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Sample records for off-shell transport approach

  1. Self-consistent approach to off-shell transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu. B.; Knoll, J.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2003-10-01

    The properties of two forms of the gradient expanded Kadanoff-Baym equations, i.e., the Kadanoff-Baym and Botermans-Malfliet forms, suitable for describing the transport dynamics of particles and resonances with broad spectral widths, are discussed in context of conservation laws, the definition of a kinetic entropy, and the possibility of numerical realization. Recent results on exact conservations of charge and energy-momentum within Kadanoff-Baym form of quantum kinetics based on local coupling schemes are extended to two cases relevant in many applications. These concern the interaction via a finite-range potential and, relevant in nuclear and hadron physics, e.g., for the pion-nucleon interaction, the case of derivative coupling.

  2. General N=2 supersymmetric quantum mechanical model: Supervariable approach to its off-shell nilpotent symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, S.; Shukla, A.; Malik, R.P.

    2014-12-15

    Using the supersymmetric (SUSY) invariant restrictions on the (anti-)chiral supervariables, we derive the off-shell nilpotent symmetries of the general one (0+1)-dimensional N=2 SUSY quantum mechanical (QM) model which is considered on a (1, 2)-dimensional supermanifold (parametrized by a bosonic variable t and a pair of Grassmannian variables θ and θ-bar with θ{sup 2}=(θ-bar){sup 2}=0,θ(θ-bar)+(θ-bar)θ=0). We provide the geometrical meanings to the two SUSY transformations of our present theory which are valid for any arbitrary type of superpotential. We express the conserved charges and Lagrangian of the theory in terms of the supervariables (that are obtained after the application of SUSY invariant restrictions) and provide the geometrical interpretation for the nilpotency property and SUSY invariance of the Lagrangian for the general N=2 SUSY quantum theory. We also comment on the mathematical interpretation of the above symmetry transformations. - Highlights: • A novel method has been proposed for the derivation of N=2 SUSY transformations. • General N=2 SUSY quantum mechanical (QM) model with a general superpotential, is considered. • The above SUSY QM model is generalized onto a (1, 2)-dimensional supermanifold. • SUSY invariant restrictions are imposed on the (anti-)chiral supervariables. • Geometrical meaning of the nilpotency property is provided.

  3. Off-shell amplitudes and Grassmannians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, L. V.; Onishchenko, A. I.

    2017-09-01

    The Grassmannian representation for gauge-invariant amplitudes for arbitrary number of legs with one of them being off-shell is derived for the case of N = 4 SYM. The obtained formula are successfully checked against known BCFW results for MHV n , NMHV4 and NMHV5 amplitudes.

  4. Off-shell Poincaré supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Daniel Z.; Roest, Diederik; Van Proeyen, Antoine

    2017-02-01

    We present the action and transformation rules of Poincaré supergravity coupled to chiral multiplets ( z α , χ α , h α ) with off-shell auxiliary fields. Starting from the geometric formulation of the superconformal theory with auxiliary fields, we derive the Poincaré counterpart by gauge-fixing the Weyl and chiral symmetry and S-supersymmetry. We show how this transition is facilitated by retaining explicit target-space covariance. Our results form a convenient starting point to study models with constrained superfields, including general matter-coupled de Sitter supergravity.

  5. Off-shell hydrodynamics from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, Michael; Glorioso, Paolo; Liu, Hong; Wang, Yifan

    2016-02-18

    In this article, we outline a program for obtaining an action principle for dissipative fluid dynamics by considering the holographic Wilsonian renormalization group applied to systems with a gravity dual. As a first step, in this paper we restrict to systems with a non-dissipative horizon. By integrating out gapped degrees of freedom in the bulk gravitational system between an asymptotic boundary and a horizon, we are led to a formulation of hydrodynamics where the dynamical variables are not standard velocity and temperature fields, but the relative embedding of the boundary and horizon hypersurfaces. At zeroth order, this action reduces to that proposed by Dubovsky et al. as an off-shell formulation of ideal fluid dynamics.

  6. Off-shell hydrodynamics from holography

    DOE PAGES

    Crossley, Michael; Glorioso, Paolo; Liu, Hong; ...

    2016-02-18

    In this article, we outline a program for obtaining an action principle for dissipative fluid dynamics by considering the holographic Wilsonian renormalization group applied to systems with a gravity dual. As a first step, in this paper we restrict to systems with a non-dissipative horizon. By integrating out gapped degrees of freedom in the bulk gravitational system between an asymptotic boundary and a horizon, we are led to a formulation of hydrodynamics where the dynamical variables are not standard velocity and temperature fields, but the relative embedding of the boundary and horizon hypersurfaces. At zeroth order, this action reduces tomore » that proposed by Dubovsky et al. as an off-shell formulation of ideal fluid dynamics.« less

  7. Off-shell Jost solutions for Coulomb and Coulomb-like interactions in all partial waves

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, U.; Bhoi, J.

    2013-01-15

    By exploiting the theory of ordinary differential equations, with judicious use of boundary conditions, interacting Green's functions and their integral transforms together with certain properties of higher transcendental functions, useful analytical expressions for the off-shell Jost solutions for motion in Coulomb and Coulomb-nuclear potentials are derived in maximal reduced form through different approaches to the problem in the representation space. The exact analytical expressions for the off-shell Jost solutions for Coulomb and Coulomb-like potentials are believed to be useful for the description of the charged particle scattering/reaction processes.

  8. Off-shell two-loop QCD vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracey, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    We calculate the triple gluon, ghost-gluon and quark-gluon vertex functions at two loops in the MS¯ scheme in the chiral limit for an arbitrary linear covariant gauge when the external legs are all off shell.

  9. Off-Shell Amplitudes for Nonoriented Closed Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappiello, Luigi; Marotta, Raffaele; Pettorino, Roberto; Pezzella, Franco

    In the context of the bosonic closed string theory, by using the operatorial formalism, we give a simple expression of the off-shell amplitude with an arbitrary number of external massless states inserted on the Klein bottle.

  10. Off-shell spinor-helicity amplitudes from light-cone deformation procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Dmitry

    2016-12-01

    We study the consistency conditions for interactions of massless fields of any spin in four-dimensional flat space using the light-cone approach. We show that they can be equivalently rewritten as the Ward identities for the off-shell light-cone amplitudes built from the light-cone Hamiltonian in the standard way. Then we find a general solution of these Ward identities. The solution admits a compact representation when written in the spinor-helicity form and is given by an arbitrary function of spinor products, satisfying wellknown homogeneity constraints. Thus, we show that the light-cone consistent deformation procedure inevitably leads to a certain off-shell version of the spinor-helicity approach. We discuss how the relation between the two approaches can be employed to facilitate the search of consistent interaction of massless higher-spin fields.

  11. Off-shell massive N = 1 supermultiplets in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzenko, Sergei M.; Tsulaia, Mirian

    2017-01-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the construction of new off-shell higher spin N = 1 supermultiplets in three spacetime dimensions. We elaborate on the gauge prepotentials and linearised super-Cotton tensors for higher spin N = 1 superconformal geometry and propose compensating superfields required to formulate off-shell massless higher spin supermultiplets. The corresponding gauge-invariant actions are worked out explicitly using an auxiliary oscillator realisation. We construct, for the first time, off-shell massive higher spin supermultiplets. The gauge-invariant actions for these supermultiplets are obtained by adding Chern-Simons like mass terms (that is, higher spin extensions of the linearised action for N = 1 conformal supergravity) to the actions for the massless supermultiplets. For each of the massive gravitino and supergravity multiplets, we propose two dually equivalent formulations.

  12. Off-Shell Supersymmetry versus Hermiticity in Superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Berkovits, N.

    1996-09-01

    We point out that off-shell four-dimensional spacetime supersymmetry implies strange Hermiticity properties for the {ital N}=1 Ramond-Neveu-Schwarz superstring. However, these Hermiticity properties become natural when the {ital N}=1 superstring is embedded into an {ital N}=2 superstring. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Off-shell superconformal higher spin multiplets in four dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzenko, Sergei M.; Manvelyan, Ruben; Theisen, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    We formulate off-shell N = 1 superconformal higher spin multiplets in four spacetime dimensions and briefly discuss their coupling to conformal supergravity. As an example, we explicitly work out the coupling of the superconformal gravitino multiplet to conformal supergravity. The corresponding action is super-Weyl invariant for arbitrary supergravity backgrounds. However, it is gauge invariant only if the supersymmetric Bach tensor vanishes. This is similar to linearised conformal supergravity in curved background.

  14. Off-shell covariantization of algebroid gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, Ursula; Heller, Marc Andre; Ikeda, Noriaki; Kaneko, Tomokazu; Watamura, Satoshi

    2017-08-01

    We present a generalized method to construct field strengths and gauge symmetries that yield a Yang-Mills-type action with Lie n-algebroid gauge symmetry. The procedure makes use of off-shell covariantization in a supergeometric setting. We apply this method to the system of a 1-form gauge field and scalar fields with Lie n-algebroid gauge symmetry. We work out some characteristic examples.

  15. Bordered surfaces, off-shell amplitudes, sewing, and string field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlip, Steven

    1989-04-01

    These lectures will deal with the current status of the sewing problem. The rationale for this approach is that any nonperturbative string theory must reproduce the Polyakov path integral as a perturbation series. If our experience in ordinary field theory is a guide, and admittedly it may not be, the terms in such a perturbation series, like Feynman diagrams, are likely to be built up from simple vertices and propagators, which can themselves be represented as (off-shell) Polyakov amplitudes. Hence an understanding of how to put together simple components into more complicated world sheet amplitudes is likely to give us much-needed information about the structure of nonperturbative string theory. To understand sewing, we must first understand the building blocks, off-shell Polyakov amplitudes. This is the subject of my first lecture. Next, we will explore the sewing of conformal field theories at a fixed conformal structure, that is, the reconstruction of correlation functions for a fixed surface (Sigma) from those on a pair of surfaces (Sigma)(sub 1) and (Sigma)(sub 2) obtained by cutting (Sigma) along a closed curve. We will then look at the problem of sewing amplitudes, integrals of correlation functions over moduli space. This will necessitate an understanding of how to build the moduli space of a complicated surface from simpler moduli spaces. Finally, we will briefly examine vertices and string field theories.

  16. Bordered surfaces, off-shell amplitudes, sewing, and string field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Carlip, S.

    1989-04-01

    These lectures will deal with the current status of the sewing problem. The rationale for this approach is that any nonperturbative string theory must reproduce the Polyakov path integral as a perturbation series. If our experience in ordinary field theory is a guide --- and admittedly it may not be --- the terms in such a perturbation series, like Feynman diagrams, are likely to be built up from simple ''vertices'' and ''propagators,'' which can themselves be represented as (off-shell) Polyakov amplitudes. Hence an understanding of how to put together simple components into more complicated world sheet amplitudes is likely to give us much-needed information about the structure of nonperturbative string theory. To understand sewing, we must first understand the building blocks, off-shell Polyakov amplitudes. This is the subject of my first lecture. Next, we will explore the sewing of conformal field theories at a fixed conformal structure, that is, the reconstruction of correlation functions for a fixed surface /Sigma/ from those on a pair of surfaces /Sigma//sub 1/ and /Sigma//sub 2/ obtained by cutting /Sigma/ along a closed curve. We will then look at the problem of sewing amplitudes, integrals of correlation functions over moduli space. This will necessitate an understanding of how to build the moduli space of a complicated surface from simpler moduli spaces. Finally, we will briefly examine vertices and string field theories. 48 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Off-shell single-top production at NLO matched to parton showers

    SciTech Connect

    Frederix, R.; Frixione, S.; Papanastasiou, A. S.; Prestel, S.; Torrielli, P.

    2016-06-06

    We study the hadroproduction of a Wb pair in association with a light jet, focusing on the dominant t-channel contribution and including exactly at the matrix-element level all non-resonant and off-shell effects induced by the finite top-quark width. Our simulations are accurate to the next-to-leading order in QCD, and are matched to the Herwig6 and Pythia8 parton showers through the MC@NLO method. We present phenomenological results relevant to the 8 TeV LHC, and carry out a thorough comparison to the case of on-shell t-channel single-top production. Furthermore, we formulate our approach so that it can be applied to the general case of matrix elements that feature coloured intermediate resonances and are matched to parton showers.

  18. Off-shell single-top production at NLO matched to parton showers

    DOE PAGES

    Frederix, R.; Frixione, S.; Papanastasiou, A. S.; ...

    2016-06-06

    We study the hadroproduction of a Wb pair in association with a light jet, focusing on the dominant t-channel contribution and including exactly at the matrix-element level all non-resonant and off-shell effects induced by the finite top-quark width. Our simulations are accurate to the next-to-leading order in QCD, and are matched to the Herwig6 and Pythia8 parton showers through the MC@NLO method. We present phenomenological results relevant to the 8 TeV LHC, and carry out a thorough comparison to the case of on-shell t-channel single-top production. Furthermore, we formulate our approach so that it can be applied to the generalmore » case of matrix elements that feature coloured intermediate resonances and are matched to parton showers.« less

  19. Leading singularities and off-shell conformal integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, James; Duhr, Claude; Eden, Burkhard; Heslop, Paul; Pennington, Jeffrey; Smirnov, Vladimir A.

    2013-08-01

    The three-loop four-point function of stress-tensor multiplets in super Yang-Mills theory contains two so far unknown, off-shell, conformal integrals, in addition to the known, ladder-type integrals. In this paper we evaluate the unknown integrals, thus obtaining the three-loop correlation function analytically. The integrals have the generic structure of rational functions multiplied by (multiple) polylogarithms. We use the idea of leading singularities to obtain the rational coefficients, the symbol — with an appropriate ansatz for its structure — as a means of characterising multiple polylogarithms, and the technique of asymptotic expansion of Feynman integrals to obtain the integrals in certain limits. The limiting behaviour uniquely fixes the symbols of the integrals, which we then lift to find the corresponding polylogarithmic functions. The final formulae are numerically confirmed. The techniques we develop can be applied more generally, and we illustrate this by analytically evaluating one of the integrals contributing to the same four-point function at four loops. This example shows a connection between the leading singularities and the entries of the symbol.

  20. Leading singularities and off-shell conformal integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, James; Duhr, Claude; Eden, Burkhard; Heslop, Paul; Pennington, Jeffrey; Smirnov, Vladimir A.

    2013-08-29

    The three-loop four-point function of stress-tensor multiplets in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory contains two so far unknown, off-shell, conformal integrals, in addition to the known, ladder-type integrals. In our paper we evaluate the unknown integrals, thus obtaining the three-loop correlation function analytically. The integrals have the generic structure of rational functions multiplied by (multiple) polylogarithms. We use the idea of leading singularities to obtain the rational coefficients, the symbol — with an appropriate ansatz for its structure — as a means of characterising multiple polylogarithms, and the technique of asymptotic expansion of Feynman integrals to obtain the integrals in certain limits. The limiting behaviour uniquely fixes the symbols of the integrals, which we then lift to find the corresponding polylogarithmic functions. The final formulae are numerically confirmed. Furthermore, we develop techniques that can be applied more generally, and we illustrate this by analytically evaluating one of the integrals contributing to the same four-point function at four loops. This example shows a connection between the leading singularities and the entries of the symbol.

  1. All (4,0): Sigma models with (4,0) off-shell supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Chris; Lindström, Ulf

    2017-08-01

    Off-shell (4, 0) supermultiplets in 2-dimensions are formulated. These are used to construct sigma models whose target spaces are vector bundles over manifolds that are hyperkähler with torsion. The off-shell supersymmetry implies that the complex structures are simultaneously integrable and allows us to write actions using extended superspace and projective superspace, giving an explicit construction of the target space geometries.

  2. NLO QCD+EW predictions for V + jets including off-shell vector-boson decays and multijet merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallweit, S.; Lindert, J. M.; Maierhöfer, P.; Pozzorini, S.; Schönherr, M.

    2016-04-01

    We present next-to-leading order (NLO) predictions including QCD and electroweak (EW) corrections for the production and decay of off-shell electroweak vector bosons in association with up to two jets at the 13 TeV LHC. All possible dilepton final states with zero, one or two charged leptons that can arise from off-shell W and Z bosons or photons are considered. All predictions are obtained using the automated implementation of NLO QCD+EW corrections in the O penLoops matrix-element generator combined with the Munich and Sherpa Monte Carlo frameworks. Electroweak corrections play an especially important role in the context of BSM searches, due to the presence of large EW Sudakov logarithms at the TeV scale. In this kinematic regime, important observables such as the jet transverse momentum or the total transverse energy are strongly sensitive to multijet emissions. As a result, fixed-order NLO QCD+EW predictions are plagued by huge QCD corrections and poor theoretical precision. To remedy this problem we present an approximate method that allows for a simple and reliable implementation of NLO EW corrections in the MePs@Nlo multijet merging framework. Using this general approach we present an inclusive simulation of vector-boson production in association with jets that guarantees NLO QCD+EW accuracy in all phase-space regions involving up to two resolved jets.

  3. Boundary behaviors for general off-shell amplitudes in Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Chen, Gang

    2013-07-01

    The boundary behavior of amplitudes—the amplitudes’ behavior under a large Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten (BCFW) momenta deformation for a pair of legs—in Yang-Mills theory is of great interest recently. In this article we analyze the boundary behavior of off-shell Yang-Mills amplitudes in Feynman gauge. The deformed legs can be either adjacent or nonadjacent. We find that a set of reduced vertices can be used to simplify the analysis and calculation of the boundary behavior of amplitudes. Boundary behavior for amplitudes with adjacent BCFW deformation is read off from the reduced vertices. Then we discover a relationship between a permutation sum with fixed color ordering of the legs and the improved boundary behavior for the off-shell amplitudes with a nonadjacent BCFW momenta deformation. Based on the boundary behavior, we generalize the BCFW recursion relation to calculate general tree-level off-shell amplitudes and analyze the relations between them.

  4. One-loop pentagon integral with one off-shell leg in 6 -2 ɛ dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Mikhail G.

    2017-02-01

    We apply the differential equations technique to the calculation of the one-loop massless diagram with one off-shell leg. Using a reduction to the ɛ -form, we managed to obtain a simple onefold integral representation exact in space-time dimensionality. Expansion of the obtained result in ɛ and an analytical continuation to the physical region are discussed.

  5. Off-shell amplitudes as boundary integrals of analytically continued Wilson line slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotko, P.; Serino, M.; Stasto, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    One of the methods to calculate tree-level multi-gluon scattering amplitudes is to use the Berends-Giele recursion relation involving off-shell currents or off-shell amplitudes, if working in the light cone gauge. As shown in recent works using the light-front perturbation theory, solutions to these recursions naturally collapse into gauge invariant and gauge-dependent components, at least for some helicity configurations. In this work, we show that such structure is helicity independent and emerges from analytic properties of matrix elements of Wilson line operators, where the slope of the straight gauge path is shifted in a certain complex direction. This is similar to the procedure leading to the Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten (BCFW) recursion, however we apply a complex shift to the Wilson line slope instead of the external momenta. While in the original BCFW procedure the boundary integrals over the complex shift vanish for certain deformations, here they are non-zero and are equal to the off-shell amplitudes. The main result can thus be summarized as follows: we derive a decomposition of a helicity-fixed off-shell current into gauge invariant component given by a matrix element of a straight Wilson line plus a reminder given by a sum of products of gauge invariant and gauge dependent quantities. We give several examples realizing this relation, including the five-point next-to-MHV helicity configuration.

  6. Off-shell invariant D = N = 2 twisted super Yang-Mills theory with a gauged central charge without constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Keisuke; Kato, Junji; Kawamoto, Noboru; Miyake, Akiko

    2013-11-01

    We formulate N=2 twisted super Yang-Mills theory with a gauged central charge by superconnection formalism in two dimensions. We obtain off-shell invariant supermultiplets and actions with and without constraints, which is in contrast with the off-shell invariant D=N=4 super Yang-Mills formulation with unavoidable constraints.

  7. Holomorphic Chern-Simons theory coupled to off-shell Kodaira-Spencer gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusto, Stefano; Imbimbo, Camillo; Rosa, Dario

    2012-10-01

    We construct an action for holomorphic Chern-Simons theory that couples the gauge field to off-shell gravitational backgrounds, comprising the complex structure and the (3,0)-form of the target space. Gauge invariance of the off-shell action is achieved by enlarging the field space to include an appropriate system of Lagrange multipliers, ghost and ghost-for-ghost fields. Both the BRST transformations and the BV action are compactly and neatly written in terms of superfields which include fields, backgrounds and their antifields. We show that the anti-holomorphic target space derivative can be written as a BRST-commutator on a functional space containing the anti-fields of both the dynamical fields and the gravitational backgrounds. We derive from this result a Ward identity that determines the anti-holomorphic dependence of physical correlators.

  8. Off-shell higher spin N =2 supermultiplets in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzenko, Sergei M.; Ogburn, Daniel X.

    2016-11-01

    Off-shell higher spin N =2 supermultiplets in three spacetime dimensions (3D) are presented in this paper. We propose gauge prepotentials for higher spin superconformal gravity and construct the corresponding gauge-invariant field strengths, which are proved to be conformal primary superfields. These field strengths are higher spin generalizations of the (linearized) N =2 super-Cotton tensor, which controls the superspace geometry of conformal supergravity. We also construct the higher spin extensions of the linearized N =2 conformal supergravity action. We provide two dually equivalent off-shell formulations for massless higher spin N =2 supermultiplets. They involve one and the same superconformal prepotential but differ in the compensators used. For the lowest superspin value 3 /2 , these higher spin series terminate at the linearized actions for the (1,1) minimal and w =-1 nonminimal N =2 Poincaré supergravity theories constructed in S. M. Kuzenko and G. Tartaglino-Mazzucchelli, arXiv:1109.0496. Similar to the pure 3D supergravity actions, their higher spin counterparts propagate no degrees of freedom. However, the massless higher spin supermultiplets are used to construct off-shell massive N =2 supermultiplets by combining the massless actions with those describing higher spin extensions of the linearized N =2 conformal supergravity. We also demonstrate that every higher spin super-Cotton tensor can be represented as a linear superposition of the equations of motion for the corresponding massless higher spin supermultiplet, with the coefficients being higher-derivative linear operators.

  9. Off-shell and nonlocal effects in proton-nucleus elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picklesimer, A.; Tandy, P. C.; Thaler, R. M.; Wolfe, D. H.

    1984-04-01

    The influence of off-shell and nonlocal effects in the first-order nonrelativistic microscopic optical potential is investigated for elastic proton scattering above 100 MeV. With the free nucleon-nucleon t matrix taken from the model of Love and Franey, these effects are significant only for scattering angles greater than about 60° and energies below about 300 MeV. The inadequacy of the standard first-order theory for predictions of spin observables at forward scattering angles remains unchanged when these effects are included and the need for higher order processes including medium and relativistic effects is reinforced.

  10. Normalization of off-shell boundary state, g-function and zeta function regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoyama, H.; Oota, T.

    2002-11-01

    We consider the model in two dimensions with boundary quadratic deformation (BQD), which has been discussed in tachyon condensation. The partition function of this model (BQD) on a cylinder is determined using the method of zeta function regularization. We show that, for closed channel partition function, a subtraction procedure must be introduced in order to reproduce the correct results at conformal points. The boundary entropy (g-function) is determined from the partition function and the off-shell boundary state. We propose and consider a supersymmetric generalization of the BQD model, which includes a boundary fermion mass term, and check the validity of the subtraction procedure.

  11. A Coulomb-Like Off-Shell T-Matrix with the Correct Coulomb Phase Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oryu, Shinsho; Watanabe, Takashi; Hiratsuka, Yasuhisa; Togawa, Yoshio

    2017-03-01

    We confirm the reliability of the well-known Coulomb renormalization method (CRM). It is found that the CRM is only available for a very-long-range screened Coulomb potential (SCP). However, such an SCP calculation in momentum space is considerably difficult because of the cancelation of significant digits. In contrast to the CRM, we propose a new method by using an on-shell equivalent SCP and the rest term. The two-potential theory with r-space is introduced, which defines fully the off-shell Coulomb amplitude.

  12. Off-shell behavior of relativistic NN effective interactions and charge symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersten, A.; Thomas, A. W.; Weyrauch, M.

    1990-04-01

    We examine in detail the suggestion of Iqbal et al. for calculating the class-four charge symmetry breaking amplitude in n-p scattering. By simplifying to a model problem, we show explicitly that the approximation scheme is unreliable if a phenomenological, effective nucleon-nucleon T matrix is used. Our results have wider implications for observables calculated in relativistic impulse approximation calculations. They reinforce the observation made in the literature that the procedure of fitting only positive energy matrix elements can lead to an NN interaction whose off-shell behavior is incorrect.

  13. Off-shell dark matter: A cosmological relic of quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravani, Mehdi; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2017-02-01

    We study a novel proposal for the origin of cosmological cold dark matter (CDM) which is rooted in the quantum nature of spacetime. In this model, off-shell modes of quantum fields can exist in asymptotic states as a result of spacetime nonlocality (expected in generic theories of quantum gravity) and play the role of CDM, which we dub off-shell dark matter (O f DM ). However, their rate of production is suppressed by the scale of nonlocality (e.g. Planck length). As a result, we show that O f DM is only produced in the first moments of big bang, and then effectively decouples (except through its gravitational interactions). We examine the observational predictions of this model: In the context of cosmic inflation, we show that this proposal relates the reheating temperature to the inflaton mass, which narrows down the uncertainty in the number of e -foldings of specific inflationary scenarios. We also demonstrate that O f DM is indeed cold, and discuss potentially observable signatures on small scale matter power spectrum.

  14. Higher gauge theories from Lie n-algebras and off-shell covariantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, Ursula; Heller, Marc Andre; Ikeda, Noriaki; Kaneko, Yukio; Watamura, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    We analyze higher gauge theories in various dimensions using a supergeometric method based on a differential graded symplectic manifold, called a QP-manifold, which is closely related to the BRST-BV formalism in gauge theories. Extensions of the Lie 2-algebra gauge structure are formulated within the Lie n-algebra induced by the QP-structure. We find that in 5 and 6 dimensions there are special extensions of the gauge algebra. In these cases, a restriction of the gauge symmetry by imposing constraints on the auxiliary gauge fields leads to a covariantized theory. As an example we show that we can obtain an off-shell covariantized higher gauge theory in 5 dimensions, which is similar to the one proposed in [1].

  15. Off-Shell Green Functions: One-Loop with Growing Legs

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Concha-Sanchez, Y.; Delbourgo, R.; Tejeda-Yeomans, M. E.

    2008-07-02

    One loop calculations in gauge theories in arbitrary gauge and dimensions become exceedingly hard with growing number of external off-shell legs. Let alone higher point functions, such a calculation for even the three point one-loop vertices for quantum electrodynamics (QED) and quantum chromodynamics (QCD) has been made available only recently. In this article, we discuss how Ward-Fradkin-Green-Takahashi identities (WFGTI) may provide a helpful tool in these computations. After providing a glimpse of our suggestion for the case of the 3-point vertex, we present our preliminary findings towards our similar efforts for the 4-point function. We restrict ourselves to the example of scalar quantum electrodynamics (SQED)

  16. Form factor of the B meson off-shell for the vertex B{sub s}*BK

    SciTech Connect

    Cerqueira, A. Jr.; Bracco, M. E.

    2010-11-12

    In this work we evaluate the coupling constant and the form factor for the vertex B{sub s}*BK using the QCD Sum Rules. In this case we consider the B meson off shell. The only theoretical evaluation for the coupling constant was made using the Heavy Hadron Chiral Perturbation Theory (HHChPT) and we made comparison with this result.

  17. A Lorentz covariant holoraumy-induced "gadget" from minimal off-shell 4D, N=1 supermultiplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, S. James; Grover, Tyler; Miller-Dickson, Miles David; Mondal, Benedict A.; Oskoui, Amir; Regmi, Shirash; Ross, Ethan; Shetty, Rajath

    2015-11-01

    Starting from three minimal off-shell 4D, N=1 supermultiplets, using constructions solely defined within the confines of the four dimensional field theory we show the existence of a "gadget" — a member of a class of metrics on the representation space of the supermultiplets — whose values directly and completely correspond to the values of a metric defined on the 1d, N = 4 adinkra networks adjacency matrices corresponding to the projections of the four dimensional supermultiplets.

  18. On the Green-functions of the classical off-shell electrodynamics under the manifestly covariant relativistic dynamics of Stueckelberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonovich, I.; Horwitz, L. P.

    2011-08-01

    In previous papers derivations of the Green function have been given for 5D off-shell electrodynamics in the framework of the manifestly covariant relativistic dynamics of Stueckelberg (with invariant evolution parameter τ). In this paper, we reconcile these derivations resulting in different explicit forms, and relate our results to the conventional fundamental solutions of linear 5D wave equations published in the mathematical literature. We give physical arguments for the choice of the Green function retarded in the fifth variable τ.

  19. Higgs production in association with off-shell top-antitop pairs at NLO EW and QCD at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Ansgar; Lang, Jean-Nicolas; Pellen, Mathieu; Uccirati, Sandro

    2017-02-01

    We present NLO electroweak corrections to Higgs production in association with off-shell top-antitop quark pairs. The full process ppto {e}+{ν}e{μ}-{overline{ν}}_{μ}boverline{b}H is considered, and hence all interference, off-shell, and non-resonant contributions are taken into account. The electroweak corrections turn out to be below one per cent for the integrated cross section but can exceed 10% in certain phase-space regions. In addition to its phenomenological relevance, the computation constitutes a major technical achievement as the full NLO virtual corrections involving up to 9-point functions have been computed exactly. The results of the full computation are supported by two calculations in the double-pole approximation. These also allow to infer the effect of off-shell contributions and emphasise their importance especially for the run II of the LHC. Finally, we present combined predictions featuring both NLO electroweak and QCD corrections in a common set-up that will help the experimental collaborations in their quest of precisely measuring the aforementioned process.

  20. Sensitivity of nucleon-nucleus scattering to the off-shell behavior of on-shell equivalent {ital NN} potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Arellano, H.F.; Brieva, F.A.; Sander, M.; von Geramb, H.V. |

    1996-11-01

    The sensitivity of nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering to the off-shell behavior of realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions is investigated when on-shell equivalent nucleon-nucleon potentials are used. The study is based on applications of the full-folding optical model potential for an explicit treatment of the off-shell behavior of the nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. Applications were made at beam energies between 40 and 500 MeV for proton scattering from {sup 40}Ca and {sup 208}Pb. We use the momentum-dependent Paris potential and its local on-shell equivalent as obtained with the Gelfand-Levitan and Marchenko inversion formalism for the two nucleon Schr{umlt o}dinger equation. Full-folding calculations for nucleon-nucleus scattering show moderate fluctuations in the corresponding observables. This sets narrow margins within which off-shell features of the nucleon-nucleon interaction can be resolved. Based on these results, inversion potentials were also constructed directly from phenomenological phase shifts (SM94). Their use in nucleon-nucleus scattering at intermediate energies provides an improved description of the data relative to those obtained from current realistic potential models. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high-mass ZZ and WW final states with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The measurements of the ZZ and WW final states in the mass range above the \\(2m_Z\\) and \\(2m_W\\) thresholds provide a unique opportunity to measure the off-shell coupling strength of the Higgs boson. This paper presents constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson event yields normalised to the Standard Model prediction (signal strength) in the \\(ZZ \\rightarrow 4\\ell \\), \\(ZZ\\rightarrow 2\\ell 2\

  2. Constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high-mass ZZ and WW final states with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The measurements of the ZZ and WW final states in the mass range above the \\(2m_Z\\) and \\(2m_W\\) thresholds provide a unique opportunity to measure the off-shell coupling strength of the Higgs boson. This paper presents constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson event yields normalised to the Standard Model prediction (signal strength) in the \\(ZZ \\rightarrow 4\\ell \\), \\(ZZ\\rightarrow 2\\ell 2\

  3. Similarity and differences between the radion and Higgs boson production and decay processes involving off-shell fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Boos, E. E.; Keizerov, S. I.; Rahmetov, E. R.; Svirina, K. S.

    2015-12-15

    The radion is a scalar particle that occurs in brane world models and interacts with the trace of the energy–momentum tensor of the Standard Model (SM). The radion–SM fermion interaction Lagrangian differs from the Higgs boson–fermion interaction Lagrangian for off-shell fermions. It is shown that all additional, as compared to the Higgs boson, contributions to the amplitudes of radion production and decay processes involving off-shell fermions are canceled out for both massless and massive fermions. Thus, additional terms in the interaction Lagrangian do not change properties of these processes for the radion and the Higgs boson, except for the general normalization factors. This similarity is a consequence of gauge invariance for the processes with production of gauge bosons. When an additional scalar particle is produced, there are no apparent reasons for the above cancellation, as confirmed, for example, by the process with production of two scalar particles, which features an additional contribution of the radion in comparison with the Higgs boson.

  4. Mechanical approach to chemical transport

    PubMed Central

    Kocherginsky, Nikolai; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics describes the rates of transport phenomena with the aid of various thermodynamic forces, but often the phenomenological transport coefficients are not known, and the description is not easily connected with equilibrium relations. We present a simple and intuitive model to address these issues. Our model is based on Lagrangian dynamics for chemical systems with dissipation, so one may think of the model as physicochemical mechanics. Using one main equation, the model allows a systematic derivation of all transport and equilibrium equations, subject to the limitation that heat generated or absorbed in the system must be small for the model to be valid. A table with all major examples of transport and equilibrium processes described using physicochemical mechanics is given. In equilibrium, physicochemical mechanics reduces to standard thermodynamics and the Gibbs–Duhem relation, and we show that the First and Second Laws of thermodynamics are satisfied for our system plus bath model. Out of equilibrium, our model provides relationships between transport coefficients and describes system evolution in the presence of several simultaneous external fields. The model also leads to an extension of the Onsager–Casimir reciprocal relations for properties simultaneously transported by many components. PMID:27647899

  5. Top Quark Pair Production in Association with a Jet with Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Off-Shell Effects at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, G; Hartanto, H B; Kraus, M; Worek, M

    2016-02-05

    We present a complete description of top quark pair production in association with a jet in the dilepton channel. Our calculation is accurate to next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD and includes all nonresonant diagrams, interferences, and off-shell effects of the top quark. Moreover, nonresonant and off-shell effects due to the finite W gauge boson width are taken into account. This calculation constitutes the first fully realistic NLO computation for top quark pair production with a final state jet in hadronic collisions. Numerical results for differential distributions as well as total cross sections are presented for the Large Hadron Collider at 8 TeV. With our inclusive cuts, NLO predictions reduce the unphysical scale dependence by more than a factor of 3 and lower the total rate by about 13% compared to leading-order QCD predictions. In addition, the size of the top quark off-shell effects is estimated to be below 2%.

  6. Off-shell extrapolation of Regge-model NN scattering amplitudes describing final state interactions in 2H(e,e'p)

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, William Paul; van Orden, Wally

    2013-11-25

    In this work, an off-shell extrapolation is proposed for the Regge-model NN amplitudes presented in a paper by Ford and Van Orden [ Phys. Rev. C 87 014004 (2013)] and in an eprint by Ford (arXiv:1310.0871 [nucl-th]). The prescriptions for extrapolating these amplitudes for one nucleon off-shell in the initial state are presented. Application of these amplitudes to calculations of deuteron electrodisintegration are presented and compared to the limited available precision data in the kinematical region covered by the Regge model.

  7. Off-shell extrapolation of Regge-model NN scattering amplitudes describing final state interactions in 2H(e,e'p)

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, William Paul; van Orden, Wally

    2013-11-25

    In this work, an off-shell extrapolation is proposed for the Regge-model NN amplitudes presented in a paper by Ford and Van Orden [ Phys. Rev. C 87 014004 (2013)] and in an eprint by Ford (arXiv:1310.0871 [nucl-th]). The prescriptions for extrapolating these amplitudes for one nucleon off-shell in the initial state are presented. Application of these amplitudes to calculations of deuteron electrodisintegration are presented and compared to the limited available precision data in the kinematical region covered by the Regge model.

  8. Systemic Analysis Approaches for Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Air transportation system designers have had only limited success using traditional operations research and parametric modeling approaches in their analyses of innovations. They need a systemic methodology for modeling of safety-critical infrastructure that is comprehensive, objective, and sufficiently concrete, yet simple enough to be used with reasonable investment. The methodology must also be amenable to quantitative analysis so issues of system safety and stability can be rigorously addressed. However, air transportation has proven itself an extensive, complex system whose behavior is difficult to describe, no less predict. There is a wide range of system analysis techniques available, but some are more appropriate for certain applications than others. Specifically in the area of complex system analysis, the literature suggests that both agent-based models and network analysis techniques may be useful. This paper discusses the theoretical basis for each approach in these applications, and explores their historic and potential further use for air transportation analysis.

  9. Optically active N-acetyldopamine dimer of the crude drug "Zentai," the cast-off shell of the Cicada, Cryptotympana sp.

    PubMed

    Noda, N; Kubota, S; Miyata, Y; Miyahara, K

    2000-11-01

    Two optically active N-acetyldopamine dimers together with four phenolic monomers were isolated from the crude drug "Zentai," a cast-off shell of the cicada of Cryptotympana sp. (Cicadidae). The former two were 2-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl)-1,4-benzodioxane derivatives carrying substituents at the 3 and 6 (or 7) positions, which are known to be components of sclerotized insect cuticles. Their structures including absolute configurations were determined on the basis of NMR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic data.

  10. Heuristic Optimization Approach to Selecting a Transport Connection in City Public Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kul'ka, Jozef; Mantič, Martin; Kopas, Melichar; Faltinová, Eva; Kachman, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    The article presents a heuristic optimization approach to select a suitable transport connection in the framework of a city public transport. This methodology was applied on a part of the public transport in Košice, because it is the second largest city in the Slovak Republic and its network of the public transport creates a complex transport system, which consists of three different transport modes, namely from the bus transport, tram transport and trolley-bus transport. This solution focused on examining the individual transport services and their interconnection in relevant interchange points.

  11. Constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high-mass ZZ and WW final states with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, J E M; Robson, A; Roda, C; Roe, S; Røhne, O; Rolli, S; Romaniouk, A; Romano, M; Saez, S M Romano; Romero Adam, E; Rompotis, N; Ronzani, M; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosbach, K; Rose, P; Rosendahl, P L; Rosenthal, O; Rossetti, V; Rossi, E; Rossi, L P; Rosten, R; Rotaru, M; Roth, I; Rothberg, J; Rousseau, D; Royon, C R; Rozanov, A; Rozen, Y; Ruan, X; Rubbo, F; Rubinskiy, I; Rud, V I; Rudolph, C; Rudolph, M S; Rühr, F; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakovich, N A; Ruschke, A; Russell, H L; Rutherfoord, J P; Ruthmann, N; Ryabov, Y F; Rybar, M; Rybkin, G; Ryder, N C; Saavedra, A F; Sabato, G; Sacerdoti, S; Saddique, A; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sadykov, R; Safai Tehrani, F; Saimpert, M; Sakamoto, H; Sakurai, Y; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saleem, M; Salek, D; Sales De Bruin, P H; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sampsonidis, D; Sanchez, A; Sánchez, J; Sanchez Martinez, V; Sandaker, H; Sandbach, R L; Sander, H G; Sanders, M P; Sandhoff, M; Sandoval, C; Sandstroem, R; Sankey, D P C; Sannino, M; Sansoni, A; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, H; Santoyo Castillo, I; Sapp, K; Sapronov, A; Saraiva, J G; Sarrazin, B; Sasaki, O; Sasaki, Y; Sato, K; Sauvage, G; Sauvan, E; Savage, G; Savard, P; Sawyer, C; Sawyer, L; Saxon, J; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scanlon, T; Scannicchio, D A; Scarcella, M; Scarfone, V; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schaefer, D; Schaefer, R; Schaeffer, J; Schaepe, S; Schaetzel, S; Schäfer, U; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Schiavi, C; Schillo, C; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmidt, E; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, S; Schmitt, S; Schneider, B; Schnellbach, Y J; Schnoor, U; Schoeffel, L; Schoening, A; Schoenrock, B D; Schopf, E; Schorlemmer, A L S; Schott, M; Schouten, D; Schovancova, J; Schramm, S; Schreyer, M; Schroeder, C; Schuh, N; Schultens, M J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwarz, T A; Schwegler, Ph; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwindling, J; Schwindt, T; Schwoerer, M; Sciacca, F G; Scifo, E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Scutti, F; Searcy, J; Sedov, G; Sedykh, E; Seema, P; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Sekula, S J; Selbach, K E; Seliverstov, D M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Serkin, L; Serre, T; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sfiligoj, T; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shan, L Y; Shang, R; Shank, J T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Shcherbakova, A; Shehu, C Y; Sherwood, P; Shi, L; Shimizu, S; Shimmin, C O; Shimojima, M; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Saadi, D Shoaleh; Shochet, M J; Shojaii, S; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Shushkevich, S; Sicho, P; Sidiropoulou, O; Sidorov, D; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simard, O; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simon, D; Simoniello, R; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Siragusa, G; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skinner, M B; Skottowe, H P; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Slawinska, M; Sliwa, K; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smestad, L; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, M N K; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snidero, G; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Socher, F; Soffer, A; Soh, D A; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solc, J; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solodkov, A A; Soloshenko, A; Solovyanov, O V; Solovyev, V; Sommer, P; Song, H Y; Soni, N; Sood, A; Sopczak, A; Sopko, B; Sopko, V; Sorin, V; Sosa, D; Sosebee, M; Sotiropoulou, C L; Soualah, R; Soueid, P; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Spagnolo, S; Spalla, M; Spanò, F; Spearman, W R; Spettel, F; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spiller, L A; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; Denis, R D St; Staerz, S; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stamm, S; Stanecka, E; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stanitzki, M M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Staszewski, R; Stavina, P; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stern, S; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Stramaglia, M E; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Strubig, A; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Subramaniam, R; Succurro, A; Sugaya, Y; Suhr, C; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, S; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, Y; Svatos, M; Swedish, S; Swiatlowski, M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Taccini, C; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tam, J Y C; Tan, K G; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tannenwald, B B; Tannoury, N; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Teoh, J J; Tepel, F; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Therhaag, J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, R J; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thun, R P; Tibbetts, M J; Torres, R E Ticse; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tiouchichine, E; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tolley, E; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; True, P; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turecek, D; Turra, R; Turvey, A J; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ughetto, M; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Unverdorben, C; Urban, J; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Usanova, A; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valderanis, C; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Den Wollenberg, W; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; Van Der Leeuw, R; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vannucci, F; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veloso, F; Velz, T; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigne, R; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, X; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, A; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yakabe, R; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yao, L; Yao, W-M; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    Measurements of the ZZ and WW final states in the mass range above the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] thresholds provide a unique opportunity to measure the off-shell coupling strength of the Higgs boson. This paper presents constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson event yields normalised to the Standard Model prediction (signal strength) in the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] final states. The result is based on pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb[Formula: see text] at a collision energy of [Formula: see text] TeV. Using the [Formula: see text] method, the observed 95 [Formula: see text] confidence level (CL) upper limit on the off-shell signal strength is in the range 5.1-8.6, with an expected range of 6.7-11.0. In each case the range is determined by varying the unknown [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] background K-factor from higher-order quantum chromodynamics corrections between half and twice the value of the known signal K-factor. Assuming the relevant Higgs boson couplings are independent of the energy scale of the Higgs boson production, a combination with the on-shell measurements yields an observed (expected) 95 [Formula: see text] CL upper limit on [Formula: see text] in the range 4.5-7.5 (6.5-11.2) using the same variations of the background K-factor. Assuming that the unknown [Formula: see text] background K-factor is equal to the signal K-factor, this translates into an observed (expected) 95 [Formula: see text] CL upper limit on the Higgs boson total width of 22.7 (33.0) MeV.

  12. Hydrodynamical approach to transport in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agosta, Roberto; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2006-03-01

    The electrical resistance induced by the viscous properties of the electron liquid has been recently derived.^1 In addition, it is known that the geometric constriction experienced by electrons flowing in a nanostructure gives rise to a fast ``collisional'' process.^2 These facts allow us to derive Navier-Stokes-type of equations, and therefore describe the electron flow on a par with a viscous and compressible liquid. By using this hydrodynamical approach we study electron transport in nanoscale systems and derive the conditions for the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in quantum point contacts. We also discuss possible experimental tests of these predictions. ^1 N. Sai, M. Zwolak, G. Vignale, and M. Di Ventra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186810 (2005).^2 M. Di Ventra and T.N. Todorov, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004); N. Bushong, N. Sai and, M. Di Ventra, Nano Lett. (in press).Work supported by the Department of Energy (DE-FG02-05ER46204)

  13. Subsurface Flow and Transport: A Stochastic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbarats, Alexandre

    Anyone who has examined core or petrophysical logs from well bores has wondered at the rhythmic successions of sedimentary fades and has puzzled at their sudden disruption or reappearance. Such wonderment is no doubt shared by those who have stood at a quarry face gazing up at the intricate hierarchy of depositional patterns and the varied textures of sediments. A fortunate few have even slogged along a mine drift and observed at close hand the perplexing relationship between the geological fabric of a rock mass and occurrences of groundwater inflow. Happily, the heterogeneity of geological materials is now widely recognized and efforts over the last 20 years have been concerned with its incorporation into models of fluid flow and solute transport in the subsurface. These research efforts are, at least in part, driven by acute societal concerns over the contamination of groundwater resources and proposed plans for the disposal of nuclear and other toxic wastes in the subsurface.

  14. Fully analytical O( α s ) results for on-shell and off-shell polarized W-boson decays into massive quark pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groote, S.; Körner, J. G.; Tuvike, P.

    2013-05-01

    We provide analytical O( α s ) results for the three polarized decay structure functions H ++, H 00 and H - that describe the decay of a polarized W boson into massive quark-antiquark pairs. As an application we consider the decay t→ b+ W + involving the helicity fractions ρ mm of the W + boson followed by the polarized decay W+(\\uparrow)to q1bar{q}2 described by the polarized decay structure functions H mm . We thereby determine the O( α s ) polar angle decay distribution of the cascade decay process tto b+W+(to q1bar{q}2). As a second example we analyze quark mass and off-shell effects in the cascade decays Hto W-+W^{ast+}(to q1bar{q}2) and Hto Z+Z^{ast}(to qbar{q}). For the decays Hto W-+W^{ast+}(to cbar{b}) and Hto Z+Z^{ast}(to bbar{b}) we find substantial deviations from the mass-zero approximation in particular in the vicinity of the threshold region.

  15. The off-shell axial anomaly via the {gamma}*{pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma} transition

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Frank, M.R.; Mitchell, K.L.; Tandy, P.C.

    1995-08-01

    The {gamma}*{pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma} form factor, F{sup {pi}0{gamma}{gamma}}(s), including the extension off the pion mass-shell, is calculated in generalized impulse approximation within the Dyson-Schwinger Equation framework used to provide an excellent description of the pion charge form factor, described above. This anomalous process is a fundamentally important characteristic of the quantum field theoretical structure of QCD because it signals the breaking of the U{sub A}(1) symmetry by quantization. This form factor was measured by the CELLO collaboration at the PETRA storage ring using the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}. There is a letter-of-intent at CEBAF to remeasure this form factor in virtual Compton scattering from a proton target. In this case a (virtual) pion is supplied by the target and a final real photon selected through the excellent missing mass spectrometry available at CEBAF. An extrapolation to the pion mass shell will be needed to deduce the physical transition form factor. Our calculation shows that the dependence on the virtual-pion momentum is smooth and well described by a simple suppression factor, which is qualitatively independent of the details of the pion interpolating field. The correct mass-shell value of this form factor is naturally generated in our approach and the q{sup 2} dependence is in accord with the available CELLO data. No parameters are adjusted to achieve this; the are fixed at the values derived in the study of F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}). A significant result of our study is that for this anomalous process, soft nonperturbative effects remain significant for Q{sup 2} < 20 GeV{sup 2}. A paper describing this work was submitted for publication.

  16. Synthesized voice approach callouts for air transport operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    A flight simulation experiment was performed to determine the effectiveness of synthesized voice approach callouts for air transport operations. Flight deck data was first collected on scheduled air carrier operations to describe existing pilot-not-flying callout procedures in the flight context and to document the types and amounts of other auditory cockpit information during different types of air carrier operations. A flight simulation scenario for a wide-body jet transport airline training simulator was developed in collaboration with a major U.S. air carrier and flown by three-man crews of qualified line pilots as part of their normally scheduled recurrent training. Each crew flew half their approaches using the experimental synthesized voice approach callout system (SYNCALL) and the other half using the company pilot-not-flying approach callout procedures (PNF). Airspeed and sink rate performance was better with the SYNCALL system than with the PNF system for non-precision approaches. For the one-engine approach, for which SYNCALL made inappropriate deviation callouts, airspeed performance was worse with SYNCALL than with PNF. Reliability of normal altitude approach callouts was comparable for PNF on the line and in the simulator and for SYNCALL in the simulator.

  17. Cyclic electron transport around photosystem I: genetic approaches.

    PubMed

    Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2007-01-01

    The light reactions in photosynthesis convert light energy into chemical energy in the form of ATP and drive the production of NADPH from NADP+. The reactions involve two types of electron flow in the chloroplast. While linear electron transport generates both ATP and NADPH, photosystem I cyclic electron transport is exclusively involved in ATP synthesis. The physiological significance of photosystem I cyclic electron transport has been underestimated, and our knowledge of the machineries involved remains very limited. However, recent genetic approaches using Arabidopsis thaliana have clarified the essential functions of this electron flow in both photoprotection and photosynthesis. Based on several lines of evidence presented here, it is necessary to reconsider the fundamental mechanisms of chloroplast energetics.

  18. Applying electrical utility least-cost approach to transportation planning

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, G.A.; Growdon, K.; Lagerberg, B.

    1994-09-01

    Members of the energy and environmental communities believe that parallels exist between electrical utility least-cost planning and transportation planning. In particular, the Washington State Energy Strategy Committee believes that an integrated and comprehensive transportation planning process should be developed to fairly evaluate the costs of both demand-side and supply-side transportation options, establish competition between different travel modes, and select the mix of options designed to meet system goals at the lowest cost to society. Comparisons between travel modes are also required under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA). ISTEA calls for the development of procedures to compare demand management against infrastructure investment solutions and requires the consideration of efficiency, socioeconomic and environmental factors in the evaluation process. Several of the techniques and approaches used in energy least-cost planning and utility peak demand management can be incorporated into a least-cost transportation planning methodology. The concepts of avoided plants, expressing avoidable costs in levelized nominal dollars to compare projects with different on-line dates and service lives, the supply curve, and the resource stack can be directly adapted from the energy sector.

  19. Parameter estimation for fractional transport: A particle-tracking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Paramita; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Lim, Chae Young

    2009-10-01

    Space-fractional advection-dispersion models provide attractive alternatives to the classical advection-dispersion equation for model applications that exhibit early arrivals and plume skewness. This paper develops a flexible method for estimating the parameters of the fractional transport model on the basis of spatial plume snapshots or temporal breakthrough curve data. A particle-tracking approach provides error bars for the parameter estimates and a general method for model fitting and comparison via optimal weighted least squares. A simple model of concentration variance, based on the particle-tracking approach, identifies the optimal weights.

  20. Monte Carlo path sampling approach to modeling aeolian sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, E. J.; Mitasova, H.; Mitas, L.

    2011-12-01

    Coastal communities and vital infrastructure are subject to coastal hazards including storm surge and hurricanes. Coastal dunes offer protection by acting as natural barriers from waves and storm surge. During storms, these landforms and their protective function can erode; however, they can also erode even in the absence of storms due to daily wind and waves. Costly and often controversial beach nourishment and coastal construction projects are common erosion mitigation practices. With a more complete understanding of coastal morphology, the efficacy and consequences of anthropogenic activities could be better predicted. Currently, the research on coastal landscape evolution is focused on waves and storm surge, while only limited effort is devoted to understanding aeolian forces. Aeolian transport occurs when the wind supplies a shear stress that exceeds a critical value, consequently ejecting sand grains into the air. If the grains are too heavy to be suspended, they fall back to the grain bed where the collision ejects more grains. This is called saltation and is the salient process by which sand mass is transported. The shear stress required to dislodge grains is related to turbulent air speed. Subsequently, as sand mass is injected into the air, the wind loses speed along with its ability to eject more grains. In this way, the flux of saltating grains is itself influenced by the flux of saltating grains and aeolian transport becomes nonlinear. Aeolian sediment transport is difficult to study experimentally for reasons arising from the orders of magnitude difference between grain size and dune size. It is difficult to study theoretically because aeolian transport is highly nonlinear especially over complex landscapes. Current computational approaches have limitations as well; single grain models are mathematically simple but are computationally intractable even with modern computing power whereas cellular automota-based approaches are computationally efficient

  1. Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

    2009-04-01

    Fluid-rock interaction (or water-rock interaction, as it was more commonly known) is a subject that has evolved considerably in its scope over the years. Initially its focus was primarily on interactions between subsurface fluids of various temperatures and mostly crystalline rocks, but the scope has broadened now to include fluid interaction with all forms of subsurface materials, whether they are unconsolidated or crystalline ('fluid-solid interaction' is perhaps less euphonious). Disciplines that previously carried their own distinct names, for example, basin diagenesis, early diagenesis, metamorphic petrology, reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, are now considered to fall under the broader rubric of fluid-rock interaction, although certainly some of the key research questions differ depending on the environment considered. Beyond the broadening of the environments considered in the study of fluid-rock interaction, the discipline has evolved in perhaps an even more important way. The study of water-rock interaction began by focusing on geochemical interactions in the absence of transport processes, although a few notable exceptions exist (Thompson 1959; Weare et al. 1976). Moreover, these analyses began by adopting a primarily thermodynamic approach, with the implicit or explicit assumption of equilibrium between the fluid and rock. As a result, these early models were fundamentally static rather than dynamic in nature. This all changed with the seminal papers by Helgeson and his co-workers (Helgeson 1968; Helgeson et al. 1969) wherein the concept of an irreversible reaction path was formally introduced into the geochemical literature. In addition to treating the reaction network as a dynamically evolving system, the Helgeson studies introduced an approach that allowed for the consideration of a multicomponent geochemical system, with multiple minerals and species appearing as both reactants and products, at least one of which could be

  2. The evolution of water transport in plants: an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Pittermann, J

    2010-03-01

    This review examines the evolution of the plant vascular system from its beginnings in the green algae to modern arborescent plants, highlighting the recent advances in developmental, organismal, geochemical and climatological research that have contributed to our understanding of the evolution of xylem. Hydraulic trade-offs in vascular structure-function are discussed in the context of canopy support and drought and freeze-thaw stress resistance. This qualitative and quantitative neontological approach to palaeobotany may be useful for interpreting the water-transport efficiencies and hydraulic limits in fossil plants. Large variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are recorded in leaf stomatal densities, and may have had profound impacts on the water conservation strategies of ancient plants. A hypothesis that links vascular function with stomatal density is presented and examined in the context of the evolution of wood and/or vessels. A discussion of the broader impacts of plant transport on hydrology and climate concludes this review.

  3. An alternative approach to charge transport in semiconducting electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomchick, J.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    The excess-carrier charge transport through the space-charge region of a semiconducting electrode is analyzed by a technique known as the flux method. In this approach reflection and transmission coefficients appropriate for a sheet of uniform semiconducting material describe its transport properties. A review is presented of the flux method showing that the results for a semiconductor electrode reduce in a limiting case to those previously found by Gaertner if the depletion layer is treated as a perfectly transmitting medium in which scattering and recombination are ignored. Then, in the framework of the flux method the depletion layer is considered more realistically by explicitly taking into account scattering and recombination processes which occur in this region.

  4. Reactive Gas transport in soil: Kinetics versus Local Equilibrium Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Jia, Ruijan

    2010-05-01

    Gas transport through the unsaturated soil zone was studied using an analytical solution of the gas transport model that is mathematically equivalent to the Two-Region model. The gas transport model includes diffusive and convective gas fluxes, interphase mass transfer between the gas and water phase, and biodegradation. The influence of non-equilibrium phenomena, spatially variable initial conditions, and transient boundary conditions are studied. The objective of this paper is to compare the kinetic approach for interphase mass transfer with the standard local equilibrium approach and to find conditions and time-scales under which the local equilibrium approach is justified. The time-scale of investigation was limited to the day-scale, because this is the relevant scale for understanding gas emission from the soil zone with transient water saturation. For the first time a generalized mass transfer coefficient is proposed that justifies the often used steady-state Thin-Film mass transfer coefficient for small and medium water-saturated aggregates of about 10 mm. The main conclusion from this study is that non-equilibrium mass transfer depends strongly on the temporal and small-scale spatial distribution of water within the unsaturated soil zone. For regions with low water saturation and small water-saturated aggregates (radius about 1 mm) the local equilibrium approach can be used as a first approximation for diffusive gas transport. For higher water saturation and medium radii of water-saturated aggregates (radius about 10 mm) and for convective gas transport, the non-equilibrium effect becomes more and more important if the hydraulic residence time and the Damköhler number decrease. Relative errors can range up to 100% and more. While for medium radii the local equilibrium approach describes the main features both of the spatial concentration profile and the time-dependence of the emission rate, it fails completely for larger aggregates (radius about 100 mm

  5. Approach to an Affordable and Sustainable Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCleskey, Caey M.; Rhodes, R. E.; Robinson, J. W.; Henderson, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an approach and a general procedure for creating space transportation architectural concepts that are at once affordable and sustainable. Previous papers by the authors and other members of the Space Propulsion Synergy Team (SPST) focused on a functional system breakdown structure for an architecture and definition of high-payoff design techniques with a technology integration strategy. This paper follows up by using a structured process that derives architectural solutions focused on achieving life cycle affordability and sustainability. Further, the paper includes an example concept that integrates key design techniques discussed in previous papers. !

  6. A transport level approach for TCP to support differentiated services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Yong-Ju; Tao, Yang; Xu, Chang-Biao

    2004-04-01

    Recently, there is an increasing interests in providing differentiated services in Internet. However, research efforts have almost exclusively focused on routers by improving their policies of packet scheduling and queue management. There has been much less work on transport level approaches to support differentiated services. The mechanism presented by Chang-Biao Xu, DSAS-TCP and MulTCP are the only pieces of the works in this direction known to the authors. Up to now, there is no paper to discuss the interrelation between these mechanisms. Regarding throughput as TCP criteria to support proportional-differentiated-services (PDS), this paper deeply explores the variants of AIMD(a,b)-based TCP congestion control and their effect on differentiated services, and presents a transport level approach for TCP to support PDS, namely PDS_TCP which can be obtained by introducing weighted factor to a or b of AIMD(a,b)-based TCP congestion control. PDS_TCP also takes into account the influence of slow start for timeout. From the analysis, this paper draws the conclusion that the existing mechanisms are only variants of PDS_TCP. For the example of PDS_TCP, the principles, implementation and simulation results of PDS_a_TCP are discussed in detail. The theory analysis and simulation results show that the proposed mechanism PDS_TCP can be implemented with lower additional overheads and support controlled PDS very well without the loss of flexibility.

  7. Approach to an Affordable and Productive Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCleskey, Carey M.; Rhodes, Russel E.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Henderson, Edward M.; Robinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an approach for creating space transportation architectures that are affordable, productive, and sustainable. The architectural scope includes both flight and ground system elements, and focuses on their compatibility to achieve a technical solution that is operationally productive, and also affordable throughout its life cycle. Previous papers by the authors and other members of the Space Propulsion Synergy Team (SPST) focused on space flight system engineering methods, along with operationally efficient propulsion system concepts and technologies. This paper follows up previous work by using a structured process to derive examples of conceptual architectures that integrate a number of advanced concepts and technologies. The examples are not intended to provide a near-term alternative architecture to displace current near-term design and development activity. Rather, the examples demonstrate an approach that promotes early investments in advanced system concept studies and trades (flight and ground), as well as in advanced technologies with the goal of enabling highly affordable, productive flight and ground space transportation systems.

  8. Radiogenic isotopic approaches for quantifying radionuclide transport (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, K.; Depaolo, D. J.; Singleton, M. J.; Christensen, J. N.; Conrad, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    Naturally occurring variations in the isotopic compositions of U and Sr provide unique opportunities for assessing the fate and transport of radionuclides at field-scale conditions. When coupled with reactive transport models, U and Sr isotopes may also provide additional constraints on the rates of sediment-fluid or sediment-waste interactions. Such isotopic approaches can be useful for sites where subsurface characterization is complicated by a lack of accessibility or the presence of substantial heterogeneity. In addition, a variety of quantitative modeling approaches of different complexity can be used to evaluate experimentally determined parameters for radionuclide mobility at the field-scale. At the Hanford Site in eastern Washington, 87Sr/86Sr and 234U/238U ratios have been used to quantify the residence time of Sr and U in the unsaturated zone, the long-term background infiltration rate through the unsaturated zone, and to assess the influence of enhanced wastewater discharge on the regional unconfined aquifer. As a result of different processing techniques or due to interactions between caustic waste and the natural sediment, waste plumes may also inherit isotopic fingerprints (e.g. 234U/238U, 235U/238U, 236U/238U; δ15N & δ18O of nitrate) that can be used to resolve multiple sources of contamination. Finally, enriched isotopic tracers can be applied to experimental manipulations to assess the retardation of a variety of contaminants. Collectively this isotopic data contributes unique perspectives on both the hydrologic conditions across the site and the mobility of key radionuclides. Predicting the long-term fate and transport of radionuclides in the environment is often challenging due to natural heterogeneity and incomplete characterization of the subsurface, however detailed analysis of isotopic variations can provide one additional means of characterizing the subsurface.

  9. Search for Higgs boson off-shell production in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV and derivation of constraints on its total decay width

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2016-09-09

    A search is presented for the Higgs boson off-shell production in gluon fusion and vector boson fusion processes with the Higgs boson decaying into a WW pair and the W bosons decaying leptonically. The data observed in this analysis are used to constrain the Higgs boson total decay width. The analysis is based on the data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.9 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.4 inverse femtobarns at 8 TeV, respectively. An observed (expected) upper limit on the off-shell Higgs boson event yield normalisedmore » to the standard model prediction of 2.4 (6.2) is obtained at the 95% CL for the gluon fusion process and of 19.3 (34.4) for the vector boson fusion process. Observed and expected limits on the total width of 26 and 66 MeV are found, respectively, at the 95% confidence level (CL). These limits are combined with the previous result in the ZZ channel leading to observed and expected 95% CL upper limits on the width of 13 and 26 MeV, respectively.« less

  10. Search for Higgs boson off-shell production in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV and derivation of constraints on its total decay width

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; El Sawy, M.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Faltermann, N.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall’Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell’Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D’imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. 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F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O’Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y. -J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; SalfeldNebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. -J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-09-09

    A search is presented for the Higgs boson off-shell production in gluon fusion and vector boson fusion processes with the Higgs boson decaying into a WW pair and the W bosons decaying leptonically. The data observed in this analysis are used to constrain the Higgs boson total decay width. The analysis is based on the data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.9 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.4 inverse femtobarns at 8 TeV, respectively. An observed (expected) upper limit on the off-shell Higgs boson event yield normalised to the standard model prediction of 2.4 (6.2) is obtained at the 95% CL for the gluon fusion process and of 19.3 (34.4) for the vector boson fusion process. Observed and expected limits on the total width of 26 and 66 MeV are found, respectively, at the 95% confidence level (CL). These limits are combined with the previous result in the ZZ channel leading to observed and expected 95% CL upper limits on the width of 13 and 26 MeV, respectively.

  11. Search for Higgs boson off-shell production in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV and derivation of constraints on its total decay width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. 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M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. 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R.; Dreyer, T.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Filipovic, N.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Jain, Sa.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. 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P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; McBrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Rupprecht, N.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. T.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.

    2016-09-01

    A search is presented for the Higgs boson off-shell production in gluon fusion and vector boson fusion processes with the Higgs boson decaying into a W+W- pair and the W bosons decaying leptonically. The data observed in this analysis are used to constrain the Higgs boson total decay width. The analysis is based on the data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.9 fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.4 fb-1 at 8 TeV, respectively. An observed (expected) upper limit on the off-shell Higgs boson event yield normalised to the standard model prediction of 2.4 (6.2) is obtained at the 95% CL for the gluon fusion process and of 19.3 (34.4) for the vector boson fusion process. Observed and expected limits on the total width of 26 and 66 MeV are found, respectively, at the 95% confidence level (CL). These limits are combined with the previous result in the ZZ channel leading to observed and expected 95% CL upper limits on the width of 13 and 26 MeV, respectively. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. An approach to improving transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Jianxin; Mei, Deqing Yang, Keji; Fan, Zongwei

    2014-08-14

    In existing ultrasonic transportation methods, the long-range transportation of micro-particles is always realized in step-by-step way. Due to the substantial decrease of the driving force in each step, the transportation is lower-speed and stair-stepping. To improve the transporting velocity, a non-stepping ultrasonic transportation approach is proposed. By quantitatively analyzing the acoustic potential well, an optimal region is defined as the position, where the largest driving force is provided under the condition that the driving force is simultaneously the major component of an acoustic radiation force. To keep the micro-particle trapped in the optimal region during the whole transportation process, an approach of optimizing the phase-shifting velocity and phase-shifting step is adopted. Due to the stable and large driving force, the displacement of the micro-particle is an approximately linear function of time, instead of a stair-stepping function of time as in the existing step-by-step methods. An experimental setup is also developed to validate this approach. Long-range ultrasonic transportations of zirconium beads with high transporting velocity were realized. The experimental results demonstrated that this approach is an effective way to improve transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles.

  13. A Linear Systems Approach to Segmented Watershed Contaminant Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleton, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) employs simulation models to estimate concentrations of pesticide residues in surface waters for risk assessment. These models have historically been used to simulate runoff loadings from homogeneous landscapes to isolated, well-mixed lentic systems that generically represent vulnerable waters. Recent efforts to refine this approach in terms of realism and geographic specificity have focused on enhancing the level of detail of the landscape representation, rather than that of receiving water hydrology. Linear systems theory and transfer function based approaches have been applied by various investigators to the representation of contaminant leaching through soils, and to surface water hydrology (e.g., unit hydrographs), but rarely to contaminant transport either within surface waters, or through multi-compartment systems such as stream networks. This poster describes a straightforward approach to simulating watersheds as segmented into collections of linked water bodies. The approach employs convolution integrals, impulse response functions, and the Discrete Fourier Transform to propagate concentration time series from upstream to downstream locations. Given knowledge only of estimated mean stream residence times, with appropriately-scaled segmentations of catchments, realistic representations of concentration dynamics are shown to be achievable. These representations are based upon high-frequency atrazine monitoring data sets collected over common time periods from upstream and downstream locations within the same small watersheds. Simulated concentrations are shown to match measured concentrations well in both the temporal and spectral domains without the need for calibration, and despite inherent simplifying assumptions such as steady flow. The approach may have utility for enhancing surface water hydrologic representation in contaminant modeling used for regulatory purposes.

  14. Filtered density function approach for reactive transport in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciu, Nicolae; Schüler, Lennart; Attinger, Sabine; Knabner, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Spatial filtering may be used in coarse-grained simulations (CGS) of reactive transport in groundwater, similar to the large eddy simulations (LES) in turbulence. The filtered density function (FDF), stochastically equivalent to a probability density function (PDF), provides a statistical description of the sub-grid, unresolved, variability of the concentration field. Besides closing the chemical source terms in the transport equation for the mean concentration, like in LES-FDF methods, the CGS-FDF approach aims at quantifying the uncertainty over the whole hierarchy of heterogeneity scales exhibited by natural porous media. Practically, that means estimating concentration PDFs on coarse grids, at affordable computational costs. To cope with the high dimensionality of the problem in case of multi-component reactive transport and to reduce the numerical diffusion, FDF equations are solved by particle methods. But, while trajectories of computational particles are modeled as stochastic processes indexed by time, the concentration's heterogeneity is modeled as a random field, with multi-dimensional, spatio-temporal sets of indices. To overcome this conceptual inconsistency, we consider FDFs/PDFs of random species concentrations weighted by conserved scalars and we show that their evolution equations can be formulated as Fokker-Planck equations describing stochastically equivalent processes in concentration-position spaces. Numerical solutions can then be approximated by the density in the concentration-position space of an ensemble of computational particles governed by the associated Itô equations. Instead of sequential particle methods we use a global random walk (GRW) algorithm, which is stable, free of numerical diffusion, and practically insensitive to the increase of the number of particles. We illustrate the general FDF approach and the GRW numerical solution for a reduced complexity problem consisting of the transport of a single scalar in groundwater

  15. An approach for economic analysis of intermodal transportation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bahri; Yilmaz, Huseyin; Ust, Yasin; Guneri, Ali Fuat; Gulsun, Bahadir; Turan, Eda

    2014-01-01

    A different intermodal transportation model based on cost analysis considering technical, economical, and operational parameters is presented. The model consists of such intermodal modes as sea-road, sea-railway, road-railway, and multimode of sea-road-railway. A case study of cargo transportation has been carried out by using the suggested model. Then, the single road transportation mode has been compared to intermodal modes in terms of transportation costs. This comparison takes into account the external costs of intermodal transportation. The research reveals that, in the short distance transportation, single transportation modes always tend to be advantageous. As the transportation distance gets longer, intermodal transportation advantages begin to be effective on the costs. In addition, the proposed method in this study leads to determining the fleet size and capacity for transportation and the appropriate transportation mode.

  16. An Approach for Economic Analysis of Intermodal Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Bahri; Ust, Yasin; Guneri, Ali Fuat; Gulsun, Bahadir; Turan, Eda

    2014-01-01

    A different intermodal transportation model based on cost analysis considering technical, economical, and operational parameters is presented. The model consists of such intermodal modes as sea-road, sea-railway, road-railway, and multimode of sea-road-railway. A case study of cargo transportation has been carried out by using the suggested model. Then, the single road transportation mode has been compared to intermodal modes in terms of transportation costs. This comparison takes into account the external costs of intermodal transportation. The research reveals that, in the short distance transportation, single transportation modes always tend to be advantageous. As the transportation distance gets longer, intermodal transportation advantages begin to be effective on the costs. In addition, the proposed method in this study leads to determining the fleet size and capacity for transportation and the appropriate transportation mode. PMID:25152919

  17. An optimal transportation approach for nuclear structure-based pathology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Ozolek, John A.; Slepčev, Dejan; Lee, Ann B.; Chen, Cheng; Rohde, Gustavo K.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear morphology and structure as visualized from histopathology microscopy images can yield important diagnostic clues in some benign and malignant tissue lesions. Precise quantitative information about nuclear structure and morphology, however, is currently not available for many diagnostic challenges. This is due, in part, to the lack of methods to quantify these differences from image data. We describe a method to characterize and contrast the distribution of nuclear structure in different tissue classes (normal, benign, cancer, etc.). The approach is based on quantifying chromatin morphology in different groups of cells using the optimal transportation (Kantorovich-Wasserstein) metric in combination with the Fisher discriminant analysis and multidimensional scaling techniques. We show that the optimal transportation metric is able to measure relevant biological information as it enables automatic determination of the class (e.g. normal vs. cancer) of a set of nuclei. We show that the classification accuracies obtained using this metric are, on average, as good or better than those obtained utilizing a set of previously described numerical features. We apply our methods to two diagnostic challenges for surgical pathology: one in the liver and one in the thyroid. Results automatically computed using this technique show potentially biologically relevant differences in nuclear structure in liver and thyroid cancers. PMID:20977984

  18. Vertical transport by convective clouds: Comparisons of three modeling approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Rood, Richard B.; Mcnamara, Donna P.; Molod, Andrea M.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary comparison of the GEOS-1 (Goddard Earth Observing System) data assimilation system convective cloud mass fluxes with fluxes from a cloud-resolving model (the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model, GCE) is reported. A squall line case study (10-11 June 1985 Oklahoma PRESTORM episode) is the basis of the comparison. Regional (central U. S.) monthly total convective mass flux for June 1985 from GEOS-1 compares favorably with estimates from a statistical/dynamical approach using GCE simulations and satellite-derived cloud observations. The GEOS-1 convective mass fluxes produce reasonable estimates of monthly-averaged regional convective venting of CO from the boundary layer at least in an urban-influenced continental region, suggesting that they can be used in tracer transport simulations.

  19. Random walk approach for dispersive transport in pipe networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sämann, Robert; Graf, Thomas; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Keywords: particle transport, random walk, pipe, network, HYSTEM-EXTAN, OpenGeoSys After heavy pluvial events in urban areas the available drainage system may be undersized at peak flows (Fuchs, 2013). Consequently, rainwater in the pipe network is likely to spill out through manholes. The presence of hazardous contaminants in the pipe drainage system represents a potential risk to humans especially when the contaminated drainage water reaches the land surface. Real-time forecasting of contaminants in the drainage system needs a quick calculation. Numerical models to predict the fate of contaminants are usually based on finite volume methods. Those are not applicable here because of their volume averaging elements. Thus, a more efficient method is preferable, which is independent from spatial discretization. In the present study, a particle-based method is chosen to calculate transport paths and spatial distribution of contaminants within a pipe network. A random walk method for particles in turbulent flow in partially filled pipes has been developed. Different approaches for in-pipe-mixing and node-mixing with respect to the geometry in a drainage network are shown. A comparison of dispersive behavior and calculation time is given to find the fastest model. The HYSTEM-EXTRAN (itwh, 2002) model is used to provide hydrodynamic conditions in the pipe network according to surface runoff scenarios in order to real-time predict contaminant transport in an urban pipe network system. The newly developed particle-based model will later be coupled to the subsurface flow model OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012). References: Fuchs, L. (2013). Gefährdungsanalyse zur Überflutungsvorsorge kommunaler Entwässerungssysteme. Sanierung und Anpassung von Entwässerungssystemen-Alternde Infrastruktur und Klimawandel, Österreichischer Wasser-und Abfallwirtschaftsverband, Wien, ISBN, 978-3. itwh (2002). Modellbeschreibung, Institut für technisch-wissenschaftliche Hydrologie Gmb

  20. Neutral solute transport across osteochondral interface: A finite element approach.

    PubMed

    Arbabi, Vahid; Pouran, Behdad; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-12-08

    Investigation of the solute transfer across articular cartilage and subchondral bone plate could nurture the understanding of the mechanisms of osteoarthritis (OA) progression. In the current study, we approached the transport of neutral solutes in human (slight OA) and equine (healthy) samples using both computed tomography and biphasic-solute finite element modeling. We developed a multi-zone biphasic-solute finite element model (FEM) accounting for the inhomogeneity of articular cartilage (superficial, middle and deep zones) and subchondral bone plate. Fitting the FEM model to the concentration-time curves of the cartilage and the equilibrium concentration of the subchondral plate/calcified cartilage enabled determination of the diffusion coefficients in the superficial, middle and deep zones of cartilage and subchondral plate. We found slightly higher diffusion coefficients for all zones in the human samples as compared to the equine samples. Generally the diffusion coefficient in the superficial zone of human samples was about 3-fold higher than the middle zone, the diffusion coefficient of the middle zone was 1.5-fold higher than that of the deep zone, and the diffusion coefficient of the deep zone was 1.5-fold higher than that of the subchondral plate/calcified cartilage. Those ratios for equine samples were 9, 2 and 1.5, respectively. Regardless of the species considered, there is a gradual decrease of the diffusion coefficient as one approaches the subchondral plate, whereas the rate of decrease is dependent on the type of species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Systems Approach to Scalable Transportation Network Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2006-01-01

    Emerging needs in transportation network modeling and simulation are raising new challenges with respect to scal-ability of network size and vehicular traffic intensity, speed of simulation for simulation-based optimization, and fidel-ity of vehicular behavior for accurate capture of event phe-nomena. Parallel execution is warranted to sustain the re-quired detail, size and speed. However, few parallel simulators exist for such applications, partly due to the challenges underlying their development. Moreover, many simulators are based on time-stepped models, which can be computationally inefficient for the purposes of modeling evacuation traffic. Here an approach is presented to de-signing a simulator with memory and speed efficiency as the goals from the outset, and, specifically, scalability via parallel execution. The design makes use of discrete event modeling techniques as well as parallel simulation meth-ods. Our simulator, called SCATTER, is being developed, incorporating such design considerations. Preliminary per-formance results are presented on benchmark road net-works, showing scalability to one million vehicles simu-lated on one processor.

  2. Luttinger-field approach to thermoelectric transport in nanoscale conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eich, F. G.; Principi, A.; Di Ventra, M.; Vignale, G.

    2014-09-01

    Thermoelectric transport in nanoscale conductors is analyzed in terms of the response of the system to a thermomechanical field, first introduced by Luttinger, which couples to the electronic energy density. While in this approach, the temperature remains spatially uniform, we show that a spatially varying thermomechanical field effectively simulates a temperature gradient across the system and allows us to calculate the electric and thermal currents that flow due to the thermomechanical field. In particular, we show that in the long-time limit, the currents thus calculated reduce to those that one obtains from the Landauer-Büttiker formula, suitably generalized to allow for different temperatures in the reservoirs, if the thermomechanical field is applied to prepare the system, and subsequently turned off at t =0. Alternatively, we can drive the system out of equilibrium by switching the thermomechanical field after the initial preparation. We compare these two scenarios, employing a model noninteracting Hamiltonian, in the linear regime, in which they coincide, and in the nonlinear regime, in which they show marked differences. We also show how an operationally defined local effective temperature can be computed within this formalism.

  3. Biomembranes. Part M. Transport in bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts: General approaches and transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, S.; Fleischer, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains three sections, each consisting of several papers. Some of the paper titles are: Voltammetric Measurement of Quinones; Use of lac Gene Fusions to Study Transport Proteins; Methods for Mutagenesis of the Bacterioopsin Gene; Transport in Mycoplasmas; Alanine Carrier from Thermophilic Bacteria; and Measurement of Citrate Transport in Tumor Mitochondria.

  4. Master equation approach to transient quantum transport in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pei-Yun; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2017-08-01

    In this review article, we present a non-equilibrium quantum transport theory for transient electron dynamics in nanodevices based on exact Master equation derived with the path integral method in the fermion coherent-state representation. Applying the exact Master equation to nanodevices, we also establish the connection of the reduced density matrix and the transient quantum transport current with the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green functions. The theory enables us to study transient quantum transport in nanostructures with back-reaction effects from the contacts, with non-Markovian dissipation and decoherence being fully taken into account. In applications, we utilize the theory to specific quantum transport systems, a variety of quantum decoherence and quantum transport phenomena involving the non-Markovian memory effect are investigated in both transient and stationary scenarios at arbitrary initial temperatures of the contacts.

  5. A Systems Approach to Developing an Affordable Space Ground Transportation Architecture using a Commonality Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Jerry L.; McCleskey, Carey M.; Bollo, Timothy R.; Rhodes, Russel E.; Robinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a structured approach for achieving a compatible Ground System (GS) and Flight System (FS) architecture that is affordable, productive and sustainable. This paper is an extension of the paper titled "Approach to an Affordable and Productive Space Transportation System" by McCleskey et al. This paper integrates systems engineering concepts and operationally efficient propulsion system concepts into a structured framework for achieving GS and FS compatibility in the mid-term and long-term time frames. It also presents a functional and quantitative relationship for assessing system compatibility called the Architecture Complexity Index (ACI). This paper: (1) focuses on systems engineering fundamentals as it applies to improving GS and FS compatibility; (2) establishes mid-term and long-term spaceport goals; (3) presents an overview of transitioning a spaceport to an airport model; (4) establishes a framework for defining a ground system architecture; (5) presents the ACI concept; (6) demonstrates the approach by presenting a comparison of different GS architectures; and (7) presents a discussion on the benefits of using this approach with a focus on commonality.

  6. The Cooperative Organization And Rural Passenger Transportation: An Approach to Community Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stommes, Eileen S.

    The need for passenger transportation is widely recognized by rural communities. Shrinking federal funding has led many communities and human service agencies to experiment with innovative approaches to provide transportation services. One such approach is the use of cooperative organizations to provide needed services. A study conducted by the…

  7. The Cooperative Organization And Rural Passenger Transportation: An Approach to Community Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stommes, Eileen S.

    The need for passenger transportation is widely recognized by rural communities. Shrinking federal funding has led many communities and human service agencies to experiment with innovative approaches to provide transportation services. One such approach is the use of cooperative organizations to provide needed services. A study conducted by the…

  8. Integrating Stable Isotope - Reactive Transport Model Approach for Assessment of Chlorinated Solvent Degradation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    FINAL REPORT Integrated Stable Isotope – Reactive Transport Model Approach for Assessment of Chlorinated Solvent Degradation ESTCP Project... Chlorinated Solvent Degradation 5b. GRANT NUMBER ER-201029 Final Report 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kuder, Tomasz; Philp, Richard, P...of ESTCP Project ER-201029 Integrated Stable Isotope – Reactive Transport Model Approach for Assessment of Chlorinated Solvent Degradation. The

  9. A multi-resolution approach for optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Angenent, Sigurd; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-09-01

    Optimal mass transport is an important technique with numerous applications in econometrics, fluid dynamics, automatic control, statistical physics, shape optimization, expert systems, and meteorology. Motivated by certain problems in image registration and medical image visualization, in this note, we describe a simple gradient descent methodology for computing the optimal L2 transport mapping which may be easily implemented using a multiresolution scheme. We also indicate how the optimal transport map may be computed on the sphere. A numerical example is presented illustrating our ideas.

  10. Modelling aeolian sand transport using a dynamic mass balancing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayaud, Jerome R.; Bailey, Richard M.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Weaver, Corinne M.

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. Whilst many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing field evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. At this scale of analysis, inertia in the saltation system causes changes in sediment transport to lag behind de/accelerations in flow. However, saltation inertia has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study, we present a new transport model that dynamically balances the sand mass being transported in the wind flow. The 'dynamic mass balance' (DMB) model we present accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) component of wind flow, as saltation is most strongly associated with the positive u component of the wind. The performance of the DMB model is tested by fitting it to two field-derived (Namibia's Skeleton Coast) datasets of wind velocity and sediment transport: (i) a 10-min (10 Hz measurement resolution) dataset; (ii) a 2-h (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset. The DMB model is shown to outperform two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (e.g. Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003), when predicting sand transport over the two experiments. For all measurement averaging intervals presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the DMB model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.48%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The DMB model also produced more realistic (less 'peaky') time series of sand flux than the other two models, and a more accurate distribution of sand flux data. The best predictions of total sand transport are achieved using

  11. Transport properties evolution of cement model system under degradation - Incorporation of a pore-scale approach into reactive transport modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seigneur, N.; L'Hôpital, E.; Dauzères, A.; Sammaljärvi, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Labeau, P. E.; Dubus, A.; Detilleux, V.

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes a multi-scale approach for the modelling of the degradation of model cement pastes using reactive transport. It specifically aims at incorporating chemistry-transport feedback results from a pore-scale approach into a continuum description. Starting from a numerical representative elementary volume of the model cement paste, which was built according to extensive experimental dedicated chacarterizations, this paper provides three separate descriptions of two different degradations: leaching and carbonation. First, 2D pore-scale simulations are performed and predict degradation depths in very good agreement with experiments. Second, 3D pore scale descriptions of how the microstructre evolves provides accurate description of the evolution of transport properties through degradation. Finally, those latter results are incorporated as a feedback law between porosity and effective diffusion coefficient into a 1D continuum approach of reactive transport. This paper provides pore-scale explanations of why reactive transport modelling has encountered mitigated success when applied to cementitious materials, especially during carbonation or degradations consisting of precipitation reactions. In addition to that, different degradation modellings are in very good agreement with experimental observations.

  12. A Computational Approach to Estimate Interorgan Metabolic Transport in a Mammal

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiao; Geffers, Lars; Eichele, Gregor; Yan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In multicellular organisms metabolism is distributed across different organs, each of which has specific requirements to perform its own specialized task. But different organs also have to support the metabolic homeostasis of the organism as a whole by interorgan metabolite transport. Recent studies have successfully reconstructed global metabolic networks in tissues and cell types and attempts have been made to connect organs with interorgan metabolite transport. Instead of these complicated approaches to reconstruct global metabolic networks, we proposed in this study a novel approach to study interorgan metabolite transport focusing on transport processes mediated by solute carrier (Slc) transporters and their couplings to cognate enzymatic reactions. We developed a computational approach to identify and score potential interorgan metabolite transports based on the integration of metabolism and transports in different organs in the adult mouse from quantitative gene expression data. This allowed us to computationally estimate the connectivity between 17 mouse organs via metabolite transport. Finally, by applying our method to circadian metabolism, we showed that our approach can shed new light on the current understanding of interorgan metabolite transport at a whole-body level in mammals. PMID:24971892

  13. Wilsonian RG-flow approach to holographic transport with momentum dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yu; Ge, Xian-Hui; Wu, Shao-Feng

    2017-08-01

    We systematically present a new approach for studying the coupled linear transport of holographic systems. In this approach, the set of equations for the linear perturbations can be reduced to a first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equation expressed as the radial (renormalization group) flow equation of the transport matrices. As an important application, we use this approach to compute the dc and ac conductivities of a holographic model with momentum dissipation, which can be easily read off from the nonlinear flow equations. This method also works for transport in the presence of an external magnetic field.

  14. Mobile transporter path planning using a genetic algorithm approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1988-01-01

    The use of an optimization technique known as a genetic algorithm for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the Space Station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Specific elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research. However, trajectory planning problems are common in space systems and the genetic algorithm provides an attractive alternative to the classical techniques used to solve these problems.

  15. A new approach to canal surface with parallel transport frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiṣi, Ilim; Öztürk, Günay

    In the present study, we attend to the canal surfaces with the spine curve γ according to the parallel transport frame in Euclidean 4-space 𝔼4. We give an example of these surfaces and obtain some results about curvature conditions in 𝔼4. Moreover, the visualizations of projections of canal surfaces are presented. Lastly, we give the necessary and sufficient conditions for canal surfaces to become weak superconformal.

  16. Transport properties of polymer solutions. A comparative approach.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, K R; Cheever, E; Leonard, J B; Blum, F D

    1984-01-01

    A variety of transport properties have been measured for solutions of the water soluble polymer poly(ethylene oxide)(PEO) with molecular weights ranging from 200 to 14,000, and volume fractions ranging from 0-80%. The transport properties are thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity at audio frequencies (in solutions containing dilute electrolyte), and water self-diffusion. These data, together with dielectric relaxation data previously reported, are amenable to analysis by the same mixture theory. The ionic conductivity and water self-diffusion coefficient, but not the thermal conductivity, are substantially smaller than predicted by the Maxwell and Hanai mixture relations, calculated using the known transport properties of pure liquid water. A 25% (by volume) solution of PEO exhibits an average dielectric relaxation frequency of the suspending water of one half that of pure water, with clear evidence of a distribution of relaxation times present. The limits of the cumulative distribution of dielectric relaxation times that are consistent with the data are obtained using a linear programming technique. The application of simple mixture theory, under appropriate limiting conditions, yields hydration values for the more dilute polymer solutions that are somewhat larger than values obtained from thermodynamic measurements. PMID:6733244

  17. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: an evaluation of the continuum approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Haukwa, Charles B; Ahlers, C Fredrik; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S; Flint, Alan L; Guertal, William B

    2003-01-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock.

  18. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: An evaluation of the continuum approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, H.-H.; Haukwa, C.B.; Ahlers, C.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Flint, A.L.; Guertal, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: An evaluation of the continuum approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Haukwa, Charles B.; Ahlers, C. Fredrik; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Flint, Alan L.; Guertal, William B.

    2002-09-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock.

  20. In vitro and in vivo approaches to characterize transporter-mediated disposition in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bo; Varma, Manthena V; Costales, Chester; Zhang, Hui; Tremaine, Larry

    2014-08-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that transporters play an important role in the absorption, distribution and elimination of many drugs. Different approaches have been developed and validated to understand the interactions between drugs and transporters, and the in vivo role of drug transporters. These tools are helping to understand the impact of transporters on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of drugs and assess the risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in drug discovery and development. This article provides an overview of different approaches to evaluate the drug transporters involved in intestinal absorption, hepatic and renal clearance, and brain penetration. Specifically, it provides the best practices to evaluate the major uptake and efflux transporters in drug discovery. It also discusses the challenges and gaps in understanding the clinical relevance of drug transporters. Quantitative prediction of transporter-mediated clearance, tissue exposure, as well as DDIs is still limited. The current challenge is to develop in vitro-in vivo correlations, extrapolate and integrate data from in vitro transporter assays, and preclinical species into humans to quantitatively predict the impact of transporters on drug absorption, disposition, elimination and DDIs. With the development of a variety of novel tools, the ultimate goal is to use high quality in vitro and in vivo data to establish physiologically based PK models, which will improve the capability to predict PK, tissue exposure and DDIs in humans.

  1. A Human Systems Integration Approach to Energy Efficiency in Ground Transportation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    APPROACH TO ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN GROUND TRANSPORTATION by Keith R. Robison December 2015 Thesis Advisor: Alejandro Hernandez Co-Advisor: Anita Salem...COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A HUMAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION APPROACH TO ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN GROUND TRANSPORTATION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS...operational energy usage 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 89 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY

  2. Integrated Stable Isotope - Reactive Transport Model Approach for Assessment of Chlorinated Solvent Degradation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-16

    FINAL REPORT Integrated Stable Isotope – Reactive Transport Model Approach for Assessment of Chlorinated Solvent Degradation ESTCP Project ER-201029...W912HQ-10-C-0060 Modeling for Assessing Chlorinated Solvent Degradation 5b. GRANT NUMBER ER-201029 Final Report 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...Approach for Assessment of Chlorinated Solvent Degradation. The objective of this guidance is to help site managers apply a Reactive Transport

  3. Transport properties of Fibonacci heterostructures: a nonparabolic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomino-Ovando, M.; Cocoletzi, G. H.

    1998-07-01

    A fourth order hamiltonian is used to explore transport properties of semiconductor Fibonacci heterostructures. The tunneling current and time delay are obtained for different Fibonacci sequences constructed withGaAsandAlxGa1 - xAs. Energy minibands are calculated to study the fractal dimension and critical electronic states in quasi-periodic arrays. Results show that nonparabolic corrections produce changes in the tunneling current, time delay and fractal dimension, and a low voltage shift of the current peaks compared with the parabolic theory. The electronic states preserve their critical nature in the presence of nonparabolic effects.

  4. Quasilinear transport approach to equilibration of quark-gluon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mrowczynski, Stanislaw; Mueller, Berndt

    2010-03-15

    We derive the transport equations of quark-gluon plasma in the quasilinear approximation. The equations are either of the Balescu-Lenard or Fokker-Planck form. The plasma's dynamics is assumed to be governed by longitudinal chromoelectric fields. The isotropic plasma, which is stable, and the two-stream system, which is unstable, are considered in detail. A process of equilibration is briefly discussed in both cases. The peaks of the two-stream distribution are shown to rapidly dissolve in time.

  5. The Monte Carlo approach to transport modeling in deca-nanometer MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiorgi, Enrico; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Esseni, David; Fiegna, Claudio; Selmi, Luca

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we review recent developments of the Monte Carlo approach to the simulation of semi-classical carrier transport in nano-MOSFETs, with particular focus on the inclusion of quantum-mechanical effects in the simulation (using either the multi-subband approach or quantum corrections to the electrostatic potential) and on the numerical stability issues related to the coupling of the transport with the Poisson equation. Selected applications are presented, including the analysis of quasi-ballistic transport, the determination of the RF characteristics of deca-nanometric MOSFETs, and the study of non-conventional device structures and channel materials.

  6. Transport in fractal media: an effective scale-invariant approach.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Coronado, H; Coronado, M; Herrera-Hernandez, E C

    2012-06-01

    In this paper an advective-dispersion equation with scale-dependent coefficients is proposed for describing transport through fractals. This equation is obtained by imposing scale invariance and assuming that the porosity, the dispersion coefficient, and the velocity follow fractional power laws on the scale. The model incorporates the empirically found trends in highly heterogeneous media, regarding the dependence of the dispersivity on the scale and the dispersion coefficient on the velocity. We conclude that the presence of nontrivial fractal parameters produces anomalous dispersion, as expected, and that the presence of convective processes induces a reescalation in the concentration and shifts the tracer velocity to different values with respect to the nonfractal case.

  7. Air pollution exposure: An activity pattern approach for active transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew D.; Yiannakoulias, Nikolaos; Kanaroglou, Pavlos S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the calculation of personal air pollution exposure during trips made by active transportation using activity patterns without personal monitors. We calculate exposure as the inhaled dose of particulate matter 2.5 μg or smaller. Two modes of active transportation are compared, and they include cycling and walking. Ambient conditions are calculated by combining mobile and stationary monitoring data in an artificial neural network space-time model. The model uses a land use regression framework and has a prediction accuracy of R2 = 0.78. Exposure is calculated at 10 m or shorter intervals during the trips using inhalation rates associated with both modes. The trips are children's routes between home and school. The average dose during morning cycling trips was 2.17 μg, during morning walking trips was 3.19 μg, during afternoon cycling trips was 2.19 μg and during afternoon walking trips was 3.23 μg. The cycling trip dose was significantly lower than the walking trip dose. The air pollution exposure during walking or cycling trips could not be strongly predicted by either the school or household ambient conditions, either individually or in combination. Multiple linear regression models regressing both the household and school ambient conditions against the dose were only able to account for, at most, six percent of the variance in the exposure. This paper demonstrates that incorporating activity patterns when calculating exposure can improve the estimate of exposure compared to its calculation from ambient conditions.

  8. Variational approach to extracting the phonon mean free path distribution from the spectral Boltzmann transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiloyan, Vazrik; Zeng, Lingping; Huberman, Samuel; Maznev, Alexei A.; Nelson, Keith A.; Chen, Gang

    2016-04-01

    The phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is a powerful tool for studying nondiffusive thermal transport. Here, we develop a new universal variational approach to solving the BTE that enables extraction of phonon mean free path (MFP) distributions from experiments exploring nondiffusive transport. By utilizing the known Fourier heat conduction solution as a trial function, we present a direct approach to calculating the effective thermal conductivity from the BTE. We demonstrate this technique on the transient thermal grating experiment, which is a useful tool for studying nondiffusive thermal transport and probing the MFP distribution of materials. We obtain a closed form expression for a suppression function that is materials dependent, successfully addressing the nonuniversality of the suppression function used in the past, while providing a general approach to studying thermal properties in the nondiffusive regime.

  9. Dissipative quantum transport in macromolecules: Effective field theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, E.; a Beccara, S.; Faccioli, P.

    2013-08-01

    We introduce an atomistic approach to the dissipative quantum dynamics of charged or neutral excitations propagating through macromolecular systems. Using the Feynman-Vernon path integral formalism, we analytically trace out from the density matrix the atomic coordinates and the heat bath degrees of freedom. This way we obtain an effective field theory which describes the real-time evolution of the quantum excitation and is fully consistent with the fluctuation-dissipation relation. The main advantage of the field-theoretic approach is that it allows us to avoid using the Keldysh contour formulation. This simplification makes it straightforward to derive Feynman diagrams to analytically compute the effects of the interaction of the propagating quantum excitation with the heat bath and with the molecular atomic vibrations. For illustration purposes, we apply this formalism to investigate the loss of quantum coherence of holes propagating through a poly(3-alkylthiophene) polymer.

  10. Linear dynamic system approach to groundwater solute transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    Groundwater pollution in the United States has been recognized in the 1980's to be extensive both in degree and geographic distribution. It has been recognized that in many cases groundwater pollution is essentially irreversible from the engineering or economic viewpoint. Under the best circumstance the problem is complicated by insufficient amounts of field data which is costly to obtain. In general, the governing partial differential equation of solute transport is spatially discretized either using finite difference or finite element scheme. The time derivative is also approximated by finite difference. In this study, only the spatial discretization is performed using finite element method and the time derivative is retained in continuous form. The advantage is that special features of finite element are maintained but most important of all is that the equation can be rearranged to be in a standard form of linear dynamic system. Two problems were studied in detail: one is the determination of the locatio of groundwater pollution source(s). The problem is equivalent to identifying an input to the dynamic system and is solved by using the sensitivity theorem. The other one is the prediction of pollutant concentration at a given time at a given location. The eigenvalue technique was employed to solve this problem and the detailed procedures of the computation were delineated.

  11. Heuristic urban transportation network design method, a multilayer coevolution approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Rui; Ujang, Norsidah; Hamid, Hussain bin; Manan, Mohd Shahrudin Abd; Li, Rong; Wu, Jianjun

    2017-08-01

    The design of urban transportation networks plays a key role in the urban planning process, and the coevolution of urban networks has recently garnered significant attention in literature. However, most of these recent articles are based on networks that are essentially planar. In this research, we propose a heuristic multilayer urban network coevolution model with lower layer network and upper layer network that are associated with growth and stimulate one another. We first use the relative neighbourhood graph and the Gabriel graph to simulate the structure of rail and road networks, respectively. With simulation we find that when a specific number of nodes are added, the total travel cost ratio between an expanded network and the initial lower layer network has the lowest value. The cooperation strength Λ and the changeable parameter average operation speed ratio Θ show that transit users' route choices change dramatically through the coevolution process and that their decisions, in turn, affect the multilayer network structure. We also note that the simulated relation between the Gini coefficient of the betweenness centrality, Θ and Λ have an optimal point for network design. This research could inspire the analysis of urban network topology features and the assessment of urban growth trends.

  12. Topological Hall Effect in Skyrmions: A Nonequilibrium Coherent Transport Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Gen; Zang, Jiadong; Lake, Roger

    2014-03-01

    Skyrmion is a topological spin texture recently observed in many materials with broken inversion symmetry. In experiments, one effective method to detect the skyrmion crystal phase is the topological Hall measurement. At adiabatic approximation, previous theoretical studies show that the Hall signal is provided by an emergent magnetic field, which explains the topological Hall effect in the classical level. Motivated by the potential device application of skyrmions as digital bits, it is important to understand the topological Hall effect in the mesoscopic level, where the electron coherence should be considered. In this talk, we will discuss the quantum aspects of the topological Hall effect on a tight binding setup solved by nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF). The charge distribution, Hall potential distribution, thermal broadening effect and the Hall resistivity are investigated in detail. The relation between the Hall resistance and the DM interaction is investigated. Driven by the spin transferred torque (SST), Skyrmion dynamics is previously studied within the adiabatic approximation. At the quantum transport level, this talk will also discuss the non-adiabatic effect in the skyrmion motion with the presence of the topological Hall effect. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. NSF 1128304 and NSF 1124733. It was also supported in part by FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, an SRC program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  13. Cation Transport in Polymer Electrolytes: A Microscopic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, A.; Heuer, A.

    2007-06-01

    A microscopic theory for cation diffusion in polymer electrolytes is presented. Based on a thorough analysis of molecular dynamics simulations on poly(ethylene) oxide with LiBF4, the mechanisms of cation dynamics are characterized. Cation jumps between polymer chains can be identified as renewal processes. This allows us to obtain an explicit expression for the lithium ion diffusion constant DLi by invoking polymer-specific properties such as the Rouse dynamics. This extends previous phenomenological and numerical approaches. In particular, the chain length dependence of DLi can be predicted and compared with experimental data. This dependence can be fully understood without referring to entanglement effects.

  14. Cation transport in polymer electrolytes: a microscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Maitra, A; Heuer, A

    2007-06-01

    A microscopic theory for cation diffusion in polymer electrolytes is presented. Based on a thorough analysis of molecular dynamics simulations on poly(ethylene) oxide with LiBF4, the mechanisms of cation dynamics are characterized. Cation jumps between polymer chains can be identified as renewal processes. This allows us to obtain an explicit expression for the lithium ion diffusion constant DLi by invoking polymer-specific properties such as the Rouse dynamics. This extends previous phenomenological and numerical approaches. In particular, the chain length dependence of DLi can be predicted and compared with experimental data. This dependence can be fully understood without referring to entanglement effects.

  15. Flight investigation of the roll requirements for transport airplanes in the landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleman, E. C.; Powers, B. G.

    1972-01-01

    An in-flight evaluation of transport roll characteristics in the landing approach was made with a general purpose airborne simulator. The evaluation task consisted of an instrument approach with a visual correction for a (200-foot) lateral offset. Pilot evaluations and ratings were obtained for approaches made at 140 knots and 180 knots indicated airspeed with variations of wheel characteristics, maximum roll rate, and roll time constant.

  16. A continuous linear optimal transport approach for pattern analysis in image datasets

    PubMed Central

    Kolouri, Soheil; Tosun, Akif B.; Ozolek, John A.; Rohde, Gustavo K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new approach to facilitate the application of the optimal transport metric to pattern recognition on image databases. The method is based on a linearized version of the optimal transport metric, which provides a linear embedding for the images. Hence, it enables shape and appearance modeling using linear geometric analysis techniques in the embedded space. In contrast to previous work, we use Monge's formulation of the optimal transport problem, which allows for reasonably fast computation of the linearized optimal transport embedding for large images. We demonstrate the application of the method to recover and visualize meaningful variations in a supervised-learning setting on several image datasets, including chromatin distribution in the nuclei of cells, galaxy morphologies, facial expressions, and bird species identification. We show that the new approach allows for high-resolution construction of modes of variations and discrimination and can enhance classification accuracy in a variety of image discrimination problems. PMID:26858466

  17. Landauer-Büttiker approach for hyperfine mediated electronic transport in the integer quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Aniket; Fauzi, M. H.; Hirayama, Y.; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran

    2017-03-01

    The interplay of spin-polarized electronic edge states with the dynamics of the host nuclei in quantum Hall systems presents rich and nontrivial transport physics. Here, we develop a Landauer-Büttiker approach to understand various experimental features observed in the integer quantum Hall setups featuring quantum point contacts. The approach developed here entails a phenomenological description of spin-resolved interedge scattering induced via hyperfine assisted electron-nuclear spin flip-flop processes. A self-consistent simulation framework between the nuclear spin dynamics and edge state electronic transport is presented in order to gain crucial insights into the dynamic nuclear polarization effects on electronic transport and in turn the electron-spin polarization effects on the nuclear spin dynamics. In particular, we show that the hysteresis noted experimentally in the conductance-voltage trace as well as in the resistively detected NMR line-shape results from a lack of quasiequilibrium between electronic transport and nuclear polarization evolution. In addition, we present circuit models to emulate such hyperfine mediated transport effects to further facilitate a clear understanding of the electronic transport processes occurring around the quantum point contact. Finally, we extend our model to account for the effects of quadrupolar splitting of nuclear levels and also depict the electronic transport signatures that arise from single and multiphoton processes.

  18. Assessing the safety effects of cooperative intelligent transport systems: A bowtie analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Ute Christine; Ryeng, Eirin Olaussen; McCormack, Edward; Khan, Faisal; Ehlers, Sören

    2017-02-01

    The safety effects of cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) are mostly unknown and associated with uncertainties, because these systems represent emerging technology. This study proposes a bowtie analysis as a conceptual framework for evaluating the safety effect of cooperative intelligent transport systems. These seek to prevent road traffic accidents or mitigate their consequences. Under the assumption of the potential occurrence of a particular single vehicle accident, three case studies demonstrate the application of the bowtie analysis approach in road traffic safety. The approach utilizes exemplary expert estimates and knowledge from literature on the probability of the occurrence of accident risk factors and of the success of safety measures. Fuzzy set theory is applied to handle uncertainty in expert knowledge. Based on this approach, a useful tool is developed to estimate the effects of safety-related cooperative intelligent transport systems in terms of the expected change in accident occurrence and consequence probability.

  19. New approach to creation of geometrical module for nuclear reactor neutron transport computer simulation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Poveschenko, T.; Poveschenko, O.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the new approach to creation of geometrical module for nuclear reactor neutron transport computer simulation analysis so called the differential cross method. It is elaborated for detecting boards between physical zones. It is proposed to use GMSH open source mesh editor extended by some features: a special option and a special kind of mesh (cubic background mesh).This method is aimed into Monte Carlo Method as well as for deterministic neutron transport methods. Special attention is attended for reactor core composed of a set of material zones with complicate geometrical boundaries. The idea of this approach is described. In general case method works for 3-D space. Algorithm of creation of the geometrical module is given. 2-D neutron transport benchmark-test for RBMK reactor cluster cell is described. It demonstrates the ability of this approach to provide flexible definition of geometrical meshing with preservation of curved surface or any level of heterogeneity. (authors)

  20. A functional genomics approach to establish the complement of carbohydrate transporters in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bidossi, Alessandro; Mulas, Laura; Decorosi, Francesca; Colomba, Leonarda; Ricci, Susanna; Pozzi, Gianni; Deutscher, Josef; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco Rinaldo

    2012-01-01

    The aerotolerant anaerobe Streptococcus pneumoniae is part of the normal nasopharyngeal microbiota of humans and one of the most important invasive pathogens. A genomic survey allowed establishing the occurrence of twenty-one phosphotransferase systems, seven carbohydrate uptake ABC transporters, one sodium:solute symporter and a permease, underlining an exceptionally high capacity for uptake of carbohydrate substrates. Despite high genomic variability, combined phenotypic and genomic analysis of twenty sequenced strains did assign the substrate specificity only to two uptake systems. Systematic analysis of mutants for most carbohydrate transporters enabled us to assign a phenotype and substrate specificity to twenty-three transport systems. For five putative transporters for galactose, pentoses, ribonucleosides and sulphated glycans activity was inferred, but not experimentally confirmed and only one transport system remains with an unknown substrate and lack of any functional annotation. Using a metabolic approach, 80% of the thirty-two fermentable carbon substrates were assigned to the corresponding transporter. The complexity and robustness of sugar uptake is underlined by the finding that many transporters have multiple substrates, and many sugars are transported by more than one system. The present work permits to draw a functional map of the complete arsenal of carbohydrate utilisation proteins of pneumococci, allows re-annotation of genomic data and might serve as a reference for related species. These data provide tools for specific investigation of the roles of the different carbon substrates on pneumococcal physiology in the host during carriage and invasive infection.

  1. Effect of air turbulence on gas transport in soil; comparison of approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbakhtiar, Alireza; Papadikis, Konstantinos; Poulsen, Tjalfe; Bridge, Jonathan; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2017-04-01

    Greenhouse gases are playing the key role in global warming. Soil is a source of greenhouse gases such as methane (CH4). Radon (Rn) which is a radioactive gas can emit form subsurface into the atmosphere and leads to health concerns in urban areas. Temperature, humidity, air pressure and vegetation of soil can affect gas emissions inside soil (Oertel et al., 2016). It's shown in many cases that wind induced fluctuations is an important factor in transport of gas through soil and other porous media. An example is: landfill gas emissions (Poulsen et al., 2001). We applied an experimental equipment for measuring controlled air turbulence on gas transport in soil in relation to the depth of sample. Two approaches for measurement of effect of wind turbulence on gas transport were applied and compared. Experiments were carried out with diffusion of CO2 and air as tracer gases with average vertical wind speeds of 0 to 0.83 m s-1. In approach A, Six different sample thicknesses from 5 to 30 cm were selected and total of 4 different wind conditions with different speed and fluctuations were applied. In approach B, a sample with constant depth was used. Five oxygen sensors were places inside sample at different depths. Total of 111 experiments were carried out. Gas transport is described by advection-dispersion equation. Gas transport is quantified as a dispersion coefficient. Oxygen breakthrough curves as a function of distance to the surface of the sample exposed to wind were derived numerically with an explicit forward time, central space finite-difference based model to evaluate gas transport. We showed that wind turbulence-induced fluctuations is an important factor in gas transport that can increase gas transport with average of 45 times more than molecular diffusion under zero wind condition. Comparison of two strategies for experiments, indicated that, constant deep samples (Approach B) are more reliable for measurement of gas transport under influence of wind

  2. Novel fluorescence-based approaches for the study of biogenic amine transporter localization, activity, and regulation.

    PubMed

    Mason, J N; Farmer, H; Tomlinson, I D; Schwartz, J W; Savchenko, V; DeFelice, L J; Rosenthal, S J; Blakely, R D

    2005-04-15

    Pre-synaptic norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) transporters (NET and DAT) terminate catecholamine synaptic transmission through reuptake of released neurotransmitter. Recent studies reveal that NET and DAT are tightly regulated by receptor and second messenger-linked signaling pathways. Common approaches for studying these transporters involve use of radiolabeled substrates or antagonists, methods possessing limited spatial resolution and that bear limited opportunities for repeated monitoring of living preparations. To circumvent these issues, we have explored two novel assay platforms that permit temporally resolved quantitation of transport activity and transporter protein localization. To monitor the binding and transport function of NET and DAT in real-time, we have investigated the uptake of the fluorescent organic compound 4-(4-diethylaminostyryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+). We have extended our previous single cell level application of this substrate to monitor transport activity via high-throughput assay platforms. Compared to radiotracer uptake methods, acquisition of ASP+ fluorescence is non-isotopic and allows for continuous, repeated transport measurements on both transfected and native preparations. Secondly, we have extended our application of small-molecule-conjugated fluorescent CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals, or quantum dots (Qdots), to utilize antibody and peptide ligands that can identify surface expressed transporters, receptors and other membrane proteins in living cell systems. Unlike typical organic fluorophores, Qdots are highly resistant to bleaching and can be conjugated to multiple ligands. They can also be illuminated by conventional light sources, yet produce narrow, gaussian emission spectra compatible with multiple target visualization (multiplexing). Together, these approaches offer novel opportunities to investigate changes in transporter function and distribution in real-time with superior spatial and temporal resolution.

  3. Simulating photon-transport in uniform media using the radiative transport equation: a study using the Neumann-series approach

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Masumura, Takahiro; Clarkson, Eric; Maslov, Alexey V.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2014-01-01

    We present the implementation, validation, and performance of a Neumann-series approach for simulating light propagation at optical wavelengths in uniform media using the radiative transport equation (RTE). The RTE is solved for an anisotropic-scattering medium in a spherical harmonic basis for a diffuse-optical-imaging setup. The main objectives of this paper are threefold: to present the theory behind the Neumann-series form for the RTE, to design and develop the mathematical methods and the software to implement the Neumann series for a diffuse-optical-imaging setup, and, finally, to perform an exhaustive study of the accuracy, practical limitations, and computational efficiency of the Neumann-series method. Through our results, we demonstrate that the Neumann-series approach can be used to model light propagation in uniform media with small geometries at optical wavelengths. PMID:23201893

  4. Number-resolved master equation approach to quantum measurement and quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-known Landauer-Büttiker scattering theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function technique for mesoscopic transports, an alternative (and very useful) scheme is quantum master equation approach. In this article, we review the particle-number ( n)-resolved master equation ( n-ME) approach and its systematic applications in quantum measurement and quantum transport problems. The n-ME contains rich dynamical information, allowing efficient study of topics such as shot noise and full counting statistics analysis. Moreover, we also review a newly developed master equation approach (and its n-resolved version) under self-consistent Born approximation. The application potential of this new approach is critically examined via its ability to recover the exact results for noninteracting systems under arbitrary voltage and in presence of strong quantum interference, and the challenging non-equilibrium Kondo effect.

  5. A multiobjective optimization approach to the operation and investment of the national energy and transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanez, Eduardo

    Most U.S. energy usage is for electricity production and vehicle transportation, two interdependent infrastructures. The strength and number of the interdependencies will increase rapidly as hybrid electric transportation systems, including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and hybrid electric trains, become more prominent. There are several new energy supply technologies reaching maturity, accelerated by public concern over global warming. The National Energy and Transportation Planning Tool (NETPLAN) is the implementation of the long-term investment and operation model for the transportation and energy networks. An evolutionary approach with underlying fast linear optimization are in place to determine the solutions with the best investment portfolios in terms of cost, resiliency and sustainability, i.e., the solutions that form the Pareto front. The popular NSGA-II algorithm is used as the base for the multiobjective optimization and metrics are developed for to evaluate the energy and transportation portfolios. An integrating approach to resiliency is presented, allowing the evaluation of high-consequence events, like hurricanes or widespread blackouts. A scheme to parallelize the multiobjective solver is presented, along with a decomposition method for the cost minimization program. The modular and data-driven design of the software is presented. The modeling tool is applied in a numerical example to optimize the national investment in energy and transportation in the next 40 years.

  6. Computational Approaches to Analyze and Predict Small Molecule Transport and Distribution at Cellular and Subcellular Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ah Min, Kyoung; Zhang, Xinyuan; Yu, Jing-yu; Rosania, Gus R.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies and mechanistic mathematical modeling approaches have been independently employed for analyzing and predicting the transport and distribution of small molecule chemical agents in living organisms. Both of these computational approaches have been useful to interpret experiments measuring the transport properties of small molecule chemical agents, in vitro and in vivo. Nevertheless, mechanistic cell-based pharmacokinetic models have been especially useful to guide the design of experiments probing the molecular pathways underlying small molecule transport phenomena. Unlike QSAR models, mechanistic models can be integrated from microscopic to macroscopic levels, to analyze the spatiotemporal dynamics of small molecule chemical agents from intracellular organelles to whole organs, well beyond the experiments and training data sets upon which the models are based. Based on differential equations, mechanistic models can also be integrated with other differential equations-based systems biology models of biochemical networks or signaling pathways. Although the origin and evolution of mathematical modeling approaches aimed at predicting drug transport and distribution has occurred independently from systems biology, we propose that the incorporation of mechanistic cell-based computational models of drug transport and distribution into a systems biology modeling framework is a logical next-step for the advancement of systems pharmacology research. PMID:24218242

  7. Computational approaches to analyse and predict small molecule transport and distribution at cellular and subcellular levels.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Zhang, Xinyuan; Yu, Jing-yu; Rosania, Gus R

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies and mechanistic mathematical modeling approaches have been independently employed for analysing and predicting the transport and distribution of small molecule chemical agents in living organisms. Both of these computational approaches have been useful for interpreting experiments measuring the transport properties of small molecule chemical agents, in vitro and in vivo. Nevertheless, mechanistic cell-based pharmacokinetic models have been especially useful to guide the design of experiments probing the molecular pathways underlying small molecule transport phenomena. Unlike QSAR models, mechanistic models can be integrated from microscopic to macroscopic levels, to analyse the spatiotemporal dynamics of small molecule chemical agents from intracellular organelles to whole organs, well beyond the experiments and training data sets upon which the models are based. Based on differential equations, mechanistic models can also be integrated with other differential equations-based systems biology models of biochemical networks or signaling pathways. Although the origin and evolution of mathematical modeling approaches aimed at predicting drug transport and distribution has occurred independently from systems biology, we propose that the incorporation of mechanistic cell-based computational models of drug transport and distribution into a systems biology modeling framework is a logical next step for the advancement of systems pharmacology research. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Comparing approaches for simulating the reactive transport of U(VI) in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, G.P.; Kohler, M.; Davis, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The reactive transport of U(VI) in a well-characterized shallow alluvial aquifer at a former U(VI) mill located near Naturita, CO, was predicted for comparative purposes using a surface complexation model (SCM) and a constant K d approach to simulate U(VI) adsorption. The ground water at the site had U(VI) concentrations that ranged from 0.01 to 20 ??M, alkalinities that ranged from 2.5 to 18 meq/L, and a nearly constant pH of 7.1. The SCM used to simulate U(VI) adsorption was previously determined independently using laboratory batch adsorption experiments. Simulations obtained using the SCM approach were compared with simulations that used a constant K d approach to simulate adsorption using previously determined site-specific K d values. In both cases, the ground water flow and transport models used a conceptual model that was previously calibrated to a chloride plume present at the site. Simulations with the SCM approach demonstrated that the retardation factor varied temporally and spatially because of the differential transport of alkalinity and dissolved U(VI) and the nonlinearity of the U(VI) adsorption. The SCM model also simulated a prolonged slow decline in U(VI) concentration, which was not simulated using a constant K d model. Simulations using the SCM approach and the constant K d approach were similar after 20 years of transport but diverged significantly after 60 years. The simulations demonstrate the need for site-specific geochemical information on U(VI) adsorption to produce credible simulations of future transport. ?? 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Simulator study of flight characteristics of several large, dissimilar, cargo transport airplanes during approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. D.; Smith, P. M.; Deal, P. L.; Neely, W. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom, ground based simulator study is conducted to evaluate the low-speed flight characteristics of four dissimilar cargo transport airplanes. These characteristics are compared with those of a large, present-day (reference) transport configuration similar to the Lockheed C-5A airplane. The four very large transport concepts evaluated consist of single-fuselage, twin-fuselage, triple-fuselage, and span-loader configurations. The primary piloting task is the approach and landing operation. The results of his study indicate that all four concepts evaluated have unsatisfactory longitudinal and lateral directional low speed flight characteristics and that considerable stability and control augmentation would be required to improve these characteristics (handling qualities) to a satisfactory level. Through the use of rate command/attitude hold augmentation in the pitch and roll axes, and the use of several turn-coordination features, the handling qualities of all four large transports simulated are improved appreciably.

  10. Variational approach to solving the spectral Boltzmann transport equation in transient thermal grating for thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiloyan, Vazrik; Zeng, Lingping; Huberman, Samuel; Maznev, Alexei A.; Nelson, Keith A.; Chen, Gang

    2016-07-01

    The phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is widely utilized to study non-diffusive thermal transport. We find a solution of the BTE in the thin film transient thermal grating (TTG) experimental geometry by using a recently developed variational approach with a trial solution supplied by the Fourier heat conduction equation. We obtain an analytical expression for the thermal decay rate that shows excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. We also obtain a closed form expression for the effective thermal conductivity that demonstrates the full material property and heat transfer geometry dependence, and recovers the limits of the one-dimensional TTG expression for very thick films and the Fuchs-Sondheimer expression for very large grating spacings. The results demonstrate the utility of the variational technique for analyzing non-diffusive phonon-mediated heat transport for nanostructures in multi-dimensional transport geometries, and will assist the probing of the mean free path distribution of materials via transient grating experiments.

  11. Modelling force deployment from army intelligence using the transportation system capability (TRANSCAP) model : a standardized approach.

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J. F., Jr.; Love, R. J.; Macal, C. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2004-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) developed the transportation system capability (TRANSCAP) model to simulate the deployment of forces from Army bases, in collaboration with and under the sponsorship of the Military Transportation Management Command Transportation Engineering Agency (MTMCTEA). TRANSCAP's design separates its pre- and post-processing modules (developed in Java) from its simulation module (developed in MODSIM III). This paper describes TRANSCAP's modelling approach, emphasizing Argonne's highly detailed, object-oriented, multilanguage software design principles. Fundamental to these design principles is TRANSCAP's implementation of an improved method for standardizing the transmission of simulated data to output analysis tools and the implementation of three Army deployment/redeployment community standards, all of which are in the final phases of community acceptance. The first is the extensive hierarchy and object representation for transport simulations (EXHORT), which is a reusable, object-oriented deployment simulation source code framework of classes. The second and third are algorithms for rail deployment operations at a military base.

  12. Hybrid Approach for the Public Transportation Time Dependent Orienteering Problem with Time Windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ander; Arbelaitz, Olatz; Vansteenwegen, Pieter; Souffriau, Wouter; Linaza, Maria Teresa

    The Time Dependent Orienteering Problem with Time Windows (TDOPTW) consists of a set of locations with associated time windows and scores. Visiting a location allows to collect its score as a reward. Traveling time between locations varies depending on the leave time. The objective is to obtain a route that maximizes the obtained score within a limited amount of time. In this paper we target the use of public transportation in a city, where users may move on foot or by public transportation. The approach can also be applied to the logistic sector, for example to the multimodal freight transportation. We apply an hybrid approach to tackle the problem. Experimental results for the city of San Sebastian show we are able to obtain valid routes in real-time.

  13. A triple-continuum approach for modeling flow and transport processes in fractured rock.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Liu, H H; Bodvarsson, G S

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents a triple-continuum conceptual model for simulating flow and transport processes in fractured rock. Field data collected from the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, a repository site of high-level nuclear waste, show a large number of small-scale fractures. The effect of these small fractures has not been considered in previous modeling investigations within the context of a continuum approach. A new triple-continuum model (consisting of matrix, small-fracture, and large-fracture continua) has been developed to investigate the effect of these small fractures. This paper derives the model formulation and discusses the basic triple-continuum behavior of flow and transport processes under different conditions, using both analytical solutions and numerical approaches. The simulation results from the site-scale model of the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain indicate that these small fractures may have an important effect on radionuclide transport within the mountain. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  14. A multidisciplinary approach to assess the welfare of weaned pigs during transport at three space allowances.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Mhairi A; Bryer, Pamela J; Davis, Brittany L; McGlone, John J

    2010-01-01

    Transport can be a stressful experience for pigs, especially in pigs simultaneously experiencing weaning stress. The objective of this study was to use a multidisciplinary approach to assess the welfare of weaned pigs during transport at 3 space allowances. A commercial semitrailer, fitted with compartments, provided 0.05, 0.06, and 0.07 m(2)/pig. The study recorded frequency of standing, lying, sitting, and standing-rearing on another pig during the entire duration of transport. Blood samples, body weights, and lesion scores were collected from a subset of pigs (n = 48 per space allowance) in each experimental compartment. Transport time for the pigs was 148.0 +/- 10.0 min to the wean-to-finishing site. Total white blood cell counts, cortisol, and several blood chemistry values increased (p < .05) after transport regardless of space allowance. Glucose and body weight decreased (p < .05) after transport regardless of space allowance. Space allowance influenced stand-rearing, sitting, standing, and lying behaviors in pigs. Combining behavioral and physiological measures of stress provides a robust picture of piglet welfare during transport at different space allowances.

  15. A computational approach to calculate the heat of transport of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Lecce, Silvia; Albrecht, Tim; Bresme, Fernando

    2017-03-01

    Thermal gradients induce concentration gradients in alkali halide solutions, and the salt migrates towards hot or cold regions depending on the average temperature of the solution. This effect has been interpreted using the heat of transport, which provides a route to rationalize thermophoretic phenomena. Early theories provide estimates of the heat of transport at infinite dilution. These values are used to interpret thermodiffusion (Soret) and thermoelectric (Seebeck) effects. However, accessing heats of transport of individual ions at finite concentration remains an outstanding question both theoretically and experimentally. Here we discuss a computational approach to calculate heats of transport of aqueous solutions at finite concentrations, and apply our method to study lithium chloride solutions at concentrations >0.5 M. The heats of transport are significantly different for Li+ and Cl‑ ions, unlike what is expected at infinite dilution. We find theoretical evidence for the existence of minima in the Soret coefficient of LiCl, where the magnitude of the heat of transport is maximized. The Seebeck coefficient obtained from the ionic heats of transport varies significantly with temperature and concentration. We identify thermodynamic conditions leading to a maximization of the thermoelectric response of aqueous solutions.

  16. A computational approach to calculate the heat of transport of aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    Di Lecce, Silvia; Albrecht, Tim; Bresme, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Thermal gradients induce concentration gradients in alkali halide solutions, and the salt migrates towards hot or cold regions depending on the average temperature of the solution. This effect has been interpreted using the heat of transport, which provides a route to rationalize thermophoretic phenomena. Early theories provide estimates of the heat of transport at infinite dilution. These values are used to interpret thermodiffusion (Soret) and thermoelectric (Seebeck) effects. However, accessing heats of transport of individual ions at finite concentration remains an outstanding question both theoretically and experimentally. Here we discuss a computational approach to calculate heats of transport of aqueous solutions at finite concentrations, and apply our method to study lithium chloride solutions at concentrations >0.5 M. The heats of transport are significantly different for Li+ and Cl− ions, unlike what is expected at infinite dilution. We find theoretical evidence for the existence of minima in the Soret coefficient of LiCl, where the magnitude of the heat of transport is maximized. The Seebeck coefficient obtained from the ionic heats of transport varies significantly with temperature and concentration. We identify thermodynamic conditions leading to a maximization of the thermoelectric response of aqueous solutions. PMID:28322266

  17. Asymptotic-preserving Lagrangian approach for modeling anisotropic transport in magnetized plasmas for arbitrary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon, Luis; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Hauck, Cory

    2012-10-01

    Modeling electron transport in magnetized plasmas is extremely challenging due to the extreme anisotropy between parallel (to the magnetic field) and perpendicular directions (χ/χ˜10^10 in fusion plasmas). Recently, a Lagrangian Green's function approach, developed for the purely parallel transport case,footnotetextD. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, PRL, 106, 195004 (2011)^,footnotetextD. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, Phys. Plasmas, 19, 056112 (2012) has been extended to the anisotropic transport case in the tokamak-ordering limit with constant density.footnotetextL. Chac'on, D. del-Castillo-Negrete, C. Hauck, JCP, submitted (2012) An operator-split algorithm is proposed that allows one to treat Eulerian and Lagrangian components separately. The approach is shown to feature bounded numerical errors for arbitrary χ/χ ratios, which renders it asymptotic-preserving. In this poster, we will present the generalization of the Lagrangian approach to arbitrary magnetic fields. We will demonstrate the potential of the approach with various challenging configurations, including the case of transport across a magnetic island in cylindrical geometry.

  18. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  19. Advanced subsonic transport approach noise: The relative contribution of airframe noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr.; Garber, Donald P.

    1992-01-01

    With current engine technology, airframe noise is a contributing source for large commercial aircraft on approach, but not the major contributor. With the promise of much quieter jet engines with the planned new generation of high-by-pass turbofan engines, airframe noise has become a topic of interest in the advanced subsonic transport research program. The objective of this paper is to assess the contribution of airframe noise relative to the other aircraft noise sources on approach. The assessment will be made for a current technology large commercial transport aircraft and for an envisioned advanced technology aircraft. NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) will be used to make total aircraft noise predictions for these two aircraft types. Predicted noise levels and areas of noise contours will be used to determine the relative importance of the contributing approach noise sources. The actual set-up decks used to make the ANOPP runs for the two aircraft types are included in appendixes.

  20. A new approach to calculate the transport matrix in RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eidelman, Yu.; Mokhov, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    A realistic approach to calculate the transport matrix in RF cavities is developed. It is based on joint solution of equations of longitudinal and transverse motion of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field of the linac. This field is a given by distribution (measured or calculated) of the component of the longitudinal electric field on the axis of the linac. New approach is compared with other matrix methods to solve the same problem. The comparison with code ASTRA has been carried out. Complete agreement for tracking results for a TESLA-type cavity is achieved. A corresponding algorithm will be implemented into the MARS15 code. A realistic approach to calculate the transport matrix in RF cavities is developed. Complete agreement for tracking results with existed code ASTRA is achieved. New algorithm will be implemented into MARS15 code.

  1. Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability method with quadratic flux approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shafii, Mohammad Ali Meidianti, Rahma Wildian, Fitriyani, Dian; Tongkukut, Seni H. J.; Arkundato, Artoto

    2014-09-30

    Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method with quadratic flux approach has been carried out. In general, the solution of the neutron transport using the CP method is performed with the flat flux approach. In this research, the CP method is implemented in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh being conducted into non flat flux approach. It means that the neutron flux at any point in the nuclear fuel cell are considered different each other followed the distribution pattern of quadratic flux. The result is presented here in the form of quadratic flux that is better understanding of the real condition in the cell calculation and as a starting point to be applied in computational calculation.

  2. Forced canonical thermalization in a hadronic transport approach at high density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliinychenko, Dmytro; Petersen, Hannah

    2017-03-01

    Hadronic transport approaches based on an effective solution of the relativistic Boltzmann equation are widely applied for the dynamical description of heavy ion reactions at low beam energies. At high densities, the assumption of binary interactions often used in hadronic transport approaches may not be applicable anymore. Therefore, we effectively simulate the high-density regime using the local forced canonical thermalization. This framework provides the opportunity to interpolate in a dynamical way between two different limits of kinetic theory: the dilute gas approximation and the ideal fluid case. This approach will be important for studies of the dynamical evolution of heavy ion collisions at low and intermediate energies as experimentally investigated at the beam energy scan program at RHIC, and in the future at FAIR and NICA. On the other hand, this new way of modeling hot and dense strongly interacting matter might be relevant for small systems at high energies (LHC and RHIC) as well.

  3. Quantum thermal transport through anharmonic systems: A self-consistent approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dahai; Thingna, Juzar; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Li, Baowen

    2016-10-01

    We propose a feasible and effective approach to study quantum thermal transport through anharmonic systems. The main idea is to obtain an effective harmonic Hamiltonian for the anharmonic system by applying the self-consistent phonon theory. By using the effective harmonic Hamiltonian, we study thermal transport within the framework of the nonequilibrium Green's function method using the celebrated Caroli formula. We corroborate our quantum self-consistent approach by using the quantum master equation that can deal with anharmonicity exactly, but is limited to the weak system-bath coupling regime. Finally, in order to demonstrate its strength, we apply the quantum self-consistent approach to study thermal rectification in a weakly coupled two-segment anharmonic system.

  4. Multiphase fluid flow and subsequent geochemical transport invariably saturated fractured rocks: 1. Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2000-08-08

    Reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in unsaturated fractured rocks has received increasing attention for studies of contaminant transport, groundwater quality, waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, mineral deposits, sedimentary diagenesis, and fluid-rock interactions in hydrothermal systems. This paper presents methods for modeling geochemical systems that emphasize: (1) involvement of the gas phase in addition to liquid and solid phases in fluid flow, mass transport and chemical reactions, (2) treatment of physically and chemically heterogeneous and fractured rocks, (3) the effect of heat on fluid flow and reaction properties and processes, and (4) the kinetics of fluid-rock interaction. The physical and chemical process model is embodied in a system of partial differential equations for flow and transport, coupled to algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations for chemical interactions. For numerical solution, the continuum equations are discretized in space and time. Space discretization is based on a flexible integral finite difference approach that can use irregular gridding to model geologic structure; time is discretized fully implicitly as a first-order finite difference. Heterogeneous and fractured media are treated with a general multiple interacting continua method that includes double-porosity, dual-permeability, and multi-region models as special cases. A sequential iteration approach is used to treat the coupling between fluid flow and mass transport on the one hand, chemical reactions on the other. Applications of the methods developed here to variably saturated geochemical systems are presented in a companion paper (part 2, this issue).

  5. An exact approach for studying cargo transport by an ensemble of molecular motors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intracellular transport is crucial for many cellular processes where a large fraction of the cargo is transferred by motor-proteins over a network of microtubules. Malfunctions in the transport mechanism underlie a number of medical maladies. Existing methods for studying how motor-proteins coordinate the transfer of a shared cargo over a microtubule are either analytical or are based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Approaches that yield analytical results, while providing unique insights into transport mechanism, make simplifying assumptions, where a detailed characterization of important transport modalities is difficult to reach. On the other hand, Monte-Carlo based simulations can incorporate detailed characteristics of the transport mechanism; however, the quality of the results depend on the number and quality of simulation runs used in arriving at results. Here, for example, it is difficult to simulate and study rare-events that can trigger abnormalities in transport. Results In this article, a semi-analytical methodology that determines the probability distribution function of motor-protein behavior in an exact manner is developed. The method utilizes a finite-dimensional projection of the underlying infinite-dimensional Markov model, which retains the Markov property, and enables the detailed and exact determination of motor configurations, from which meaningful inferences on transport characteristics of the original model can be derived. Conclusions Under this novel probabilistic approach new insights about the mechanisms of action of these proteins are found, suggesting hypothesis about their behavior and driving the design and realization of new experiments. The advantages provided in accuracy and efficiency make it possible to detect rare events in the motor protein dynamics, that could otherwise pass undetected using standard simulation methods. In this respect, the model has allowed to provide a possible explanation for possible mechanisms

  6. Development of Systematic Approaches for Calibration of Subsurface Transport Models Using Hard and Soft Data on System Characteristics and Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-02

    environmental problems to include the simulation of contaminant transport and volatilization in the shallow subsurface and water content fluctuation...REPORT Development of systematic approaches for calibration of subsurface transport models using hard and soft data on system characteristics and...Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS model calibration, data assimilation, subsurface transport Tissa H. Illangasekare, Toshihiro Sakaki Colorado

  7. The adjoint neutron transport equation and the statistical approach for its solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracco, P.; Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.

    2016-11-01

    The adjoint equation was introduced in the early days of neutron transport and its solution, the neutron importance, has been used for several applications in neutronics. The work presents at first a critical review of the adjoint neutron transport equation. Afterwards, the adjont model is constructed for a reference physical situation, for which an analytical approach is viable, i.e. an infinite homogeneous scattering medium. This problem leads to an equation that is the adjoint of the slowing-down equation, which is well known in nuclear reactor physics. A general closed-form analytical solution to such adjoint equation is obtained by a procedure that can be used also to derive the classical Placzek functions. This solution constitutes a benchmark for any statistical or numerical approach to the adjoint equation. A sampling technique to evaluate the adjoint flux for the transport equation is then proposed and physically interpreted as a transport model for pseudo-particles. This can be done by introducing appropriate kernels describing the transfer of the pseudo-particles in the phase space. This technique allows estimating the importance function by a standard Monte Carlo approach. The sampling scheme is validated by comparison with the analytical results previously obtained.

  8. A biomechanical triphasic approach to the transport of nondilute solutions in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Abazari, Alireza; Elliott, Janet A W; Law, Garson K; McGann, Locksley E; Jomha, Nadr M

    2009-12-16

    Biomechanical models for biological tissues such as articular cartilage generally contain an ideal, dilute solution assumption. In this article, a biomechanical triphasic model of cartilage is described that includes nondilute treatment of concentrated solutions such as those applied in vitrification of biological tissues. The chemical potential equations of the triphasic model are modified and the transport equations are adjusted for the volume fraction and frictional coefficients of the solutes that are not negligible in such solutions. Four transport parameters, i.e., water permeability, solute permeability, diffusion coefficient of solute in solvent within the cartilage, and the cartilage stiffness modulus, are defined as four degrees of freedom for the model. Water and solute transport in cartilage were simulated using the model and predictions of average concentration increase and cartilage weight were fit to experimental data to obtain the values of the four transport parameters. As far as we know, this is the first study to formulate the solvent and solute transport equations of nondilute solutions in the cartilage matrix. It is shown that the values obtained for the transport parameters are within the ranges reported in the available literature, which confirms the proposed model approach.

  9. A Biomechanical Triphasic Approach to the Transport of Nondilute Solutions in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Abazari, Alireza; Elliott, Janet A.W.; Law, Garson K.; McGann, Locksley E.; Jomha, Nadr M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Biomechanical models for biological tissues such as articular cartilage generally contain an ideal, dilute solution assumption. In this article, a biomechanical triphasic model of cartilage is described that includes nondilute treatment of concentrated solutions such as those applied in vitrification of biological tissues. The chemical potential equations of the triphasic model are modified and the transport equations are adjusted for the volume fraction and frictional coefficients of the solutes that are not negligible in such solutions. Four transport parameters, i.e., water permeability, solute permeability, diffusion coefficient of solute in solvent within the cartilage, and the cartilage stiffness modulus, are defined as four degrees of freedom for the model. Water and solute transport in cartilage were simulated using the model and predictions of average concentration increase and cartilage weight were fit to experimental data to obtain the values of the four transport parameters. As far as we know, this is the first study to formulate the solvent and solute transport equations of nondilute solutions in the cartilage matrix. It is shown that the values obtained for the transport parameters are within the ranges reported in the available literature, which confirms the proposed model approach. PMID:20006942

  10. Natural Organic Matter Transport Modeling with a Continuous Time Random Walk Approach

    PubMed Central

    McInnis, Daniel P.; Bolster, Diogo; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In transport experiments through columns packed with naturally Fe/Al oxide-coated quartz sand, breakthrough curves (BTCs) of natural organic matter (NOM) displayed strong and persistent power law tailing that could not be described by the classical advection–dispersion equation. Tailing was not observed in BTCs for a nonreactive tracer (sulforhodamine B); therefore, the anomalous transport is attributed to diverse adsorptive behavior of the polydisperse NOM sample rather than to physical heterogeneity of the porous medium. NOM BTC tailing became more pronounced with decreases in pH and increases in ionic strength, conditions previously shown to be associated with enhanced preferential adsorption of intermediate to high molecular weight NOM components. Drawing from previous work on anomalous solute transport, we develop an approach to model NOM transport within the framework of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) and show that under all conditions examined, the CTRW model is able to capture tailing of NOM BTCs by accounting for differences in transport rates of NOM fractions through a distribution of effective retardation factors. These results demonstrate the importance of considering effects of adsorptive fractionation on NOM mobility, and illustrate the ability of the CTRW model to describe transport of a multicomponent solute. PMID:24596449

  11. An Inverse Analysis Approach to the Characterization of Chemical Transport in Paints

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Matthew P.; Stevenson, Shawn M.; Pearl, Thomas P.; Mantooth, Brent A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to directly characterize chemical transport and interactions that occur within a material (i.e., subsurface dynamics) is a vital component in understanding contaminant mass transport and the ability to decontaminate materials. If a material is contaminated, over time, the transport of highly toxic chemicals (such as chemical warfare agent species) out of the material can result in vapor exposure or transfer to the skin, which can result in percutaneous exposure to personnel who interact with the material. Due to the high toxicity of chemical warfare agents, the release of trace chemical quantities is of significant concern. Mapping subsurface concentration distribution and transport characteristics of absorbed agents enables exposure hazards to be assessed in untested conditions. Furthermore, these tools can be used to characterize subsurface reaction dynamics to ultimately design improved decontaminants or decontamination procedures. To achieve this goal, an inverse analysis mass transport modeling approach was developed that utilizes time-resolved mass spectroscopy measurements of vapor emission from contaminated paint coatings as the input parameter for calculation of subsurface concentration profiles. Details are provided on sample preparation, including contaminant and material handling, the application of mass spectrometry for the measurement of emitted contaminant vapor, and the implementation of inverse analysis using a physics-based diffusion model to determine transport properties of live chemical warfare agents including distilled mustard (HD) and the nerve agent VX. PMID:25226346

  12. An inverse analysis approach to the characterization of chemical transport in paints.

    PubMed

    Willis, Matthew P; Stevenson, Shawn M; Pearl, Thomas P; Mantooth, Brent A

    2014-08-29

    The ability to directly characterize chemical transport and interactions that occur within a material (i.e., subsurface dynamics) is a vital component in understanding contaminant mass transport and the ability to decontaminate materials. If a material is contaminated, over time, the transport of highly toxic chemicals (such as chemical warfare agent species) out of the material can result in vapor exposure or transfer to the skin, which can result in percutaneous exposure to personnel who interact with the material. Due to the high toxicity of chemical warfare agents, the release of trace chemical quantities is of significant concern. Mapping subsurface concentration distribution and transport characteristics of absorbed agents enables exposure hazards to be assessed in untested conditions. Furthermore, these tools can be used to characterize subsurface reaction dynamics to ultimately design improved decontaminants or decontamination procedures. To achieve this goal, an inverse analysis mass transport modeling approach was developed that utilizes time-resolved mass spectroscopy measurements of vapor emission from contaminated paint coatings as the input parameter for calculation of subsurface concentration profiles. Details are provided on sample preparation, including contaminant and material handling, the application of mass spectrometry for the measurement of emitted contaminant vapor, and the implementation of inverse analysis using a physics-based diffusion model to determine transport properties of live chemical warfare agents including distilled mustard (HD) and the nerve agent VX.

  13. A sequential partly iterative approach for multicomponent reactive transport with CORE2D

    SciTech Connect

    Samper, J.; Xu, T.; Yang, C.

    2008-11-01

    CORE{sup 2D} V4 is a finite element code for modeling partly or fully saturated water flow, heat transport and multicomponent reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. It can handle coupled microbial processes and geochemical reactions such as acid-base, aqueous complexation, redox, mineral dissolution/precipitation, gas dissolution/exsolution, ion exchange, sorption via linear and nonlinear isotherms, sorption via surface complexation. Hydraulic parameters may change due to mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. Coupled transport and chemical equations are solved by using sequential iterative approaches. A sequential partly-iterative approach (SPIA) is presented which improves the accuracy of the traditional sequential noniterative approach (SNIA) and is more efficient than the general sequential iterative approach (SIA). While SNIA leads to a substantial saving of computing time, it introduces numerical errors which are especially large for cation exchange reactions. SPIA improves the efficiency of SIA because the iteration between transport and chemical equations is only performed in nodes with a large mass transfer between solid and liquid phases. The efficiency and accuracy of SPIA are compared to those of SIA and SNIA using synthetic examples and a case study of reactive transport through the Llobregat Delta aquitard in Spain. SPIA is found to be as accurate as SIA while requiring significantly less CPU time. In addition, SPIA is much more accurate than SNIA with only a minor increase in computing time. A further enhancement of the efficiency of SPIA is achieved by improving the efficiency of the Newton-Raphson method used for solving chemical equations. Such an improvement is obtained by working with increments of log-concentrations and ignoring the terms of the Jacobian matrix containing derivatives of activity coefficients. A proof is given for the symmetry and non-singularity of the Jacobian matrix

  14. Evaluation of microwave landing system approaches in a wide-body transport simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.; Feather, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the suitability of flying complex curved approaches using the microwave landing system (MLS) with a wide-body transport aircraft. Fifty pilots in crews of two participated in the evaluation using a fixed-base simulator that emulated an MD-11 aircraft. Five approaches, consisting of one straight-in approach and four curved approaches, were flown by the pilots using a flight director. The test variables include the following: (1) manual and autothrottles; (2) wind direction; and (3) type of navigation display. The navigation display was either a map or a horizontal situation indicator (HSI). A complex wind that changed direction and speed with altitude, and included moderate turbulence, was used. Visibility conditions were Cat 1 or better. Subjective test data included pilot responses to questionnaires and pilot comments. Objective performance data included tracking accuracy, position error at decision height, and control activity. Results of the evaluation indicate that flying curved MLS approaches with a wide-body transport aircraft is operationally acceptable, depending upon the length of the final straight segment and the complexity of the approach.

  15. Collaborative Approaches in Developing Environmental and Safety Management Systems for Commercial Space Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Stacey; Murray, D.

    2009-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST) licenses and permits U.S. commercial space launch and reentry activities, and licenses the operation of non-federal launch and reentry sites. ASTs mission is to ensure the protection of the public, property, and the national security and foreign policy interests of the United States during commercial space transportation activities and to encourage, facilitate, and promote U.S. commercial space transportation. AST faces unique challenges of ensuring the protection of public health and safety while facilitating and promoting U.S. commercial space transportation. AST has developed an Environmental Management System (EMS) and a Safety Management System (SMS) to help meet its mission. Although the EMS and SMS were developed independently, the systems share similar elements. Both systems follow a Plan-Do-Act-Check model in identifying potential environmental aspects or public safety hazards, assessing significance in terms of severity and likelihood of occurrence, developing approaches to reduce risk, and verifying that the risk is reduced. This paper will describe the similarities between ASTs EMS and SMS elements and how AST is building a collaborative approach in environmental and safety management to reduce impacts to the environment and risks to the public.

  16. Tight-binding implementation of the microcanonical approach to transport in nanoscale conductors: Generalization and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercan, Ilke; Anderson, Neal G.

    2010-06-01

    Bushong, Sai, and Di Ventra (BSD) recently demonstrated that steady-state transport can emerge solely from quantum dynamics in a globally closed system consisting of a nanoscale conductor bridging two electrodes by Bushong et al. [Nano Lett. 5, 2569 (2005)]. They reported calculations, based on a simple tight-binding implementation of the "microcanonical" approach (TBIMCA) by Di Ventra and Todorov [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16, 8025 (2004)], in which a steady-state conductor current consistent in magnitude with the quantum conductance G0=2e2/h is established after an initial bias-induced imbalance in electrode populations begins to equalize. In this work, BSD's TBIMCA is generalized, and their expressions for the time-dependent current and local occupation functions are shown to apply only to a restricted class of structures. Calculations of the current dynamics and local occupation functions, based on the generalized formalism, are then presented for a wide variety of electrode-conductor-electrode geometries. These calculations provide a more comprehensive characterization of the TBIMCA, enable identification of the conditions under which signature features of nanoscale transport emerge, and show that the emergence of these features hinges critically on details of the structure geometry. This structure dependence represents an important consideration for application of the TBIMCA to the modeling of transport through nanostructures and should be recognized in any attempt to identify and explain signature features of nanoscale transport within this approach.

  17. Collaborative Approaches in Developing Environmental and Safety Management Systems for Commercial Space Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Stacey; Murray, D.

    2009-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST) licenses and permits U.S. commercial space launch and reentry activities, and licenses the operation of non-federal launch and reentry sites. ASTs mission is to ensure the protection of the public, property, and the national security and foreign policy interests of the United States during commercial space transportation activities and to encourage, facilitate, and promote U.S. commercial space transportation. AST faces unique challenges of ensuring the protection of public health and safety while facilitating and promoting U.S. commercial space transportation. AST has developed an Environmental Management System (EMS) and a Safety Management System (SMS) to help meet its mission. Although the EMS and SMS were developed independently, the systems share similar elements. Both systems follow a Plan-Do-Act-Check model in identifying potential environmental aspects or public safety hazards, assessing significance in terms of severity and likelihood of occurrence, developing approaches to reduce risk, and verifying that the risk is reduced. This paper will describe the similarities between ASTs EMS and SMS elements and how AST is building a collaborative approach in environmental and safety management to reduce impacts to the environment and risks to the public.

  18. Improved master equation approach to quantum transport: from Born to self-consistent Born approximation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jinshuang; Li, Jun; Liu, Yu; Li, Xin-Qi; Yan, YiJing

    2014-06-28

    Beyond the second-order Born approximation, we propose an improved master equation approach to quantum transport under self-consistent Born approximation. The basic idea is to replace the free Green's function in the tunneling self-energy diagram by an effective reduced propagator under the Born approximation. This simple modification has remarkable consequences. It not only recovers the exact results for quantum transport through noninteracting systems under arbitrary voltages, but also predicts the challenging nonequilibrium Kondo effect. Compared to the nonequilibrium Green's function technique that formulates the calculation of specific correlation functions, the master equation approach contains richer dynamical information to allow more efficient studies for such as the shot noise and full counting statistics.

  19. A Two-Stage Approach for Medical Supplies Intermodal Transportation in Large-Scale Disaster Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Junhu; Wang, Xuping; Shi, Yan

    2014-01-01

    We present a two-stage approach for the “helicopters and vehicles” intermodal transportation of medical supplies in large-scale disaster responses. In the first stage, a fuzzy-based method and its heuristic algorithm are developed to select the locations of temporary distribution centers (TDCs) and assign medial aid points (MAPs) to each TDC. In the second stage, an integer-programming model is developed to determine the delivery routes. Numerical experiments verified the effectiveness of the approach, and observed several findings: (i) More TDCs often increase the efficiency and utility of medical supplies; (ii) It is not definitely true that vehicles should load more and more medical supplies in emergency responses; (iii) The more contrasting the traveling speeds of helicopters and vehicles are, the more advantageous the intermodal transportation is. PMID:25350005

  20. A two-stage approach for medical supplies intermodal transportation in large-scale disaster responses.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Junhu; Wang, Xuping; Shi, Yan

    2014-10-27

    We present a two-stage approach for the "helicopters and vehicles" intermodal transportation of medical supplies in large-scale disaster responses. In the first stage, a fuzzy-based method and its heuristic algorithm are developed to select the locations of temporary distribution centers (TDCs) and assign medial aid points (MAPs) to each TDC. In the second stage, an integer-programming model is developed to determine the delivery routes. Numerical experiments verified the effectiveness of the approach, and observed several findings: (i) More TDCs often increase the efficiency and utility of medical supplies; (ii) It is not definitely true that vehicles should load more and more medical supplies in emergency responses; (iii) The more contrasting the traveling speeds of helicopters and vehicles are, the more advantageous the intermodal transportation is.

  1. Impact of food, housing, and transportation insecurity on ART adherence: a hierarchical resources approach.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Talea; Jones, Maranda; Merly, Cynthia; Welles, Brandi; Kalichman, Moira O; Kalichman, Seth C

    2017-04-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has transformed HIV into a manageable illness. However, high levels of adherence must be maintained. Lack of access to basic resources (food, transportation, and housing) has been consistently associated with suboptimal ART adherence. Moving beyond such direct effects, this study takes a hierarchical resources approach in which the effects of access to basic resources on ART adherence are mediated through interpersonal resources (social support and care services) and personal resources (self-efficacy). Participants were 915 HIV-positive men and women living in Atlanta, GA, recruited from community centers and infectious disease clinics. Participants answered baseline questionnaires, and provided prospective data on ART adherence. Across a series of nested models, a consistent pattern emerged whereby lack of access to basic resources had indirect, negative effects on adherence, mediated through both lack of access to social support and services, and through lower treatment self-efficacy. There was also a significant direct effect of lack of access to transportation on adherence. Lack of access to basic resources negatively impacts ART adherence. Effects for housing instability and food insecurity were fully mediated through social support, access to services, and self-efficacy, highlighting these as important targets for intervention. Targeting service supports could be especially beneficial due to the potential to both promote adherence and to link clients with other services to supplement food, housing, and transportation. Inability to access transportation had a direct negative effect on adherence, suggesting that free or reduced cost transportation could positively impact ART adherence among disadvantaged populations.

  2. FRIGA, A New Approach To Identify Isotopes and Hypernuclei In N-Body Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Févre, A.; Leifels, Y.; Aichelin, J.; Hartnack, Ch; Kireyev, V.; Bratkovskaya, E.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new algorithm to identify fragments in computer simulations of relativistic heavy ion collisions. It is based on the simulated annealing technique and can be applied to n-body transport models like the Quantum Molecular Dynamics. This new approach is able to predict isotope yields as well as hyper-nucleus production. In order to illustrate its predicting power, we confront this new method to experimental data, and show the sensitivity on the parameters which govern the cluster formation.

  3. Absolutely and uniformly convergent iterative approach to inverse scattering with an infinite radius of convergence

    DOEpatents

    Kouri, Donald J.; Vijay, Amrendra; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Jingfeng; Hoffman, David K.

    2007-05-01

    A method and system for solving the inverse acoustic scattering problem using an iterative approach with consideration of half-off-shell transition matrix elements (near-field) information, where the Volterra inverse series correctly predicts the first two moments of the interaction, while the Fredholm inverse series is correct only for the first moment and that the Volterra approach provides a method for exactly obtaining interactions which can be written as a sum of delta functions.

  4. Absolutely and uniformly convergent iterative approach to inverse scattering with an infinite radius of convergence

    DOEpatents

    Kouri, Donald J.; Vijay, Amrendra; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Jingfeng; Hoffman, David K.

    2007-05-01

    A method and system for solving the inverse acoustic scattering problem using an iterative approach with consideration of half-off-shell transition matrix elements (near-field) information, where the Volterra inverse series correctly predicts the first two moments of the interaction, while the Fredholm inverse series is correct only for the first moment and that the Volterra approach provides a method for exactly obtaining interactions which can be written as a sum of delta functions.

  5. Design approaches and parameters for magnetically levitated transport systems. [Null flux suspension (Maglev)

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Powell, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanically levitated transport system approaches are assessed with regard to thrust power needs, track cost, suspension stability, and safety. The null flux suspension appears as the favored approach, having the least thrust power requirements, highest stability, and lowest amount of track material. Various null flux configurations are described together with their operating parameters. The Linear Synchronous Motor (LSM) propulsion system is also described for propelling the suspended vehicles. Cryogenics and superconductivity aspects are discussed and the effect of high T/sub c/ superconductors evaluated. 13 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. An approach to market analysis for lighter than air transportation of freight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, P. O.; Marcus, H. S.; Pollock, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    An approach is presented to marketing analysis for lighter than air vehicles in a commercial freight market. After a discussion of key characteristics of supply and demand factors, a three-phase approach to marketing analysis is described. The existing transportation systems are quantitatively defined and possible roles for lighter than air vehicles within this framework are postulated. The marketing analysis views the situation from the perspective of both the shipper and the carrier. A demand for freight service is assumed and the resulting supply characteristics are determined. Then, these supply characteristics are used to establish the demand for competing modes. The process is then iterated to arrive at the market solution.

  7. Towards a realistic approach to validation of reactive transport models for performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.D.

    1993-12-31

    Performance assessment calculations are based on geochemical models that assume that interactions among radionuclides, rocks and groundwaters under natural conditions, can be estimated or bound by data obtained from laboratory-scale studies. The data include radionuclide distribution coefficients, measured in saturated batch systems of powdered rocks, and retardation factors measured in short-term column experiments. Traditional approaches to model validation cannot be applied in a straightforward manner to the simple reactive transport models that use these data. An approach to model validation in support of performance assessment is described in this paper. It is based on a recognition of different levels of model validity and is compatible with the requirements of current regulations for high-level waste disposal. Activities that are being carried out in support of this approach include (1) laboratory and numerical experiments to test the validity of important assumptions inherent in current performance assessment methodologies,(2) integrated transport experiments, and (3) development of a robust coupled reaction/transport code for sensitivity analyses using massively parallel computers.

  8. Surrogate model approach for improving the performance of reactive transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatnieks, Janis; De Lucia, Marco; Sips, Mike; Dransch, Doris

    2016-04-01

    Reactive transport models can serve a large number of important geoscientific applications involving underground resources in industry and scientific research. It is common for simulation of reactive transport to consist of at least two coupled simulation models. First is a hydrodynamics simulator that is responsible for simulating the flow of groundwaters and transport of solutes. Hydrodynamics simulators are well established technology and can be very efficient. When hydrodynamics simulations are performed without coupled geochemistry, their spatial geometries can span millions of elements even when running on desktop workstations. Second is a geochemical simulation model that is coupled to the hydrodynamics simulator. Geochemical simulation models are much more computationally costly. This is a problem that makes reactive transport simulations spanning millions of spatial elements very difficult to achieve. To address this problem we propose to replace the coupled geochemical simulation model with a surrogate model. A surrogate is a statistical model created to include only the necessary subset of simulator complexity for a particular scenario. To demonstrate the viability of such an approach we tested it on a popular reactive transport benchmark problem that involves 1D Calcite transport. This is a published benchmark problem (Kolditz, 2012) for simulation models and for this reason we use it to test the surrogate model approach. To do this we tried a number of statistical models available through the caret and DiceEval packages for R, to be used as surrogate models. These were trained on randomly sampled subset of the input-output data from the geochemical simulation model used in the original reactive transport simulation. For validation we use the surrogate model to predict the simulator output using the part of sampled input data that was not used for training the statistical model. For this scenario we find that the multivariate adaptive regression splines

  9. Component mode synthesis approach for quantum mechanical electrostatic and transport analysis of nanoscale structures and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhe

    As the dimensions of commonly used semiconductor devices have shrunk into nanometer regime, it is recognized that the influence of quantum effects on their electrostatic and transport properties cannot be ignored. In the past few decades, various computational models and approaches have been developed to analyze these properties in nanostructures and devices. Among these computational models, the Schrodinger-Poisson model has been widely adopted for quantum mechanical electrostatic and transport analysis of nanostructures and devices such as quantum wires, metal--oxide--semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The numerical results allow for evaluations of the electrical properties such as charge concentration and potential profile in these structures. The emergence of MOSFETs with multiple gates, such as Trigates, FinFETs and Pi-gates, offers a superior electrostatic control of devices by the gates, which can be therefore used to reduce the short channel effects within those devices. Full 2-D electrostatic and transport analysis enables a better understanding of the scalability of devices, geometric effects on the potential and charge distribution, and transport characteristics of the transistors. The Schrodinger-Poisson model is attractive due to its simplicity and straightforward implementation by using standard numerical methods. However, as it is required to solve a generalized eigenvalue problem generated from the discretization of the Schrodinger equation, the computational cost of the analysis increases quickly when the system's degrees of freedom (DOFs) increase. For this reason, techniques that enable an efficient solution of discretized Schrodinger equation in multidimensional domains are desirable. In this work, we seek to accelerate the numerical solution of the Schrodinger equation by using a component mode synthesis (CMS) approach. In the CMS approach, a nanostructure is divided into a set of

  10. Physical Activity through Sustainable Transport Approaches (PASTA): protocol for a multi-centre, longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Dons, Evi; Götschi, Thomas; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; de Nazelle, Audrey; Anaya, Esther; Avila-Palencia, Ione; Brand, Christian; Cole-Hunter, Tom; Gaupp-Berghausen, Mailin; Kahlmeier, Sonja; Laeremans, Michelle; Mueller, Natalie; Orjuela, Juan Pablo; Raser, Elisabeth; Rojas-Rueda, David; Standaert, Arnout; Stigell, Erik; Uhlmann, Tina; Gerike, Regine; Int Panis, Luc

    2015-11-14

    Physical inactivity is one of the leading risk factors for non-communicable diseases, yet many are not sufficiently active. The Physical Activity through Sustainable Transport Approaches (PASTA) study aims to better understand active mobility (walking and cycling for transport solely or in combination with public transport) as an innovative approach to integrate physical activity into individuals' everyday lives. The PASTA study will collect data of multiple cities in a longitudinal cohort design to study correlates of active mobility, its effect on overall physical activity, crash risk and exposure to traffic-related air pollution. A set of online questionnaires incorporating gold standard approaches from the physical activity and transport fields have been developed, piloted and are now being deployed in a longitudinal study in seven European cities (Antwerp, Barcelona, London, Oerebro, Rome, Vienna, Zurich). In total, 14000 adults are being recruited (2000 in each city). A first questionnaire collects baseline information; follow-up questionnaires sent every 13 days collect prospective data on travel behaviour, levels of physical activity and traffic safety incidents. Self-reported data will be validated with objective data in subsamples using conventional and novel methods. Accelerometers, GPS and tracking apps record routes and activity. Air pollution and physical activity are measured to study their combined effects on health biomarkers. Exposure-adjusted crash risks will be calculated for active modes, and crash location audits are performed to study the role of the built environment. Ethics committees in all seven cities have given independent approval for the study. The PASTA study collects a wealth of subjective and objective data on active mobility and physical activity. This will allow the investigation of numerous correlates of active mobility and physical activity using a data set that advances previous efforts in its richness, geographical coverage

  11. Modeling nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers using a particle-tracking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhengtao; Welty, Claire; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-09-01

    We have integrated multispecies biodegradation and geochemical reactions into an existing particle-tracking code to simulate reactive transport in three-dimensional variably saturated media, with a focus on nitrification and denitrification processes. This new numerical model includes reactive air-phase transport so that gases such as N2 and CO2 can be tracked. Although nitrogen biodegradation is the primary problem addressed here, the method presented is also applicable to other reactive multispecies transport problems. We verified the model by comparison with (1) analytical solutions for saturated one- and two-dimensional cases; (2) a finite element model for a one-dimensional unsaturated case; and (3) laboratory observations for a one-dimensional saturated case. Good agreement between the new code and the verification problems is demonstrated. The new model can simulate nitrogen transport and transformation in a heterogeneous permeability field where sharp concentration gradients are present. An example application to nitrogen species biodegradation and transport of a plume emanating from a leaking sewer in a heterogeneous, variably saturated aquifer is presented to illustrate this capability. This example is a novel application of coupling unsaturated/saturated zone transport with nitrogen species biodegradation. The code has the computational advantages of particle-tracking algorithms, including local and global mass conservation and minimal numerical dispersion. We also present new methods for improving particle code efficiency by implementing the concept of tracking surplus/deficit particles and particle recycling in order to control the growth of particle numbers. The new model retains the advantages of the particle tracking approach such as allowing relatively low spatial and temporal resolutions to be used, while incorporating the robustness of grid-based Monod kinetics to simulate biogeochemical reactions.

  12. An expected consequence approach to route choice in the maritime transportation of crude oil.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Atiq; Verma, Manish

    2013-11-01

    Maritime transportation is the major conduit of international trade, and the primary link for global crude oil movement. Given the volume of oil transported on international maritime links, it is not surprising that oil spills of both minor and major types result, although most of the risk-related work has been confined to the local settings. We propose an expected consequence approach for assessing oil-spill risk from intercontinental transportation of crude oil that not only adheres to the safety guidelines specified by the International Maritime Organization but also outlines a novel technique that makes use of coarse global data to estimate accident probabilities. The proposed estimation technique, together with four of the most popular cost-of-spill models from the literature, were applied to study and analyze a realistic size problem instance. Numerical analyses showed that: a shorter route may not necessarily be less risky; an understanding of the inherent oil-spill risk of different routes could potentially facilitate tanker routing decisions; and the associated negotiations over insurance premium between the transport company and the not-for-profit prevention and indemnity clubs. Finally, we note that only the linear model should be used with one of the three nonlinear cost-of-spill models for evaluating tanker routes. © 2013 Society for Risk Analysis.

  13. Hemodynamic modeling of leukocyte and erythrocyte transport and interactions in intracranial aneurysms by a multiphase approach.

    PubMed

    Ou, Chubin; Huang, Wei; Yuen, Matthew Ming-Fai; Qian, Yi

    2016-10-03

    Hemodynamics has been recognized as an important factor in the development, growth, and rupture of cerebral aneurysms, and investigated by computational fluid dynamics techniques using a single phase approach. However, flow-dependent cell transport and interactions are usually ignored in single phase models, in which blood is usually treated as a single phase Newtonian fluid. For getting better insight into the underlying pathology of intracranial aneurysm, cell transport and interactions should be covered in hemodynamic studies. In the present study, a multiphase hemodynamic model incorporating cell transport and interactions was developed, in which blood was modeled as multiphase fluid having a continuous phase (plasma) and two particulate phases (erythrocytes and leukocytes). The model showed good agreement with experimental data and observations in the literature, and was applied to four patient-specific aneurysms in a pulsatile manner. Leukocyte accumulations were predicted at locations with flow disturbance and low wall shear stress. The concentrations of leukocyte at accumulation sites were found to exceed 200 to 500% of normal physiological level on three unstable aneurysms, including two ruptured aneurysms and a growing aneurysm where accumulation was observed near a daughter sac and a secondary aneurysm. This suggested that aneurysms with complex secondary flow patterns could be prone to leukocyte accumulation on the wall. As this is the first study to characterize cell transport and interactions in aneurysm hemodynamics, our model can serve as a foundation for future intracranial aneurysm models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Unified approach to ion transport and structural relaxation in amorphous polymers and glasses.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Malcolm D; Imrie, Corrie T; Ledru, Jacques; Hutchinson, John M

    2008-01-24

    Kinetic data for structural relaxation in silver iodomolybdates at the glass transition temperature (Tg) are obtained by high-pressure differential scanning calorimetry (HP-DSC) and are compared with activation energies (EA) and volumes (VA) obtained earlier from conductivities below Tg. The results are fitted to an empirical equation, EA = MVA, and displayed in the form of a master plot of EA versus VA, an approach previously applied to strongly coupled systems, including polymer electrolytes and molten salts above their glass transition temperatures. The parameter M emerges as a localized modulus, expressive of interatomic forces within the medium, linking together EA,sigma, VA,sigma and EA,s, VA,s, the "apparent" activation parameters for ionic conductivity and structural relaxation, respectively. The VA and EA values for ion transport are much smaller than the corresponding values for structural relaxation. However, remarkably close agreement emerges between the "process parameters", Ms and Msigma, both close to 8 GPa, thus establishing a quantitative link between ion transport and structural relaxation in this highly decoupled system. A new EA versus VA master plot is constructed, which points the way to a unified approach to ion transport in polymers and glasses.

  15. A Fuzzy Approach of the Competition on the Air Transport Market

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charfeddine, Souhir; DeColigny, Marc; Camino, Felix Mora; Cosenza, Carlos Alberto Nunes

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this communication is to study with a new scope the conditions of the equilibrium in an air transport market where two competitive airlines are operating. Each airline is supposed to adopt a strategy maximizing its profit while its estimation of the demand has a fuzzy nature. This leads each company to optimize a program of its proposed services (frequency of the flights and ticket prices) characterized by some fuzzy parameters. The case of monopoly is being taken as a benchmark. Classical convex optimization can be used to solve this decision problem. This approach provides the airline with a new decision tool where uncertainty can be taken into account explicitly. The confrontation of the strategies of the companies, in the ease of duopoly, leads to the definition of a fuzzy equilibrium. This concept of fuzzy equilibrium is more general and can be applied to several other domains. The formulation of the optimization problem and the methodological consideration adopted for its resolution are presented in their general theoretical aspect. In the case of air transportation, where the conditions of management of operations are critical, this approach should offer to the manager elements needed to the consolidation of its decisions depending on the circumstances (ordinary, exceptional events,..) and to be prepared to face all possibilities. Keywords: air transportation, competition equilibrium, convex optimization , fuzzy modeling,

  16. A simple approach to fabricate the rose petal-like hierarchical surfaces for droplet transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chao; Huang, Mengyu; Yu, Xingjian; Ma, Yupu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-11-01

    Precise transportation of liquid microdroplets is a great challenge in the microfluidic field. A sticky superhydrophobic surface with a high static contact angle (CA) and a large contact angle hysteresis (CAH) is recognized as the favorable tool to deal with the challenging job. Some approaches have been proposed to fabricate such surface, such as mimicing the dual-scale hierarchical structure of a natural material, like rose petal. However, the available approaches normally require multiple processing steps or are carried out with great expense. In this study, we report a straightforward and inexpensive method for fabricating the sticky superhydrophobic surfaces. The fabrication relies on electroless galvanic deposition to coat the copper substrates with a textured layer of silver. The whole fabrication process is carried out under ambient conditions by using conventional laboratory materials and equipments, and generally take less than 15 min. Despite the simplicity of this fabrication method, the rose petal-like hierarchical structures and the corresponding sticky superhydrophobic wetting properties were well achieved on the artificial surfaces. For instance, the surface with a deposition time of 10 s exhibits the superhydrophobity with a CA of 151.5°, and the effective stickiness with a CAH of 56.5°. The prepared sticky superhydrophobic surfaces are finally shown in the application of droplet transportation, in which the surface acts as a mechanical hand to grasp and transport the water droplet.

  17. Evaluation of Different Modeling Approaches to Simulate Contaminant Transport in a Fractured Limestone Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosthaf, K.; Rosenberg, L.; Balbarini, N.; Broholm, M. M.; Bjerg, P. L.; Binning, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    It is important to understand the fate and transport of contaminants in limestone aquifers because they are a major drinking water resource. This is challenging because they are highly heterogeneous; with micro-porous grains, flint inclusions, and being heavily fractured. Several modeling approaches have been developed to describe contaminant transport in fractured media, such as the discrete fracture (with various fracture geometries), equivalent porous media (with and without anisotropy), and dual porosity models. However, these modeling concepts are not well tested for limestone geologies. Given available field data and model purpose, this paper therefore aims to develop, examine and compare modeling approaches for transport of contaminants in fractured limestone aquifers. The model comparison was conducted for a contaminated site in Denmark, where a plume of a dissolved contaminant (PCE) has migrated through a fractured limestone aquifer. Multilevel monitoring wells have been installed at the site and available data includes information on spill history, extent of contamination, geology and hydrogeology. To describe the geology and fracture network, data from borehole logs was combined with an analysis of heterogeneities and fractures from a nearby excavation (analog site). Methods for translating the geological information and fracture mapping into each of the model concepts were examined. Each model was compared with available field data, considering both model fit and measures of model suitability. An analysis of model parameter identifiability and sensitivity is presented. Results show that there is considerable difference between modeling approaches, and that it is important to identify the right one for the actual scale and model purpose. A challenge in the use of field data is the determination of relevant hydraulic properties and interpretation of aqueous and solid phase contaminant concentration sampling data. Traditional water sampling has a bias

  18. Particle production and equilibrium properties within a new hadron transport approach for heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, J.; Steinberg, V.; Staudenmaier, J.; Pang, L. G.; Oliinychenko, D.; Mohs, J.; Kretz, M.; Kehrenberg, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Bäuchle, B.; Auvinen, J.; Attems, M.; Petersen, H.

    2016-11-01

    The microscopic description of heavy-ion reactions at low beam energies is achieved within hadronic transport approaches. In this article a new approach called "Simulating Many Accelerated Strongly interacting Hadrons" (SMASH) is introduced and applied to study the production of nonstrange particles in heavy-ion reactions at Ekin=0.4 A -2 A GeV. First, the model is described including details about the collision criterion, the initial conditions and the resonance formation and decays. To validate the approach, equilibrium properties such as detailed balance are presented and the results are compared to experimental data for elementary cross sections. Finally results for pion and proton production in C+C and Au+Au collisions is confronted with data from the high-acceptance dielectron spectrometer (HADES) and FOPI. Predictions for particle production in π +A collisions are made.

  19. A non-equilibrium equation-of-motion approach to quantum transport utilizing projection operators.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Maicol A; Galperin, Michael; Ratner, Mark A

    2014-11-12

    We consider a projection operator approach to the non-equilibrium Green function equation-of-motion (PO-NEGF EOM) method. The technique resolves problems of arbitrariness in truncation of an infinite chain of EOMs and prevents violation of symmetry relations resulting from the truncation (equivalence of left- and right-sided EOMs is shown and symmetry with respect to interchange of Fermi or Bose operators before truncation is preserved). The approach, originally developed by Tserkovnikov (1999 Theor. Math. Phys. 118 85) for equilibrium systems, is reformulated to be applicable to time-dependent non-equilibrium situations. We derive a canonical form of EOMs, thus explicitly demonstrating a proper result for the non-equilibrium atomic limit in junction problems. A simple practical scheme applicable to quantum transport simulations is formulated. We perform numerical simulations within simple models and compare results of the approach to other techniques and (where available) also to exact results.

  20. Two-scale approach for the coupled heat and moisture transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruis, Jaroslav; Krejčí, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes two-level approach for coupled heat and moisture transport in masonry structures. Motivation for two-level description comes from two major difficulties connected with masonry. First, the size of stone blocks is much larger than the size of mortar layers and very fine mesh has to be used. Second, the masonry composition is always random and therefore the concept of representative volume is reasonable. In two-level approach, the macro-scale level deals with a structure while the meso-scale level is concentrated on detailed composition of the masonry. Connection between the macro and meso level will be described. This two-level approach is suitable for parallel computers.

  1. Motion/visual cueing requirements for vortex encounters during simulated transport visual approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, R. V.; Bowles, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper addresses the issues of motion/visual cueing fidelity requirements for vortex encounters during simulated transport visual approaches and landings. Four simulator configurations were utilized to provide objective performance measures during simulated vortex penetrations, and subjective comments from pilots were collected. The configurations used were as follows: fixed base with visual degradation (delay), fixed base with no visual degradation, moving base with visual degradation (delay), and moving base with no visual degradation. The statistical comparisons of the objective measures and the subjective pilot opinions indicated that although both minimum visual delay and motion cueing are recommended for the vortex penetration task, the visual-scene delay characteristics were not as significant a fidelity factor as was the presence of motion cues. However, this indication was applicable to a restricted task, and to transport aircraft. Although they were statistically significant, the effects of visual delay and motion cueing on the touchdown-related measures were considered to be of no practical consequence.

  2. Comparison of Flamelet Models with the Transported Mass Fraction Approach for Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenhai; Alabi, Ken; Ladeinde, Foluso

    2015-11-01

    In this study, two fully compressible RANS, LES, and combined RANS/LES flow solvers - AEROFLO and VULCAN, both of which were originally developed by the United States Department of Defense but have since been significantly enhanced and commercialized by our organization, are used to investigate the accuracy of flamelet-based approach when employed to model supersonic combustion. The flamelet results from both codes are assessed relative to solutions obtained by solving the transport equations for the mass fractions - which is also supported by one of the codes, and making familiar assumptions about the closure of the reaction rate. The studies are carried out in the flamelet regime, and the numerical procedures are based on high-order schemes, which are also used to solve the level-set and mixture fraction transport equations used to study, respectively, premixed and non-premixed combustion. The effects of supersonic Mach numbers on the results are discussed.

  3. A single-molecule approach to explore binding, uptake and transport of cancer cell targeting nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, C.; Plochberger, B.; Ruprecht, V.; Wieser, S.; Rankl, C.; Heister, E.; Unterauer, B.; Brameshuber, M.; Danzberger, J.; Lukanov, P.; Flahaut, E.; Schütz, G.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ebner, A.

    2014-03-01

    In the past decade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied as a potential drug-delivery system, especially with functionality for cellular targeting. Yet, little is known about the actual process of docking to cell receptors and transport dynamics after internalization. Here we performed single-particle studies of folic acid (FA) mediated CNT binding to human carcinoma cells and their transport inside the cytosol. In particular, we employed molecular recognition force spectroscopy, an atomic force microscopy based method, to visualize and quantify docking of FA functionalized CNTs to FA binding receptors in terms of binding probability and binding force. We then traced individual fluorescently labeled, FA functionalized CNTs after specific uptake, and created a dynamic ‘roadmap’ that clearly showed trajectories of directed diffusion and areas of nanotube confinement in the cytosol. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single-molecule approach for investigation of drug-delivery vehicles and their targeting capacity.

  4. Unified semiclassical approach to electronic transport from diffusive to ballistic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Hao; Deng, Wei-Yin; Ren, Yue-Jiao; Sheng, Li; Xing, Ding-Yu

    2016-09-01

    We show that by integrating out the electric field and incorporating proper boundary conditions, a Boltzmann equation can describe electron transport properties, continuously from the diffusive to ballistic regimes. General analytical formulas of the conductance in D = 1,2,3 dimensions are obtained, which recover the Boltzmann-Drude formula and Landauer-Büttiker formula in the diffusive and ballistic limits, respectively. This intuitive and efficient approach can be applied to investigate the interplay of system size and impurity scattering in various charge and spin transport phenomena, when the quantum interference effect is not important. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2015CB921202 and 2014CB921103) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11225420).

  5. Physical Activity through Sustainable Transport Approaches (PASTA): a study protocol for a multicentre project

    PubMed Central

    de Nazelle, Audrey; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Panis, Luc Int; Anaya, Esther; Avila-Palencia, Ione; Boschetti, Florinda; Brand, Christian; Cole-Hunter, Tom; Dons, Evi; Eriksson, Ulf; Gaupp-Berghausen, Mailin; Kahlmeier, Sonja; Laeremans, Michelle; Mueller, Natalie; Orjuela, Juan Pablo; Racioppi, Francesca; Raser, Elisabeth; Rojas-Rueda, David; Schweizer, Christian; Standaert, Arnout; Uhlmann, Tina; Wegener, Sandra; Götschi, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Only one-third of the European population meets the minimum recommended levels of physical activity (PA). Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for non-communicable diseases. Walking and cycling for transport (active mobility, AM) are well suited to provide regular PA. The European research project Physical Activity through Sustainable Transport Approaches (PASTA) pursues the following aims: (1) to investigate correlates and interrelations of AM, PA, air pollution and crash risk; (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of selected interventions to promote AM; (3) to improve health impact assessment (HIA) of AM; (4) to foster the exchange between the disciplines of public health and transport planning, and between research and practice. Methods and analysis PASTA pursues a mixed-method and multilevel approach that is consistently applied in seven case study cities. Determinants of AM and the evaluation of measures to increase AM are investigated through a large scale longitudinal survey, with overall 14 000 respondents participating in Antwerp, Barcelona, London, Örebro, Rome, Vienna and Zurich. Contextual factors are systematically gathered in each city. PASTA generates empirical findings to improve HIA for AM, for example, with estimates of crash risks, factors on AM-PA substitution and carbon emissions savings from mode shifts. Findings from PASTA will inform WHO's online Health Economic Assessment Tool on the health benefits from cycling and/or walking. The study's wide scope, the combination of qualitative and quantitative methods and health and transport methods, the innovative survey design, the general and city-specific analyses, and the transdisciplinary composition of the consortium and the wider network of partners promise highly relevant insights for research and practice. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been obtained by the local ethics committees in the countries where the work is being conducted, and sent to the European

  6. PARTICLE TRANSPORTATION AND DEPOSITION IN HOT GAS FILTER VESSELS - A COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2002-07-01

    In this project, a computational modeling approach for analyzing flow and ash transport and deposition in filter vessels was developed. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for studying hot-gas filtration process was established. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas flows in the filter vessel, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the particle transport and deposition. Particular attention was given to the Siemens-Westinghouse filter vessel at Power System Development Facility in Wilsonville in Alabama. Details of hot-gas flow in this tangential flow filter vessel are evaluated. The simulation results show that the rapidly rotation flow in the spacing between the shroud and the vessel refractory acts as cyclone that leads to the removal of a large fraction of the larger particles from the gas stream. Several alternate designs for the filter vessel are considered. These include a vessel with a short shroud, a filter vessel with no shroud and a vessel with a deflector plate. The hot-gas flow and particle transport and deposition in various vessels are evaluated. The deposition patterns in various vessels are compared. It is shown that certain filter vessel designs allow for the large particles to remain suspended in the gas stream and to deposit on the filters. The presence of the larger particles in the filter cake leads to lower mechanical strength thus allowing for the back-pulse process to more easily remove the filter cake. A laboratory-scale filter vessel for testing the cold flow condition was designed and fabricated. A laser-based flow visualization technique is used and the gas flow condition in the laboratory-scale vessel was experimental studied. A computer model for the experimental vessel was also developed and the gas flow and particle transport patterns are evaluated.

  7. Reactive solute transport in streams: A surface complexation approach for trace metal sorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; Kimball, B.A.; McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    A model for trace metals that considers in-stream transport, metal oxide precipitation-dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption is presented. Linkage between a surface complexation submodel and the stream transport equations provides a framework for modeling sorption onto static and/or dynamic surfaces. A static surface (e.g., an iron-oxide-coated streambed) is defined as a surface with a temporally constant solid concentration. Limited contact between solutes in the water column and the static surface is considered using a pseudokinetic approach. A dynamic surface (e.g., freshly precipitated metal oxides) has a temporally variable solid concentration and is in equilibrium with the water column. Transport and deposition of solute mass sorbed to the dynamic surface is represented in the stream transport equations that include precipitate settling. The model is applied to a pH-modification experiment in an acid mine drainage stream. Dissolved copper concentrations were depressed for a 3 hour period in response to the experimentally elevated pH. After passage of the pH front, copper was desorbed, and dissolved concentrations returned to ambient levels. Copper sorption is modeled by considering sorption to aged hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) on the streambed (static surface) and freshly precipitated HFO in the water column (dynamic surface). Comparison of parameter estimates with reported values suggests that naturally formed iron oxides may be more effective in removing trace metals than synthetic oxides used in laboratory studies. The model's ability to simulate pH, metal oxide precipitation-dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption provides a means of evaluating the complex interactions between trace metal chemistry and hydrologic transport at the field scale.

  8. Modeling bed load transport and step-pool morphology with a reduced-complexity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saletti, Matteo; Molnar, Peter; Hassan, Marwan A.; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Steep mountain channels are complex fluvial systems, where classical methods developed for lowland streams fail to capture the dynamics of sediment transport and bed morphology. Estimations of sediment transport based on average conditions have more than one order of magnitude of uncertainty because of the wide grain-size distribution of the bed material, the small relative submergence of coarse grains, the episodic character of sediment supply, and the complex boundary conditions. Most notably, bed load transport is modulated by the structure of the bed, where grains are imbricated in steps and similar bedforms and, therefore, they are much more stable then predicted. In this work we propose a new model based on a reduced-complexity (RC) approach focused on the reproduction of the step-pool morphology. In our 2-D cellular-automaton model entrainment, transport and deposition of particles are considered via intuitive rules based on physical principles. A parsimonious set of parameters allows the control of the behavior of the system, and the basic processes can be considered in a deterministic or stochastic way. The probability of entrainment of grains (and, as a consequence, particle travel distances and resting times) is a function of flow conditions and bed topography. Sediment input is fed at the upper boundary of the channel at a constant or variable rate. Our model yields realistic results in terms of longitudinal bed profiles and sediment transport trends. Phases of aggradation and degradation can be observed in the channel even under a constant input and the memory of the morphology can be quantified with long-range persistence indicators. Sediment yield at the channel outlet shows intermittency as observed in natural streams. Steps are self-formed in the channel and their stability is tested against the model parameters. Our results show the potential of RC models as complementary tools to more sophisticated models. They provide a realistic description of

  9. Obtaining parsimonious hydraulic conductivity fields using head and transport observations: A Bayesian geostatistical parameter estimation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienen, M.; Hunt, R.; Krabbenhoft, D.; Clemo, T.

    2009-08-01

    Flow path delineation is a valuable tool for interpreting the subsurface hydrogeochemical environment. Different types of data, such as groundwater flow and transport, inform different aspects of hydrogeologic parameter values (hydraulic conductivity in this case) which, in turn, determine flow paths. This work combines flow and transport information to estimate a unified set of hydrogeologic parameters using the Bayesian geostatistical inverse approach. Parameter flexibility is allowed by using a highly parameterized approach with the level of complexity informed by the data. Despite the effort to adhere to the ideal of minimal a priori structure imposed on the problem, extreme contrasts in parameters can result in the need to censor correlation across hydrostratigraphic bounding surfaces. These partitions segregate parameters into facies associations. With an iterative approach in which partitions are based on inspection of initial estimates, flow path interpretation is progressively refined through the inclusion of more types of data. Head observations, stable oxygen isotopes (18O/16O ratios), and tritium are all used to progressively refine flow path delineation on an isthmus between two lakes in the Trout Lake watershed, northern Wisconsin, United States. Despite allowing significant parameter freedom by estimating many distributed parameter values, a smooth field is obtained.

  10. Obtaining parsimonious hydraulic conductivity fields using head and transport observations: A bayesian geostatistical parameter estimation approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, M.; Hunt, R.; Krabbenhoft, D.; Clemo, T.

    2009-01-01

    Flow path delineation is a valuable tool for interpreting the subsurface hydrogeochemical environment. Different types of data, such as groundwater flow and transport, inform different aspects of hydrogeologie parameter values (hydraulic conductivity in this case) which, in turn, determine flow paths. This work combines flow and transport information to estimate a unified set of hydrogeologic parameters using the Bayesian geostatistical inverse approach. Parameter flexibility is allowed by using a highly parameterized approach with the level of complexity informed by the data. Despite the effort to adhere to the ideal of minimal a priori structure imposed on the problem, extreme contrasts in parameters can result in the need to censor correlation across hydrostratigraphic bounding surfaces. These partitions segregate parameters into faci??s associations. With an iterative approach in which partitions are based on inspection of initial estimates, flow path interpretation is progressively refined through the inclusion of more types of data. Head observations, stable oxygen isotopes (18O/16O) ratios), and tritium are all used to progressively refine flow path delineation on an isthmus between two lakes in the Trout Lake watershed, northern Wisconsin, United States. Despite allowing significant parameter freedom by estimating many distributed parameter values, a smooth field is obtained. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of tether transportation is given. Four steps were used over a period of time. First, theoretical engineering feasibility and technology requirements were determined. Then the survivors of that effort went into step two in the analysis of promising candidates. Those survivors went into the third phase which is engineering design and cost benefits. Survivors entered into the demonstration mission definition phase. Transportation studies have covered two kinds of deployments. First, steady state deployment was studied. Like the TSS, it's nearly vertical. It takes a long time to deploy and involves relatively high tether tension. Secondly, dynamic deployment was studied. Deployment started in an almost horizontal direction under a very shallow angle which allows a high deployment rate under very low tension. Momentum transfer here occurs by libration. Specific payloads were used to study tethered transportation benefits. Four transportation concepts were studied with regard to cost benefits. A tethered orbiter deboost from the space station, an OTV boost up from the Space Station, a science platform on a tether with a possible micro-g lab moving in between platform and station, and a tethered boost of payloads fromthe orbiter are the four concepts. These benefits are examined in detail.

  12. A Comprehensive Approach for the Ergonomic Evaluation of 13 Emergency and Transport Ventilators.

    PubMed

    Marjanovic, Nicolas; L'Her, Erwan

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an important part of emergency medicine and is frequently used for transportation. Human errors during ventilator settings are frequent and may be associated with high morbidity/mortality. The aim of the study was to provide a complete ergonomic evaluation of emergency and transport ventilators, taking into account objective and subjective human-machine interface assessments and individual mental work load. We performed a prospective bench ergonomic evaluation of 13 emergency and transport ventilators, using standardized conditions and a global methodological approach. The study was performed in an evaluation laboratory dedicated to respiratory care, and 12 emergency physicians unfamiliar with the tested devices were included in the evaluation. The ventilators were classified into 3 categories (simple, sophisticated, and ICU-like). Objective chronometric evaluations were conducted considering 9 tasks, and subjective evaluations were performed (ease of use, willingness to use, and user-friendliness of monitoring) using Likert scales. Mental work load evaluation was performed using the NASA Task Load Index scale. Overall task failure rate represented 4% of all attempts. Setting modifications, ventilation mode changes, and powering down durations were different between simple and other emergency and transport ventilator categories (P < .005). There was no difference between ventilator categories for the ease of use and user-friendliness of the monitoring. In contrast, the willingness to use was lower for simple devices, compared with sophisticated and ICU-like emergency and transport ventilators (2.9 ± 1.4 vs 3.9 ± 1.2, P = .002 and 4.3 ± 1, P < .001). No differences were observed between devices regarding the mental work load, except for several specific devices in the sophisticated category. A comprehensive ergonomic evaluation provides valuable information while investigating operational friendliness in emergency and transport

  13. Creating Intelligent Computer Workstation of a Freight Officer in a Single Information Space of Railway Transport: Synergetic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malybaev, Saken K.; Malaybaev, Nurlan S.; Isina, Botakoz M.; Kenzhekeeva, Akbope R.; Khuangan, Nurbol

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of researches aimed at the creation of automated workplaces for railway transport specialists with the help of intelligent information systems. The analysis of tendencies of information technologies development in the transport network was conducted. It was determined that the most effective approach is to create…

  14. Wave-function approach to Master equations for quantum transport and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvitz, Shmuel

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of the wave-function approach for derivation of the numberresolved Master equations, used for description of transport and measurement in mesoscopic systems. The review contains important amendments, clarifying subtle points in derivation of the Master equations and their validity. This completes the earlier works on the subject. It is demonstrated that the derivation does not assume weak coupling with the environment and reservoirs, but needs only high bias condition. This condition is very essential for validity of the Markovian Master equations, widely used for a phenomenological description of different physical processes.

  15. Lattice hydrodynamic model based traffic control: A transportation cyber-physical system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Sun, Dihua; Liu, Weining

    2016-11-01

    Lattice hydrodynamic model is a typical continuum traffic flow model, which describes the jamming transition of traffic flow properly. Previous studies in lattice hydrodynamic model have shown that the use of control method has the potential to improve traffic conditions. In this paper, a new control method is applied in lattice hydrodynamic model from a transportation cyber-physical system approach, in which only one lattice site needs to be controlled in this control scheme. The simulation verifies the feasibility and validity of this method, which can ensure the efficient and smooth operation of the traffic flow.

  16. Effects of alternate pictorial pathway displays and stereo 3-D presentation on simulated transport landing approach performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busquets, Anthony M.; Parrish, Russell V.; Williams, Steven P.

    1991-08-01

    `Pathway-in-the-sky'' flight display formats appear to offer exceptional path-control precision for future transport operational environments requiring complex-path approaches. With the conversion from the present instrument landing system (ILS) to the microwave landing system (MLS) within the National Airspace System, complex-path approaches could be used for commercial transport operations to address airport capacity issues. Therefore, the application of `pathway-in-the-sky'' formats to commercial transport operations is being evaluated at various flight display research laboratories. The introduction of true depth cues via stereopsis techniques offers a means of further enhancing these displays. The paper describes research conducted to determine the effectiveness of two candidate pathway formats for landing approach and to investigate the effect of their presentation in stereo versus nonstereo display environments. A real-time piloted simulation experiment comparing performance across these factors in a transport landing-approach task is discussed.

  17. Automatic guidance and control of a transport aircraft during a helical landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A linear optimal regulator theory was applied to a nonlinear simulation of a transport aircraft performing a helical landing approach. A closed-form expression for the quasi-steady nominal flight path is presented along with the method for determining the corresponding constant nominal control inputs. The Jacobian matrices and the weighting matrices in the cost functional were time varying. A method of solving for the optimal feedback gains is reviewed. The control system was tested on several alternative landing approaches using both 3 deg and 6 deg flight path angles. On each landing approach, the aircraft was subjected to large random initial-state errors and to randomly directed crosswinds. The system was also tested for sensitivity to changes in the parameters of the aircraft and of the atmosphere. Results indicate that performance of the optimal controller on all the 3 deg approaches is very good. The control system proved to be reasonably insensitive to parametric uncertainties. Performance is not as good on the 6 deg approaches. A modification to the 6 deg flight path was proposed for the purpose of improving performance.

  18. N3LO NN interaction adjusted to light nuclei in ab exitu approach

    DOE PAGES

    Shirokov, A. M.; Shin, I. J.; Kim, Y.; ...

    2016-08-09

    Here, we use phase-equivalent transformations to adjust off-shell properties of similarity renormalization group evolved chiral effective field theory NN interaction (Idaho N3LO) to fit selected binding energies and spectra of light nuclei in an ab exitu approach. Then, we test the transformed interaction on a set of additional observables in light nuclei to verify that it provides reasonable descriptions of these observables with an apparent reduced need for three- and many-nucleon interactions.

  19. ANFIS-based approach for predicting sediment transport in clean sewer

    PubMed Central

    Azamathulla, H. Md.; Ab. Ghani, Aminuddin; Fei, Seow Yen

    2012-01-01

    The necessity of sewers to carry sediment has been recognized for many years. Typically, old sewage systems were designated based on self-cleansing concept where there is no deposition in sewer. These codes were applicable to non-cohesive sediments (typically storm sewers). This study presents adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), which is a combination of neural network and fuzzy logic, as an alternative approach to predict the functional relationships of sediment transport in sewer pipe systems. The proposed relationship can be applied to different boundaries with partially full flow. The present ANFIS approach gives satisfactory results (r2 = 0.98 and RMSE = 0.002431) compared to the existing predictor. PMID:22389640

  20. Three-dimensional Neumann-series approach to model light transport in nonuniform media

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Clarkson, Eric; Hartman, John H.

    2014-01-01

    We present the implementation, validation, and performance of a three-dimensional (3D) Neumann-series approach to model photon propagation in nonuniform media using the radiative transport equation (RTE). The RTE is implemented for nonuniform scattering media in a spherical harmonic basis for a diffuse-optical-imaging setup. The method is parallelizable and implemented on a computing system consisting of NVIDIA Tesla C2050 graphics processing units (GPUs). The GPU implementation provides a speedup of up to two orders of magnitude over non-GPU implementation, which leads to good computational efficiency for the Neumann-series method. The results using the method are compared with the results obtained using the Monte Carlo simulations for various small-geometry phantoms, and good agreement is observed. We observe that the Neumann-series approach gives accurate results in many cases where the diffusion approximation is not accurate. PMID:23201945

  1. Quantum transport: A unified approach via a multivariate hypergeometric generating function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo-Junior, A. F.; Macêdo, A. M. S.

    2014-07-01

    We introduce a characteristic function method to describe charge-counting statistics (CCS) in phase coherent systems that directly connects the three most successful approaches to quantum transport: random-matrix theory (RMT), the nonlinear σ-model and the trajectory-based semiclassical method. The central idea is the construction of a generating function based on a multivariate hypergeometric function, which can be naturally represented in terms of quantities that are well-defined in each approach. We illustrate the power of our scheme by obtaining exact analytical results for the first four cumulants of CCS in a chaotic quantum dot coupled ideally to electron reservoirs via perfectly conducting leads with arbitrary number of open scattering channels.

  2. Flight evaluation of two segment approaches for jet transport noise abatement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. A.; Wohl, B.; Gale, C. M.

    1973-01-01

    A 75 flight-hour operational evaluation was conducted with a representative four-engine fan-jet transport in a representative airport environment. The flight instrument systems were modified to automatically provide pilots with smooth and continuous pitch steering command information during two-segment approaches. Considering adverse weather, minimum ceiling and flight crew experience criteria, a transition initiation altitude of approximately 800 feet AFL would have broadest acceptance for initiating two-segment approach procedures in scheduled service. The profile defined by the system gave an upper glidepath of approximately 6 1/2 degrees. This was 1/2 degree greater than inserted into the area navigation system. The glidepath error is apparently due to an erroneous along-track, distance-to-altitude profile.

  3. Fixed base simulator study of an externally blown flap STOL transport airplane during approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. D.; Nguyen, L. T.; Patton, J. M., Jr.; Deal, P. L.; Champine, R. A.; Carter, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    A fixed-base simulator study was conducted to determine the flight characteristics of a representative STOL transport having a high wing and equipped with an external-flow jet flap in combination with four high-bypass-ratio fan-jet engines during the approach and landing. Real-time digital simulation techniques were used. The computer was programed with equations of motion for six degrees of freedom and the aerodynamic inputs were based on measured wind-tunnel data. A visual display of a STOL airport was provided for simulation of the flare and touchdown characteristics. The primary piloting task was an instrument approach to a breakout at a 200-ft ceiling with a visual landing.

  4. A new dust transport approach to quantify anthropogenic sources of atmospheric PM10 deposition on lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lee; Thé, Jesse; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Stainsby, Eleanor A.; Winter, Jennifer G.

    2014-10-01

    Windblown dust simulations are one of the most uncertain types of atmospheric transport models. This study presents an integrated PM10 emission, transport and deposition model which has been validated using monitored data. This model characterizes the atmospheric phosphorus load focusing on the major local sources within the Lake Simcoe airshed including paved and unpaved roads, agricultural sources, construction sites and aggregate mining sources. This new approach substantially reduces uncertainty by providing improved estimates of the friction velocities than those developed previously. Modeling improvements were also made by generating and validating an hourly windfield using detailed meteorology, topography and land use data for the study area. The model was used to estimate dust emissions generated in the airshed and to simulate the long-range transport and deposition of PM10 to Lake Simcoe. The deposition results from the model were verified against observed bulk collector phosphorus concentration data for both wet and dry deposition. Bulk collector data from stations situated outside the airshed in a remote, undeveloped area were also compared to determine the background contribution from distant sources.

  5. Toward Optimized Bioclogging and Biocementation Through Combining Advanced Geophysical Monitoring and Reactive Transport Modeling Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, C. G.; Hubbard, S. S.; Wu, Y.; Surasani, V.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Commer, M.; Dou, S.; Kwon, T.; Li, L.; Fouke, B. W.; Coates, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Bioclogging and biocementation offer exciting opportunities for solutions to diverse problems ranging from soil stabilization to microbially enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. The effectiveness of bioclogging and biocementation strategies is governed by processes and properties ranging from microbial metabolism at the submicron scale, to changes in pore geometry at the pore scale, to geological heterogeneities at the field scale. Optimization of these strategies requires advances in mechanistic reactive transport modeling and geophysical monitoring methodologies. Our research focuses on (i) performing laboratory experiments to refine understanding of reaction networks and to quantify changes in hydrological properties (e.g. permeability), the evolution of biominerals and geophysical responses (focusing on seismic and electrical techniques); (ii) developing and using a reactive transport simulator capable of predicting the induced metabolic processes to numerically explore how to optimize the desired effect; and (iii) using loosely coupled reactive transport and geophysical simulators to explore detectability and resolvability of induced bioclogging and biocementation processes at the field scale using time-lapse geophysical methods. Here we present examples of our research focused on three different microbially-mediated methods to enhance hydrocarbon recovery through selective clogging of reservior thief zones, including: (a) biopolymer clogging through dextran production; (b) biomineral clogging through iron oxide precipitation; and (c) biomineral clogging through carbonate precipitation. We will compare the utility of these approaches for enhancing hydrocarbon recovery and will describe the utility of geophysical methods to remotely monitor associated field treatments.

  6. Combinatorial theory of the semiclassical evaluation of transport moments. I. Equivalence with the random matrix approach

    SciTech Connect

    Berkolaiko, G.; Kuipers, J.

    2013-11-15

    To study electronic transport through chaotic quantum dots, there are two main theoretical approaches. One involves substituting the quantum system with a random scattering matrix and performing appropriate ensemble averaging. The other treats the transport in the semiclassical approximation and studies correlations among sets of classical trajectories. There are established evaluation procedures within the semiclassical evaluation that, for several linear and nonlinear transport moments to which they were applied, have always resulted in the agreement with random matrix predictions. We prove that this agreement is universal: any semiclassical evaluation within the accepted procedures is equivalent to the evaluation within random matrix theory. The equivalence is shown by developing a combinatorial interpretation of the trajectory sets as ribbon graphs (maps) with certain properties and exhibiting systematic cancellations among their contributions. Remaining trajectory sets can be identified with primitive (palindromic) factorisations whose number gives the coefficients in the corresponding expansion of the moments of random matrices. The equivalence is proved for systems with and without time reversal symmetry.

  7. Combinatorial theory of the semiclassical evaluation of transport moments. I. Equivalence with the random matrix approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkolaiko, G.; Kuipers, J.

    2013-11-01

    To study electronic transport through chaotic quantum dots, there are two main theoretical approaches. One involves substituting the quantum system with a random scattering matrix and performing appropriate ensemble averaging. The other treats the transport in the semiclassical approximation and studies correlations among sets of classical trajectories. There are established evaluation procedures within the semiclassical evaluation that, for several linear and nonlinear transport moments to which they were applied, have always resulted in the agreement with random matrix predictions. We prove that this agreement is universal: any semiclassical evaluation within the accepted procedures is equivalent to the evaluation within random matrix theory. The equivalence is shown by developing a combinatorial interpretation of the trajectory sets as ribbon graphs (maps) with certain properties and exhibiting systematic cancellations among their contributions. Remaining trajectory sets can be identified with primitive (palindromic) factorisations whose number gives the coefficients in the corresponding expansion of the moments of random matrices. The equivalence is proved for systems with and without time reversal symmetry.

  8. A novel explicit approach to model bromide and pesticide transport in soils containing macropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, J.; Zehe, E.

    2011-01-01

    The present study tests whether an explicit treatment of worm burrows is feasible for simulating water flow, bromide and pesticide transport in structured heterogeneous soils. The essence is to represent worm burrows as morphologically connected paths of low flow resistance in the spatially highly resolved model domain. A recent Monte Carlo study (Klaus and Zehe, 2010) revealed that this approach allowed successful reproduction of tile drain event discharge recorded during an irrigation experiment at a tile drained field site. However, several "hillslope architectures" that were all consistent with the available extensive data base allowed a good reproduction of tile drain flow response. Our second objective was thus to find out whether this "equifinality" in spatial model setups may be reduced when including bromide tracer data in the model falsification process. We thus simulated transport of bromide and Isoproturon (IPU) for the 13 spatial model setups, which performed best with respect to reproduce tile drain event discharge, without any further calibration. All model setups allowed a very good prediction of the temporal dynamics of cumulated bromide leaching into the tile drain, while only four of them matched the accumulated water balance and accumulated bromide loss into the tile drain. The number of behavioural model architectures could thus be reduced to four. One of those setups was used for simulating transport of IPU, using different parameter combinations to characterise adsorption according to the Footprint data base. Simulations could, however, only reproduce the observed leaching behaviour, when we allowed for retardation coefficients that were very close to one.

  9. Approaching disorder-free transport in high-mobility conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Venkateshvaran, Deepak; Nikolka, Mark; Sadhanala, Aditya; Lemaur, Vincent; Zelazny, Mateusz; Kepa, Michal; Hurhangee, Michael; Kronemeijer, Auke Jisk; Pecunia, Vincenzo; Nasrallah, Iyad; Romanov, Igor; Broch, Katharina; McCulloch, Iain; Emin, David; Olivier, Yoann; Cornil, Jerome; Beljonne, David; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2014-11-20

    Conjugated polymers enable the production of flexible semiconductor devices that can be processed from solution at low temperatures. Over the past 25 years, device performance has improved greatly as a wide variety of molecular structures have been studied. However, one major limitation has not been overcome; transport properties in polymer films are still limited by pervasive conformational and energetic disorder. This not only limits the rational design of materials with higher performance, but also prevents the study of physical phenomena associated with an extended π-electron delocalization along the polymer backbone. Here we report a comparative transport study of several high-mobility conjugated polymers by field-effect-modulated Seebeck, transistor and sub-bandgap optical absorption measurements. We show that in several of these polymers, most notably in a recently reported, indacenodithiophene-based donor-acceptor copolymer with a near-amorphous microstructure, the charge transport properties approach intrinsic disorder-free limits at which all molecular sites are thermally accessible. Molecular dynamics simulations identify the origin of this long sought-after regime as a planar, torsion-free backbone conformation that is surprisingly resilient to side-chain disorder. Our results provide molecular-design guidelines for 'disorder-free' conjugated polymers.

  10. Transportability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-25

    psi). (g) Maximum axle load (pneumatic tires) - 2,268 kg (5,000 lb). (h) Maximum wheel load (pneumatic tires) - 1,134 kg (2,500 lb). (i...survivability following the shock or vibration environment induced. Vehicles not typically transported with payload such as wreckers, truck tractors ...combination weight rating (GCWR) means the value specified by the manufacturer as the loaded weight of the combination vehicle. (d) Gross axle weight

  11. Transportation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    International (cont.) European Commission – Directorate General for Energy and Transport, Brussels, Belgium Headquarters Netherlands Customs ...100,000 by 2014. As a result of these challenges and due to the increase in intermodal freight traffic, a customer /client relationship has...increase by 50% domestically and 110% internationally by 2016 (CRS, 2007). United Parcel Service (UPS), FedEx, and DHL currently control the package

  12. Increasing oral absorption of polar neuraminidase inhibitors: a prodrug transporter approach applied to oseltamivir analogue.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak; Varghese Gupta, Sheeba; Dahan, Arik; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Hilfinger, John; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-02-04

    Poor oral absorption is one of the limiting factors in utilizing the full potential of polar antiviral agents. The neuraminidase target site requires a polar chemical structure for high affinity binding, thus limiting oral efficacy of many high affinity ligands. The aim of this study was to overcome this poor oral absorption barrier, utilizing prodrug to target the apical brush border peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1). Guanidine oseltamivir carboxylate (GOCarb) is a highly active polar antiviral agent with insufficient oral bioavailability (4%) to be an effective therapeutic agent. In this report we utilize a carrier-mediated targeted prodrug approach to improve the oral absorption of GOCarb. Acyloxy(alkyl) ester based amino acid linked prodrugs were synthesized and evaluated as potential substrates of mucosal transporters, e.g., PEPT1. Prodrugs were also evaluated for their chemical and enzymatic stability. PEPT1 transport studies included [(3)H]Gly-Sar uptake inhibition in Caco-2 cells and cellular uptake experiments using HeLa cells overexpressing PEPT1. The intestinal membrane permeabilities of the selected prodrugs and the parent drug were then evaluated for epithelial cell transport across Caco-2 monolayers, and in the in situ rat intestinal jejunal perfusion model. Prodrugs exhibited a pH dependent stability with higher stability at acidic pHs. Significant inhibition of uptake (IC(50) <1 mM) was observed for l-valyl and l-isoleucyl amino acid prodrugs in competition experiments with [(3)H]Gly-Sar, indicating a 3-6 times higher affinity for PEPT1 compared to valacyclovir, a well-known PEPT1 substrate and >30-fold increase in affinity compared to GOCarb. The l-valyl prodrug exhibited significant enhancement of uptake in PEPT1/HeLa cells and compared favorably with the well-absorbed valacyclovir. Transepithelial permeability across Caco-2 monolayers showed that these amino acid prodrugs have a 2-5-fold increase in permeability as compared to the parent drug and

  13. A systems approach to energy management and policy in commuter rail transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owan, Ransome Egimine

    1998-12-01

    This research is motivated by a recognition of energy as a significant part of the transportation problem. Energy is a long-term variable cost that is controllable. The problem is comprised of: the limited supply of energy, chronic energy deficits and oil imports, energy cost, poor fuel substitution, and the undesirable environmental effects of transportation fuels (Green House Gases and global warming). Mass transit systems are energy intensive networks and energy is a direct constraint to the supply of affordable transportation. Commuter railroads are also relatively unresponsive to energy price changes due to travel demand patterns, firm power needs and slow adoption of efficient train technologies. However, the long term energy demand is lacking in existing transportation planning philosophy. In spite of the apparent oversight, energy is as important as urban land use, funding and congestion, all of which merit explicit treatment. This research was conducted in the form of a case study of New Jersey Transit in an attempt to broaden the understanding of the long-term effects of energy in a transportation environment. The systems approach method that is driven by heuristic models was utilized to investigate energy usage, transit peer group efficiency, energy management regimes, and the tradeoffs between energy and transportation, a seldom discussed topic in the field. Implicit in systems thinking is the methodological hunt for solutions. The energy problem was divided into thinking is the methodological hunt for solutions. The energy problem was divided into smaller parts that in turn were simpler to solve. The research presented five heuristic models: Transit Energy Aggregation Model, Structural Energy Consumption Model, Traction Power Consumption Model, Conjunctive Demand Model, and a Managerial Action Module. A putative relationship was established between traction energy, car-miles, seasonal and ambient factors, without inference of direct causality. The co

  14. A Rayleighian approach for modeling kinetics of ionic transport in polymeric media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Mahalik, Jyoti P.; Bocharova, Vera; Stacy, Eric W.; Gainaru, Catalin; Saito, Tomonori; Gobet, Mallory P.; Greenbaum, Steve; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2017-02-01

    We report a theoretical approach for analyzing impedance of ionic liquids (ILs) and charged polymers such as polymerized ionic liquids (PolyILs) within linear response. The approach is based on the Rayleigh dissipation function formalism, which provides a computational framework for a systematic study of various factors, including polymer dynamics, in affecting the impedance. We present an analytical expression for the impedance within linear response by constructing a one-dimensional model for ionic transport in ILs/PolyILs. This expression is used to extract mutual diffusion constants, the length scale of mutual diffusion, and thicknesses of a low-dielectric layer on the electrodes from the broadband dielectric spectroscopy measurements done for an IL and three PolyILs. Also, static dielectric permittivities of the IL and the PolyILs are determined. The extracted mutual diffusion constants are compared with the self-diffusion constants of ions measured using pulse field gradient (PFG) fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). For the first time, excellent agreement between the diffusivities extracted from the Electrode Polarization spectra (EPS) of IL/PolyILs and those measured using the PFG-NMR are found, which allows the use of the EPS and the PFG-NMR techniques in a complimentary manner for a general understanding of the ionic transport.

  15. A numerical spectral approach to solve the dislocation density transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djaka, K. S.; Taupin, V.; Berbenni, S.; Fressengeas, C.

    2015-09-01

    A numerical spectral approach is developed to solve in a fast, stable and accurate fashion, the quasi-linear hyperbolic transport equation governing the spatio-temporal evolution of the dislocation density tensor in the mechanics of dislocation fields. The approach relies on using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. Low-pass spectral filters are employed to control both the high frequency Gibbs oscillations inherent to the Fourier method and the fast-growing numerical instabilities resulting from the hyperbolic nature of the transport equation. The numerical scheme is validated by comparison with an exact solution in the 1D case corresponding to dislocation dipole annihilation. The expansion and annihilation of dislocation loops in 2D and 3D settings are also produced and compared with finite element approximations. The spectral solutions are shown to be stable, more accurate for low Courant numbers and much less computation time-consuming than the finite element technique based on an explicit Galerkin-least squares scheme.

  16. Designing optimal transportation networks: a knowledge-based computer-aided multicriteria approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, S.I.

    1986-01-01

    The dissertation investigates the applicability of using knowledge-based expert systems (KBES) approach to solve the single-mode (automobile), fixed-demand, discrete, multicriteria, equilibrium transportation-network-design problem. Previous works on this problem has found that mathematical programming method perform well on small networks with only one objective. Needed is a solution technique that can be used on large networks having multiple, conflicting criteria with different relative importance weights. The KBES approach developed in this dissertation represents a new way to solve network design problems. The development of an expert system involves three major tasks: knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, and testing. For knowledge acquisition, a computer aided network design/evaluation model (UFOS) was developed to explore the design space. This study is limited to the problem of designing an optimal transportation network by adding and deleting capacity increments to/from any link in the network. Three weighted criteria were adopted for use in evaluating each design alternative: cost, average V/C ratio, and average travel time.

  17. A Systematic Solution Approach for Neutron Transport Problems in Diffuse Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manteuffel, T. A.; Ressel, K. J.

    1996-01-01

    A systematic solution approach for the neutron transport equation, based on a least-squares finite-element discretization, is presented. This approach includes the theory for the existence and uniqueness of the analytical as well as of the discrete solution, bounds for the discretization error, and guidance for the development of an efficient multigrid solver for the resulting discrete problem. To guarantee the accuracy of the discrete solution for diffusive regimes, a scaling transformation is applied to the transport operator prior to the discretization. The key result is the proof of the V-ellipticity and continuity of the scaled least-squares bilinear form with constants that are independent of the total cross section and the absorption cross section. For a variety of least-squares finite-element discretizations this leads to error bounds that remain valid in diffusive regimes. Moreover, for problems in slab geometry a full multigrid solver is presented with V(1, 1)-cycle convergence rates approximately equal to 0.1, independent of the size of the total cross section and the absorption cross section.

  18. Modeling microbial transport in porous media: Traditional approaches and recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2007-06-01

    A substantial research effort has been aimed at elucidating the role of various physical, chemical and biological factors on microbial transport and removal in natural subsurface environments. The major motivation of such studies is an enhanced mechanistic understanding of these processes for development of improved mathematical models of microbial transport and fate. In this review, traditional modeling approaches used to predict the migration and removal of microorganisms (e.g., viruses, bacteria, and protozoa) in saturated porous media are systematically evaluated. A number of these methods have inherent weaknesses or inconsistencies which are often overlooked or misunderstood in actual application. Some limitations of modeling methods reviewed here include the inappropriate use of the equilibrium adsorption approach, the observed breakdown of classical filtration theory, the inability of existing theories to predict microbial attachment rates, and omission of physical straining and microbe detachment. These and other issues are considered with an emphasis on current research developments. Finally, recently proposed improvements to the most commonly used filtration model are discussed, with particular consideration of straining and microbe motility.

  19. Quantifying Vadose Zone Flow and Transport Uncertainties Using a Unified, Hierarchical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Philip D.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schaap, Marcel

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop and demonstrate a general approach for modeling flow and transport in the heterogeneous vadose zone. The approach uses similar media scaling, geostatistics, and conditional simulation methods to estimate soil hydraulic parameters at unsampled locations from field-measured water content data and scale-mean hydraulic parameters determined from available site characterization data. Neural network methods are being developed to estimate soil hydraulic parameters from more easily measured physical property data such as bulk density, organic matter content, and percentages of sand, silt, and clay (or particle-size distributions). Field water content distributions are being estimated using various geophysical methods including neutron moderation, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistance tomography. One of the primary goals of this research is to determine relationships between the type of data used in model parameterization, the quantity of data available, the scale of the measurement, and the uncertainty in predictions of flow and transport using these methods. Evaluation of the relationships between available data, scale, and uncertainty are using data from a large-scale, controlled field experiment.

  20. Quantifying Vadose Zone Flow and Transport Uncertainties Using a Unified, Hierarchical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Philip D.; Murray, Chris J.; Rockhold, Mark L.

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop and demonstrate a general approach for modeling flow and transport in the heterogeneous vadose zone. The approach uses similar media scaling, geostatistics, and conditional simulation methods to estimate soil hydraulic parameters at unsampled locations from field-measured water content data and scale-mean hydraulic parameters determined from available site characterization data. Neural network methods are being developed to estimate soil hydraulic parameters from more easily measured physical property data such as bulk density, organic matter content, and percentages of sand, silt, and clay (or particle-size distributions). Field water content distributions are being estimated using various geophysical methods including neutron moderation, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistance tomography. One of the primary goals of this research is to determine relationships between the type of data used in model parameterization, th e quantity of data available, the scale of the measurement, and the uncertainty in predictions of flow and transport using these methods. Evaluation of the relationships between available data, scale, and uncertainty will use primarily existing data from large-scale, controlled experiments.

  1. A Rayleighian approach for modeling kinetics of ionic transport in polymeric media

    DOE PAGES

    Kumar, Rajeev; Mahalik, Jyoti P.; Bocharova, Vera; ...

    2017-02-14

    Here, we report a theoretical approach for analyzing impedance of ionic liquids (ILs) and charged polymers such as polymerized ionic liquids (PolyILs) within linear response. The approach is based on the Rayleigh dissipation function formalism, which provides a computational framework for a systematic study of various factors, including polymer dynamics, in affecting the impedance. We present an analytical expression for the impedance within linear response by constructing a one-dimensional model for ionic transport in ILs/PolyILs. This expression is used to extract mutual diffusion constants, the length scale of mutual diffusion, and thicknesses of a low-dielectric layer on the electrodes frommore » the broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) measurements done for an IL and three PolyILs. Also, static dielectric permittivities of the IL and the PolyILs are determined. The extracted mutual diffusion constants are compared with the self diffusion constants of ions measured using pulse field gradient (PFG) fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). For the first time, excellent agreements between the diffusivities extracted from the Electrode Polarization spectra (EPS) of IL/PolyILs and those measured using the PFG-NMR are found, which allows the use of the EPS and the PFG-NMR techniques in a complimentary manner for a general understanding of the ionic transport.« less

  2. A Dual Model-Reduction Approach to Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanko, Z.; Boyce, S. E.; Yeh, W. W. G.

    2014-12-01

    Mathematical-model reduction using singular value decomposition (SVD) has been shown to be an effective method for reducing the computer runtime of linear and nonlinear groundwater-flow models without sacrificing accuracy. The discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) is an alternate method of model reduction better suited for nonlinear systems. In this research, both methods are applied simultaneously to reduce the dimensionality of a 3-D unconfined groundwater-flow model: SVD to reduce the column space and DEIM to reduce the row space. The results of the dimensional reduction can approach several orders of magnitude, resulting in significantly faster simulation runtimes. The implementation and benefit of SVD/DEIM model reduction is demonstrated through its application to a synthetic, groundwater-flow and solute-transport model with groundwater extraction wells that influence of seawater intrusion. The developed methodology identifies the dominant locations (i.e. the discrete points) of the model that have the most influence on the water levels and saltwater concentrations. The result is a reduced model constructed from fewer equations (row dimension) and is projected into a reduced subspace (column dimension). The methodology first independently constructs the reduced flow and transport models such that their errors are minimized for a flow-only model and transport-only model, respectively. Once the two reduced models have been established, a density-dependent flow simulation is preformed by iterating between the flow and transport models for each time step. Further analysis of the SVD/DEIM method illustrates the tradeoff between magnitude of the reduced dimension and corresponding errors in model output, with respect to the unreduced and independently reduced models. The application of this method shows that runtime can be significantly decreased for models of this type while still maintaining control of desired model accuracy.

  3. Modeling and numerical simulation of the transport processes inside DSSC using a monodomain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neculae, Adrian; Paulescu, Marius; Curticapean, Dan

    2008-04-01

    Computer modeling has become a necessity in the solar cells design. A computer model allows the study of the physical behavior of the device offering valuable information on the effects of each parameter on device performance. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) have attracted a lot of interest in recent years, in research as well as in industry. In present, the development has reached a stage where detailed physical models may contribute considerably to the optimization of these devices. Up to now, there is not a comprehensive model which links material parameters of a DSSC based on TiO2 nanocrystals DSSC to the electrical performance of the whole cell, such as I-V characteristic and spectral response. Typically, a DSSC consists of two layers, a TiO2 porous structure coated with a suitable light-absorbing charge-transfer dye wetted with an iodide/triiodide redox electrolyte and a bulk electrolyte layer, sandwiched between two glass substrates which are coated with transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layers. In this paper we present a model for the transport processes inside the DSSC based on the classical transport equations in one dimension. The equations are solved using the monodomain approach, which consists of using a single set of equations, with different values for the transport coefficients inside the two regions of the computational domain. The transport coefficients for the porous medium are calculated using homogenization techniques. The model permits the computation of the dye-sensitized solar cell I-V curves and efficiency. As model application, the influence of the most important material parameters on the cell performances investigated by numerical simulation is reported.

  4. Nested modeling approach to quantify sediment transport pathways and temporal variability of barrier island evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J. W.; Dalyander, S.; Sherwood, C. R.; Thompson, D. M.; Plant, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Chandeleur Islands, situated off the coast of Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico, comprise a sand-starved barrier island system that has been disintegrating over the last decade. The persistent sediment transport in this area is predominantly directed alongshore but overwash and inundation during storm conditions has fragmented the island and reduced the subaerial extent by almost 75% since 2001. From 2010-2011 a sand berm was constructed along the Gulf side of the island adding 20 million cubic yards of sediment to this barrier island system. The redistribution of this sediment, particularly whether it remains in the active system and progrades the barrier island, has been evaluated using a series of numerical models and an extensive set of in situ and remote sensing observations. We have developed a coupled numerical modeling system capable of simulating morphologic evolution of the sand berm and barrier island using observations and predictions of regional and nearshore oceanographic processes. A nested approach provides large scale oceanographic information to force island evolution in a series of smaller grids, including two nearshore domains that are designed to simulate (1) the persistent alongshore sediment transport O(months-years) and (2) the overwash and breaching of the island/berm due to cross-shore forcing driven by winter cold fronts and tropical storms (O(hours-days)). The coupled model is evaluated using the observations of waves, water levels, currents, and topographic/morphologic change. Modeled processes are then used to identify the dominant sediment transport pathways and quantify the role of alongshore and cross-shore sediment transport in evolving the barrier island over a range of temporal scales.

  5. A second order kinetic approach for modeling solute retention and transport in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, H. M.; Amacher, M. C.

    1988-12-01

    We present a second-order kinetic approach for the description of solute retention during transport in soils. The basis for this approach is that it accounts for the sites on the soil matrix which are accessible for retention of the reactive solutes in solution. This approach was incorporated with the fully kinetic two-site model where the difference between the characteristics of the two types of sites is based on the rate of kinetic retention reactions. We also assume that the retention mechanisms are site-specific, e.g., the sorbed phase on type 1 sites may be characteristically different in their energy of reaction and/or the solute species from that on type 2 sites. The second-order two-site (SOTS) model was capable of describing the kinetic retention behavior of Cr(VI) batch data for Olivier, Windsor, and Cecil soils. Using independently measured parameters, the SOTS model was successful in predicting experimental Cr breakthrough curves (BTC's). The proposed second-order approach was also extended to the diffusion controlled mobile-immobile or two-region (SOMIM) model. The use of estimated parameters (e.g., the mobile water fraction and mass transfer coefficients) for the SOMIM model did not provide improved predictions of Cr BTC's in comparison to the SOTS model. The failure of the mobile-immobile model was attributed to the lack of nonequilibrium conditions for the two regions in these soils.

  6. Towards a filtered density function approach for reactive transport in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciu, N.; Schüler, L.; Attinger, S.; Knabner, P.

    2016-04-01

    Evolution equations for probability density functions (PDFs) and filtered density functions (FDFs) of random species concentrations weighted by conserved scalars are formulated as Fokker-Planck equations describing stochastically equivalent processes in concentration-position spaces. This approach provides consistent numerical PDF/FDF solutions, given by the density in the concentration-position space of an ensemble of computational particles governed by the associated Itô equations. The solutions are obtained by a global random walk (GRW) algorithm, which is stable, free of numerical diffusion, and practically insensitive to the increase of the number of particles. The general FDF approach and the GRW numerical solution are illustrated for a reduced complexity problem consisting of the transport of a single scalar in groundwater. Randomness is induced by the stochastic parameterization of the hydraulic conductivity, characterized by short range correlations and small variance. The objective is to infer the statistics of the random concentration sampled at the plume center of mass, integrated over the transverse dimension of a two-dimensional spatial domain. The PDF/FDF problem can therefore be formulated in a two-dimensional domain as well, a spatial dimension and one in the concentration space. The upscaled drift and diffusion coefficients describing the PDF transport in the physical space are estimated on single-trajectories of diffusion in velocity fields with short-range correlations, owing to their self-averaging property. The mixing coefficients describing the PDF transport in concentration spaces are parameterized by the trend and the noise inferred from the statistical analysis of an ensemble of simulated concentration time series, as well as by classical mixing models. A Gaussian spatial filter applied to a Kraichnan velocity field generator is used to construct coarse-grained simulations (CGS) for FDF problems. The purposes of the CGS simulations are

  7. Impedance Analysis of Ion Transport Through Supported Lipid Membranes Doped with Ionophores: A New Kinetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, P. E.; Vallejo, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Kinetics of facilitated ion transport through planar bilayer membranes are normally analyzed by electrical conductance methods. The additional use of electrical relaxation techniques, such as voltage jump, is necessary to evaluate individual rate constants. Although electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is recognized as the most powerful of the available electric relaxation techniques, it has rarely been used in connection with these kinetic studies. According to the new approach presented in this work, three steps were followed. First, a kinetic model was proposed that has the distinct quality of being general, i.e., it properly describes both carrier and channel mechanisms of ion transport. Second, the state equations for steady-state and for impedance experiments were derived, exhibiting the input–output representation pertaining to the model’s structure. With the application of a method based on the similarity transformation approach, it was possible to check that the proposed mechanism is distinguishable, i.e., no other model with a different structure exhibits the same input–output behavior for any input as the original. Additionally, the method allowed us to check whether the proposed model is globally identifiable (i.e., whether there is a single set of fit parameters for the model) when analyzed in terms of its impedance response. Thus, our model does not represent a theoretical interpretation of the experimental impedance but rather constitutes the prerequisite to select this type of experiment in order to obtain optimal kinetic identification of the system. Finally, impedance measurements were performed and the results were fitted to the proposed theoretical model in order to obtain the kinetic parameters of the system. The successful application of this approach is exemplified with results obtained for valinomycin–K+ in lipid bilayers supported onto gold substrates, i.e., an arrangement capable of emulating biological membranes. PMID:19669528

  8. Molecular dynamics and charge transport in organic semiconductors: a classical approach to modeling electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pelzer, Kenley M.; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Ratcliff, Laura E.; Tretiak, Sergei; Bair, Raymond A.; Gray, Stephen K.; Van Voorhis, Troy; Larsen, Ross E.; Darling, Seth B.

    2017-01-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are a promising carbon-neutral energy conversion technology, with recent improvements pushing power conversion efficiencies over 10%. A major factor limiting OPV performance is inefficiency of charge transport in organic semiconducting materials (OSCs). Due to strong coupling with lattice degrees of freedom, the charges form polarons, localized quasi-particles comprised of charges dressed with phonons. These polarons can be conceptualized as pseudo-atoms with a greater effective mass than a bare charge. Here we propose that due to this increased mass, polarons can be modeled with Langevin molecular dynamics (LMD), a classical approach with a computational cost much lower than most quantum mechanical methods. Here we present LMD simulations of charge transfer between a pair of fullerene molecules, which commonly serve as electron acceptors in OSCs. We find transfer rates consistent with experimental measurements of charge mobility, suggesting that this method may provide quantitative predictions of efficiency when used to simulate materials on the device scale. Our approach also offers information that is not captured in the overall transfer rate or mobility: in the simulation data, we observe exactly when and why intermolecular transfer events occur. In addition, we demonstrate that these simulations can shed light on the properties of polarons in OSCs. In conclusion, much remains to be learned about these quasi-particles, and there are no widely accepted methods for calculating properties such as effective mass and friction. Lastly, our model offers a promising approach to exploring mass and friction as well as providing insight into the details of polaron transport in OSCs.

  9. Molecular dynamics and charge transport in organic semiconductors: a classical approach to modeling electron transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Pelzer, Kenley M.; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Ratcliff, Laura E.; ...

    2017-01-11

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are a promising carbon-neutral energy conversion technology, with recent improvements pushing power conversion efficiencies over 10%. A major factor limiting OPV performance is inefficiency of charge transport in organic semiconducting materials (OSCs). Due to strong coupling with lattice degrees of freedom, the charges form polarons, localized quasi-particles comprised of charges dressed with phonons. These polarons can be conceptualized as pseudo-atoms with a greater effective mass than a bare charge. We propose that due to this increased mass, polarons can be modeled with Langevin molecular dynamics (LMD), a classical approach with a computational cost much lower than mostmore » quantum mechanical methods. Here we present LMD simulations of charge transfer between a pair of fullerene molecules, which commonly serve as electron acceptors in OSCs. We find transfer rates consistent with experimental measurements of charge mobility, suggesting that this method may provide quantitative predictions of efficiency when used to simulate materials on the device scale. Our approach also offers information that is not captured in the overall transfer rate or mobility: in the simulation data, we observe exactly when and why intermolecular transfer events occur. In addition, we demonstrate that these simulations can shed light on the properties of polarons in OSCs. Much remains to be learned about these quasi-particles, and there are no widely accepted methods for calculating properties such as effective mass and friction. Lastly, our model offers a promising approach to exploring mass and friction as well as providing insight into the details of polaron transport in OSCs.« less

  10. Molecular dynamics and charge transport in organic semiconductors: a classical approach to modeling electron transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Pelzer, Kenley M.; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Ratcliff, Laura E.; ...

    2017-01-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are a promising carbon-neutral energy conversion technology, with recent improvements pushing power conversion efficiencies over 10%. A major factor limiting OPV performance is inefficiency of charge transport in organic semiconducting materials (OSCs). Due to strong coupling with lattice degrees of freedom, the charges form polarons, localized quasi-particles comprised of charges dressed with phonons. These polarons can be conceptualized as pseudo-atoms with a greater effective mass than a bare charge. Here we propose that due to this increased mass, polarons can be modeled with Langevin molecular dynamics (LMD), a classical approach with a computational cost much lower thanmore » most quantum mechanical methods. Here we present LMD simulations of charge transfer between a pair of fullerene molecules, which commonly serve as electron acceptors in OSCs. We find transfer rates consistent with experimental measurements of charge mobility, suggesting that this method may provide quantitative predictions of efficiency when used to simulate materials on the device scale. Our approach also offers information that is not captured in the overall transfer rate or mobility: in the simulation data, we observe exactly when and why intermolecular transfer events occur. In addition, we demonstrate that these simulations can shed light on the properties of polarons in OSCs. In conclusion, much remains to be learned about these quasi-particles, and there are no widely accepted methods for calculating properties such as effective mass and friction. Lastly, our model offers a promising approach to exploring mass and friction as well as providing insight into the details of polaron transport in OSCs.« less

  11. A dual-permeability approach to preferential water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; Comegna, Alessandro; Gerke, Horst H.; Basile, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    The pore systems in most natural soils is dynamically changing due to alternating swelling and shrinkage processes, which induces changes in pore volume and pore size distribution including deformations in pore geometry. This is a serious difficulty for modeling flow and transport in dual permeability approaches, as it will also require that the geometrical deformation of both the soil matrix and the fracture porous systems be taken into account, as well as the dynamics of soil hydraulic properties in response to the domain deformations. This study follows up a previous work by the same authors extending the classical rigid (RGD) approach formerly proposed by Gerke and van Genuchten, to account for shrinking effects (SHR) in modeling water flow and solute transport in dual-permeability porous media. In this study we considered three SHR scenarios, assuming that aggregate shrinkage may change either: (i) the hydraulic properties of the two pore domains, (ii) their relative fractions, and (iii) both, hydraulic properties and fractions of the two domains. The objective was to compare simulation results obtained under the RGD and the SHR assumptions to illustrate the impact of matrix volume changes on water storage, water fluxes and solute concentrations during: 1) An infiltration process bringing an initially dry soil to saturation, 2) A drainage process starting from an initially saturated soil. For an infiltration process, the simulated wetting front and the solute concentration propagation velocity, as well as the water fluxes, water and solute exchange rates, for the three SHR scenarios significantly deviated from the RGD. By contrast, relatively similar water content profiles evolved under all scenarios during drying. Overall, compared to the RGD approach, the effect of changing the hydraulic properties and the weight of the two domains according to the shrinkage behavior of the soil aggregates induced a much more rapid response in terms of water fluxes and

  12. Prompt-photon plus jet associated photoproduction at HERA in the parton Reggeization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniehl, B. A.; Nefedov, M. A.; Saleev, V. A.

    2014-06-01

    We study the photoproduction of isolated prompt photons associated with hadron jets in the framework of the parton Reggeization approach. The cross section distributions in the transverse energies and pseudorapidities of the prompt photon and the jet as well as the azimuthal-decorrelation variables measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at DESY HERA are nicely described by our predictions. The main improvements with respect to previous studies in the kT-factorization framework include the application of the Reggeized-quark formalism, the generation of exactly gauge-invariant amplitudes with off-shell initial-state quarks, and the exact treatment of the γR→γg box contribution with off-shell initial-state gluons.

  13. Intercomparison of Multiscale Modeling Approaches in Simulating Subsurface Flow and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Mehmani, Y.; Barajas-Solano, D. A.; Song, H. S.; Balhoff, M.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Scheibe, T. D.

    2016-12-01

    Hybrid multiscale simulations that couple models across scales are critical to advance predictions of the larger system behavior using understanding of fundamental processes. In the current study, three hybrid multiscale methods are intercompared: multiscale loose-coupling method, multiscale finite volume (MsFV) method and multiscale mortar method. The loose-coupling method enables a parallel workflow structure based on the Swift scripting environment that manages the complex process of executing coupled micro- and macro-scale models without being intrusive to the at-scale simulators. The MsFV method applies microscale and macroscale models over overlapping subdomains of the modeling domain and enforces continuity of concentration and transport fluxes between models via restriction and prolongation operators. The mortar method is a non-overlapping domain decomposition approach capable of coupling all permutations of pore- and continuum-scale models with each other. In doing so, Lagrange multipliers are used at interfaces shared between the subdomains so as to establish continuity of species/fluid mass flux. Subdomain computations can be performed either concurrently or non-concurrently depending on the algorithm used. All the above methods have been proven to be accurate and efficient in studying flow and transport in porous media. However, there has not been any field-scale applications and benchmarking among various hybrid multiscale approaches. To address this challenge, we apply all three hybrid multiscale methods to simulate water flow and transport in a conceptualized 2D modeling domain of the hyporheic zone, where strong interactions between groundwater and surface water exist across multiple scales. In all three multiscale methods, fine-scale simulations are applied to a thin layer of riverbed alluvial sediments while the macroscopic simulations are used for the larger subsurface aquifer domain. Different numerical coupling methods are then applied between

  14. Physical Activity through Sustainable Transport Approaches (PASTA): a study protocol for a multicentre project.

    PubMed

    Gerike, Regine; de Nazelle, Audrey; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Panis, Luc Int; Anaya, Esther; Avila-Palencia, Ione; Boschetti, Florinda; Brand, Christian; Cole-Hunter, Tom; Dons, Evi; Eriksson, Ulf; Gaupp-Berghausen, Mailin; Kahlmeier, Sonja; Laeremans, Michelle; Mueller, Natalie; Orjuela, Juan Pablo; Racioppi, Francesca; Raser, Elisabeth; Rojas-Rueda, David; Schweizer, Christian; Standaert, Arnout; Uhlmann, Tina; Wegener, Sandra; Götschi, Thomas

    2016-01-07

    Only one-third of the European population meets the minimum recommended levels of physical activity (PA). Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for non-communicable diseases. Walking and cycling for transport (active mobility, AM) are well suited to provide regular PA. The European research project Physical Activity through Sustainable Transport Approaches (PASTA) pursues the following aims: (1) to investigate correlates and interrelations of AM, PA, air pollution and crash risk; (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of selected interventions to promote AM; (3) to improve health impact assessment (HIA) of AM; (4) to foster the exchange between the disciplines of public health and transport planning, and between research and practice. PASTA pursues a mixed-method and multilevel approach that is consistently applied in seven case study cities. Determinants of AM and the evaluation of measures to increase AM are investigated through a large scale longitudinal survey, with overall 14,000 respondents participating in Antwerp, Barcelona, London, Örebro, Rome, Vienna and Zurich. Contextual factors are systematically gathered in each city. PASTA generates empirical findings to improve HIA for AM, for example, with estimates of crash risks, factors on AM-PA substitution and carbon emissions savings from mode shifts. Findings from PASTA will inform WHO's online Health Economic Assessment Tool on the health benefits from cycling and/or walking. The study's wide scope, the combination of qualitative and quantitative methods and health and transport methods, the innovative survey design, the general and city-specific analyses, and the transdisciplinary composition of the consortium and the wider network of partners promise highly relevant insights for research and practice. Ethics approval has been obtained by the local ethics committees in the countries where the work is being conducted, and sent to the European Commission before the start of the survey. The PASTA website

  15. Numerical and experimental approaches to study soil transport and clogging in granular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanarska, Y.; Smith, J. J.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Lomov, I.; Glascoe, L. G.

    2012-12-01

    Failure of a dam by erosion ranks among the most serious accidents in civil engineering. The best way to prevent internal erosion is using adequate granular filters in the transition areas where important hydraulic gradients can appear. In case of cracking and erosion, if the filter is capable of retaining the eroded particles, the crack will seal and the dam safety will be ensured. Numerical modeling has proved to be a cost-effective tool for improving our understanding of physical processes. Traditionally, the consideration of flow and particle transport in porous media has focused on treating the media as continuum. Practical models typically address flow and transport based on the Darcy's law as a function of a pressure gradient and a medium-dependent permeability parameter. Additional macroscopic constitutes describe porosity, and permeability changes during the migration of a suspension through porous media. However, most of them rely on empirical correlations, which often need to be recalibrated for each application. Grain-scale modeling can be used to gain insight into scale dependence of continuum macroscale parameters. A finite element numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for fluid flow together with Lagrange multiplier technique for solid particles was applied to the simulation of soil filtration in the filter layers of gravity dam. The numerical approach was validated through comparison of numerical simulations with the experimental results of base soil particle clogging in the filter layers performed at ERDC. The numerical simulation correctly predicted flow and pressure decay due to particle clogging. The base soil particle distribution was almost identical to those measured in the laboratory experiment. It is believed that the agreement between simulations and experimental data demonstrates the applicability of the proposed approach for prediction of the soil transport and clogging in embankment dams. To get more precise understanding of

  16. The Data Transport Network: A Usenet-Based Approach For Data Retrieval From Remote Field Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentic, T. A.

    2005-12-01

    The Data Transport Network coordinates the collection of scientific data, instrument telemetry and post-processing for the delivery of real-time results over the Internet from instruments located at remote field sites with limited or unreliable network connections. The system was originally developed in 1999 for the distribution of large data sets collected by the radar, lidars and imagers at the NSF upper atmosphere research facility in Sondrestrom, Greenland. The system helped to mitigate disruptions in network connectivity and optimized transfers over the site's low-bandwidth satellite link. The core idea behind the system is to transfer data files as attachments in Usenet messages. The messages collected by a local news server are periodically transmitted to other servers on the Internet when link conditions permit. If the network goes down, data files continue to be stored locally and the server will periodically attempt to deliver the files for upwards of two weeks. Using this simple approach, the Data Transport Network is able to handle a large number of independent data streams from multiple instruments. Each data stream is posted into a separate news group. There are no limitations to the types of data files that can be sent and the system uses standard Internet protocols for encoding, accessing and transmitting files. A common framework allows for new data collection or processing programs to be easily integrated. The two-way nature of the communications also allows for data to be delivered to the site as well, a feature used for the remote control of instruments. In recent years, the Data Transport Network has been applied to small, low-power embedded systems. Coupled with satellite-based communications systems such as Iridium, these miniature Data Transport servers have found application in a number of remote instrument deployments in the Arctic. SRI's involvement as a team member in Veco Polar Resources, the NSF Office of Polar Programs Arctic

  17. Impact of air pollutants from surface transport sources on human health: A modeling and epidemiological approach.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Preeti; Jain, Suresh

    2015-10-01

    This study adopted an integrated 'source-to-receptor' assessment paradigm in order to determine the effects of emissions from passenger transport on urban air quality and human health in the megacity, Delhi. The emission modeling was carried out for the base year 2007 and three alternate (ALT) policy scenarios along with a business as usual (BAU) scenario for the year 2021. An Activity-Structure-Emission Factor (ASF) framework was adapted for emission modeling, followed by a grid-wise air quality assessment using AERMOD and a health impact assessment using an epidemiological approach. It was observed that a 2021-ALT-III scenario resulted in a maximum concentration reduction of ~24%, ~42% and ~58% for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and particulate matter (PM), respectively, compared to a 2021-BAU scenario. Further, it results in significant reductions in respiratory and cardiovascular mortality, morbidity and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY) by 41% and 58% on exposure to PM2.5 and NO2 concentrations when compared to the 2021-BAU scenario, respectively. In other words, a mix of proposed policy interventions namely the full-phased introduction of the Integrated Mass Transit System, fixed bus speed, stringent vehicle emission norms and a hike in parking fees for private vehicles would help in strengthening the capability of passenger transport to cater to a growing transport demand with a minimum health burden in the Delhi region. Further, the study estimated that the transport of goods would be responsible for ~5.5% additional VKT in the 2021-BAU scenario; however, it will contribute ~49% and ~55% additional NO2 and PM2.5 concentrations, respectively, in the Delhi region. Implementation of diesel particulate filters for goods vehicles in the 2021-ALT-IV-O scenario would help in the reduction of ~87% of PM2.5 concentration, compared to the 2021-BAU scenario; translating into a gain of 1267 and 505 DALY per million people from exposure to PM2.5 and NO

  18. Quantitative Prediction of Human Renal Clearance and Drug-Drug Interactions of Organic Anion Transporter Substrates Using In Vitro Transport Data: A Relative Activity Factor Approach.

    PubMed

    Mathialagan, Sumathy; Piotrowski, Mary A; Tess, David A; Feng, Bo; Litchfield, John; Varma, Manthena V

    2017-04-01

    Organic anion transporters (OATs) are important in the renal secretion, and thus, the clearance, of many drugs; and their functional change can result in pharmacokinetic variability. In this study, we applied transport rates measured in vitro using OAT-transfected human embryonic kidney cells to predict human renal secretory and total renal clearance of 31 diverse drugs. Selective substrates to OAT1 (tenofovir), OAT2 (acyclovir and ganciclovir), and OAT3 (benzylpenicillin, oseltamivir acid) were used to obtain relative activity factors (RAFs) for these individual transporters by relating in vitro transport clearance (after physiologic scaling) to in vivo secretory clearance. Using the estimated RAFs (0.64, 7.3, and 4.1, respectively, for OAT1, OAT2, and OAT3, respectively) and the in vitro active clearances, renal secretory clearance and total renal clearance were predicted with average fold errors (AFEs) of 1.89 and 1.40, respectively. The results show that OAT3-mediated transport play a predominant role in renal secretion for 22 of the 31 drugs evaluated. This mechanistic static approach was further applied to quantitatively predict renal drug-drug interactions (AFE ∼1.6) of the substrate drugs with probenecid, a clinical probe OAT inhibitor. In conclusion, the proposed in vitro-in vivo extrapolation approach is the first comprehensive attempt toward mechanistic modeling of renal secretory clearance based on routinely employed in vitro cell models.

  19. Characterization of Transient Transport Behavior During Biostimulation Field Experiments Using Novel Breakthrough Analysis Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, A.; Kowalsky, M.; Li, L.; Long, P.; Hubbard, S.

    2007-12-01

    Biostimulation experiments were performed to immobilize uranium within a shallow, unconsolidated, and unconfined aquifer at the DOE Integrated Field Challenge Site (IFC) in Rifle, CO. During experiments conducted in 2002 and 2003, twenty wells were used to deliver acetate and bromide to the contaminated aquifer over a 111 and 119 day period, respectively. Due to changes in the injection rate, the injection concentration and the groundwater level during the injection period, the mean concentration of the bromide injected to the aquifer was temporally variable. Although a dense dataset of bromide concentrations was collected from fifteen downgradient monitoring wells, interpretation of the bromide breakthrough datasets in terms of hydrological heterogeneity was difficult using conventional tracer test analysis methods due to the complex bromide input function. We developed two novel approaches for analyzing and interpreting breakthrough curves (BTC) in the presence of a complex tracer injection function. The first approach is based on conventional temporal moment analysis. It estimates the effective velocity and dispersivity based on changes of the first and second moment along the distance between the injection and the monitoring well. The second approach is based on the analytical solution of the one dimensional convection dispersion equation. To account for the complex injection function, here each step in the injection function is represented by an analytical solution of the one dimensional convection dispersion equation. These are weighted by the concentration of each step and combined based on superposition. Fit of this function to the BTCs permits the estimation of the effective velocity and dispersivity. We applied the developed approaches to the bromide BTCs at the IFC to characterize the flow and transport processes in the sense of a stream tube model. This analysis suggested that the novel BTC analysis approach greatly improved our ability to

  20. State Representation Approach for Atomistic Time-Dependent Transport Calculations in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Zelovich, Tamar; Kronik, Leeor; Hod, Oded

    2014-08-12

    We propose a new method for simulating electron dynamics in open quantum systems out of equilibrium, using a finite atomistic model. The proposed method is motivated by the intuitive and practical nature of the driven Liouville-von-Neumann equation approach of Sánchez et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124, 214708] and Subotnik et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 144105]. A key ingredient of our approach is a transformation of the Hamiltonian matrix from an atomistic to a state representation of the molecular junction. This allows us to uniquely define the bias voltage across the system while maintaining a proper thermal electronic distribution within the finite lead models. Furthermore, it allows us to investigate complex molecular junctions, including multilead configurations. A heuristic derivation of our working equation leads to explicit expressions for the damping and driving terms, which serve as appropriate electron sources and sinks that effectively "open" the finite model system. Although the method does not forbid it, in practice we find neither violation of Pauli's exclusion principles nor deviation from density matrix positivity throughout our numerical simulations of various tight-binding model systems. We believe that the new approach offers a practical and physically sound route for performing atomistic time-dependent transport calculations in realistic molecular junction models.

  1. Detecting the local transport properties and the dimensionality of transport of epitaxial graphene by a multi-point probe approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, Lucas; Perkins, Edward; Johannsen, Jens; Ulstrup, Søren; Fromm, Felix; Raidel, Christian; Seyller, Thomas; Hofmann, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of epitaxial monolayer graphene (MLG) and hydrogen-intercalated quasi free-standing bilayer graphene (QFBLG) on SiC(0001) are investigated by micro multi-point probes. Using a probe with 12 contacts, we perform four-point probe measurements with the possibility to effectively vary the contact spacing over more than one order of magnitude, allowing us to establish that the transport is purely two-dimensional. Combined with the carrier density obtained by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we find the room temperature mobility of MLG to be (870±120) cm2/V s. The transport in QFBLG is also found to be two-dimensional with a mobility of (1600±160) cm2/V s.

  2. A preliminary reactive transport approach to quantify swelling of clay-sulfate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, D.; Prommer, H.; Blum, P.; Butscher, C.; Siade, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    The processes underlying the swelling of clay-sulfate rocks are complex and have been the subject of numerous previous investigations. In general, the transformation of anhydrite into gypsum is considered the main mechanism of swelling, a process that is likely initiated by a change in hydraulic conditions, followed by influx of water and a change in geochemistry. Furthermore, it is accompanied by a volume increase of 61 % and a heat production of 28 kJ/mol. However, hydraulic and geochemical processes in the swelling zone, typically induced by construction measures such as borehole drillings, remain difficult to assess. In this study a numerical model was developed and applied to a site in Staufen, Germany, where significant swelling occurred in clay-sulfate rocks as a result of geothermal drillings. We used a field-scale dual-domain reactive transport modeling approach to investigate and quantify the importance of groundwater influx and geochemical reactions within the swelling zone. The observed swelling process was conceptualized through (i) a mobile domain that accounts for water flux and solute transport along preferential flow paths (PFP); and (ii) an immobile `reactive' domain considering the rate-limited transformation of anhydrite into gypsum. The model development was constrained by geodesic heave measurements at the ground surface as well as vertical temperature profiles. Both data types could be related to the predicted increase in rock volume and release of heat caused by the exothermal reaction, respectively. Compared to reported reaction rates of anhydrite dissolution and gypsum precipitation determined in laboratory experiments, our calibrated model yields considerably lower effective reaction rates. It was found that transport by PFP as well as the mass transfer between domains and therefore water availability impose a strong control on the magnitude and spatial extent of the simulated swelling process.

  3. Electron transport through a spin crossover junction. Perspectives from a wavefunction-based approach.

    PubMed

    Vela, Sergi; Verot, Martin; Fromager, Emmanuel; Robert, Vincent

    2017-02-14

    The present paper reports the application of a computational framework, based on the quantum master equation, the Fermi's golden Rule, and conventional wavefunction-based methods, to describe electron transport through a spin crossover molecular junction (Fe(bapbpy) (NCS)2, 1, bapbpy = N-(6-(6-(Pyridin-2-ylamino)pyridin-2-yl)pyridin-2-yl)-pyridin-2-amine). This scheme is an alternative to the standard approaches based on the relative position and nature of the frontier orbitals, as it evaluates the junction's Green's function by means of accurate state energies and wavefunctions. In the present work, those elements are calculated for the relevant states of the high- and low-spin species of 1, and they are used to evaluate the output conductance within a given range of bias- and gate-voltages. The contribution of the ground and low-lying excited states to the current is analyzed, and inspected in terms of their 2S + 1 Ms-states. In doing so, it is shown the relevance of treating not only the ground state in its maximum-Ms projection, as usually done in most computational-chemistry packages, but the whole spectrum of low-energy states of the molecule. Such improved representation of the junction has a notable impact on the total conductivity and, more importantly, it restores the equivalence between alpha and beta transport, which means that no spin polarization is observed in the absence of Zeeman splitting. Finally, this work inspects the strong- and weak-points of the suggested theoretical framework to understand electron transport through molecular switchable materials, identifies a pathway for future improvement, and offers a new insight into concepts that play a key role in spintronics.

  4. Electron transport through a spin crossover junction. Perspectives from a wavefunction-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela, Sergi; Verot, Martin; Fromager, Emmanuel; Robert, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    The present paper reports the application of a computational framework, based on the quantum master equation, the Fermi's golden Rule, and conventional wavefunction-based methods, to describe electron transport through a spin crossover molecular junction (Fe(bapbpy) (NCS)2, 1, bapbpy = N-(6-(6-(Pyridin-2-ylamino)pyridin-2-yl)pyridin-2-yl)-pyridin-2-amine). This scheme is an alternative to the standard approaches based on the relative position and nature of the frontier orbitals, as it evaluates the junction's Green's function by means of accurate state energies and wavefunctions. In the present work, those elements are calculated for the relevant states of the high- and low-spin species of 1, and they are used to evaluate the output conductance within a given range of bias- and gate-voltages. The contribution of the ground and low-lying excited states to the current is analyzed, and inspected in terms of their 2S + 1 Ms-states. In doing so, it is shown the relevance of treating not only the ground state in its maximum-Ms projection, as usually done in most computational-chemistry packages, but the whole spectrum of low-energy states of the molecule. Such improved representation of the junction has a notable impact on the total conductivity and, more importantly, it restores the equivalence between alpha and beta transport, which means that no spin polarization is observed in the absence of Zeeman splitting. Finally, this work inspects the strong- and weak-points of the suggested theoretical framework to understand electron transport through molecular switchable materials, identifies a pathway for future improvement, and offers a new insight into concepts that play a key role in spintronics.

  5. A novel explicit approach to model bromide and pesticide transport in connected soil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, J.; Zehe, E.

    2011-07-01

    The present study tests whether an explicit treatment of worm burrows and tile drains as connected structures is feasible for simulating water flow, bromide and pesticide transport in structured heterogeneous soils at hillslope scale. The essence is to represent worm burrows as morphologically connected paths of low flow resistance in a hillslope model. A recent Monte Carlo study (Klaus and Zehe, 2010, Hydrological Processes, 24, p. 1595-1609) revealed that this approach allowed successful reproduction of tile drain event discharge recorded during an irrigation experiment at a tile drained field site. However, several "hillslope architectures" that were all consistent with the available extensive data base allowed a good reproduction of tile drain flow response. Our second objective was thus to find out whether this "equifinality" in spatial model setups may be reduced when including bromide tracer data in the model falsification process. We thus simulated transport of bromide for the 13 spatial model setups that performed best with respect to reproduce tile drain event discharge, without any further calibration. All model setups allowed a very good prediction of the temporal dynamics of cumulated bromide leaching into the tile drain, while only four of them matched the accumulated water balance and accumulated bromide loss into the tile drain. The number of behavioural model architectures could thus be reduced to four. One of those setups was used for simulating transport of Isoproturon, using different parameter combinations to characterise adsorption according to the Footprint data base. Simulations could, however, only reproduce the observed leaching behaviour, when we allowed for retardation coefficients that were very close to one.

  6. A second order residual based predictor-corrector approach for time dependent pollutant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan, S.; Hervouet, J.-M.; Ricchiuto, M.; Ata, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a second order residual distribution scheme for scalar transport problems in shallow water flows. The scheme, suitable for the unsteady cases, is obtained adapting to the shallow water context the explicit Runge-Kutta schemes for scalar equations [1]. The resulting scheme is decoupled from the hydrodynamics yet the continuity equation has to be considered in order to respect some important numerical properties at discrete level. Beyond the classical characteristics of the residual formulation presented in [1,2], we introduce the possibility to iterate the corrector step in order to improve the accuracy of the scheme. Another novelty is that the scheme is based on a precise monotonicity condition which guarantees the respect of the maximum principle. We thus end up with a scheme which is mass conservative, second order accurate and monotone. These properties are checked in the numerical tests, where the proposed approach is also compared to some finite volume schemes on unstructured grids. The results obtained show the interest in adopting the predictor-corrector scheme for pollutant transport applications, where conservation of the mass, monotonicity and accuracy are the most relevant concerns.

  7. New Approaches to Overcome Transport Related Drug Resistance in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Salcedo, Jose A.; Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Valverde-Pozo, Javier; Soriano, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania and Trypanosoma are members of the Trypanosomatidae family that cause severe human infections such as leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and sleeping sickness affecting millions of people worldwide. Despite efforts to eradicate them, migrations are expanding these infections to developing countries. There are no vaccines available and current treatments depend only on chemotherapy. Drug resistance is a major obstacle for the treatment of these diseases given that existing drugs are old and limited, with some having severe side effects. Most resistance mechanisms developed by these parasites are related with a decreased uptake or increased efflux of the drug due to mutations or altered expression of membrane transporters. Different new approaches have been elaborated that can overcome these mechanisms of resistance including the use of inhibitors of efflux pumps and drug carriers for both active and passive targeting. Here we review new formulations that have been successfully applied to circumvent resistance related to drug transporters, opening alternative ways to solve drug resistance in protozoan parasitic diseases. PMID:27733833

  8. Modeling PSA Problems - II: A Cell-to-Cell Transport Theory Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Labeau, P.E.; Izquierdo, J.M.

    2005-06-15

    In the first paper of this series, we presented an extension of the classical theory of dynamic reliability in which the actual occurrence of an event causing a change in the system dynamics is possibly delayed. The concept of stimulus activation, which triggers the realization of an event after a distributed time delay, was introduced. This gives a new understanding of competing events in the sequence delineation process.In the context of the level-2 probabilistic safety analysis (PSA), the information on stimulus activation mainly consists of regions of the process variables space where the activation can occur with a given probability. The evolution equations of the extended theory of probabilistic dynamics are therefore particularized to a transport process between discrete cells defined in phase-space on this basis. Doing so, an integrated and coherent approach to level-2 PSA problems is propounded. This amounts to including the stimulus concept and the associated stochastic delays discussed in the first paper in the frame of a cell-to-cell transport process.In addition, this discrete model provides a theoretical basis for the definition of appropriate numerical schemes for integrated level-2 PSA applications.

  9. A Systems Thinking approach to post-disaster restoration of maritime transportation systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lespier, Lizzette Pérez; Long, Suzanna K.; Shoberg, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    A Systems Thinking approach is used to examine elements of a maritime transportation system that are most likely to be impacted by an extreme event. The majority of the literature uses a high-level view that can fail to capture the damage at the sub-system elements. This work uses a system dynamics simulation for a better view and understanding of the Port of San Juan, Puerto Rico, as a whole system and uses Hurricane Georges (1998), as a representative disruptive event. The model focuses on the impacts of natural disasters at the sub-system level with a final goal of determining the sequence needed to restore an ocean-going port to its pre-event state. This work in progress details model development and outlines steps for using real-world information to assist maritime port manager planning and recommendations for best practices to mitigate disaster damage.

  10. Identifying the Critical Links in Road Transportation Networks: Centrality-based approach utilizing structural properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chinthavali, Supriya

    2016-04-01

    Surface transportation road networks share structural properties similar to other complex networks (e.g., social networks, information networks, biological networks, and so on). This research investigates the structural properties of road networks for any possible correlation with the traffic characteristics such as link flows those determined independently. Additionally, we define a criticality index for the links of the road network that identifies the relative importance in the network. We tested our hypotheses with two sample road networks. Results show that, correlation exists between the link flows and centrality measures of a link of the road (dual graph approach is followed) and the criticality index is found to be effective for one test network to identify the vulnerable nodes.

  11. Extension of the source-sink potential (SSP) approach to multichannel quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocheleau, Philippe; Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2012-11-01

    We present an extension of the single channel source-sink potential approach [F. Goyer, M. Ernzerhof, and M. Zhuang, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 144104 (2007), 10.1063/1.2715932] for molecular electronic devices (MEDs) to multiple channels. The proposed multichannel source-sink potential method relies on an eigenchannel description of conducting states of the MED which are obtained by a self-consistent algorithm. We use the newly developed model to examine the transport of the 1-phenyl-1,3-butadiene molecule connected to two coupled rows of atoms that act as contacts on the left and right sides. With an eigenchannel description of the wave function in the contacts, we determined that one of the eigenchannels is effectively closed by the interference effects of the side chain. Furthermore, we provide an example where we observe a complete inversion (from bonding to antibonding and vice versa) of the transverse character of the wave function upon passage through the molecule.

  12. Applicability of the control configured design approach to advanced earth orbital transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, A. K.; Zeck, H.; Walker, W. H.; Shafer, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    The applicability of the control configured design approach (CCV) to advanced earth orbital transportation systems was studied. The baseline system investigated was fully reusable vertical take-off/horizontal landing single-stage-to-orbit vehicle and had mission requirements similar to the space shuttle orbiter. Technical analyses were made to determine aerodynamic, flight control and subsystem design characteristics. Figures of merit were assessed on vehicle dry weight and orbital payload. The results indicated that the major parameters for CCV designs are hypersonic trim, aft center of gravity, and control surface heating. Optimized CCV designs can be controllable and provide substantial payload gains over conventional non-CCV design vertical take-off vehicles.

  13. An on-chip electrical transport spectroscopy approach for in situ monitoring electrochemical interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mengning; He, Qiyuan; Wang, Gongming; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2015-08-01

    In situ monitoring electrochemical interfaces is crucial for fundamental understanding and continued optimization of electrocatalysts. Conventional spectroscopic techniques are generally difficult to implement for in situ electrochemical studies. Here we report an on-chip electrical transport spectroscopy approach for directly probing the electrochemical surfaces of metallic nanocatalysts in action. With a four-electrode device configuration, we demonstrate that the electrical properties of ultrafine platinum nanowires are highly sensitive and selective to the electrochemical surface states, enabling a nanoelectronic signalling pathway that reveals electrochemical interface information during in-device cyclic voltammetry. Our results not only show a high degree of consistency with generally accepted conclusions in platinum electrochemistry but also offer important insights on various practically important electrochemical reactions. This study defines a nanoelectronic strategy for in situ electrochemical surface studies with high surface sensitivity and surface specificity.

  14. Structural, electronic, mechanical and quantum transport of ultrathin gold nanowire: A density functional approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jariwala, P. H.; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2017-06-01

    We have scrutinized the gold (Au) nanowires with distinct cross-section with 1-10 Au atoms for each unit cell by density-functional approach and performed first-principles computation. Here, we have investigated structural, electronic, transport and mechanical characteristic of Au nanowires. The structural characteristic of cubic bulk and nanowires of Au are very diverse from each other. The electronic density of state (DOS) and band structures of different formations express that all the nanowires are very good conductor in nature. The figure of conduction channels leans on number of atoms for each unit cell, diameter and structure of nanowires. We also inspect that the electronic thermal conductivities dependency on the temperature and we found that all the considered AuNWs have low conductivity than that of the bulk Au. Our results show that AuNWs have potential application in electronic devices like nanoelectro-mechanical systems (NEMS).

  15. Thermal transport in porous Si nanowires from approach-to-equilibrium molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartoixà, Xavier; Dettori, Riccardo; Melis, Claudio; Colombo, Luciano; Rurali, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    We study thermal transport in porous Si nanowires (SiNWs) by means of approach-to-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the presence of pores greatly reduces the thermal conductivity, κ, of the SiNWs as long mean free path phonons are suppressed. We address explicitly the dependence of κ on different features of the pore topology—such as the porosity and the pore diameter—and on the nanowire (NW) geometry—diameter and length. We use the results of the molecular dynamics calculations to tune an effective model, which is capable of capturing the dependence of κ on porosity and NW diameter. The model illustrates the failure of Matthiessen's rule to describe the coupling between boundary and pore scattering, which we account for by the inclusion of an additional empirical term.

  16. Extension of the source-sink potential (SSP) approach to multichannel quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Rocheleau, Philippe; Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2012-11-07

    We present an extension of the single channel source-sink potential approach [F. Goyer, M. Ernzerhof, and M. Zhuang, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 144104 (2007)] for molecular electronic devices (MEDs) to multiple channels. The proposed multichannel source-sink potential method relies on an eigenchannel description of conducting states of the MED which are obtained by a self-consistent algorithm. We use the newly developed model to examine the transport of the 1-phenyl-1,3-butadiene molecule connected to two coupled rows of atoms that act as contacts on the left and right sides. With an eigenchannel description of the wave function in the contacts, we determined that one of the eigenchannels is effectively closed by the interference effects of the side chain. Furthermore, we provide an example where we observe a complete inversion (from bonding to antibonding and vice versa) of the transverse character of the wave function upon passage through the molecule.

  17. An on-chip electrical transport spectroscopy approach for in situ monitoring electrochemical interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Mengning; He, Qiyuan; Wang, Gongming; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2015-01-01

    In situ monitoring electrochemical interfaces is crucial for fundamental understanding and continued optimization of electrocatalysts. Conventional spectroscopic techniques are generally difficult to implement for in situ electrochemical studies. Here we report an on-chip electrical transport spectroscopy approach for directly probing the electrochemical surfaces of metallic nanocatalysts in action. With a four-electrode device configuration, we demonstrate that the electrical properties of ultrafine platinum nanowires are highly sensitive and selective to the electrochemical surface states, enabling a nanoelectronic signalling pathway that reveals electrochemical interface information during in-device cyclic voltammetry. Our results not only show a high degree of consistency with generally accepted conclusions in platinum electrochemistry but also offer important insights on various practically important electrochemical reactions. This study defines a nanoelectronic strategy for in situ electrochemical surface studies with high surface sensitivity and surface specificity. PMID:26245937

  18. A generalized quantum chemical approach for elastic and inelastic electron transports in molecular electronics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Kula, Mathias; Luo, Yi

    2006-01-01

    A generalized quantum chemical approach for electron transport in molecular devices is developed. It allows one to treat devices where the metal electrodes and the molecule are either chemically or physically bonded on equal footing. An extension to include the vibration motions of the molecule has also been implemented which has produced the inelastic electron-tunneling spectroscopy of molecular electronics devices with unprecedented accuracy. Important information about the structure of the molecule and of metal-molecule contacts that are not accessible in the experiment are revealed. The calculated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of different molecular devices, including benzene-1,4-dithiolate, octanemonothiolate [H(CH2)8S], and octanedithiolate [S(CH2)8S] bonded to gold electrodes, are in very good agreement with experimental measurements.

  19. Nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons within a microscopic transport approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular-dynamics transport model, the nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons has been investigated thoroughly. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing the primary fragments in phase space. The secondary decay process of the fragments is described by a well-known statistical code. It is found that the localized energy released in antibaryon-baryon annihilation is deposited in a nucleus mainly via pion-nucleon collisions, which leads to the emissions of pre-equilibrium particles, fission, evaporation of nucleons, light fragments, etc. The strangeness exchange reactions dominate the hyperon production. The averaged mass loss increases with the mass number of target nucleus. A bump structure in the domain of intermediate mass for heavy targets appears owing to the contribution of fission fragments.

  20. Non-Hermitian approach of edge states and quantum transport in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostahie, B.; Niţa, M.; Aldea, A.

    2016-11-01

    We develop a manifest non-Hermitian approach of spectral and transport properties of two-dimensional mesoscopic systems in a strong magnetic field. The finite system to which several terminals are attached constitutes an open system that can be described by an effective Hamiltonian. The lifetime of the quantum states expressed by the energy imaginary part depends specifically on the lead-system coupling and makes the difference among three regimes: resonant, integer quantum Hall effect, and superradiant. The discussion is carried on in terms of edge state lifetime in different gaps, channel formation, role of hybridization, and transmission coefficients quantization. A toy model helps in understanding non-Hermitian aspects in open systems.

  1. High-Payoff Space Transportation Design Approach with a Technology Integration Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCleskey, C. M.; Rhodes, R. E.; Chen, T.; Robinson, J.

    2011-01-01

    A general architectural design sequence is described to create a highly efficient, operable, and supportable design that achieves an affordable, repeatable, and sustainable transportation function. The paper covers the following aspects of this approach in more detail: (1) vehicle architectural concept considerations (including important strategies for greater reusability); (2) vehicle element propulsion system packaging considerations; (3) vehicle element functional definition; (4) external ground servicing and access considerations; and, (5) simplified guidance, navigation, flight control and avionics communications considerations. Additionally, a technology integration strategy is forwarded that includes: (a) ground and flight test prior to production commitments; (b) parallel stage propellant storage, such as concentric-nested tanks; (c) high thrust, LOX-rich, LOX-cooled first stage earth-to-orbit main engine; (d) non-toxic, day-of-launch-loaded propellants for upper stages and in-space propulsion; (e) electric propulsion and aero stage control.

  2. Inference of reactive transport model parameters using a Bayesian multivariate approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniato, Luca; Schoups, Gerrit; van de Giesen, Nick

    2014-08-01

    Parameter estimation of subsurface transport models from multispecies data requires the definition of an objective function that includes different types of measurements. Common approaches are weighted least squares (WLS), where weights are specified a priori for each measurement, and weighted least squares with weight estimation (WLS(we)) where weights are estimated from the data together with the parameters. In this study, we formulate the parameter estimation task as a multivariate Bayesian inference problem. The WLS and WLS(we) methods are special cases in this framework, corresponding to specific prior assumptions about the residual covariance matrix. The Bayesian perspective allows for generalizations to cases where residual correlation is important and for efficient inference by analytically integrating out the variances (weights) and selected covariances from the joint posterior. Specifically, the WLS and WLS(we) methods are compared to a multivariate (MV) approach that accounts for specific residual correlations without the need for explicit estimation of the error parameters. When applied to inference of reactive transport model parameters from column-scale data on dissolved species concentrations, the following results were obtained: (1) accounting for residual correlation between species provides more accurate parameter estimation for high residual correlation levels whereas its influence for predictive uncertainty is negligible, (2) integrating out the (co)variances leads to an efficient estimation of the full joint posterior with a reduced computational effort compared to the WLS(we) method, and (3) in the presence of model structural errors, none of the methods is able to identify the correct parameter values.

  3. An Electronic Structure Approach to Charge Transfer and Transport in Molecular Building Blocks for Organic Optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Heidi Phillips

    A fundamental understanding of charge separation in organic materials is necessary for the rational design of optoelectronic devices suited for renewable energy applications and requires a combination of theoretical, computational, and experimental methods. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD)DFT are cost effective ab-initio approaches for calculating fundamental properties of large molecular systems, however conventional DFT methods have been known to fail in accurately characterizing frontier orbital gaps and charge transfer states in molecular systems. In this dissertation, these shortcomings are addressed by implementing an optimally-tuned range-separated hybrid (OT-RSH) functional approach within DFT and TDDFT. The first part of this thesis presents the way in which RSH-DFT addresses the shortcomings in conventional DFT. Environmentally-corrected RSH-DFT frontier orbital energies are shown to correspond to thin film measurements for a set of organic semiconducting molecules. Likewise, the improved RSH-TDDFT description of charge transfer excitations is benchmarked using a model ethene dimer and silsesquioxane molecules. In the second part of this thesis, RSH-DFT is applied to chromophore-functionalized silsesquioxanes, which are currently investigated as candidates for building blocks in optoelectronic applications. RSH-DFT provides insight into the nature of absorptive and emissive states in silsesquioxanes. While absorption primarily involves transitions localized on one chromophore, charge transfer between chromophores and between chromophore and silsesquioxane cage have been identified. The RSH-DFT approach, including a protocol accounting for complex environmental effects on charge transfer energies, was tested and validated against experimental measurements. The third part of this thesis addresses quantum transport through nano-scale junctions. The ability to quantify a molecular junction via spectroscopic methods is crucial to their

  4. A musculo-mechanical model of esophageal transport based on an immersed boundary-finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Wenjun; Griffith, Boyce E.; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-11-01

    This work extends a fiber-based immersed boundary (IB) model of esophageal transport by incorporating a continuum model of the deformable esophageal wall. The continuum-based esophagus model adopts finite element approach that is capable of describing more complex and realistic material properties and geometries. The leakage from mismatch between Lagrangian and Eulerian meshes resulting from large deformations of the esophageal wall is avoided by careful choice of interaction points. The esophagus model, which is described as a multi-layered, fiber-reinforced nonlinear elastic material, is coupled to bolus and muscle-activation models using the IB approach to form the esophageal transport model. Cases of esophageal transport with different esophagus models are studied. Results on the transport characteristics, including pressure field and esophageal wall kinematics and stress, are analyzed and compared. Support from NIH grant R01 DK56033 and R01 DK079902 is gratefully acknowledged. BEG is supported by NSF award ACI 1460334.

  5. Analysis of ballistic transport in nanoscale devices by using an accelerated finite element contact block reduction approach

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Li, G.

    2014-08-28

    An accelerated Finite Element Contact Block Reduction (FECBR) approach is presented for computational analysis of ballistic transport in nanoscale electronic devices with arbitrary geometry and unstructured mesh. Finite element formulation is developed for the theoretical CBR/Poisson model. The FECBR approach is accelerated through eigen-pair reduction, lead mode space projection, and component mode synthesis techniques. The accelerated FECBR is applied to perform quantum mechanical ballistic transport analysis of a DG-MOSFET with taper-shaped extensions and a DG-MOSFET with Si/SiO{sub 2} interface roughness. The computed electrical transport properties of the devices obtained from the accelerated FECBR approach and associated computational cost as a function of system degrees of freedom are compared with those obtained from the original CBR and direct inversion methods. The performance of the accelerated FECBR in both its accuracy and efficiency is demonstrated.

  6. Analysis of ballistic transport in nanoscale devices by using an accelerated finite element contact block reduction approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Li, G.

    2014-08-01

    An accelerated Finite Element Contact Block Reduction (FECBR) approach is presented for computational analysis of ballistic transport in nanoscale electronic devices with arbitrary geometry and unstructured mesh. Finite element formulation is developed for the theoretical CBR/Poisson model. The FECBR approach is accelerated through eigen-pair reduction, lead mode space projection, and component mode synthesis techniques. The accelerated FECBR is applied to perform quantum mechanical ballistic transport analysis of a DG-MOSFET with taper-shaped extensions and a DG-MOSFET with Si/SiO2 interface roughness. The computed electrical transport properties of the devices obtained from the accelerated FECBR approach and associated computational cost as a function of system degrees of freedom are compared with those obtained from the original CBR and direct inversion methods. The performance of the accelerated FECBR in both its accuracy and efficiency is demonstrated.

  7. A space–angle DGFEM approach for the Boltzmann radiation transport equation with local angular refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Kópházi, József Lathouwers, Danny

    2015-09-15

    In this paper a new method for the discretization of the radiation transport equation is presented, based on a discontinuous Galerkin method in space and angle that allows for local refinement in angle where any spatial element can support its own angular discretization. To cope with the discontinuous spatial nature of the solution, a generalized Riemann procedure is required to distinguish between incoming and outgoing contributions of the numerical fluxes. A new consistent framework is introduced that is based on the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. The resulting numerical fluxes for the various possible cases where neighboring elements have an equal, higher or lower level of refinement in angle are derived based on tensor algebra and the resulting expressions have a very clear physical interpretation. The choice of discontinuous trial functions not only has the advantage of easing local refinement, it also facilitates the use of efficient sweep-based solvers due to decoupling of unknowns on a large scale thereby approaching the efficiency of discrete ordinates methods with local angular resolution. The approach is illustrated by a series of numerical experiments. Results show high orders of convergence for the scalar flux on angular refinement. The generalized Riemann upwinding procedure leads to stable and consistent solutions. Further the sweep-based solver performs well when used as a preconditioner for a Krylov method.

  8. Combinatorial materials approach to accelerate materials discovery for transportation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Combinatorial material research offers fast and efficient solutions to identify promising and advanced materials. It has revolutionized the pharmaceutical industry and now is being applied to accelerate the discovery of other new compounds, e.g. superconductors, luminescent materials, catalysts etc. Differing from the traditional trial-and-error process, this approach allows for the synthesis of a large number of compositionally diverse compounds by varying the combinations of the components and adjusting the ratios. It largely reduces the cost of single-sample synthesis/characterization, along with the turnaround time in the material discovery process, therefore, could dramatically change the existing paradigm for discovering and commercializing new materials. This talk outlines the use of combinatorial materials approach in the material discovery in transportation sector. It covers the general introduction to the combinatorial material concept, state of art for its application in energy-related research. At the end, LBNL capabilities in combinatorial materials synthesis and high throughput characterization that are applicable for material discovery research will be highlighted.

  9. Super-micron-scale atomistic simulation for electronic transport with atomic vibration: Unified approach from quantum to classical transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizeki, Keisuke; Sasaoka, Kenji; Konabe, Satoru; Souma, Satofumi; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2017-07-01

    We develop a powerful simulation method that can treat electronic transport in a super-micron-scale open system with atomic vibration at finite temperature. As an application of the developed method to realistic materials, we simulate electronic transport in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes from nanometer scale to micrometer scale at room temperature. Based on the simulation results, we successfully identify two different crossovers, namely, ballistic to diffusive crossover and coherent to incoherent crossover, simultaneously and with equal footing, from which the mean free path and the phase coherence length can be extracted clearly. Moreover, we clarify the scaling behavior of the electrical resistance and the electronic current in the crossover regime.

  10. Fine particulate matter source apportionment using a hybrid chemical transport and receptor model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Balachandran, S.; Pachon, J. E.; Baek, J.; Ivey, C.; Holmes, H.; Odman, M. T.; Mulholland, J. A.; Russell, A. G.

    2013-10-01

    A hybrid fine particulate matter (PM2.5) source apportionment approach based on a receptor-model (RM) species balance and species specific source impacts from a chemical transport model (CTM) equipped with a sensitivity analysis tool is developed to provide physically- and chemically-consistent relationships between source emissions and receptor impacts. This hybrid approach enhances RM results by providing initial estimates of source impacts from a much larger number of sources than are typically used in RMs, and provides source-receptor relationships for secondary species. Further, the method addresses issues of source collinearities, and accounts for emissions uncertainties. Hybrid method results also provide information on the resulting source impact uncertainties. We apply this hybrid approach to conduct PM2.5 source apportionment at Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) sites across the US. Ambient PM2.5 concentrations at these receptor sites were apportioned to 33 separate sources. Hybrid method results led to large changes of impacts from CTM estimates for sources such as dust, woodstove, and other biomass burning sources, but limited changes to others. The refinements reduced the differences between CTM-simulated and observed concentrations of individual PM2.5 species by over 98% when using a weighted least squared error minimization. The rankings of source impacts changed from the initial estimates, revealing that CTM-only results should be evaluated with observations. Assessment with RM results at six US locations showed that the hybrid results differ somewhat from commonly resolved sources. The hybrid method also resolved sources that typical RM methods do not capture without extra measurement information on unique tracers. The method can be readily applied to large domains and long (such as multi-annual) time periods to provide source impact estimates for management- and health-related studies.

  11. Fine particulate matter source apportionment using a hybrid chemical transport and receptor model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Balachandran, S.; Pachon, J. E.; Baek, J.; Ivey, C.; Holmes, H.; Odman, M. T.; Mulholland, J. A.; Russell, A. G.

    2014-06-01

    A hybrid fine particulate matter (PM2.5) source apportionment approach based on a receptor model (RM) species balance and species specific source impacts from a chemical transport model (CTM) equipped with a sensitivity analysis tool is developed to provide physically and chemically consistent relationships between source emissions and receptor impacts. This hybrid approach enhances RM results by providing initial estimates of source impacts from a much larger number of sources than are typically used in RMs, and provides source-receptor relationships for secondary species. Further, the method addresses issues of source collinearities and accounts for emissions uncertainties. We apply this hybrid approach to conduct PM2.5 source apportionment at Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) sites across the US. Ambient PM2.5 concentrations at these receptor sites were apportioned to 33 separate sources. Hybrid method results led to large changes of impacts from CTM estimates for sources such as dust, woodstoves, and other biomass-burning sources, but limited changes to others. The refinements reduced the differences between CTM-simulated and observed concentrations of individual PM2.5 species by over 98% when using a weighted least-squares error minimization. The rankings of source impacts changed from the initial estimates, further demonstrating that CTM-only results should be evaluated with observations. Assessment with RM results at six US locations showed that the hybrid results differ somewhat from commonly resolved sources. The hybrid method also resolved sources that typical RM methods do not capture without extra measurement information for unique tracers. The method can be readily applied to large domains and long (such as multi-annual) time periods to provide source impact estimates for management- and health-related studies.

  12. Modelisation of transport in fractured media with a smeared fractures modeling approach: special focus on matrix diffusion process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourno, A.; Grenier, C.; Benabderrahmane, H.

    2003-04-01

    Modeling flow and transport in natural fractured media is a difficult issue due among others to the complexity of the system, the particularities of the geometrical features, the strong parameter value contrasts between the fracture zones (flow zones) and the matrix zones (no flow zones). This lead to the development of dedicated tools like for instance discrete fracture network models (DFN). We follow here another line applicable for classical continuous modeling codes. The fracture network is not meshed here but presence of fractures is taken into account by means of continuous heterogeneous fields (permeability, porosity, head, velocity, concentration ...). This line, followed by different authors, is referred as smeared fracture approach and presents the following advantages: the approach is very versatile because no dedicated spatial discretization effort is required (we use a basic regular mesh, simulations can be done on a rough mesh saving computer time). This makes this kind of approach very promising for taking heterogeneity of properties as well as uncertainties into account within a Monte Carlo framework for instance. Furthermore, the geometry of the matrix blocks where transfers proceed by diffusion is fully taken into account contrary to classical simplified 1D approach for instance. Nevertheless continuous heterogeneous field representation of a fractured medium requires a homogenization process at the scale of the mesh considered. Literature proves that this step of homogenization for transport is still a challenging task. Consequently, the level precision of the results has to be estimated. We precedently proposed a new approach dedicated to Mixed and Hybrid Finite Element approach. This numerical scheme is very interesting for such highly heterogeneous media and in particular guaranties exact conservation of mass flow for each mesh leading to good transport results. We developed a smeared fractures approach to model flow and transport limited to

  13. A Multiblock Approach to Pore-Scale Modeling of Reactive Transport with Applications to Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    mehmani, Y.; Sun, T.; Balhoff, M.; Bryant, S. L.; Eichhubl, P.

    2012-12-01

    In order to safely store CO2 in depleted reservoirs and deep saline aquifers, a better understanding of the storage mechanisms of CO2 is required. Reaction of CO2 with minerals to form precipitate in the subsurface helps to securely store CO2 over geologic time periods, but a concern is the formation of localized channels through which CO2 could travel at large, localized rates. Pore-scale network modeling is an attractive option for modeling and understanding this inherently pore-level process, but the relatively small domains of network models may prevent capturing of any such "emergent phenomena" and more importantly their study. Here, we develop a transient, single-phase, reactive pore-network model that includes reduction of throat conductivity as a result of precipitation. The novelty of this work is the implementation of a new Mortar/Transport method for coupling pore networks together at model interfaces that ensure continuity of pressures, species concentrations, and fluxes. Coupled sub-domains are solved separately in parallel and information is effectively communicated between them via the coupling process. The multiscale method can be further applied to modeling of multi-species/multiphase transport phenomena in highly heterogeneous media arising in various subsurface applications, and may potentially be applied to the seamless inclusion of pore-scale models in continuum simulators. The coupling allows for modeling at larger scales which may lead to more accurate upscaling approaches. Here, we couple pore-scale models with large variation in permeability and porosity which results initial preferential pathways for flow. Our simulation results suggest that the preferential pathways close in time due to precipitation, but are not redirected at late times.

  14. Predicting Transport of 3,5,6-Trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) into Saliva Using a Combination Experimental and Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jordan Ned; Carver, Zana A; Weber, Thomas J; Timchalk, Charles

    2017-04-11

    A combination experimental and computational approach was developed to predict chemical transport into saliva. A serous-acinar chemical transport assay was established to measure chemical transport with non-physiological (standard cell culture medium) and physiological (using surrogate plasma and saliva medium) conditions using 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) a metabolite of the pesticide chlorpyrifos. High levels of TCPy protein binding were observed in cell culture medium and rat plasma resulting in different TCPy transport behaviors in the two experimental conditions. In the non-physiological transport experiment, TCPy reached equilibrium at equivalent concentrations in apical and basolateral chambers. At higher TCPy doses, increased unbound TCPy was observed, and TCPy concentrations in apical and basolateral chambers reached equilibrium faster than lower doses, suggesting only unbound TCPy is able to cross the cellular monolayer. In the physiological experiment, TCPy transport was slower than non-physiological conditions, and equilibrium was achieved at different concentrations in apical and basolateral chambers at a comparable ratio (0.034) to what was previously measured in rats dosed with TCPy (saliva:blood ratio: 0.049). A cellular transport computational model was developed based on TCPy protein binding kinetics and simulated all transport experiments reasonably well using different permeability coefficients for the two experimental conditions (1.14 vs 0.4 cm/hr for non-physiological and physiological experiments, respectively). The computational model was integrated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and accurately predicted TCPy concentrations in saliva of rats dosed with TCPy. Overall, this study demonstrates an approach to predict chemical transport in saliva, potentially increasing the utility of salivary biomonitoring in the future.

  15. Effects of sediment transport on survival of salmonid embryos in a natural stream: A simulation approach

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. Lisle; Jack Lewis

    1992-01-01

    A model is presented that simulates the effects of streamflow and sediment transport on survival of salmonid embryos incubating in spawning gravels in a natural channel. Components of the model include a 6-yr streamflow record, an empirical bed load-transport function, a relation between transport and infiltration of sandy bedload into a gravel bed, effects of fine-...

  16. An approach to selecting routes over which to transport excess salt from the Deaf Smith County Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    This report presents an approach to be utilized in the identification of rail and/or highway routes for the disposal of waste salt and other salt contaminated material from repository construction. Relevant issues regarding salt transport also are identified. The report identifies a sequence of activities that precede actual route selection, i.e., final selection of a salt disposal method and its location, refined estimates of salt shipment volume and schedule, followed by selection of rail or truck or a combination thereof, as the preferred transport mode. After these factors are known, the route selection process can proceed. Chapter 2.0 of this report identifies directives and requirements that potentially could affect salt transport from the Deaf Smith site. A summary of salt disposal alternatives and reference cases is contained in Chapter 3.0. Chapter 4.0 identifies and discusses current methods of salt handling and transport in the United States, and also provides some perspective as to the volume of excess salt to be transported from the Deaf Smith site relative to current industry practices. Chapter 5.0 identifies an approach to the salt transportation issue, and suggests one system for evaluating alternative highway routes for truck shipments.

  17. Scaling approach to tight-binding transport in realistic graphene devices: The case of transverse magnetic focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beconcini, M.; Valentini, S.; Kumar, R. Krishna; Auton, G. H.; Geim, A. K.; Ponomarenko, L. A.; Polini, M.; Taddei, F.

    2016-09-01

    Ultraclean graphene sheets encapsulated between hexagonal boron nitride crystals host two-dimensional electron systems in which low-temperature transport is solely limited by the sample size. We revisit the theoretical problem of carrying out microscopic calculations of nonlocal ballistic transport in such micron-scale devices. By employing the Landauer-Büttiker scattering theory, we propose a scaling approach to tight-binding nonlocal transport in realistic graphene devices. We test our numerical method against experimental data on transverse magnetic focusing (TMF), a textbook example of nonlocal ballistic transport in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. This comparison enables a clear physical interpretation of all the observed features of the TMF signal, including its oscillating sign.

  18. A Many-Task Parallel Approach for Multiscale Simulations of Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Yang, Xiaofan; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Chase, Jared M.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-12-16

    Continuum-scale models have long been used to study subsurface flow, transport, and reactions but lack the ability to resolve processes that are governed by pore-scale mixing. Recently, pore-scale models, which explicitly resolve individual pores and soil grains, have been developed to more accurately model pore-scale phenomena, particularly reaction processes that are controlled by local mixing. However, pore-scale models are prohibitively expensive for modeling application-scale domains. This motivates the use of a hybrid multiscale approach in which continuum- and pore-scale codes are coupled either hierarchically or concurrently within an overall simulation domain (time and space). This approach is naturally suited to an adaptive, loosely-coupled many-task methodology with three potential levels of concurrency. Each individual code (pore- and continuum-scale) can be implemented in parallel; multiple semi-independent instances of the pore-scale code are required at each time step providing a second level of concurrency; and Monte Carlo simulations of the overall system to represent uncertainty in material property distributions provide a third level of concurrency. We have developed a hybrid multiscale model of a mixing-controlled reaction in a porous medium wherein the reaction occurs only over a limited portion of the domain. Loose, minimally-invasive coupling of pre-existing parallel continuum- and pore-scale codes has been accomplished by an adaptive script-based workflow implemented in the Swift workflow system. We describe here the methods used to create the model system, adaptively control multiple coupled instances of pore- and continuum-scale simulations, and maximize the scalability of the overall system. We present results of numerical experiments conducted on NERSC supercomputing systems; our results demonstrate that loose many-task coupling provides a scalable solution for multiscale subsurface simulations with minimal overhead.

  19. A Novel Approach of Understanding and Incorporating Error of Chemical Transport Models into a Geostatistical Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J.; Vizuete, W.; Serre, M. L.; Xu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The EPA employs a vast monitoring network to measure ambient PM2.5 concentrations across the United States with one of its goals being to quantify exposure within the population. However, there are several areas of the country with sparse monitoring spatially and temporally. One means to fill in these monitoring gaps is to use PM2.5 modeled estimates from Chemical Transport Models (CTMs) specifically the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. CMAQ is able to provide complete spatial coverage but is subject to systematic and random error due to model uncertainty. Due to the deterministic nature of CMAQ, often these uncertainties are not quantified. Much effort is employed to quantify the efficacy of these models through different metrics of model performance. Currently evaluation is specific to only locations with observed data. Multiyear studies across the United States are challenging because the error and model performance of CMAQ are not uniform over such large space/time domains. Error changes regionally and temporally. Because of the complex mix of species that constitute PM2.5, CMAQ error is also a function of increasing PM2.5 concentration. To address this issue we introduce a model performance evaluation for PM2.5 CMAQ that is regionalized and non-linear. This model performance evaluation leads to error quantification for each CMAQ grid. Areas and time periods of error being better qualified. The regionalized error correction approach is non-linear and is therefore more flexible at characterizing model performance than approaches that rely on linearity assumptions and assume homoscedasticity of CMAQ predictions errors. Corrected CMAQ data are then incorporated into the modern geostatistical framework of Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME). Through cross validation it is shown that incorporating error-corrected CMAQ data leads to more accurate estimates than just using observed data by themselves.

  20. Emergency Situation Prediction Mechanism: A Novel Approach for Intelligent Transportation System Using Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gokulakrishnan, P.

    2015-01-01

    In Indian four-lane express highway, millions of vehicles are travelling every day. Accidents are unfortunate and frequently occurring in these highways causing deaths, increase in death toll, and damage to infrastructure. A mechanism is required to avoid such road accidents at the maximum to reduce the death toll. An Emergency Situation Prediction Mechanism, a novel and proactive approach, is proposed in this paper for achieving the best of Intelligent Transportation System using Vehicular Ad Hoc Network. ESPM intends to predict the possibility of occurrence of an accident in an Indian four-lane express highway. In ESPM, the emergency situation prediction is done by the Road Side Unit based on (i) the Status Report sent by the vehicles in the range of RSU and (ii) the road traffic flow analysis done by the RSU. Once the emergency situation or accident is predicted in advance, an Emergency Warning Message is constructed and disseminated to all vehicles in the area of RSU to alert and prevent the vehicles from accidents. ESPM performs well in emergency situation prediction in advance to the occurrence of an accident. ESPM predicts the emergency situation within 0.20 seconds which is comparatively less than the statistical value. The prediction accuracy of ESPM against vehicle density is found better in different traffic scenarios. PMID:26065014

  1. Emergency Situation Prediction Mechanism: A Novel Approach for Intelligent Transportation System Using Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks.

    PubMed

    Ganeshkumar, P; Gokulakrishnan, P

    2015-01-01

    In Indian four-lane express highway, millions of vehicles are travelling every day. Accidents are unfortunate and frequently occurring in these highways causing deaths, increase in death toll, and damage to infrastructure. A mechanism is required to avoid such road accidents at the maximum to reduce the death toll. An Emergency Situation Prediction Mechanism, a novel and proactive approach, is proposed in this paper for achieving the best of Intelligent Transportation System using Vehicular Ad Hoc Network. ESPM intends to predict the possibility of occurrence of an accident in an Indian four-lane express highway. In ESPM, the emergency situation prediction is done by the Road Side Unit based on (i) the Status Report sent by the vehicles in the range of RSU and (ii) the road traffic flow analysis done by the RSU. Once the emergency situation or accident is predicted in advance, an Emergency Warning Message is constructed and disseminated to all vehicles in the area of RSU to alert and prevent the vehicles from accidents. ESPM performs well in emergency situation prediction in advance to the occurrence of an accident. ESPM predicts the emergency situation within 0.20 seconds which is comparatively less than the statistical value. The prediction accuracy of ESPM against vehicle density is found better in different traffic scenarios.

  2. Projectile fragmentation of {sup 40,48}Ca and isotopic scaling in a transport approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailova, T. I. Erdemchimeg, B.; Artukh, A. G.; Toro, M. Di; Wolter, H. H.

    2016-07-15

    We investigate theoretically projectile fragmentation in reactions of {sup 40,48}Ca on {sup 9}Be and {sup 181}Ta targets using a Boltzmann-type transport approach, which is supplemented by a statistical decay code to describe the de-excitation of the hot primary fragments. We determine the thermodynamical properties of the primary fragments and calculate the isotope distributions of the cold final fragments. These describe the data reasonably well. For the pairs of projectiles with different isotopic content we analyze the isotopic scaling (or isoscaling) of the final fragment distributions, which has been used to extract the symmetry energy of the primary source. The calculation exhibits isoscaling behavior for the total yields as do the experiments. We also perform an impact-parameter-dependent isoscaling analysis in view of the fact that the primary systems at different impact parameters have very different properties. Then the isoscaling behavior is less stringent, which we can attribute to specific structure effects of the {sup 40,48}Ca pair. The symmetry energy determined in this way depends on these structure effects.

  3. Network topology, Transport dynamics, and Vulnerability Analysis in River Deltas: A Graph-Theoretic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, A.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Longjas, A.; Zaliapin, I. V.

    2014-12-01

    River deltas are intricate landscapes with complex channel networks that self-organize to deliver water, sediment, and nutrients from the apex to the delta top and eventually to the coastal zone. The natural balance of material and energy fluxes which maintains a stable hydrologic, geomorphologic, and ecological state of a river delta, is often disrupted by external factors causing topological and dynamical changes in the delta structure and function. A formal quantitative framework for studying river delta topology and transport dynamics and their response to change is lacking. Here we present such a framework based on spectral graph theory and demonstrate its value in quantifying the complexity of the delta network topology, computing its steady state fluxes, and identifying upstream (contributing) and downstream (nourishment) areas from any point in the network. We use this framework to construct vulnerability maps that quantify the relative change of sediment and water delivery to the shoreline outlets in response to possible perturbations in hundreds of upstream links. This enables us to evaluate which links (hotspots) and what management scenarios would most influence flux delivery to the outlets, paving the way of systematically examining how local or spatially distributed delta interventions can be studied within a systems approach for delta sustainability.

  4. Novel experimental design for steady-state processes: a systematic Bayesian approach for enzymes, drug transport, receptor binding, continuous culture and cell transport kinetics.

    PubMed

    Crabbe, M James C; Murphy, Emma F; Gilmour, Steven G

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that a Bayesian approach (the use of prior knowledge) to the design of steady-state experiments can produce major gains quantifiable in terms of information, productivity and accuracy of each experiment. Developing the use of Bayesian utility functions, we have used a systematic method to identify the optimum experimental designs for a number of kinetic model data sets. This has enabled the identification of trends between kinetic model types, sets of design rules and the key conclusion that such designs should be based on some prior knowledge of the kinetic model. We suggest an optimal and iterative method for selecting features of the design such as the substrate range, number of measurements and choice of intermediate points. The final design collects data suitable for accurate modelling and analysis and minimises the error in the parameters estimated. It is equally applicable to enzymes, drug transport, receptor binding, microbial culture and cell transport kinetics.

  5. Promising approaches to crystallization of macromolecules suppressing the convective mass transport to the growing crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, K. M.; Popov, V. O.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    Conditions of mass transport to growing crystals are important factors that have an impact on the size and quality of macromolecular crystals. The mass transport occurs via two mechanisms — by diffusion and convection. The crystal quality can be influenced by changing (either suppressing or enhancing) the convective mass transport. The review gives an overview and analysis of the published data on different methods of macromolecular crystallization providing the suppression of convective mass transport to growing crystals in order to improve the crystal quality. The bibliography includes 91 references.

  6. A two-tiered approach to reactive transport: Application to Sr mobility under variable pH

    SciTech Connect

    Toran, L.; Bryant, S.; Wheeler, M.F.; Saunders, J.

    1998-05-01

    One benefit of a coupled geochemistry/transport approach is that interactions between chemical constituents that can change the mobility of species (such as pH) can be treated explicitly, rather than lumping all of the geochemistry into a single term (i.e., the retardation factor). A two-tiered approach to modeling coupled geochemistry/transport is presented here, which allows a comparison of the results of different methods as well as better efficiency in modeling time. The codes ParSSim, a coupled transport code for supercomputers, and PHREEQC, an advective geochemistry code, were used to model Sr mobility under varying pH. The problem was based on liquid low level radioactive waste that was disposed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Oak Ridge, Tennessee) in a highly alkaline solution to try to enhance precipitation and sorption. Interactions with carbonate rock and ground water lowered the pH and led to mobilization of radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr. Simulation of contaminant migration in this mixing environment requires a coupled geochemistry and transport model. The interplay between propagation of a pH front (which was retarded) and propagation of the Sr front leads to a fast-moving pulse of Sr as well as a strongly retarded front of Sr. This behavior could not have been predicted by a geochemistry or a transport code alone.

  7. Woody debris transport modelling by a coupled DE-SW approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persi, Elisabetta; Petaccia, Gabriella; Sibilla, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The presence of wood in rivers is gaining more and more attention: on one side, the inclusion of woody debris in streams is emphasized for its ecological benefits; on the other hand, particular attention must be paid to its management, not to affect hydraulic safety. Recent events have shown that wood can be mobilized during floodings (Comiti et al. 2008, Lange and Bezzola 2006), aggravating inundations, in particular near urban areas. For this reason, the inclusion of woody debris influence on the prediction of flooded areas is an important step toward the reduction of hydraulic risk. Numerical modelling plays an important role to this purpose. Ruiz-Villanueva et al. (2014) use a two-dimensional numerical model to calculate the kinetics of cylindrical woody debris transport, taking into account also the hydrodynamic effects of wood. The model here presented couples a Discrete Element approach (DE) for the calculation of motion of a cylindrical log with the solution of the Shallow Water Equations (SW), in order to simulate woody debris transport in a two-dimensional stream. In a first step, drag force, added mass force and side force are calculated from flow and log velocities, assuming a reference area and hydrodynamic coefficients taken from literature. Then, the equations of dynamics are solved to model the planar roto-translation of the wooden cylinder. Model results and its physical reliability are clearly affected by the values of the drag and side coefficients, which in turn depend upon log submergence and angle towards the flow direction. Experimental studies to evaluate drag and side coefficients can be found for a submerged cylinder, with various orientations (Gippel et al. 1996; Hoang et al. 2015). To extend such results to the case of a floating (non-totally submerged) cylinder, the authors performed a series of laboratory tests whose outcomes are implemented in the proposed DE-SW model, to assess the effects of these values on the dynamic of woody

  8. Modeling of Coastal Effluent Transport: an Approach to Linking of Far-field and Near-field Models

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2008-09-01

    One of the challenges in effluent transport modeling in coastal tidal environments is the proper calculation of initial dilution in connection with the far-field transport model. In this study, an approach of external linkage of far-field and near-field effluent transport models is presented, and applied to simulate the effluent transport in the Port Angeles Harbor, Washington in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. A near-field plume model was used to calculate the effluent initial dilution and a three-dimensional (3-D) hydrodynamic model was developed to simulate the tidal circulation and far-field effluent transport in the Port Angeles Harbor. In the present study, the hydrodynamic model was driven by tides and surface winds. Observed water surface elevation and velocity data were used to calibrate the model over a period covering the neap-spring tidal cycle. The model was also validated with observed surface drogue trajectory data. The model successfully reproduced the tidal dynamics in the study area and good agreements between model results and observed data were obtained. This study demonstrated that the linkage between the near-field and far-field models in effluent transport modeling can be achieved through iteratively adjusting the model grid sizes such that the far-field modeled dilution ratio and effluent concentration in the effluent discharge model grid cell match the concentration calculated by the near-field plume model.

  9. The Italian Spacegate: Study and innovative approaches to future generation transportation based on High Altitude Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Francesco; Bellomo, Alessandro; Bolle, Andrea; Vittori, Roberto

    2014-08-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the pre-feasibility studies carried out in 2012 on the concept of sub orbital and hypersonic, high altitude flight in support of future generation transportation. Currently, while the High Altitude Flight is mostly instrumental to touristic purposes and emphasizes the so called Spaceports as futuristic, customers-luring airports featured with all the support services, the “Spacegate” concept deals with scheduled traveling in the upper part of the atmosphere between two points over the Earth surface, with significant reduction of the transfer time. The first part of the paper provides a theoretical approach to the matter, by proposing an “operational” mapping of the atmosphere as well as of the different kinds of flight occurring at High Altitude. The second part of the paper addresses the problem of the limited human capability of maintaining an active control of the vehicle during the re-entry phase and introduces the “Spacegate” concept as the conical portion of the atmosphere above the landing site, whose surface delimits the spiral-descending trajectories that the pilot can travel for a safe re-entry. This paper further outlines the results of the preliminary definition of top level operational requirements and derived architecture functional modules in support to the “Spacegate” implementation. Special attention was given to the favorable geographic and climatic conditions of Italy that make this Country suitable enough for future experimental sub orbital flights and related operations. An initial analysis was performed on the regulatory backbone that has to be built to properly operate High Altitude Flight vehicles in Italy according to the concept of an Italian “Spacegate”. A Preliminary Master Plan/Road Map for the “Spacegate” has been laid out, with special emphasis to selected near term activities and support infrastructures necessary to be carried out to better refine the study in preparation

  10. Turbidity Current Transport using DEM and FEM: a Hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, J. L.; Guevara, N. O., Jr.; Silva, C. E.; Alves, F. T.; Gazoni, L. C.; Coutinho, A.; Camata, J.; Elias, R. N.; Paraizo, P.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we describe a contribution to the study of turbidity transport in scales smaller than TFM (two-fluid models), The intent of the work, part of a large scale simulation project, is to assess local, small scale parameters and their upscaling. The hybrid model is based on a Lagrangian-Eulerian approach under a class of the so called Unresolved Discrete Particle Method (UDPM). In this approach, a Lagrangian description is used for the particle system employing the Discrete Element Method (DEM) while a fixed Eulerian mesh is used for the fluid phase modeled by finite element method (FEM), Fluid motion is governed by Navier-Stokes equations which are solved by an appropriate FEM implementation. Closure equation are used to compute drag and lift forces over the particles in the DEM framework. Volume averaged momentum sink terms are included in the fluid equations. The resulting coupled DEM-FEM model is integrated in time with a subcycling scheme. The aforementioned scheme was applied in the simulation of a sedimentation basin as depicted in figures 1 and 2 to investigate flow and deposition features of the suspension in a finer scale. For this purpose a submodel of the basin was generated. Mapping variables back and forth the Eulerian (finite element) model and the Lagrangian (discrete element) model were performed during the subcycled integration of the hybrid model. References: [1] Hoomans, B.P.B., Kuipers, J.A.M., Swaaij, van W.P.M," Granular dynamics Simulation of segregation phenomena in bubbling gas-fluidised beds", Powder Technology, V 109, Issues 1-3, 3 April 2000, pp 41-48; [2] Cho, S.H., Choi,H.G, Yoo, J.Y.,"Direct numerical simulation of fluid flow laden with many particles", International Journal of Multiphase Flow, V 31, Issue 4, April 2005, pp 435-451;; Sedimentation basin: sectioning the turbidity plume in the Eulerian FE model for setting up the discrete particle model. ; Sedimentation Basin: section of the turbidity plume displaying the

  11. Development of chitosan-SLN microparticles for chemotherapy: in vitro approach through efflux-transporter modulation.

    PubMed

    Dharmala, Kiran; Yoo, Jin Wook; Lee, Chi H

    2008-11-12

    Drug efflux-transporters serve as a major barrier to anticancer drugs at the target site. One strategy to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of drugs against cancer is to increase their available concentrations at the target site by suppressing or modulating efflux-transporters. This manuscript deals with the development and evaluation of the particle type drug delivery system made of stearic acid (Solid Lipid Nanoparticle - SLN) and chitosan for the delivery of Phenethyl Isothiocyanate (PEITC), a tumor-suppressive agent, through the pulmonary route. The rationale behind the particle type drug delivery system involves a prior release of the efflux-transporter inhibitors, such as tamoxifen, verapamil HCl or nifedipine, to suppress or modulate the efflux activity of ABC transporters followed by the release of the efflux-transporter substrate, PEITC. The efficacy of Chitosan-SLN Microparticles (CSM) as a carrier for PEITC was evaluated by investigating the release profiles of PEITC loaded in CSM and its cytotoxicity in the presence or absence of the efflux-transporter inhibitors. An initial burst release of the inhibitors, followed by gradual, sustained release of PEITC and subsequent increase in cytotoxicity was observed. This finding indicated that the efflux transporter inhibitors significantly affected the PEITC uptake rate by Calu-3 cells. Judging from these results, CSM can be an efficient drug delivery system for the substrates susceptible to the efflux-transporters.

  12. A new geometrical approach to Eulerian transport: an application to the ocean circulation; final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWilliams, J. C.; Chao, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the transport processes in the large-scale ocean circulations using the new transport theory. We focus on the mid-latitude ocean circulation, especially the Gulf Stream, because it is recognized as a most energetic ocean current and plays a crucial role in maintaining the earth's climate system.

  13. Three-dimensional numerical approach to investigate the substrate transport and conversion in an immobilized enzyme reactor.

    PubMed

    Esterl, Stefan; Ozmutlu, Ozlem; Hartmann, Christoph; Delgado, Antonio

    2003-09-30

    This numerical study evaluates the momentum and mass transfer in an immobilized enzyme reactor. The simulation is based on the solution of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation and a scalar transport equation with a sink term for the transport and the conversion of substrate to product. The reactor consists of a container filled with 20 spherical enzyme carriers. Each of these carriers is covered with an active enzyme layer where the conversion takes place. To account for the biochemical activity, the sink term in the scalar transport equation is represented by a standard Michaelis-Menten approach. The simulation gives detailed information of the local substrate and product concentrations with respect to external and internal transport limitations. A major focus is set on the influence of the substrate transport velocity on the catalytic process. For reactor performance analysis the overall and the local transport processes are described by a complete set of dimensionless variables. The interaction between substrate concentration, velocity, and efficiency of the process can be studied with the help of these variables. The effect of different substrate inflow concentrations on the process can be seen in relation to velocity variations. The flow field characterization of the system makes it possible to understand fluid mechanical properties and its importance to transport processes. The distribution of fluid motion through the void volume has different properties in different parts of the reactor. This phenomenon has strong effects on the arrangement of significantly different mass transport areas as well as on process effectiveness. With the given data it is also possible to detect zones of high, low, and latent enzymatic activity and to determine whether the conversion is limited due to mass transfer or reaction resistances.

  14. New Putative Chloroplast Vesicle Transport Components and Cargo Proteins Revealed Using a Bioinformatics Approach: An Arabidopsis Model

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nadir Zaman; Lindquist, Emelie; Aronsson, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Proteins and lipids are known to be transported to targeted cytosolic compartments in vesicles. A similar system in chloroplasts is suggested to transfer lipids from the inner envelope to the thylakoids. However, little is known about both possible cargo proteins and the proteins required to build a functional vesicle transport system in chloroplasts. A few components have been suggested, but only one (CPSAR1) has a verified location in chloroplast vesicles. This protein is localized in the donor membrane (envelope) and vesicles, but not in the target membrane (thylakoids) suggesting it plays a similar role to a cytosolic homologue, Sar1, in the secretory pathway. Thus, we hypothesized that there may be more similarities, in addition to lipid transport, between the vesicle transport systems in the cytosol and chloroplast, i.e. similar vesicle transport components, possible cargo proteins and receptors. Therefore, using a bioinformatics approach we searched for putative chloroplast components in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, corresponding mainly to components of the cytosolic vesicle transport system that may act in coordination with previously proposed COPII chloroplast homologues. We found several additional possible components, supporting the notion of a fully functional vesicle transport system in chloroplasts. Moreover, we found motifs in thylakoid-located proteins similar to those of COPII vesicle cargo proteins, supporting the hypothesis that chloroplast vesicles may transport thylakoid proteins from the envelope to the thylakoid membrane. Several putative cargo proteins are involved in photosynthesis, thus we propose the existence of a novel thylakoid protein pathway that is important for construction and maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery. PMID:23573218

  15. Zinc uptake and radial transport in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana: a modelling approach to understand accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Claus, Juliane; Bohmann, Ansgar; Chavarría-Krauser, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Zinc uptake in roots is believed to be mediated by ZIP (ZRT-, IRT-like proteins) transporters. Once inside the symplast, zinc is transported to the pericycle, where it exits by means of HMA (heavy metal ATPase) transporters. The combination of symplastic transport and spatial separation of influx and efflux produces a pattern in which zinc accumulates in the pericycle. Here, mathematical modelling was employed to study the importance of ZIP regulation, HMA abundance and symplastic transport in creation of the radial pattern of zinc in primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Methods A comprehensive one-dimensional dynamic model of radial zinc transport in roots was developed and used to conduct simulations. The model accounts for the structure of the root consisting of symplast and apoplast and includes effects of water flow, diffusion and cross-membrane transport via transporters. It also incorporates the radial geometry and varying porosity of root tissues, as well as regulation of ZIP transporters. Key Results Steady-state patterns were calculated for various zinc concentrations in the medium, water influx and HMA abundance. The experimentally observed zinc gradient was reproduced very well. An increase of HMA or decrease in water influx led to loss of the gradient. The dynamic behaviour for a change in medium concentration and water influx was also simulated showing short adaptation times in the range of seconds to minutes. Slowing down regulation led to oscillations in expression levels, suggesting the need for rapid regulation and existence of buffering agents. Conclusions The model captures the experimental findings very well and confirms the hypothesis that low abundance of HMA4 produces a radial gradient in zinc concentration. Surprisingly, transpiration was found also to be a key parameter. The model suggests that ZIP regulation takes place on a comparable timescale as symplastic transport. PMID:23258417

  16. A versatile pore-scale multicomponent reactive transport approach based on lattice Boltzmann method: Application to portlandite dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ravi A.; Perko, Janez; Jacques, Diederik; De Schutter, Geert; Van Breugel, Klaas; Ye, Guang

    A versatile lattice Boltzmann (LB) based pore-scale multicomponent reactive transport approach is presented in this paper. This approach is intended to capture mineral phase and pore structure evolution resulting from geochemical interactions applicable, for example to model microstructural evolution of hardened cement paste during chemical degradation. In the proposed approach heterogeneous reactions are conceptualized as pseudo-homogenous (volumetric) reactions by introducing an additional source term in the fluid node located at the interface adjacent to a solid node, and not as flux boundaries as used in previously proposed approaches. This allows a complete decoupling of transport and reaction computations, thus different reaction systems can be introduced within the LB framework through coupling with external geochemical codes. A systematic framework for coupling an external geochemical code with the LB including pore geometry evolution is presented, with the generic geochemical code PHREEQC as an example. The developed approach is validated with a set of benchmarks. A first example demonstrates the ability of the developed approach to capture the influence of pH on average portlandite dissolution rate and surface evolution. This example is further extended to illustrate the influence of reactive surface area and spatial arrangement of mineral grains on average dissolution rate. It was demonstrated that both location of mineral grains and surface area play a crucial role in determining average dissolution rate and pore structure evolution.

  17. A micromechanical approach of suffusion based on a length scale analysis of the grain detachment and grain transport processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wautier, Antoine; Bonelli, Stéphane; Nicot, François

    2017-06-01

    Suffusion is the selective erosion of the finest particles of a soil subjected to an internal flow. Among the four types of internal erosion and piping identified today, suffusion is the least understood. Indeed, there is a lack of micromechanical approaches for identifying the critical microstructural parameters responsible for this process. Based on a discrete element modeling of non cohesive granular assemblies, specific micromechanical tools are developed in a unified framework to account for the two first steps of suffusion, namely the grain detachment and the grain transport processes. Thanks to the use of an enhanced force chain definition and autocorrelation functions the typical lengths scales associated with grain detachment are characterized. From the definition of transport paths based on a graph description of the pore space the typical lengths scales associated with grain transport are recovered. For a uniform grain size distribution, a separation of scales between these two processes exists for the finest particles of a soil

  18. Microbial and Organic Fine Particle Transport Dynamics in Streams - a Combined Experimental and Stochastic Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Jen; Davies-Colley, Rob; Stott, Rebecca; Sukias, James; Nagels, John; Sharp, Alice; Packman, Aaron

    2014-05-01

    Transport dynamics of microbial cells and organic fine particles are important to stream ecology and biogeochemistry. Cells and particles continuously deposit and resuspend during downstream transport owing to a variety of processes including gravitational settling, interactions with in-stream structures or biofilms at the sediment-water interface, and hyporheic exchange and filtration within underlying sediments. Deposited cells and particles are also resuspended following increases in streamflow. Fine particle retention influences biogeochemical processing of substrates and nutrients (C, N, P), while remobilization of pathogenic microbes during flood events presents a hazard to downstream uses such as water supplies and recreation. We are conducting studies to gain insights into the dynamics of fine particles and microbes in streams, with a campaign of experiments and modeling. The results improve understanding of fine sediment transport, carbon cycling, nutrient spiraling, and microbial hazards in streams. We developed a stochastic model to describe the transport and retention of fine particles and microbes in rivers that accounts for hyporheic exchange and transport through porewaters, reversible filtration within the streambed, and microbial inactivation in the water column and subsurface. This model framework is an advance over previous work in that it incorporates detailed transport and retention processes that are amenable to measurement. Solute, particle, and microbial transport were observed both locally within sediment and at the whole-stream scale. A multi-tracer whole-stream injection experiment compared the transport and retention of a conservative solute, fluorescent fine particles, and the fecal indicator bacterium Escherichia coli. Retention occurred within both the underlying sediment bed and stands of submerged macrophytes. The results demonstrate that the combination of local measurements, whole-stream tracer experiments, and advanced modeling

  19. Flight-test measurement of the noise reduction of a jet transport delayed flap approach procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. D.; Lasagna, P. L.

    1976-01-01

    A delayed flap approach procedure was flight tested using the NASA CV-990 airplane to measure and analyze the noise produced beneath the flight path. Three other types of landing approaches were also flight tested to provide a comparison of the noise reduction benefits to the delayed flap approach. The conventional type of approach was used as a baseline to compare the effectiveness of the other approaches. The decelerating approach is a variation of the delayed flap approach. A detailed comparison of the ground perceived noise generated during the approaches is presented. For this comparison, the measured noise data were normalized to compensate for variations in aircraft weight and winds that occurred during the flight tests. The data show that the reduced flap approach offers some noise reduction, while the delayed flap and decelerating approaches offer significant noise reductions over the conventional approach.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann-Based Approaches for Pore-Scale Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Kang, Qinjun; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-07-29

    Here an important geoscience and environmental applications such as geologic carbon storage, environmental remediation, and unconventional oil and gas recovery are best understood in the context of reactive flow and multicomponent transport in the subsurface environment. The coupling of chemical and microbiological reactions with hydrological and mechanical processes can lead to complex behaviors across an enormous range of spatial and temporal scales. These coupled responses are also strongly influenced by the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the geologic formations. Reactive transport processes can change the pore morphology at the pore scale, thereby leading to nonlinear interactions with advective and diffusive transport, which can strongly influence larger-scale properties such as permeability and dispersion.

  1. Combinatorial theory of the semiclassical evaluation of transport moments II: Algorithmic approach for moment generating functions

    SciTech Connect

    Berkolaiko, G.; Kuipers, J.

    2013-12-15

    Electronic transport through chaotic quantum dots exhibits universal behaviour which can be understood through the semiclassical approximation. Within the approximation, calculation of transport moments reduces to codifying classical correlations between scattering trajectories. These can be represented as ribbon graphs and we develop an algorithmic combinatorial method to generate all such graphs with a given genus. This provides an expansion of the linear transport moments for systems both with and without time reversal symmetry. The computational implementation is then able to progress several orders further than previous semiclassical formulae as well as those derived from an asymptotic expansion of random matrix results. The patterns observed also suggest a general form for the higher orders.

  2. Validation of a combined sediment transport modelling approach for the morphodynamic simulation of the upper Hungarian Danube River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, Gergely T.; Baranya, Sándor; Rüther, Nils

    2017-04-01

    The reliable numerical modelling of morphological changes of rivers is still an unsolved problem, particularly in non-uniform river bed. Several sediment transport formulas were developed for mixed bed materials, however, none of them works well for any general case. For instance, a given non-uniform transport formula is expected and proved to calculate the bed armouring process well. On the other hand, it might estimate the movement and settling of the eroded finer particles less accurately. In order to overcome this issue the authors have elaborated and presented a combined approach implemented in a 3D numerical flow and sediment transport model. The combined approach means that the model applies two models at the same time but spatially differentiated based on the bed material conditions. Here, we use the sediment transport models of van Rijn (1984) and the Wilcock and Crowe (2003). Recent numerical model validation using laboratory data demonstrated the benefits of this novel method (Török et al., 2017). The main goal of this study is to prove the advantages of the combined approach for field environment. Thus, the upper Hungarian Danube River with non-uniform bed material was selected for morphodynamic modelling purposes. The morphological processes at this river reach are considerably complex, e.g. bed armouring process in the main channel, side gravel bar formation, silting up between the river training structures and sediment deposition in the floodplain caused by floods can be observed. Field measurement data provided hydrological and morphological data for the parameterization of a 3D CFD model. The effect of the historical flood wave in 2013 June was analysed. The results show that the combined approach resulted in a more accurate simulation of the morphological changes, compared to the separate application of the sediment transport formulas. The Wilcock and Crowe formula calculated reliably the armored bed surface in the main channel which resulted in

  3. A streamline splitting pore-network approach for computationally inexpensive and accurate simulation of transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Mehmani, Yashar; Oostrom, Martinus; Balhoff, Matthew

    2014-03-20

    Several approaches have been developed in the literature for solving flow and transport at the pore-scale. Some authors use a direct modeling approach where the fundamental flow and transport equations are solved on the actual pore-space geometry. Such direct modeling, while very accurate, comes at a great computational cost. Network models are computationally more efficient because the pore-space morphology is approximated. Typically, a mixed cell method (MCM) is employed for solving the flow and transport system which assumes pore-level perfect mixing. This assumption is invalid at moderate to high Peclet regimes. In this work, a novel Eulerian perspective on modeling flow and transport at the pore-scale is developed. The new streamline splitting method (SSM) allows for circumventing the pore-level perfect mixing assumption, while maintaining the computational efficiency of pore-network models. SSM was verified with direct simulations and excellent matches were obtained against micromodel experiments across a wide range of pore-structure and fluid-flow parameters. The increase in the computational cost from MCM to SSM is shown to be minimal, while the accuracy of SSM is much higher than that of MCM and comparable to direct modeling approaches. Therefore, SSM can be regarded as an appropriate balance between incorporating detailed physics and controlling computational cost. The truly predictive capability of the model allows for the study of pore-level interactions of fluid flow and transport in different porous materials. In this paper, we apply SSM and MCM to study the effects of pore-level mixing on transverse dispersion in 3D disordered granular media.

  4. A variational approach for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu Kwok, YanHo; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-09-14

    Recent development of theoretical method for dissipative quantum transport has achieved notable progresses in the weak or strong electron-phonon coupling regime. However, a generalized theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space had not been established. In this work, a variational polaron theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide range of electron-phonon coupling is developed. The optimal polaron transformation is determined by the optimization of the Feynman-Bogoliubov upper bound of free energy. The free energy minimization ends up with an optimal mean-field Hamiltonian and a minimal interaction Hamiltonian. Hence, second-order perturbation can be applied to the transformed system, resulting in an accurate and efficient method for the treatment of dissipative quantum transport with different electron-phonon coupling strength. Numerical benchmark calculation on a single site model coupled to one phonon mode is presented.

  5. SELECTION AND CALIBRATION OF SUBSURFACE REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELS USING A SURROGATE-MODEL APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    While standard techniques for uncertainty analysis have been successfully applied to groundwater flow models, extension to reactive transport is frustrated by numerous difficulties, including excessive computational burden and parameter non-uniqueness. This research introduces a...

  6. SELECTION AND CALIBRATION OF SUBSURFACE REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELS USING A SURROGATE-MODEL APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    While standard techniques for uncertainty analysis have been successfully applied to groundwater flow models, extension to reactive transport is frustrated by numerous difficulties, including excessive computational burden and parameter non-uniqueness. This research introduces a...

  7. A variational approach for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-09-14

    Recent development of theoretical method for dissipative quantum transport has achieved notable progresses in the weak or strong electron-phonon coupling regime. However, a generalized theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space had not been established. In this work, a variational polaron theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide range of electron-phonon coupling is developed. The optimal polaron transformation is determined by the optimization of the Feynman-Bogoliubov upper bound of free energy. The free energy minimization ends up with an optimal mean-field Hamiltonian and a minimal interaction Hamiltonian. Hence, second-order perturbation can be applied to the transformed system, resulting in an accurate and efficient method for the treatment of dissipative quantum transport with different electron-phonon coupling strength. Numerical benchmark calculation on a single site model coupled to one phonon mode is presented.

  8. Chemometrics approach for the prediction of structure-activity relationship for membrane transporter bilitranslocase.

    PubMed

    Martinčič, R; Venko, K; Župerl, Š; Novič, M

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins are essential for cellular uptake of numerous salts, nutrients and drugs. Bilitranslocase is a transporter, specific for water-soluble organic anions, and is the only known carrier of nucleotides and nucleotide-like compounds. Experimental data of bilitranslocase ligand specificity for 120 compounds were used to construct classification models using counter-propagation artificial neural networks (CP-ANNs) and support vector machines (SVMs). A subset of active compounds with experimentally determined transport rates was used to build predictive QSAR models for estimation of transport rates of unknown compounds. Several modelling methods and techniques were applied, i.e. CP-ANN, genetic algorithm, self-organizing mapping and multiple linear regression method. The best predictions were achieved using CP-ANN coupled with a genetic algorithm, with the external validation parameter QV(2) of 0.96. The applicability domains of the models were defined to determine the chemical space in which reliable predictions can be obtained. The models were applied for the estimation of bilitranslocase transport activity for two sets of pharmaceutically interesting compounds, antioxidants and antiprions. We found that the relative planarity and a high potential for hydrogen bond formation are the common structural features of anticipated substrates of bilitranslocase. These features may serve as guidelines in the design of new pharmaceuticals transported by bilitranslocase.

  9. Transport equation approach to calculations of Hadamard Green functions and non-coincident DeWitt coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottewill, Adrian C.; Wardell, Barry

    2011-11-01

    Building on an insight due to Avramidi, we provide a system of transport equations for determining key fundamental bitensors, including derivatives of the world function, σ(x,x'), the square root of the Van Vleck determinant, Δ1/2(x,x'), and the tail term, V(x,x'), appearing in the Hadamard form of the Green function. These bitensors are central to a broad range of problems from radiation reaction to quantum field theory in curved spacetime and quantum gravity. Their transport equations may be used either in a semi-recursive approach to determining their covariant Taylor series expansions, or as the basis of numerical calculations. To illustrate the power of the semi-recursive approach, we present an implementation in Mathematica, which computes very high order covariant series expansions of these objects. Using this code, a moderate laptop can, for example, calculate the coincidence limit [a7(x,x)] and V(x,x') to order (σa)20 in a matter of minutes. Results may be output in either a compact notation or in xTensor form. In a second application of the approach, we present a scheme for numerically integrating the transport equations as a system of coupled ordinary differential equations. As an example application of the scheme, we integrate along null geodesics to solve for V(x,x') in Nariai and Schwarzschild spacetimes.

  10. Reactive Transport Modeling of Induced Calcite Precipitation Reaction Fronts in Porous Media Using A Parallel, Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Huang, H.; Gaston, D.; Redden, G. D.; Fox, D. T.; Fujita, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Inducing mineral precipitation in the subsurface is one potential strategy for immobilizing trace metal and radionuclide contaminants. Generating mineral precipitates in situ can be achieved by manipulating chemical conditions, typically through injection or in situ generation of reactants. How these reactants transport, mix and react within the medium controls the spatial distribution and composition of the resulting mineral phases. Multiple processes, including fluid flow, dispersive/diffusive transport of reactants, biogeochemical reactions and changes in porosity-permeability, are tightly coupled over a number of scales. Numerical modeling can be used to investigate the nonlinear coupling effects of these processes which are quite challenging to explore experimentally. Many subsurface reactive transport simulators employ a de-coupled or operator-splitting approach where transport equations and batch chemistry reactions are solved sequentially. However, such an approach has limited applicability for biogeochemical systems with fast kinetics and strong coupling between chemical reactions and medium properties. A massively parallel, fully coupled, fully implicit Reactive Transport simulator (referred to as “RAT”) based on a parallel multi-physics object-oriented simulation framework (MOOSE) has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Within this simulator, systems of transport and reaction equations can be solved simultaneously in a fully coupled, fully implicit manner using the Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method with additional advanced computing capabilities such as (1) physics-based preconditioning for solution convergence acceleration, (2) massively parallel computing and scalability, and (3) adaptive mesh refinements for 2D and 3D structured and unstructured mesh. The simulator was first tested against analytical solutions, then applied to simulating induced calcium carbonate mineral precipitation in 1D columns and 2D flow cells as analogs

  11. A Combined Observational and Modeling Approach to Study Modern Dust Transport from the Patagonia Desert to East Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, S.; Stein, A.; Marino, F.; Castellano, E.; Udisti, R.; Ceratto, J.

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of present atmospheric transport processes from Southern Hemisphere (SH) landmasses to Antarctica can improve the interpretation of stratigraphic data in Antarctic ice cores. In addition, long range transport can deliver key nutrients normally not available to marine ecosystems in the Southern Ocean and may trigger or enhance primary productivity. However, there is a dearth of observational based studies of dust transport in the SH. This work aims to improve current understanding of dust transport in the SH by showing a characterization of two dust events originating in the Patagonia desert (south end of South America). The approach is based on a combined and complementary use of satellite retrievals (detectors MISR, MODIS, GLAS ,POLDER, OMI,), transport model simulation (HYSPLIT) and surface observations near the sources and aerosol measurements in Antarctica (Neumayer and Concordia sites). Satellite imagery and visibility observations confirm dust emission in a stretch of dry lakes along the coast of the Tierra del Fuego (TdF) island (approx.54deg S) and from the shores of the Colihue Huapi lake in Central Patagonia (approx.46deg S) in February 2005. Model simulations initialized by these observations reproduce the timing of an observed increase in dust concentration at the Concordia Station and some of the observed increases in atmospheric aerosol absorption (here used as a dust proxy) in the Neumayer station. The TdF sources were the largest contributors of dust at both sites. The transit times from TdF to the Neumayer and Concordia sites are 6-7 and 9-10 days respectively. Lidar observations and model outputs coincide in placing most of the dust cloud in the boundary layer and suggest significant de- position over the ocean immediately downwind. Boundary layer dust was detected as far as 1800 km from the source and approx.800 km north of the South Georgia Island over the central sub-Antarctic Atlantic Ocean. Although the analysis suggests the

  12. Transportation network policy modeling for congestion and pollution control: A variational inequality approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujam, Padma

    1999-08-01

    Public concern over the state of the environment has grown over the past decade. All indications are that this concern will continue to influence policy making into the foreseeable future. Road transport is seen as the major contributor to environmental degradation. Transportation planners around the world face the question: cleaner air and/or faster commutes? While individual vehicles can be made more environmentally friendly, the sheer scale of growth in world-wide vehicle numbers is projected to cause significant environmental degradation in the longer run, and in the absence of newer and stricter polices. It is a challenge for governments to find policies that ensure congestion-free metropolitan areas while guaranteeing both critical environmental quality levels and a sufficient infrastructure access to all groups involved. The objective of the dissertation is to provide a mathematical framework to study transportation policy models for the purpose of controlling congestion and pollution. Towards this objective. a series of transportation policy models are developed to study travel behavior and to quantity the reductions in congestion and automobile emissions. The dissertation begins with a brief historical overview of some of the pioneering works in urban transportation economics and later presents the theoretical foundation for the transportation policy models developed. The dissertation introduces single modal and multimodal transportation network policy models that accomplish road pricing with the imposition of goal targets on link loads. as well as, integrated traffic equilibrium models with marketable mobile emission permits. Furthermore, equilibrium conditions are derived for each model, and both qualitative analysis and computational procedures are studied. Finally, the dissertation concludes with a comparative study of the relationship between regulatory pricing models and marketable emission permit transportation models and a discussion on key factors

  13. Reflections on solute transport in rivers: Historical developments, present approaches, and future promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packman, A. I.

    2012-12-01

    Thirty years after Bencala and Walters' landmark paper on transient storage seems like a good time to reflect on our understanding of hyporheic exchange and solute transport in rivers. Bencala and Walters' work, and the related fieldwork of many others at the U.S. Geological Survey, changed the paradigm for flow in river corridors. Previously, the prevailing view had been that in-stream transport was regulated primarily by advection and dispersion. This thinking was rooted in well-established theory derived from the work of G.I. Taylor on dispersion processes, and supported by extensive fieldwork in the 1960's and 1970's. River and groundwater flow were strictly separated at the channel boundary. After Bencala and Walters (and a lot of follow-up work!) we now understand that water continuously exchanges across stream channel boundaries. This has profound implications for not only solute transport in rivers, but also a wide variety of biogeochemical, ecological, and even geomorphological processes. In this talk, I will review the historical development of theory for solute transport in rivers, try to convey why Bencala and Walters was so important to both hydrology and biogeochemistry, and discuss how recent developments in measurement methods and stochastic transport theory can be used to further advance our understanding of surface-groundwater connectivity.

  14. Reactive Transport Modeling: An Essential Tool and a New ResearchApproach for the Earth Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl I.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2005-08-25

    Reactive transport modeling is an essential tool for the analysis of coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes in Earth systems, and has additional potential to better integrate the results from focused fundamental research on Earth materials. Appropriately designed models can describe the interactions of competing processes at a range of spatial and time scales, and hence are critical for connecting the advancing capabilities for materials characterization at the atomic scale with the macroscopic behavior of complex Earth systems. Reactive transport modeling has had a significant impact on the treatment of contaminant retardation in the subsurface, the description of elemental and nutrient fluxes between major Earth reservoirs, and in the treatment of deep Earth processes such as metamorphism and magma transport. Active topics of research include the development of pore scale and hybrid, or multiple continua, models to capture the scale dependence of coupled reactive transport processes. Frontier research questions, that are only now being addressed, include the effects of chemical microenvironments, coupled thermal mechanical chemical processes, controls on mineral fluid reaction rates in natural media, and scaling of reactive transport processes from the microscopic to pore to field scale.

  15. Proposing An Effective Route For Transporting Solid Waste Using Gis Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainun, Noor Yasmin; Samsu, Ku Nor Syazana Ku; Rohani, Munzilah Md

    2016-11-01

    Transportation is one of the important elements in solid waste management. Effective transportation by selecting the shortest route can save time and cost in handling the waste. Thus, this paper presents a case study on deciding shortest waste transportation route from residential area to sanitary landfill in Kluang district handled by Solid Waste and Public Cleansing Management Corporation (SWCorp). The shortest transportation distance was determined using ArcGIS software on the basis of coordinate tracking, data collection for network analysis and fuel consumption estimation. The case study focuses on municipal solid waste collection routes from residential area in Kluang district to Ladang CEP 1 sanitary landfill and Seelong sanitary landfill. The study found that SWCorp could save up to 18% and 7.3% of fuel consumption per day by following the effective routes for transporting solid waste to Ladang CEP 1 sanitary landfill and to Seelong Sanitary landfill respectively. The findings could assist SWCorp saving management cost and also keep environment cleaner.

  16. Realistic representation of grain shapes in CFD-DEM simulations of sediment transport with a bonded-sphere approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rui; Xiao, Heng; Sun, Honglei

    2017-09-01

    Development of algorithms and growth of computational resources in the past decades have enabled simulations of sediment transport processes with unprecedented fidelities. The Computational Fluid Dynamics-Discrete Element Method (CFD-DEM) is one of the high-fidelity approaches, where the motions of and collisions among the sediment grains as well as their interactions with surrounding fluids are resolved. In most DEM solvers the particles are modeled as soft spheres due to computational efficiency and implementation complexity considerations, although natural sediments are usually a mixture of non-spherical (e.g., disk-, blade-, and rod-shaped) particles. Previous attempts to extend sphere-based DEM to treat irregular particles neglected fluid-induced torques on particles, and the method lacked flexibility to handle sediments with an arbitrary mixture of particle shapes. In this contribution we proposed a simple, efficient approach to representing common sediment grain shapes with bonded spheres, where the fluid forces are computed and applied on each sphere. The proposed approach overcomes the aforementioned limitations of existing methods and has improved efficiency and flexibility over existing approaches. We use numerical simulations to demonstrate the merits and capability of the proposed method in predicting the falling characteristics, terminal velocity, threshold of incipient motion, and transport rate of natural sediments. The simulations show that the proposed method is a promising approach for faithful representation of natural sediment, which leads to accurate simulations of their transport dynamics. While this work focuses on non-cohesive sediments, the proposed method also opens the possibility for first-principle-based simulations of the flocculation and sedimentation dynamics of cohesive sediments. Elucidation of these physical mechanisms can provide much needed improvement on the prediction capability and physical understanding of muddy coast

  17. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  18. Computational approaches for the study of serotonin and its membrane transporter SERT: implications for drug design in neurological sciences.

    PubMed

    Pratuangdejkul, J; Schneider, B; Launay, J-M; Kellermann, O; Manivet, P

    2008-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), a monoamine neurotransmitter of the central nervous and peripheral systems (CNS), plays a critical role in a wide variety of physiological and behavioral processes. In the serotonergic system, deregulation of the tightly controlled extracellular concentration of 5-HT appears to be at the origin of a host of metabolic and psychiatric disorders. A key step that regulates 5-HT external level is the re-uptake of 5-HT into cells by the 5-HT transporter (SERT), which is besides the target of numerous drugs interacting with the serotonergic system. Therapeutic strategies have mainly focused on the development of compounds that block the activity of SERT, for instance reuptake inhibitors (e.g. tricyclics, "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitors) and in the past, specific substrate-type releasers (e.g. amphetamine and cocaine derivatives). Today, generation of new drugs targetting SERT with enhanced selectivity and reduced toxicity is one of the most challenging tasks in drug design. In this context, studies aiming at characterizing the physicochemical properties of 5-HT as well as the biological active conformation of SERT are a prerequisite to the design of new leads. However, the absence of a high-resolution 3D-structure for SERT has hampered the design of new transporter inhibitors. Using computational approaches, numerous efforts were made to shed light on the structure of 5-HT and its transporter. In this review, we compared several in silico methods dedicated to the modeling of 5-HT and SERT with an emphasis on i) quantum chemistry for study of 5-HT conformation and ii) ligand-based (QSAR and pharmacophore models) and transporter-based (homology models) approaches for studying SERT molecule. In addition, we discuss some methodological aspects of the computational work in connection with the construction of putative but reliable 3D structural models of SERT that may help to predict the mechanisms of neurotransmitter transport.

  19. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE PAGES

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; ...

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  20. Lattice Boltzmann-Based Approaches for Pore-Scale Reactive Transport

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Kang, Qinjun; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-07-29

    Here an important geoscience and environmental applications such as geologic carbon storage, environmental remediation, and unconventional oil and gas recovery are best understood in the context of reactive flow and multicomponent transport in the subsurface environment. The coupling of chemical and microbiological reactions with hydrological and mechanical processes can lead to complex behaviors across an enormous range of spatial and temporal scales. These coupled responses are also strongly influenced by the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the geologic formations. Reactive transport processes can change the pore morphology at the pore scale, thereby leading to nonlinear interactions with advective and diffusive transport,more » which can strongly influence larger-scale properties such as permeability and dispersion.« less

  1. Influence of reservoirs on solute transport: A regional-scale approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, V.J.

    2001-01-01

    Regional transport of water and dissolved constituents through heavily regulated river systems is influenced by the presence of reservoirs. Analysis of seasonal patterns in solute fluxes for salinity and nutrients indicates that in-reservoir processes within large storage reservoirs in the Rio Grande and Colorado basins (southwestern USA) are superimposed over the underlying watershed processes that predominate in relatively unregulated stream reaches. Connectivity of the aquatic system with the landscape is apparently disrupted by processes within the reservoir systems; these processes result in large changes in characteristics for solute transport that persist downstream in the absence of significant inputs. Additionally, reservoir processes may be linked for upstream/downstream reservoirs that are located relatively close in a series. In contrast, the regional effect of in-reservoir processes is negligible for solute transport through run-of-river reservoirs in the lower Columbia River (northwestern USA).

  2. A hybrid (Monte Carlo/deterministic) approach for multi-dimensional radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bal, Guillaume; Davis, Anthony B.; Langmore, Ian

    2011-08-20

    Highlights: {yields} We introduce a variance reduction scheme for Monte Carlo (MC) transport. {yields} The primary application is atmospheric remote sensing. {yields} The technique first solves the adjoint problem using a deterministic solver. {yields} Next, the adjoint solution is used as an importance function for the MC solver. {yields} The adjoint problem is solved quickly since it ignores the volume. - Abstract: A novel hybrid Monte Carlo transport scheme is demonstrated in a scene with solar illumination, scattering and absorbing 2D atmosphere, a textured reflecting mountain, and a small detector located in the sky (mounted on a satellite or a airplane). It uses a deterministic approximation of an adjoint transport solution to reduce variance, computed quickly by ignoring atmospheric interactions. This allows significant variance and computational cost reductions when the atmospheric scattering and absorption coefficient are small. When combined with an atmospheric photon-redirection scheme, significant variance reduction (equivalently acceleration) is achieved in the presence of atmospheric interactions.

  3. Geochemical & Physical Aquifer Property Heterogeneity: A Multiscale Sedimentologic Approach to Reactive Solute Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Chris; Allen-King, Richelle; Weissmann, Gary

    2006-06-01

    This project is testing the hypothesis that sedimentary lithofacies determine the geochemical and physical hydrologic properties that control reactive solute transport (Figure 1). We are testing that hypothesis for one site, a portion of the saturated zone at the Hanford Site (Ringold Formation), and for a model solute, carbon tetrachloride (CT). The representative geochemical and physical aquifer properties selected for quantification in the proposed project are the properties that control CT transport: hydraulic conductivity (K) and reactivity (sorption distribution coefficient, Kd, and anaerobic transformation rate constant, kn). We are combining observations at outcrop analog sites (to measure lithofacies dimensions and statistical relations) with measurements from archived and fresh core samples (for geochemical experiments and to provide additional constraint to the stratigraphic model) from the Ringold Formation to place local-scale lithofacies successions, and their distinct hydrologic property distributions, into the basinal context, thus allowing us to estimate the spatial distributions of properties that control reactive solute transport in the subsurface.

  4. Salinity tolerance in plants. Quantitative approach to ion transport starting from halophytes and stepping to genetic and protein engineering for manipulating ion fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport is the fundamental factor determining salinity tolerance in plants. The Review starts from differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes. The comparison provides introductory information for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion fluxes. Further steps require knowledge about mechanisms of ion transport and individual genes of ion transport proteins. Initially, the Review describes methods to measure ion fluxes, the independent set of techniques ensures robust and reliable basement for quantitative approach. The Review briefly summarizes current data concerning Na+ and K+ concentrations in cells, refers to primary thermodynamics of ion transport and gives special attention to individual ion channels and transporters. Simplified scheme of a plant cell with known transport systems at the plasma membrane and tonoplast helps to imagine the complexity of ion transport and allows choosing specific transporters for modulating ion transport. The complexity is enhanced by the influence of cell size and cell wall on ion transport. Special attention is given to ion transporters and to potassium and sodium transport by HKT, HAK, NHX, and SOS1 proteins. Comparison between non-selective cation channels and ion transporters reveals potential importance of ion transporters and the balance between the two pathways of ion transport. Further on the Review describes in detail several successful attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to promising candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. Potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters using single point mutations is discussed and

  5. Salinity tolerance in plants. Quantitative approach to ion transport starting from halophytes and stepping to genetic and protein engineering for manipulating ion fluxes.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport is the fundamental factor determining salinity tolerance in plants. The Review starts from differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes. The comparison provides introductory information for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion fluxes. Further steps require knowledge about mechanisms of ion transport and individual genes of ion transport proteins. Initially, the Review describes methods to measure ion fluxes, the independent set of techniques ensures robust and reliable basement for quantitative approach. The Review briefly summarizes current data concerning Na(+) and K(+) concentrations in cells, refers to primary thermodynamics of ion transport and gives special attention to individual ion channels and transporters. Simplified scheme of a plant cell with known transport systems at the plasma membrane and tonoplast helps to imagine the complexity of ion transport and allows choosing specific transporters for modulating ion transport. The complexity is enhanced by the influence of cell size and cell wall on ion transport. Special attention is given to ion transporters and to potassium and sodium transport by HKT, HAK, NHX, and SOS1 proteins. Comparison between non-selective cation channels and ion transporters reveals potential importance of ion transporters and the balance between the two pathways of ion transport. Further on the Review describes in detail several successful attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to promising candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. Potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters using single point mutations is discussed and

  6. An optimal transport approach for seismic tomography: application to 3D full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Mérigot, Q.; Oudet, E.; Virieux, J.

    2016-11-01

    The use of optimal transport distance has recently yielded significant progress in image processing for pattern recognition, shape identification, and histograms matching. In this study, the use of this distance is investigated for a seismic tomography problem exploiting the complete waveform; the full waveform inversion. In its conventional formulation, this high resolution seismic imaging method is based on the minimization of the L 2 distance between predicted and observed data. Application of this method is generally hampered by the local minima of the associated L 2 misfit function, which correspond to velocity models matching the data up to one or several phase shifts. Conversely, the optimal transport distance appears as a more suitable tool to compare the misfit between oscillatory signals, for its ability to detect shifted patterns. However, its application to the full waveform inversion is not straightforward, as the mass conservation between the compared data cannot be guaranteed, a crucial assumption for optimal transport. In this study, the use of a distance based on the Kantorovich-Rubinstein norm is introduced to overcome this difficulty. Its mathematical link with the optimal transport distance is made clear. An efficient numerical strategy for its computation, based on a proximal splitting technique, is introduced. We demonstrate that each iteration of the corresponding algorithm requires solving the Poisson equation, for which fast solvers can be used, relying either on the fast Fourier transform or on multigrid techniques. The development of this numerical method make possible applications to industrial scale data, involving tenths of millions of discrete unknowns. The results we obtain on such large scale synthetic data illustrate the potentialities of the optimal transport for seismic imaging. Starting from crude initial velocity models, optimal transport based inversion yields significantly better velocity reconstructions than those based on

  7. Interrogating Emergent Transport Properties for Molecular Motor Ensembles: A Semi-analytical Approach.

    PubMed

    Bhaban, Shreyas; Materassi, Donatello; Li, Mingang; Hays, Thomas; Salapaka, Murti

    2016-11-01

    Intracellular transport is an essential function in eucaryotic cells, facilitated by motor proteins-proteins converting chemical energy into kinetic energy. It is understood that motor proteins work in teams enabling unidirectional and bidirectional transport of intracellular cargo over long distances. Disruptions of the underlying transport mechanisms, often caused by mutations that alter single motor characteristics, are known to cause neurodegenerative diseases. For example, phosphorylation of kinesin motor domain at the serine residue is implicated in Huntington's disease, with a recent study of phosphorylated and phosphomimetic serine residues indicating lowered single motor stalling forces. In this article we report the effects of mutations of this nature on transport properties of cargo carried by multiple wild-type and mutant motors. Results indicate that mutants with altered stall forces might determine the average velocity and run-length even when they are outnumbered by wild type motors in the ensemble. It is shown that mutants gain a competitive advantage and lead to an increase in the expected run-length when the load on the cargo is in the vicinity of the mutant's stalling force or a multiple of its stalling force. A separate contribution of this article is the development of a semi-analytic method to analyze transport of cargo by multiple motors of multiple types. The technique determines transition rates between various relative configurations of motors carrying the cargo using the transition rates between various absolute configurations. This enables a computation of biologically relevant quantities like average velocity and run-length without resorting to Monte Carlo simulations. It can also be used to introduce alterations of various single motor parameters to model a mutation and to deduce effects of such alterations on the transport of a common cargo by multiple motors. Our method is easily implementable and we provide a software package for

  8. Interrogating Emergent Transport Properties for Molecular Motor Ensembles: A Semi-analytical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Materassi, Donatello; Li, Mingang; Hays, Thomas; Salapaka, Murti

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular transport is an essential function in eucaryotic cells, facilitated by motor proteins—proteins converting chemical energy into kinetic energy. It is understood that motor proteins work in teams enabling unidirectional and bidirectional transport of intracellular cargo over long distances. Disruptions of the underlying transport mechanisms, often caused by mutations that alter single motor characteristics, are known to cause neurodegenerative diseases. For example, phosphorylation of kinesin motor domain at the serine residue is implicated in Huntington’s disease, with a recent study of phosphorylated and phosphomimetic serine residues indicating lowered single motor stalling forces. In this article we report the effects of mutations of this nature on transport properties of cargo carried by multiple wild-type and mutant motors. Results indicate that mutants with altered stall forces might determine the average velocity and run-length even when they are outnumbered by wild type motors in the ensemble. It is shown that mutants gain a competitive advantage and lead to an increase in the expected run-length when the load on the cargo is in the vicinity of the mutant’s stalling force or a multiple of its stalling force. A separate contribution of this article is the development of a semi-analytic method to analyze transport of cargo by multiple motors of multiple types. The technique determines transition rates between various relative configurations of motors carrying the cargo using the transition rates between various absolute configurations. This enables a computation of biologically relevant quantities like average velocity and run-length without resorting to Monte Carlo simulations. It can also be used to introduce alterations of various single motor parameters to model a mutation and to deduce effects of such alterations on the transport of a common cargo by multiple motors. Our method is easily implementable and we provide a software package

  9. Boundary-projection acceleration: A new approach to synthetic acceleration of transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.L.; Martin, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    We present a new class of synthetic acceleration methods which can be applied to transport calculations regardless of geometry, discretization scheme, or mesh shape. Unlike other synthetic acceleration methods which base their acceleration on P1 equations, these methods use acceleration equations obtained by projecting the transport solution onto a coarse angular mesh only on cell boundaries. We demonstrate, via Fourier analysis of a simple model problem as well as numerical calculations of various problems, that the simplest of these methods are unconditionally stable with spectral radius less than or equal toc/3 (c being the scattering ratio), for several different discretization schemes in slab geometry. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. A data-driven approach to establishing microstructure-property relationships in porous transport layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çeçen, A.; Fast, T.; Kumbur, E. C.; Kalidindi, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    The diffusion media (DM) has been shown to be a vital component for performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). The DM has a dual-layer structure composed of a macro-substrate referred to as the gas diffusion layer (GDL) coated with a micro-porous layer (MPL). Efficient prediction of the effective transport properties of the DM from its internal structure is essential to optimizing the multifunctional characteristics of this critical component. In this work, a unique data-driven approach to establishing structure-property correlations is introduced and applied to the case of gas diffusion in the GDL and MPL. This new approach provides an automated process to produce unbiased estimators to microstructural variance, in contrast to many process-related (hence biased) parameters employed by prominent correlations in the field. The present approach starts with a rigorous quantification of microstructure in the form of n-point statistics. It is followed by the identification of the key aspects of the internal structure through the use of principle component analysis. A data-driven correlation is established when the principal components are related to effective diffusivity by multivariate linear regression. This data-driven approach is compared to the conventional correlations and shown to achieve a very high accuracy for capturing the diffusive transport in the tested PEFC components.

  11. A novel approach for the characterisation of transport and optical properties of aerosol particles near sources - Part II: Microphysics-chemistry-transport model development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdebenito B, Álvaro M.; Pal, Sandip; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Lammel, Gerhard

    2011-06-01

    A new high-resolution microphysics-chemistry-transport model (LES-AOP) was developed and applied for the investigation of aerosol transformation and transport in the vicinity of a livestock facility in northern Germany (PLUS1 field campaign). The model is an extension of a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model. The PLUS1 field campaign included the first deployment of the new eye-safe scanning aerosol lidar system of the University of Hohenheim. In a combined approach, model and lidar results were used to characterise a faint aerosol source. The farm plume structure was investigated and the absolute value of its particle backscatter coefficient was determined. Aerosol optical properties were predicted on spatial and temporal resolutions below 100 m and 1 min, upon initialisation by measured meteorological and size-resolved particulate matter mass concentration and composition data. Faint aerosol plumes corresponding to a particle backscatter coefficient down to 10 -6 sr -1 m -1 were measured and realistically simulated. Budget-related quantities such as the emission flux and change of the particulate matter mass, were estimated from model results and ground measurements.

  12. Integrating air pollution modelling with scenario testing in road transport planning: the TRAEMS approach.

    PubMed

    Affum, J K; Brown, A L; Chan, Y C

    2003-08-01

    Transport add-on environmental modelling system (TRAEMS) is a GIS-based environmental modelling system designed to evaluate the environmental consequences of road traffic in urban areas. Its development has been underpinned by the premises that the evaluation of road traffic impacts is best undertaken during the early planning stages of road networks, and that this can utilise much of the data generated by the transport planners themselves as they apply their travel demand models as to planning of road networks. The system integrates information about traffic-usually from travel-forecasting models-with information about land use, to provide the input data to a range of commonly used models that estimate pollution from a road traffic system, and the energy consumption of that system. TRAEMS facilitates this integration and allows land use, transport and environmental planners to have rapid feedback on the environmental effects of road transport network scenarios that are being developed and tested. Its purpose is to aid in the selection of environmentally-preferred road networks and to highlight where management of pollution levels on future road networks will be required. TRAEMS has a modular structure. This paper describes the main features of the air pollution and fuel consumption modules of the system and illustrates the system's utility through case studies at both metropolitan-wide- and local-area scales.

  13. A tutorial on the piecewise regression approach applied to bedload transport data

    Treesearch

    Sandra E. Ryan; Laurie S. Porth

    2007-01-01

    This tutorial demonstrates the application of piecewise regression to bedload data to define a shift in phase of transport so that the reader may perform similar analyses on available data. The use of piecewise regression analysis implicitly recognizes different functions fit to bedload data over varying ranges of flow. The transition from primarily low rates of sand...

  14. New approach to the solution of the Boltzmann radiation transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffi, Vinicio C.; Dunn, William L.

    1987-03-01

    Transport monodimensional stationary solutions for the angular space-energy neutron flux, of interest in radiation penetration problems, are studied by Green's function method. Explicit analytical results for the spatial moments of the sought solution are obtained for the case of an isotropically scattering slab of infinite thickness and of a continuous slowing down model in energy.

  15. New Approaches to Quantifying Transport Model Error in Atmospheric CO2 Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, L.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Nielsen, J. E.; Collatz, G. J.; Gregg, W. W.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made in observing CO2 distributions from space. However, the use of these observations to infer source/sink distributions in inversion studies continues to be complicated by difficulty in quantifying atmospheric transport model errors. We will present results from several different experiments designed to quantify different aspects of transport error using the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM). In the first set of experiments, an ensemble of simulations is constructed using perturbations to parameters in the model s moist physics and turbulence parameterizations that control sub-grid scale transport of trace gases. Analysis of the ensemble spread and scales of temporal and spatial variability among the simulations allows insight into how parameterized, small-scale transport processes influence simulated CO2 distributions. In the second set of experiments, atmospheric tracers representing model error are constructed using observation minus analysis statistics from NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). The goal of these simulations is to understand how errors in large scale dynamics are distributed, and how they propagate in space and time, affecting trace gas distributions. These simulations will also be compared to results from NASA's Carbon Monitoring System Flux Pilot Project that quantified the impact of uncertainty in satellite constrained CO2 flux estimates on atmospheric mixing ratios to assess the major factors governing uncertainty in global and regional trace gas distributions.

  16. Fingerprinting of sediment transport processes in coastal lagoon: An environmental magnetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badesab, F. K.; von Dobeneck, T. F.; Briggs, R. M.; Just, J.; Bryan, K. R.; Müller, H.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment transport in a coastal lagoon is highly complex and is controlled by various processes (mixing, sorting, erosion, transport, deposition) that govern the distribution of sediments between sources and sinks. In this study, we explore the potential of environmental magnetism in combination with sedimentological methods to magnetically fingerprint sediment transport processes in New Zealand's largest barrier enclosed mesotidal estuarine lagoon. Measurements of bulk magnetic susceptibility and grain sizes of surficial samples collected from various parts of Tauranga Harbour including rivers, the estuary, and nearshore zone helped to identify and differentiate the sedimentary processes in and off the lagoon. The sediments were mainly dominated by variable proportion of titanomagnetite and yield different grain sizes. A general trend (NW - SE) of increasing magnetite concentration and decreasing physical grain sizes indicates the variability in sediment inputs and transport energy of flow. Higher values of SIRM / χ indicate the dominance of fine grained magnetite within riverine sediments. The low enriched fine-grained riverine sediments entering the basin are mostly flushed out to the open sea, while medium-coarse grained magnetite rich sediments gets trapped into the southern lagoonal basin forming enriched zones as inferred from the magnetic data. Within the lagoon, the intense mixing and sorting causes fractionation of heavy (magnetic) minerals which further leads to magnetic enhancement and coarsening of magnetic grain sizes within the tidal channel network of the southern basin. We observed two different patterns in sediment grain sizes. The northern lagoonal basin sediments are dominated by fine sand (~ 200 μm), while the southern basin sediments are composed of mixed grain sizes (300-500 μm). This suggests much calmer hydrodynamics conditions in the northern basin favoured accumulation of fine grained sediment while as outlined above transport is more

  17. Dispersive approach to two-photon exchange in elastic electron-proton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Blunden, P. G.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2017-06-14

    We examine the two-photon exchange corrections to elastic electron-nucleon scattering within a dispersive approach, including contributions from both nucleon and Δ intermediate states. The dispersive analysis avoids off-shell uncertainties inherent in traditional approaches based on direct evaluation of loop diagrams, and guarantees the correct unitary behavior in the high energy limit. Using empirical information on the electromagnetic nucleon elastic and NΔ transition form factors, we compute the two-photon exchange corrections both algebraically and numerically. Finally, results are compared with recent measurements of e+ p to e- p cross section ratios from the CLAS, VEPP-3 and OLYMPUS experiments.

  18. Axonal transport of calmodulin: a physiologic approach to identification of long-term associations between proteins

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Calmodulin is a soluble, heat-stable protein which has been shown to modulate both membrane-bound and soluble enzymes, but relatively little has been known about the in vivo associations of calmodulin. A 17,000- dalton heat-stable protein was found to move in axonal transport in the guinea pig visual system with the proteins of slow component b (SCb; 2 mm/d) along with actin and the bulk of the soluble proteins of the axon. Co-electrophoresis of purified calmodulin and radioactively labeled SCb proteins in two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) demonstrated the identity of the heat-stable SCb protein and calmodulin on the basis of pI, molecular weight, and anomalous migration in the presence of Ca2+-chelating agents. No proteins co-migrating with calmodulin in two-dimensional PAGE could be detected among the proteins of slow component a (SCa; 0.3 mm/d, microtubules and neurofilaments) or fast component (FC; 250 mm/d, membrane-associated proteins). We conclude that calmodulin is transported solely as part of the SCb complex of proteins, the axoplasmic matrix. Calmodulin moves in axonal transport independent of the movements of microtubules (SCa) and membranes (FC), which suggests that the interactions of calmodulin with these structures may represent a transient interaction between groups of proteins moving in axonal transport at different rates. Axonal transport has been shown to be an effective tool for the demonstration of long-term in vivo protein associations. PMID:6166619

  19. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  20. In vitro models of tumor vessels and matrix: Engineering approaches to investigate transport limitations and drug delivery in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-stroma interactions have emerged as critical determinants of drug efficacy. However, the underlying biological and physicochemical mechanisms by which the microenvironment regulates therapeutic response remain unclear, due in part to a lack of physiologically relevant in vitro platforms to accurately interrogate tissue-level phenomena. Tissue-engineered tumor models are beginning to address this shortcoming. By allowing selective incorporation of microenvironmental complexity, these platforms afford unique access to tumor-associated signaling and transport dynamics. This review will focus on engineering approaches to study drug delivery as a function of tumor-associated changes of the vasculature and extracellular matrix (ECM). First, we review current biological understanding of these components and discuss their impact on transport processes. Then, we evaluate existing microfluidic, tissue engineering, and materials science strategies to recapitulate vascular and ECM characteristics of tumors, and finish by outlining challenges and future directions of the field that may ultimately improve anti-cancer therapies. PMID:24309015

  1. In vitro models of tumor vessels and matrix: engineering approaches to investigate transport limitations and drug delivery in cancer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Bo Ri; Delnero, Peter; Fischbach, Claudia

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-stroma interactions have emerged as critical determinants of drug efficacy. However, the underlying biological and physicochemical mechanisms by which the microenvironment regulates therapeutic response remain unclear, due in part to a lack of physiologically relevant in vitro platforms to accurately interrogate tissue-level phenomena. Tissue-engineered tumor models are beginning to address this shortcoming. By allowing selective incorporation of microenvironmental complexity, these platforms afford unique access to tumor-associated signaling and transport dynamics. This review will focus on engineering approaches to study drug delivery as a function of tumor-associated changes of the vasculature and extracellular matrix (ECM). First, we review current biological understanding of these components and discuss their impact on transport processes. Then, we evaluate existing microfluidic, tissue engineering, and materials science strategies to recapitulate vascular and ECM characteristics of tumors, and finish by outlining challenges and future directions of the field that may ultimately improve anti-cancer therapies.

  2. Structural fluctuations and quantum transport through DNA molecular wires: a combined molecular dynamics and model Hamiltonian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, R.; Caetano, R.; Woiczikowski, P. B.; Kubar, T.; Elstner, M.; Cuniberti, G.

    2010-02-01

    Charge transport through a short DNA oligomer (Dickerson dodecamer (DD)) in the presence of structural fluctuations is investigated using a hybrid computational methodology based on a combination of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a model Hamiltonian approach. Based on a fragment orbital description, the DNA electronic structure can be coarse-grained in a very efficient way. The influence of dynamical fluctuations, arising either from the solvent fluctuations or from base-pair vibrational modes, can be taken into account in a straightforward way through the time series of the effective DNA electronic parameters, evaluated at snapshots along the MD trajectory. We show that charge transport can be promoted through the coupling to solvent fluctuations, which gate the on-site energies along the DNA wire.

  3. Integrating Geochemical Reactions with a Particle-Tracking Approach to Simulate Nitrogen Transport and Transformation in Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Z.; Welty, C.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Lagrangian, particle-tracking models are commonly used to simulate solute advection and dispersion in aquifers. They are computationally efficient and suffer from much less numerical dispersion than grid-based techniques, especially in heterogeneous and advectively-dominated systems. Although particle-tracking models are capable of simulating geochemical reactions, these reactions are often simplified to first-order decay and/or linear, first-order kinetics. Nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers involves both biodegradation and higher-order geochemical reactions. In order to take advantage of the particle-tracking approach, we have enhanced an existing particle-tracking code SLIM-FAST, to simulate nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers. The approach we are taking is a hybrid one: the reactive multispecies transport process is operator split into two steps: (1) the physical movement of the particles including the attachment/detachment to solid surfaces, which is modeled by a Lagrangian random-walk algorithm; and (2) multispecies reactions including biodegradation are modeled by coupling multiple Monod equations with other geochemical reactions. The coupled reaction system is solved by an ordinary differential equation solver. In order to solve the coupled system of equations, after step 1, the particles are converted to grid-based concentrations based on the mass and position of the particles, and after step 2 the newly calculated concentration values are mapped back to particles. The enhanced particle-tracking code is capable of simulating subsurface nitrogen transport and transformation in a three-dimensional domain with variably saturated conditions. Potential application of the enhanced code is to simulate subsurface nitrogen loading to the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. Implementation details, verification results of the enhanced code with one-dimensional analytical solutions and other existing numerical models will be presented in

  4. Conformal anomaly and off-shell extensions of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Krzysztof A.; Nicolai, Hermann

    2017-08-01

    The gauge dependence of the conformal anomaly for spin-3/2 and spin-2 fields in nonconformal supergravities has been a long standing puzzle. In this paper we argue that the "correct" gauge choice is the one that follows from requiring all terms that would imply a violation of the Wess-Zumino consistency condition to be absent in the counterterm, because otherwise the usual link between the anomaly and the one-loop divergence becomes invalid. Remarkably, the "good" choice of gauge is the one that confirms our previous result [K. A. Meissner and H. Nicolai, Phys. Lett. B 772, 169 (2017)., 10.1016/j.physletb.2017.06.031] that a complete cancellation of conformal anomalies in D =4 can only be achieved for N -extended (Poincaré) supergravities with N ≥5 .

  5. Off-shell {N} = 2 linear multiplets in five dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkan, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    We present a superconformal tensor calculus for an arbitrary number of five dimensional {N} = 2 linear multiplets. We also demonstrate how to construct higher derivative invariants, and produce higher order supersymmetric off-diagonal models. Finally, we show the procedure required for the derivation of the supersymmetric completion of the non-Abelian F 4 action.

  6. Soft-Stowed Approach: Safe Transportation to ISS for Experiments, Spares & New Hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itta, Antonietta; Quagliotti, Francesco

    2012-07-01

    The ISS operational and logistic scenario relies on the regular upload of new experiments and maintenance hardware. The extension of the ISS lifetime places even more emphasis on a resupply policy based on safe, cheap and flexible transportation solutions to ISS. A transportation method suitable for all available carriers is represented by foam packaged items put inside bags or containers. This flight condition can now be analyzed thanks to the results derived from an extensive test campaign performed by Boeing in 2009 under NASA sponsorship. Data and guidelines are provided for the calculation of the attenuated flight environments due to the soft packaging conditions. The paper also reports a real life application: the uploading to ISS of the Columbus PDU (some 90 kg) inside ATV II Johannes Kepler, wrapped in 1” of zotek and put inside a M01 bag. The mission was successful: PDU is today safely stored inside a Columbus Rack.

  7. Nonlocal Nature of the Viscous Transport in Supercooled Liquids: Complex Fluid Approach to Supercooled Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Akira; Tanaka, Hajime

    2009-09-25

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show clear evidence for the nonlocal mesoscopic nature of the anomalous viscous transport in a supercooled liquid and its direct link to dynamic heterogeneity: (i) a distinct crossover from the microscopic to macroscopic viscosity at a mesoscopic length scale, which is comparable to the correlation length of dynamic heterogeneity and grows with an increase in the degree of supercooling; (ii) a strong anisotropic decay of the shear-stress autocorrelation at a finite wave number, which indicates intrinsic decoupling between the longitudinal and transverse dynamics. Our findings suggest the fundamental importance of the growing dynamic correlation in anomalous transport and shed new light on the nature of slow dynamics.

  8. A novel modelling approach to energy transport in a respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Nithiarasu, Perumal; Sazonov, Igor

    2016-11-24

    In this paper, energy transport in a respiratory tract is modelled using the finite element method for the first time. The upper and lower respiratory tracts are approximated as a 1-dimensional domain with varying cross-sectional and surface areas, and the radial heat conduction in the tissue is approximated using the 1-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system. The governing equations are solved using 1-dimensional linear finite elements with convective and evaporative boundary conditions on the wall. The results obtained for the exhalation temperature of the respiratory system have been compared with the available animal experiments. The study of a full breathing cycle indicates that evaporation is the main mode of heat transfer, and convection plays almost negligible role in the energy transport. This is in-line with the results obtained from animal experiments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Final Report: Transport and its regulation in Marine Microorganisms: A Genomic Based Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Palenik; Bianca Brahamsha; Ian Paulsen

    2009-09-03

    This grant funded the analysis and annotation of the genomes of Synechococcus and Ostreococcus, major marine primary producers. Particular attention was paid to the analysis of transporters using state of the art bioinformatics analyses. During the analysis of the Synechococcus genome, some of the components of the unique bacterial swimming apparatus of one species of Synechococcus (Clade III, strain WH8102) were determined and these included transporters, novel giant proteins and glycosyltransferases. This grant funded the analysis of gene expression in Synechococcus using whole genome microarrays. These analyses revealed the strategies by which marine cyanobacteria respond to environmental conditions such as the absence of phosphorus, a common limiting nutrient, and the interaction of Synechococcus with other microbes. These analyses will help develop models of gene regulation in cyanobacteria and thus help predict their responses to changes in environmental conditions.

  10. From Sequential Extraction to Transport Modeling, Monitored Natural Attenuation as a Remediation Approach for Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    POWELL, KIMBERLYR.

    2004-05-25

    Implementation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation method requires a mechanistic understanding of the natural attenuation processes occurring at a given site. For inorganic contaminants, natural attenuation typically involves a decrease in metal toxicity and/or mobility. These natural processes include dilution, dispersion, sorption (including adsorption, absorption, and precipitation), and redox processes. In order to better quantify these processes in terms of metal availability, sequential extraction experiments were carried out on subsurface soil samples impacted by a low pH, high sulfate, metals (Be, Ni, U, As) plume associated with the long-term operation of a coal plant at the Savannah River Site. These laboratory scale studies provide mechanistic information regarding the solid phases in the soils associated with natural attenuation of the contaminant metals. This data provides input to be evaluated in the definition of the contaminant source term as well as transport of contaminants for site transport models.

  11. A novel approach to hydrogen recovery, storage and transport: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, M.C.; Sangiovanni, J.J.

    1988-12-01

    The obtaining of high purity hydrogen from the coal gasification process is a series of chemical reactions, several of which require preparation/purification. At any point in the process, it would be useful to have a chemical separation system which can purify the product hydrogen and store it in convenient form. The purpose of this research program is to evaluate one such candidate system, the catalytically reversible hydrogenation of an aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene, to its corresponding cyclical paraffin, methylcyclohexane. In this reaction scheme, the hydrogen present in the product flow from, in principle, any reaction in the coal gasification process is extracted from the flow by reaction with toluene, a readily transportable liquid at ambient temperatures, to form methylcyclohexane, MCH, which is also a liquid at ambient conditions. The hydrogen stored in the organic hydride could therefore be transported and released when desired in the reverse reaction to give recoverable toluene and the desired hydrogen. 13 refs., 30 figs., 22 tabs.

  12. A renormalization approach to describe charge transport in quasiperiodic dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmento, R. G.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Freire, V. N.

    2011-10-01

    We study the charge transport properties of a dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecule focusing on a quasiperiodic arrangement of its constituent nucleotides forming a Rudin-Shapiro (RS) and Fibonacci (FB) Poly (CG) sequences, as well as a natural DNA sequence (Ch22) for the sake of comparison. Making use of a one-step renormalization process, the DBL-DNA molecule is modeled in terms of a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian to investigate its transmissivity and current-voltage (I-V) profiles. Beyond the semiconductor I-V characteristics, a striking similarity between the electronic transport properties of the RS quasiperiodic structure and the natural DNA sequence was found.

  13. An Integrated Hydrologic Modeling Approach to Cesium-137 Transport in Forested Fukushima Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siirila-Woodburn, E. R.; Steefel, C. I.; Williams, K. H.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in Japan resulted in a significant dissemination of cesium-137 (Cs-137) over a wide area west of the plant, including the contamination of many watersheds and the subsequent evacuation of many communities. Today approximately 90% of on-land Cs-137 fallout following the accident resides in the upper 5 cm of forest soils. While this can be partially attributed to the forested composition of the prefecture (70%), there is also difficulty in cleanup efforts in these regions due to a lack of understanding and predictive capability of radioisotopes transport at the catchment to watershed scale. Subsequently, there is an uncertain, but likely long-term impact on local communities with implications for the use of nuclear energy use worldwide. Due to the complex nature of forest eco-hydrology, sophisticated modeling tools to accurately predict Cs-137 fluxes across different spatial and temporal scales are required. High fidelity, high resolution numerical modeling techniques in conjunction with parallel high performance computing is required to accurately determine transport and feedbacks in these complex systems. To better understand the fundamental transport of Cs-137, a watershed near the FDNPP is modeled with an integrated hydrologic model that includes variably saturated groundwater and overland flow in addition to atmospheric and vegetative processes via a coupled land surface model. Of specific interest is the impact of land cover type on hydrologic flow in the area, which will likely play an important role in erosion patterns and the consequent transport of Cs-137 strongly sorbed to surface soils. Risk management practices (for example, passive remediation versus active remediation such as targeted logging) for two principal tree types (evergreen and deciduous) are informed given the simulated responses to flow patterns assuming different quantities and spatial distribution patterns of each tree type.

  14. Transport of sulfadiazine in soil columns — Experiments and modelling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrhan, Anne; Kasteel, Roy; Simunek, Jirka; Groeneweg, Joost; Vereecken, Harry

    2007-01-01

    Antibiotics, such as sulfadiazine, reach agricultural soils directly through manure of grazing livestock or indirectly through the spreading of manure or sewage sludge on the field. Knowledge about the fate of antibiotics in soils is crucial for assessing the environmental risk of these compounds, including possible transport to the groundwater. Transport of 14C-labelled sulfadiazine was investigated in disturbed soil columns at a constant flow rate of 0.26 cm h - 1 near saturation. Sulfadiazine was applied in different concentrations for either a short or a long pulse duration. Breakthrough curves of sulfadiazine and the non-reactive tracer chloride were measured. At the end of the leaching period the soil concentration profiles were determined. The peak maxima of the breakthrough curves were delayed by a factor of 2 to 5 compared to chloride and the decreasing limbs are characterized by an extended tailing. However, the maximum relative concentrations differed as well as the eluted mass fractions, ranging from 18 to 83% after 500 h of leaching. To identify relevant sorption processes, breakthrough curves of sulfadiazine were fitted with a convective-dispersive transport model, considering different sorption concepts with one, two and three sorption sites. Breakthrough curves can be fitted best with a three-site sorption model, which includes two reversible kinetic and one irreversible sorption site. However, the simulated soil concentration profiles did not match the observations for all of the used models. Despite this incomplete process description, the obtained results have implications for the transport behavior of sulfadiazine in the field. Its leaching may be enhanced if it is frequently applied at higher concentrations.

  15. Do anthropogenic transports facilitate stored-product pest moth dispersal? A molecular approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryne, Camilla; Bensch, Staffan

    2008-02-01

    Stored-product moths cause large economic damage in food processing industries and storage facilities. Control of indoor pests is currently dealt with locally, and control strategies seldom include different mills or cooperative industries in joint efforts to reduce infestations. In colder climates where conditions hinder flight dispersal of stored-product moths, we hypothesize that human transport between mills will facilitate dispersal. Albeit considered intuitive, this hypothesis has so far never been tested. Male moths from three mills (populations) in southern Sweden and Denmark were collected and by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) pair-wise F st values were calculated. Cluster (population) origins of the genotypes were computed by using a model-based method, structure. The results suggest that known transportation of flour between two mills generate genetically more similar populations of the economically important stored-product moth, Ephestia kuehniella (Zell.) (Lepidoptera; Pyralidae), compared to the third mill, with another distribution area, but situated geographically in between the other mills. The structure model placed the sampled genotypes to belong to either two or five original populations, with a higher probability of two original populations. The third mill was consistently different from the other two mills independent of the models’ calculated number of populations. Although the study was restricted to three mills and one transportation route, it highlights the possibility that transportation of food products promotes genetic mixing (i.e. dispersal) of insect pest populations. Including cooperating mills in control (or monitor) strategy schemes against stored-product pest insects would therefore be a more effective action, rather than to treat each mill separately.

  16. Hybrid Model Approaches to Predict Multiscale and Multiphysics Coastal Hydrodynamic and Sediment Transport Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    couples different models to each other, and the domain decomposition method ( DDM ) divides a flow domain into many subdomains, each of which is...assigned to an individual model. Combining HM and DDM is one of the most promising currently available techniques to bridge the scales and overcome...recent work in modeling of multiscale and multiphysics hydrodynamics phenomena using HM and DDM . We also discuss related sediment transport, with

  17. Multigrid Approach to Solving the Long Transportation Problem on a Regular Grid in Cost Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    feasible solution has an optimal solution ( Bazaraa , 1990). Some traditional solution methods are presf-nted next. D. THE SIMPLEX METHOD Whenever feasible...root to every node in D. If the solution to a minimal cost flow problem is examined graphically it corresponds to a spanning tree in the network ( Bazaraa ...REFERENCES Balas, Egon, "Solution of Large-Scale Transportation Problems Through Aggregation," Operations Research, 13, 1965, pp. 82-84. Bazaraa , M.S

  18. In vitro approaches to evaluate placental drug transport by using differentiating JEG-3 human choriocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kenji; Utoguchi, Naoki; Tsutsui, Hidenobu; Yamaue, Satoko; Homemoto, Manami; Nakao, Erina; Hukunaga, Yumi; Yamasaki, Kyohei; Myotoku, Michiaki; Hirotani, Yoshihiko

    2011-02-01

    Human choriocarcinoma cells have been used as models for studying transcellular drug transport through placental trophoblasts. However, these models allow the transport of low-molecular-weight drugs through intercellular gap junctions. This study aimed at investigating the differentiation patterns of JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells under different culture conditions and establishing the appropriate model of in vitro syncytiotrophoblast drug transport. Paracellular permeability was estimated by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) across JEG-3 cell layers. The mRNA expression levels of non-expressed in choriocarcinoma clone 1 (NECC1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and those of E-cadherin (ECAD) and cadherin-11 (CDH11), which are adherens junction-associated proteins related to fusogenic ability of syncytiotrophoblasts differentiated from cytotrophoblasts, protein expression levels were considered as the differentiation signals. The highest TEER values were obtained in the JEG-3 cells cultured in the Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/Ham's F-12 (1:1) mixed medium (CS-C(®) ; Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan). By comparing the TEER values and the differentiation signals, the authors identified at least five JEG-3 cell-differentiation patterns. The differentiation pattern of JEG-3 cultured in CS-C resembled the syncytiotrophoblast-like differentiation signal characterizations in vivo. In conclusion, the syncytiotrophoblast-like models of differentiating JEG-3 cells cultured in CS-C might be appropriate for evaluating drug transport across the placental trophoblast. © 2010 The Authors. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2010 Nordic Pharmacological Society.

  19. Modeling coupled nanoparticle aggregation and transport in porous media: A Lagrangian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavy, Amir; Pennell, Kurt D.; Abriola, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in nanoparticle size and shape due to particle-particle interactions (i.e., aggregation or agglomeration) may significantly alter particle mobility and retention in porous media. To date, however, few modeling studies have considered the coupling of transport and particle aggregation processes. The majority of particle transport models employ an Eulerian modeling framework and are, consequently, limited in the types of collisions and aggregate sizes that can be considered. In this work, a more general Lagrangian modeling framework is developed and implemented to explore coupled nanoparticle aggregation and transport processes. The model was verified through comparison of model simulations to published results of an experimental and Eulerian modeling study (Raychoudhury et al., 2012) of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-modified nano-sized zero-valent iron particle (nZVI) transport and retention in water-saturated sand columns. A model sensitivity analysis reveals the influence of influent particle concentration (ca. 70 to 700 mg/L), primary particle size (10-100 nm) and pore water velocity (ca. 1-6 m/day) on particle-particle, and, consequently, particle-collector interactions. Model simulations demonstrate that, when environmental conditions promote particle-particle interactions, neglecting aggregation effects can lead to under- or over-estimation of nanoparticle mobility. Results also suggest that the extent to which higher order particle-particle collisions influence aggregation kinetics will increase with the fraction of primary particles. This work demonstrates the potential importance of time-dependent aggregation processes on nanoparticle mobility and provides a numerical model capable of capturing/describing these interactions in water-saturated porous media.

  20. Do anthropogenic transports facilitate stored-product pest moth dispersal? A molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Ryne, Camilla; Bensch, Staffan

    2008-02-01

    Stored-product moths cause large economic damage in food processing industries and storage facilities. Control of indoor pests is currently dealt with locally, and control strategies seldom include different mills or cooperative industries in joint efforts to reduce infestations. In colder climates where conditions hinder flight dispersal of stored-product moths, we hypothesize that human transport between mills will facilitate dispersal. Albeit considered intuitive, this hypothesis has so far never been tested. Male moths from three mills (populations) in southern Sweden and Denmark were collected and by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) pair-wise F(st) values were calculated. Cluster (population) origins of the genotypes were computed by using a model-based method, structure. The results suggest that known transportation of flour between two mills generate genetically more similar populations of the economically important stored-product moth, Ephestia kuehniella (Zell.) (Lepidoptera; Pyralidae), compared to the third mill, with another distribution area, but situated geographically in between the other mills. The structure model placed the sampled genotypes to belong to either two or five original populations, with a higher probability of two original populations. The third mill was consistently different from the other two mills independent of the models' calculated number of populations. Although the study was restricted to three mills and one transportation route, it highlights the possibility that transportation of food products promotes genetic mixing (i.e. dispersal) of insect pest populations. Including cooperating mills in control (or monitor) strategy schemes against stored-product pest insects would therefore be a more effective action, rather than to treat each mill separately.

  1. Contaminant transport in a municipal drinking water supply: a steady-state approach to estimate rate and uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Bergvall, Martin; Grip, Harald; Sjöström, Jan; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2007-09-01

    Contaminant transport is generally considered to be a key factor when assessing and classifying the environmental risk of polluted areas. In the study presented here, a steady-state approach was applied to obtain estimates of the transit time and concentration of the pesticide metabolite BAM (2,6-dichlorobenzoamide) at a site where it is contaminating a municipal drinking water supply. A Monte Carlo simulation technique was used to quantify the uncertainty of the results and to evaluate the sensitivity of the used parameters. The adopted approach yielded an estimated median transit time of 10 y for the BAM transport from the polluted site to the water supply. Soil organic carbon content in the unsaturated zone and the hydraulic conductivity in the saturated zone explained 44% and 23% of the uncertainty in the transit time estimate, respectively. The sensitivity analysis showed that the dilution factor due to regional groundwater flow and the soil organic carbon content at the polluted site explained 53% and 31% of the uncertainty of concentration estimates, respectively. In conclusion, the adopted steady-state approach can be used to obtain reliable first estimates of transit time and concentration, but to improve concentration predictions of degrading contaminants, a dynamic model is probably required.

  2. A Combined Approach Using Transporter-Flux Assays and Mass Spectrometry to Examine Psychostimulant Street Drugs of Unknown Content

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The illicit consumption of psychoactive compounds may cause short and long-term health problems and addiction. This is also true for amphetamines and cocaine, which target monoamine transporters. In the recent past, an increasing number of new compounds with amphetamine-like structure such as mephedrone or 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) entered the market of illicit drugs. Subtle structural changes circumvent legal restrictions placed on the parent compound. These novel drugs are effectively marketed “designer drugs” (also called “research chemicals”) without any knowledge of the underlying pharmacology, the potential harm or a registration of the manufacturing process. Accordingly new entrants and their byproducts are identified postmarketing by chemical analysis and their pharmacological properties inferred by comparison to compounds of known structure. However, such a heuristic approach fails, if the structures diverge substantially from a known derivative. In addition, the understanding of structure–activity relations is too rudimentary to predict detailed pharmacological activity. Here, we tested a combined approach by examining the composition of street drugs using mass spectrometry and by assessing the functional activity of their constituents at the neuronal transporters for dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine. We show that this approach is superior to mere chemical analysis in recognizing novel and potentially harmful street drugs. PMID:23336057

  3. An Integrated Modeling Approach for Describing Fate and Transport of Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) in Estuarine Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Nguyen Viet, T.; Wang, X.; Chen, H.; Gin, K. Y. H.

    2014-12-01

    The fate and transport processes of emerging contaminants in aquatic ecosystems are complex, which are not only determined by their own properties but also influenced by the environmental setting, physical, chemical and biological processes. A 3D-emerging contaminant model has been developed based on Delft3D water quality model and coupled with a hydrodynamic model and a catchment-scale 1D- hydrological and hydraulic model to study the possible fate and transport mechanisms of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in Marina Reservoir in Singapore. The main processes in the contaminant model include partitioning (among detritus, dissolved organic matter and phytoplankton), settling, resuspension and degradation. We used the integrated model to quantify the distribution of the total PFCs and two major components, namely perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in the water, sediments and organisms in the reservoir. The model yielded good agreement with the field measurements when evaluated based on the datasets in 2009 and 2010 as well as recent observations in 2013 and 2014. Our results elucidate that the model can be a useful tool to characterize the occurrence, sources, sinks and trends of PFCs both in the water column and in the sediments in the reservoir. Thisapproach provides a better understanding of mechanisms that influence the fate and transport of emerging contaminants and lays down a framework for future experiments to further explore how the dominant environmental factors change towards mitigation of emerging contaminants in the reservoirs.

  4. Sustainable transport planning using GIS and remote sensing: an integrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgoudis, Marios D.; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Shiftan, Yoram

    2014-08-01

    The main advantage of using GIS is its ability to access and analyze spatially distributed data. The applications of GIS to transportation can be viewed as involving either on data retrieval; data integrator; or data analysis. The use of remote sensing can assist the retrieval of land use changes. Indeed, the integration of GIS and remote sensing will be used to fill the gap in the smart transport planning. A four step research is going to be done in order to try to integrate the usage of GIS and remote sensing to sustainable transport planning. The proposed research will be held in the city of Limassol, Cyprus. The data that are going to be used are data that are going to be collected through questionnaires, and other available data from the Cyprus Public Works Department and from the Remote Sensing Laboratory and Geo-Environment Research Lab of the Cyprus University of Technology. Overall, statistical analysis and market segmentation of data will be done, the land usage will be examined, and a scenario building on mode choice will be held. This paper presents an overview of the methodology that will be adopted.

  5. Exact dynamics of dissipative electronic systems and quantum transport: Hierarchical equations of motion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jinshuang; Zheng, Xiao; Yan, Yijing

    2008-06-01

    A generalized quantum master equation theory that governs the exact, nonperturbative quantum dissipation and quantum transport is formulated in terms of hierarchically coupled equations of motion for an arbitrary electronic system in contact with electrodes under either a stationary or a nonstationary electrochemical potential bias. The theoretical construction starts with the influence functional in path integral, in which the electron creation and annihilation operators are Grassmann variables. Time derivatives on the influence functionals are then performed in a hierarchical manner. Both the multiple-frequency dispersion and the non-Markovian reservoir parametrization schemes are considered for the desired hierarchy construction. The resulting hierarchical equations of motion formalism is in principle exact and applicable to arbitrary electronic systems, including Coulomb interactions, under the influence of arbitrary time-dependent applied bias voltage and external fields. Both the conventional quantum master equation and the real-time diagrammatic formalism of Schön and co-workers can be readily obtained at well defined limits of the present theory. We also show that for a noninteracting electron system, the present hierarchical equations of motion formalism terminates at the second tier exactly, and the Landuer-Büttiker transport current expression is recovered. The present theory renders an exact and numerically tractable tool to evaluate various transient and stationary quantum transport properties of many-electron systems, together with the involving nonperturbative dissipative dynamics.

  6. Exact dynamics of dissipative electronic systems and quantum transport: Hierarchical equations of motion approach.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jinshuang; Zheng, Xiao; Yan, YiJing

    2008-06-21

    A generalized quantum master equation theory that governs the exact, nonperturbative quantum dissipation and quantum transport is formulated in terms of hierarchically coupled equations of motion for an arbitrary electronic system in contact with electrodes under either a stationary or a nonstationary electrochemical potential bias. The theoretical construction starts with the influence functional in path integral, in which the electron creation and annihilation operators are Grassmann variables. Time derivatives on the influence functionals are then performed in a hierarchical manner. Both the multiple-frequency dispersion and the non-Markovian reservoir parametrization schemes are considered for the desired hierarchy construction. The resulting hierarchical equations of motion formalism is in principle exact and applicable to arbitrary electronic systems, including Coulomb interactions, under the influence of arbitrary time-dependent applied bias voltage and external fields. Both the conventional quantum master equation and the real-time diagrammatic formalism of Schon and co-workers can be readily obtained at well defined limits of the present theory. We also show that for a noninteracting electron system, the present hierarchical equations of motion formalism terminates at the second tier exactly, and the Landuer-Buttiker transport current expression is recovered. The present theory renders an exact and numerically tractable tool to evaluate various transient and stationary quantum transport properties of many-electron systems, together with the involving nonperturbative dissipative dynamics.

  7. Approach to novel functional foods for stress control 4. Regulation of serotonin transporter by food factors.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mikiko; Haito, Sakiko; Furumoto, Mari; Kawai, Yoshichika; Terao, Junji; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2005-11-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are pre-synaptic proteins specialized for the clearance of serotonin following vesicular release at central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system synapses. SERTs are high affinity targets in vivo for antidepressants such as serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). These include 'medical' psychopharmacological agents such as analgesics and antihistamines, a plant extract called St John's Wort (Hypericum). Osteoclasts are the primary cells responsible for bone resorption. They arise by the differentiation of osteoclast precursors of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. The expression of SERTs was increased in RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cells. Using RANKL stimulation of RAW264.7 cells as a model system for osteoclast differentiation, we studied the direct effects of food factor on serotonin uptake. The SSRIs (fluoxetine and fluvoxamine) inhibited markedly (approximately 95%) in serotonin transport in differentiated osteoclast cells. The major components of St. John's Wort, hyperforin and hypericine were significantly decreased in serotonin transport activity. Thus, a new in vitro model using RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cells may be useful to analyze the regulation of SERT by food factors and SSRIs.

  8. Efficient approach for modeling phonon transmission probability in nanoscale interfacial thermal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Zhang, Gang

    2015-05-01

    The Kapitza or interfacial thermal resistance at the boundary of two different insulating solids depends on the transmission of phonons across the interface and the phonon dispersion of either material. We extend the existing atomistic Green's function (AGF) method to compute the probability for individual phonon modes to be transmitted across the interface. The extended method is based on the concept of the Bloch matrix and allows us to determine the wavelength and polarization dependence of the phonon transmission as well as to analyze efficiently the contribution of individual acoustic and optical phonon modes to interfacial thermal transport. The relationship between the phonon transmission probability and dispersion is explicitly established. A detailed description of the method is given and key formulas are provided. To illustrate the role of the phonon dispersion in interfacial thermal conduction, we apply the method to study phonon transmission and thermal transport at the armchair interface between monolayer graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. We find that the phonon transmission probability is high for longitudinal (LA) and flexural (ZA) acoustic phonons at normal and oblique incidence to the interface. At room temperature, the dominant contribution to interfacial thermal transport comes from the transverse-polarized phonons in graphene (45.5%) and longitudinal-polarized phonons in boron nitride (47.4%).

  9. Lattice Boltzmann-Based Approaches for Pore-Scale Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Kang, Qinjun; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Important geoscience and environmental applications such as geologic carbon storage, environmental remediation, and unconventional oil and gas recovery are best understood in the context of reactive flow and multicomponent transport in the subsurface environment. The coupling of chemical and microbiological reactions with hydrological and mechanical processes can lead to complex behaviors across an enormous range of spatial and temporal scales. These coupled responses are also strongly influenced by the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the geologic formations. Reactive transport processes can change the pore morphology at the pore scale, thereby leading to nonlinear interactions with advective and diffusive transport, which can strongly influence larger-scale properties such as permeability and dispersion. Therefore, one of the greatest research challenges is to improve our ability to predict these processes across scales (DOE 2007). The development of pore-scale experimental and modeling methods to study reactive processes involving mineral precipitation and dissolution, and biofilm dynamics allows more fundamental investigation of physical behavior so that more accurate and robust upscaled constitutive models can be developed for the continuum scale.

  10. A Continuum Approach for Numerical Simulation of Solute Transport in Fractured Granitic Gneiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, T.; Chiang, L.; Lee, S.; Huang, S.; Lin, W.

    2011-12-01

    This study developed a Fractured Continuum Model (FCM) for simulating solute transport in fractured granitic gneiss. FCM first converts discrete fracture network (DFN) into a continuum and then performs transport simulations in the equivalent continuum using TOUGH2. Three-dimensional (3D) DFNs were numerically simulated using characteristic fracture data analyzed from samples collected from surface outcrops and boreholes. A two-dimensional (2D) DFN and then its corresponding fracture backbone were extracted from the 3D DFN between targeted depths within which in-situ cross-hole, natural gradient tracer test was implemented. Equivalent fracture conductance of a grid block in the 2D backbone was calculated using the Equivalent Continuum Theory (EMT), which was then converted to permeability by considering the sizes of the block and the average number of fractures (Nf) in the block. Inter-connectedness of the backbone was taken into account in EMT by the parameter "coordination number" (z). Besides the equivalent permeability, equivalent porosity within a grid block was also calculated. The heterogeneous permeability and porosity fields were substituted into TOUGH2 by modifying the MESH file and the INCON file, respectively. EOS7 module was used for all transport simulations. Sensitivity studies demonstrated that longitudinal dispersivity and the hydraulic gradient of the natural groundwater flow field are sensitive parameters. Only if a trivial dispersivity and a hydraulic gradient of 0.09 are used in FCM can result in tracer breakthrough curve (BTC) that is close enough to the field BTC. In addition, effect of molecular diffusion has found to be trivial. Furthermore, changing the location of injection can significantly vary the resulting tracer BTC, meaning that connected flow paths do transect the boreholes between the targeted depth interval. Simulation results from FCM were compared with those from a time-domain particle tracking (TDPT) scheme that specifically

  11. A Combined Approach to Model Reduction for Nonlinear Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport Simulations Using POD and DEIM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanko, Z.; Boyce, S. E.; Yeh, W. W. G.

    2015-12-01

    Model reduction techniques using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) have been very effective in applications to confined groundwater flow models. These techniques consist of performing a projection of the solution of the full model onto a reduced basis. POD combined with the snapshot approach has been successfully applied to highly discretized linear models. In many cases, the reduced model is orders of magnitude smaller than the full model and runs 1,000 times faster. For nonlinear models, such as the unconfined groundwater flow, direct application of POD requires additional calls to the full model to generate additional snapshots. This is time consuming and increases the dimension of the reduced model. The discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) is a technique that avoids the additional full model calls and captures the dynamics of the nonlinear term while reducing the dimensions. Here, POD and DEIM are combined to reduce both the nonlinear unconfined groundwater flow and solute transport equations. To prove the concept, simple one-dimensional models are created for MODFLOW and MT3DMS separately. The dual approach is then tested on a density-dependent flow and transport simulation using the LMT package developed for MODFLOW. For each iteration of the nonlinear flow solver and the transport solver, the respective reduced models are solved instead. Numerical experiments show that significant reduction is obtainable before errors become too large. This method is well suited for a coastal aquifer seawater intrusion scenario, where nonlinearities only exist in small subregions of the model domain. A fine discretization can be utilized and POD will effectively eliminate unnecessary parameterization by projecting the full model system matrix onto a subspace with fewer column dimensions. DEIM can then reduce the row dimension of the original system by using only those state variable nodes with the most influence. This combined approach allows for full

  12. An in-flight simulation of approach and landing of a STOL transport with adverse ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an in-flight simulation program undertaken to study the problems of landing a representative STOL transport in the presence of adverse ground effects are presented. Landings were performed with variations in ground effect magnitude, ground effect lag, and thrust response. Other variations covered the effects of augmented lift response, SAS-failures, turbulence, segmented approach, and flare warning. The basic STOL airplane required coordinated use of both stick and throttle for consistently acceptable landings, and the presence of adverse ground effects made the task significantly more difficult. Ground effect lag and good engine response gave noticeable improvement, as did augmented lift response.

  13. A new approach to calculate charge carrier transport mobility in organic molecular crystals from imaginary time path integral simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-05-07

    We present a new non-perturbative method to calculate the charge carrier mobility using the imaginary time path integral approach, which is based on the Kubo formula for the conductivity, and a saddle point approximation to perform the analytic continuation. The new method is first tested using a benchmark calculation from the numerical exact hierarchical equations of motion method. Imaginary time path integral Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to explore the temperature dependence of charge carrier delocalization and mobility in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) within the Holstein and Holstein-Peierls models. The effects of nonlocal electron-phonon interaction on mobility in different charge transport regimes are also investigated.

  14. A new approach to calculate charge carrier transport mobility in organic molecular crystals from imaginary time path integral simulations.

    PubMed

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-05-07

    We present a new non-perturbative method to calculate the charge carrier mobility using the imaginary time path integral approach, which is based on the Kubo formula for the conductivity, and a saddle point approximation to perform the analytic continuation. The new method is first tested using a benchmark calculation from the numerical exact hierarchical equations of motion method. Imaginary time path integral Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to explore the temperature dependence of charge carrier delocalization and mobility in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) within the Holstein and Holstein-Peierls models. The effects of nonlocal electron-phonon interaction on mobility in different charge transport regimes are also investigated.

  15. Transport-of-intensity approach to differential interference contrast (TI-DIC) microscopy for quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Kou, Shan Shan; Waller, Laura; Barbastathis, George; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2010-02-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is an inherently qualitative phase-imaging technique. What is obtained is an image with mixed phase-gradient and amplitude information rather than a true linear mapping of actual optical path length (OPL) differences. Here we investigate an approach that combines the transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) with DIC microscopy, thus improving direct visual observation. There is little hardware modification and the computation is noniterative. Numerically solving for the propagation of light in a series of through-focus DIC images allows linear phase information in a single slice to be completely determined and restored from DIC intensity values.

  16. Directional fabric measurements: an investigative approach to transport and depositional mechanisms in pyroclastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioni, Bruno; Nappi, Giovanni; Valentini, Laura

    2001-07-01

    Computer-assisted image analysis data of rock fabrics from two quaternary ignimbrites in the Vulsini and Cimini Volcanic Districts of Central Italy are interpreted in terms of transport and depositional mechanisms. Samples were collected vertically at m spaces up two sections through each deposit. The Orvieto-Bagnoregio ignimbrite (OBI) is a non-welded ignimbrite that shows both fluctuations in the mean particle orientation values of up to approximately ±60°, and large variations in the strength of particle iso-orientation with height. The circular frequency distributions of particle orientations are almost always anisotropic and unimodal, in line with a theoretical Von Mises distribution (the circular equivalent of a unimodal, log-normal distribution). In contrast, the welded Cimina ignimbrite (CI) shows vertical homogeneities in mean orientation values with height, and generally lower degrees of anisotropy. Such differences are interpreted as being the results of different depositional mechanisms: incremental deposition at the base of a density-stratified, partially turbulent flow for the OBI; deposition of a laminar mass flow for the CI. In the former case, during transport particles under solidus temperature are subjected to a frictional regime, particles gliding and dispersive pressures, which finally produce size-inverse grading and variable fabric development, depending on the residence time of particles at the basal shear conditions. In the latter case, elongated particles, supported in a laminar flowing viscous matrix, undergo periodic motions which tend to develop parallel-to-flow iso-orientation. Fabric data in the deposit suggest vertical constancy in the rheological properties of the flow, absence of rheological decoupling and (shearing pervasively during transport) a minor importance of plug horizons.

  17. An approach to understanding hydrologic connectivity on the hillslope and the implications for nutrient transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stieglitz, M.; Shaman, J.; McNamara, J.; Engel, V.; Shanley, J.; Kling, G.W.

    2003-01-01

    Hydrologic processes control much of the export of organic matter and nutrients from the land surface. It is the variability of these hydrologic processes that produces variable patterns of nutrient transport in both space and time. In this paper, we explore how hydrologic "connectivity" potentially affects nutrient transport. Hydrologic connectivity is defined as the condition by which disparate regions on the hillslope are linked via subsurface water flow. We present simulations that suggest that for much of the year, water draining through a catchment is spatially isolated. Only rarely, during storm and snowmelt events when antecedent soil moisture is high, do our simulations suggest that mid-slope saturation (or near saturation) occurs and that a catchment connects from ridge to valley. Observations during snowmelt at a small headwater catchment in Idaho are consistent with these model simulations. During early season discharge episodes, in which the mid-slope soil column is not saturated, the electrical conductivity in the stream remains low, reflecting a restricted, local (lower slope) source of stream water and the continued isolation of upper and mid-slope soil water and nutrients from the stream system. Increased streamflow and higher stream water electrical conductivity, presumably reflecting the release of water from the upper reaches of the catchment, are simultaneously observed when the mid-slope becomes sufficiently wet. This study provides preliminary evidence that the seasonal timing of hydrologic connectivity may affect a range of ecological processes, including downslope nutrient transport, C/N cycling, and biological productivity along the toposequence. A better elucidation of hydrologic connectivity will be necessary for understanding local processes as well as material export from land to water at regional and global scales. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Impact of Geological Characterization Uncertainties on Subsurface Flow & Transport Using a Stochastic Discrete Fracture Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principal pathways for transport of water and contaminants in groundwater systems, enhanced geothermal system fluids, migration of oil and gas, carbon dioxide leakage from carbon sequestration sites, and of radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples, among other techniques. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distribution functions for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as a stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions of fracture density, orientation, aperture and size on the flow and transport using topological measures such as fracture connectivity, physical characteristics such as effective hydraulic conductivity tensors, and

  19. Reactive transport in porous media: pore-network model approach compared to pore-scale model.

    PubMed

    Varloteaux, Clément; Vu, Minh Tan; Békri, Samir; Adler, Pierre M

    2013-02-01

    Accurate determination of three macroscopic parameters governing reactive transport in porous media, namely, the apparent solute velocity, the dispersion, and the apparent reaction rate, is of key importance for predicting solute migration through reservoir aquifers. Two methods are proposed to calculate these parameters as functions of the Péclet and the Péclet-Dahmköhler numbers. In the first method called the pore-scale model (PSM), the porous medium is discretized by the level set method; the Stokes and convection-diffusion equations with reaction at the wall are solved by a finite-difference scheme. In the second method, called the pore-network model (PNM), the void space of the porous medium is represented by an idealized geometry of pore bodies joined by pore throats; the flow field is computed by solving Kirchhoff's laws and transport calculations are performed in the asymptotic regime where the solute concentration undergoes an exponential evolution with time. Two synthetic geometries of porous media are addressed by using both numerical codes. The first geometry is constructed in order to validate the hypotheses implemented in PNM. PSM is also used for a better understanding of the various reaction patterns observed in the asymptotic regime. Despite the PNM approximations, a very good agreement between the models is obtained, which shows that PNM is an accurate description of reactive transport. PNM, which can address much larger pore volumes than PSM, is used to evaluate the influence of the concentration distribution on macroscopic properties of a large irregular network reconstructed from microtomography images. The role of the dimensionless numbers and of the location and size of the largest pore bodies is highlighted.

  20. An approach to understanding hydrologic connectivity on the hillslope and the implications for nutrient transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Marc; Shaman, Jeff; McNamara, James; Engel, Victor; Shanley, Jamie; Kling, George W.

    2003-12-01

    Hydrologic processes control much of the export of organic matter and nutrients from the land surface. It is the variability of these hydrologic processes that produces variable patterns of nutrient transport in both space and time. In this paper, we explore how hydrologic "connectivity" potentially affects nutrient transport. Hydrologic connectivity is defined as the condition by which disparate regions on the hillslope are linked via subsurface water flow. We present simulations that suggest that for much of the year, water draining through a catchment is spatially isolated. Only rarely, during storm and snowmelt events when antecedent soil moisture is high, do our simulations suggest that mid-slope saturation (or near saturation) occurs and that a catchment connects from ridge to valley. Observations during snowmelt at a small headwater catchment in Idaho are consistent with these model simulations. During early season discharge episodes, in which the mid-slope soil column is not saturated, the electrical conductivity in the stream remains low, reflecting a restricted, local (lower slope) source of stream water and the continued isolation of upper and mid-slope soil water and nutrients from the stream system. Increased streamflow and higher stream water electrical conductivity, presumably reflecting the release of water from the upper reaches of the catchment, are simultaneously observed when the mid-slope becomes sufficiently wet. This study provides preliminary evidence that the seasonal timing of hydrologic connectivity may affect a range of ecological processes, including downslope nutrient transport, C/N cycling, and biological productivity along the toposequence. A better elucidation of hydrologic connectivity will be necessary for understanding local processes as well as material export from land to water at regional and global scales.

  1. Successful approaches to deploying a metropolitan intelligent transportation system. Final report, June 1997--July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    DeBlasio, A.J.; Jackson, D.W.; Tallon, A.C.; Powers, G.M.; O`Donnell, J.P.

    1999-03-01

    One study area of this evaluation is the Institutional Benefits Study, which is being conducted by analysts from the US DOT`s John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center). The purpose of MDI Institutional Benefits Study is fivefold: Assessment actions taken to overcome institutional constraints; Identify the benefits of taking these actions and the investments needed to reap these benefits; Document lessons learned; Identify successful strategies that representatives of state and local governments can follow in planning and deploying ITS products; and Provide examples of legislation policies, procedures, and structures that facilitated the deployment of ITS.

  2. Novel therapeutic approaches targeting L-type amino acid transporters for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Keitaro; Anzai, Naohiko

    2017-01-01

    L-type amino acid transporters (LATs) mainly assist the uptake of neutral amino acids into cells. Four LATs (LAT1, LAT2, LAT3 and LAT4) have so far been identified. LAT1 (SLC7A5) has been attracting much attention in the field of cancer research since it is commonly up-regulated in various cancers. Basic research has made it increasingly clear that LAT1 plays a predominant role in malignancy. The functional significance of LAT1 in cancer and the potential therapeutic application of the features of LAT1 to cancer management are described in this review. PMID:28144396

  3. Rethinking Drug Treatment Approaches in ALS by Targeting ABC Efflux Transporters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    disease  progression,  and  found  that   chronic  treatment  with  either   the...down   disease  progression  as  reported.     In  addition  to  evaluating  the  toxicity  of   chronic  Elacridar...far underestimated issue of disease -driven pharmacoresistance mediated by the multi-drug resistance (mdr) efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein

  4. Communications: A nonperturbative quantum master equation approach to charge carrier transport in organic molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Chen, Liping; Zheng, Renhui; Wang, Linjun; Shi, Qiang

    2010-02-28

    We present a nonperturbative quantum master equation to investigate charge carrier transport in organic molecular crystals based on the Liouville space hierarchical equations of motion method, which extends the previous stochastic Liouville equation and generalized master equation methods to a full quantum treatment of the electron-phonon coupling. Diffusive motion of charge carriers in a one-dimensional model in the presence of nonlocal electron-phonon coupling was studied, and two different charge carrier diffusion mechanisms are observed for large and small average intermolecular couplings. The new method can also find applications in calculating spectra and energy transfer in various types of quantum aggregates where the perturbative treatments fail.

  5. Representing intestinal drug transport in silico: an agent-oriented approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Hunt, C Anthony

    2004-01-01

    A prototype Epithelio-Mimetic Device (EMD) was developed and tested. EMD components are designed to map logically to biological components at multiple levels of resolution. Those components are engineered to represent actual components within an in vitro cellular system used to study intestinal drug transport. Our goal is that the behaviors of the EMD closely match observed behaviors of the in vitro systems for a wide variety of drugs. Early stage system verification is achieved. The general patterns of experimental results from the EMD for a set of hypothetical drugs having a variety of physicochemical properties reasonably match observed patterns for a wide range of experimental conditions.

  6. Dimer and cluster approach for the evaluation of electronic couplings governing charge transport: Application to two pentacene polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canola, Sofia; Pecoraro, Claudia; Negri, Fabrizia

    2016-10-01

    Hole transport properties are modeled for two polymorphs of pentacene: the single crystal polymorph and the thin film polymorph relevant for organic thin-film transistor applications. Electronic couplings are evaluated in the standard dimer approach but also considering a cluster approach in which the central molecule is surrounded by a large number of molecules quantum-chemically described. The effective electronic couplings suitable for the parametrization of a tight-binding model are derived either from the orthogonalization scheme limited to HOMO orbitals and from the orthogonalization of the full basis of molecular orbitals. The angular dependent mobilities estimated for the two polymorphs using the predicted pattern of couplings display different anisotropy characteristics as suggested from experimental investigations.

  7. Non-canonical distribution and non-equilibrium transport beyond weak system-bath coupling regime: A polaron transformation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dazhi; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-08-01

    The concept of polaron, emerged from condense matter physics, describes the dynamical interaction of moving particle with its surrounding bosonic modes. This concept has been developed into a useful method to treat open quantum systems with a complete range of system-bath coupling strength. Especially, the polaron transformation approach shows its validity in the intermediate coupling regime, in which the Redfield equation or Fermi's golden rule will fail. In the polaron frame, the equilibrium distribution carried out by perturbative expansion presents a deviation from the canonical distribution, which is beyond the usual weak coupling assumption in thermodynamics. A polaron transformed Redfield equation (PTRE) not only reproduces the dissipative quantum dynamics but also provides an accurate and efficient way to calculate the non-equilibrium steady states. Applications of the PTRE approach to problems such as exciton diffusion, heat transport and light-harvesting energy transfer are presented.

  8. Communication: Electronic and transport properties of molecular junctions under a finite bias: A dual mean field approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuanglong; Feng, Yuan Ping; Zhang, Chun

    2013-11-21

    We show that when a molecular junction is under an external bias, its properties cannot be uniquely determined by the total electron density in the same manner as the density functional theory for ground state properties. In order to correctly incorporate bias-induced nonequilibrium effects, we present a dual mean field (DMF) approach. The key idea is that the total electron density together with the density of current-carrying electrons are sufficient to determine the properties of the system. Two mean fields, one for current-carrying electrons and the other one for equilibrium electrons can then be derived. Calculations for a graphene nanoribbon junction show that compared with the commonly used ab initio transport theory, the DMF approach could significantly reduce the electric current at low biases due to the non-equilibrium corrections to the mean field potential in the scattering region.

  9. Simulator study of flight characteristics of a large twin-fuselage cargo transport airplane during approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. D.; Deal, P. L.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.; Smith, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    A six degree-of-freedom, ground-based simulator study was conducted to evaluate the low speed flight characteristics of a twin fuselage cargo transport airplane and to compare these characteristics with those of a large, single fuselage (reference) transport configuration which was similar to the Lockheed C-5C airplane. The primary piloting task was the approach and landing. The results indicated that in order to achieve "acceptable' low speed handling qualities on the twin fuselage concept, considerable stability and control augmentation was required, and although the augmented airplane could be landed safely under adverse conditions, the roll performance of the aircraft had to be improved appreciably before the handling qualities were rated as being "satisfactory.' These ground-based simulation results indicated that a value of t sub phi = 30 (time required to bank 30 deg) less than 6 sec should result in "acceptable' roll response characteristics, and when t sub phi = 30 is less than 3.8 sec, "satisfactory' roll response should be attainable on such large and unusually configured aircraft as the subject twin fuselage cargo transport concept.

  10. Equilibration and freeze-out of an expanding gas in a transport approach in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tindall, J.; Torres-Rincon, J. M.; Rose, J. B.; Petersen, H.

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by a recent finding of an exact solution of the relativistic Boltzmann equation in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime, we implement this metric into the newly developed transport approach Simulating Many Accelerated Strongly-interacting Hadrons (SMASH). We study the numerical solution of the transport equation and compare it to this exact solution for massless particles. We also compare a different initial condition, for which the transport equation can be independently solved numerically. Very nice agreement is observed in both cases. Having passed these checks for the SMASH code, we study a gas of massive particles within the same spacetime, where the particle decoupling is forced by the Hubble expansion. In this simple scenario we present an analysis of the freeze-out times, as function of the masses and cross sections of the particles. The results might be of interest for their potential application to relativistic heavy-ion collisions, for the characterization of the freeze-out process in terms of hadron properties.

  11. Landauer, Kubo, and microcanonical approaches to quantum transport and noise: A comparison and implications for cold-atom dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chih-Chun; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Zwolak, Michael

    2014-08-01

    We compare the Landauer, Kubo, and microcanonical [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16, 8025 (2005), 10.1088/0953-8984/16/45/024] approaches to quantum transport for the average current, the entanglement entropy, and the semiclassical full-counting statistics (FCS). Our focus is on the applicability of these approaches to isolated quantum systems such as ultracold atoms in engineered optical potentials. For two lattices connected by a junction, we find that the current and particle number fluctuations from the microcanonical approach compare well with the values predicted by the Landauer formalism and FCS assuming a binomial distribution. However, we demonstrate that well-defined reservoirs (i.e., particles in Fermi-Dirac distributions) are not present for a substantial duration of the quasi-steady state. Thus, on the one hand, the Landauer assumption of reservoirs and/or inelastic effects is not necessary for establishing a quasi-steady state. Maintaining such a state indefinitely requires an infinite system, and in this limit well-defined Fermi-Dirac distributions can occur. On the other hand, as we show, the existence of a finite speed of particle propagation preserves the quasi-steady state irrespective of the existence of well-defined reservoirs. This indicates that global observables in finite systems may be substantially different from those predicted by an uncritical application of the Landauer formalism, with its underlying thermodynamic limit. Therefore, the microcanonical formalism which is designed for closed, finite-size quantum systems seems more suitable for studying particle dynamics in ultracold atoms. Our results highlight both the connection and differences with more traditional approaches to calculating transport properties in condensed matter systems, and will help guide the way to their simulations in cold-atom systems.

  12. A probabilistic approach for assessing the vulnerability of transportation infrastructure to flooding from sea level rise and storm surge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, E. M.; Kirshen, P. H.; Bosma, K.; Watson, C.; Miller, S.; McArthur, K.

    2015-12-01

    There now exists a plethora of information attesting to the reality of our changing climate and its impacts on both human and natural systems. There also exists a growing literature linking climate change impacts and transportation infrastructure (highways, bridges, tunnels, railway, shipping ports, etc.) which largely agrees that the nation's transportation systems are vulnerable. To assess this vulnerability along the coast, flooding due to sea level rise and storm surge has most commonly been evaluated by simply increasing the water surface elevation and then estimating flood depth by comparing the new water surface elevation with the topographic elevations of the land surface. While this rudimentary "bathtub" approach may provide a first order identification of potential areas of vulnerability, accurate assessment requires a high resolution, physically-based hydrodynamic model that can simulate inundation due to the combined effects of sea level rise, storm surge, tides and wave action for site-specific locations. Furthermore, neither the "bathtub" approach nor other scenario-based approaches can quantify the probability of flooding due to these impacts. We developed a high resolution coupled ocean circulation-wave model (ADCIRC/SWAN) that utilizes a Monte Carlo approach for predicting the depths and associated exceedance probabilities of flooding due to both tropical (hurricanes) and extra-tropical storms under current and future climate conditions. This required the development of an entirely new database of meteorological forcing (e.g. pressure, wind speed, etc.) for historical Nor'easters in the North Atlantic basin. Flooding due to hurricanes and Nor'easters was simulated separately and then composite flood probability distributions were developed. Model results were used to assess the vulnerability of the Central Artery/Tunnel system in Boston, Massachusetts to coastal flooding now and in the future. Local and regional adaptation strategies were

  13. Transport in Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications-A Systematic Non-Equilibrium Approach.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Cárdenas, Angie L; Koper, Ger J M

    2017-05-25

    We hypothesize that the properties of proton-exchange membranes for fuel cell applications cannot be described unambiguously unless interface effects are taken into account. In order to prove this, we first develop a thermodynamically consistent description of the transport properties in the membranes, both for a homogeneous membrane and for a homogeneous membrane with two surface layers in contact with the electrodes or holder material. For each subsystem, homogeneous membrane, and the two surface layers, we limit ourselves to four parameters as the system as a whole is considered to be isothermal. We subsequently analyze the experimental results on some standard membranes that have appeared in the literature and analyze these using the two different descriptions. This analysis yields relatively well-defined values for the homogeneous membrane parameters and estimates for those of the surface layers and hence supports our hypothesis. As demonstrated, the method used here allows for a critical evaluation of the literature values. Moreover, it allows optimization of stacked transport systems such as proton-exchange membrane fuel cell units where interfacial layers, such as that between the catalyst and membrane, are taken into account systematically.

  14. A binomial modeling approach for upscaling colloid transport under unfavorable conditions: organic prediction of extended tailing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilpert, Markus; Rasmuson, Anna; Johnson, William

    2017-04-01

    Transport of colloids in saturated porous media is significantly influenced by colloidal interactions with grain surfaces. Near-surface fluid domain colloids experience relatively low fluid drag and relatively strong colloidal forces that slow their down-gradient translation relative to colloids in bulk fluid. Near surface fluid domain colloids may re-enter into the bulk fluid via diffusion (nanoparticles) or expulsion at rear flow stagnation zones, they may immobilize (attach) via strong primary minimum interactions, or they may move along a grain-to-grain contact to the near surface fluid domain of an adjacent grain. We introduce a simple model that accounts for all possible permutations of mass transfer within a dual pore and grain network. The primary phenomena thereby represented in the model are mass transfer of colloids between the bulk and near-surface fluid domains and immobilization onto grain surfaces. Colloid movement is described by a sequence of trials in a series of unit cells, and the binomial distribution is used to calculate the probabilities of each possible sequence. Pore-scale simulations provide mechanistically-determined likelihoods and timescales associated with the above pore-scale colloid mass transfer processes, whereas the network-scale model employs pore and grain topology to determine probabilities of transfer from up-gradient bulk and near-surface fluid domains to down-gradient bulk and near-surface fluid domains. Inter-grain transport of colloids in the near surface fluid domain can cause extended tailing.

  15. A Population Approach to Transportation Planning: Reducing Exposure to Motor-Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Morency, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Transportation planning and public health have important historical roots. To address common challenges, including road traffic fatalities, integration of theories and methods from both disciplines is required. This paper presents an overview of Geoffrey Rose's strategy of preventive medicine applied to road traffic fatalities. One of the basic principles of Rose's strategy is that a large number of people exposed to a small risk can generate more cases than a small number exposed to a high risk. Thus, interventions should address the large number of people exposed to the fundamental causes of diseases. Exposure to moving vehicles could be considered a fundamental cause of road traffic deaths and injuries. A global reduction in the amount of kilometers driven would result in a reduction of the likelihood of collisions for all road users. Public health and transportation research must critically appraise their practice and engage in informed dialogue with the objective of improving mobility and productivity while simultaneously reducing the public health burden of road deaths and injuries. PMID:23840236

  16. Thermal transport properties of bulk and monolayer MoS2: an ab-initio approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bano, Amreen; Khare, Preeti; Gaur, N. K.

    2017-05-01

    The transport properties of semiconductors are key to the performance of many solid-state devices (transistors, data storage, thermoelectric cooling and power generation devices, etc). In recent years simulation tools based on first-principles calculations have been greatly improved, being able to obtain the fundamental ground-state properties of materials accurately. The quasi harmonic thermal properties of bulk and monolayer of MoS2 has been computed with ab initio periodic simulations based of density functional theory (DFT). The temperature dependence of bulk modulus, specific heat, thermal expansion and gruneisen parameter have been calculated in our work within the temperature range of 0K to 900K with projected augmented wave (PAW) method using generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Our results show that the optimized lattice parameters are in good agreement with the earlier reported works and also for thermoelastic parameter, i.e. isothermal bulk modulus (B) at 0K indicates that monolayer MoS2 (48.5 GPa)is more compressible than the bulk structure (159.23 GPa). The thermal expansion of monolayer structure is slightly less than the bulk. Similarly, other parameters like heat capacity and gruneisen parameter shows different nature which is due to the confinement of 3 dimensional structure to 2 dimension (2D) for improving its transport characteristics.

  17. Constrained Optimization of Average Arrival Time via a Probabilistic Approach to Transport Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Namazi-Rad, Mohammad-Reza; Dunbar, Michelle; Ghaderi, Hadi; Mokhtarian, Payam

    2015-01-01

    To achieve greater transit-time reduction and improvement in reliability of transport services, there is an increasing need to assist transport planners in understanding the value of punctuality; i.e. the potential improvements, not only to service quality and the consumer but also to the actual profitability of the service. In order for this to be achieved, it is important to understand the network-specific aspects that affect both the ability to decrease transit-time, and the associated cost-benefit of doing so. In this paper, we outline a framework for evaluating the effectiveness of proposed changes to average transit-time, so as to determine the optimal choice of average arrival time subject to desired punctuality levels whilst simultaneously minimizing operational costs. We model the service transit-time variability using a truncated probability density function, and simultaneously compare the trade-off between potential gains and increased service costs, for several commonly employed cost-benefit functions of general form. We formulate this problem as a constrained optimization problem to determine the optimal choice of average transit time, so as to increase the level of service punctuality, whilst simultaneously ensuring a minimum level of cost-benefit to the service operator. PMID:25992902

  18. Transport in Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications—A Systematic Non-Equilibrium Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Cárdenas, Angie L.; Koper, Ger J. M

    2017-01-01

    We hypothesize that the properties of proton-exchange membranes for fuel cell applications cannot be described unambiguously unless interface effects are taken into account. In order to prove this, we first develop a thermodynamically consistent description of the transport properties in the membranes, both for a homogeneous membrane and for a homogeneous membrane with two surface layers in contact with the electrodes or holder material. For each subsystem, homogeneous membrane, and the two surface layers, we limit ourselves to four parameters as the system as a whole is considered to be isothermal. We subsequently analyze the experimental results on some standard membranes that have appeared in the literature and analyze these using the two different descriptions. This analysis yields relatively well-defined values for the homogeneous membrane parameters and estimates for those of the surface layers and hence supports our hypothesis. As demonstrated, the method used here allows for a critical evaluation of the literature values. Moreover, it allows optimization of stacked transport systems such as proton-exchange membrane fuel cell units where interfacial layers, such as that between the catalyst and membrane, are taken into account systematically. PMID:28772939

  19. Flux-Averaged and Volume-Averaged Concentrations in Continuum Approaches to Solute Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. C.; van Genuchten, M. Th.

    1984-07-01

    Transformations between volume-averaged pore fluid concentrations and flux-averaged concentrations are presented which show that both modes of concentration obey convective-dispersive transport equations of identical mathematical form for nonreactive solutes. The pertinent boundary conditions for the two modes, however, do not transform identically. Solutions of the convection-dispersion equation for a semi-infinite system during steady flow subject to a first-type inlet boundary condition is shown to yield flux concentrations, while solutions subject to a third-type boundary condition yield volume-averaged concentrations. These solutions may be applied with reasonable impunity to finite as well as semi-infinite media if back mixing at the exit is precluded. Implications of the distinction between resident and flux concentrations to laboratory and field studies of solute transport are discussed. It is suggested that perceived limitations of the convection-dispersion model for media with large variations in pore water velocities may in certain cases be attributable to a failure to distinguish between volume-averaged and flux-averaged concentrations.

  20. Constrained Optimization of Average Arrival Time via a Probabilistic Approach to Transport Reliability.

    PubMed

    Namazi-Rad, Mohammad-Reza; Dunbar, Michelle; Ghaderi, Hadi; Mokhtarian, Payam

    2015-01-01

    To achieve greater transit-time reduction and improvement in reliability of transport services, there is an increasing need to assist transport planners in understanding the value of punctuality; i.e. the potential improvements, not only to service quality and the consumer but also to the actual profitability of the service. In order for this to be achieved, it is important to understand the network-specific aspects that affect both the ability to decrease transit-time, and the associated cost-benefit of doing so. In this paper, we outline a framework for evaluating the effectiveness of proposed changes to average transit-time, so as to determine the optimal choice of average arrival time subject to desired punctuality levels whilst simultaneously minimizing operational costs. We model the service transit-time variability using a truncated probability density function, and simultaneously compare the trade-off between potential gains and increased service costs, for several commonly employed cost-benefit functions of general form. We formulate this problem as a constrained optimization problem to determine the optimal choice of average transit time, so as to increase the level of service punctuality, whilst simultaneously ensuring a minimum level of cost-benefit to the service operator.

  1. A multi-diagnostic approach to understanding high-latitude plasma transport during the Halloween 2003 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, P.; Mitchell, C. N.; Spencer, P.; McCrea, I.; Pedersen, T.

    2008-09-01

    During the Halloween 2003 storm event, significant electron density enhancements at elevated F-layer altitudes were recorded by the EISCAT and ESR radars in northern Europe between 20:00 and 24:00 UT on 30 October. At the same time, a sequence of optical images from Qaanaaq in northern Greenland captured a series of eastward-propagating polar cap patches. In this paper, an advanced 4-D tomographic method based on the assimilation of global GPS data, coupled to a predictive Kalman filtering technique, has been used to reveal the linkage between these ionospheric structures. The combination of the various data sources has clearly established the time history of this extreme event, in which high-density plasma was uplifted in the dayside ionosphere and convected anti-sunward across the polar cap to European high latitudes at an elevated F-layer. Using this multi instrument approach, we can differentiate between those density structures observed at the ESR which occurred as a result of cross-polar transport and those more likely to have been produced by in-situ soft particle precipitation, a distinction which is supported by the ESR and EISCAT data. The multi-diagnostic approach reported here has the potential significantly to extend our current understanding of high latitude plasma transport and the origin of electron density enhancements.

  2. Ergonomic analyses within the French transport and logistics sector: first steps towards a new "act elsewhere" prevention approach.

    PubMed

    Wioland, Liên

    2013-10-01

    Statistics from the French Employee National Health Insurance Fund indicate high accident levels in the transport sector. This study represents initial thinking on a new approach to transport sector prevention based on the assumption that a work situation could be improved by acting on another interconnected work situation. Ergonomic analysis of two connected work situations, involving the road haulage drivers and cross-docking platform employees, was performed to test this assumption. Our results show that drivers are exposed to a number of identified risks, but their multiple tasks raise the question of activity intensification. The conditions, under which the drivers will perform their work and take to the road, are partly determined by the quality and organisation of the platform with which they interact. We make a number of recommendations (e.g. changing handling equipment, re-appraising certain jobs) to improve platform organisation and employee working conditions with the aim of also improving driver conditions. These initial steps in this prevention approach appear promising, but more detailed investigation is required.

  3. Human health risk assessment of CO2 leakage into overlying aquifers using a stochastic, geochemical reactive transport approach.

    PubMed

    Atchley, Adam L; Maxwell, Reed M; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K

    2013-06-04

    Increased human health risk associated with groundwater contamination from potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into a potable aquifer is predicted by conducting a joint uncertainty and variability (JUV) risk assessment. The approach presented here explicitly incorporates heterogeneous flow and geochemical reactive transport in an efficient manner and is used to evaluate how differences in representation of subsurface physical heterogeneity and geochemical reactions change the calculated risk for the same hypothetical aquifer scenario where a CO2 leak induces increased lead (Pb(2+)) concentrations through dissolution of galena (PbS). A nested Monte Carlo approach was used to take Pb(2+) concentrations at a well from an ensemble of numerical reactive transport simulations (uncertainty) and sample within a population of potentially exposed individuals (variability) to calculate risk as a function of both uncertainty and variability. Pb(2+) concentrations at the well were determined with numerical reactive transport simulation ensembles using a streamline technique in a heterogeneous 3D aquifer. Three ensembles with variances of log hydraulic conductivity (σ(2)lnK) of 1, 3.61, and 16 were simulated. Under the conditions simulated, calculated risk is shown to be a function of the strength of subsurface heterogeneity, σ(2)lnK and the choice between calculating Pb(2+) concentrations in groundwater using equilibrium with galena and kinetic mineral reaction rates. Calculated risk increased with an increase in σ(2)lnK of 1 to 3.61, but decreased when σ(2)lnK was increased from 3.61 to 16 for all but the highest percentiles of uncertainty. Using a Pb(2+) concentration in equilibrium with galena under CO2 leakage conditions (PCO2 = 30 bar) resulted in lower estimated risk than the simulations where Pb(2+) concentrations were calculated using kinetic mass transfer reaction rates for galena dissolution and precipitation. This study highlights the importance of

  4. Reactive Transport of Nitrate in Northern California Groundwater basins: An Integrated Characterization and Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, B. K.; Moran, J. E.; Hudson, G. B.; Carle, S. F.; McNab, W.; Tompson, A. F.; Moore, K.; Beller, H.; Kane, S.; Eaton, G.

    2003-12-01

    More than 1/3 of active public drinking water supply wells in California produce water with nitrate-N levels indicative of anthropogenic inputs (> 4 mg/L). Understanding how the distribution of nitrate in California groundwater basins will evolve is vital to water supply and infrastructure planning. To address this need, we are studying the basin-scale reactive transport of nitrate in the Livermore and Llagas basins of Northern California. Both basins have increasingly urban populations heavily reliant on groundwater. A distinct nitrate "plume" exists in the Livermore Basin (Alameda County) whereas pervasive nitrate contamination exists in shallow groundwaters of the Llagas Basin (Santa Clara County). The sources and timing of nitrate contamination in these basins are not definitively known; septic systems, irrigated agriculture and livestock operations exist or have existed in both areas. The role of denitrification in controlling nitrate distribution is also unknown; dissolved oxygen levels are sufficiently low in portions of each basin as to indicate the potential for denitrification. We have collected water from 60 wells, and are determining both groundwater age (by the 3H/3He method) and the extent of denitrification (by the excess N2 method). Excess nitrogen is being determined by both membrane-inlet and noble gas mass spectrometry, using Ar and Ne content to account for atmospheric N2. We are also analyzing for stable istotopes of nitrate and water, nitrate co-contaminants, and general water quality parameters. Preliminary analysis of archival water district data from both basins suggests positive correlations of nitrate with Ca+2, Mg+2 and bicarbonate and negative correlation with pH. In the Llagas Basin, a negative correlation also exists between nitrate and temperature. Flow path-oriented reactive transport modeling is being explored as a tool to aid in the identification of both the sources of nitrate and evidence for denitrification in both basins

  5. Transporting Pedagogy: Implementing the Project Approach in Two First-Grade Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzog, Nancy B.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores how a project-based approach, based on gifted education pedagogy, was implemented in a public school program where the majority of students were from low-income families. The 2 first-grade teachers in this study were able to change their teaching practices to include more strategies commonly found in gifted programs such as…

  6. Gas transport and bubble collapse in rhyolitic magma: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westrich, Henry R.; Eichelberger, John C.

    1994-12-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to test concepts of porous flow degassing of rhyolitic magma during ascent and of the subsequent collapse of vesicles in degassed magma to form obsidian. Dense, synthetically hydrated, natural glasses were pressurized under water-saturated conditions and then decompressed to achieve a range of porosities in the presence of a tracer vapor, D2O. Rapid isotopic exchange indicative of vapor transport rather than of simple diffusion occurred at a porosity >60 vol.%, in accord with earlier gas permeability measurements on cold natural samples. In another series of experiments, natural and synthetic pumices, vesiculated by degassing to atmospheric pressure, rapidly collapsed to dense glass on repressurization to the modest pressures prevailing in lava flows. No relict bubble textures remained. These results support the hypothesis that effusive eruptions result from the syneruptive escape of gas from permeable magmatic foam, and that a process analogous to welding yields dense lavas when such foams are extruded.

  7. Crystal structure and charge transport properties of poly(arylene-ethynylene) derivatives: A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzón, Andrés; Granadino-Roldán, José M.; García, Gregorio; Moral, Mónica; Fernández-Gómez, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, a series of crystalline poly(arylene-ethynylene) copolymers containing phenylethynylene and 2,5-dialkoxy-phenylethynylene units together with 1,3,4-thiadiazole rings has been modeled by means of periodic calculations. Optimized three-dimensional polymeric structures show interchain distances that are consistent with the experimental values reported for a related polymer. It has also been observed that the presence of pendant alkoxy chains brings on both a further flattening and a separation of the coplanar chains. This fact is linked to a decrease of the interchain cofacial distance. The electron transport character of the polymer crystal structures was assessed through Marcus theory. Electronic coupling between neighboring polymer chains is most influenced by the presence of alkoxy chains giving rise to an expectable enhancement of the electron hopping mobility.

  8. National, holistic, watershed-scale approach to understand the sources, transport, and fate of agricultural chemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capel, P.D.; McCarthy, K.A.; Barbash, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the following series of papers that report on in-depth investigations that have been conducted at five agricultural study areas across the United States in order to gain insights into how environmental processes and agricultural practices interact to determine the transport and fate of agricultural chemicals in the environment. These are the first study areas in an ongoing national study. The study areas were selected, based on the combination of cropping patterns and hydrologic setting, as representative of nationally important agricultural settings to form a basis for extrapolation to unstudied areas. The holistic, watershed-scale study design that involves multiple environmental compartments and that employs both field observations and simulation modeling is presented. This paper introduces the overall study design and presents an overview of the hydrology of the five study areas. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of the source regions for surface to stratosphere transport: An Eulerian backtracking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, P. E.; Esler, J. G.

    2014-02-01

    A wide range of inverse problems in atmospheric transport and chemistry can be solved within the Eulerian backtracking framework. Here it is shown how a new and accurate numerical implementation can be used as an alternative to Lagrangian back trajectory methods in a wide class of process studies. As a key example, the question of how the (time-averaged) stratospheric flux of a finite lifetime chemical species depends upon the location(s) of its surface source(s) is addressed. The resulting sensitivity maps are demonstrated to be robust features of the global atmospheric circulation, with relatively low interannual variability. The maps serve as an at-a-glance resource for policymakers wishing to compare the likely impact of proposed emission locations for very short lived halogenated species on the total loading of stratospheric chlorine and bromine.

  10. 21st century space transportation system design approach - HL-20 personnel launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Howard W.; Piland, William M.

    1993-10-01

    This article provides an introduction to and overview of the research that was conducted on the HL-20 lifting body. The concept has been defined as an option for a personnel launch system (PLS) that is intended to carry six to eight Space Station Freedom crew persons. In this role the HL-20 will complement the Space Shuttle operation and ensure the ability to transport people to and from Earth orbit after the year 2000. The research covers a broad range of disciplines, including aerodynamics, aerodynamic heating and thermal protection systems, structural design, subsystem definition, trajectory and guidance system development for entry and abort, production and operations, and human factors. This article also presents the lifting-body heritage, design features of the concept, and HL-20/PLS mission requirements.

  11. 21st century space transportation system design approach - HL-20 personnel launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Howard W.; Piland, William M.

    1993-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to and overview of the research that was conducted on the HL-20 lifting body. The concept has been defined as an option for a personnel launch system (PLS) that is intended to carry six to eight Space Station Freedom crew persons. In this role the HL-20 will complement the Space Shuttle operation and ensure the ability to transport people to and from Earth orbit after the year 2000. The research covers a broad range of disciplines, including aerodynamics, aerodynamic heating and thermal protection systems, structural design, subsystem definition, trajectory and guidance system development for entry and abort, production and operations, and human factors. This article also presents the lifting-body heritage, design features of the concept, and HL-20/PLS mission requirements.

  12. Transport properties of water molecules confined between hydroxyapaptite surfaces: A Molecular dynamics simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Muthuramalingam; Lemaire, Thibault; Di Tommaso, Devis; de Leeuw, Nora; Lewerenz, Marius; Caruel, Matthieu; Naili, Salah

    2017-10-01

    Water diffusion in the vicinity of hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals is a key issue to describe biomineralization process. In this study, a configuration of parallel HAP platelets mimicking bone nanopores is proposed to characterize the nanoscopic transport properties of water molecules at HAP-water surface and interfaces using various potential models such as combination of the Core-Shell (CS) model, Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials with SPC or SPC/E water models. When comparing all these potentials models, it appears that the core-shell potential for HAP together with the SPC/E water model more accurately predicts the diffusion properties of water near HAP surface. Moreover, we have been able to put into relief the possibility of observing hydroxyl (OH-) ion dissociation that modifies the water structure near the HAP surface.

  13. Arsenic transport between surface and groundwater in a moderately reducing zone: Geochemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaska, Mahmoud; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Verdoux, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic contamination represents a major risk to human health as one of the most prominent environmental causes of cancer mortality. Mining activities, particularly those involving arsenic rich ores have an impact on the environment and on human health that may persist for many decades after mine closure. The relationships between As released from alluvial aquifer in the vicinity of the sulfide-rich mine dumps was demonstrated with geochemical and isotopic tracers (major and traces elements, 87Sr/86Sr, 18O, 2H). Strontium isotopes were used to trace the transport of As downstream from a As rich tailing dam. Increasing As and Fe concentrations in surface water are explained by As release associated with alluvial groundwater discharge to the stream. This process occurs in a moderately reduced section of the stream downgradient from the sulfide-rich tailing dam. High As, total Fe and low Eh in groundwater confirm the discharge of alluvial groundwater and explain its impact on surface water. Transport of As between surface and groundwater can be described as follows: 1- Subsurface moderately reducing conditions prevail in groundwater downgradient from the tailing dams. This suggests a flux of reduced water from sulfide-rich tailing dams which is characterized by its high As and Fe content resulting from the reduction of Fe-sulfides. 2- Upon mixing with surface water, oxidizing conditions prevails and precipitate as Fe hydroxide on the stream bed. As and Sr subsequently adsorbed on the Fe -oxyhydroxide surface. This process contributes to the immobilization of As in surface water. Remaining dissolved As in surface water can be re-introduced in alluvial groundwater downstream of the reducing zone.

  14. Urban and rural transport of semivolatile organic compounds at regional scale: A multimedia model approach.

    PubMed

    Song, Shuai; Su, Chao; Lu, Yonglong; Wang, Tieyu; Zhang, Yueqing; Liu, Shijie

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas are generally regarded as major sources of some semivolatile organic compounds and other persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to the surrounding regions. Huge differences in contaminant emissions between urban and rural areas directly affect their fate in environmental media. Little is known about POPs behavior between urban and rural areas at a regional scale. A spatially resolved Berkeley-Trent-Urban-Rural Fate Model (BETR-UR) was designed by coupling land cover information to simulate the transport of POPs between urban and rural areas, and the Bohai Rim was used as a case study to estimate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) fate. The processes of contaminant fate including emission, inter-compartmental transfer, advection and degradation in urban and rural areas were simulated in the model. Simulated PAH concentrations in environmental media of urban and rural areas were very close to measured values. The model accuracy was highly improved, with the average absolute relative error for PAH concentrations reduced from 37% to 3% compared with unimproved model results. PAH concentrations in urban soil and air were considerably higher than those in rural areas. Sensitivity analysis showed temperature was the most influential parameter for Phen rather than for Bap, whose fate was more influenced by emission rate, compartment dimension, transport velocity and chemical persistence. Uncertainty analysis indicated modeled results in urban media had higher uncertainty than those in rural areas due to larger variations of emissions in urban areas. The differences in urban and rural areas provided us with valuable guidance on policy setting for urban-rural POP control.

  15. Stormwater Design Return Period Standards for U.S. Transportation Infrastructure: How Are States Approaching Resilience?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaras, C.; Lopez, T.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is projected to increase the frequency and intensity of precipitation in many regions, which is relevant for stormwater engineering designs and resilience in the transportation sector. Existing and future stormwater infrastructure is generally designed for historical and stationary hydrologic conditions. For example, the design return period is based on statistical analysis of past precipitation events, often over a 50-year historical timeline. The design return period translates into how much peak precipitation volume a system is designed for in a state, and provides information about the performance of a drainage structure. The higher the design period used by an engineer for a given stormwater system, the more peak stormwater volume the system can convey. Therefore, design return periods can be associated with a design's near-term and long-term resilience. However, there is a tradeoff between the choice of design return period, the total infrastructure capital cost, and the resilience of a system to heavy precipitation events. This study analyzes current stormwater infrastructure design guidelines for state departments of transportation in the contiguous United States, in order to understand how stormwater design return periods vary across states and provide insight into the resilience of current stormwater systems design. The study found that the design return period varies considerably across the United States by roadway functional class and drainage classification, as well as within climate regions. Understanding this variation will help states identify possible vulnerabilities, highlight deficiencies across states and infrastructure types, and help in updating design return periods to increase the climate resilience of stormwater infrastructure.

  16. A pore scale modeling approach to isotopic fractionation during reactive transport through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Druhan, J. L.; Parmigiani, A.; Shafei, B.; Maher, K.

    2013-12-01

    The stable isotope compositions of reactant and product species are commonly utilized in the analysis of biogeochemical cycling, contaminant remediation and paleo-proxy records. While novel analytical models for isotopic exchange during steady state mineral growth are poised to offer new insights into these fields, commonly encountered transient conditions such as variable saturation state, flow rate and porosity/permeability present a formidable challenge. The problem arises from the precipitation of new mineral that is isotopically variant normal to the plane of growth, reflecting the temporal evolution of the adjacent, supersaturated fluid (e.g. Pearce et al., 2012; Druhan et al., 2013). Reactive transport models intended to describe isotopic exchange between the fluid and mineral surface then incur error through the use of a bulk mineral isotopic ratio rather than tracking a spatially variable isotopic composition within the solid. Here we present a novel multi-species, pore-scale reactive transport code based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) capable of simulating the individual isotopes of calcium during fractionating, kinetically controlled precipitation of calcite from a supersaturated, flowing fluid. The isotopic composition of the mineral surface in contact with the advecting fluid is tracked through time by computing the averaged isotopic composition of the solid fraction over small solid volume fraction bins. This method allows us to model isotopic composition zoning at a scale smaller than that of the computational grid, thus effectively distinguishing the isotopic ratio of the mineral surface in contact with the fluid from the remainder of the solid phase. Druhan, J.L.; Steefel, C.I.; Williams, K.H.; DePaolo, D.J. (2013) Calcium isotope fractionation in groundwater: Molecular scale processes influencing field scale behavior. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta., in press. Pearce, C.R.; Saldi, G.D.; Schott, J.; Oelkers, E.H. (2012) Isotopic fractionation

  17. A GIS-based approach for modeling the fate and transport of pollutants in Europe.

    PubMed

    Pistocchi, A

    2008-05-15

    This paper presents an approach to estimate chemical concentration in multiple environmental media (soil, water, and the atmosphere) with the sole use of basic geographical information system (GIS) operations and, particularly, map algebra. This allows solving mass balance equations in a different way from the traditional methods involving numerical or analytical solution of systems of equations, producing maps of chemical fluxes and concentrations only through combinations of maps of emissions and environmental removal or transfer rates. Benchmarking with the well-established EMEP MSCE-POP model shows that the method provides consistent results with this more detailed description. When available, experimental evidence equally supports the proposed method in relation to the more complex approaches.

  18. One-domain approach for studying multiphase transport phenomena in biofilm growing systems.

    PubMed

    Oliveros-Muñoz, Juan Manuel; Calderón-Alvarado, Martha Patricia; Martínez-González, Gloria María; Navarrete-Bolaños, José Luis; Jiménez-Islas, Hugo

    2017-04-01

    The one-domain approach (ODA) was used as an alternative to solve fluid-biofilm interfacial behavior in a 2-D model for diffusion-reaction-convection coupled with prediction of irregular growth of biofilms via a cellular automaton strategy. The simulations exhibited errors of <7% compared with the porosity of a previously reported capillary experimental system. Additionally, biofilm surface geometrical aspects were satisfactorily compared with reports of experimental and similar rigorously simulated benchmark systems. The method developed was applied to simulate typical biofilm systems predicting recirculation flow patterns, interface concentration profiles, and clogging of the inlet section of the capillary tube, which are phenomena that affect the efficiency of diverse biotechnological applications, including membrane bioreactors and biofilters. The ODA method applied to the governing equations of momentum and mass transfer combined with a cellular automaton algorithm is a suitable and straightforward approach for modeling solid-state fermentation at different sophistication levels.

  19. Nitrogen transport and transformations in a shallow aquifer receiving wastewater discharge: A mass balance approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeSimone, L.A.; Howes, B.L.

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen transport and transformations were followed over the initial 3 years of development of a plume of wastewater-contaminated groundwater in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Ammonification and nitrification in the unsaturated zone and ammonium sorption in the saturated zone were predominant, while loss of fixed nitrogen through denitrification was minor. The major effect of transport was the oxidation of discharged organic and inorganic forms to nitrate, which was the dominant nitrogen form in transit to receiving systems. Ammonification and nitrification in the unsaturated zone transformed 16-19% and 50-70%, respectively, of the total nitrogen mass discharged to the land surface during the study but did not attenuate the nitrogen loading. Nitrification in the unsaturated zone also contributed to a pH decrease of 2 standard units and to an N2O increase (46-660 ??g N/L in the plume). Other processes in the unsaturated zone had little net effect: Ammonium sorption removed <1% of the total discharged nitrogen mass; filtering of particulate organic nitrogen was less than 3%; ammonium and nitrate assimilation was less than 6%; and ammonia volatilization was less than 0.25%. In the saturated zone a central zone of anoxic groundwater (DO ??? 0.05 mg/L) was first detected 17 months after effluent discharge to the aquifer began, which expanded at about the groundwater-flow velocity. Although nitrate was dominant at the water table, the low, carbon-limited rates of denitrification in the anoxic zone (3.0-9.6 (ng N/cm3)/d) reduced only about 2% of the recharged nitrogen mass to N2. In contrast, ammonium sorption in the saturated zone removed about 16% of the recharged nitrogen mass from the groundwater. Ammonium sorption was primarily limited to anoxic zone, where nitrification was prevented, and was best described by a Langmuir isotherm in which effluent ionic concentrations were simulated. The initial nitrogen load discharged from the groundwater system may depend largely on

  20. Non-equilibrium STLS approach to transport properties of single impurity Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Rezai, Raheleh Ebrahimi, Farshad

    2014-04-15

    In this work, using the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we study the effects of the electron–electron interaction and the electron-spin correlation on the non-equilibrium Kondo effect and the transport properties of the symmetric single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) at zero temperature by generalizing the self-consistent method of Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjolander (STLS) for a single-band tight-binding model with Hubbard type interaction to out of equilibrium steady-states. We at first determine in a self-consistent manner the non-equilibrium spin correlation function, the effective Hubbard interaction, and the double-occupancy at the impurity site. Then, using the non-equilibrium STLS spin polarization function in the non-equilibrium formalism of the iterative perturbation theory (IPT) of Yosida and Yamada, and Horvatic and Zlatic, we compute the spectral density, the current–voltage characteristics and the differential conductance as functions of the applied bias and the strength of on-site Hubbard interaction. We compare our spectral densities at zero bias with the results of numerical renormalization group (NRG) and depict the effects of the electron–electron interaction and electron-spin correlation at the impurity site on the aforementioned properties by comparing our numerical result with the order U{sup 2} IPT. Finally, we show that the obtained numerical results on the differential conductance have a quadratic universal scaling behavior and the resulting Kondo temperature shows an exponential behavior. -- Highlights: •We introduce for the first time the non-equilibrium method of STLS for Hubbard type models. •We determine the transport properties of SIAM using the non-equilibrium STLS method. •We compare our results with order-U2 IPT and NRG. •We show that non-equilibrium STLS, contrary to the GW and self-consistent RPA, produces the two Hubbard peaks in DOS. •We show that the method keeps the universal scaling behavior and correct

  1. Relationship between Rap1 protein phosphorylation and regulation of Ca2+ transport in platelets: a new approach.

    PubMed Central

    Magnier, C; Corvazier, E; Aumont, M C; Le Jemtel, T H; Enouf, J

    1995-01-01

    Although the interrelationship between the two messengers Ca2+ and cyclic AMP in platelet function is well documented, its mechanism of action still remains to be established. We investigated here the question of the regulation of platelet Ca(2+)-ATPases by cyclic AMP through the phosphorylation of the Rap1 protein using a pathological model. We first found experimental conditions where Ca(2+)-transport by platelet membrane vesicles appeared to be dependent on the phosphorylation of the Rap1 protein. Then, we studied platelets of patients with congestive heart failure for their expression of the potential 97 kDa Ca(2+)-ATPase target of regulation through the Rap1 protein as well as the phosphorylation of the Rap1 protein using the catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (C. Sub.). In the first patients studied, we found no significant modification in the expression of the 97 kDa Ca(2+)-ATPase by Western blotting using the PL/IM 430 monoclonal antibody which specifically recognized this isoform. In contrast, the Rap1 protein was differentially phosphorylated when using 15 micrograms/ml of the C. Sub. These results allowed us to use these pathological platelets to study the relationship between the expression of Rap1 protein and the regulation of Ca2+ transport by selecting a patient with severe heart failure. We could show a decrease in the expression as well as in the phosphorylation of Rap1 protein and demonstrate a lower effect of C. Sub. on Ca2+ transport. Finally, by studying a further series of patients, we could confirm that the decrease in Rap1 protein expression in heart failure, whatever its extent, was variable, and could strictly correlate the expression of Rap1 protein with the stimulatory effect of C. Sub. on Ca2+ transport. Besides the evidence for regulation of the expression of the Rap1 protein in platelets from patients with heart failure, these findings constitute a new approach in favour of the regulation of platelet Ca2

  2. Integrated Microbial Trait Based-Reactive Transport Modeling Approach Towards Understanding Microbial Reservoir Souring and Desouring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Cheng, Y.; Bouskill, N.; Hubbard, C. G.; Engelbrektson, A. L.; Coates, J. D.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Microbially mediated sulfate reduction is the major metabolic process that leads to the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in oil reservoirs. Biogenesis of H2S (souring) has detrimental impacts on oil production operations and can cause significant environmental and health problems. Understanding the processes that control the rates and patterns of sulfate reduction is a crucial step in developing a predictive understanding of reservoir souring and associated mitigation processes. In this study, we describe the development of a microbial trait-based model that is coupled to a reactive transport model. The model represents several anaerobic microbial functional guilds with different resource acquisition (e.g., electron donor, sulfate) traits. The integrated model was used to simulate the temporal and spatial evolution of the primary chemical species (e.g. sulfate, sulfide, nitrate, chlorate and perchlorate) and the microbial community dynamics involved in the souring and desouring processes as revealed in a recent laboratory column experiment comparing the effectiveness of nitrate, chlorate and perchlorate treatments as souring control strategies. Simulation of the laboratory experimental results shows that the model captured the spatio-temporal trend of the chemical species and microbial guilds during both souring and desouring. Model parameters derived through modeling of the column data are utilized in subsequent field-scale model simulations across a set of reservoir relevant environmental conditions. This integrated model demonstrates that interactions between SRBs and other heterotrophs can significantly impact the occurrence and extent of H2S production.

  3. An experiential approach to improving the integration of knowledge during EIA in transport planning

    SciTech Connect

    Soria-Lara, Julio A.; Bertolini, Luca; Brömmelstroet, Marco te

    2016-01-15

    The integration of knowledge from stakeholders and the public at large is seen as one of the biggest process-related barriers during the scoping phase of EIA application in transport planning. While the academic literature offers abundant analyses, discussions and suggestions how to overcome this problem, the proposed solutions are yet to be adequately tested in practice. In order to address this gap, we test the effectiveness of a set of interventions and trigger mechanisms for improving different aspects of knowledge integration. The interventions are tested in an experiential study with two sequential cases, representing “close-to-real-life” conditions, in the context of two cities in Andalusia, Spain. In general terms, the participants perceived that the integration of knowledge improved during the simulation of the EIA scoping phase. Certain shortcomings were also discussed, fundamentally related to how the time spent during the scoping phase was crucial to lead an effective learning process between the involved people. The study concludes with a reflection on the effectiveness of the tested interventions according to similarities and differences obtained from the two experiential case studies, as well as with a discussion of the potential to generate new knowledge through the use of experiential studies in EIA practice. - Highlights: • It tests a set of interventions and mechanisms to improve the integration of knowledge. • The scoping phase of EIA is simulated to assess the effectiveness of interventions. • Two sequential case studies are used.

  4. Simulating nitrogen transport and transformation through urban riparian zones using a particle-tracking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Z.; Welty, C.; Gold, A. J.; Groffman, P. M.; Kaushal, S.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrate is the most common and mobile form of nitrogen contaminant found in groundwater. Riparian zones, often identified as denitrification hot spots, play an important role in processing nitrate as it moves from uplands to streams through the subsurface. However, in urban areas, where groundwater flow paths may be altered by channel incision, it is not clear how riparian zone denitrification responds to such changes in groundwater flow paths. To quantify the effects of groundwater flow path changes on riparian zone denitrification, we are applying a recently-developed 3D numerical groundwater nitrogen transport model to this problem. Based on an existing particle-tracking code, SLIM-FAST, new components were added using the operator splitting technique to account for biogeochemical reactions. The model was verified with analytical solutions, other numerical codes, and laboratory experimental results. Here we report on application of the model to a hypothetical stream riparian site to evaluate nitrogen transformations under various groundwater flow conditions. The flow field is generated using the 3D groundwater flow code, ParFlow. The particle-tracking code uses the flow field as input and the movement and reactions of the nitrogen species are simulated by the code. Initial model simulation results confirm well-known behavior that as groundwater flow paths pass through DOC-rich riparian zones, higher denitrification rates are obtained. Ongoing simulations are being carried out to quantify the effect of stream downcutting on the denitrification process.

  5. A multilevel cost-space approach to solving the balanced long transportation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanaugh, Kevin J.; Henson, Van Emden

    1993-01-01

    We develop a multilevel scheme for solving the balanced long transportation problem, that is, given a set (c(sub kj)) of shipping costs from a set of M supply nodes S(sub k) to a set of N demand nodes D(sub j), we seek to find a set of flows, (x(sub kj)), that minimizes the total cost Sigma(sub k=1)(exp M) Sigma(sub j=1)(exp N) x(sub kj)c(sub kj). We require that the problem be balanced, that is, the total demand must equal the total supply. Solution techniques for this problem are well known from optimization and linear programming. We examine this problem, however, in order to develop principles that can then be applied to more intractible problems of optimization. We develop a multigrid scheme for solving the problem, defining the grids, relaxation, and intergrid operators. Numerical experimentation shows that this line of research may prove fruitful. Further research directions are suggested.

  6. A novel approach to modelling water transport and drug diffusion through the stratum corneum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The potential of using skin as an alternative path for systemically administering active drugs has attracted considerable interest, since the creation of novel drugs capable of diffusing through the skin would provide a great step towards easily applicable -and more humane- therapeutic solutions. However, for drugs to be able to diffuse, they necessarily have to cross a permeability barrier: the stratum corneum (SC), the uppermost set of skin layers. The precise mechanism by which drugs penetrate the skin is generally thought to be diffusion of molecules through this set of layers following a "tortuous pathway" around corneocytes, i.e. impermeable dead cells. Results In this work, we simulate water transport and drug diffusion using a three-dimensional porous media model. Our numerical simulations show that diffusion takes place through the SC regardless of the direction and magnitude of the fluid pressure gradient, while the magnitude of the concentrations calculated are consistent with experimental studies. Conclusions Our results support the possibility for designing arbitrary drugs capable of diffusing through the skin, the time-delivery of which is solely restricted by their diffusion and solubility properties. PMID:20716360

  7. From Sequential Extraction to Transport Modeling: Monitored Natural Attenuation as a Remediation Approach for Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Crapse, Kimberly P.; Serkiz, Steven M.; Pishko, Adrian L.; Kaplan, Daniel L.; Lee, Cindy M.; Schank, Anja

    2005-08-18

    To quantify metal natural attenuation processes in terms of environmental availability, sequential extraction experiments were carried out on subsurface soil samples impacted by a low pH, high sulfate, metals (Be, Ni, U, As) plume associated with the long-term operation of a coal plant at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Despite significant heterogeneity resulting both from natural and anthropogenic factors, sequential extraction results demonstrate that pH is a controlling factor in the prediction of the distribution of metal contaminants within the solid phases in soils at the site as well as the contaminant partitioning between the soil and the soil solution. Results for beryllium, the most mobile metal evaluated, exhibit increasing attenuation along the plume flow path which corresponds to an increasing plume pH. These laboratory- and field-scale studies provide mechanistic information regarding partitioning of metals to soils at the site (one of the major attenuation mechanisms for the metals at the field site). Subsequently, these data have been used in the definition of the contaminant source terms and contaminant transport factors in risk modeling for the site.

  8. Non-equilibrium STLS approach to transport properties of single impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezai, Raheleh; Ebrahimi, Farshad

    2014-04-01

    In this work, using the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we study the effects of the electron-electron interaction and the electron-spin correlation on the non-equilibrium Kondo effect and the transport properties of the symmetric single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) at zero temperature by generalizing the self-consistent method of Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjolander (STLS) for a single-band tight-binding model with Hubbard type interaction to out of equilibrium steady-states. We at first determine in a self-consistent manner the non-equilibrium spin correlation function, the effective Hubbard interaction, and the double-occupancy at the impurity site. Then, using the non-equilibrium STLS spin polarization function in the non-equilibrium formalism of the iterative perturbation theory (IPT) of Yosida and Yamada, and Horvatic and Zlatic, we compute the spectral density, the current-voltage characteristics and the differential conductance as functions of the applied bias and the strength of on-site Hubbard interaction. We compare our spectral densities at zero bias with the results of numerical renormalization group (NRG) and depict the effects of the electron-electron interaction and electron-spin correlation at the impurity site on the aforementioned properties by comparing our numerical result with the order U2 IPT. Finally, we show that the obtained numerical results on the differential conductance have a quadratic universal scaling behavior and the resulting Kondo temperature shows an exponential behavior.

  9. Risk assessment of nitrate transport through subsurface layers and groundwater using experimental and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Alslaibi, Tamer M; Abunada, Ziyad; Abu Amr, Salem S; Abustan, Ismail

    2017-09-22

    Landfills are one of the main point sources of groundwater pollution. This research mainly aims to assess the risk of nitrate [Formula: see text] transport from the unlined landfill to subsurface layers and groundwater using experimental results and the SESOIL model. Samples from 12 groundwater wells downstream of the landfill were collected and analyzed in 2008, 21 years after the landfill construction. The average [Formula: see text] concentration in the wells was 54 mg/L, slightly higher than the World Health Organization ([Formula: see text] 50 mg/L) standards. SESOIL model was used to predict the [Formula: see text] concentration at the bottom of the unsaturated zone. Results indicated that the current mean [Formula: see text] concentration at the bottom of the unsaturated zone is 75 mg/L. the model predicted that the level of NO3 will increased up to 325 mg/L within 30 years. Accordingly, the [Formula: see text] concentration in groundwater wells near the landfill area is expected to gradually increase with time. Although the current risk associated with the [Formula: see text] level might not be harm to adults, however, it might pose severe risks to both adults and infants in the near future due to [Formula: see text] leaching. Urgent mitigation measures such as final cell cover (cap), lining system and vertical expansion should be considered at the landfill to protect the public health in the area.

  10. Occurrence, transport, and fate of trace elements, Blue River Basin, Summit County, Colorado: an integrated approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.; Driver, N.E.; Bails, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    Mining activities in the Blue River Basin, Summit County, Colorado, have affected the trace-element chemistry and biota along French Gulch and the Blue River. Elevated concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn were present in the bed and suspended sediments. Bed sediment trace-element concentrations were high in the streams in and near mining activities in the basin and remained high as water flowed into Dillon Reservoir about 3.5 km downstream. Bed-sediment (< 63 μm) data were useful in assessing the distribution of trace elements in the basin. Suspended-sediment measurements provided information as to the transport of the trace elements. Filtered (< 0.45 μm) water-column trace-element concentrations were orders of magnitude less than the sediment concentrations. Concentrations of Cd and Zn in the water column at some sites exceeded stream water-quality standards. Elevated trace-element concentrations in the sediment and water column are a source of contamination and must be considered in water-quality management of the Blue River Basin.

  11. Transport coefficient to trace anomaly in the clustering of color sources approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias de Deus, J.; Hirsch, A. S.; Pajares, C.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Srivastava, B. K.

    2016-02-01

    From our previously obtained shear viscosity to entropy density ratio (η /s ) in the framework of clustering of color sources (the color string percolation model, CSPM), we calculate the jet quenching parameter q ̂ and trace anomaly Δ =(ɛ -3 p ) /T4 as a function of temperature. It is shown that the scaled q ̂/T3 is in agreement with the recent JET Collaboration estimates. The inverse of η /s is found to represent Δ . The results for Δ are in excellent agreement with lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) simulations. From the trace anomaly and energy density ɛ , the equation of state is obtained as a function of temperature and compared with LQCD simulations. It is possible that there is a direct connection between the η /s and Δ . Thus the estimate of transport coefficient η /s provides q ̂ and Δ as a function of temperature. Both Δ and η /s describe the transition from a strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (QGP) to a weakly coupled QGP.

  12. Metabolic Control of Type 2 Diabetes by Targeting the GLUT4 Glucose Transporter: Intervention Approaches.

    PubMed

    Alam, Fahmida; Islam, Md Asiful; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the most common form of diabetes, is characterized by insulin resistance in the hepatic and peripheral tissues. Glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) plays a major role in the pathophysiology of T2DM. Its defective expression or translocation to the peripheral cell plasma membrane in T2DM patients hinders the entrance of glucose into the cell for energy production. In addition to suitable drugs, an appropriate diet and/or exercise can be implemented to target the increase in GLUT4 expression, GLUT4 concentrations and GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface when managing the glucose metabolism of T2DM patients. In this review, we discussed successful intervention strategies that were individually administered or coupled with diet and/or exercise and affected the expression and translocation of GLUT4 in T2DM while reducing the excess glucose load from the blood. Additionally, some potentially good synthetic and natural compounds, which can activate the insulin-independent GLUT4 signaling pathways for the efficient management of T2DM, are highlighted as possible targets or emerging alternative sources for future anti-diabetic drug development.

  13. A Phosphorus Index that Combines Critical Source Areas and Transport Pathways using a Travel Time Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, B. P.; Walter, T.; Shaw, S. B.; Easton, Z. M.

    2012-12-01

    Spatially distributed nonpoint source (NPS) pollution indices are used to identify areas in a watershed where potential pollutant loading coincides with runoff generating areas. However, most such indices either ignore the degree of hydrologic connectivity to the stream network or they estimate it based simply on the distance of the pollution generating area from an open channel. We propose an NPS pollution index based on runoff travel times from saturated variable source areas (VSA) to the natural stream network as a means for including hydrologic connectivity between source areas and streams. Although this method could be generalized to any pollutant transported by storm runoff, here we focus on phosphorus and refer to the index as the travel-time phosphorus index (TTPI). The TTPI was applied to a 38 km2 agricultural watershed in central New York and shown to yield realistic, spatially explicit predictions of critical phosphorus loading areas and routing pathways. One interesting finding is the potential role of man-made drainage networks (e.g., road- or agricultural-ditches) in NPS pollution and the possibilities of targeting water quality protection practices around or within these networks. Because the technique is GIS-based, relatively simple to apply, uses readily available geospatial data, and the theoretical underpinnings are transparent, it can provide a useful screening tool for water resource managers charged with the identification and remediation of critical NPS pollution source areas.

  14. A phosphorus index that combines critical source areas and transport pathways using a travel time approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Brian P.; Archibald, Josephine A.; Easton, Zachary M.; Shaw, Stephen B.; Schneider, Rebecca L.; Todd Walter, M.

    2013-04-01

    SummarySpatially distributed nonpoint source (NPS) pollution indices are used to identify areas in a watershed where potential pollutant loading coincides with runoff generating areas. However, most such indices either ignore the degree of hydrologic connectivity to the stream network or they estimate it based simply on the distance of the pollution generating area from an open channel. We propose an NPS pollution index based on runoff travel times from saturated variable source areas (VSAs) to the natural stream network as a means for including hydrologic connectivity between source areas and streams. Although this method could be generalized to any pollutant transported by storm runoff, here we focus on phosphorus and refer to the index as the travel-time phosphorus index (TTPI). The TTPI was applied to a 38 km2 agricultural watershed in central New York and shown to yield realistic, spatially explicit predictions of critical phosphorus loading areas and routing pathways. One interesting finding is the potential role of man-made drainage networks (e.g., road- or agricultural-ditches) in NPS pollution and the possibilities of targeting water quality protection practices around or within these networks. Because the technique is GIS-based, relatively simple to apply, uses readily available geospatial data, and the theoretical underpinnings are transparent, it can provide a useful screening tool for water resource managers charged with the identification and remediation of critical NPS pollution source areas.

  15. Systematic study of the elliptic flow parameter using a transport approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasim, Md.; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2015-04-01

    Elliptic flow parameter, v2 is considered as a sensitive probe for early dynamics of the heavy-ion collision. In this work, we have discussed the effect of detector efficiency, procedure of centrality determination, effect of resonance decay and the procedure to correct event plane resolution on the measured v2 by standard event plane method within the framework of a transport model. The measured value of v2 depends on the efficiency in particle number counting by the detector. The effect of centrality determination is found to be negligible. The new method of event plane resolution correction for wide centrality bin yields results in v2 values closer to the true value of the v2. The contributions from the resonance decay seems to decrease the value of v2 of π and K within the Ultra relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) model based calculation. We also propose a procedure to correct for an event bias effect on v2 arising while comparing the minimum bias collision centrality v2 values for different multi-strange hadrons. Finally, we have presented a model based confirmation of the recently proposed relation between v2 obtained using event plane method and scalar product method to the true value of v2.

  16. Transport properties of liquid para-hydrogen: The path integral centroid molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru; Kinugawa, Kenichi

    2003-11-01

    Several fundamental transport properties of a quantum liquid para-hydrogen (p-H2) at 17 K have been numerically evaluated by means of the quantum dynamics simulation called the path integral centroid molecular dynamics (CMD). For comparison, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have also been performed under the same condition. In accordance with the previous path integral simulations, the calculated static properties of the liquid agree well with the experimental results. For the diffusion coefficient, thermal conductivity, and shear viscosity, the CMD predicts the values closer to the experimental ones though the classical MD results are far from the reality. The agreement of the CMD result with the experimental one is especially good for the shear viscosity with the difference less than 5%. The calculated diffusion coefficient and the thermal conductivity agree with the experimental values at least in the same order. We predict that the ratio of bulk viscosity to shear viscosity for liquid p-H2 is much larger than classical van der Waals simple liquids such as rare gas liquids.

  17. What is geological entropy and why measure it? A parsimonious approach for predicting transport behaviour in heterogeneous aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Marco; Pedretti, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    We present an approach to predict non-Fickian transport behaviour in alluvial aquifers from knowledge of physical heterogeneity. This parsimonious approach is based on only two measurable parameters describing the global variability and the structure of the hydraulic conductivity (K) field: the variance of the ln(K) values (σY 2), and a newly developed index of geological entropy (HR), based on the concept of Shannon information entropy. Both σY 2 and HR can be obtained from data collected during conventional hydrogeological investigations and from the analysis of a representative model of the spatial distribution of K classes (e.g. hydrofacies) over the domain of interest. The new index HR integrates multiple characteristics of the K field, including the presence of well-connected features, into a unique metric that quantifies the degrees of spatial disorder in the K field structure. Stochastic simulations of tracer tests in synthetic K fields based on realistic distributions of hydrofacies in alluvial aquifers are conducted to identify empirical relations between HR, σY 2, and the first three central temporal moments of the resulting breakthrough curves (BTCs). Results indicate that the first and second moments tend to increase with spatial disorder (i.e, HR increasing). Conversely, high values of the third moment (i.e. skewness), which indicate significant post-peak tailing in the BTCs and non-Fickian transport behaviour, are observed in more orderly structures (i.e, HR decreasing), or for very high σY 2 values. We show that simple closed-form empirical expressions can be derived to describe the bivariate dependency between the skewness of the BTC and corresponding pairs of HR and σY 2. This dependency shows clear correlation for a broad range of structures and Kvariability levels. Therefore, it provides an effective and broadly applicable approach to explain and predict non-Fickian transport in real aquifers, such as those at the well-known MADE site and

  18. Integrated modeling approach for fate and transport of submerged oil and oil-particle aggregates in a freshwater riverine environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, Faith A.; Johnson, Rex; Zhu, Zhenduo; Waterman, David; McCulloch, Richard D.; Hayter, Earl; Garcia, Marcelo H.; Boufadel, Michel C.; Dekker, Timothy; Hassan, Jacob S.; Soong, David T.; Hoard, Christopher J.; Lee, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The Enbridge Line 6B pipeline release of diluted bitumen into the Kalamazoo River downstream of Marshall, Michigan, U.S.A., in July 2010 was one of the largest oil spills into freshwater in North American history. A portion of the oil interacted with river sediment and submerged requiring the development and implementation of new approaches for detection and recovery of oil mixed with river sediment. Hydrodynamic and sediment transport modeling became an integral part of containment and recovery operations for decision support about the potential fate and migration of submerged oil and oiled sediment. Three models were developed for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to cover a range of spatial scales of interest to onsite operations. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic and sediment transport models from the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code and the sediment bed model SEDZLJ1 were used to simulate potential resuspension, migration, and deposition of submerged oil and oiled sediment along a 38-mile reach of the Kalamazoo River affected by the oil from Marshall to Kalamazoo. An algorithm was added to SEDZLJ to represent three additional particle size classes of oilparticle aggregates (OPAs) with a range of sizes, specific gravities, and settling velocities. Field and laboratory experiments and flume tests were done to support the numerical modeling of OPAs. A three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was developed to simulate hydrodynamics and OPA tracking through Morrow Lake, the most downstream impoundment. This model incorporated wind and dam operations into high and low flow, lake drawdown, and containment simulations. Finally, a 2D unstructured grid model, HydroSed2D, was used to simulate flows and sediment transport along 1- to 2-mile segments of the Kalamazoo River around islands and through side channels and backwater areas that are particularly prone to submerged oil deposition.Integrated models could be developed quickly due to the availability of

  19. Restored glial glutamate transporter EAAT2 function as a potential therapeutic approach for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kou; Kong, Qiongman; Stouffer, Nathan; Schulte, Delanie A.; Lai, Liching; Liu, Qibing; Chang, Ling-Chu; Dominguez, Sky; Xing, Xuechao; Cuny, Gregory D.; Hodgetts, Kevin J.; Glicksman, Marcie A.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic systems play a critical role in cognitive functions and are known to be defective in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. Previous literature has indicated that glial glutamate transporter EAAT2 plays an essential role in cognitive functions and that loss of EAAT2 protein is a common phenomenon observed in AD patients and animal models. In the current study, we investigated whether restored EAAT2 protein and function could benefit cognitive functions and pathology in APPSw,Ind mice, an animal model of AD. A transgenic mouse approach via crossing EAAT2 transgenic mice with APPSw,Ind. mice and a pharmacological approach using a novel EAAT2 translational activator, LDN/OSU-0212320, were conducted. Findings from both approaches demonstrated that restored EAAT2 protein function significantly improved cognitive functions, restored synaptic integrity, and reduced amyloid plaques. Importantly, the observed benefits were sustained one month after compound treatment cessation, suggesting that EAAT2 is a potential disease modifier with therapeutic potential for AD. PMID:25711212

  20. A graded approach to flow and transport modeling to support decommissioning activities at the Savannah river site.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Kenneth L; Lee, Patricia L; Flach, Gregory P

    2008-05-01

    A graded approach to flow and transport modeling has been used as a cost effective solution to evaluating potential groundwater risk in support of Deactivation and Decommissioning activities at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. This approach balances modeling complexity with potential risk and has been successfully used at SRS to reduce costs and accelerate schedule without compromising human health or the environment. The approach incorporates both simple spreadsheet calculations (i.e., screening models) and complex numerical modeling to evaluate the threat to human health posed by contaminants leaching from decommissioned concrete building slabs. Simple spreadsheet calculations were used to produce generic slab concentration limits for a suite of radiological and non-radiological contaminants for a chemical separations area at SRS. These limits, which are based upon the United States Environmental Protection Agency Soil Screening Guidance, were used to eliminate most building slabs from further risk assessment, thereby limiting the time and associated cost of the more rigorous assessment to higher risk facilities. Of the more than 58 facilities located in the area, to date only one slab has been found to have a contaminant concentration in excess of the area specific slab limit. For this slab, a more rigorous numerical modeling effort was undertaken which eliminated some of the simplifying and conservative assumptions inherent in the spreadsheet calculations. Results from the more sophisticated numerical model show that the remaining contaminant of concern would not likely impact groundwater above drinking water standards.

  1. A Systematic Approach for Developing Conceptual Models of Contaminant Transport at the Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, C. J.; Last, G. V.; Rohay, V. J.; Schelling, F. J.; Hildebrand, R. D.; Morse, J. G.

    2004-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) faces many decisions regarding future remedial actions and waste disposal at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. To support these decisions, DOE recognized the need for a comprehensive and systematic approach to developing and documenting complete, consistent, and defensible conceptual models of contaminant release and migration. After reviewing existing conceptual model development methodologies that might be applicable to environmental assessments at the Hanford Site, DOE initiated efforts to adapt and implement the Features, Events, and Processes (FEP) methodology developed for use in performance assessments of nuclear waste disposal systems by NIREX. In adapting this methodology for use in the environmental assessments at Hanford, the international list of FEPs, compiled from nuclear waste disposal programs, was evaluated to develop a list of potentially relevant Hanford-specific FEPs. The international nuclear waste programs focus on deep geologic disposal while waste disposal at the Hanford Site involves burial in shallow unconsolidated geologic deposits. Thus, a graphical tool called the Process Relationship Diagram (PRD) was created to assist in identifying the international FEPs and additional factors that are relevant to Hanford, and to illustrate the relationships among these factors. The PRD is similar in form and function to the Master Directed Diagram used by NIREX to provide a visual and systematic structure for the FEP methodology. Adaptation of this approach is showing promise in facilitating the development of conceptual models and selection of relevant factors to be incorporated into environmental uncertainty assessments for the Hanford Site.

  2. Effect of biodiversity on shallow groundwater: Vertical chloride transport modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessema, S. G.

    2011-12-01

    Studies show that positive relationship between biomass production and species richness (plant diversity).Water is one of the most important requirements for biomass production, and different plant diversity (species/functional richness) also have different consumption pattern and this patterns are not much studied. During water stress (summer season in our case) water consumption efficiency and consumption pattern is important. Our objective is to study the upward flow pattern of water using chloride measurement in the soil profile of plots with different plant diversity during water stress. We assumed that chloride is easily mobile, conservative and only affected by advective transport of water.Our hypothesis is that, different plots with different diversity level accumulate chloride near the surface differently. We measured the soil water chloride concentration at 10, 20, 30 and 60cm depths in plots of diversity levels 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 species and compared. We used evapotranspiration and precipitation to find out the time when the net flow is upward. Plots which contain some functional groups and more diverse species resulted in accumulation of chloride near the surface of the of the soil. Plots with legumes and tall herbs resulted in more chloride accumulation near the surface than plots with grasses and short herbs. We have also observed that plots with higher diversity tend to accumulate more chloride near the surface. We conclude from this that, plots with deep roots, and plots with combination of deep and shallow roots are capable of stress resistance as they can pull up water from the shallow groundwater. Plots without deep roots could not accumulate chloride even if they were more diversified.

  3. Spatio-temporal analyses of sediment transport processes in an alpine catchment a scales oriented approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, S.; Habersack, H. M.

    2003-04-01

    Increasing morphological problems are being encountered with water courses in Austria, related to the impacts of sediment regime with lack and surplus of material. River bed degradation and aggradation are enhanced by human intervention. On a scaling perspective the boundary conditions and major processes in a catchment, like the geomorphological setting, are given by longterm developments. On the basis of field mapping these effects are discusssed with respect to sediment availability, being affected e. g. by deep-seated gravitational slope deformations and slope creeping. Within these longterm processes, short-term unsteady sediment supply, erosion, transfer, deposition and remobilisation processes determine catchment sedimentation and management. At the moment the analysis of sediment regime is restricted to specific scales. Measurements of sediment transport are performed at limited spatial scales of a few meters or even individual points. These measurements are often not typical for the whole vertical or the whole cross section.