomena have been treated from a unified theoretical point of view in which the asymmetric disturbances are linearized and the blade characteristics are assumed quasi-steady. Experimental results are in essential agreement with this theory wherever the limitations of the theory are satisfied. For the self-induced disturbances and the more interesting examples of the forced disturbances, the dominant blade characteristic is the dependence of total pressure loss, rather than the turning angle, upon the local blade inlet angle.

  13. Positional cloning of the gene for pre-axial polydactyly

    SciTech Connect

    Heutink, P.; Breedveld, G.J.; Zguricas, J.

    1994-09-01

    Pre-axial polydactyly can occur as an isolated anomaly, in association with other abnormalities of the hand or as a component of complex developmental disorders. We recently localized the gene for pre-axial polydactyly to the most distal part of chromosome 7q. Identification and characterization of the gene defect and studies of the expression pattern during embryonic development may help clarify questions about the role of this gene in other developmental processes than those in hands. A key element involved in the formation of the separate digits of the developing limb is the apical ectodermal ridge (AER). In the AER and in the adjacent mesoderm, homeobox genes as well as genes regulating programmed cell death, growth factors or receptors are expressed. Disruption of any of these genes might potentially interfere with normal differentiation. How these genes interact and which genes are involved in the formation of the five digits is still largely unknown. We have ascertained additional families and performed haplotype analysis to define the critical region. Currently, we are developing new STS polymorphic markers to narrow down this critical region. YAC and cosmid contigs are being developed. On the syntenic region of human 7q36, the mouse chromosome 5p, a mutation has been localized that resembles the human polydactyly phenotype. Hx is a candidate gene for the disease gene in the families studied. YACs from the critical regions of the human and mouse phenotypes are being used to identify conserved sequences. These sequences are used to isolate cDNAs which will be used for mutation analysis in human family material in order to isolate the responsible gene for pre-axial polydactyly. Our most recent results will be presented.

  14. Graph anomalies in cyber communications

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Wiel, Scott A; Storlie, Curtis B; Sandine, Gary; Hagberg, Aric A; Fisk, Michael

    2011-01-11

    Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for anomalies with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional anomaly detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of anomalies that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.

  15. Boundary terms of conformal anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the structure of the boundary terms in the conformal anomaly integrated over a manifold with boundaries. We suggest that the anomalies of type B, polynomial in the Weyl tensor, are accompanied with the respective boundary terms of the Gibbons-Hawking type. Their form is dictated by the requirement that they produce a variation which compensates the normal derivatives of the metric variation on the boundary in order to have a well-defined variational procedure. This suggestion agrees with recent findings in four dimensions for free fields of various spins. We generalize this consideration to six dimensions and derive explicitly the respective boundary terms. We point out that the integrated conformal anomaly in odd dimensions is non-vanishing due to the boundary terms. These terms are specified in three and five dimensions.

  16. Spacecraft environmental anomalies expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koons, H. C.; Gorney, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    A microcomputer-based expert system is being developed at the Aerospace Corporation Space Sciences Laboratory to assist in the diagnosis of satellite anomalies caused by the space environment. The expert system is designed to address anomalies caused by surface charging, bulk charging, single event effects and total radiation dose. These effects depend on the orbit of the satellite, the local environment (which is highly variable), the satellite exposure time and the hardness of the circuits and components of the satellite. The expert system is a rule-based system that uses the Texas Instruments Personal Consultant Plus expert system shell. The completed expert system knowledge base will include 150 to 200 rules, as well as a spacecraft attributes database, an historical spacecraft anomalies database, and a space environment database which is updated in near real-time. Currently, the expert system is undergoing development and testing within the Aerospace Corporation Space Sciences Laboratory.

  17. Shortening anomalies in supersymmetric theories

    DOE PAGES

    Gomis, Jaume; Komargodski, Zohar; Ooguri, Hirosi; ...

    2017-01-17

    We present new anomalies in two-dimensional N = (2, 2) superconformal theories. They obstruct the shortening conditions of chiral and twisted chiral multiplets at coincident points. This implies that marginal couplings cannot be promoted to background superfields in short representations. Therefore, standard results that follow from N = (2, 2) spurion analysis are invalidated. These anomalies appear only if supersymmetry is enhanced beyond N = (2; 2). These anomalies explain why the conformal manifolds of the K3 and T4 sigma models are not Kähler and do not factorize into chiral and twisted chiral moduli spaces and why there are nomore » N = (2, 2) gauged linear sigma models that cover these conformal manifolds. We also present these results from the point of view of the Riemann curvature of conformal manifolds.« less

  18. Shortening anomalies in supersymmetric theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, Jaume; Komargodski, Zohar; Ooguri, Hirosi; Seiberg, Nathan; Wang, Yifan

    2017-01-01

    We present new anomalies in two-dimensional N=(2,2) superconformal theories. They obstruct the shortening conditions of chiral and twisted chiral multiplets at coincident points. This implies that marginal couplings cannot be promoted to background superfields in short representations. Therefore, standard results that follow from N=(2,2) spurion analysis are invalidated. These anomalies appear only if supersymmetry is enhanced beyond N=(2,2) . These anomalies explain why the conformal manifolds of the K3 and T 4 sigma models are not Kähler and do not factorize into chiral and twisted chiral moduli spaces and why there are no N=(2,2) gauged linear sigma models that cover these conformal manifolds. We also present these results from the point of view of the Riemann curvature of conformal manifolds.

  19. Electromagnetic duality and entanglement anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, William; Michel, Ben; Wall, Aron C.

    2017-08-01

    Duality is an indispensable tool for describing the strong-coupling dynamics of gauge theories. However, its actual realization is often quite subtle: quantities such as the partition function can transform covariantly, with degrees of freedom rearranged in a nonlocal fashion. We study this phenomenon in the context of the electromagnetic duality of Abelian p -forms. A careful calculation of the duality anomaly on an arbitrary D -dimensional manifold shows that the effective actions agree exactly in odd D , while in even D they differ by a term proportional to the Euler number. Despite this anomaly, the trace of the stress tensor agrees between the dual theories. We also compute the change in the vacuum entanglement entropy under duality, relating this entanglement anomaly to the duality of an "edge mode" theory in two fewer dimensions. Previous work on this subject has led to conflicting results; we explain and resolve these discrepancies.

  20. Self-consistent approach to off-shell transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu. B.; Knoll, J.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2003-10-01

    The properties of two forms of the gradient expanded Kadanoff-Baym equations, i.e., the Kadanoff-Baym and Botermans-Malfliet forms, suitable for describing the transport dynamics of particles and resonances with broad spectral widths, are discussed in context of conservation laws, the definition of a kinetic entropy, and the possibility of numerical realization. Recent results on exact conservations of charge and energy-momentum within Kadanoff-Baym form of quantum kinetics based on local coupling schemes are extended to two cases relevant in many applications. These concern the interaction via a finite-range potential and, relevant in nuclear and hadron physics, e.g., for the pion-nucleon interaction, the case of derivative coupling.

  1. Off-shell {N} = 2 linear multiplets in five dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkan, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    We present a superconformal tensor calculus for an arbitrary number of five dimensional {N} = 2 linear multiplets. We also demonstrate how to construct higher derivative invariants, and produce higher order supersymmetric off-diagonal models. Finally, we show the procedure required for the derivation of the supersymmetric completion of the non-Abelian F 4 action.

  2. Analysis of DSN software anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galorath, D. D.; Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.; Reifer, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    A categorized data base of software errors which were discovered during the various stages of development and operational use of the Deep Space Network DSN/Mark 3 System was developed. A study team identified several existing error classification schemes (taxonomies), prepared a detailed annotated bibliography of the error taxonomy literature, and produced a new classification scheme which was tuned to the DSN anomaly reporting system and encapsulated the work of others. Based upon the DSN/RCI error taxonomy, error data on approximately 1000 reported DSN/Mark 3 anomalies were analyzed, interpreted and classified. Next, error data are summarized and histograms were produced highlighting key tendencies.

  3. Liquid rocket engine axial-flow turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, D. D.; Huppert, M. C.; Viteri, F.; Farquhar, J.; Keller, R. B., Jr. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The axial pump is considered in terms of the total turbopump assembly. Stage hydrodynamic design, pump rotor assembly, pump materials for liquid hydrogen applications, and safety factors as utilized in state of the art pumps are among the topics discussed. Axial pump applications are included.

  4. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-09-02

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies. 5 figs.

  5. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1997-01-01

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies.

  6. Novel Integration Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth; Brown, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics; separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and magnetic field modeling results will be presented.

  7. Novel Integrated Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Brown, Gary L.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics, separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and analysis results will be presented.

  8. Coral can have growth anomalies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral growth anomalies (GAs) are changes in the coral cells that deposit the calcium carbonate skeleton. They usually appear as raised areas of the skeleton and tissue that are different from the surrounding normal areas on the same colony. The features include abnormal shape a...

  9. Thermal anomalies in stressed Teflon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. H.; Wulff, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    In the course of testing polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) as a calorimetric gasketing material, serendipity revealed a thermal anomaly in stressed film that occurs concomitantly with the well-documented 25 C transition. The magnitude of the excess energy absorption - about 35 cal/g - is suggested to be related to the restricted thermal expansion of the film.

  10. Global gravitational anomalies and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Subham Dutta; David, Justin R.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the constraints imposed by global gravitational anomalies on parity odd induced transport coefficients in even dimensions for theories with chiral fermions, gravitinos and self dual tensors. The η-invariant for the large diffeomorphism corresponding to the T transformation on a torus constraints the coefficients in the thermal effective action up to mod 2. We show that the result obtained for the parity odd transport for gravitinos using global anomaly matching is consistent with the direct perturbative calculation. In d = 6 we see that the second Pontryagin class in the anomaly polynomial does not contribute to the η-invariant which provides a topological explanation of this observation in the `replacement rule'. We then perform a direct perturbative calculation for the contribution of the self dual tensor in d = 6 to the parity odd transport coefficient using the Feynman rules proposed by Gaumé and Witten. The result for the transport coefficient agrees with that obtained using matching of global anomalies.

  11. Connecting Stratospheric and Ionospheric Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spraggs, M. E.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Zhang, S.; Coster, A. J.; Benkevitch, L. V.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates any relationship between lunar phases and ionospheric anomalies that appear at low latitudes concurrently with sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs). The study utilizes World-wide GPS Receiver Network Total Electron Content (TEC) data spanning 13 years (2001-2014) and focuses on the changes in the equatorial ionization anomaly the Western hemisphere. TEC is highly variable due to the influences of solar flux, geomagnetic activity, and seasonal variation and these influences are removed by the use of model. This empirical TEC model is a combination of linear dependencies of solar flux (F10.7) and geomagnetic activity (Ap3) with a third degree polynomial dependency for day-of-year (DOY). With such dependencies removed, the remaining TEC variation could be resolved and attributed to an appropriate mechanism. Lunar phase and apside was investigated in particular, especially the new and full moon phases during perigees when tidal forcing would be most powerful. Lunar tidal forcing on planetary waves is also examined as being physically responsible for setting up conditions that may give rise to SSWs and ionospheric anomalies. Preliminary results suggest that such anomalies may be enhanced in intensity during the full or new moon and even more so during perigee by different amounts depending on whether the SSW is a major (40-60%) or minor (20-45%) event.

  12. Numerical anomalies mimicking physical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, R.

    1995-09-01

    Numerical simulations of flows with shock waves typically use finite-difference shock-capturing algorithms. These algorithms give a shock a numerical width in order to generate the entropy increase that must occur across a shock wave. For algorithms in conservation form, steady-state shock waves are insensitive to the numerical dissipation because of the Hugoniot jump conditions. However, localized numerical errors occur when shock waves interact. Examples are the ``excess wall heating`` in the Noh problem (shock reflected from rigid wall), errors when a shock impacts a material interface or an abrupt change in mesh spacing, and the start-up error from initializing a shock as a discontinuity. This class of anomalies can be explained by the entropy generation that occurs in the transient flow when a shock profile is formed or changed. The entropy error is localized spatially but under mesh refinement does not decrease in magnitude. Similar effects have been observed in shock tube experiments with partly dispersed shock waves. In this case, the shock has a physical width due to a relaxation process. An entropy anomaly from a transient shock interaction is inherent in the structure of the conservation equations for fluid flow. The anomaly can be expected to occur whenever heat conduction can be neglected and a shock wave has a non-zero width, whether the width is physical or numerical. Thus, the numerical anomaly from an artificial shock width mimics a real physical effect.

  13. Coral can have growth anomalies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral growth anomalies (GAs) are changes in the coral cells that deposit the calcium carbonate skeleton. They usually appear as raised areas of the skeleton and tissue that are different from the surrounding normal areas on the same colony. The features include abnormal shape a...

  14. Conformal anomalies and gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Krzysztof A.; Nicolai, Hermann

    2017-09-01

    We argue that the presence of conformal anomalies in gravitational theories can lead to observable modifications to Einstein's equations via the induced anomalous effective actions, whose non-localities can overwhelm the smallness of the Planck scale. The fact that no such effects have been seen in recent cosmological or gravitational wave observations therefore imposes strong restrictions on the field content of possible extensions of Einstein's theory: all viable theories should have vanishing conformal anomalies. We then show that a complete cancellation of conformal anomalies in D = 4 for both the C2 invariant and the Euler (Gauss-Bonnet) invariant E4 can only be achieved for N-extended supergravity multiplets with N ⩾ 5, as well as for M theory compactified to four dimensions. Although there remain open questions, in particular concerning the true significance of conformal anomalies in non-conformal theories, as well as their possible gauge dependence for spin s ⩾3/2, these cancellations suggest a hidden conformal structure of unknown type in these theories.

  15. Bony anomaly of Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Salter, E George; Oakes, W Jerry

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the seemingly rare occurrence of bone formation within the proximal superior aspect of Meckel's cave thus forming a bony foramen for the proximal trigeminal nerve to traverse. The anatomy of Meckel's cave is reviewed and the clinical potential for nerve compression from this bony anomaly discussed.

  16. The 5q-anomaly.

    PubMed

    Van den Berghe, H; Vermaelen, K; Mecucci, C; Barbieri, D; Tricot, G

    1985-07-01

    A deletion of the long arm of chromosome #5 (5q-) occurs nonrandomly in human malignancies. As a rule, the deletion is interstitial; the distal breakpoint by conventional techniques is usually in band q32, the proximal breakpoints in q12 or q14. Variant breakpoints occur in less than 10% of all cases. As the sole anomaly, 5q- is characteristically found in refractory anemia with or without excess of blasts. It can occur as the sole anomaly in de novo or secondary acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, but is usually accompanied in those disorders by other chromosome changes that are also nonrandomly distributed. In addition, it can be found in lymphoproliferative disorders, and occasionally, also in solid tumors. The 5q- myelodysplastic syndrome typically occurs in older age groups, particularly in females. Characteristic features are macrocytic anemia, normal or elevated platelets in the presence of megakaryocytic anomalies, and a mild clinical course. In cases with 5q- only, transformation into ANLL occurs rarely. Additional chromosome anomalies and male sex are prognostically unfavorable signs. Sex ratio is also at the disadvantage of females in de novo 5q- ANLL, and the latter disorder can occur without being preceded by a myelodysplastic phase. A myelodysplastic phase usually precedes 5q- secondary leukemia, in males as well as in females, and additional chromosome anomalies, especially of chromosome #7, are almost invariably present in those cases. We conclude that 5q- is the most frequently occurring single chromosome anomaly in secondary leukemia. Furthermore, the resemblance between de novo and secondary 5q- MDS and ANLL is striking; clinically, as well as cytogenetically, they are indistinguishable, suggesting that all de novo cases may be due to environmental (chemical) carcinogens. Response to treatment and prognosis are very poor with current therapeutic regimens in de novo as well as in secondary 5q- ANLL. Morphologically, these ANLLs fall into all FAB

  17. The trace anomaly and massless scalar degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Gianotti, Maurizio; Mottola, Emil

    2008-01-01

    The trace anomaly of quantum fields in electromagnetic or gravitational backgrounds implies the existence of massless scalar poles in physical amplitudes involving the stress-energy tensor. Considering first the axial anomaly and using QED as an example, we compute the full one-loop triangle amplitude of the fermionic stress tensor with two current vertices, {open_square}T{sup {mu}{nu}}J{sup {alpha}}J{sup {beta}}, and exhibit the scalar pole in this amplitude associated with the trace anomaly, in the limit of zero electron mass m{yields}0. To emphasize the infrared aspect of the anomaly, we use a dispersive approach and show that this amplitude and the existence of the massless scalar pole is determined completely by its ultraviolet finite terms, together with the requirements of Poincare invariance of the vacuum, Bose symmetry under interchange of J{sup {alpha}} and J{sup {beta}}, and vector current and stress-tensor conservation. We derive a sum rule for the appropriate positive spectral function corresponding to the discontinuity of the triangle amplitude, showing that it becomes proportional to {delta}(k{sup 2}) and therefore contains a massless scalar intermediate state in the conformal limit of zero electron mass. The effective action corresponding to the trace of the triangle amplitude can be expressed in local form by the introduction of two scalar auxiliary fields which satisfy massless wave equations. These massless scalar degrees of freedom couple to classical sources, contribute to gravitational scattering processes, and can have long range gravitational effects.

  18. Non-Radiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Eshed, Iris

    2015-12-01

    The term non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nrAxSpA) was coined for patients who have a clinical picture of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) but do not exhibit radiographic sacroiliitis. The ASAS classification criteria for nrAxSpA, ensuring the recruitment of homogenous study cohorts, were accepted in 2009, although the respective diagnostic criteria for daily clinical practice have not yet been developed. The clinical diagnosis should be based on the composite of clinical symptoms and signs of the disease, HLA B27 status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of sacroiliac joints. Notably, a negative MRI or HLA B27 does not exclude the diagnosis in patients with a high clinical suspicion for nrAxSpA. The prevalence of nrAxSpA is similar to that of AS, but the former has a higher female preponderance. The rate of progression of nrAxSpA to the radiographic stage of disease (AS) ranges from 10% to 20% over 2 years. Current treatment strategies for nrAxSpA are the same as for AS and include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. While this review summarizes the current achievements in the field of nrAxSpA, further understanding of the epidemiology and natural history of the disease and, particularly, mechanisms of inflammation and subsequent new bone formation is essential for the development of new treatment strategies for nrAxSpA patients.

  19. Flow Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOEpatents

    Walrath, David E.; Lindberg, William R.; Burgess, Robert K.; LaBelle, James

    2000-02-22

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. An axially aligned outlet may also increase the flow efficiency. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane. A seal separator may increase the useful life of the seal between the fixed and rotatable portions.

  20. Axial Flow Conditioning Device for Mitigating Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Vineet (Inventor); Birkbeck, Roger M. (Inventor); Hosangadi, Ashvin (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A flow conditioning device for incrementally stepping down pressure within a piping system is presented. The invention includes an outer annular housing, a center element, and at least one intermediate annular element. The outer annular housing includes an inlet end attachable to an inlet pipe and an outlet end attachable to an outlet pipe. The outer annular housing and the intermediate annular element(s) are concentrically disposed about the center element. The intermediate annular element(s) separates an axial flow within the outer annular housing into at least two axial flow paths. Each axial flow path includes at least two annular extensions that alternately and locally direct the axial flow radially outward and inward or radially inward and outward thereby inducing a pressure loss or a pressure gradient within the axial flow. The pressure within the axial flow paths is lower than the pressure at the inlet end and greater than the vapor pressure for the axial flow. The invention minimizes fluidic instabilities, pressure pulses, vortex formation and shedding, and/or cavitation during pressure step down to yield a stabilized flow within a piping system.

  1. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  2. Echocardiographic assessment of Ebstein's anomaly.

    PubMed

    Booker, Oscar J; Nanda, Navin C

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a complex congenital lesion which primarily involves the tricuspid valve. The tricuspid leaflets are tethered to varying degrees to the right ventricular free wall and the ventricular septum often resulting in significant tricuspid regurgitation and a small functioning right ventricular chamber. Although the septal leaflet originates normally at the right atrioventricular junction, the proximal portion is often completely tethered to the ventricular septum resulting in a misconception and erroneous statements in many publications that its attachment is apically displaced. Although two-dimensional echocardiography represents the primary modality for the diagnosis of this anomaly, three-dimensional echocardiography provides incremental value in characterizing the extent and severity of tethering of individual tricuspid valve leaflets. This information is useful in surgical decision making whether to repair or replace the tricuspid valve.

  3. Four Decades of Hyperfine Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Martin G. H.; Mårtensson-Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    Isotopic differences in the distribution of nuclear charge and magnetization give rise to "hyperfine structure anomalies" which were observed already in the 1950s. More recently, the distribution of nuclear magnetization has been found to complicate the interpretation of the measured hyperfine splittings in highly charged hydrogen-like ions. In this paper, results of numerical calculations for a few hydrogen-like systems (133Cs, 165Ho, 185,187Re and 209Bi) of current experimental interest are presented in terms of moments of the nuclear charge and magnetization distribution, thereby displaying directly the sensitivity and emphasizing the need for a better understanding of nuclear wavefunctions. In addition, we also present results of many-body perturbation theory calculations for Cs hyperfine anomalies, in connection with experiments planned at ISOLDE.

  4. [Ectopia cordis and cardiac anomalies].

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Alberto; Rodrigo, David; Luis, María Teresa; Pastor, Esteban; Galdeano, José Miguel; Esteban, Susana

    2002-11-01

    Ectopia cordis is a rare disease that occurs in 5.5 to 7.9 per million live births. Only 267 cases had been reported as of 2001, most (95%) associated with other cardiac anomalies. We studied the cardiac malformations associated in 6 patients with ectopia cordis. Depending on where the defect was located, the cases of ectopia were classified into four groups: cervical, thoracic, thoraco-abdominal, and abdominal. All 6 patients died before the third day of life, 4 during delivery. Three of the patients were included in the thoracic group, whereas the other 3 belonged to the thoraco-abdominal group. All the patients had associated ventricular septal defects, 3 double-outlet right ventricle (50%) and the rest (50%) tetralogy of Fallot-pulmonary atresia. Two patients with double-outlet right ventricle presented mitral-valve pathology, a parachute valve and an atresic mitral valve. None of these cardiac anomalies have been reported to date.

  5. Survey of Anomaly Detection Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, B

    2006-10-12

    This survey defines the problem of anomaly detection and provides an overview of existing methods. The methods are categorized into two general classes: generative and discriminative. A generative approach involves building a model that represents the joint distribution of the input features and the output labels of system behavior (e.g., normal or anomalous) then applies the model to formulate a decision rule for detecting anomalies. On the other hand, a discriminative approach aims directly to find the decision rule, with the smallest error rate, that distinguishes between normal and anomalous behavior. For each approach, we will give an overview of popular techniques and provide references to state-of-the-art applications.

  6. Congenital pancreatic anomalies, variants, and conditions.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Lauren F

    2012-05-01

    Understanding pancreatic development and the congenital anomalies and variants that result from alterations in normal development allows for better recognition of these anomalies at diagnostic imaging. This article reviews normal pancreatic embryology and anatomy, and the appearance of the more common developmental anomalies and ductal variants, with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Common mimics of masses are also covered.

  7. Syndromes and anomalies associated with cleft

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, R.

    2009-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are one of the commonest birth defects, and may be associated with other congenital anomalies. The majority of these orofacial clefts are nonsyndromic. A significant percentage of these clefts both syndromic and non-syndromic may have associated anomalies. Apart from reviewing other studies, this article also analyses a study of associated anomalies from a tertiary cleft centre in India. PMID:19884681

  8. Pair creation in an electric flux tube and chiral anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Iwazaki, Aiichi

    2009-11-15

    Using the chiral anomaly, we discuss the pair creation of massless fermions under the effect of a magnetic field B-vector when an electric flux tube E-vector parallel to B-vector is switched on. The tube is axially symmetric and infinitely long. For the constraint B>>E, we can analytically obtain the spatial and temporal behaviors of the number density of the fermions, the azimuthal magnetic field generated by the fermions, and so on. We find that the lifetime t{sub c} of the electric field becomes shorter as the width of the tube becomes narrower. Applying it to the plasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions, we find that the color electric field decays quickly such that t{sub c}{approx_equal}Q{sub s}{sup -1}, in which Q{sub s} is the saturation momentum.

  9. Fast Anomaly Discovery Given Duplicates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    skipping the computations for duplicate points in SN(ui) that have ci larger than k, the runtime complexity is enhanced significantly. That is, in...Fast anomaly discovery given duplicates Jay-Yoon Lee, U Kang, Danai Koutra, Christos Faloutsos Dec 2012 CMU-CS-12-146 School of Computer Science...ES) Carnegie Mellon University,School of Computer Science,Pittsburgh,PA,15213 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING

  10. Isotopic anomalies in extraterrestrial grains.

    PubMed

    Ireland, T R

    1996-03-01

    Isotopic compositions are referred to as anomalous if the isotopic ratios measured cannot be related to the terrestrial (solar) composition of a given element. While small effects close to the resolution of mass spectrometric techniques can have ambiguous origins, the discovery of large isotopic anomalies in inclusions and grains from primitive meteorites suggests that material from distinct sites of stellar nucleosynthesis has been preserved. Refractory inclusions, which are predominantly composed of the refractory oxides of Al, Ca, Ti, and Mg, in chondritic meteorites commonly have excesses in the heaviest isotopes of Ca, Ti, and Cr which are inferred to have been produced in a supernova. Refractory inclusions also contain excess 26Mg from short lived 26Al decay. However, despite the isotopic anomalies indicating the preservation of distinct nucleosynthetic sites, refractory inclusions have been processed in the solar system and are not interstellar grains. Carbon (graphite and diamond) and silicon carbide grains from the same meteorites also have large isotopic anomalies but these phases are not stable in the oxidized solar nebula which suggests that they are presolar and formed in the circumstellar atmospheres of carbon-rich stars. Diamond has a characteristic signature enriched in the lightest and heaviest isotopes of Xe, and graphite shows a wide range in C isotopic compositions. SiC commonly has C and N isotopic signatures which are characteristic of H-burning in the C-N-O cycle in low-mass stars. Heavier elements such as Si, Ti, Xe, Ba, and Nd, carry an isotopic signature of the s-process. A minor population of SiC (known as Grains X, ca. 1%) are distinct in having decay products of short lived isotopes 26Al (now 26Mg), 44Ti (now 44Ca), and 49V (now 49Ti), as well as 28Si excesses which are characteristic of supernova nucleosynthesis. The preservation of these isotopic anomalies allows the examination of detailed nucleosynthetic pathways in stars.

  11. Entanglement entropy and anomaly inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Taylor L.; Leigh, Robert G.; Parrikar, Onkar; Ramamurthy, Srinidhi T.

    2016-03-01

    We study entanglement entropy for parity-violating (time-reversal breaking) quantum field theories on R1 ,2 in the presence of a domain wall between two distinct parity-odd phases. The domain wall hosts a 1 +1 -dimensional conformal field theory (CFT) with nontrivial chiral central charge. Such a CFT possesses gravitational anomalies. It has been shown recently that, as a consequence, its intrinsic entanglement entropy is sensitive to Lorentz boosts around the entangling surface. Here, we show using various methods that the entanglement entropy of the three-dimensional bulk theory is also sensitive to such boosts owing to parity-violating effects, and that the bulk response to a Lorentz boost precisely cancels the contribution coming from the domain wall CFT. We argue that this can naturally be interpreted as entanglement inflow (i.e., inflow of entanglement entropy analogous to the familiar Callan-Harvey effect) between the bulk and the domain-wall, mediated by the low-lying states in the entanglement spectrum. These results can be generally applied to 2 +1 -d topological phases of matter that have edge theories with gravitational anomalies, and provide a precise connection between the gravitational anomaly of the physical edge theory and the low-lying spectrum of the entanglement Hamiltonian.

  12. Columbus Payloads Flow Rate Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quaranta, Albino; Bufano, Gaetana; DePalo, Savino; Holt, James M.; Szigetvari, Zoltan; Palumberi, Sergio; Hinderer, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) is the main thermal bus for the pressurized racks working inside the European laboratory. One of the ATCS goals is to provide proper water flow rate to each payload (P/L) by controlling actively the pressure drop across the common plenum distribution piping. Overall flow measurement performed by the Water Pump Assembly (WPA) is the only flow rate monitor available at system level and is not part of the feedback control system. At rack activation the flow rate provided by the system is derived on ground by computing the WPA flow increase. With this approach, several anomalies were raised during these 3 years on-orbit, with the indication of low flow rate conditions on the European racks FSL, BioLab, EDR and EPM. This paper reviews the system and P/Ls calibration approach, the anomalies occurred, the engineering evaluation on the measurement approach and the accuracy improvements proposed, the on-orbit test under evaluation with NASA and finally discusses possible short and long term solutions in case of anomaly confirmation.

  13. Surgical treatment of cloacal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Krstic, Z D; Lukac, M; Lukac, R; Smoljanic, Z; Vukadinovic, V; Varinac, D

    2001-05-01

    From 1989-1998 14 patients were treated with cloacal anomalies: 5 typical cloacas (PC), 5 posterior cloacas, and 4 cloacal exstrophies (CE); 12 underwent surgery. Four typical cloacas were resolved with posterior sagittal anorectovagino-urethroplasty (PSARVUP), whereas in the 5th total urogenital mobilization (TUM) was used. Three PCs were managed with transanorectal TUM and 2 with anterior TUM without opening the anal canal and rectum (without a protective colostomy). Two CEs were treated with atypical procedures. Two patients with CE died without surgery and 2 died after surgery due to complex associated anomalies. During postoperative follow-up of 1-8 years, 5 children had voluntary bowel movements and no soiling while the others had soiling with or without enemas; 1 had stress incontinence; 3 were on clean intermittent catheterization due to neurogenic bladder and were dry. PSARVUP provides a satisfactory result if there is no sacral anomaly. TUM makes this operation easier to perform. In patients with a PC it is sometimes possible using TUM to separate the urinary from the genital tract and remove the accessory urethra without opening the anus and rectum.

  14. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; Schwimmer, Adam; Seiberg, Nathan; Theisen, Stefan

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads to new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.

  15. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    DOE PAGES

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; ...

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads tomore » new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.« less

  16. Modeling axial compression fatigue in fiber ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Hearle, J.W.S.; Hobbs, R.E.; Overington, M.S.; Banfield, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The modeling of long-term fatigue performance of twisted ropes has been extended to cover axial compression fatigue. This mode of failure has been observed in use and testing of ropes. It is characterized by sharp cooperative kinking of yarns, which leads to flex fatigue breakage of fibers. A model of pipeline buckling was modified to allow for plasticity in bending. An axial and lateral restraints, which influence the buckling, were derived from the existing rope mechanics model. Axial compression was introduced into the total computational model, in order to predict the form of buckling and the consequent fiber failure. An alternative use of the program is simply to detect conditions in which axial compression occurs as an indication of the occurrence of fatigue.

  17. Axial grading of inert matrix fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Recktenwald, G. D.; Deinert, M. R.

    2012-07-01

    Burning actinides in an inert matrix fuel to 750 MWd/kg IHM results in a significant reduction in transuranic isotopes. However, achieving this level of burnup in a standard light water reactor would require residence times that are twice that of uranium dioxide fuels. The reactivity of an inert matrix assembly at the end of life is less than 1/3 of its beginning of life reactivity leading to undesirable radial and axial power peaking in the reactor core. Here we show that axial grading of the inert matrix fuel rods can reduce peaking significantly. Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the assembly level power distributions in both ungraded and graded fuel rods. The results show that an axial grading of uranium dioxide and inert matrix fuels with erbium can reduces power peaking by more than 50% in the axial direction. The reduction in power peaking enables the core to operate at significantly higher power. (authors)

  18. High temperature co-axial winding transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Novotny, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis and design of co-axial winding transformers is presented. The design equations are derived and the different design approaches are discussed. One of the most important features of co-axial winding transformers is the fact that the leakage inductance is well controlled and can be made low. This is not the case in conventional winding transformers. In addition, the power density of co-axial winding transformers is higher than conventional ones. Hence, using co-axial winding transformers in a certain converter topology improves the power density of the converter. The design methodology used in meeting the proposed specifications of the co-axial winding transformer specifications are presented and discussed. The final transformer design was constructed in the lab. Co-axial winding transformers proved to be a good choice for high power density and high frequency applications. They have a more predictable performance compared with conventional transformers. In addition, the leakage inductance of the transformer can be controlled easily to suit a specific application. For space applications, one major concern is the extraction of heat from power apparatus to prevent excessive heating and hence damaging of these units. Because of the vacuum environment, the only way to extract heat is by using a cold plate. One advantage of co-axial winding transformers is that the surface area available to extract heat from is very large compared to conventional transformers. This stems from the unique structure of the co-axial transformer where the whole core surface area is exposed and can be utilized for cooling effectively. This is a crucial issue here since most of the losses are core losses.

  19. The Slotted Blade Axial-Flow Blower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1955-09-01

    YORK 18, NEW YORK w is|’ .THE SLOTTED BLADE AXIAL-FLOW BLOVER AUG 0 1 13941J F Dr. H. E. Sheets, Member ASME Chief Research and Development Engineer ... blades of an axial flow blower. The subject of boundary-layer control has attracted considerable attention in respect to the isolated airfoil (1)1 but... blades . Flow through airfoils displays a region of laminar flow beginning at the leading edge. Further downstream, at approximately the location of the

  20. Axial forces in centrifugal compressor couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. N.; Ivanov, N. M.; Yun, V. K.

    2017-08-01

    The article presents the results of the theoretical and experimental investigation of axial forces arising in the toothed and plate couplings of centrifugal compressor shaft lines. Additional loads on the thrust bearing are considered that can develop in the toothed couplings as a result of coupled rotors misalignment. Design relationships to evaluate the level of axial forces and recommendations for their reduction in the operating conditions are given.

  1. Planned Axial Reorientation Investigation on Sloshsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper details the design and logic of an experimental investigation to study axial reorientation in low gravity. The Sloshsat free-flyer is described. The planned axial reorientation experiments and test matrixes are presented. Existing analytical tools are discussed. Estimates for settling range from 64 to 1127 seconds. The planned experiments are modelled using computational fluid dynamics. These models show promise in reducing settling estimates and demonstrate the ability of pulsed high thrust settling to emulate lower thrust continuous firing.

  2. Unilateral optic disc pit and orbital cyst in an eye with normal axial length.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Luna; Thaller, Vladimir T

    2010-01-01

    Orbital cyst and optic disc pits are both congenital embryological anomalies. Orbital cysts occurring in association with optic disc colobomata and microphthalmic eyes have been widely reported in literature. The authors describe the case of a 69-year-old man with an asymptomatic orbital mass, who was investigated and found to have a coexistent optic disc pit and orbital cyst. The axial length was normal. Visual acuity was reduced due to epiretinal membrane at the macula as a consequence of serous maculopathy secondary to the optic disc pit. No active intervention was offered due to poor visual potential, and no changes in the cyst occurred over time. This is an unusual case of coexistent orbital cyst and optic disc pit in an eye with normal axial length, although the dual pathology has previously been described in a microphthalmic eye.

  3. Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOEpatents

    Walrath, David E.; Lindberg, William R.; Burgess, Robert K.

    2000-08-29

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane.

  4. Wave propagation in axially moving periodic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Vladislav S.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2017-04-01

    The paper deals with analytically studying transverse waves propagation in an axially moving string with periodically modulated cross section. The structure effectively models various relevant technological systems, e.g. belts, thread lines, band saws, etc., and, in particular, roller chain drives for diesel engines by capturing both their spatial periodicity and axial motion. The Method of Varying Amplitudes is employed in the analysis. It is shown that the compound wave traveling in the axially moving periodic string comprises many components with different frequencies and wavenumbers. This is in contrast to non-moving periodic structures, for which all components of the corresponding compound wave feature the same frequency. Due to this "multi-frequency" character of the wave motion, the conventional notion of frequency band-gaps appears to be not applicable for the moving periodic strings. Thus, for such structures, by frequency band-gaps it is proposed to understand frequency ranges in which the primary component of the compound wave attenuates. Such frequency band-gaps can be present for a moving periodic string, but only if its axial velocity is lower than the transverse wave speed, and, the higher the axial velocity, the narrower the frequency band-gaps. The revealed effects could be of potential importance for applications, e.g. they indicate that due to spatial inhomogeneity, oscillations of axially moving periodic chains always involve a multitude of frequencies.

  5. Up, down, and strange nucleon axial form factors from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Green, Jeremy; Hasan, Nesreen; Meinel, Stefan; ...

    2017-06-14

    Here, we report a calculation of the nucleon axial form factorsmore » $$G_A^q(Q^2)$$ and $$G_P^q(Q^2)$$ for all three light quark flavors $$q\\in\\{u,d,s\\}$$ in the range $$0\\leq Q^2\\lesssim 1.2\\text{ GeV}^2$$ using lattice QCD. Our work was done using a single ensemble with pion mass 317 MeV and made use of the hierarchical probing technique to efficiently evaluate the required disconnected loops. We perform nonperturbative renormalization of the axial current, including a nonperturbative treatment of the mixing between light and strange currents due to the singlet-nonsinglet difference caused by the axial anomaly. The form factor shapes are fit using the model-independent $z$ expansion. From $$G_A^q(Q^2)$$, we determine the quark contributions to the nucleon spin and axial radii. By extrapolating the isovector $$G_P^{u-d}(Q^2)$$, we obtain the induced pseudoscalar coupling relevant for ordinary muon capture and the pion-nucleon coupling constant. We also found that the disconnected contributions to $$G_P$$ form factors are large, and give an interpretation based on the dominant influence of the pseudoscalar poles in these form factors.« less

  6. Apollo experience report: Flight anomaly resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobb, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The identification of flight anomalies, the determination of their causes, and the approaches taken for corrective action are described. Interrelationships of the broad range of disciplines involved with the complex systems and the team concept employed to ensure timely and accurate resolution of anomalies are discussed. The documentation techniques and the techniques for management of anomaly resolution are included. Examples of specific anomalies are presented in the original form of their progressive documentation. Flight anomaly resolution functioned as a part of the real-time mission support and postflight testing, and results were included in the postflight documentation.

  7. Global anomalies and effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Golkar, Siavash; Sethi, Savdeep

    2016-05-17

    Here, we show that matching anomalies under large gauge transformations and large diffeomorphisms can explain the appearance and non-renormalization of couplings in effective field theory. We focus on thermal effective field theory, where we argue that the appearance of certain unusual Chern-Simons couplings is a consequence of global anomalies. As an example, we show that a mixed global anomaly in four dimensions fixes the chiral vortical effect coefficient (up to an overall additive factor). This is an experimentally measurable prediction from a global anomaly. For certain situations, we propose a simpler method for calculating global anomalies which uses correlation functions rather than eta invariants.

  8. The water-column chemical signature after the 1998 Eruption of Axial Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resing, Joseph A.; Feely, Richard A.; Massoth, Gary J.; Baker, Edward T.

    The eruption of Axial Volcano in January 1998 produced extensive plumes in the overlying water column with large anomalies in Fe, Mn, pH, light attenuation, and temperature. A strong correlation between total iron and light attenuation (dc) suggests a low abundance of particulate sulfur (PS) in the plumes. Because total carbon dioxide (ΣCO2) samples were not collected, high-precision pH measurements were used to estimate maximum CO2 anomalies (ΔCO2) which, when compared to the other physical and chemical data, suggest that the fluids being vented 3 weeks after eruption were formed by the interaction between an intruded dike and a mixture of interstitial seawater and mature hydrothermal fluids.

  9. Ebstein Anomaly: An Overview for Nursing.

    PubMed

    Johnstad, Christine M; Hecker-Fernandes, Jill Renee; Fernandes, Regis

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital heart defect. Many nurses have probably never encountered this anomaly, with very few able to accurately depict the pathological anatomy of the condition. As technology further develops, providers are better equipped to recognize and manage Ebstein anomaly. There are important considerations for nurses when caring for an individual with Ebstein anomaly. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the condition exploring the pathophysiology, how patients typically present, and how to effectively care for a patient with Ebstein anomaly regarding medical and surgical courses of treatment. It is important for nurses to have a resource to reference on Ebstein anomaly, and the majority of current literature is solely based for medical providers. Furthermore, Ebstein patients may be seen on a variety of units in the hospital beyond cardiology (i.e., pregnant patient with a diagnosis of Ebstein anomaly).

  10. Satellite GN and C Anomaly Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Brent; Stoneking, Eric

    2003-01-01

    On-orbit anomaly records for satellites launched from 1990 through 2001 are reviewed to determine recent trends of un-manned space mission critical failures. Anomalies categorized by subsystems show that Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) subsystems have a high number of anomalies that result in a mission critical failure when compared to other subsystems. A mission critical failure is defined as a premature loss of a satellite or loss of its ability to perform its primary mission during its design life. The majority of anomalies are shown to occur early in the mission, usually within one year from launch. GN&C anomalies are categorized by cause and equipment type involved. A statistical analysis of the data is presented for all anomalies compared with the GN&C anomalies for various mission types, orbits and time periods. Conclusions and recommendations are presented for improving mission success and reliability.

  11. Hyperquenched hyaloclastites from Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zezin, D.; Helo, C.; Richard, D.; Clague, D. A.; Dingwell, D. B.; Stix, J.

    2009-12-01

    We determined apparent cooling rates for basaltic hyaloclastites from Axial caldera, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Samples originate from different stratigraphic layers within the unconsolidated volcaniclastic sequences, on flanks of the volcanic edifice. Water depth is ~1400 m below sea level. The hyaloclastite glass fragments comprise two principal morphologies: (1) angular fragments, and (2) thin glassy melt films interpreted as bubble walls, called deep-sea limu o Pele. A natural cooling rate was estimated for each sample of ~50 carefully selected glass shards. The heat capacity was first measured with a differential scanning calorimeter in two heating scans with heating rates of 20 K/min, and a matching cooling rate between those scans. The fictive temperatures Tf were then determined from both heating cycles, and the natural cooling rate derived by the non-Arrhenian relationship between Tf and cooling rate. All samples display hyperquenched states, manifested in a strong exothermic energy release during the initial heating cycle before reaching the glass transition. Cooling rates range from 10 6.73 K/s to 10 3.94 K/s for the limu, and 10 4.92 K/s to 10 2.34 K/s for the angular fragments. Almost all samples of limu shards show elevated cooling rates compared to their angular counterparts of comparable grain mass. In addition, the exothermic part of the enthalpy curves reveal two superimposed relaxation domains, the main broad exothermal peak, ranging from ~350 K to the onset of the glass transition, and a small subordinate peak/shoulder occurring between 550 K and 700 K. The magnitude of the latter varies from clearly identifiable to nearly absent, and tends to be more pronounced in curves obtained from angular fragments. The main exothermal peak is related to the frozen-in structure of the glass and consequently to its thermal history when passing through the glass transition. The subordinate peak may represent strain rate-induced and tensile stress accumulation

  12. Remanent magnetization model for the broken ridge satellite magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    A crustal model for the interpretation of the Broken Ridge satellite magnetic anomaly was constructed from bathymetric data assuming an Airy-type isostatic compensation. An average crustal magnetization of 6 A.m is required to account for the observed anomaly amplitudes provided that the whole crust is homogeneously magnetized. In contrast, a model representing only the topographic expression of the Broken Ridge, above the surrounding sea floor, requires a magnetization of the order of 40 A.m-1. Since this latter figure is much higher than is to be expected from studies of magnetic properties of oceanic rocks, it is concluded that the majority of the crustal volume of Broken Ridge is magnetized relatively uniformly. The direction of the source magnetization is consistent with an inclination shallower than the present geomagnetic field and close to that of an axial dipole. Since a more northerly source location for Broken Ridge is contrary to the paleolatitude data it is though that the magnetization represents a magnetization obtained by averaging the geomagnetic field direction over a sufficient time to remove secular variation effects. This pattern is indicative of viscous magnetization.

  13. Hot Flow Anomalies at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinson, G. A.; Sibeck, David Gary; Boardsen, Scott A.; Moore, Tom; Barabash, S.; Masters, A.; Shane, N.; Slavin, J.A.; Coates, A.J.; Zhang, T. L.; Sarantos, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-instrument study of a hot flow anomaly (HFA) observed by the Venus Express spacecraft in the Venusian foreshock, on 22 March 2008, incorporating both Venus Express Magnetometer and Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA) plasma observations. Centered on an interplanetary magnetic field discontinuity with inward convective motional electric fields on both sides, with a decreased core field strength, ion observations consistent with a flow deflection, and bounded by compressive heated edges, the properties of this event are consistent with those of HFAs observed at other planets within the solar system.

  14. Recognising serious umbilical cord anomalies.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Andrew S J; Jayapal, Sathiya S K; Whitburn, Jessica A S; Akinbiyi, Bolutito A; Willetts, Ian E

    2013-11-27

    Umbilical vessel catheterisation is a common intervention in neonatal care. Many complications are recognised, some of which are life-threatening. We report the case of a term neonate who was compromised at birth following antepartum haemorrhage with evidence of multiorgan ischaemic injury. Following resuscitation and umbilical vessel catheterisation, she developed pneumoperitoneum. At laparotomy, a patent vitellointestinal duct was identified and resected. Intestinal perforation was found in the duct wall, most plausibly explained by the unintentional catheterisation of the duct via the umbilicus. Learning to recognise umbilical cord anomalies, such as patent vitellointestinal duct, can be simple and could prevent potentially serious complications.

  15. Recognising serious umbilical cord anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Andrew S J; Jayapal, Sathiya S K; Whitburn, Jessica A S; Akinbiyi, Bolutito A; Willetts, Ian E

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical vessel catheterisation is a common intervention in neonatal care. Many complications are recognised, some of which are life-threatening. We report the case of a term neonate who was compromised at birth following antepartum haemorrhage with evidence of multiorgan ischaemic injury. Following resuscitation and umbilical vessel catheterisation, she developed pneumoperitoneum. At laparotomy, a patent vitellointestinal duct was identified and resected. Intestinal perforation was found in the duct wall, most plausibly explained by the unintentional catheterisation of the duct via the umbilicus. Learning to recognise umbilical cord anomalies, such as patent vitellointestinal duct, can be simple and could prevent potentially serious complications. PMID:24285812

  16. [Rare renal anomalies in childhood].

    PubMed

    Arambasić, Jadranka; Puseljić, Silvija; Angebrandt, Snjezana; Puseljić, Ivo

    2003-01-01

    Three patients with megacalycosis, a rare ren anomaly which includes dilatation of all ren calices, are presented. The symptoms of acute uroinfection were present in all three patients. The patients underwent clinical observation, laboratory testing, and renal ultrasound. Ultrasound revealed unilateral hydronephrosis in all three patients. Additional examinations included static and dynamic renal scintigraphy, voiding cystourethrography, and intravenous urography which pointed to unilateral megacalycosis. The symptoms of acute uroinfection were probably triggered by urinary stasis in dilated calices. Surgical intervention is not indicated in megacalycosis. The increasing incidence of uroinfection, urolithiasis and hematuria imposed the need of continuous follow-up in these patients.

  17. Congenital anomalies in Primorsky region.

    PubMed

    Kiku, P; Voronin, S; Golokhvast, K

    2015-01-01

    According to WHO hereditary diseases and congenital malformations contribute significantly to the health of population. Thus, the problems of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of congenital abnormalities are of interest for many researchers [2]. In addition, the dynamic accounting for the incidence of congenital malformations and hereditary diseases allows the researchers to assess the ecological situation in the region [1]. The occurrence of congenital anomalies in the world varies; it depends heavily on how carefully the data is collected [4]. Multifactorial or polygenic diseases develop under the influence of environmental factors in the presence of defective genes. They can constitute up to 90% of all chronic pathology [2-5]. To determine the incidence of congenital anomalies under the influence of environmental factors. The study used the methodology of system evaluation of congenital anomalies incidence in Primorsky region, depending on bio-climatic and environmental conditions. The authors used health statistics for the period from 2000 to 2014, F.12 class for congenital abnormalities in adolescents and children that were compared in geographical and temporal aspects with environmental factors of 33 settlements in Primorsky region. The environment is represented by nature and climate (6 factor modules) and sanitation (7 factor modules) blocks of factors. When formalizing the information database of the environment a specially developed 10-point assessment scale was used. Statistical processing of the information was carried out using Pearson's chi-squared test and multiple regression method from SSPS application program package. The study found that over the 15-year period the level of congenital abnormalities in children increased by 27.5% and in adolescents - by 35.1%, and in 2014 it amounted to 1687.6 and 839.3 per 100 000 people, respectively. The predictive model shows a steady further growth of this pathology. The incidence

  18. ISHM Anomaly Lexicon for Rocket Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalzel, John L.; Buchanan, Aubri; Hensarling, Paula L.; Morris, Jonathan; Turowski, Mark; Figueroa, Jorge F.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) is a comprehensive capability. An ISHM system must detect anomalies, identify causes of such anomalies, predict future anomalies, help identify consequences of anomalies for example, suggested mitigation steps. The system should also provide users with appropriate navigation tools to facilitate the flow of information into and out of the ISHM system. Central to the ability of the ISHM to detect anomalies is a clearly defined catalog of anomalies. Further, this lexicon of anomalies must be organized in ways that make it accessible to a suite of tools used to manage the data, information and knowledge (DIaK) associated with a system. In particular, it is critical to ensure that there is optimal mapping between target anomalies and the algorithms associated with their detection. During the early development of our ISHM architecture and approach, it became clear that a lexicon of anomalies would be important to the development of critical anomaly detection algorithms. In our work in the rocket engine test environment at John C. Stennis Space Center, we have access to a repository of discrepancy reports (DRs) that are generated in response to squawks identified during post-test data analysis. The DR is the tool used to document anomalies and the methods used to resolve the issue. These DRs have been generated for many different tests and for all test stands. The result is that they represent a comprehensive summary of the anomalies associated with rocket engine testing. Fig. 1 illustrates some of the data that can be extracted from a DR. Such information includes affected transducer channels, narrative description of the observed anomaly, and the steps used to correct the problem. The primary goal of the anomaly lexicon development efforts we have undertaken is to create a lexicon that could be used in support of an associated health assessment database system (HADS) co-development effort. There are a number of significant

  19. Space Weather, Cosmic Rays, and Satellite Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Dorman

    Results are presented of the Satellite Anomaly Project, which aims to improve the methods of safeguarding satellites in the Earth’s magnetosphere from the negative effects of the space environment. Anomaly data from the USSR and Russian “Kosmos” series satellites in the period 1971-1999 are combined into one database, together with similar information on other spacecraft. This database contains, beyond the anomaly information, various characteristics of space weather: geomagnetic activity indices (Ap, AE and Dst), fluxes and fluencies of electrons and protons at different energies, high energy cosmic ray variations and other solar, interplanetary and solar wind data. A comparative analysis of the distribution of each of these parameters relative to satellite anomalies was carried out for the total number of anomalies (about 6000 events), and separately for high altitude orbit satellites ( 5000 events) and low altitude (about 800 events). No relation was found between low and high altitude satellite anomalies. Daily numbers of satellite anomalies, averaged by a superposed epoch method around sudden storm commencements and proton event onsets for high (>1500 km) and low (<1500 km) altitude orbits revealed a big difference in behavior. Satellites were divided into several groups according to their orbital characteristics (altitude and inclination). The relation of satellite anomalies to the environmental parameters was found to be different for various orbits, and this should be taken into account when developing anomaly frequency models. The preliminary anomaly frequency models are presented.

  20. Optimization of residual heat removal pump axial thrust and axial bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, F.

    1996-12-01

    The residual heat removal (RHR) pumps of German 1300 megawatt pressurized-water reactor (PWR) power plants are of the single stage end suction type with volute casing or with diffuser and forged circular casing. Due to the service conditions the pumps have to cover the full capacity range as well as a big variation in suction static pressure. This results in a big difference in the axial thrust that has to be borne by the axial bearing. Because these pumps are designed to operate without auxiliary systems (things that do not exist can not fail), they are equipped with antifriction bearings and sump oil lubrication. To minimize the heat production within the bearing casing, a number of PWR plants have pumps with combined axial/radial bearings of the ball type. Due to the fact that the maximum axial thrust caused by static pressure and hydrodynamic forces on the impeller is too big to be borne by that type of axial bearing, the impellers were designed to produce a hydrodynamic axial force that counteracts the static axial force. Thus, the resulting axial thrust may change direction when the static pressure varies.

  1. Axial eye length after retinal detachment surgery.

    PubMed

    Vukojević, Nenad; Sikić, Jakov; Curković, Tihomir; Juratovac, Zlatko; Katusić, Damir; Sarić, Borna; Jukić, Tomislav

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the eye axial diameter were studied to assess the eye globe impact of conventional operation for retinal detachment. The study included 69 eyes in 69 patients operated on for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. There were 46.4% of men and 53.6% of women, mean age 52.7 (+/- 15.21) years. Results of preoperative and postoperative ultrasonographic measurement of axial diameter are presented. The mean preoperative and postoperative eye axial diameter was 23.69 (+/- 1.84) mm and 24.43 (+/- 1.91) mm, respectively. Postoperative results showed the axial eye length to increase by a mean of 0.74 (+/- 0.44) mm, yielding a statistically significant difference from the preoperative measurement (p < 0.001). The mean myopia induced by this eyeball elongation was 1.77 D. The encircling band with and without segmental buckling used in surgical repair of retinal detachment creates circular and segmental indentation of the eyeball, thus increasing its axial length. The myopia induced by elongation of the eyeball results in considerable myopia, which requires appropriate correction in the early postoperative period to achieve favorable vision rehabilitation.

  2. Axial flow gas turbine engine combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Shekleton, J.R.; Sawyer, K.W.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a gas turbine engine. It comprises: radial compressor means for compressing air entering through a compressor inlet opening; axial turbine means in axially spaced relation to the radial compressor means; the radial compressor means being operatively associated with the axial turbine means; radial combustor means intermediate the radial compressor means and axial turbine means; turbine nozzle means proximate the axial turbine means for directing gases of combustion thereto; the radial combustor means defining a radial combustion space in communication with both the radial compressor means and the turbine nozzle means. The radial combustor means including means for introducing compressed air generally tangentially into the radial combustion space upstream of the turbine nozzle means and at a point radially outwardly of the turbine nozzle means and the turbine nozzle means being disposed radially inwardly of the radial combustion space to define a generally radial flow path therebetween. The radial combustor means generating the gases of combustion by combusting fuel from a source and air from the radial compressor means; and fuel injection means operatively associated with the radial combustor means radially outwardly of the turbine nozzle means for injecting a fuel/air mixture generally tangentially into the radial combustion space; whereby a tangential swirl flow is established within the radial combustion space.

  3. Are axial and radial flow chromatography different?

    PubMed

    Besselink, Tamara; van der Padt, Albert; Janssen, Anja E M; Boom, Remko M

    2013-01-04

    Radial flow chromatography can be a solution for scaling up a packed bed chromatographic process to larger processing volumes. In this study we compared axial and radial flow affinity chromatography both experimentally and theoretically. We used an axial flow column and a miniaturized radial flow column with a ratio of 1.8 between outer and inner surface area, both with a bed height of 5 cm. The columns were packed with affinity resin to adsorb BSA. The average velocity in the columns was set equal. No difference in performance between the two columns could be observed. To gain more insight into the design of a radial flow column, the velocity profile and resin distribution in the radial flow column were calculated. Using mathematical models we found that the breakthrough performance of radial flow chromatography is very similar to axial flow when the ratio between outer and inner radius of the radial flow column is around 2. When this ratio is increased, differences become more apparent, but remain small. However, the ratio does have a significant influence on the velocity profile inside the resin bed, which directly influences the pressure drop and potentially resin compression, especially at higher values for this ratio. The choice between axial and radial flow will be based on cost price, footprint and packing characteristics. For small-scale processes, axial flow chromatography is probably the best choice, for resin volumes of at least several tens of litres, radial flow chromatography may be preferable.

  4. Axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography.

    PubMed

    Pendharker, Sarang; Shende, Swapnali; Newman, Ward; Ogg, Stephen; Nazemifard, Neda; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-12-01

    Optical tomographic reconstruction of a three-dimensional (3D) nanoscale specimen is hindered by the axial diffraction limit, which is 2-3 times worse than the focal plane resolution. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography method that enables the use of regular evanescent wave microscopes like the total internal reflection fluorescence microscope beyond surface imaging and achieve a tomographic reconstruction with axial super-resolution. Our proposed method based on Fourier reconstruction achieves axial super-resolution by extracting information from multiple sets of 3D fluorescence images when the sample is illuminated by an evanescent wave. We propose a procedure to extract super-resolution features from the incremental penetration of an evanescent wave and support our theory by one-dimensional (along the optical axis) and 3D simulations. We validate our claims by experimentally demonstrating tomographic reconstruction of microtubules in HeLa cells with an axial resolution of ∼130  nm. Our method does not require any additional optical components or sample preparation. The proposed method can be combined with focal plane super-resolution techniques like stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy and can also be adapted for THz and microwave near-field tomography.

  5. Animated axial surface mapping: The multimedia companion

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, S.C.; Shaw, J.H.; Suppe, J.

    1995-09-01

    This newly expanded version of AAPG`s first DataShare Disk brings to life the concepts and applications of a new method of structural trend analysis. Through the dynamic use of color, sound, animation, and humor, this multimedia companion to the May 1994 article on Axial Surface Mapping introduces the reader (or viewer) to the concepts of rigid-block translation, fault-bend folding, and axial surface mapping. Animated models of growing fault-bend folds allow the viewer to see in four dimensions. The axial surface map shows the horizontal plane; the folding lines show depth planes; and the animations show the structure and its two-dimensional map changing with time and increasing slip. The animations create theoretical map patterns under varying, but controlled conditions that can be compared to axial surface maps from real data. The model patterns are then used to interpret seismic data and axial surface maps from a producing gas field in offshore California and from an exploration play in Pennsylvania.

  6. Axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendharker, Sarang; Shende, Swapnali; Newman, Ward; Ogg, Stephen; Nazemifard, Neda; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-12-01

    Optical tomographic reconstruction of a 3D nanoscale specimen is hindered by the axial diffraction limit, which is 2-3 times worse than the focal plane resolution. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography (AxSET) method that enables the use of regular evanescent wave microscopes like Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscope (TIRF) beyond surface imaging, and achieve tomographic reconstruction with axial super-resolution. Our proposed method based on Fourier reconstruction achieves axial super-resolution by extracting information from multiple sets of three-dimensional fluorescence images when the sample is illuminated by an evanescent wave. We propose a procedure to extract super-resolution features from the incremental penetration of an evanescent wave and support our theory by 1D (along the optical axis) and 3D simulations. We validate our claims by experimentally demonstrating tomographic reconstruction of microtubules in HeLa cells with an axial resolution of $\\sim$130 nm. Our method does not require any additional optical components or sample preparation. The proposed method can be combined with focal plane super-resolution techniques like STORM and can also be adapted for THz and microwave near-field tomography.

  7. Conductivity Anomalies in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neska, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a review of studies which, by applying the magnetotelluric, geomagnetic deep sounding, and magnetovariational sounding methods (the latter refers to usage of the horizontal magnetic tensor), investigate Central Europe for zones of enhanced electrical conductivity. The study areas comprise the region of the Trans-European Suture Zone (i.e. the south Baltic region and Poland), the North German Basin, the German and Czech Variscides, the Pannonian Basin (Hungary), and the Polish, Slovakian, Ukrainian, and Romanian Carpathians. This part of the world is well investigated in terms of data coverage and of the density of published studies, whereas the certainty that the results lead to comprehensive interpretations varies within the reviewed literature. A comparison of spatially coincident or adjacent studies reveals the important role that the data coverage of a distinct conductivity anomaly plays for the consistency of results. The encountered conductivity anomalies are understood as linked to basin sediments, asthenospheric upwelling, large differences in lithospheric age, and—this concerns most of them, which all concentrate in the middle crust—tectonic boundaries that developed during all mountain building phases that have taken place on the continent.

  8. Surgical management of Ebstein's anomaly.

    PubMed

    Stulak, John M; Dearani, Joseph A; Danielson, Gordon K

    2007-01-01

    Ebstein's malformation is a congenital anomaly of the tricuspid valve and right ventricle. Surgical repair of Ebstein's anomaly improves functional class and exercise tolerance, eliminates right-to-left intracardiac shunting (if present), and reduces the incidence of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. As a result, quality of life and survival are improved. Because of the variable degree of malformation present, repair is predicated on favorable anatomic factors, most importantly the arrangement of the anterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve. When anatomic derangements threaten a durable tricuspid valve repair, valve replacement with protection of the conduction tissue and right coronary artery should be performed. The vast majority of patients can undergo a biventricular repair. The application of the bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis is reserved for patients with poor right ventricular function. Freedom from reoperation after tricuspid valve repair is similar when compared with valve replacement. In the current era, overall early mortality after surgical repair in children and adults has fallen to less than 3% in experienced centers. Surgical treatment of the symptomatic neonate remains a significant challenge, with approaches that include either a biventricular or single ventricle algorithm.

  9. Axial resolution enhancement of third harmonic generation microscopy by harmonic focal point axial modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozdoor Dashtabi, Mahdi; Arabanian, Atoosa Sadat; Massudi, Reza

    2017-02-01

    Harmonic focal point axial modulation (h-FPAM) in nonlinear optical microscopy is introduced and used to enhance the axial resolution and the signal to background ratio by modulating the focal point of a beam of femtosecond pulses train along the axial direction and phase sensitively filtering the resulting signals using a lock-in amplifier. Axial resolution enhancement factor of 2.05 is acquired in 2f detection mode for the third harmonic generation microscopy of glass-oil interfaces. This technique also resolves the image interpretation problem of the fundamental harmonic FPAM technique. Moreover, the potential of this technique for axial sectioning is demonstrated by acquiring images from a red blood cell.

  10. Anomalous transport and generalized axial charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilin, Vladimir P.; Sadofyev, Andrey V.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we continue studying the modification of the axial charge in chiral media by macroscopic helicities. Recently it was shown that magnetic reconnections result in a persistent current of zero mode along flux tubes. Here we argue that in general a change in the helical part of the generalized axial charge results in the same phenomenon. Thus one may say that there is a novel realization of chiral effects requiring no initial chiral asymmetry. The transfer of flow helicity to zero modes is analyzed in a toy model based on a vortex reconnection in a chiral superfluid. Then, we discuss the balance between the two competing processes effect of reconnections and the chiral instability on the example of magnetic helicity. We argue that in the general case there is a possibility for the distribution of the axial charge between the magnetic and fermionic forms at the end of the instability.

  11. Organocatalytic atroposelective synthesis of axially chiral styrenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sheng-Cai; Wu, San; Zhou, Qinghai; Chung, Lung Wa; Ye, Liu; Tan, Bin

    2017-05-01

    Axially chiral compounds are widespread in biologically active compounds and are useful chiral ligands or organocatalysts in asymmetric catalysis. It is well-known that styrenes are one of the most abundant and principal feedstocks and thus represent excellent prospective building blocks for chemical synthesis. Driven by the development of atroposelective synthesis of axially chiral styrene derivatives, we discovered herein the asymmetric organocatalytic approach via direct Michael addition reaction of substituted diones/ketone esters/malononitrile to alkynals. The axially chiral styrene compounds were produced with good chemical yields, enantioselectivities and almost complete E/Z-selectivities through a secondary amine-catalysed iminium activation strategy under mild conditions. Such structural motifs are important precursors for further transformations into biologically active compounds and synthetic useful intermediates and may have potential applications in asymmetric synthesis as olefin ligands or organocatalysts.

  12. Axial flow positive displacement worm gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement engine has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes and the third twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. A combustor section extends axially downstream through at least a portion of the second section.

  13. Minor congenital anomalies and ataxic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, G

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of minor congenital anomalies was examined in 36 patients with ataxic cerebral palsy, in unaffected family members, and in 100 unrelated control subjects. None of the control subjects or family members had more than four anomalies, and 25 of 36 (69%) of the patients had more than four. The distribution of anomalies differed considerably, with 60% of the index cases having seven or more, and 94% of the controls having three or less. The number occurring in the patients was significantly more than in their relatives. Of the 25 patients with more than four anomalies, 16 (64%) had undergone potentially adverse perinatal or early postnatal events. Thus minor congenital anomalies were considerably more frequent in those with ataxic cerebral palsy than in related or unrelated control subjects. These anomalies may be markers of early prenatal factors that contributed to the adverse outcome either directly or by predisposing to perinatal difficulties. PMID:2751330

  14. The Mars Rover Spirit FLASH anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, Glenn E.; Neilson, Tracy C.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover 'Spirit' suffered a debilitating anomaly that prevented communication with Earth for several anxious days. With the eyes of the world upon us, the anomaly team used each scrap of information, our knowledge of the system, and sheer determination to analyze and fix the problem, then return the vehicle to normal operation. This paper will discuss the Spirit FLASH anomaly, including the drama of the investigation, the root cause and the lessons learned from the experience.

  15. Debendox does not cause the Poland anomaly.

    PubMed

    David, T J

    1982-06-01

    The suggestion that Debendox may cause the Poland anomaly is refuted by a study of the antenatal drug exposure in 46 cases of the Poland anomaly and 32 cases of isolated absence of the pectoralis major. Debendox had been prescribed in one case of the Poland anomaly and in one case of isolated pectoralis absence, but in neither was the compound given during organogenesis. In none of the 78 cases could Debendox be causally implicated.

  16. Debendox does not cause the Poland anomaly.

    PubMed Central

    David, T J

    1982-01-01

    The suggestion that Debendox may cause the Poland anomaly is refuted by a study of the antenatal drug exposure in 46 cases of the Poland anomaly and 32 cases of isolated absence of the pectoralis major. Debendox had been prescribed in one case of the Poland anomaly and in one case of isolated pectoralis absence, but in neither was the compound given during organogenesis. In none of the 78 cases could Debendox be causally implicated. PMID:7092316

  17. Ground Viewing Perspective Hyperspectral Anomaly Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    features autonomous clutter background characterization (ACBC), adaptive anomaly detection , and constrained subspace target classification, where the first...materials (targets or non-targets). The first stage has two main components, ACBC and anomaly detection . The uniqueness of this first stage is that a random...ignored in the development of autonomous anomaly detection algorithms. Experimental results, using no prior information about the clutter background

  18. Axial pico turbine - construction and experimental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peczkis, G.; Goryca, Z.; Korczak, A.

    2017-08-01

    The paper concerns axial water turbine of power equal to 1 kW. The example of axial water turbine constructional calculations was provided, as well as turbine rotor construction with NACA profile blades. The laboratory test rig designed and built to perform measurements on pico turbine was described. The turbine drove three-phase electrical generator. On the basis of highest efficiency parameters, pico turbine basic characteristics were elaborated. The experimental research results indicated that pico turbine can achieve maximum efficiency close to the values of larger water turbines.

  19. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A plurality of lubricating plugs are disposed in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are disposed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  20. A Mixed Finite Analysis of Axial Foreshortening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzicka, Gene; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In previous studies, a mixed finite element was derived and shown to be effective in facilitating accurate modal reduction of rotor blades. This study builds upon that earlier work through the development of algorithms that allow the element's Lagrangian axial displacement degrees of freedom to be eliminated in favor of the axial force degrees of freedom. This reduction process, which had been demonstrated previously for the case of a single mixed finite element, may be viewed as a generalization of the UMARC blade analysis methodology to arbitrary topologies. A unique strength of the method. developed here is that the model may consist of two dimensional or even three dimensional elements.

  1. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H.

    1988-01-01

    A series of lubricating plugs is located in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are placed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  2. Theoretical Determination of Axial Fan Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struve, E.

    1943-01-01

    The report presents a method for the computation of axial fan characteristics. The method is based on the assumption that the law of constancy of the circulation along the blade holds, approximately, for all fan conditions for which the blade elements operate at normal angles of attack (up to the stalling angles). Pressure head coefficient K(sub a) and power coefficient K(sub u) for the force components in the axial and tangential directions, respectively, and analogous to the lift and drag coefficients C(sub y) and C(sub x) are conveniently introduced.

  3. Conscious and unconscious detection of semantic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    When asked What superhero is associated with bats, Robin, the Penguin, Metropolis, Catwoman, the Riddler, the Joker, and Mr. Freeze? people frequently fail to notice the anomalous word Metropolis. The goals of this study were to determine whether detection of semantic anomalies, like Metropolis, is conscious or unconscious and whether this detection is immediate or delayed. To achieve these goals, participants answered anomalous and nonanomalous questions as their reading times for words were recorded. Comparisons between detected versus undetected anomalies revealed slower reading times for detected anomalies-a finding that suggests that people immediately and consciously detected anomalies. Further, comparisons between first and second words following undetected anomalies versus nonanomalous controls revealed some slower reading times for first and second words-a finding that suggests that people may have unconsciously detected anomalies but this detection was delayed. Taken together, these findings support the idea that when we are immediately aware of a semantic anomaly (i.e., immediate conscious detection) our language processes make immediate adjustments in order to reconcile contradictory information of anomalies with surrounding text; however, even when we are not consciously aware of semantic anomalies, our language processes still make these adjustments, although these adjustments are delayed (i.e., delayed unconscious detection).

  4. The magnetic anomaly of the Ivreazone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, G.

    1979-01-01

    A magnetic field survey was made in the Ivreazone in 1969/70. The results were: significant anomaly of the vertical intensity is found. It follows the basic main part of the Ivrea-Verbano zone and continues to the south. The width of the anomaly is about 10 km, the maximum measures about +800 gamma. The model interpretation shows that possibly the anomaly belongs to an amphibolitic body, which in connection with the Ivrea-body was found by deep seismic sounding. Therefore, the magnetic anomaly provides further evidence for the conception that the Ivrea-body has to be regarded as a chip of earthmantle material pushed upward by tectonic processes.

  5. Tectonically Induced Anomalies Without Large Earthquake Occurrences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zheming; Wang, Guangcai; Liu, Chenglong; Che, Yongtai

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we documented a case involving large-scale macroscopic anomalies in the Xichang area, southwestern Sichuan Province, China, from May to June of 2002, after which no major earthquake occurred. During our field survey in 2002, we found that the timing of the high-frequency occurrence of groundwater anomalies was in good agreement with those of animal anomalies. Spatially, the groundwater and animal anomalies were distributed along the Anninghe-Zemuhe fault zone. Furthermore, the groundwater level was elevated in the northwest part of the Zemuhe fault and depressed in the southeast part of the Zemuhe fault zone, with a border somewhere between Puge and Ningnan Counties. Combined with microscopic groundwater, geodetic and seismic activity data, we infer that the anomalies in the Xichang area were the result of increasing tectonic activity in the Sichuan-Yunnan block. In addition, groundwater data may be used as a good indicator of tectonic activity. This case tells us that there is no direct relationship between an earthquake and these anomalies. In most cases, the vast majority of the anomalies, including microscopic and macroscopic anomalies, are caused by tectonic activity. That is, these anomalies could occur under the effects of tectonic activity, but they do not necessarily relate to the occurrence of earthquakes.

  6. Consistent anomalies of the induced W gravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abud, Mario; Ader, Jean-Pierre; Cappiello, Luigi

    1996-02-01

    The BRST anomaly which may be present in the induced Wn gravity quantized on the light-cone is evaluated in the geometrical framework of Zucchini. The cocycles linked by the cohomology of the BRST operator to the anomaly are straightforwardly calculated thanks to the analogy between this formulation and the Yang-Mills theory. We give also a conformally covariant formulation of these quantities including the anomaly, which is valid on arbitrary Riemann surfaces. The example of the W3 theory is discussed and a comparison with other candidates for the anomaly available in the literature is presented.

  7. Spectral Methods for Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. L.; Gee, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Spectral methods, that is, those based in the Fourier transform, have long been employed in the analysis of magnetic anomalies. For example, Schouten and MaCamy's Earth filter is used extensively to map patterns to the pole, and Parker's Fourier transform series facilitates forward modeling and provides an efficient algorithm for inversion of profiles and surveys. From a different, and perhaps less familiar perspective, magnetic anomalies can be represented as the realization of a stationary stochastic process and then statistical theory can be brought to bear. It is vital to incorporate the full 2-D power spectrum, even when discussing profile data. For example, early analysis of long profiles failed to discover the small-wavenumber peak in the power spectrum predicted by one-dimensional theory. The long-wavelength excess is the result of spatial aliasing, when energy leaks into the along-track spectrum from the cross-track components of the 2-D spectrum. Spectral techniques may be used to improve interpolation and downward continuation of survey data. They can also evaluate the reliability of sub-track magnetization models both across and and along strike. Along-strike profiles turn out to be surprisingly good indicators of the magnetization directly under them; there is high coherence between the magnetic anomaly and the magnetization over a wide band. In contrast, coherence is weak at long wavelengths on across-strike lines, which is naturally the favored orientation for most studies. When vector (or multiple level) measurements are available, cross-spectral analysis can reveal the wavenumber interval where the geophysical signal resides, and where noise dominates. One powerful diagnostic is that the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-path components of the field must be constant 90 degrees. To illustrate, it was found that on some very long Project Magnetic lines, only the lowest 10% of the wavenumber band contain useful geophysical signal. In this

  8. Congenital anomalies surveillance in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lowry, R Brian

    2008-01-01

    Congenital anomalies (CA) are present in approximately 3% of all newborn babies and account for about 12% of paediatric hospital admissions. They represent an important public health problem. Surveillance is especially important so that preventive measures such as folic acid fortification can be properly assessed without resorting to a series of ad hoc studies. Canada's surveillance of CAs is weak, with only Alberta and British Columbia having established sytems. Most provinces have perinatal systems but their CA data are incomplete and they do not capture terminations of pregnancy. The same is true of the Public Health Agency of Canada's system. A new system, the Fetal Alert Network, has been proposed for Ontario, which represents a start but will require additional sources of ascertainment if it is to be a truly population-based system for Ontario.

  9. Classical anomalies for spinning particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, Jorge; Plyushchay, Mikhail

    1998-02-01

    We discuss the phenomenon of classical anomaly. It is observed for 3D Berezin-Marinov (BM), Barducci-Casalbuoni-Lusanna (BCL) and Cortés-Plyushchay-Velázquez (CPV) pseudoclassical spin particle models. We show that quantum mechanically these different models correspond to the same P, T-invariant system of planar fermions, but the quantum system has global symmetries being not reproducible classically in full in any of the models. We demonstrate that the specific U(1) gauge symmetry characterized by the opposite coupling constants of spin s = + {1}/{2} and s = - {1}/{2} states has a natural classical analog in the CPV model but can be reproduced in the BM and BCL models in an obscure and rather artificial form. We also show that the BM and BCL models quantum mechanically are equivalent in any odd-dimensional space-time, but describe different quantum systems in even space-time dimensions.

  10. Co-axial, high energy gamma generator

    DOEpatents

    Reijonen, Jani Petteri; Gicquel, Frederic

    2011-08-16

    A gamma ray generator includes an ion source in a first chamber. A second chamber is configured co-axially around the first chamber at a lower second pressure. Co-axially arranged plasma apertures separate the two chambers and provide for restricted passage of ions and gas from the first to the second chamber. The second chamber is formed by a puller electrode having at least one long channel aperture to draw ions from the first chamber when the puller electrode is subject to an appropriate applied potential. A plurality of electrodes rings in the third chamber in third pressure co-axially surround the puller electrode and have at least one channel corresponding to the at least one puller electrode aperture and plasma aperture. The electrode rings increase the energy of the ions to a selected energy in stages in passing between successive pairs of the electrodes by application of an accelerating voltage to the successive pairs of accelerator electrodes. A target disposed co-axially around the plurality of electrodes receives the beam of accelerated ions, producing gamma rays.

  11. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  12. Computerized axial tomography: the normal EMI scan.

    PubMed Central

    Gawler, J; Bull, J D; Du Boulay, G H; Marshall, J

    1975-01-01

    Computerized axial tomography using the EMI scanner as a new method of using x-rays in diagnosis. The technique displays intracranial and orbital structures in the transverse plane. The appearances of normal EMI Scans are described and correlated with cerebral and orbital anatomy seen in transverse section. Images PMID:1081587

  13. Investigations on Experimental Impellers for Axial Blowers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Encke, W.

    1947-01-01

    A selection of measurements obtained on experimental impellers for axial blowers will be reported. In addition to characteristic curves plotted for low and for high peripheral velocities, proportions and blade sections for six different blower models and remarks on the design of blowers will be presented.

  14. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  15. Computer programs for axial flow compressor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmody, R. H.; Creveling, H. F.

    1969-01-01

    Four computer programs examine effects of design parameters and indicate areas for research of multistage axial flow compressors. The programs provide information on velocity diagrams and stage-by-stage performance calculation, radial equilibrium of flow, radial distribution of total pressure, and off-design performance calculation.

  16. Aerodynamic Design of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. O. (Editor); Johnsen, I. A.

    1965-01-01

    An overview of 'Aerodynamic systems design of axial flow compressors' is presented. Numerous chapters cover topics such as compressor design, ptotential and viscous flow in two dimensional cascades, compressor stall and blade vibration, and compressor flow theory. Theoretical aspects of flow are also covered.

  17. Excitation modes in non-axial nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leviatan, A.; Ginnochio, J.N.

    1990-01-01

    Excitation modes of non-axial quadrupole shapes are investigated in the framework of interacting boson models. Both {gamma}-unstable and {gamma}-rigid nuclear shapes are considered for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. 6 refs.

  18. Active axial stress in mouse aorta.

    PubMed

    Agianniotis, A; Rachev, A; Stergiopulos, N

    2012-07-26

    The study verifies the development of active axial stress in the wall of mouse aorta over a range of physiological loads when the smooth muscle cells are stimulated to contract. The results obtained show that the active axial stress is virtually independent of the magnitude of pressure, but depends predominately on the longitudinal stretch ratio. The dependence is non-monotonic and is similar to the active stress-stretch dependence in the circumferential direction reported in the literature. The expression for the active axial stress fitted to the experimental data shows that the maximum active stress is developed at longitudinal stretch ratio 1.81, and 1.56 is the longitudinal stretch ratio below which the stimulation does not generate active stress. The study shows that the magnitude of active axial stress is smaller than the active circumferential stress. There is need for more experimental investigations on the active response of different types of arteries from different species and pathological conditions. The results of these studies can promote building of refined constrictive models in vascular rheology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Axial spondyloarthritis: the heart of the matter.

    PubMed

    Gensler, Lianne S

    2015-06-01

    A variety of cardiovascular clinical manifestations have been described in patients with spondyloarthritis, especially in well-established ankylosing spondylitis. These include both structural heart disease, conduction defects and ischemic heart disease. The true prevalence of cardiovascular involvement in patients with axial spondyloarthritis, including non-radiographic disease needs to be further defined.

  20. Lenses axial space ray tracing measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiqian; Sun, Ruoduan; Qiu, Lirong; Shi, Libo; Sha, Dingguo

    2010-02-15

    In order to achieve the precise measurement of the lenses axial space, a new lenses axial space ray tracing measurement (ASRTM) is proposed based on the geometrical theory of optical image. For an assembled lenses with the given radius of curvature r(n) and refractive index nn of every lens, ASRTM uses the annular laser differential confocal chromatography focusing technique (ADCFT) to achieve the precise focusing at the vertex position P(n) of its inner-and-outer spherical surface Sn and obtain the coordinate z(n) corresponding to the axial movement position of ASRTM objective, and then, uses the ray tracing facet iterative algorithm to precisely determine the vertex position P(n) of every spherical surface by these coordinates z(n), refractive index n(n) and spherical radius r(n), and thereby obtaining the lenses inner axial space d(n). The preliminary experimental results indicate that ASRTM has a relative measurement error of less than 0.02%.

  1. Stability of structural members under axial load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E

    1937-01-01

    The principles of the cross method of moment distribution are used to check the stability of structural members under axial load. A brief theoretical treatment of the subject, together with an illustrative problem, is included as well as a discussion of the reduced modulus at high stresses and a set of tables to aid in the solution of practical problems.

  2. Supersonic axial-flow fan flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, John K.

    1988-01-01

    Lane's (1957) analytical formulation of the unsteady pressure distribution on an oscillating two-dimensional flat plate cascade in supersonic axial flow has been developed into a computer code. This unsteady aerodynamic code has shown good agreement with other published data. This code has also been incorporated into an existing aeroelastic code to analyze the NASA Lewis supersonic through-flow fan design.

  3. Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

    2010-02-19

    This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.

  4. Uhl's anomaly: a difficult prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vaujois, Laurence; van Doesburg, Nicolaas; Raboisson, Marie-Josée

    2015-03-01

    Uhl's anomaly is an evolutive disease leading to terminal right ventricular failure. The most difficult differential diagnosis at presentation is the Ebstein disease. We describe the evolution of a foetus with Uhl's anomaly from 21 to 30 weeks of gestation, with progressive reduction in the right ventricular anterior myocardium suggestive of apoptosis, leading to foetal demise.

  5. Magnitude Anomalies and Propagation of Local Phases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-31

    statistically significant variation of magnitude anomalies versus one of this above parameters. A contrario, we observed a significant dependance between...enough to demand a more detailed analysis. III - Local dependance of magnitude anomalies. A smoothing of our data on all quakes originating in the same

  6. Sources of Near Side Lunar Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Nicola C.; Hood, Lon L.; Halekas, J. S.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Binder, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    Lunar Prospector magnetometer data has been used to identify a number of nearside magnetic anomalies. Some of the features identified appear to correlate with impact ejecta, supporting a basin ejecta origin to the nearside anomalies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Photodiode and photomultiplier areal sensitivity anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngbluth, O., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Several silicon photodiodes and photomultipliers were tested to determine signal variations as a light spot was scanned over the photosensitive surface of these detectors. Qualitative and quantitative data is presented to demonstrate the areal sensitivity anomalies. These anomalies are related back to the fabrication techniques of the manufacturers.

  8. Integration of trace anomaly in 6D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Fabricio M.; Shapiro, Ilya L.

    2017-09-01

    The trace anomaly in six-dimensional space is given by the local terms which have six derivatives of the metric. We find the effective action which is responsible for the anomaly. The result is presented in non-local covariant form and also in the local covariant form with two auxiliary scalar fields.

  9. Sources of Near Side Lunar Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Nicola C.; Hood, Lon L.; Halekas, J. S.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Binder, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    Lunar Prospector magnetometer data has been used to identify a number of nearside magnetic anomalies. Some of the features identified appear to correlate with impact ejecta, supporting a basin ejecta origin to the nearside anomalies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Distance Metric Learning for Conditional Anomaly Detection.

    PubMed

    Valko, Michal; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2008-01-01

    Anomaly detection methods can be very useful in identifying unusual or interesting patterns in data. A recently proposed conditional anomaly detection framework extends anomaly detection to the problem of identifying anomalous patterns on a subset of attributes in the data. The anomaly always depends (is conditioned) on the value of remaining attributes. The work presented in this paper focuses on instance-based methods for detecting conditional anomalies. The methods depend heavily on the distance metric that lets us identify examples in the dataset that are most critical for detecting the anomaly. To optimize the performance of the anomaly detection methods we explore and study metric learning methods. We evaluate the quality of our methods on the Pneumonia PORT dataset by detecting unusual admission decisions for patients with the community-acquired pneumonia. The results of our metric learning methods show an improved detection performance over standard distance metrics, which is very promising for building automated anomaly detection systems for variety of intelligent monitoring applications.

  11. Distance Metric Learning for Conditional Anomaly Detection

    PubMed Central

    Valko, Michal; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2010-01-01

    Anomaly detection methods can be very useful in identifying unusual or interesting patterns in data. A recently proposed conditional anomaly detection framework extends anomaly detection to the problem of identifying anomalous patterns on a subset of attributes in the data. The anomaly always depends (is conditioned) on the value of remaining attributes. The work presented in this paper focuses on instance–based methods for detecting conditional anomalies. The methods depend heavily on the distance metric that lets us identify examples in the dataset that are most critical for detecting the anomaly. To optimize the performance of the anomaly detection methods we explore and study metric learning methods. We evaluate the quality of our methods on the Pneumonia PORT dataset by detecting unusual admission decisions for patients with the community–acquired pneumonia. The results of our metric learning methods show an improved detection performance over standard distance metrics, which is very promising for building automated anomaly detection systems for variety of intelligent monitoring applications. PMID:20485452

  12. Axial type self-bearing motor for axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yohji; Masuzawa, Toru; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Ohmori, Kunihiro; Yamane, Takashi; Konishi, Yoshiaki; Fukahori, Shinya; Ueno, Satoshi; Kim, Seung-Jong

    2003-10-01

    An axial self-bearing motor is proposed which can drive an axial blood pump without physical contact. It is a functional combination of the bi-directional disc motor and the axial active magnetic bearing, where it actively controls single degree-of-freedom motion, while other motions such as lateral vibration are passively stable. For application to a blood pump, the proposed self-bearing motor has the advantages of simple structure and small size. Through the finite element method (FEM) analysis and the experimental test, its good feasibility is verified. Finally, the axial flow pump is fabricated using the developed magnetically suspended motor. The pump test is carried out and the results are discussed in detail.

  13. Global magnetic anomaly and aurora of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Andrew F.

    1990-01-01

    The large offset and tilt of Neptune's dipole magnetic field combine to create a global magnetic anomaly, analogous to but much more important than earth's South Atlantic Anomaly. Energetic particle precipitation loss within the Neptune anomaly creates 'atmospheric drift shadows' within which particle fluxes are greatly reduced. The energetic particle dropout observed by Voyager near closest approach occurred near the predicted times when Voyager passed within the atmospheric drift shadow. Extremely soft, structured bursts of ions and electrons within the drift shadow may result from plasma wave-induced pitch angle scattering of trapped particles confined near the magnetic equator. The dropout does not necessarily imply that Voyager passed through an earth-like discrete auroral zone, as earlier reported. The ion and electron fluxes observed within the dropout period correspond to particles that must precipitate to Neptune's atmosphere within the anomaly region. This anomaly precipitation can account for a major portion of the ultraviolet emissions previously identified as Neptune aurora.

  14. Regional magnetic anomaly constraints on continental rifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Radially polarized MAGSAT anomalies of North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic lithospheric sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. These major magnetic features apparently preserve their integrity until a superimposed metamorphoric event alters the magnitude and pattern of the anomalies. The longevity of continental scale magnetic anomalies contrasts markedly with that of regional gravity anomalies which tend to reflect predominantly isostatic adjustments associated with neo-tectonism. First observed as a result of NASA's magnetic satellite programs, these anomalies provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans. Accordingly, satellite magnetic observations provide a further tool for investigating continental drift to compliment other lines of evidence in paleoclimatology, paleontology, paleomagnetism, and studies of the radiometric ages and geometric fit of the continents.

  15. Anomaly detection and reconstruction from random projections.

    PubMed

    Fowler, James E; Du, Qian

    2012-01-01

    Compressed-sensing methodology typically employs random projections simultaneously with signal acquisition to accomplish dimensionality reduction within a sensor device. The effect of such random projections on the preservation of anomalous data is investigated. The popular RX anomaly detector is derived for the case in which global anomalies are to be identified directly in the random-projection domain, and it is determined via both random simulation, as well as empirical observation that strongly anomalous vectors are likely to be identifiable by the projection-domain RX detector even in low-dimensional projections. Finally, a reconstruction procedure for hyperspectral imagery is developed wherein projection-domain anomaly detection is employed to partition the data set, permitting anomaly and normal pixel classes to be separately reconstructed in order to improve the representation of the anomaly pixels.

  16. Global anomalies and effective field theory

    DOE PAGES

    Golkar, Siavash; Sethi, Savdeep

    2016-05-17

    Here, we show that matching anomalies under large gauge transformations and large diffeomorphisms can explain the appearance and non-renormalization of couplings in effective field theory. We focus on thermal effective field theory, where we argue that the appearance of certain unusual Chern-Simons couplings is a consequence of global anomalies. As an example, we show that a mixed global anomaly in four dimensions fixes the chiral vortical effect coefficient (up to an overall additive factor). This is an experimentally measurable prediction from a global anomaly. For certain situations, we propose a simpler method for calculating global anomalies which uses correlation functionsmore » rather than eta invariants.« less

  17. Normative segment-specific axial and coronal angulation corridors of subaxial cervical column in axial rotation.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Pintar, Frank A; Baisden, Jamie L; Shender, Barry S; Paskoff, Glenn

    2008-03-01

    In contrast to clinical studies wherein loading magnitudes are indeterminate, experiments permit controlled and quantifiable moment applications, record kinematics in multiple planes, and allow derivation of moment-angulation corridors. Axial and coronal moment-angulation corridors were determined at every level of the subaxial cervical spine, expressed as logarithmic functions, and level-specificity of range of motion and neutral zones were evaluated. segmental primary axial and coupled coronal motions do not vary by level. Although it is known that cervical spine responses are coupled, segment-specific corridors of axial and coronal kinematics under axial twisting moments from healthy normal spines are not reported. Ten human cadaver columns (23-44 years, mean: 34 +/- 6.8) were fixed at the ends and targets were inserted to each vertebra to obtain kinematics in axial and coronal planes. The columns were subjected to pure axial twisting moments. Range of motion and neutral zone for primary-axial and coupled-coronal rotation components were determined at each spinal level. Data were analyzed using factorial analysis of variance. Moment-rotation angulations were expressed using logarithmic functions, and mean +/-1 standard deviation corridors were derived at each level for both components. Moment-angulations responses were nonlinear. Each segmental curve for both components was well represented by a logarithmic function (r2 > 0.95). Factorial analysis of variance indicated that the biomechanical metrics are spinal level-specific (P < 0.05). Axial and coronal angulations of cervical spinal columns show statistically different level-specific responses. The presentation of moment-angulation corridors for both metrics forms a dataset for the normal population. These segment-specific nonlinear corridors may help clinicians assess dysfunction or instability. These data will assist mathematical models of the spine in improved validation and lead to efficacious design of

  18. Congenital renal anomalies detected in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Muttarak, M; Sriburi, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective To document the types of congenital renal anomalies detected in adulthood, the clinical presentation and complications of these renal anomalies, and the most useful imaging modality in detecting a renal anomaly. Materials and methods This study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was waived. Between January 2007 and January 2011, the clinical data and imaging studies of 28 patients older than 18 years diagnosed with renal anomaly at the authors’ institution were retrospectively reviewed. Renal anomalies in this study included only those with abnormality in position and in form. Results Of these 28 patients, 22 underwent imaging studies and their results constituted the material of this study. Of the 22 patients, 14 had horseshoe kidneys (HSK), four had crossed renal ectopia and four had malrotation. Sixteen patients were men and six were women. The patients ranged in age from 19 to 74 years (mean age 51.1 years). Clinical presentations were abdominal pain (13), fever (13), haematuria (4), palpable mass (2), asymptomatic (2), polyuria (1) dysuria (1), blurred vision (1), and headache with weakness of left extremities (1). Imaging studies included abdominal radiograph (15), intravenous pyelography (IVP) (8), retrograde pyelography (RP) (4), ultrasonography (US) (7), and computed tomography (CT) (9). Associated complications included urinary tract stones (17), urinary tract infection (16), hydronephrosis (12), and tumours (2). Abdominal radiograph suggested renal anomalies in nine out of 15 studies. IVP, RP, US and CT suggested anomalies in all patients who had these studies performed. However, CT was the best imaging modality to evaluate anatomy, function and complications of patients with renal anomalies. Conclusion HSK was the most common renal anomaly, with abdominal pain and fever being the most common presentations. UTI and stones were the most common complications. IVP, RP, US and CT can be used to diagnose renal

  19. Description of Axial Detail for ROK Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Trellue, Holly R; Galloway, Jack D

    2012-04-20

    For the purpose of NDA simulations of the ROK fuel assemblies, we have developed an axial burnup distribution to represent the pins themselves based on gamma scans of rods in the G23 assembly. For the purpose of modeling the G23 assembly (both at ORNL and LANL), the pin-by-pin burnup map as simulated by ROK is being assumed to represent the radial burnup distribution. However, both DA and NDA results indicate that this simulated estimate is not 100% correct. In particular, the burnup obtained from the axial gamma scan of 7 pins does not represent exactly the same 'average' pin burnup as the ROK simulation. Correction for this discrepancy is a goal of the well-characterized assembly task but will take time. For now, I have come up with a correlation for 26 axial points of the burnup as obtained by gamma scans of 7 different rods (C13, G01, G02, J11, K10, L02, and M04, neglecting K02 at this time) to the average burnup given by the simulation for each of the rods individually. The resulting fraction in each axial zone is then averaged for the 7 different rods so that it can represent every fuel pin in the assembly. The burnup in each of the 26 axial zones of rods in all ROK assemblies will then be directly adjusted using this fraction, which is given in Table 1. Note that the gamma scan data given by ROK for assembly G23 included a length of {approx}3686 mm, so the first 12 mm and the last 14 mm were ignored to give an actual rod length of {approx}366 cm. To represent assembly F02 in which no pin-by-pin burnup distribution is given by ROK, we must model it using infinitely-reflected geometry but can look at the effects of measuring in different axial zones by using intermediate burnup files (i.e. smaller burnups than 28 GWd/MTU) and determining which axial zone(s) each burnup represents. Details for assembly F02 are then given in Tables 2 and 3, which is given in Table 1 and has 44 total axial zones to represent the top meter in explicit detail in addition to the

  20. Realistic model for a fifth force explaining anomaly in Be8* →8Bee+e- decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Pei-Hong; He, Xiao-Gang

    2017-06-01

    We propose a theoretical model to explain a 6.8 σ anomaly recently reported in the opening angle and invariant mass distributions of e+e- pairs produced in excited Be8* nuclear transition to its ground state 8B e. The anomaly is explained by a fifth force mediated by a 17 MeV X boson through the decay Be8* →8Be X followed by X →e+e-. The X boson comes from extension of the standard model with two additional U(1) gauge symmetries producing a protophobic pure vector current interaction with quarks. The model also contains axial-vector current interaction. Although the existent axial-vector current interactions are strongly constrained by the measurement of parity violation in e-quark scattering, their contributions cancel out in the iso-scalar interaction for Be8* →8Be X. It is remarkable that the model parameters need to explain the anomaly survive all known low energy experimental constraints. The model may also alleviate the long-standing (g - 2)μ anomaly problem and can be probed by the LHCb experiment.

  1. Congenital limb anomalies: frequency and aetiological factors: Data from the Edinburgh Register of the Newborn (1964-68)

    PubMed Central

    Rogala, E. J.; Wynne-Davies, R.; Littlejohn, A.; Gormley, J.

    1974-01-01

    This paper reports a detailed follow up of 156 patients with structural upper and lower limb anomalies, obtained from the Edinburgh Register of the Newborn (a registration of 52,029 consecutive births between 1964 and 1968). At the time of this survey the patients were between 4 and 9 years of age. The Register had noted probably 96% of all children born with limb defects in Edinburgh between 1964 and 1968. It was found that the diagnosis was completely accurate in only 26% of cases, and partially so in a further 42%. The frequency of each anomaly has been noted, subdivided into isolated anomalies; those that occurred with other limb anomalies, and those that formed part of a syndrome. Syndactyly of toes, post-axial polydactyly of the fingers, polysyndactyly, and brachydactyly were found to have a genetic basis. All `absence' defects, pre-axial polydactyly, and multiple limb deformities appeared to be sporadic. Amongst the sporadic group, the main aetiological factors noted were an excess of maternal toxaemia of pregnancy and of illegitimate children, when compared with the Register Control Data. PMID:4372353

  2. Anomaly Detection in Dynamic Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Turcotte, Melissa

    2014-10-14

    Anomaly detection in dynamic communication networks has many important security applications. These networks can be extremely large and so detecting any changes in their structure can be computationally challenging; hence, computationally fast, parallelisable methods for monitoring the network are paramount. For this reason the methods presented here use independent node and edge based models to detect locally anomalous substructures within communication networks. As a first stage, the aim is to detect changes in the data streams arising from node or edge communications. Throughout the thesis simple, conjugate Bayesian models for counting processes are used to model these data streams. A second stage of analysis can then be performed on a much reduced subset of the network comprising nodes and edges which have been identified as potentially anomalous in the first stage. The first method assumes communications in a network arise from an inhomogeneous Poisson process with piecewise constant intensity. Anomaly detection is then treated as a changepoint problem on the intensities. The changepoint model is extended to incorporate seasonal behavior inherent in communication networks. This seasonal behavior is also viewed as a changepoint problem acting on a piecewise constant Poisson process. In a static time frame, inference is made on this extended model via a Gibbs sampling strategy. In a sequential time frame, where the data arrive as a stream, a novel, fast Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) algorithm is introduced to sample from the sequence of posterior distributions of the change points over time. A second method is considered for monitoring communications in a large scale computer network. The usage patterns in these types of networks are very bursty in nature and don’t fit a Poisson process model. For tractable inference, discrete time models are considered, where the data are aggregated into discrete time periods and probability models are fitted to the

  3. Collie Eye Anomaly in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Walser-Reinhardt, L; Hässig, M; Spiess, B

    2009-12-01

    In this retrospective study, the results of 3'527 eye examinations in 6 different breeds affected with Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA) over a period of 8 years (1999 - 2007) are described. CEA was divided into three main ophthalmoscopic features, a) choroidal hypoplasia (CRH), b) CRH and coloboma and c) coloboma alone. Of the 101 Smooth Collies 8.9 % showed signs of CRH, whereas 36.9 % of Rough Collies were affected with CRH, 2.8 % with CRH and coloboma and 0.38 % with coloboma alone. Choroidal hypoplasia was present in 13.1 %, CRH and coloboma in 1.8 % and coloboma alone in 0.2 % of the Shetland Sheepdogs. Only one Australian Shepherd dog had CRH, while 0.7 % of the Border Collies were affected with CRH. None of the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers were affected with CEA. There were no statistically significant differences in the occurrence of CEA between males and females, nor was there any relation between coat colors. Significant differences could be shown between dogs younger or older than 8 weeks at first examination. CEA was more often diagnosed in dogs younger than 8 weeks within the Rough Collie and Shetland Sheepdog.

  4. Data Mining for Anomaly Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Gautam; Mack, Daniel; Mylaraswamy, Dinkar; Bharadwaj, Raj

    2013-01-01

    The Vehicle Integrated Prognostics Reasoner (VIPR) program describes methods for enhanced diagnostics as well as a prognostic extension to current state of art Aircraft Diagnostic and Maintenance System (ADMS). VIPR introduced a new anomaly detection function for discovering previously undetected and undocumented situations, where there are clear deviations from nominal behavior. Once a baseline (nominal model of operations) is established, the detection and analysis is split between on-aircraft outlier generation and off-aircraft expert analysis to characterize and classify events that may not have been anticipated by individual system providers. Offline expert analysis is supported by data curation and data mining algorithms that can be applied in the contexts of supervised learning methods and unsupervised learning. In this report, we discuss efficient methods to implement the Kolmogorov complexity measure using compression algorithms, and run a systematic empirical analysis to determine the best compression measure. Our experiments established that the combination of the DZIP compression algorithm and CiDM distance measure provides the best results for capturing relevant properties of time series data encountered in aircraft operations. This combination was used as the basis for developing an unsupervised learning algorithm to define "nominal" flight segments using historical flight segments.

  5. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-03-01

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

  6. Relating the South Atlantic Anomaly and geomagnetic flux patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra-Nova, Filipe; Amit, Hagay; Hartmann, Gelvam A.; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.; Pinheiro, Katia J.

    2017-05-01

    The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is a region of weak geomagnetic field intensity at the Earth's surface, which is commonly attributed to reversed flux patches (RFPs) on the core-mantle boundary (CMB). While the SAA is clearly affected by the reversed flux region below the South Atlantic, we show that the relation between the intensity minimum at Earth's surface and RFPs is not straightforward. We map a field-dependent intensity kernel (Constable, 2007a) to study the relation between the radial geomagnetic field at the CMB and the field intensity at Earth's surface. Synthetic tests highlight the role of specific patches (reversed and normal) in determining the location of the surface intensity minimum and demonstrate that the SAA can indeed be explained by a few intense patches. We show that the level of axial dipolarity of the field determines the stability of the relation between the SAA minimum and RFPs. The present position of the SAA minimum is determined by the interplay among several robust geomagnetic flux patches at the CMB. The longitude of the SAA minimum appears near the longitude of the Patagonia RFP due to the low-latitude normal flux patches (NFPs) near Africa and mid-Atlantic which diminish the effect of the Africa RFPs. The latitude of the SAA minimum is lower than the Patagonia RFP latitude due to the South Pacific high-latitude NFP and the axial dipole effect. The motion of the SAA minimum is explained by the motions and changes in intensity of these robust geomagnetic flux patches. Simple secular variation (SV) scenarios suggest that while the SAA path can be explained by advection, its intensity decrease requires magnetic diffusion. In addition these SV scenarios provide some speculative predictions for the SAA.

  7. Piping inspection carriage having axially displaceable sensor

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

    1994-12-06

    A pipe inspection instrument carriage is described for use with a pipe crawler for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has a Y-arm mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and a mounting block, a linear actuator and axial movement arm for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has a rotation motor and gear assembly for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure. 4 figures.

  8. Piping inspection carriage having axially displaceable sensor

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.; Treanor, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    A pipe inspection instrument carriage for use with a pipe crawler for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has a y-arm mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and a mounting block, a linear actuator and axial movement arm for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has a rotation motor and gear assembly for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure.

  9. Axial flow positive displacement worm compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement compressor has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first and second sections of a compressor assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first and second twist slopes in the first and second sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. An engine including the compressor has in downstream serial flow relationship from the compressor a combustor and a high pressure turbine drivingly connected to the compressor by a high pressure shaft.

  10. Buckling of axially compressed conical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C.-H.; Katz, L.

    1980-01-01

    The buckling of a truncated elastic conical shell subjected to an axial compression is a classical problem in shell structures. The paper reinvestigates the buckling of an axially compressed truncated conical shell with rigid bulkheads. Two improvements are achieved. First, the condition that the total horizontal displacement must vanish due to rigid bulkhead and axisymmetry is treated as a constraint. This constraint is incorporated into the system through the use of the Lagrange multiplier; then the variational method is used to derive a complete set of boundary conditions for conical shells. Second, the stability is evaluated in the deformed state using the asymptotic solutions of the pair of Donnell-type equations for axisymmetric configuration. The results indicate that the buckling strength of conical shells depends mainly on the condition of the smaller end. In addition to the vertex angle, the distance ratio plays, at least, an equally important role.

  11. Tri-axial tactile sensing element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos-Ramos, Julián.; Navas-González, Rafael; Vidal-Verdú, F.

    2013-05-01

    A 13 x 13 square millimetre tri-axial taxel is presented which is suitable for some medical applications, for instance in assistive robotics that involves contact with humans or in prosthetics. Finite Element Analysis is carried out to determine what structure is the best to obtain a uniform distribution of pressure on the sensing areas underneath the structure. This structure has been fabricated in plastic with a 3D printer and a commercial tactile sensor has been used to implement the sensing areas. A three axis linear motorized translation stage with a tri-axial precision force sensor is used to find the parameters of the linear regression model and characterize the proposed taxel. The results are analysed to see to what extent the goal has been reached in this specific implementation.

  12. Micrometer axial resolution OCT for corneal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rahul; Lee, Kye-Sung; Rolland, Jannick P.; Zavislan, James M.; Aquavella, James V.; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2011-01-01

    An optical coherence tomography (OCT) for high axial resolution corneal imaging is presented. The system uses 375 nm bandwidth (625 to 1000 nm) from a broadband supercontinuum light source. The system was developed in free space to minimize image quality degradation due to dispersion. A custom-designed spectrometer based on a Czerny Turner configuration was implemented to achieve an imaging depth of 1 mm. Experimentally measured axial resolution was 1.1 μm in corneal tissue and had a good agreement with the theoretically calculated resolution from the envelope of the spectral interference fringes. In vivo imaging was carried out and thin corneal layers such as the tear film and the Bowman’s layer were quantified in normal, keratoconus, and contact lens wearing eyes, indicating the system’s suitability for several ophthalmic applications. PMID:22076265

  13. The closed co-axial analgesia system.

    PubMed

    Waaben, J; Jørgensen, S; Oxhøj, H; Arnsbo, P

    1980-10-01

    A twin-tube system for nitrous oxide analgesia in dental surgeries is described. The system is a non-polluting modification of the Mapleson A system, employing the principle of co-axial tubing introduced by Bain & Spoerel (1972). Active, continuous and calibrated gas removal takes place via the co-axial tubing by means of an ejector flowmeter. Investigation of the dynamic pressure excursions occurring at the nose-piece are fully compatible with normal breathing. Gas contamination of the dental environment can be reduced by at least 90%. The system described is safe and easy to handle. It is made of light-weight material and is adaptable to the equipment available. No rebreathing takes place when using a fresh gas inflow of 150 ml/kg body weight/min.

  14. Axial length changes after retinal detachment surgery.

    PubMed

    Burton, T C; Herron, B E; Ossoinig, K C

    1977-01-01

    A-scan echography was an accurate method for detecting changes in the depth of the anterior chamber, lens thickness, and length of the vitreous cavity after retinal detachment surgery in 30 eyes. Approximately 60% of the eyes had significant alterations in axial lengths exceeding+/-0.36 mm in aphakic eyes and +/-0.54 mm in phakic eyes. However, the operation of scleral bucklingg with large segments of hard silicone rubber implants or explants supported by an encircling band failed to result in a significant predictable shift of axial change in phakic or aphakic eyes. A-scan echography showed significant shallowing of the anterior chamber, and scleral buckling significantly increases lens thickness for at least six weeks. This induced a minor myopic refractive change that may explain some of the difference in postoperative refracitons between phakic and aphakic eyes.

  15. Microwave axial dielectric properties of carbon fiber

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng; Li, Zhuan

    2015-01-01

    Randomly distributed carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy resin composites are prepared by the pouring method, the dielectric properties of CF composites with different fiber content and length have been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of the composite increases with the fiber length, which is attributed to the decrease of depolarization field, and increases with the volume fraction, which is attributed to the increase of polarization. A formula, based on the theory of Reynolds-Hugh, is proposed to calculate the effective permittivity of CF composites, and validated by the experiments. The proposed formula is further applied to derive the axial permittivity of CF and analyze the effect of fiber length on the axial permittivity. PMID:26477579

  16. Modular organization of axial microcircuits in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bagnall, Martha W.; McLean, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Locomotion requires precise control of spinal networks. In tetrapods and bipeds, dynamic regulation of locomotion is simplified by the modular organization of spinal limb circuits, but it is not known whether their predecessors, fish axial circuits, are similarly organized. Here, we demonstrate that the larval zebrafish spinal cord contains distinct, parallel microcircuits for independent control of dorsal and ventral musculature on each side of the body. During normal swimming, dorsal and ventral microcircuits are equally active; but during postural correction, fish differentially engage these microcircuits to generate torque for self-righting. These findings reveal greater complexity in the axial spinal networks responsible for swimming than previously recognized and suggest an early template of modular organization for more complex locomotor circuits in later vertebrates. PMID:24408436

  17. Computed tomography of axial skeletal osteoid osteomas

    SciTech Connect

    Gamba, J.L.; Martinez, S.; Apple, J.; Harrelson, J.M.; Nunley, J.A.

    1984-04-01

    Five cases of axial skeletal osteoid osteomas were viewed with particular attention to the role of computed tomography (CT) as a key diagnostic tool in the evaluation of osteoid osteoma. The complex anatomy of the axial skeleton can make the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma extremely difficult on routine films or tomograms, and the lesion often is well delineated only on CT scans. As complete surgical excision of this benign bony tumor is curative, precise anatomic localization is essential to the surgeon. Conventional radiographs were normal in all patients. Bone scans were positive when obtained and were useful in localizing the lesion and directing CT to the appropriate level. In all five cases CT was of proven value in accurately demonstrating the location, nidus, and other characteristic diagnostic radiographic features of osteoid osteoma.

  18. Thermal infrared anomalies of several strong earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Congxin; Zhang, Yuansheng; Guo, Xiao; Hui, Shaoxing; Qin, Manzhong; Zhang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful anomaly information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1) There are significant thermal radiation anomalies before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of anomalies includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic anomalies by method of "time-frequency relative power spectrum." (2) There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3) Thermal radiation anomalies are closely related to the geological structure. (4) Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared anomalies as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting.

  19. Thermal Infrared Anomalies of Several Strong Earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Congxin; Guo, Xiao; Qin, Manzhong

    2013-01-01

    In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful anomaly information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1) There are significant thermal radiation anomalies before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of anomalies includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic anomalies by method of “time-frequency relative power spectrum.” (2) There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3) Thermal radiation anomalies are closely related to the geological structure. (4) Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared anomalies as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting. PMID:24222728

  20. Congenital hand anomalies in Upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abulezz, Tarek; Talaat, Mohamed; Elsani, Asem; Allam, Karam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hand anomalies are numerous and markedly variant. Their significance is attributed to the frequent occurrence and their serious social, psychological and functional impacts on patient's life. Patients and Methods: This is a follow-up study of 64 patients with hand anomalies of variable severity. All patients were presented to Plastic Surgery Department of Sohag University Hospital in a period of 24 months. Results: This study revealed that failure of differentiation and duplication deformities were the most frequent, with polydactyly was the most common anomaly encountered. The mean age of presentation was 6 years and female to male ratio was 1.46:1. Hand anomalies were either isolated, associated with other anomalies or part of a syndrome. Conclusion: Incidence of congenital hand anomalies in Upper Egypt is difficult to be estimated due to social and cultural concepts, lack of education, poor registration and deficient medical survey. Management of hand anomalies should be individualised, carefully planned and started as early as possible to achieve the best outcome. PMID:27833283

  1. Congenital basis of posterior fossa anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Cotes, Claudia; Bonfante, Eliana; Lazor, Jillian; Jadhav, Siddharth; Caldas, Maria; Swischuk, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    The classification of posterior fossa congenital anomalies has been a controversial topic. Advances in genetics and imaging have allowed a better understanding of the embryologic development of these abnormalities. A new classification schema correlates the embryologic, morphologic, and genetic bases of these anomalies in order to better distinguish and describe them. Although they provide a better understanding of the clinical aspects and genetics of these disorders, it is crucial for the radiologist to be able to diagnose the congenital posterior fossa anomalies based on their morphology, since neuroimaging is usually the initial step when these disorders are suspected. We divide the most common posterior fossa congenital anomalies into two groups: 1) hindbrain malformations, including diseases with cerebellar or vermian agenesis, aplasia or hypoplasia and cystic posterior fossa anomalies; and 2) cranial vault malformations. In addition, we will review the embryologic development of the posterior fossa and, from the perspective of embryonic development, will describe the imaging appearance of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. Knowledge of the developmental bases of these malformations facilitates detection of the morphological changes identified on imaging, allowing accurate differentiation and diagnosis of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. PMID:26246090

  2. Measurement of axial forces via natural frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, Samer H.; Reynolds, Don; EnChen, Shen; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents results from testing several suspender ropes of the Delaware Memorial Bridge using vibration measurements and a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) instrument called the Axial Load Monitor (ALM). The testing consisted of measuring the frequencies of suspender ropes and determining their tension levels. Results were compared to theoretical predictions. This paper presents the results of the testing and discusses the problems associated with vibration measurements on actual bridges.

  3. Atlanto-axial subluxation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Thurlow, Robert D

    1988-01-01

    One of the causes of death in rheumatoid patients is cord compression following atlanto-axial subluxation. Dislocations in the cervical spine are common with patients who have rheumatoid arthritis. Anterior subluxation occurs in up to 35%, followed by vertical subluxation in 22.2%, lateral subluxation in 20.6% and rarely posterior subluxation. A case report is presented to illustrate such a complication. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4

  4. Compressive strength of axially loaded composite cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollar, Laszlo P.; Springer, George C.; Spingarn, Jay; McColskey, J. D.

    1993-10-01

    Tests were performed to measure the failure loads of axially compressed glass-fiber-reinforced and graphite-fiber-reinforced composite cylinders. The data were compared with the results of a previous model, which was based on a three-dimensional stress analysis and the Tsai-Wu quadratic first-ply failure criterion. This model predicted the failure loads for glass-fiber-reinforced composites with good accuracy, but less accurately for failure loads of graphite-epoxy composites.

  5. Bessel beam CARS of axially structured samples

    PubMed Central

    Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for axial profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of axially structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are modeled by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an axially layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern. PMID:26046671

  6. Wetting on axially-patterned heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Ruiz-Cabello, F J Montes; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, M A

    2008-05-19

    Contact angle variability, leading to errors in interpretation, arises from various sources. Contact angle hysteresis (history-dependent wetting) and contact angle multiplicity (corrugation of three-phase contact line) are irrespectively the most frequent causes of this uncertainty. Secondary effects also derived from the distribution of chemical defects on solid surfaces, and so due to the existence of boundaries, are the known "stick/jump-slip" phenomena. Currently, the underlying mechanisms in contact angle hysteresis and their connection to "stick/jump-slip" effects and the prediction of thermodynamic contact angle are not fully understood. In this study, axial models of smooth heterogeneous surface were chosen in order to mitigate contact angle multiplicity. For each axial pattern, advancing, receding and equilibrium contact angles were predicted from the local minima location of the system free energy. A heuristic model, based on the local Young equation for spherical drops on patch-wise axial patterns, was fruitfully tested from the results of free-energy minimization. Despite the very simplistic surface model chosen in this study, it allowed clarifying concepts usually misleading in wetting phenomena.

  7. Direct optical nanoscopy with axially localized detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, N.; Mayet, C.; Dupuis, G.; Barroca, T.; Bon, P.; Lécart, S.; Fort, E.; Lévêque-Fort, S.

    2015-09-01

    Evanescent light excitation is widely used in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to confine light and reduce background noise. Here, we propose a method of exploiting evanescent light in the context of emission. When a fluorophore is located in close proximity to a medium with a higher refractive index, its near-field component is converted into light that propagates beyond the critical angle. This so-called supercritical-angle fluorescence can be captured using a high-numerical-aperture objective and used to determine the axial position of the fluorophore with nanometre precision. We introduce a new technique for three-dimensional nanoscopy that combines direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) with dedicated detection of supercritical-angle fluorescence emission. We demonstrate that our approach of direct optical nanoscopy with axially localized detection (DONALD) typically yields an isotropic three-dimensional localization precision of 20 nm within an axial range of ∼150 nm above the coverslip.

  8. Bessel beam CARS of axially structured samples.

    PubMed

    Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-06-05

    We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for axial profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of axially structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are modeled by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an axially layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern.

  9. Bessel beam CARS of axially structured samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for axial profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of axially structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are modeled by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an axially layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern.

  10. Vibration of axially loaded circular arches

    SciTech Connect

    Sabir, A.B.; Djoudi, M.S.

    1996-11-01

    The work in the present paper is devoted to the determination of the buckling loads and natural frequencies of axially loaded arch structures. The finite element method is employed using a strain based arch element. The element is based on the conventional Euler curved beam type of strain displacement relationship and satisfies the exact representation of rigid body modes. The sub-space iteration technique is used to determine the eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of the governing transcendental equation. The buckling of a pinned arch subjected to a uniform lateral pressure is first considered. The work is then extended to produce a comprehensive set of results for the vibration of axially loaded arches which are either pinned or fixed at both ends. The first symmetric and anti symmetric modes of vibration are determined and the effect of the axial load on these frequencies is investigated. The practical problem of an arch with a backfill is then considered and the effect of the elastic packing due to this backfill on the natural frequencies is determined.

  11. Golimumab for the treatment of axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gelfer, Gita; Perry, Lisa; Deodhar, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease of the axial skeleton that includes ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA). Patients with AS experience chronic pain due to sacroiliac joint and spinal inflammation, and may develop spinal ankylosing with syndesmophyte formation. Tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (TNFi) have shown promise in the management of AS and axSpA by targeting the underlying inflammatory process, and providing symptomatic relief. Whether they alter the progression of the disease is uncertain. Golimumab is a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets and downregulates the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. The use of golimumab has been shown to reduce the signs and symptoms of axSpA as well as improve patient function and quality reported outcomes. This review focuses on the biological rationale and the results of clinical trials with golimumab for the treatment of axSpA.

  12. Turbulence Effects of Axial Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C.; Chamorro, L. P.; Neary, V. S.; Morton, S.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2011-12-01

    Axial flow hydrokinetic turbines provide a method for extracting the kinetic energy available in unidirectional (river), bidirectional (tidal) and marine currents; however, a deep understanding of the wake dynamics, momentum recovery, geomorphologic effects, and ecological interaction with these hydrokinetic turbines is required to guarantee their economical and environmental viability. The St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) at the University of Minnesota (UMN) has performed physical modeling experiments using a 1:10 scale axial flow tidal turbine in the SAFL Main Channel, a 2.75m x 1.8m x 80m open channel test facility. A sophisticated control system allows synchronous measurements of turbine torque and rotational speed along with high resolution 3-D velocity measurements within the channel. Using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), high resolution 3-D velocity profile data were collected up to 15 turbine diameters downstream of the turbine location. These data provide valuable information on the wake characteristics (turbulence, Reynolds stresses, etc.) resulting from a rotating axial flow hydrokinetic machine. Regions of high turbulence and shear zones that persist in the near wake regions are delineated along with the velocity deficit and momentum recovery within the wake downstream of the device. Synchronous ADV data shed light on the rotational and meandering characteristics of the wake and its potential impacts on the local geomorphology and hydrodynamic environment. This dataset on single hydrokinetic turbine flow characteristics is the basis for further work on the optimal arrangement and performance environment for arrays of similar hydrokinetic devices.

  13. Peters anomaly: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Ramanath; Ferri, Sara; Whittaker, Beatrice; Liu, Margaret; Lazzaro, Douglas R

    2011-08-01

    Peters anomaly is a rare dramatic finding at birth and can be associated with other systemic malformations. We performed a literature review of multiple case reports and case series to better define the common characteristics and unusual findings associated with Peters anomaly. A representative case is discussed followed by a literature review of multiple case reports and case series. The literature search was conducted for the years 1969 to 2009. Cases and case series were included in the review of published English ophthalmic literature. Cases were excluded if no information was reported on ocular and systemic malformations or if no information was reported on surgical interventions or outcomes. In addition, if cases did not report laterality of the lesion, they were excluded from the review. Fifty-eight cases were found that fit the above criteria, and the relevant cases were reviewed to better characterize the systemic malformations, interventions, and outcomes associated with Peters anomaly reported in the literature. Fifty-eight cases of Peters anomaly were reviewed. Of those cases reporting sex, 56% were men and 44% of cases were women. In terms of laterality, 67.2% of cases were bilateral versus 32.8% of cases that were unilateral. Moreover, bilateral cases of Peters anomaly were associated with a higher rate of systemic malformations (71.8%) versus unilateral Peters anomaly (36.8%). This difference was significant (P < 0.03 by Fischer exact test). In the 15 eyes where results of penetrating keratoplasty were reported, the overall success rate was 53%. However, the success rate was significantly higher in patients with Peters anomaly type I (87.5%), as opposed to those patients with Peters anomaly type II (14.2%) (P < 0.02 by Fischer exact test). The clinical features, epidemiology, genetics, complications, and treatments of Peters anomaly are presented. Cornea specialists who care for pediatric patients should be aware of the common and uncommon

  14. Simple recipe for holographic Weyl anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugini, F.; Diaz, D. E.

    2017-04-01

    We propose a recipe — arguably the simplest — to compute the holographic type-B Weyl anomaly for general higher-derivative gravity in asymptotically AdS spacetimes. In 5 and 7 dimensions we identify a suitable basis of curvature invariants that allows to read off easily, without any further computation, the Weyl anomaly coefficients of the dual CFT. We tabulate the contributions from quadratic, cubic and quartic purely algebraic curvature invariants and also from terms involving derivatives of the curvature. We provide few examples, where the anomaly coefficients have been obtained by other means, to illustrate the effectiveness of our prescription.

  15. Zero bias anomaly in Andreev reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, J. A.; Zhao, G. J.; Li, B. C.; Zhang, J.; Kim, D. R.; Chen, T. Y.

    2016-10-01

    Zero bias anomalies have been observed in point contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy using conventional superconductors, and they cannot be suppressed by a highly spin-polarized current. By systematically varying the size of the point contact, the anomalies are found to be evolved from conductance dips outside the superconducting gap. These anomalies, which depend on the size of the interface, are not intrinsic to the superconductors but due to a large resistance change when the contact region is driven to normal by an Oersted field.

  16. Chromium isotopic anomalies in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Abundances of the chromium isotopes in terrestrial and bulk meteorite samples are identical to 0.01 percent. However, Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende meteorite show endemic isotopic anomalies in chromium which require at least three nucleosynthetic components. Large anomalies at Cr-54 in a special class of inclusions are correlated with large anomalies at Ca-48 and Ti-50 and provide strong support for a component reflecting neutron-rich nucleosynthesis at nuclear statistical equilibrium. This correlation suggests that materials from very near the core of an exploding massive star may be injected into the interstellar medium.

  17. Magnetic and gravity anomalies in the Americas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The cleaning and magnetic tape storage of spherical Earth processing programs are reported. These programs include: NVERTSM which inverts total or vector magnetic anomaly data on a distribution of point dipoles in spherical coordinates; SMFLD which utilizes output from NVERTSM to compute total or vector magnetic anomaly fields for a distribution of point dipoles in spherical coordinates; NVERTG; and GFLD. Abstracts are presented for papers dealing with the mapping and modeling of magnetic and gravity anomalies, and with the verification of crustal components in satellite data.

  18. Recent Advances in Ionospheric Anomalies detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Anton; Vyacheslav, Khattatov

    2016-07-01

    The variability of the parameters of the ionosphere and ionospheric anomalies are the subject of intensive research. It is widely known and studied in the literature ionospheric disturbances caused by solar activity, the passage of the terminator, artificial heating of high-latitude ionosphere, as well as seismic events. Each of the above types of anomalies is the subject of study and analysis. Analysis of these anomalies will provide an opportunity to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of ionospheric disturbances. To solve this problem are encouraged to develop a method of modeling the ionosphere, based on the assimilation of large amounts of observational data.

  19. Chromium isotopic anomalies in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Abundances of the chromium isotopes in terrestrial and bulk meteorite samples are identical to 0.01 percent. However, Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende meteorite show endemic isotopic anomalies in chromium which require at least three nucleosynthetic components. Large anomalies at Cr-54 in a special class of inclusions are correlated with large anomalies at Ca-48 and Ti-50 and provide strong support for a component reflecting neutron-rich nucleosynthesis at nuclear statistical equilibrium. This correlation suggests that materials from very near the core of an exploding massive star may be injected into the interstellar medium.

  20. Gravitational anomalies in higher dimensional Riemann Cartan space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, S.; Tokuo, S.; Fukuda, M.; Higashida, Y.; Kamo, Y.; Kubota, S.-I.; Taira, H.

    2007-02-01

    By applying the covariant Taylor expansion method of the heat kernel, the covariant Einstein anomalies associated with a Weyl fermion of spin \\frac{1}{2} in four-, six- and eight-dimensional Riemann Cartan space are manifestly given. Many unknown terms with torsion tensors appear in these anomalies. The Lorentz anomaly is intimately related to the Einstein anomaly even in Riemann Cartan space. The explicit form of the Lorentz anomaly corresponding to the Einstein anomaly is also obtained.

  1. Congenital anomalies of the inner ear: introducing a new classification of labyrinthine anomalies.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, S; Sando, I

    1979-01-01

    In a literature review of 108 articles a special effort was made to find and classify inner ear anomalies and diseases associated with inner ear anomalies. This study showed the following. Most of the diseases associated with inner ear anomalies are also associated with anomalies in other parts of the body. Hereditary characteristics comprise the most common etiological factor among the diseases associated with inner ear anomalies. Among anomalies observed in the cochlea, the vestibule, and the semicircular canals, anomalies in the cochlea are most frequently associated with various diseases and were observed in 30 of 40 diseases. Anomalies of the vestibule were observed in 25 diseases, and those of the semicircular canals in 18 diseases. Anomalies in both the osseous and the membranous labyrinth were most frequently associated with the diseases studied, as they were observed to occur with 10 of the 43 diseases. In this paper a new classification system for labyrinthine anomalies is introduced, based on this study of the literature.

  2. Large geomagnetic field anomalies revealed in Bronze to Iron Age archeomagnetic data from Tel Megiddo and Tel Hazor, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaar, Ron; Tauxe, Lisa; Ron, Hagai; Ebert, Yael; Zuckerman, Sharon; Finkelstein, Israel; Agnon, Amotz

    2016-05-01

    Geomagnetic field measurements from the past few centuries show heightened secular variation activity in the southern hemisphere associated with the south Atlantic anomaly (SAA). It is uncertain whether geomagnetic anomalies at a similar scale have existed in the past owing to limited coverage and uncertainties in the paleomagnetic database. Here we provide new evidence from archaeological sources in the Levant suggesting a large positive northern hemisphere anomaly, similar in magnitude to the SAA during the 9th-8th centuries BCE, called ;Levantine Iron Age anomaly;. We also report an additional geomagnetic spike in the 8th century. The new dataset comprises 73 high precision paleointensity estimates from ca. 3000 BCE to 732 BCE, and five directional measurements between the 14th and the 9th centuries BCE. Well-dated pottery and cooking ovens were collected from twenty archaeological strata in two large contemporaneous stratigraphical mounds (tells) in Israel: Tel Megiddo and Tel Hazor. The new data are combined with previously published data and interpreted automatically using the PmagPy Thellier GUI program. The Tel Megiddo and Tel Hazor data sets demonstrate excellent internal consistency and remarkable agreement with published data from Mesopotamia (Syria). The data illustrate the evolution of an extreme geomagnetic high that culminated in at least two spikes between the 11th and the 8th centuries BCE (Iron Age in the Levant). The paleomagnetic directional data of the 9th century BCE show positive inclination anomalies, and deviations of up to 22° from the averaged geocentric axial dipole (GAD) direction. From comparison of the Levantine archaeomagnetic data with IGRF model for 2015 we infer the ;Levantine Iron Age anomaly; between the 10th and the 8th centuries BCE is a local positive anomaly. The eastward extent of the anomaly is currently unknown.

  3. Might axial myofascial properties and biomechanical mechanisms be relevant to ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed

    Masi, Alfonse T

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthropathy have characteristic age- and sex-specific onset patterns, typical entheseal lesions, and marked heritability, but the integrative mechanisms causing the pathophysiological and structural alterations remain largely undefined. Myofascial tissues are integrated in the body into webs and networks which permit transmission of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and help to control movements. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized as a potential excessive polymorphic trait which could contribute to chronic biomechanical overloading and exaggerated stresses at entheseal sites. Such a mechanism may help to integrate many of the characteristic host, pathological, and structural features of ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis. Biomechanical stress and strain were recently documented to correlate with peripheral entheseal inflammation and new bone formation in a murine model of spondyloarthritis. Ankylosing spondylitis has traditionally been classified by the modified New York criteria, which require the presence of definite radiographic sacroiliac joint lesions. New classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis now include patients who do not fulfill the modified New York criteria. The male-to-female sex ratios clearly differed between the two patient categories - 2:1 or 3:1 in ankylosing spondylitis and 1:1 in non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis - and this suggests a spectral concept of disease and, among females, milder structural alterations. Magnetic resonance imaging of active and chronic lesions in ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis reveals complex patterns, usually interpreted as inflammatory reactions, but shows similarities to acute degenerative disc disease, which attributed to edema formation following mechanical stresses and micro-damage. A basic question is whether mechanically induced microinjury and immunologically mediated

  4. Might axial myofascial properties and biomechanical mechanisms be relevant to ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthropathy have characteristic age- and sex-specific onset patterns, typical entheseal lesions, and marked heritability, but the integrative mechanisms causing the pathophysiological and structural alterations remain largely undefined. Myofascial tissues are integrated in the body into webs and networks which permit transmission of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and help to control movements. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized as a potential excessive polymorphic trait which could contribute to chronic biomechanical overloading and exaggerated stresses at entheseal sites. Such a mechanism may help to integrate many of the characteristic host, pathological, and structural features of ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis. Biomechanical stress and strain were recently documented to correlate with peripheral entheseal inflammation and new bone formation in a murine model of spondyloarthritis. Ankylosing spondylitis has traditionally been classified by the modified New York criteria, which require the presence of definite radiographic sacroiliac joint lesions. New classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis now include patients who do not fulfill the modified New York criteria. The male-to-female sex ratios clearly differed between the two patient categories - 2:1 or 3:1 in ankylosing spondylitis and 1:1 in non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis - and this suggests a spectral concept of disease and, among females, milder structural alterations. Magnetic resonance imaging of active and chronic lesions in ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis reveals complex patterns, usually interpreted as inflammatory reactions, but shows similarities to acute degenerative disc disease, which attributed to edema formation following mechanical stresses and micro-damage. A basic question is whether mechanically induced microinjury and immunologically mediated

  5. Atlanto-axial malformation and instability in dogs with pituitary dwarfism due to an LHX3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Voorbij, A M W Y; Meij, B P; van Bruggen, L W L; Grinwis, G C M; Stassen, Q E M; Kooistra, H S

    2015-01-01

    Canine pituitary dwarfism or combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) in shepherd dogs is associated with an LHX3 mutation and can lead to a wide range of clinical manifestations. Some dogs with CPHD have neurological signs that are localized to the cervical spine. In human CPHD, caused by an LHX3 mutation, anatomical abnormalities in the atlanto-axial (C1-C2) joint have been described. To evaluate the presence of atlanto-axial malformations in dogs with pituitary dwarfism associated with an LHX3 mutation and to investigate the degree of similarity between the atlanto-axial anomalies found in canine and human CPHD patients with an LHX3 mutation. Three client-owned Czechoslovakian wolfdogs and 1 client-owned German shepherd dog, previously diagnosed with pituitary dwarfism caused by an LHX3 mutation, with neurological signs indicating a cervical spinal disorder. Radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging of the cranial neck and skull, necropsy, and histology. Diagnostic imaging identified abnormal positioning of the dens axis and incomplete ossification of the suture lines between the ossification centers of the atlas with concurrent atlanto-axial instability and dynamic compression of the spinal cord by the dens axis. The malformations and aberrant motion at C1-C2 were confirmed at necropsy and histology. The atlanto-axial abnormalities of the dwarf dogs resemble those encountered in human CPHD patients with an LHX3 mutation. These findings suggest an association between the LHX3 mutation in dogs with CPHD and atlanto-axial malformations. Consequently, pituitary dwarfs should be monitored closely for neurological signs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Congenital anomalies associated with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Dott, B; Alembik, Y; Koehl, C

    1999-01-01

    The French national neonatal screening program for congenital hypothyroidism (CH) was initiated in 1978. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the incidence of congenital extrathyroid anomalies (ETAs) among the infants with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) and to compare it with the Northeastern France Birth Defect Monitoring System data from 1979 to 1996. Among 129 CH infants on whom adequate data were available, 20 infants (15.5%) had associated congenital anomalies. Eight out of 76 infants with persistent CH had ETAs (10.5%) whereas 12 out of 53 children with transient hypothyroidism had ETAs (22.6%, p < 0.05). Some additional anomalies were considerably more common than in the general population. Nine infants had congenital cardiac anomalies (6.9%). This rises the question if teratogenic effects active during organogenesis may affect simultaneously many organs, including the developing thyroid, causing a relatively high percentage of CH infants with congenital ETAs.

  7. Method of Mapping Anomalies in Homogenous Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An electrical conductor and antenna are positioned in a fixed relationship to one another. Relative lateral movement is generated between the electrical conductor and a homogenous material while maintaining the electrical conductor at a fixed distance from the homogenous material. The antenna supplies a time-varying magnetic field that causes the electrical conductor to resonate and generate harmonic electric and magnetic field responses. Disruptions in at least one of the electric and magnetic field responses during this lateral movement are indicative of a lateral location of a subsurface anomaly. Next, relative out-of-plane movement is generated between the electrical conductor and the homogenous material in the vicinity of the anomaly's lateral location. Disruptions in at least one of the electric and magnetic field responses during this out-of-plane movement are indicative of a depth location of the subsurface anomaly. A recording of the disruptions provides a mapping of the anomaly.

  8. Cervicobrachialgia with congenital vertebral anomalies and diastematomyelia.

    PubMed

    Roosen, N; De Moor, J

    1984-05-01

    A case of diastematomyelia in an adult female patient is reported. The relationship of the cervicobrachialgia, which was the presenting sign, to the diastematomyelia and the congenital vertebral anomalies is discussed.

  9. Chemical Compositions and Anomalies in Stellar Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    In summary, as the papers cited here and in earlier reports demonstrate, this award has enabled us to obtain a fairly good picture of the abundance anomalies in stellar coronae. The "inverse FIP" effect in very active stars has now been fleshed out as a more complex anomaly depending on FIP, whereas before it appeared only in terms of a general metal paucity, the recent solar abundance assessment of Asplund et a1 will, if correct, challenge some of the older interpretations of coronal abundance anomalies since they imply quite different relative abundances of CNO compared with Fe, Mg and Si. Further investigations have been in into the possibility of modeling some of the recent coronal abundance anomaly results in terms of Alfven wave-driven separation of neutrals and ions in the upper chromosphere. This work still remains in the seed stage, and future funding from a different program will be requested to pursue it further.

  10. Reduction of satellite magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slud, E. V.; Smith, P. J.; Langel, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of global magnetic anomaly maps derived from satellite data is facilitated by inversion to the equivalent magnetization in a constant thickness magnetic crust or, equivalently, by reduction to the pole. Previous inversions have proven unstable near the geomagnetic equator. The instability results from magnetic moment distributions which are admissible in the inversion solution but which make only small contribution to the computed values of anomaly field. Their admissibility in the solution could result from noisy or incomplete data or from small poorly resolved anomalies. The resulting magnetic moments are unrealistically large and oscillatory. Application of the method of principal components (e.g. eigenvalue decomposition and selective elimination of less significant eigenvectors) is proposed as a way of overcoming the instability and the method is demonstrated by applying it to the region around the Bangui anomaly in Central Africa.

  11. Understanding Magnetic Anomalies and Their Significance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise testing the Vine-Matthews-Morley hypothesis of plate tectonics. Includes 14 questions with explanations using graphs and charts. Provides a historical account of the current plate tectonic and magnetic anomaly theory. (MVL)

  12. Conditioning domestic chickens to a magnetic anomaly.

    PubMed

    Denzau, Susanne; Kuriakose, Dany; Freire, Rafael; Munro, Ursula; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2011-12-01

    Young domestic chicks of two strains, ISA brown layers and White Leghorn X Australorps, were trained to associate a magnetic anomaly with food. This was done by feeding them in their housing boxes from a dish placed above a small coil that produced a magnetic anomaly roughly six times as strong as the local geomagnetic field. Unrewarded tests began on day 9 after hatching. In a square arena, two corresponding coils were placed underneath two opposite corners. One coil, the control coil, was double-wrapped producing no net magnetic field, while the other in the opposite corner produced a local magnetic anomaly similar to that experienced during feeding. The chicks favoured the corner with the anomaly from day 10 after hatching onward. Both strains of chickens showed this preference, indicating that they could sense the local changes in the magnetic field.

  13. Design and Implementation of an Anomaly Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bagherjeiran, A; Cantu-Paz, E; Kamath, C

    2005-07-11

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a general-purpose anomaly detector for streaming data. Based on a survey of similar work from the literature, a basic anomaly detector builds a model on normal data, compares this model to incoming data, and uses a threshold to determine when the incoming data represent an anomaly. Models compactly represent the data but still allow for effective comparison. Comparison methods determine the distance between two models of data or the distance between a model and a point. Threshold selection is a largely neglected problem in the literature, but the current implementation includes two methods to estimate thresholds from normal data. With these components, a user can construct a variety of anomaly detection schemes. The implementation contains several methods from the literature. Three separate experiments tested the performance of the components on two well-known and one completely artificial dataset. The results indicate that the implementation works and can reproduce results from previous experiments.

  14. Flyby Anomaly Test Integrating Multiple Approaches (FATIMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levit, Creon; Jaroux, Belgacem Amar

    2014-01-01

    FATIMA is a mission concept for a small satellite to investigate the flyby anomaly - a possible velocity increase that has been observed in some earlier satellites when they have performed gravitational swingy maneuvers of the earth.

  15. Isostatic geoid anomalies on a sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.

    1982-01-01

    Long-wavelength geoid anomalies due to lateral variations in the density or thickness of a thin layer in local isostatic equilibrium on the surface of a sphere depend sensitively on the assumed state of stress within the layer. A number of common intuitive definitions of local isostasy generally believed to be essentially identical are associated with quite different states of isostatic stress, and the corresponding theoretical geoid anomalies can vary by more than a factor of 2. This sensitivity of the theoretical anomaly to the exact definition of local isostasy constitutes an obstacle to any proposed program of interpreting or exploiting observed global isostatic geoid anomalies such as those associated with the aging of the oceanic lithosphere.

  16. Understanding Magnetic Anomalies and Their Significance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise testing the Vine-Matthews-Morley hypothesis of plate tectonics. Includes 14 questions with explanations using graphs and charts. Provides a historical account of the current plate tectonic and magnetic anomaly theory. (MVL)

  17. Quantum anomalies in superconducting Weyl metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Hao, Lei; Wang, Baigeng; Ting, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically study the quantum anomalies in the superconducting Weyl metals based on the topological field theory. It is demonstrated that the Fermi arc and the surface Andreev bound state, characteristic of the superconducting Weyl metals, are the manifestations of two underlying phenomena, namely, the chiral anomaly and the paritylike anomaly, respectively. The first anomaly is inherited from the Berry curvature around the original Weyl points, while the second is the result of the superconductivity. We show that all the fascinating topological behavior of the superconducting Weyl metals, either the intranode Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov or the internode Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer pairing state, can be satisfactorily described and predicted by our topological field theory.

  18. Vaginal agenesis, the hymen, and associated anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kimberley, N; Hutson, J M; Southwell, B R; Grover, S R

    2012-02-01

    Review anomalies in patients with vaginal agenesis. In particular, to clarify the impact of an absent hymen on the presence of other anomalies; on the success of creating a vagina with dilators; and on sexual function outcomes. Retrospective medical record review; questionnaire on sexual function. Gynecology service at a children's hospital and the practice of 1 gynecologist. All patients with vaginal agenesis were identified from the databases, as well as the subgroup in which hymenal status was known. Data regarding hymen, renal, skeletal, cardiac, and other anomalies; for women who had a neovagina, the technique used to create a functional vagina. Of 69 females (age range 2-70 years), renal tract anomalies (43.3%), vertebral anomalies (29%), cardiac anomalies (14.5%), and syndromes including Klippel-Feil (7%) and MURCS association (7%) were identified. Where hymenal status was known (n = 47), 31 were normal, and 16 had an absent hymen. Where the hymen was absent, renal agenesis was increased (odds ratio = 13.5, P < .001). There was no association between other anomalies and an absent hymen, or between the various anomalies. For women without a hymen, the likelihood of failing dilation therapy was increased (odds ratio = 21.7; P < .01]. An absent hymen makes renal agenesis more likely and increases the likelihood that dilator techniques will fail. This condition appears to be associated with reports of long-term problems with poor lubrication that are potentially related to the absence of the peri-hymenal Bartholin's glands. Copyright © 2012 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. PHACE Syndrome: Persistent Fetal Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Prochazka, V.; Hrbac, T.; Chmelova, J.; Skoloudik, D.; Prochazka, M.

    2005-01-01

    Summary PHACE(S) syndrome is an acronym for neurocutaneous disease encompassing the expression of (P) posterior cranial fossa malformations, (H) facial haemangiomas, (A) arterial anomalies, (C) aortic coarctaion and other cardiac defects, (E) eye abnormalities and (S) for sternal malformation or stenotic arterial diseases. We report on a case of PHACE syndrome complete expression with persistent fetal vascular anomalies unusually in a 55-year-old women with large bilateral facial and neck haemangioma and posterior fossa circulation insufficiency. PMID:20584448

  20. Pentaquarks and possible anomalies at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafferty, G.

    2016-07-01

    With the LHC Run 1 data, the LHCb experiment discovered two pentaquark states and has evidence for a number of possible anomalies in the flavour sector. The possible anomalies include indications of violations of lepton flavour universality, deviations from Standard Model predictions in several B-meson decay modes that are mediated by flavour-changing neutral currents, and further evidence for a discrepancy between inclusive and exclusive measurements of the CKM matrix element |Vub|.

  1. Pentaquarks and Possible Anomalies at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafferty, G.

    With the LHC Run 1 data, the LHCb experiment discovered two pentaquark states and has evidence for a number of possible anomalies in the avour sector. The possible anomalies include indications of violations of lepton avour universality, deviations from Standard Model predictions in several B-meson decay modes that are mediated by avour-changing neutral currents, and further evidence for a discrepancy between inclusive and exclusive measurements of the CKM matrix element |Vub|.

  2. [Mild type of the Ebstein anomaly].

    PubMed

    Jedliński, Ireneusz; Jamrozek-Jedlińska, Maria; Bugajski, Paweł; Waśniewski, Michał; Poprawski, Kajetan; Słomczyński, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a congenital malformation of the heart that is characterised by apical displacement of the septal and posterior tricuspid valve leaflets, leading to atrialisation of the right ventricle with a variable degree of malformation and displacement of the anterior leaflet. We present a case of a mild type Ebstein anomaly leading to moderate tricuspid valve regurgitation and some degree of right ventricular dysfunction.

  3. On the topological interpretation of gravitational anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Denis

    2001-07-01

    We consider the mixed gravitational Yang-Mills anomaly as the coupling between the K-theory and K-homology of a C ∗-algebra crossed product. The index theorem of Connes-Moscovici allows to compute the Chern character of the K-cycle by local formulae involving connections and curvatures. It gives a topological interpretation to the anomaly, in the sense of noncommutative algebras.

  4. Lymphatic system anomalies in Crouzon syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Pierre; Moniotte, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterised mainly by distinctive malformations of the skull and facial region and caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. No study reported on oedemas related to lymphatic system abnormalities in these patients. A case of Crouzon syndrome displaying classic facial anomalies but also with bilateral lower limb oedema is reported in whom lymphoscintigraphic investigation of the limbs clearly delineated the presence of lymphatic system anomalies. PMID:21686735

  5. Anaesthesia management in craniovertebral junctional anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Craniovertebral Junctional (CVJ) anomalies are developmental disorders that affect the skeleton and enclosed neuraxis at the junction of cranium and cervical spine. The high prevalence of airway obstruction and restrictive pulmonary disease in combination with cardiovascular manifestations poses a high anaesthetic risk to these patients. This article provides a discussion of management of anaesthesia in patients with craniovertebral anomalies, the evaluation of risk factors in these patients and their management, including emergency airway issues. PMID:27891026

  6. Gauge anomalies in Lorentz-violating QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Tiago R. S.; Sobreiro, Rodrigo F.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we study the issue of gauge anomalies in Lorentz-violating QED. To do so, we opt to use the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin formalism within the algebraic renormalization approach, reducing our study to a cohomology problem. Since this approach is independent of the renormalization scheme, the results obtained here are expected to be general. We find that the Lorentz-violating QED is free of gauge anomalies to all orders in perturbation theory.

  7. IDENTIFYING ANOMALIES IN GRAVITATIONAL LENS TIME DELAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, Arthur B.; Keeton, Charles R.; Nordgren, C. Erik E-mail: keeton@physics.rutgers.ed

    2010-02-01

    We examine the ability of gravitational lens time delays to reveal complex structure in lens potentials. In a previous paper, we predicted how the time delay between the bright pair of images in a 'fold' lens scales with the image separation, for smooth lens potentials. Here we show that the proportionality constant increases with the quadrupole moment of the lens potential, and depends only weakly on the position of the source along the caustic. We use Monte Carlo simulations to determine the range of time delays that can be produced by realistic smooth lens models consisting of isothermal ellipsoid galaxies with tidal shear. We can then identify outliers as 'time delay anomalies'. We find evidence for anomalies in close image pairs in the cusp lenses RX J1131 - 1231 and B1422+231. The anomalies in RX J1131 - 1231 provide strong evidence for substructure in the lens potential, while at this point the apparent anomalies in B1422+231 mainly indicate that the time delay measurements need to be improved. We also find evidence for time delay anomalies in larger-separation image pairs in the fold lenses, B1608+656 and WFI 2033 - 4723, and the cusp lens RX J0911+0551. We suggest that these anomalies are caused by some combination of substructure and a complex lens environment. Finally, to assist future monitoring campaigns we use our smooth models with shear to predict the time delays for all known four-image lenses.

  8. Coronary artery anomalies in Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Viuff, Mette H; Trolle, Christian; Wen, Jan; Jensen, Jesper M; Nørgaard, Bjarne L; Gutmark, Ephraim J; Gutmark-Little, Iris; Mortensen, Kristian H; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Andersen, Niels H

    Congenital heart disease, primarily involving the left-sided structures, is often seen in patients with Turner Syndrome. Moreover, a few case reports have indicated that coronary anomalies may be more prevalent in Turner Syndrome than in the normal population. We therefore set out to systematically investigate coronary arterial anatomy by computed tomographic coronary angiography (coronary CTA) in Turner Syndrome patients. Fifty consecutive women with Turner Syndrome (mean age 47 years [17-71]) underwent coronary CTA. Patients were compared with 25 gender-matched controls. Coronary anomaly was more frequent in patients with Turner Syndrome than in healthy controls [20% vs. 4% (p = 0.043)]. Nine out of ten abnormal cases had an anomalous left coronary artery anatomy (absent left main trunk, n = 7; circumflex artery originating from the right aortic sinus, n = 2). One case had a tubular origin of the right coronary artery above the aortic sinus. There was no correlation between the presence of coronary arterial anomalies and karyotype, bicuspid aortic valve, or other congenital heart defects. Coronary anomalies are highly prevalent in Turner Syndrome. The left coronary artery is predominantly affected, with an absent left main coronary artery being the most common anomaly. No hemodynamically relevant coronary anomalies were found. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. All rights reserved.

  9. Acoustic Wood anomaly in transmitted diffraction field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfei; Declercq, Nico F.

    2017-03-01

    In acoustics, the term Wood anomaly, in analogy to the Wood anomaly in optics, has so far referred to the anomalies observed in the specular reflection spectra of acoustic waves perpendicularly incident on periodic surfaces. Inspired by the pioneering work of Jungman et al. on the study of the transmission field of a solid-fluid periodic interface, this work attempts to provide a complete experimental investigation of the transmission fields of a broadband sound pulse transmitted through a periodic liquid-solid interface as well as a periodic solid-liquid interface. At different frequencies, two types of anomalies are observed: a spectral tip and a spectral dip, which correspond, respectively, to the brighter band and the darker band in optical Wood anomalies. The search for their physical origin suggests that the type and location of the observed spectral anomalies are strongly related to the generation and the diffraction of pseudosurface waves on the interface having superimposed periodic corrugations and time-domain windowing in spectral analysis. To compare with the surface waves on a plane surface, the properties of the pseudosurface waves are also investigated through examining their phase and by comparing their amplitudes.

  10. Relating mantle convection, epeirogeny and gravity anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, Lorenzo; Ghelichkhan, Siavash; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2017-04-01

    Spatial variations of crustal thickness and density are the primary cause for most of Earth's topography. Indeed, short- to mid-wavelength topography and gravity anomalies can be explained with a relatively simple model that combines isostatic compensation and elastic support by the lithosphere. As the wavelength increases, however, sub-lithospheric mass anomalies play an increasingly important role, both directly and through the convective stresses that they excite: these convective stresses deform the surface, generating what is called dynamic topography, and complicate the relationship between internal mass anomalies, surface topography and the resulting gravity anomalies. Here we show that this complexity can only be captured by global, self-gravitating, viscously stratified Earth models. Moreover, sub-lithospheric mass anomalies are advected by global mantle convection — unlike near-surface mass anomalies, which stay frozen in the crust and lithosphere. Dynamic topography thus changes in time, causing epeirogenic movements. For this reason, the pattern, timing and amplitudes of past epeirogenic movements are primary geologic observables that can help constrain global mantle convection models.

  11. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  12. Co-axial multicusp source for low axial energy spread ion beam production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Gough, R. A.; Leung, K. N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M. D.; Zahir, N.

    1999-09-01

    A co-axial multicusp ion source has been designed and tested. This source uses a new magnetic filter configuration. This magnetic filter is efficient in modifying the plasma potential distribution which can reduce the axial energy spread of the extracted ion beam. Energy spreads as low as 0.6 eV have been obtained. The electron temperature in this source has also been found to be about 0.1 eV. Furthermore, the new source configuration is capable of adjusting the radial plasma potential distribution which can improve the transverse ion energy, which results in a low beam emittance. The co-axial source can be used for a number of different applications such as ion projection lithography and radioactive ion beam projets.

  13. Anomaly-free dark matter models are not so simple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Tunney, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    We explore the anomaly-cancellation constraints on simplified dark matter (DM) models with an extra U(1)' gauge boson Z '. We show that, if the Standard Model (SM) fermions are supplemented by a single DM fermion χ that is a singlet of the SM gauge group, and the SM quarks have non-zero U(1)' charges, the SM leptons must also have non-zero U(1)' charges, in which case LHC searches impose strong constraints on the Z ' mass. Moreover, the DM fermion χ must have a vector-like U(1)' coupling. If one requires the DM particle to have a purely axial U(1)' coupling, which would be the case if χ were a Majorana fermion and would reduce the impact of direct DM searches, the simplest possibility is that it is accompanied by one other new singlet fermion, but in this case the U(1)' charges of the SM leptons still do not vanish. This is also true in a range of models with multiple new singlet fermions with identical charges. Searching for a leptophobic model, we then introduce extra fermions that transform non-trivially under the SM gauge group. We find several such models if the DM fermion is accompanied by two or more other new fermions with non-identical charges, which may have interesting experimental signatures. We present benchmark representatives of the various model classes we discuss.

  14. Early brain enlargement and elevated extra-axial fluid in infants who develop autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mark D; Nordahl, Christine W; Young, Gregory S; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L; Lee, Aaron; Liston, Sarah E; Harrington, Kayla R; Ozonoff, Sally; Amaral, David G

    2013-09-01

    Prospective studies of infants at risk for autism spectrum disorder have provided important clues about the early behavioural symptoms of autism spectrum disorder. Diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, however, is not currently made until at least 18 months of age. There is substantially less research on potential brain-based differences in the period between 6 and 12 months of age. Our objective in the current study was to use magnetic resonance imaging to identify any consistently observable brain anomalies in 6-9 month old infants who would later develop autism spectrum disorder. We conducted a prospective infant sibling study with longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging scans at three time points (6-9, 12-15, and 18-24 months of age), in conjunction with intensive behavioural assessments. Fifty-five infants (33 'high-risk' infants having an older sibling with autism spectrum disorder and 22 'low-risk' infants having no relatives with autism spectrum disorder) were imaged at 6-9 months; 43 of these (27 high-risk and 16 low-risk) were imaged at 12-15 months; and 42 (26 high-risk and 16 low-risk) were imaged again at 18-24 months. Infants were classified as meeting criteria for autism spectrum disorder, other developmental delays, or typical development at 24 months or later (mean age at outcome: 32.5 months). Compared with the other two groups, infants who developed autism spectrum disorder (n = 10) had significantly greater extra-axial fluid at 6-9 months, which persisted and remained elevated at 12-15 and 18-24 months. Extra-axial fluid is characterized by excessive cerebrospinal fluid in the subarachnoid space, particularly over the frontal lobes. The amount of extra-axial fluid detected as early as 6 months was predictive of more severe autism spectrum disorder symptoms at the time of outcome. Infants who developed autism spectrum disorder also had significantly larger total cerebral volumes at both 12-15 and 18-24 months of age. This is the first magnetic

  15. Clustering and Recurring Anomaly Identification: Recurring Anomaly Detection System (ReADS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIntosh, Dawn

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Recurring Anomaly Detection System (ReADS). The Recurring Anomaly Detection System is a tool to analyze text reports, such as aviation reports and maintenance records: (1) Text clustering algorithms group large quantities of reports and documents; Reduces human error and fatigue (2) Identifies interconnected reports; Automates the discovery of possible recurring anomalies; (3) Provides a visualization of the clusters and recurring anomalies We have illustrated our techniques on data from Shuttle and ISS discrepancy reports, as well as ASRS data. ReADS has been integrated with a secure online search

  16. MAGSAT correlations with geoid anomalies. [magnetic anomalies in the western Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowin, C. O. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    A digital data library of MAGSAT data is described and its applications and capabilities are reviewed. Polynomial trends were removed from each half-orbit in order to estimate and remove ring current effects from the data. The MAGSAT data in the Gulf of Mexico region was analyzed to define better the possible relation of the negative MAGSAT anomaly there to the negative residual geoid anomaly in the western Gulf of Mexico. Since the shape and location of the negative magnetic anomaly are variable depending upon the particular polynomial surface and curve orders used, no definitive conclusion as to the degree of correspondance between the residual geoid and MAGSAT lithosphere anomalies is offered.

  17. Cloud Radiative Forcing Anomalies Associated with and Their Effects on the Atmospheric Response to Equatorial Pacific SST Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghang

    The NCAR CCM2 has been used in this study to investigate cloud radiative forcing (CRF) anomalies associated with equatorial Pacific SST anomalies, and the effects of the longwave CRF (LWCRF) anomalies on the atmospheric response to the SST anomalies. The SST anomalies cause large CRF anomalies, both longwave and shortwave, as well as latent heat anomalies at low latitudes on a global scale. The relative magnitude of the simulated longwave and shortwave CRF anomalies is consistent with the result of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), which means cloud height and cloud radiative properties, such as emissivity and reflectivity, are well simulated by the model. The CRF anomalies, however, are underestimated in the CCM2. This underestimate of the CRF anomalies is due to the insufficient high cloud amount anomaly in the model. The LWCRF anomaly strongly enhances the precipitation anomaly in the whole tropical belt. The positive (negative) LWCRF anomaly warms (cools) the troposphere and destabilizes (stabilizes) the upper troposphere. The LWCRF anomaly enhances the Southern Oscillation, both the positive sea level pressure (SLP) anomaly in the Indonesia-Australia region and the negative SLP anomaly in the central and eastern Pacific, and the related Walker circulation anomaly. The effects of the LWCRF anomaly are essential to the NH extratropical circulation anomaly, the PNA pattern. The LWCRF anomaly has a large contribution to the three action centers of the PNA pattern at all levels. This large contribution results from the direct thermal effect of the tropical LWCRF anomaly and its strong positive interaction with tropical deep convection. As a consequence of the complex interaction between the forced wave train, orographic forcing and other factors, the contribution rates of the LWCRF anomaly to the three PNA action centers are different.

  18. Drop size selection in axially heated co-axial fiber capillary instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowlavi, Saviz; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Gallaire, Francois

    2015-11-01

    We analyze the sphere size selection mechanism in silicon-in-silica sphere formation through the application of an external axial thermal gradient to a co-axial silicon-in-silica fiber (Gumennik et al., Nature Com., 2013). We first apply a convective/absolute stability analysis to the in-fibre capillary instability governing the sphere formation and demonstrate that the resulting wavelength selection predicts a finite but still too large wavelength. A global stability analysis is then pursued, which accounts for the spatial inhomogeneity of the base flow. F.G. acknowledges funding from ERC SimCoMiCs 280117.

  19. Designing and updating the flow part of axial and radial-axial turbines through mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, Andrey; Rusanov, Roman; Lampart, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes an algorithm for the design of axial and radial-axial type turbines. The algorithm is based on using mathematical models of various levels of complexity - from 1D to 3D. Flow path geometry is described by means of analytical methods of profiling using a limited number of parameters. 3D turbulent flow model is realised in the program complex IPMFlow, developed based on the earlier codes FlowER and FlowER-U. Examples of developed or modernized turbines for differentpurpose power machines are presented. They are: an expansion turbine, ORC turbine and cogeneration mediumpressure turbine.

  20. Baryon-number-induced Chern-Simons couplings of vector and axial-vector mesons in holographic QCD.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Sophia K; Harvey, Jeffrey A

    2007-10-05

    We show that holographic models of QCD predict the presence of a Chern-Simons coupling between vector and axial-vector mesons at finite baryon density. In the Anti de Sitter/Conformal Field Theory dictionary, the coefficient of this coupling is proportional to the baryon number density and is fixed uniquely in the five-dimensional holographic dual by anomalies in the flavor currents. For the lightest mesons, the coupling mixes transverse rho and a1 polarization states. At sufficiently large baryon number densities, it produces an instability, which causes the rho and a1 mesons to condense in a state breaking both rotational and translational invariance.

  1. Electronic and optical properties of silicene under uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strains: A first principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Brij; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-07-01

    The uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strain mediated electronic band structures and dielectric properties of silicene have been investigated. It is found that on applying uni- and bi-axial strains, the band gap opens for smaller strain in silicene. However, on further increase of strain beyond 8% silicene changed into metal. The ultimate tensile strength estimated is 3.4 GPa. Imaginary part of dielectric function shows that the inter-band transitions are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial tensile strains and are blue shifted for uni- and bi-axial compressive strains. Electron energy loss (EEL) function shows that the π+σ plasmon energies are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial strains and blue-shifted for compressive strains. The π plasmons disappears for tensile and asymmetric strains. Bi-axial asymmetric strain is found to have no influence on inter-band transitions and π+σ plasmon energies.

  2. Digital enhancement of computerized axial tomograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A systematic evaluation has been conducted of certain digital image enhancement techniques performed in image space. Three types of images have been used, computer generated phantoms, tomograms of a synthetic phantom, and axial tomograms of human anatomy containing images of lesions, artificially introduced into the tomograms. Several types of smoothing, sharpening, and histogram modification have been explored. It has been concluded that the most useful enhancement techniques are a selective smoothing of singular picture elements, combined with contrast manipulation. The most useful tool in applying these techniques is the gray-scale histogram.

  3. Digital enhancement of computerized axial tomograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A systematic evaluation was conducted of certain digital image enhancement techniques performed in image space. Three types of images were used, computer generated phantoms, tomograms of a synthetic phantom, and axial tomograms of human anatomy containing images of lesions, artificially introduced into the tomograms. Several types of smoothing, sharpening, and histogram modification were explored. It was concluded that the most useful enhancement techniques are a selective smoothing of singular picture elements, combined with contrast manipulation. The most useful tool in applying these techniques is the gray-scale histogram.

  4. Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  5. Water ingestion into jet engine axial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1982-01-01

    An axial flow compressor has been tested with water droplet ingestion under a variety of conditions. The results illustrate the manner in which the compressor pressure ratio, efficiency and surging characteristics are affected. A model for estimating the performance of a compressor during water ingestion has been developed and the predictions obtained compare favorably with the test results. It is then shown that with respect to five droplet-associated nonlinearly-interacting processes (namely, droplet-blade interactions, blade performance changes, centrifugal action, heat and mass transfer processes and droplet break-up), the initial water content and centrifugal action play the most dominant roles.

  6. Flow field visualization about external axial corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to visualize the flow field about external axial corners. The investigation was initiated to provide answers to questions about the inviscid flow pattern for continuing numerical investigations. Symmetrical and asymmetrical corner models were tested at a Reynolds number per meter of 60,700,000. Oil-flow and vapor-screen photographs were taken for both models at angle of attack and yaw. The paper presents the results of the investigation in the form of oil-flow photographs and the surrounding shock wave location obtained from the vapor screens.

  7. Scalar resonances in axially symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranea-Sandoval, Ignacio F.; Vucetich, Héctor

    2015-03-01

    We study properties of resonant solutions to the scalar wave equation in several axially symmetric spacetimes. We prove that nonaxial resonant modes do not exist neither in the Lanczos dust cylinder, the extreme (2 + 1) dimensional Bañados-Taitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) spacetime nor in a class of simple rotating wormhole solutions. Moreover, we find unstable solutions to the wave equation in the Lanczos dust cylinder and in the r2 < 0 region of the extreme (2 + 1) dimensional BTZ spacetime, two solutions that possess closed timelike curves. Similarities with previous results obtained for the Kerr spacetime are explored.

  8. Water ingestion into jet engine axial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1982-01-01

    An axial flow compressor has been tested with water droplet ingestion under a variety of conditions. The results illustrate the manner in which the compressor pressure ratio, efficiency and surging characteristics are affected. A model for estimating the performance of a compressor during water ingestion has been developed and the predictions obtained compare favorably with the test results. It is then shown that with respect to five droplet-associated nonlinearly-interacting processes (namely, droplet-blade interactions, blade performance changes, centrifugal action, heat and mass transfer processes and droplet break-up), the initial water content and centrifugal action play the most dominant roles.

  9. Axial tomography from digitized real time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnay, A.S.; McDonald, W.M.; Doupont, P.A.; McKinney, R.L.; Lee, M.M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  10. Whole exome sequence analysis of Peters anomaly.

    PubMed

    Weh, Eric; Reis, Linda M; Happ, Hannah C; Levin, Alex V; Wheeler, Patricia G; David, Karen L; Carney, Erin; Angle, Brad; Hauser, Natalie; Semina, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Peters anomaly is a rare form of anterior segment ocular dysgenesis, which can also be associated with additional systemic defects. At this time, the majority of cases of Peters anomaly lack a genetic diagnosis. We performed whole exome sequencing of 27 patients with syndromic or isolated Peters anomaly to search for pathogenic mutations in currently known ocular genes. Among the eight previously recognized Peters anomaly genes, we identified a de novo missense mutation in PAX6, c.155G>A, p.(Cys52Tyr), in one patient. Analysis of 691 additional genes currently associated with a different ocular phenotype identified a heterozygous splicing mutation c.1025+2T>A in TFAP2A, a de novo heterozygous nonsense mutation c.715C>T, p.(Gln239*) in HCCS, a hemizygous mutation c.385G>A, p.(Glu129Lys) in NDP, a hemizygous mutation c.3446C>T, p.(Pro1149Leu) in FLNA, and compound heterozygous mutations c.1422T>A, p.(Tyr474*) and c.2544G>A, p.(Met848Ile) in SLC4A11; all mutations, except for the FLNA and SLC4A11 c.2544G>A alleles, are novel. This is the first study to use whole exome sequencing to discern the genetic etiology of a large cohort of patients with syndromic or isolated Peters anomaly. We report five new genes associated with this condition and suggest screening of TFAP2A and FLNA in patients with Peters anomaly and relevant syndromic features and HCCS, NDP and SLC4A11 in patients with isolated Peters anomaly.

  11. Preliminary aeromagnetic anomaly map of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Carter W.; Jachens, Rober C.

    1999-01-01

    The magnetization in crustal rocks is the vector sum of induced in minerals by the Earth’s present main field and the remanent magnetization of minerals susceptible to magnetization (chiefly magnetite) (Blakely, 1995). The direction of remanent magnetization acquired during the rock’s history can be highly variable. Crystalline rocks generally contain sufficient magnetic minerals to cause variations in the Earth’s magnetic field that can be mapped by aeromagnetic surveys. Sedimentary rocks are generally weakly magnetized and consequently have a small effect on the magnetic field: thus a magnetic anomaly map can be used to “see through” the sedimentary rock cover and can convey information on lithologic contrasts and structural trends related to the underlying crystalline basement (see Nettleton,1971; Blakely, 1995). The magnetic anomaly map (fig. 2) provides a synoptic view of major anomalies and contributes to our understanding of the tectonic development of California. Reference fields, that approximate the Earth’s main (core) field, have been subtracted from the recorded magnetic data. The resulting map of the total magnetic anomalies exhibits anomaly patterns related to the distribution of magnetized crustal rocks at depths shallower than the Curie point isotherm (the surface within the Earth beneath which temperatures are so high that rocks lose their magnetic properties). The magnetic anomaly map has been compiled from existing digital data. Data obtained from aeromagnetic surveys that were made at different times, spacings and elevations, were merged by analytical continuation of each set onto a common surface 305 m (1000 ft) above terrain. Digital data in this compatible form allows application of analytical techniques (Blakley, 1995) that can be used to enhance anomaly characteristics (e.g., wavelength and trends) and provide new interpretive information.

  12. Whole exome sequence analysis of Peters anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Weh, Eric; Reis, Linda M.; Happ, Hannah C.; Levin, Alex V.; Wheeler, Patricia G.; David, Karen L.; Carney, Erin; Angle, Brad; Hauser, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Peters anomaly is a rare form of anterior segment ocular dysgenesis, which can also be associated with additional systemic defects. At this time, the majority of cases of Peters anomaly lack a genetic diagnosis. We performed whole exome sequencing of 27 patients with syndromic or isolated Peters anomaly to search for pathogenic mutations in currently known ocular genes. Among the eight previously recognized Peters anomaly genes, we identified a de novo missense mutation in PAX6, c.155G>A, p.(Cys52Tyr), in one patient. Analysis of 691 additional genes currently associated with a different ocular phenotype identified a heterozygous splicing mutation c.1025+2T>A in TFAP2A, a de novo heterozygous nonsense mutation c.715C>T, p.(Gln239*) in HCCS, a hemizygous mutation c.385G>A, p.(Glu129Lys) in NDP, a hemizygous mutation c.3446C>T, p.(Pro1149Leu) in FLNA, and compound heterozygous mutations c.1422T>A, p.(Tyr474*) and c.2544G>A, p.(Met848Ile) in SLC4A11; all mutations, except for the FLNA and SLC4A11 c.2544G>A alleles, are novel. This is the frst study to use whole exome sequencing to discern the genetic etiology of a large cohort of patients with syndromic or isolated Peters anomaly. We report five new genes associated with this condition and suggest screening of TFAP2A and FLNA in patients with Peters anomaly and relevant syndromic features and HCCS, NDP and SLC4A11 in patients with isolated Peters anomaly. PMID:25182519

  13. Radionuclide imaging of rare congenital renal fusion anomalies.

    PubMed

    Volkan, Bilge; Ceylan, Emel; Kiratli, Pinar Ozgen

    2003-03-01

    Demonstration of a congenital renal anomaly plays an important role in the treatment of patients with renal infection. These patients are prone to infections because of coexisting urinary tract anomalies such as duplicated ureter, ureter opening anomalies, and urinary stasis. Assessment of renal parenchymal damage resulting from acute or chronic renal infection is the primary indication for radionuclide imaging with Tc-99m DMSA. In addition, this technique allows congenital anomalies to be identified. The authors review congenital renal fusion anomalies identified in children through Tc-99m DMSA imaging. They conclude that Tc-99m DMSA imaging can reveal important diagnostic information about various congenital anomalies, including fusion anomalies.

  14. Multi-frequency Axial Transmission Bone Ultrasonometer

    PubMed Central

    Tatarinov, Alexey; Egorov, Vladimir; Sarvazyan, Noune; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen a surge in the development of axial transmission QUS (Quantitative UltraSound) technologies for the assessment of long bones using various modes of acoustic waves. The condition of cortical bones and the development of osteoporosis are determined by numerous mechanical, micro-structural, and geometrical or macro-structural bone properties like hardness, porosity and cortical thickness. Such complex manifestations of osteoporosis require the evaluation of multiple parameters with different sensitivities to the various properties of bone that are affected by the disease. This objective may be achieved by using a multi-frequency ultrasonic examination The ratio of the acoustic wavelength to the cortical thickness can be changed by varying the frequency of the ultrasonic pulse propagating through the long bone that results in the change in composition of the induced wave comprised of a set of numerous modes of guided, longitudinal, and surface acoustic waves. The multi-frequency axial transmission QUS method developed at Artann Laboratories (Trenton, NJ) is implemented in the Bone Ultrasonic Scanner (BUSS). In the current version of the BUSS, a train of ultrasonic pulses with 60, 100, 400, 800, and 1200 kHz frequencies is used. The developed technology was tested on a variety of bone phantoms simulating normal, osteopenic, and osteoporotic bones. The results of this study confirm the feasibility of the multi-frequency approach for the assessment of the processes leading to osteoporosis. PMID:24206675

  15. Multi-frequency axial transmission bone ultrasonometer.

    PubMed

    Tatarinov, Alexey; Egorov, Vladimir; Sarvazyan, Noune; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2014-07-01

    The last decade has seen a surge in the development of axial transmission QUS (Quantitative UltraSound) technologies for the assessment of long bones using various modes of acoustic waves. The condition of cortical bones and the development of osteoporosis are determined by numerous mechanical, micro-structural, and geometrical or macro-structural bone properties like hardness, porosity and cortical thickness. Such complex manifestations of osteoporosis require the evaluation of multiple parameters with different sensitivities to the various properties of bone that are affected by the disease. This objective may be achieved by using a multi-frequency ultrasonic examination The ratio of the acoustic wavelength to the cortical thickness can be changed by varying the frequency of the ultrasonic pulse propagating through the long bone that results in the change in composition of the induced wave comprised of a set of numerous modes of guided, longitudinal, and surface acoustic waves. The multi-frequency axial transmission QUS method developed at Artann Laboratories (Trenton, NJ) is implemented in the Bone Ultrasonic Scanner (BUSS). In the current version of the BUSS, a train of ultrasonic pulses with 60, 100, 400, 800, and 1200 kHz frequencies is used. The developed technology was tested on a variety of bone phantoms simulating normal, osteopenic, and osteoporotic bones. The results of this study confirm the feasibility of the multi-frequency approach for the assessment of the processes leading to osteoporosis.

  16. Microbubbling by co-axial electrohydrodynamic atomization.

    PubMed

    Farook, U; Stride, E; Edirisinghe, M J; Moaleji, R

    2007-08-01

    The preparation of microbubble suspensions is an important feature of medical engineering research. Recently, co-axial electrohydrodynamic atomization was used in our laboratory for the first time to prepare microbubble suspensions. In this paper, using a model glycerol-air system, we investigate in detail the characteristics of this microbubbling process. Modes of microbubbling are elucidated with respect to applied voltage and liquid and air flow rates. Thus, a parametric plot is constructed to identify a liquid and gas flow rate regime, which allows continuous microbubbling. This map provides a basis for the selection of a suitable combination of liquid and gas flow rates particularly in relation to yield and bubble size. The mechanism of microbubbling in microfluidic systems is compared with that of microbubbling by co-axial electrohydrodynamic atomization to identify the advantages and the limiting factors of the latter. Stability of microbubbles prepared by this method in terms of variation of diameter as a function of time is compared with previous literature on the dissolution of microbubbles with an air core and suggests the need for further work to stabilize the bubbles.

  17. Modeling of an axial injection torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L. L.; Álvarez, R.; Marques, L.; Rubio, S. J.; Rodero, A.; Quintero, M. C.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents simulation results for a microwave (2.45GHz) plasma reactor, operated by an axial injection torch (AIT). The study gives a two-dimensional description of the AIT-reactor system, based on an electromagnetic model (that solves Maxwell's equations adopting a time-harmonic description, yielding the distribution of the electromagnetic fields and the average power absorbed by the plasma), and a hydrodynamic model (that solves the Navier-Stokes' equations for the flowing neutral gas, yielding the distribution of mass density, pressure, temperature, and velocities). Comparison between model results and experimental measurements reveal common variation trends, with changes in the reactor height, for the power reflected by the system, and yield a qualitative agreement for the axial profile of the gas rotational temperature. Model results, such as the power transmission coefficient and the gas temperature, are particularly dependent on the reactor dimensions, the electron density and temperature, and the gas input flow, which indicates that simulations can be used to provide general guidelines for device optimization.

  18. Axial vessel widening in arborescent monocots.

    PubMed

    Petit, Giai; DeClerck, Fabrice A J; Carrer, Marco; Anfodillo, Tommaso

    2014-02-01

    Dicotyledons have evolved a strategy to compensate for the increase in hydraulic resistance to water transport with height growth by widening xylem conduits downwards. In monocots, the accumulation of hydraulic resistance with height should be similar, but the absence of secondary growth represents a strong limitation for the maintenance of xylem hydraulic efficiency during ontogeny. The hydraulic architecture of monocots has been studied but it is unclear how monocots arrange their axial vascular structure during ontogeny to compensate for increases in height. We measured the vessel lumina and estimated the hydraulic diameter (Dh) at different heights along the stem of two arborescent monocots, Bactris gasipaes (Kunth) and Guadua angustifolia (Kunth). For the former, we also estimated the variation in Dh along the leaf rachis. Hydraulic diameter increased basally from the stem apex to the base with a scaling exponent (b) in the range of those reported for dicot trees (b = 0.22 in B. gasipaes; b = 0.31 and 0.23 in G. angustifolia). In B. gasipaes, vessels decrease in Dh from the stem's centre towards the periphery, an opposite pattern compared with dicot trees. Along the leaf rachis, a pattern of increasing Dh basally was also found (b = 0.13). The hydraulic design of the monocots studied revealed an axial pattern of xylem conduits similar to those evolved by dicots to compensate and minimize the negative effect of root-to-leaf length on hydrodynamic resistance to water flow.

  19. Pulsed Detonation Operation of an Axial Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, David; St. George, Andrew; Driscoll, Robert; Gutmark, Ephraim; Gas Dynamics and Propulsion Lab Team

    2013-11-01

    A detonation is by its nature a more thermodynamically efficient combustion mode than deflagration. Several attempts are underway to integrate detonating combustion into turbomachines in order to realize the increased efficiency available, save resources and reduce emissions. One approach to this challenge is to employ pulsed detonations as from pulsed detonation engines (PDEs) and use the pulsed outflow to drive a turbine. The difficulty with this approach is that turbines, especially the more efficient axial turbines suffer in efficiency when their inflow is pulsed. At present there is not even a commonly acknowledged turbine efficiency measure which works reasonably for a pulsed input. The present work investigates the efficiency of an axial turbine with pulsed flow. Initial tests are performed with non-combusting flow in order to study the influence of pulsation on the turbine performance. This cold flow will admit a broader range of instrumentation which can be inserted within the turbine. This allows time-resolved measure of the flow angles which have a pronounced effect on the turbine performance. Later tests with detonating inflow yield global measures and these are compared to the non-combusting results. Work sponsored by Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc.

  20. Geological reasons for change in intensity of linear magnetic anomalies of the Kursk magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhavoronkin, I. A.; Kopayev, V. V.

    1985-01-01

    The geological reasons for fluctuations in the anomalous field intensity along the polar axes were examined. The Kursk magnetic anomaly is used as the basis for the study. A geological-geophysical section was constructed which used the results of the interpretation of gravimagnetic anomalies.

  1. Hyperbolic Orbits and the Planetary Flylby Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T.L.; Blome, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Space probes in the Solar System have experienced unexpected changes in velocity known as the flyby anomaly [1], as well as shifts in acceleration referred to as the Pioneer anomaly [2-4]. In the case of Earth flybys, ESA s Rosetta spacecraft experienced the flyby effect and NASA s Galileo and NEAR satellites did the same, although MESSENGER did not possibly due to a latitudinal property of gravity assists. Measurements indicate that both anomalies exist, and explanations have varied from the unconventional to suggestions that new physics in the form of dark matter might be the cause of both [5]. Although dark matter has been studied for over 30 years, there is as yet no strong experimental evidence supporting it [6]. The existence of dark matter will certainly have a significant impact upon ideas regarding the origin of the Solar System. Hence, the subject is very relevant to planetary science. We will point out here that one of the fundamental problems in science, including planetary physics, is consistency. Using the well-known virial theorem in astrophysics, it will be shown that present-day concepts of orbital mechanics and cosmology are not consistent for reasons having to do with the flyby anomaly. Therefore, the basic solution regarding the anomalies should begin with addressing the inconsistencies first before introducing new physics.

  2. Geopotential field anomalies and regional tectonic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandea, Mioara; Korte, Monika

    2016-07-01

    Maps of both gravity and magnetic field anomalies offer crucial information about physical properties of the Earth's crust and upper mantle, required in understanding geological settings and tectonic structures. Density and magnetization represent independent rock properties and thus provide complementary information on compositional and structural changes. Two regions are considered: southern Africa (encompassing South Africa, Namibia and Botswana) and Germany. This twofold choice is motivated firstly by the fact that these regions represent rather diverse geological and geophysical conditions (old Archean crust with strong magnetic anomalies in southern Africa, and much younger, weakly magnetized crust in central Europe) and secondly by our intimate knowledge of the magnetic vector ground data from these two regions. We take also advantage of the recently developed satellite potential field models and compare magnetic and gravity gradient anomalies of some 200 km resolution. Comparing short and long wavelength anomalies and the correlation of rather large scale magnetic and gravity anomalies, and relating them to known lithospheric structures, we generally find a better agreement over the southern African region than the German territory. This probably indicates a stronger concordance between near-surface and deeper structures in the former area, which can be perceived to agree with a thicker lithosphere.

  3. Gynecologic concerns in patients with cloacal anomaly.

    PubMed

    Breech, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    Children with anorectal malformations (ARM) constitute a significant group within a pediatric surgery practice. It is important with female cases of anorectal malformations to consider the association of gynecologic anomalies, especially at the time of the definitive repair. However, it is critical to consider the association of such gynecologic anomalies when caring for patients with a cloacal anomaly. If not recognized, an opportunity to diagnose and treat such anomalies may be missed with the possibility of negative implications for future reproductive capacity. With the knowledge of the associated anomalies and long-term sequelae, surgeons can provide better care for girls and important counseling for parents. Knowledge of reproductive related issues in females with cloaca allows the pediatric surgeon an opportunity both, to provide optimal surgical management in infancy, childhood, and into young adulthood and to collaborate medically and surgically with an experienced gynecologist in patients with more complex anatomic variations. Appropriate counseling for patients and families about potential reproductive concerns that may develop many years after the definitive surgical repair allows preparation and planning to preserve future fertility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hyperspectral Anomaly Detection in Urban Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejas Ayuga, J. G.; Martínez Marín, R.; Marchamalo Sacristán, M.; Bonatti, J.; Ojeda, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    We have studied the spectral features of reflectance and emissivity in the pattern recognition of urban materials in several single hyperspectral scenes through a comparative analysis of anomaly detection methods and their relationship with city surfaces with the aim to improve information extraction processes. Spectral ranges of the visible-near infrared (VNIR), shortwave infrared (SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) from hyperspectral data cubes of AHS sensor and HyMAP and MASTER of two cities, Alcalá de Henares (Spain) and San José (Costa Rica) respectively, have been used. In this research it is assumed no prior knowledge of the targets, thus, the pixels are automatically separated according to their spectral information, significantly differentiated with respect to a background, either globally for the full scene, or locally by image segmentation. Several experiments on urban scenarios and semi-urban have been designed, analyzing the behaviour of the standard RX anomaly detector and different methods based on subspace, image projection and segmentation-based anomaly detection methods. A new technique for anomaly detection in hyperspectral data called DATB (Detector of Anomalies from Thermal Background) based on dimensionality reduction by projecting targets with unknown spectral signatures to a background calculated from thermal spectrum wavelengths is presented. First results and their consequences in non-supervised classification and extraction information processes are discussed.

  5. Genitourinary anomalies of pediatric FG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smith, James F; Wayment, Robert O; Cartwright, Patrick C; Snow, Brent W; Opitz, John M

    2007-08-01

    The FG syndrome, also known as Opitz-Kaveggia syndrome, is an X-linked disorder characterized by developmental delay, congenital hypotonia, characteristic facial appearance, relative macrocephaly and anomalies affecting the genitourinary, gastrointestinal and musculoskeletal systems. Genitourinary abnormalities in the FG syndrome include cryptorchidism, hypospadias, inguinal hernia, hydrocele and occasional anomalies of renal or ureteral development. To our knowledge no previous study has systematically evaluated the genitourinary aspects of the disorder. We describe the genitourinary anomalies seen in children with the FG syndrome. This report may help elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for the disorder. Also, we provide a simple checklist for urologists that will help guide referrals for genetics and other specialty consultations. We retrospectively reviewed 228 patients with the FG syndrome to identify the frequency of characteristic historical and physical findings. These patients were diagnosed on the basis of a firsthand history and physical examination, or by a careful outside evaluation including detailed records and photographs. Of the patients 90% were male. The overall incidence of any genitourinary anomaly was 48.5% in boys, 13.6% in girls and 44.7% overall. In boys the most common abnormalities were cryptorchidism (24%), hypospadias (14%) and hernia or hydrocele (13%). The FG syndrome is a disorder with a greater prevalence than previously thought, yet is rarely suspected by urologists. The manifestations may be complex. Identification of patients with syndromal genitourinary anomalies by urologists will enhance the quality of care based on referral of patients for additional evaluation.

  6. Anomaly detection and localization in crowded scenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Weixin; Mahadevan, Vijay; Vasconcelos, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    The detection and localization of anomalous behaviors in crowded scenes is considered, and a joint detector of temporal and spatial anomalies is proposed. The proposed detector is based on a video representation that accounts for both appearance and dynamics, using a set of mixture of dynamic textures models. These models are used to implement 1) a center-surround discriminant saliency detector that produces spatial saliency scores, and 2) a model of normal behavior that is learned from training data and produces temporal saliency scores. Spatial and temporal anomaly maps are then defined at multiple spatial scales, by considering the scores of these operators at progressively larger regions of support. The multiscale scores act as potentials of a conditional random field that guarantees global consistency of the anomaly judgments. A data set of densely crowded pedestrian walkways is introduced and used to evaluate the proposed anomaly detector. Experiments on this and other data sets show that the latter achieves state-of-the-art anomaly detection results.

  7. Bilateral first and second arch anomalies: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Pal; Kumar, Virad; Narula, Vineet; Meher, Ravi; Raj, Anoop

    2012-04-01

    Branchial sinuses are one of the most common congenital anomalies present. They are usually unilateral; bilateral cases are present but are rare. The presentation of bilateral branchial sinus anomalies along with bilateral first arch anomalies is very rare. Here, we present a case of bilateral first arch anomalies co-existing with bilateral second arch anomalies in a patient with no related family history and no associated syndrome.

  8. Fetal Central Nervous System Anomalies Detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Two-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sefidbakht, Sepideh; Dehghani, Sakineh; Safari, Maryam; Vafaei, Homeira; Kasraeian, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is gradually becoming more common for thorough visualization of the fetus than ultrasound (US), especially for neurological anomalies, which are the most common indications for fetal MRI and are a matter of concern for both families and society. Objectives We investigated fetal MRIs carried out in our center for frequency of central nervous system anomalies. This is the first such report in southern Iran. Materials and Methods One hundred and seven (107) pregnant women with suspicious fetal anomalies in prenatal ultrasound entered a cross-sectional retrospective study from 2011 to 2013. A 1.5 T Siemens Avanto scanner was employed for sequences, including T2 HASTE and Trufisp images in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes to mother’s body, T2 HASTE and Trufisp relative to the specific fetal body part being evaluated, and T1 flash images in at least one plane based on clinical indication. We investigated any abnormality in the central nervous system and performed descriptive analysis to achieve index of frequency. Results Mean gestational age ± standard deviation (SD) for fetuses was 25.54 ± 5.22 weeks, and mean maternal age ± SD was 28.38 ± 5.80 years Eighty out of 107 (74.7%) patients who were referred with initial impression of borderline ventriculomegaly. A total of 18 out of 107 (16.82%) patients were found to have fetuses with CNS anomalies and the remainder were neurologically normal. Detected anomalies were as follow: 3 (16.6%) fetuses each had the Dandy-Walker variant and Arnold-Chiari II (with myelomeningocele). Complete agenesis of corpus callosum, partial agenesis of corpus callosum, and aqueductal stenosis were each seen in 2 (11.1%) fetuses. Arnold-Chiari II without myelomeningocele, anterior spina bifida associated with neurenteric cyst, arachnoid cyst, lissencephaly, and isolated enlarged cisterna magna each presented in one (5.5%) fetus. One fetus had concomitant schizencephaly and complete agenesis of

  9. Trace anomaly for non-relativistic fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzzi, Roberto; Baiguera, Stefano; Nardelli, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    We study the coupling of a 2 + 1 dimensional non-relativistic spin 1/2 fermion to a curved Newton-Cartan geometry, using null reduction from an extra-dimensional relativistic Dirac action in curved spacetime. We analyze Weyl invariance in detail: we show that at the classical level it is preserved in an arbitrary curved background, whereas at the quantum level it is broken by anomalies. We compute the trace anomaly using the Heat Kernel method and we show that the anomaly coefficients a, c are proportional to the relativistic ones for a Dirac fermion in 3 + 1 dimensions. As for the previously studied scalar case, these coefficents are proportional to 1/ m, where m is the non-relativistic mass of the particle.

  10. Continental magnetic anomaly constraints on continental reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies mapped by the MAGSAT satellite for North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica and adjacent marine areas were adjusted to a common elevation of 400 km and differentially reduced to the radial pole of intensity 60,000 nT. These radially polarized anomalies are normalized for differential inclination, declination and intensity effects of the geomagnetic field, so that in principle they directly reflected the geometric and magnetic polarization attributes of sources which include regional petrologic variations of the crust and upper mantle, and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. Continental anomalies demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, they suggest further fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution of the continents and their reconstructions.

  11. The mineralogy of global magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Experimental and analytical data on magnetic mineralogy was provided as an aid to the interpretation of magnetic anomaly maps. An integrated program, ranging from the chemistry of materials from 100 or more km depth within the Earth, to an examination of the MAGSAT anomaly maps at about 400 km above the Earth's surface, was undertaken. Within this framework, a detailed picture of the pertinent mineralogical and magnetic relationships for the region of West Africa was provided. Efforts were directed toward: (1) examining the geochemistry, mineralogy, magnetic properties, and phases relations of magnetic oxides and metal alloys in rocks demonstrated to have originated in the lower crust of upper mantle, (2) examining the assumption that these rocks portray the nature of their source regions; and (3) examining the regional geology, tectonics, gravity field and the MAGSAT anomaly maps for West Africa.

  12. Interpretation of satellite elevation magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Carle, H. M.; Hayling, K. L.

    1986-01-01

    The present discussion is based on a study of the magnetic field data obtained with the aid of the magnetic field satellite Magsat, deployed in October 1979, over most of the earth during a 7.5-month mission. Inversions using spherical harmonic coefficients are considered along with the inversion of residual fields. In order to perform the correct operation, it is necessary to add on to the source function produced by the inversion process a magnetization function which has no external field. Such a function is known as an annihilator. The use of the annihilator for Pacific Ocean anomalies is discussed. Attention is given to models of oceanic crustal magnetization, and continental long-wavelength anomalies. It is found that in continental regions the annihilator is also useful if induced magnetizations are thought to be responsible for the long-wavelength anomaly.

  13. 'T hooft anomaly matching for QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Terning, John

    1998-03-03

    I present a set of theories which display non-trivial 'tHooft anomaly matching for QCD with F flavors. The matching theories arenon-Abelian gauge theories with "dual" quarks and baryons, rather thanthe purely confining theories of baryons that 't Hooft originallysearched for. The matching gauge groups are required to have an Fpm 6dimensional representation. Such a correspondence is reminiscent ofSeiberg's duality for supersymmetric (SUSY) QCD, and these theories arecandidates for non-SUSY duality. However anomaly matching by itself isnot sufficiently restrictive, and duality for QCD cannot be establishedat present. At the very least, the existence of multiple anomaly matchingsolutions should provide a note of caution regarding conjectured non-SUSYdualities.

  14. Trace anomaly on a quantum spacetime manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Spallucci, Euro; Smailagic, Anais; Nicolini, Piero

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we investigate the trace anomaly in a space-time where single events are delocalized as a consequence of short distance quantum coordinate fluctuations. We obtain a modified form of heat kernel asymptotic expansion which does not suffer from short distance divergences. Calculation of the trace anomaly is performed using an IR regulator in order to circumvent the absence of UV infinities. The explicit form of the trace anomaly is presented and the corresponding 2D Polyakov effective action and energy-momentum tensor are obtained. The vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor in the Boulware, Hartle-Hawking and Unruh vacua is explicitly calculated in a rt section of a recently found, noncommutative inspired, Schwarzschild-like solution of the Einstein equations. The standard short distance divergences in the vacuum expectation values are regularized in agreement with the absence of UV infinities removed by quantum coordinate fluctuations.

  15. Monozygotic twins discordant for body stalk anomaly.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, G J; Nicolaides, K H

    2002-07-01

    We report on two cases of monozygotic twins discordant for body stalk anomaly, diagnosed prenatally in a multicenter ultrasound screening study at 10-14 weeks of gestation. Ultrasound showed a large abdominal wall defect with most of the abdominal contents and almost half of the body in the celomic cavity, in association with severe kyphoscoliosis and a very short umbilical cord. Both pregnancies were managed expectantly and delivered by Cesarean section. The abnormal babies died soon after birth and autopsy confirmed the sonographic diagnosis. Body stalk anomaly in twins is extremely rare. These are, to our knowledge, the first cases reported on monozygotic twins discordant for this anomaly, indicating that the incomplete twinning theory cannot uniformly explain the pathogenesis of the body stalk in twins.

  16. Elastic Buckling of Orthotropic Plates Under Varying Axial Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badir, Ashraf; Hu, Hurang; Diallo, Abdouramane

    1997-01-01

    The elastic buckling load of simply supported rectangular orthotropic plates subjected to a second degree parabolic variation of axial stresses in the longitudinal direction is calculated using analytical methods. The variation of axial stresses is equilibrated by nonuniform shear stresses along the plate edges and transverse normal stresses. The influence of the aspect ratio is examined, and the results are compared with plates subjected to uniform axial stresses.

  17. A technique to determine a desired preparation axial inclination.

    PubMed

    Parker, M Harry; Ivanhoe, John R; Blalock, John S; Frazier, Kevin B; Plummer, Kevin D

    2003-10-01

    The guidelines recommended in the literature for the convergence angle of a crown preparation vary from 3 to 24 degrees. There is a lack of guidelines on techniques to achieve a specific axial inclination. The purpose of this article was to present a practical technique, with a diamond rotary cutting instrument of known axial inclination, to determine the diamond rotary cutting instrument angulations required to achieve the desired axial inclination of a preparation.

  18. U(1) axial charge in the chiral limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiangdong

    1990-07-01

    The U(1) axial-vector form factor is studied using an unsubtracted dispersion relation. The associated axial charge is shown to be analytic in quark masses in the chiral limit although individual terms in the Cheng-Li separation exhibit large isospin and flavor-SU(3) symmetry breaking. A new separation of the U(1) axial charge is proposed, based on the wave functions of the physical states entering in the spectral density.

  19. Anomaly Detection for Discrete Sequences: A Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Banerjee, Arindam; Kumar, Vipin

    2012-01-01

    This survey attempts to provide a comprehensive and structured overview of the existing research for the problem of detecting anomalies in discrete/symbolic sequences. The objective is to provide a global understanding of the sequence anomaly detection problem and how existing techniques relate to each other. The key contribution of this survey is the classification of the existing research into three distinct categories, based on the problem formulation that they are trying to solve. These problem formulations are: 1) identifying anomalous sequences with respect to a database of normal sequences; 2) identifying an anomalous subsequence within a long sequence; and 3) identifying a pattern in a sequence whose frequency of occurrence is anomalous. We show how each of these problem formulations is characteristically distinct from each other and discuss their relevance in various application domains. We review techniques from many disparate and disconnected application domains that address each of these formulations. Within each problem formulation, we group techniques into categories based on the nature of the underlying algorithm. For each category, we provide a basic anomaly detection technique, and show how the existing techniques are variants of the basic technique. This approach shows how different techniques within a category are related or different from each other. Our categorization reveals new variants and combinations that have not been investigated before for anomaly detection. We also provide a discussion of relative strengths and weaknesses of different techniques. We show how techniques developed for one problem formulation can be adapted to solve a different formulation, thereby providing several novel adaptations to solve the different problem formulations. We also highlight the applicability of the techniques that handle discrete sequences to other related areas such as online anomaly detection and time series anomaly detection.

  20. Modular functional organisation of the axial locomotor system in salamanders.

    PubMed

    Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Charrier, Vanessa; Mathou, Alexia

    2014-02-01

    Most investigations on tetrapod locomotion have been concerned with limb movements. However, there is compelling evidence that the axial musculoskeletal system contributes to important functions during locomotion. Adult salamanders offer a remarkable opportunity to examine these functions because these amphibians use axial undulations to propel themselves in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. In this article, we review the currently available biological data on axial functions during various locomotor modes in salamanders. We also present data showing the modular organisation of the neural networks that generate axial synergies during locomotion. The functional implication of this modular organisation is discussed.

  1. Motion and emotion: anxiety-axial connections in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Šumec, Rastislav; Rektorová, Irena; Jech, Robert; Menšíková, Kateřina; Roth, Jan; Růžička, Evžen; Sochorová, Dana; Dušek, Ladislav; Kaňovský, Petr; Rektor, Ivan; Pavlík, Tomáš; Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Anxiety is a serious and frequent complication in Parkinson's disease (PD) that significantly affects the quality of life of patients. Multiple neuroanatomical, experimental, and clinical studies suggest its close association with axial disturbances. However, whether this relation applies for PD patients (commonly suffering from axial difficulties, such as balance and gait disturbance) has not been properly tested yet. The purpose of this study was to determine whether PD patients suffering from axial symptoms have higher levels of anxiety than others and to identify other factors associated with anxiety-axial connections. In this questionnaire study, 212 patients with PD were assessed by standardized scales, such as Hamilton Anxiety Scale, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, examining their mood and cognitive status. These data were correlated to dominant motor symptoms of these patients, such as tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and axial symptoms. Unlike other motor symptoms, only axial symptoms showed to be significantly related to higher levels of anxiety. The patients suffering from anxiety and axial problems have also shown significantly higher depression levels. Axial disturbances are related to higher anxiety levels in PD patients. It is crucial to pay high attention to symptoms of anxiety in patients having postural instability or gait disorder. Further clinical studies are desirable to investigate new, practical implications of anxiety-axial connection to provide complex management options of these serious symptoms.

  2. Nuclear axial currents in chiral effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Baroni, Alessandro; Girlanda, Luca; Pastore, Saori; Schiavilla, Rocco; Viviani, Michele

    2016-01-11

    Two-nucleon axial charge and current operators are derived in chiral effective field theory up to one loop. The derivation is based on time-ordered perturbation theory and accounts for cancellations between the contributions of irreducible diagrams and the contributions owing to nonstatic corrections from energy denominators of reducible diagrams. Ultraviolet divergencies associated with the loop corrections are isolated in dimensional regularization. The resulting axial current is finite and conserved in the chiral limit, while the axial charge requires renormalization. As a result, a complete set of contact terms for the axial charge up to the relevant order in the power counting is constructed.

  3. Nuclear axial currents in chiral effective field theory

    DOE PAGES

    Baroni, Alessandro; Girlanda, Luca; Pastore, Saori; ...

    2016-01-11

    Two-nucleon axial charge and current operators are derived in chiral effective field theory up to one loop. The derivation is based on time-ordered perturbation theory and accounts for cancellations between the contributions of irreducible diagrams and the contributions owing to nonstatic corrections from energy denominators of reducible diagrams. Ultraviolet divergencies associated with the loop corrections are isolated in dimensional regularization. The resulting axial current is finite and conserved in the chiral limit, while the axial charge requires renormalization. As a result, a complete set of contact terms for the axial charge up to the relevant order in the power countingmore » is constructed.« less

  4. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital anomaly widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital anomalies associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital anomalies occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital anomalies between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital anomaly. The most common associated anomalies were cardiac anomalies, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system anomalies, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system anomalies, 35 cases (5%), urinary system anomalies, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system anomalies, 13 cases (2%), and other system anomalies, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac anomaly was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system anomaly recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive anomaly of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common anomalies associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the anomalies associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to

  5. Persistent anomalies of the Southern Hemisphere circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, K. C.

    1983-01-01

    The persistent features of large anomalies have been examined and the locations of blocking in the Southern Hemisphere were determined. The data set used here contains daily maps of 500 mb geopotential heights for 100 months (June 1, 1972 to Nov. 30, 1980) covering from 10S to 90S. The seasonal cycle was defined as a 8 year mean and the 8th (annual) and 16th (semiannual) Fourier components of the time series at each grid point. Anomalies were defined as the difference between the total field and the seasonal cycle for each grid point.

  6. The Coulomb Anomaly in Strongly Disordered Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    r- AD-A271 0951 III [II[ I[Il ~ !!D T ! SC T 0 •9 3 The Coulomb Anomaly in Strongly Disordered FiiA 4 ’ Shih-Ying Hsu and J.M. Valles, Jr...strongly disordered quench condensed granular films are presented. The strength of this anomaly grows with increasing sheet resistance, RN, at low RN...Increases in the static disorder in metal The disordered films were deposited onto films degrades the screening capabilities of cooled substrates (-’ 8K

  7. Adaptive Anomaly Detection using Isolation Forest

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-20

    detectors such as ORCA [8] and one-class SVM [31], and density-based anomaly detector LOF [9]. The rest of the paper is organised as follows. Section 2...that a value can be computed using this measure. We use k = 5 in our experiments. The second experiment compares HS*-Trees with ORCA [8], one-class...SVM (first mentioned in [31]) and LOF [9]. ORCA employs distance-based definition (ii), stated in sec- tion 3.1, to rank anomalies; LOF is the state-of

  8. Developmental Venous Anomaly Responsible for Hemifacial Spasm

    PubMed Central

    Chiaramonte, R.; Bonfiglio, M.; D'Amore, A.; Chiaramonte, I.

    2013-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a facial movement disorder characterized by involuntary, unilateral and intermittent contractions of the facial muscles. It is one of the syndromes related to neurovascular conflict, first described by Jannetta et al. in 1979. Typically, HFS is due to pulsatile compression by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. We describe a rare case of left developmental venous anomaly in a 59-year-old man referred to us with a six-month history of left-sided HFS. We performed an MR study of the brain and cerebellopontine angles, which demonstrated a compression of the ipsilateral facial nerve by the developmental venous anomaly. PMID:23859243

  9. Radioactive anomaly discrimination from spectral ratios

    DOEpatents

    Maniscalco, James; Sjoden, Glenn; Chapman, Mac Clements

    2013-08-20

    A method for discriminating a radioactive anomaly from naturally occurring radioactive materials includes detecting a first number of gamma photons having energies in a first range of energy values within a predetermined period of time and detecting a second number of gamma photons having energies in a second range of energy values within the predetermined period of time. The method further includes determining, in a controller, a ratio of the first number of gamma photons having energies in the first range and the second number of gamma photons having energies in the second range, and determining that a radioactive anomaly is present when the ratio exceeds a threshold value.

  10. Meteoroid-Induced Anomalies on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic meteoroid background is directional (not isotropic) and accounts for 90 percent of the meteoroid risk to a typical spacecraft. Meteor showers get all the press, but account for only approximately10 percent of spacecraft risk. Bias towards assigning meteoroid cause to anomalies during meteor showers. Vast majority of meteoroids come from comets and have a bulk density of approximately 1 gram per cubic centimeter (ice). High speed meteoroids (approximately 50 kilometers per second) can induce electrical anomalies in spacecraft through discharging of charged surfaces (also EMP (electromagnetic pulse?).

  11. Myocardial Ischemia Caused by a Coronary Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Mustafa; Ozeren, Ali; Peksoy, Irfan; Cabuk, Mehmet; Bilge, Mehmet; Dursun, Aydin; Elbey, Mehmet Ali

    2004-01-01

    We present the case of a patient in whom a previously undetected anomalous origin of the circumflex coronary artery caused myocardial ischemia and led to positive myocardial scintigraphic results. Subsequent coronary angiography showed that the left circumflex coronary artery arose from the right coronary ostium—an anomaly that has been associated with chest discomfort—without atherosclerotic lesions. The peripheral distribution of the left circumflex artery was normal. We describe the clinical and angiographic findings in our patient and discuss the relationship between coronary artery anomalies and ischemia. PMID:15562848

  12. Perioperative and Anesthetic Considerations in Ebstein's Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ross, Faith J; Latham, Gregory J; Richards, Michael; Geiduschek, Jeremy; Thompson, Douglas; Joffe, Denise

    2016-03-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a complex and heterogeneous form of congenital heart disease characterized by malformation and apical displacement of the tricuspid valve leaflets. Patients may present at any time from the neonatal period to adulthood with symptoms ranging from cardiac failure and cyanosis to paroxysmal arrhythmias. Depending on the timing of presentation, various surgical options are available for the management of symptomatic patients. This review will discuss the perioperative and anesthetic management of patients with Ebstein's anomaly with reference to the more common surgical approaches.

  13. Magnetic field anomalies in the lunar wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.; Ness, N. F.

    1971-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field is only slightly perturbed by the presence of the moon in the solar wind flow. A statistical study of umbral increases and of penumbral variations was conducted with respect to variation in the solar wind plasma value beta, the distance from the moon, and the selenographic longitude of the limb regions of the lunar surface in the solar wind flow. All lunar wake anomalies show a strong positive correlation with the plasma value beta, while only penumbral increases show a marked variation with distance from the moon. There is no clear correlation of penumbral anomaly occurrence with selenographic longitude of the exposed lunar limb in the solar wind flow.

  14. Global anomalies in Chiral Lattice Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, Oliver; Campos, Isabel

    As first realized by Witten an SU(2) gauge theory coupled to a single Weyl fermion suffers from a global anomaly. This problem is addressed here in the context of the recent developments on chiral gauge theories on the lattice. We find Witten's anomaly manifests in the impossibility of defining globally a fermion measure that reproduces the proper continuum limit. Moreover, following Witten's original argument, we check numerically the crossing of the lowest eigenvalues of Neuberger's operator along a path connecting two gauge fields that differ by a topologically non-trivial gauge transformation.

  15. Eliminating the Rayleigh anomalies in metal grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongtao; Yan, Wei; Hu, Song; Zhang, Yudong

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate that Rayleigh anomalies of some diffraction order of metal reflection gratings and transmission grating can be eliminated. The studied grating consists of a one-dimensional (1-D) periodic rectangular slit array. A systemic rule has been reported that can be used to counteract the infinity of the Green function resulted from working at the Rayleigh cutoff wavelength, by choosing a suitable value of the ratio of the slit width to the period of the grating. Eliminating the Rayleigh anomalies is of intrinsic physical interest as well as of vital concern in the design of the optical element.

  16. The source of marine magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Christopher G. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Vine-Matthews hypothesis (1963) is examined. This hypothesis suggests that oceanic rocks become polarized in the direction of the magnetic field at the time of their formation, thus recording the polarity history of the earth's magnetic field. This produces the lineated magnetic anomalies on either side of the midoceanic ridge crests. The strength of these magnetic anomalies is studied to determine the strength of magnetization. Indirect determinations of the magnetization intensity of the oceanic crust and direct observations of the oceanic crust are compared. It is found that the average magnetization of a 6-km thick oceanic crust is 1.18 A/m.

  17. Endoscopic management of pediatric nasolacrimal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Michael J

    2006-10-01

    Developmental anomalies of the nasolacrimal drainage system typically manifest early in childhood with epiphora and occasionally infection. Although the majority of cases of congenital nasolacrimal obstruction resolve spontaneously with conservative medical management, certain anomalies require operative intervention. Included in this latter group are dacryocystoceles or nasolacrimal duct cysts. The application of endoscopic sinus surgical techniques to children with persistent symptomatic nasolacrimal obstruction provides an alternative to external dacryocystorhinostomy that appears to be equally efficacious and concurrently allows for the potential correction of any predisposing intranasal pathology. Endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy is best performed as a joint otolaryngologic-ophthalmologic procedure.

  18. Geochemistry of Axial seamount lavas: Magmatic relationship between the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.M.; Morgan, C.; Lilas, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Axial seamount, located along the central portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and at the eastern end of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, is the current center of the Cobb hotspot. Lava chemistry and bathymetry indicate that Axial seamount is a discrete volcanic unit, with a more productive shallow magmatic plumbing system separate from the adjacent ridge segments. Despite this classic association of spreading center and hotspot volcanic activity, there is no evidence in the lavas for geochemical or isotopic enrichment typical of hotspot or mantle plume activity. The differences in composition between the Axial seamount lavas and the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas are attributed to melting processes rather than to any fundamental differences in their mantle source compositions. The higher magma production rates, higher Sr, and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas relative to the ridge lavas are thought to be a consequence of melt initiation at greater depths. The melting column producing the seamount lavas is thought to be initiated in the stability field of spinel peridotite, whereas the ridge lavas are produced from a melting column initiated at shallower levels, possibly within or close to the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. Implicit in this interpretation is the conclusion that the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas, and by analogy most MORB, are generated at shallow mantle levels, mostly within the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. This interpretation also requires that for the upwelling mantle to intersect the solidus at different depths, the mantle supplying Axial seamount must be hotter than the rest of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Axial seamount, therefore, reflects a thermal anomaly in the mantle, rather than a geochemically enriched ocean island basalt type mantle plume.

  19. Axially symmetric shapes with minimum wave drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaslet, Max A; Fuller, Franklyn B

    1956-01-01

    The external wave drag of bodies of revolution moving at supersonic speeds can be expressed either in terms of the geometry of the body, or in terms of the body-simulating axial source distribution. For purposes of deriving optimum bodies under various given conditions, it is found that the second of the methods mentioned is the more tractable. By use of a quasi-cylindrical theory, that is, the boundary conditions are applied on the surface of a cylinder rather than on the body itself, the variational problems of the optimum bodies having prescribed volume or caliber are solved. The streamline variations of cross-sectional area and drags of the bodies are exhibited, and some numerical results are given.

  20. Axial flux machine, stator and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Carl, Ralph James

    2004-03-16

    An axial flux machine comprises: a soft magnetic composite stator extension positioned in parallel with a rotor disk and having slots; soft magnetic composite pole pieces attached to the stator extension and facing a permanent magnet on the rotor disk, each comprising a protrusion situated within a respective one of the slots, each protrusion shaped so as to facilitate orientation of the respective pole piece with respect to the stator extension; electrical coils, each wrapped around a respective one of the pole pieces. In another embodiment the soft magnetic composite pole pieces each comprise a base portion around with the electrical coils are wound and a trapezoidal shield portion a plurality of heights with a first height in a first region being longer than a second height in a second region, the second region being closer to a pole-to-pole gap than the first region.

  1. Temperature gradient formation while axial gas compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyko, V. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    A spinning gas in equilibrium has a rotation-dependent heat capacity. However, as equilibrium is approached, such as after sudden heating, significant variations in temperature appear. Surprisingly, when fast axial compression or instantaneous gas heating occurs, the temperature does not grow homogeneously in radial direction, but instead has a gradient towards to the maximum of potential energy of external or self potential. The gradient monotonically grows with compression rate and the amplitude of the potential. The gradient builds up due to change of equilibrium density distribution, yet, not due to acoustic waves created by the compression. This result was checked in numerical simulations for particles in an external constant gravitational potential and also for rotating gas in the cylinder with perfect slip boundary conditions on the walls. This work was supported by the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and by the NNSA SSAA Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-FG52-08NA28553.

  2. Axially symmetric static sources of gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Pastora, J. L.; Herrera, L.; Martin, J.

    2016-12-01

    A general procedure to find static and axially symmetric, interior solutions to the Einstein equations is presented. All the so obtained solutions, verify the energy conditions for a wide range of values of the parameters, and match smoothly to some exterior solution of the Weyl family, thereby representing globally regular models describing non-spherical sources of gravitational field. In the spherically symmetric limit, all our models converge to the well known incompressible perfect fluid solution. The key stone of our approach is based on an ansatz allowing to define the interior metric in terms of the exterior metric functions evaluated at the boundary source. Some particular sources are obtained, and the physical variables of the energy-momentum tensor are calculated explicitly, as well as the geometry of the source in terms of the relativistic multipole moments. The total mass of different configurations is also calculated, it is shown to be equal to the monopole of the exterior solution.

  3. Prismatic effect in axially symmetric spectacle lenses.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jose Ramon

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare different approximate formulas to compute the prismatic effect in axially symmetric spectacle lenses. Gaussian formulas to calculate the prismatic effect are derived, for thick and thin lenses, and for near and far vision. The results from these formulas, as well as other taken from the literature, are compared with the exact results. None of the studied approximations provides the most accurate results in all circumstances. The Gaussian formula for thick lenses could be considered globally the most accurate, both in near vision and far vision. However, it is notably more difficult to use than the traditional Prentice rule, because it is mathematically more complex, and needs several additional lens parameters.

  4. Hierarchical tapered bar elements undergoing axial deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, N.; Thampi, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described to model the dynamics of tapered axial bars of various cross sections based on the well-known Craig/Bampton component mode synthesis technique. This element is formed in terms of the static constraint modes and interface restrained normal modes. This is in contrast with the finite elements as implemented in NASTRAN where the interface restrained normal modes are neglected. These normal modes are in terms of Bessel functions. Restoration of a few of these modes leads to higher accuracy with fewer generalized coordinates. The proposed models are hierarchical so that all lower order element matrices are embedded in higher order element matrices. The advantages of this formulation compared to standard NASTRAN truss element formulation are demonstrated through simple numerical examples.

  5. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  6. Dark energy and collapsing axial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Manzoor, Rubab

    This paper investigates the effects of dark source term on the dissipative axially symmetric collapse by taking self-interacting Brans-Dicke (SBD) gravity as a dark energy (DE) candidate. We discuss physically feasible energy source of the model and formulate all the dynamical variables as well as structure scalars. It is found that the dark source term is one of the source of anisotropy and dissipation in the system. Further, we obtain structure scalars in this background. In order to discuss factors describing dissipative collapse, we develop equations related to the evolution of dynamical variables, heat transport equation as well as super-Poynting vector. We conclude that the thermodynamics of the collapse, evolution of kinematical terms (like expansion scalar, shear and vorticity) and inhomogeneity are affected by dark source term. Finally, we study the existence of radiation having repulsive gravitational nature in this collapse scenario.

  7. Buckling of cylindrical panels under axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, L. H.; Weller, T.; Agarwal, B. L.

    1976-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of boundary conditions and panel width on the axially compressive buckling behavior of unstiffened, isotropic, circular cylindrical panels. Numerical results are presented for eight different sets of boundary conditions along the straight edges of the panels. For all sets of boundary conditions except one (SS1), the results show that the panel buckling loads monotonically approach the complete cylinder buckling load from above as the panel width is increased. Low buckling loads, sometimes less than half the complete cylinder buckling load, are found for simply supported panels with free in-plane edge displacements (SS1). It is observed that the prevention of circumferential edge displacement is the most important in-plane boundary condition from the point of view of increasing the buckling load; and that the prevention of edge rotation in the circumferential direction also significantly increases the buckling load.

  8. Effects of longwave cloud radiative forcing anomalies on the atmospheric response to equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghang; Cess, Robert D.; Zhang, Ming-Hua

    1995-07-01

    The latest version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research community climate model (CCM2) has been used to investigate cloud radiative forcing (CRF) anomalies associated with equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies and the effects of the longwave CRF (LWCRF) anomalies on the atmospheric response to the SST anomalies. The SST anomalies cause large CRF anomalies, both longwave and shortwave, as well as latent heat anomalies at low latitudes on a global scale. The relative magnitude of the simulated longwave and shortwave CRF anomalies is consistent with the result of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), implying that cloud height and cloud radiative properties such as emissivity and reflectivity are well simulated by the model. The LWCRF anomaly strongly enhances the precipitation anomaly in the whole tropical belt. The positive (negative) LWCRF anomaly warms (cools) the troposphere and destabilizes (stabilizes) the upper troposphere. The LWCRF anomaly enhances the Southern Oscillation and the related Walker circulation anomaly. The effects of the LWCRF anomaly are essential to the northern hemispheric extratropical circulation anomaly, the Pacific/North American pattern.

  9. Effects of Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing Anomalies on the Atmospheric Response to Equatorial Pacific Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M.; Cess, Robert D.; Zhang, Ming-Hua

    1995-01-01

    The latest version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research community climate model (CCM2) has been used to investigate cloud radiative forcing (CRF) anomalies associated with equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies and the effects of the longwave CRF (LWCRF) anomalies on the atmospheric response to the SST anomalies. The SST anomalies cause large CRF anomalies, both longwave and shortwave, as well as latent heat anomalies at low latitudes on a global scale. The relative magnitude of the simulated longwave and shortwave CRF anomalies is consistent with the result of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), implying that cloud height and cloud radiative properties such as emissivity and reflectivity are well simulated by the model. The LWCRF anomaly strongly enhances the precipitation anomaly in the whole tropical belt. The positive (negative) LWCRF anomaly warms (cools) the troposphere and destabilizes (stabilizes) the upper troposphere. The LWCRF anomaly enhances the Southern Oscillation and the related Walker circulation anomaly. The effects of the LWCRF anomaly are essential to the northern hemispheric extratropical circulation anomaly, the Pacific/North American pattern.

  10. Axially evoked postural reflexes: influence of task.

    PubMed

    Govender, Sendhil; Dennis, Danielle L; Colebatch, James G

    2015-01-01

    Postural reflexes were recorded in healthy subjects (n = 17) using brief axial accelerations and tap stimuli applied at the vertebra prominens (C7) and manubrium sterni. Short latency (SL) responses were recorded from the soleus, hamstrings and tibialis anterior muscles and expressed as a percentage of the background EMG prior to stimulus onset. In the majority of postural conditions tested, subjects were recorded standing erect and leaning forward with their feet together. The SL response was larger for soleus than for the hamstrings during standing (soleus vs hamstrings; 70.4 vs 28.1%), whereas the opposite occurred during kneeling (25.3 vs 127.3%). Concordant head and trunk accelerations produced larger SL responses than discordant accelerations for soleus and hamstrings, but the evoked excitatory response was independent of head direction and as expected for the direction of truncal acceleration. Postural reflexes for soleus and tibialis anterior were strongly affected by conditions that posed a significant threat to postural stability; stimulation at C7 was associated with significant SL enhancement for soleus during anterior lean while sternal stimulation showed SL enhancement for tibialis anterior during posterior lean. Cutaneous anaesthesia applied over the C7 stimulation site had no significant effect on EMG responses, nor did vision or surface type (rigid or compliant). This study provides further evidence that postural reflexes produced by brief axial accelerations are independent of cutaneous receptors, vestibular afferents and ankle proprioceptors, and demonstrates that postural tasks and truncal orientation significantly affect the evoked response, consistent with a role in stabilising posture.

  11. Axial seismic crustal structure of the Galápagos Spreading Center at 92° W and 94.25° W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canales, J.; Detrick, R. S.

    2001-12-01

    We use wide-angle seismic refraction data acquired during the G-PRIME experiment to image the sub-axial seismic crustal structure of the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) at two morphologically distinct ridge segments spreading at similar intermediate rates (51-54 mm/yr full rate). At 92° W the GSC is shallow (1700 m) and its morphology is characterized by a 30-km-wide axial high, elevated 700 m from the surrounding seafloor. At this location, travel time and amplitude modeling of the seismic data reveal a 9-km-wide zone of low seismic velocities between 0.5 and 5 km beneath the axial summit. Between 2 and 3 km sub-seafloor depths, axial seismic velocities are 0.6 km lower than velocities in ~0.6-My-old crust north of the spreading axis. This low velocity anomaly lies immediately below a bright reflector imaged with multichannel seismic (MCS) data, interpreted as the top of an axial magma chamber (AMC) [Blacic et al., this meeting]. Seismic arrivals from rays crossing the ridge axis at mid-crustal levels have highly attenuated amplitudes, suggesting the presence of partial melt. However, the magnitude of the low velocity anomaly is only 25% of a comparable anomaly observed at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9.5° N [Dunn et al., JGR, 2000], where the relief of the axial high is only 400 m and the AMC is found at ~1.6 km sub-seafloor depth. Therefore despite a more inflated axial morphology, the amount of melt within the mid-crust of the plume-influenced, intermediate spreading GSC is considerably less (as much as a few percent) than at the fast-spreading EPR. The uppermost 2 km of the crust displays a low velocity anomaly (<-0.4 km/s) 2-10 km off axis, suggesting thickening of the extrusive layer away from the axis. This anomaly is more pronounced in the southern flank of the ridge, where small, off-axis volcanic features are more abundant. This asymmetry is probably related to the nearby Wolf-Darwin volcanic lineament which extends between the GSC

  12. Anatomic Anomalies Encountered in 467 Open Carpal Tunnel Surgeries.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Ahmadreza; Nasiri, Behnam; Mousavi, Seyed Ahmad; Hesarikia, Hamid; Navaeifar, Nasrin; Taleb, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compression neuropathy and carpal tunnel surgery is the most frequently performed hand surgery. Anatomic anomalies may predispose the median nerve to compression. The aim of the current study was to search for anatomic anomalies in open carpal tunnel surgeries through a cross-sectional study. During a cross-sectional study in a one-year period, 436 consecutive patients (307 females and 129 males) with the average age of 50.3 ± 2.4 years underwent 467 classic open carpal tunnel surgeries. Thirty-one patients had bilateral surgeries. A thorough inspection of the incisions was conducted to search for vascular, neural, tendon and muscular anomalies. Forty-two (8.9%) hands (14 males and 28 females) had anomalies. The average age of the patients with discovered anomalies was 48.6 ± 7.6 years. Ten anomalies were seen on the left hands and 32 anomalies were seen on the right hands. Among the 42 anomalies, there were 16 persistent median arteries, 14 anomalies of the median nerve, 7 intratunnel intrusion of the flexor and lumbrical muscle bellies and 5 anomalies of the origin of the thenar muscles. There was no correlation between the discovered anomalies and the age, gender or hand sides. Anatomical anomalies are not uncommon in carpal tunnel surgeries. However, the frequencies of the reported anomalies vary among different studies. Familiarity with these anomalies increases the safety of the operation.

  13. New approach to a novel axially chiral ligand showing spontaneous enrichment of axial chirality.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomokuni; Omote, Masaaki; Sato, Kazuyuki; Ando, Akira; Kumadaki, Itsumaro

    2003-03-01

    We have synthesized novel axially chiral ligand with two chiral centers, (R)-(R)(2)- and (S)-(S)(2)-2,2'-bis(2,2,2-trifluoro-1-hydroxyethyl)biphenyl (1), which showed a high asymmetric induction when used as ligand. Here, another new approach to 1 by kinetic and thermodynamic resolution is presented which gave these ligands in a much shorter steps, in a higher yield, and in a higher enantiomeric excess.

  14. Trace anomaly and counterterms in designer gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru; Choque, David; Martínez, Cristián

    2016-03-01

    We construct concrete counterterms of the Balasubramanian-Kraus type for Einstein-scalar theories with designer gravity boundary conditions in AdS4, so that the total action is finite on-shell and satisfy a well defined variational principle. We focus on scalar fields with the conformal mass m 2 = -2 l -2 and show that the holographic mass matches the Hamiltonian mass for any boundary conditions. We compute the trace anomaly of the dual field theory in the generic case, as well as when there exist logarithmic branches of non-linear origin. As expected, the anomaly vanishes for the boundary conditions that are AdS invariant. When the anomaly does not vanish, the dual stress tensor describes a thermal gas with an equation of state related to the boundary conditions of the scalar field. In the case of a vanishing anomaly, we recover the dual theory of a massless thermal gas. As an application of the formalism, we consider a general family of exact hairy black hole solutions that, for some particular values of the parameters in the moduli potential, contains solutions of four-dimensional gauged {N}=8 supergravity and its ω-deformation. Using the AdS/CFT duality dictionary, they correspond to triple trace deformations of the dual field theory.

  15. Anomaly Recovery and the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, Jacob R.; Dewell, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    The premise of the design of operations for the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) is that the vehicles will drive each day. As a result, they will encounter some aspect of the terrain environment that cannot be anticipated or otherwise accommodated by the sequences linked onboard that day. The operations team then must correct the problem by planning then commanding the execution of a different drive the next day. Often other aspects of the operation on the surface of Mars: environmental changes, component degradation, errors in sequence design or execution, etc., lead to anomalies which must be addressed before normal operations can resume. The operational design that makes it possible to recover from a driving error each day also reduces the time needed to recover from anomalies. As an example of the efficiency achieved, less than 5% (about 30 sols out of 700 sols of operations) of the time on the surface has been devoted to recovery from anomalies for each vehicle. In this paper the major anomalies experienced by the MER rovers will be recounted and the streamlined approaches to addressing these problems described. The operational flexibility developed for these missions is also a function of the system design that anticipated a number of likely faults and conditions arising from uncertainty in sequence execution and environmental change. This design will be described as well as the considerations in operation that motivated this design. These considerations will likely be present in any future surface mission.

  16. Anomaly Detection Techniques for Ad Hoc Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Chaoli

    2009-01-01

    Anomaly detection is an important and indispensable aspect of any computer security mechanism. Ad hoc and mobile networks consist of a number of peer mobile nodes that are capable of communicating with each other absent a fixed infrastructure. Arbitrary node movements and lack of centralized control make them vulnerable to a wide variety of…

  17. Group actions and anomalies in gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catenacci, R.; Pirola, G. P.; Martellini, Maurizio; Reina, Cesare

    1986-05-01

    The transformation properties are studied of the vacuum functional W(A) for chiral fermions in a gauge potential A under the group A×U(1)×R+ of gauge, chiral and scale transformations. The vacuum functional W is identified with a section of a G×U(1)×R+ line bundle over the space A of all gauge potentials. Known results on bundles carrying group actions give a simple and unifying clue to non-abelian, abelian chiral anomalies, as well as to trace anomalies. While the first are due to the twisting of a line bundle on A/G, the abelian chiral and trace anomalies are related to characters of U(1) and R+ respectively. Characters of U(1) are basically controlled by ``winding numbers'', i.e. again by topology. Opposite to these, trace anomalies seem to have little to do with topology, with the exception of two-dimensional theories. Also at Gruppo Nazionale di Fisica Matematica, CNR.

  18. Do retractile testes have anatomical anomalies?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kleber M.; Costa, Suelen F.; Sampaio, Francisco J.B.; Favorito, Luciano A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To assess the incidence of anatomical anomalies in patients with retractile testis. Materials and Methods: We studied prospectively 20 patients (28 testes) with truly retractile testis and compared them with 25 human fetuses (50 testes) with testis in scrotal position. We analyzed the relations among the testis, epididymis and patency of the processus vaginalis (PV). To analyze the relations between the testis and epididymis, we used a previous classification according to epididymis attachment to the testis and the presence of epididymis atresia. To analyze the structure of the PV, we considered two situations: obliteration of the PV and patency of the PV. We used the Chi-square test for contingency analysis of the populations under study (p <0.05). Results: The fetuses ranged in age from 26 to 35 weeks post-conception (WPC) and the 20 patients with retractile testis ranged in ages from 1 to 12 years (average of 5.8). Of the 50 fetal testes, we observed complete patency of the PV in 2 cases (4%) and epididymal anomalies (EAs) in 1 testis (2%). Of the 28 retractile testes, we observed patency of the PV in 6 cases (21.4%) and EA in 4 (14.28%). When we compared the incidence of EAs and PV patency we observed a significantly higher prevalence of these anomalies in retractile testes (p=0.0116). Conclusions: Retractile testis is not a normal variant with a significant risk of patent processus vaginalis and epididymal anomalies. PMID:27564294

  19. Psychoeducational Implications of Sex Chromosome Anomalies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodrich, David L.; Tarbox, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Numerous anomalies involving the sex chromosomes (X or Y) have been documented and their impact on development, learning, and behavior studied. This article reviews three of these disorders, Turner syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, and Lesch-Nyhan disease. Each of these three is associated with one or more selective impairments or behavioral…

  20. Congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Toka, Hakan R; Toka, Okan; Hariri, Ali; Nguyen, Hiep T

    2010-07-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract anatomy (CAKUT) are common in children and represent approximately 30% of all prenatally diagnosed malformations. CAKUT is phenotypically variable and can affect the kidney(s) alone and/or the lower urinary tract. The spectrum includes more common anomalies such as vesicoureteral reflux and, rarely, more severe malformations such as bilateral renal agenesis. In young children, congenital anomalies are the leading cause of kidney failure and for kidney transplantation or dialysis. CAKUT can also lead to significant renal problems in adulthood and may present itself with hypertension and/or proteinuria. Congenital renal anomalies can be sporadic or familial, syndromic (also affecting nonrenal or non-urinary tract tissues), or nonsyndromic. Genetic causes have been identified for the syndromic forms and have shed some light into the molecular mechanisms of kidney development in human beings. The genetic causes for the more common nonsyndromic forms of CAKUT are unknown. The role of prenatal interventions and postnatal therapies as well as the benefits of screening affected individuals and their family members are not clear.