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Sample records for official american thoracic

  1. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: tobacco control initiatives within the American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Wewers, Mary Ellen; Bailey, William C; Carlsen, Kai-Häkon; Eisner, Mark D; Folan, Patricia; Heath, Janie; Klinnert, Mary D; Kovesi, Tom; Pien, Grace W; Reichart, Virginia C; Talwar, Arunabh; Thompson, Katherine

    2010-02-01

    Cigarette smoking represents the single most preventable cause of premature morbidity and mortality in the United States and the burden of tobacco use is apparent world-wide. Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the third leading cause of death in the United States in 2004. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and its members have contributed significantly to an understanding of the biological and pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for the development and management of tobacco-attributable disease and disability. The society's active involvement in tobacco control advocacy and policy-related initiatives are central to its mission. Within the ATS, there is also increased interest in accelerating the society's efforts to understand the mechanisms responsible for the uptake, persistence, and cessation of tobacco use. Scientific, clinical, and educational activities that include an examination of these underlying mechanisms are warranted. This paper describes findings from an ATS initiative that developed a preliminary strategy for enhancing scientific, clinical, educational, and policy-related tobacco control efforts that are consistent with the vision of the ATS. The specific aims of this project included the identification of existing mechanisms, as well as the current governance in place within the ATS infrastructure, to address tobacco control issues related to scientific inquiry, policy initiatives, and advocacy for tobacco control. This assessment generated recommendations to inform the ATS leadership with regard to the future development of relevant tobacco control initiatives.

  2. An official American Thoracic Society Policy statement: managing conflict of interest in professional societies.

    PubMed

    Schünemann, Holger J; Osborne, Molly; Moss, Joel; Manthous, Constantine; Wagner, Gregory; Sicilian, Leonard; Ohar, Jill; McDermott, Shane; Lucas, Lance; Jaeschke, Roman

    2009-09-15

    Competing interests occur frequently in health care. This results in the potential for conflict of interest (COI). COI can lead to biased generation or assessment of evidence and misinform healthcare decision makers. Declaration of COI is insufficient to neutralize potentially harmful effects. Medical professional societies are obliged to develop robust mechanisms to "manage" COI, particularly in the development of official guidance documents that affect health care. This document describes the background, methods, and content of the new "American Thoracic Society (ATS) Policy on Management of COI in Official ATS Documents, Projects, and Conferences." We used existing reviews on COI policies that were prepared for the World Health Organization and for an ATS guideline methodology workshop as the evidence base for this work. We reviewed existing policies of selected organizations and other relevant literature. Members of the ATS Documents Development and Implementation Committee and the ATS Ethics and COI Committee collaborated to draft a COI policy. We used face-to-face meetings, electronic correspondence, and teleconferences to finalize the draft. The policy then underwent review and ultimate approval by the ATS Board of Directors. The ATS developed a new policy and procedures for declaration and management of COI. These procedures include: (1) self declaration of COI, (2) review of potential participants' COI, (3) disclosure of COI to project participants, (4) refusal or excusal from certain decisions or recommendations when appropriate, (5) disclosure of COI to users of documents or attendees of conferences, (6) handling disputes in COI resolution. This policy includes a tool that may be useful for supporting decision makers in management of COIs as they assess the value and relevance of conflicts. The ATS Policy on Management of COI in Official ATS Documents, Projects, and Conferences, in effect since March 2008, promises greater organizational transparency

  3. An Official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Policy Statement

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Daniel R.; Diamond, Edward; Fan, Vincent S.; Maurer, Janet R.; Mularski, Richard A.; Peters, Jay I.; Halpern, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    The American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation’s Choosing Wisely campaign aims to curb health-care costs and improve patient care by soliciting lists from medical societies of the top five tests or treatments in their specialty that are used too frequently and inappropriately. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and American College of Chest Physicians created a joint task force, which produced a top five list for adult pulmonary medicine. Our top five recommendations, which were approved by the executive committees of the ATS and American College of Chest Physicians and published by Choosing Wisely in October 2013, are as follows: (1) Do not perform CT scan surveillance for evaluation of indeterminate pulmonary nodules at more frequent intervals or for a longer period of time than recommended by established guidelines; (2) do not routinely offer pharmacologic treatment with advanced vasoactive agents approved only for the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension to patients with pulmonary hypertension resulting from left heart disease or hypoxemic lung diseases (groups II or III pulmonary hypertension); (3) for patients recently discharged on supplemental home oxygen following hospitalization for an acute illness, do not renew the prescription without assessing the patient for ongoing hypoxemia; (4) do not perform chest CT angiography to evaluate for possible pulmonary embolism in patients with a low clinical probability and negative results of a highly sensitive D-dimer assay; (5) do not perform CT scan screening for lung cancer among patients at low risk for lung cancer. We hope pulmonologists will use these recommendations to stimulate frank discussions with patients about when these tests and treatments are indicated—and when they are not. PMID:24889436

  4. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: research questions in COPD.

    PubMed

    Celli, Bartolome R; Decramer, Marc; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wilson, Kevin C; Agustí, Alvar; Criner, Gerard J; MacNee, William; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Stockley, Robert A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Barnes, Peter J; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Calverley, Peter M; Casanova, Ciro; Clini, Enrico M; Cooper, Christopher B; Coxson, Harvey O; Dusser, Daniel J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Fahy, Bonnie; Ferguson, Gary T; Fisher, Andrew; Fletcher, Monica J; Hayot, Maurice; Hurst, John R; Jones, Paul W; Mahler, Donald A; Maltais, François; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Miravitlles, Marc; Meek, Paula M; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Roche, Nicolas; Sciurba, Frank C; Sethi, Sanjay; Siafakas, Nikos; Sin, Don D; Soriano, Joan B; Stoller, James K; Tashkin, Donald P; Troosters, Thierry; Verleden, Geert M; Verschakelen, Johny; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John W; Washko, George R; Wise, Robert A; Wouters, Emiel F M; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) research statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes.

  5. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: research questions in COPD.

    PubMed

    Celli, Bartolome R; Decramer, Marc; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wilson, Kevin C; Agustí, Alvar A; Criner, Gerard J; MacNee, William; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Stockley, Robert A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Barnes, Peter J; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Calverley, Peter M; Casanova, Ciro; Clini, Enrico M; Cooper, Christopher B; Coxson, Harvey O; Dusser, Daniel J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Fahy, Bonnie; Ferguson, Gary T; Fisher, Andrew; Fletcher, Monica J; Hayot, Maurice; Hurst, John R; Jones, Paul W; Mahler, Donald A; Maltais, François; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Miravitlles, Marc; Meek, Paula M; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Roche, Nicolas; Sciurba, Frank C; Sethi, Sanjay; Siafakas, Nikos; Sin, Don D; Soriano, Joan B; Stoller, James K; Tashkin, Donald P; Troosters, Thierry; Verleden, Geert M; Verschakelen, Johny; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John W; Washko, George R; Wise, Robert A; Wouters, Emiel F M; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Research Statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment, and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes.

  6. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: assessment and palliative management of dyspnea crisis.

    PubMed

    Mularski, Richard A; Reinke, Lynn F; Carrieri-Kohlman, Virginia; Fischer, Mark D; Campbell, Margaret L; Rocker, Graeme; Schneidman, Ann; Jacobs, Susan S; Arnold, Robert; Benditt, Joshua O; Booth, Sara; Byock, Ira; Chan, Garrett K; Curtis, J Randall; Donesky, Doranne; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Heffner, John; Klein, Russell; Limberg, Trina M; Manning, Harold L; Morrison, R Sean; Ries, Andrew L; Schmidt, Gregory A; Selecky, Paul A; Truog, Robert D; Wang, Angela C C; White, Douglas B

    2013-10-01

    In 2009, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) funded an assembly project, Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis, to focus on identification, management, and optimal resource utilization for effective palliation of acute episodes of dyspnea. We conducted a comprehensive search of the medical literature and evaluated available evidence from systematic evidence-based reviews (SEBRs) using a modified AMSTAR approach and then summarized the palliative management knowledge base for participants to use in discourse at a 2009 ATS workshop. We used an informal consensus process to develop a working definition of this novel entity and established an Ad Hoc Committee on Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis to further develop an official ATS document on the topic. The Ad Hoc Committee members defined dyspnea crisis as "sustained and severe resting breathing discomfort that occurs in patients with advanced, often life-limiting illness and overwhelms the patient and caregivers' ability to achieve symptom relief." Dyspnea crisis can occur suddenly and is characteristically without a reversible etiology. The workshop participants focused on dyspnea crisis management for patients in whom the goals of care are focused on palliation and for whom endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are not consistent with articulated preferences. However, approaches to dyspnea crisis may also be appropriate for patients electing life-sustaining treatment. The Ad Hoc Committee developed a Workshop Report concerning assessment of dyspnea crisis; ethical and professional considerations; efficient utilization, communication, and care coordination; clinical management of dyspnea crisis; development of patient education and provider aid products; and enhancing implementation with audit and quality improvement.

  7. An official European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society research statement: interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Aryeh; Antoniou, Katerina M; Brown, Kevin K; Cadranel, Jacques; Corte, Tamera J; du Bois, Roland M; Lee, Joyce S; Leslie, Kevin O; Lynch, David A; Matteson, Eric L; Mosca, Marta; Noth, Imre; Richeldi, Luca; Strek, Mary E; Swigris, Jeffrey J; Wells, Athol U; West, Sterling G; Collard, Harold R; Cottin, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Many patients with an idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) have clinical features that suggest an underlying autoimmune process but do not meet established criteria for a connective tissue disease (CTD). Researchers have proposed differing criteria and terms to describe these patients, and lack of consensus over nomenclature and classification limits the ability to conduct prospective studies of a uniform cohort.The "European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society Task Force on Undifferentiated Forms of Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease" was formed to create consensus regarding the nomenclature and classification criteria for patients with IIP and features of autoimmunity.The task force proposes the term "interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features" (IPAF) and offers classification criteria organised around the presence of a combination of features from three domains: a clinical domain consisting of specific extra-thoracic features, a serologic domain consisting of specific autoantibodies, and a morphologic domain consisting of specific chest imaging, histopathologic or pulmonary physiologic features.A designation of IPAF should be used to identify individuals with IIP and features suggestive of, but not definitive for, a CTD. With IPAF, a sound platform has been provided from which to launch the requisite future research investigations of a more uniform cohort. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  8. Official American Thoracic Society technical standards: flexible airway endoscopy in children.

    PubMed

    Faro, Albert; Wood, Robert E; Schechter, Michael S; Leong, Albin B; Wittkugel, Eric; Abode, Kathy; Chmiel, James F; Daines, Cori; Davis, Stephanie; Eber, Ernst; Huddleston, Charles; Kilbaugh, Todd; Kurland, Geoffrey; Midulla, Fabio; Molter, David; Montgomery, Gregory S; Retsch-Bogart, George; Rutter, Michael J; Visner, Gary; Walczak, Stephen A; Ferkol, Thomas W; Michelson, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    Flexible airway endoscopy (FAE) is an accepted and frequently performed procedure in the evaluation of children with known or suspected airway and lung parenchymal disorders. However, published technical standards on how to perform FAE in children are lacking. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) approved the formation of a multidisciplinary committee to delineate technical standards for performing FAE in children. The committee completed a pragmatic synthesis of the evidence and used the evidence synthesis to answer clinically relevant questions. There is a paucity of randomized controlled trials in pediatric FAE. The committee developed recommendations based predominantly on the collective clinical experience of our committee members highlighting the importance of FAE-specific airway management techniques and anesthesia, establishing suggested competencies for the bronchoscopist in training, and defining areas deserving further investigation. These ATS-sponsored technical standards describe the equipment, personnel, competencies, and special procedures associated with FAE in children.

  9. Official American Thoracic Society technical standards: spirometry in the occupational setting.

    PubMed

    Redlich, Carrie A; Tarlo, Susan M; Hankinson, John L; Townsend, Mary C; Eschenbacher, William L; Von Essen, Susanna G; Sigsgaard, Torben; Weissman, David N

    2014-04-15

    This document addresses aspects of the performance and interpretation of spirometry that are particularly important in the workplace, where inhalation exposures can affect lung function and cause or exacerbate lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or fibrosis. Issues that previous American Thoracic Society spirometry statements did not adequately address with respect to the workplace were identified for systematic review. Medline 1950-2012 and Embase 1980-2012 were searched for evidence related to the following: training for spirometry technicians; testing posture; appropriate reference values to use for Asians in North America; and interpretative strategies for analyzing longitudinal change in lung function. The evidence was reviewed and technical recommendations were developed. Spirometry performed in the work setting should be part of a comprehensive workplace respiratory health program. Effective technician training and feedback can improve the quality of spirometry testing. Posture-related changes in FEV1 and FVC, although small, may impact interpretation, so testing posture should be kept consistent and documented on repeat testing. Until North American Asian-specific equations are developed, applying a correction factor of 0.88 to white reference values is considered reasonable when testing Asian American individuals in North America. Current spirometry should be compared with previous tests. Excessive loss in FEV1 over time should be evaluated using either a percentage decline (15% plus loss expected due to aging) or one of the other approaches discussed, taking into consideration testing variability, worker exposures, symptoms, and other clinical information. Important aspects of workplace spirometry are discussed and recommendations are provided for the performance and interpretation of workplace spirometry.

  10. An American Thoracic Society Official Research Statement: Future Directions in Lung Fibrosis Research.

    PubMed

    White, Eric S; Borok, Zea; Brown, Kevin K; Eickelberg, Oliver; Guenther, Andreas; Jenkins, R Gisli; Kolb, Martin; Martinez, Fernando J; Roman, Jesse; Sime, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis encompasses a group of lung-scarring disorders that occur owing to known or unknown insults and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality. Despite intense investigation spanning decades, much remains to be learned about the natural history, pathophysiology, and biologic mechanisms of disease. To identify the most pressing research needs in the lung fibrosis community and to provide a roadmap of priorities to investigators, funding agencies, patient advocacy groups, and other interested stakeholders. An ad hoc international working group of the American Thoracic Society with experience in clinical, translational, and bench-based research in fibrotic lung diseases was convened. The group used an iterative consensus process to identify successes and challenges in pulmonary fibrosis research. The group identified five main priority areas in which substantial resources should be invested to advance our understanding and to develop novel therapies for patients with pulmonary fibrosis. These priorities include develop newer models of human lung fibrosis, engage current and new stakeholders to provide sustained funding for the initiatives, create a global infrastructure for storing patient-derived materials, establish collaborative preclinical and clinical research networks in fibrotic lung disease, and create a global lung fibrosis initiative that unites these multifaceted efforts into a single virtual umbrella structure. Despite recent advances in the treatment of some forms of lung fibrosis, many gaps in knowledge about natural history, pathophysiology, and treatment remain. Investment in the research priorities enumerated above will help address these shortcomings and enhance patient care worldwide.

  11. An official American Thoracic Society policy statement: managing conscientious objections in intensive care medicine.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Newby, Mithya; Wicclair, Mark; Pope, Thaddeus; Rushton, Cynda; Curlin, Farr; Diekema, Douglas; Durrer, Debbie; Ehlenbach, William; Gibson-Scipio, Wanda; Glavan, Bradford; Langer, Rabbi Levi; Manthous, Constantine; Rose, Cecile; Scardella, Anthony; Shanawani, Hasan; Siegel, Mark D; Halpern, Scott D; Truog, Robert D; White, Douglas B

    2015-01-15

    Intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians sometimes have a conscientious objection (CO) to providing or disclosing information about a legal, professionally accepted, and otherwise available medical service. There is little guidance about how to manage COs in ICUs. To provide clinicians, hospital administrators, and policymakers with recommendations for managing COs in the critical care setting. This policy statement was developed by a multidisciplinary expert committee using an iterative process with a diverse working group representing adult medicine, pediatrics, nursing, patient advocacy, bioethics, philosophy, and law. The policy recommendations are based on the dual goals of protecting patients' access to medical services and protecting the moral integrity of clinicians. Conceptually, accommodating COs should be considered a "shield" to protect individual clinicians' moral integrity rather than as a "sword" to impose clinicians' judgments on patients. The committee recommends that: (1) COs in ICUs be managed through institutional mechanisms, (2) institutions accommodate COs, provided doing so will not impede a patient's or surrogate's timely access to medical services or information or create excessive hardships for other clinicians or the institution, (3) a clinician's CO to providing potentially inappropriate or futile medical services should not be considered sufficient justification to forgo the treatment against the objections of the patient or surrogate, and (4) institutions promote open moral dialogue and foster a culture that respects diverse values in the critical care setting. This American Thoracic Society statement provides guidance for clinicians, hospital administrators, and policymakers to address clinicians' COs in the critical care setting.

  12. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: Climate change and human health.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, Kent E; Rom, William N; Akpinar-Elci, Muge; Balmes, John R; Bayram, Hasan; Brandli, Otto; Hollingsworth, John W; Kinney, Patrick L; Margolis, Helene G; Martin, William J; Sasser, Erika N; Smith, Kirk R; Takaro, Tim K

    2012-03-01

    This document presents the proceedings from the American Thoracic Society Climate Change and Respiratory Health Workshop that was held on May 15, 2010, in New Orleans, Louisiana. The purpose of the one-day meeting was to address the threat to global respiratory health posed by climate change. Domestic and international experts as well as representatives of international respiratory societies and key U.S. federal agencies convened to identify necessary research questions concerning climate change and respiratory health and appropriate mechanisms and infrastructure needs for answering these questions. After much discussion, a breakout group compiled 27 recommendations for physicians, researchers, and policy makers. These recommendations are listed under main issues that the workshop participants deemed of key importance to respiratory health. Issues include the following: (1) the health impacts of climate change, with specific focus on the effect of heat waves, air pollution, and natural cycles; (2) mitigation and adaptation measures to be taken, with special emphasis on recommendations for the clinical and research community; (3) recognition of challenges specific to low-resource countries when coping with respiratory health and climate change; and (4) priority research infrastructure needs, with special discussion of international needs for cooperating with present and future environmental monitoring and alert systems.

  13. An Official American Thoracic Society Statement: The Importance of Healthy Sleep. Recommendations and Future Priorities

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sutapa; Patel, Sanjay R.; Kales, Stefanos N.; Ayas, Najib T.; Strohl, Kingman P.; Gozal, David; Malhotra, Atul

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Despite substantial public interest, few recommendations on the promotion of good sleep health exist to educate health care providers and the general public on the importance of sleep for overall health. Objectives: The aim of this American Thoracic Society (ATS) statement is to provide a review of the current scientific literature to assist health care providers, especially pulmonologists and sleep physicians, in making recommendations to patients and the general public about the importance of achieving good quality and adequate quantity of sleep. Methods: ATS members were invited, based on their expertise in sleep medicine, and their conclusions were based on both empirical evidence identified after comprehensive literature review and clinical experience. Main Results: We focus on sleep health in both children and adults, including the impact of occupation on sleep, the public health implications of drowsy driving, and the common sleep disorders of obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia. This ATS statement also delineates gaps in research and knowledge that should be addressed and lead to new focused research priorities to advance knowledge in sleep and sleep health. Conclusions: Good quality and quantity of sleep are essential for good health and overall quality of life; therefore a strong recommendation was made for the implementation of public education programs on the importance of sleep health. PMID:26075423

  14. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement: A Research Framework for Pulmonary Nodule Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Slatore, Christopher G; Horeweg, Nanda; Jett, James R; Midthun, David E; Powell, Charles A; Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Wisnivesky, Juan P; Gould, Michael K

    2015-08-15

    Pulmonary nodules are frequently detected during diagnostic chest imaging and as a result of lung cancer screening. Current guidelines for their evaluation are largely based on low-quality evidence, and patients and clinicians could benefit from more research in this area. In this research statement from the American Thoracic Society, a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates reviewed available evidence for pulmonary nodule evaluation, characterized six focus areas to direct future research efforts, and identified fundamental gaps in knowledge and strategies to address them. We did not use formal mechanisms to prioritize one research area over another or to achieve consensus. There was widespread agreement that novel tests (including novel imaging tests and biopsy techniques, biomarkers, and prognostic models) may improve diagnostic accuracy for identifying cancerous nodules. Before they are used in clinical practice, however, better evidence is needed to show that they improve more distal outcomes of importance to patients. In addition, the pace of research and the quality of clinical care would be improved by the development of registries that link demographic and nodule characteristics with patient-level outcomes. Methods to share data from registries are also necessary. This statement may help researchers to develop impactful and innovative research projects and enable funders to better judge research proposals. We hope that it will accelerate the pace and increase the efficiency of discovery to improve the quality of care for patients with pulmonary nodules.

  15. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: the Integrated Care of The COPD Patient.

    PubMed

    Nici, Linda; ZuWallack, Richard

    2012-03-01

    The optimal care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) requires an individualized, patient-centered approach that recognizes and treats all aspects of the disease, addresses the systemic effects and comorbidities, and integrates medical care among healthcare professionals and across healthcare sectors. In many ways the integration of medical care for COPD is still in its infancy, and its implementation will undoubtedly represent a paradigm shift in our thinking. This article summarizes the proceedings of a workshop, The Integrated Care of the COPD Patient, which was funded by the American Thoracic Society. This workshop included participants who were chosen because of their expertise in the area as well as their firsthand experience with disease management models. Our summary describes the concepts of integrated care and chronic disease management, details specific components of disease management as they may apply to the patient with COPD, and provides several innovative examples of COPD disease management programs originating from different healthcare systems. It became clear from the discussions and review of the literature that more high-quality research in this area is vital. It is our hope that the information presented here provides a "call to arms" in this regard.

  16. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Pediatric Chronic Home Invasive Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Sterni, Laura M; Collaco, Joseph M; Baker, Christopher D; Carroll, John L; Sharma, Girish D; Brozek, Jan L; Finder, Jonathan D; Ackerman, Veda L; Arens, Raanan; Boroughs, Deborah S; Carter, Jodi; Daigle, Karen L; Dougherty, Joan; Gozal, David; Kevill, Katharine; Kravitz, Richard M; Kriseman, Tony; MacLusky, Ian; Rivera-Spoljaric, Katherine; Tori, Alvaro J; Ferkol, Thomas; Halbower, Ann C

    2016-04-15

    Children with chronic invasive ventilator dependence living at home are a diverse group of children with special health care needs. Medical oversight, equipment management, and community resources vary widely. There are no clinical practice guidelines available to health care professionals for the safe hospital discharge and home management of these complex children. To develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the hospital discharge and home/community management of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. The Pediatric Assembly of the American Thoracic Society assembled an interdisciplinary workgroup with expertise in the care of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. The experts developed four questions of clinical importance and used an evidence-based strategy to identify relevant medical evidence. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was used to formulate and grade recommendations. Clinical practice recommendations for the management of children with chronic ventilator dependence at home are provided, and the evidence supporting each recommendation is discussed. Collaborative generalist and subspecialist comanagement is the Medical Home model most likely to be successful for the care of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. Standardized hospital discharge criteria are suggested. An awake, trained caregiver should be present at all times, and at least two family caregivers should be trained specifically for the child's care. Standardized equipment for monitoring, emergency preparedness, and airway clearance are outlined. The recommendations presented are based on the current evidence and expert opinion and will require an update as new evidence and/or technologies become available.

  17. An Official American Thoracic Society Statement: The Importance of Healthy Sleep. Recommendations and Future Priorities.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sutapa; Patel, Sanjay R; Kales, Stefanos N; Ayas, Najib T; Strohl, Kingman P; Gozal, David; Malhotra, Atul

    2015-06-15

    Despite substantial public interest, few recommendations on the promotion of good sleep health exist to educate health care providers and the general public on the importance of sleep for overall health. The aim of this American Thoracic Society (ATS) statement is to provide a review of the current scientific literature to assist health care providers, especially pulmonologists and sleep physicians, in making recommendations to patients and the general public about the importance of achieving good quality and adequate quantity of sleep. ATS members were invited, based on their expertise in sleep medicine, and their conclusions were based on both empirical evidence identified after comprehensive literature review and clinical experience. We focus on sleep health in both children and adults, including the impact of occupation on sleep, the public health implications of drowsy driving, and the common sleep disorders of obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia. This ATS statement also delineates gaps in research and knowledge that should be addressed and lead to new focused research priorities to advance knowledge in sleep and sleep health. Good quality and quantity of sleep are essential for good health and overall quality of life; therefore a strong recommendation was made for the implementation of public education programs on the importance of sleep health.

  18. Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guidelines: Diagnostic Evaluation of Infants with Recurrent or Persistent Wheezing.

    PubMed

    Ren, Clement L; Esther, Charles R; Debley, Jason S; Sockrider, Marianna; Yilmaz, Ozge; Amin, Nikhil; Bazzy-Asaad, Alia; Davis, Stephanie D; Durand, Manuel; Ewig, Jeffrey M; Yuksel, Hasan; Lombardi, Enrico; Noah, Terry L; Radford, Peggy; Ranganathan, Sarath; Teper, Alejandro; Weinberger, Miles; Brozek, Jan; Wilson, Kevin C

    2016-08-01

    Infantile wheezing is a common problem, but there are no guidelines for the evaluation of infants with recurrent or persistent wheezing that is not relieved or prevented by standard therapies. An American Thoracic Society-sanctioned guideline development committee selected clinical questions related to uncertainties or controversies in the diagnostic evaluation of wheezing infants. Members of the committee conducted pragmatic evidence syntheses, which followed the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. The evidence syntheses were used to inform the formulation and grading of recommendations. The pragmatic evidence syntheses identified few studies that addressed the clinical questions. The studies that were identified constituted very low-quality evidence, consisting almost exclusively of case series with risk of selection bias, indirect patient populations, and imprecise estimates. The committee made conditional recommendations to perform bronchoscopic airway survey, bronchoalveolar lavage, esophageal pH monitoring, and a swallowing study. It also made conditional recommendations against empiric food avoidance, upper gastrointestinal radiography, and gastrointestinal scintigraphy. Finally, the committee recommended additional research about the roles of infant pulmonary function testing and food avoidance or dietary changes, based on allergy testing. Although infantile wheezing is common, there is a paucity of evidence to guide clinicians in selecting diagnostic tests for recurrent or persistent wheezing. Our committee made several conditional recommendations to guide clinicians; however, additional research that measures clinical outcomes is needed to improve our confidence in the effects of various diagnostic interventions and to allow advice to be provided with greater confidence.

  19. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement: A Research Framework for Pulmonary Nodule Evaluation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Horeweg, Nanda; Jett, James R.; Midthun, David E.; Powell, Charles A.; Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Wisnivesky, Juan P.; Gould, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary nodules are frequently detected during diagnostic chest imaging and as a result of lung cancer screening. Current guidelines for their evaluation are largely based on low-quality evidence, and patients and clinicians could benefit from more research in this area. Methods: In this research statement from the American Thoracic Society, a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates reviewed available evidence for pulmonary nodule evaluation, characterized six focus areas to direct future research efforts, and identified fundamental gaps in knowledge and strategies to address them. We did not use formal mechanisms to prioritize one research area over another or to achieve consensus. Results: There was widespread agreement that novel tests (including novel imaging tests and biopsy techniques, biomarkers, and prognostic models) may improve diagnostic accuracy for identifying cancerous nodules. Before they are used in clinical practice, however, better evidence is needed to show that they improve more distal outcomes of importance to patients. In addition, the pace of research and the quality of clinical care would be improved by the development of registries that link demographic and nodule characteristics with patient-level outcomes. Methods to share data from registries are also necessary. Conclusions: This statement may help researchers to develop impactful and innovative research projects and enable funders to better judge research proposals. We hope that it will accelerate the pace and increase the efficiency of discovery to improve the quality of care for patients with pulmonary nodules. PMID:26278796

  20. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report: Developing Performance Measures from Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Michael K.; Krishnan, Jerry A.; Wilson, Kevin C.; Au, David H.; Cooke, Colin R.; Douglas, Ivor S.; Feemster, Laura C.; Mularski, Richard A.; Slatore, Christopher G.; Renda Soylemez, Wiener

    2014-01-01

    Many health care performance measures are either not based on high-quality clinical evidence or not tightly linked to patient-centered outcomes, limiting their usefulness in quality improvement. In this report we summarize the proceedings of an American Thoracic Society workshop convened to address this problem by reviewing current approaches to performance measure development and creating a framework for developing high-quality performance measures by basing them directly on recommendations from well-constructed clinical practice guidelines. Workshop participants concluded that ideally performance measures addressing care processes should be linked to clinical practice guidelines that explicitly rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, such as the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process. Under this framework, process-based performance measures would only be developed from strong recommendations based on high- or moderate-quality evidence. This approach would help ensure that clinical processes specified in performance measures are both of clear benefit to patients and supported by strong evidence. Although this approach may result in fewer performance measures, it would substantially increase the likelihood that quality-improvement programs based on these measures actually improve patient care. PMID:24828810

  1. An official American thoracic society workshop report: developing performance measures from clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jeremy M; Gould, Michael K; Krishnan, Jerry A; Wilson, Kevin C; Au, David H; Cooke, Colin R; Douglas, Ivor S; Feemster, Laura C; Mularski, Richard A; Slatore, Christopher G; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2014-05-01

    Many health care performance measures are either not based on high-quality clinical evidence or not tightly linked to patient-centered outcomes, limiting their usefulness in quality improvement. In this report we summarize the proceedings of an American Thoracic Society workshop convened to address this problem by reviewing current approaches to performance measure development and creating a framework for developing high-quality performance measures by basing them directly on recommendations from well-constructed clinical practice guidelines. Workshop participants concluded that ideally performance measures addressing care processes should be linked to clinical practice guidelines that explicitly rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, such as the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process. Under this framework, process-based performance measures would only be developed from strong recommendations based on high- or moderate-quality evidence. This approach would help ensure that clinical processes specified in performance measures are both of clear benefit to patients and supported by strong evidence. Although this approach may result in fewer performance measures, it would substantially increase the likelihood that quality-improvement programs based on these measures actually improve patient care.

  2. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Pediatric Chronic Home Invasive Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Collaco, Joseph M.; Baker, Christopher D.; Carroll, John L.; Sharma, Girish D.; Brozek, Jan L.; Finder, Jonathan D.; Ackerman, Veda L.; Arens, Raanan; Boroughs, Deborah S.; Carter, Jodi; Daigle, Karen L.; Dougherty, Joan; Gozal, David; Kevill, Katharine; Kravitz, Richard M.; Kriseman, Tony; MacLusky, Ian; Rivera-Spoljaric, Katherine; Tori, Alvaro J.; Ferkol, Thomas; Halbower, Ann C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with chronic invasive ventilator dependence living at home are a diverse group of children with special health care needs. Medical oversight, equipment management, and community resources vary widely. There are no clinical practice guidelines available to health care professionals for the safe hospital discharge and home management of these complex children. Purpose: To develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the hospital discharge and home/community management of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. Methods: The Pediatric Assembly of the American Thoracic Society assembled an interdisciplinary workgroup with expertise in the care of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. The experts developed four questions of clinical importance and used an evidence-based strategy to identify relevant medical evidence. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was used to formulate and grade recommendations. Results: Clinical practice recommendations for the management of children with chronic ventilator dependence at home are provided, and the evidence supporting each recommendation is discussed. Conclusions: Collaborative generalist and subspecialist comanagement is the Medical Home model most likely to be successful for the care of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. Standardized hospital discharge criteria are suggested. An awake, trained caregiver should be present at all times, and at least two family caregivers should be trained specifically for the child’s care. Standardized equipment for monitoring, emergency preparedness, and airway clearance are outlined. The recommendations presented are based on the current evidence and expert opinion and will require an update as new evidence and/or technologies become available. PMID:27082538

  3. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement: Implementation Science in Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Curtis H; Krishnan, Jerry A; Au, David H; Bender, Bruce G; Carson, Shannon S; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Cloutier, Michelle M; Cooke, Colin R; Erickson, Karen; George, Maureen; Gerald, Joe K; Gerald, Lynn B; Goss, Christopher H; Gould, Michael K; Hyzy, Robert; Kahn, Jeremy M; Mittman, Brian S; Mosesón, Erika M; Mularski, Richard A; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Patel, Sanjay R; Rand, Cynthia S; Redeker, Nancy S; Reiss, Theodore F; Riekert, Kristin A; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Tate, Judith A; Wilson, Kevin C; Thomson, Carey C

    2016-10-15

    Many advances in health care fail to reach patients. Implementation science is the study of novel approaches to mitigate this evidence-to-practice gap. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) created a multidisciplinary ad hoc committee to develop a research statement on implementation science in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. The committee used an iterative consensus process to define implementation science and review the use of conceptual frameworks to guide implementation science for the pulmonary, critical care, and sleep community and to explore how professional medical societies such as the ATS can promote implementation science. The committee defined implementation science as the study of the mechanisms by which effective health care interventions are either adopted or not adopted in clinical and community settings. The committee also distinguished implementation science from the act of implementation. Ideally, implementation science should include early and continuous stakeholder involvement and the use of conceptual frameworks (i.e., models to systematize the conduct of studies and standardize the communication of findings). Multiple conceptual frameworks are available, and we suggest the selection of one or more frameworks on the basis of the specific research question and setting. Professional medical societies such as the ATS can have an important role in promoting implementation science. Recommendations for professional societies to consider include: unifying implementation science activities through a single organizational structure, linking front-line clinicians with implementation scientists, seeking collaborations to prioritize and conduct implementation science studies, supporting implementation science projects through funding opportunities, working with research funding bodies to set the research agenda in the field, collaborating with external bodies responsible for health care delivery, disseminating results of implementation

  4. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society policy statement: disparities in respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Schraufnagel, Dean E; Blasi, Francesco; Kraft, Monica; Gaga, Mina; Finn, Patricia W; Rabe, Klaus F

    2013-10-01

    Health disparities, defined as a significant difference in health between populations, are more common for diseases of the respiratory system than for those of other organ systems, because of the environmental influence on breathing and the variation of the environment among different segments of the population. The lowest social groups are up to 14 times more likely to have respiratory diseases than are the highest. Tobacco smoke, air pollution, environmental exposures, and occupational hazards affect the lungs more than other organs, and occur disproportionately in ethnic minorities and those with lower socioeconomic status. Lack of access to quality health care contributes to disparities. The executive committees of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) established a writing committee to develop a policy on health disparities. The document was reviewed, edited, and approved by the full executive committees and boards of directors of the societies. This document expresses a policy to address health disparities by promoting scientific inquiry and training, disseminating medical information and best practices, and monitoring and advocating for public respiratory health. ERS and ATS have strong international commitments, and work with leaders from governments, academia, and organizations to address and reduce avoidable health inequalities. Their training initiatives improve the function of health care systems and health equality. Both the ATS and ERS support all aspects of this document, confer regularly, and act together when possible, but the activities to bring about change may vary because of the differences in the continents where the two organizations carry out most of their activities. The ATS and ERS pledge to frame their actions to reduce respiratory health disparities. The vision of the ATS and ERS is that all persons attain better and sustained respiratory health. They call on all their members and other societies to

  5. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report: Noninvasive Identification of Inspiratory Flow Limitation in Sleep Studies.

    PubMed

    Pamidi, Sushmita; Redline, Susan; Rapoport, David; Ayappa, Indu; Palombini, Luciana; Farre, Ramon; Kirkness, Jason; Pépin, Jean-Louis; Polo, Olli; Wellman, Andrew; Kimoff, R John

    2017-07-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the American Thoracic Society Workshop on the Noninvasive Identification of Inspiratory Flow Limitation in Sleep Studies held on May 16, 2015, in Denver, Colorado. The goal of the workshop was to discuss methods for standardizing the scoring of flow limitation from nasal cannula pressure tracings. The workshop began with presentations on the physiology underlying flow limitation, existing methods of scoring flow limitation, the effects of signal acquisition and filtering on flow shapes, and a review of the literature examining the adverse outcomes related to flow limitation. After these presentations, the results from online scoring exercises, which were crowdsourced to workshop participants in advance of the workshop, were reviewed and discussed. Break-out sessions were then held to discuss potential algorithms for scoring flow limitation. Based on these discussions, subsequent online scoring exercises, and webinars after the workshop, a consensus-based set of recommendations for a scoring algorithm for flow limitation was developed. Key conclusions from the workshop were: (1) a standardized and automated approach to scoring flow limitation is needed to provide a metric of nonepisodic elevated upper airway resistance, which can then be related to clinical outcomes in large cohorts and patient groups; (2) at this time, the most feasible method for standardization is by proposing a consensus-based framework, which includes scoring rules, developed by experts (3) hardware and software settings of acquisition devices, including filter settings, affect the shape of the flow curve, and should be clearly specified; and (4) a priority for future research is the generation of an open-source, expert-derived training set to encourage and support validation of automated flow limitation scoring algorithms.

  6. An American Thoracic Society Official Research Statement: Future Directions in Lung Fibrosis Research

    PubMed Central

    Borok, Zea; Brown, Kevin K.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Guenther, Andreas; Jenkins, R. Gisli; Kolb, Martin; Martinez, Fernando J.; Roman, Jesse; Sime, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary fibrosis encompasses a group of lung-scarring disorders that occur owing to known or unknown insults and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality. Despite intense investigation spanning decades, much remains to be learned about the natural history, pathophysiology, and biologic mechanisms of disease. Purpose: To identify the most pressing research needs in the lung fibrosis community and to provide a roadmap of priorities to investigators, funding agencies, patient advocacy groups, and other interested stakeholders. Methods: An ad hoc international working group of the American Thoracic Society with experience in clinical, translational, and bench-based research in fibrotic lung diseases was convened. The group used an iterative consensus process to identify successes and challenges in pulmonary fibrosis research. Measurements and Main Results: The group identified five main priority areas in which substantial resources should be invested to advance our understanding and to develop novel therapies for patients with pulmonary fibrosis. These priorities include develop newer models of human lung fibrosis, engage current and new stakeholders to provide sustained funding for the initiatives, create a global infrastructure for storing patient-derived materials, establish collaborative preclinical and clinical research networks in fibrotic lung disease, and create a global lung fibrosis initiative that unites these multifaceted efforts into a single virtual umbrella structure. Conclusions: Despite recent advances in the treatment of some forms of lung fibrosis, many gaps in knowledge about natural history, pathophysiology, and treatment remain. Investment in the research priorities enumerated above will help address these shortcomings and enhance patient care worldwide. PMID:27035782

  7. An official American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society policy statement: disparities in respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Schraufnagel, Dean E; Blasi, Francesco; Kraft, Monica; Gaga, Mina; Finn, Patricia; Rabe, Klaus F

    2013-10-01

    Health disparities, defined as a significant difference in health between populations, are more common for diseases of the respiratory system than for those of other organ systems, because of the environmental influence on breathing and the variation of the environment among different segments of the population. The lowest social groups are up to 14 times more likely to have respiratory diseases than are the highest. Tobacco smoke, air pollution, environmental exposures, and occupational hazards affect the lungs more than other organs and occur disproportionately in ethnic minorities and those with lower socioeconomic status. Lack of access to quality healthcare contributes to disparities. The executive committees of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) established a writing committee to develop a policy on health disparities. The document was reviewed, edited, and approved by their full executive committees and boards of directors of the societies. This document expresses a policy to address health disparities by promoting scientific inquiry and training, disseminating medical information and best practices, and monitoring and advocating for public respiratory health. The ERS and the ATS have strong international commitments and work with leaders from governments, academia, and other organisational bodies to address and reduce avoidable health inequalities. Their training initiatives improve the function of healthcare systems and health equality. Both the ATS and the ERS support all aspects of this document, confer regularly, and act together when possible, but the activities to bring about change may vary because of the differences in the continents where the two organisations carry out most of their activities. The ATS and ERS pledge to frame their actions to reduce respiratory health disparities. The vision of the ATS and ERS is that all persons attain better and sustained respiratory health. They call on all their members

  8. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Research questions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Celli, Bartolome R; Decramer, Marc; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wilson, Kevin C; Agustí, Alvar; Criner, Gerard J; MacNee, William; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Stockley, Robert A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Barnes, Peter J; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Calverley, Peter M; Casanova, Ciro; Clini, Enrico M; Cooper, Christopher B; Coxson, Harvey O; Dusser, Daniel J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Fahy, Bonnie; Ferguson, Gary T; Fisher, Andrew; Fletcher, Monica J; Hayot, Maurice; Hurst, John R; Jones, Paul W; Mahler, Donald A; Maltais, François; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Miravitlles, Marc; Meek, Paula M; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Roche, Nicolas; Sciurba, Frank C; Sethi, Sanjay; Siafakas, Nikos; Sin, Don D; Soriano, Joan B; Stoller, James K; Tashkin, Donald P; Troosters, Thierry; Verleden, Geert M; Verschakelen, Johny; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John W; Washko, George R; Wise, Robert A; Wouters, Emiel F M; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and resource use worldwide. The goal of this Official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Research Statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment, and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarized, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment, and management of COPD as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS Research Statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centered outcomes.

  9. An official American Thoracic Society policy statement: pay-for-performance in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jeremy M; Scales, Damon C; Au, David H; Carson, Shannon S; Curtis, J Randall; Dudley, R Adams; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Krishnan, Jerry A; Maurer, Janet R; Mularski, Richard; Popovich, John; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Sinuff, Tasnim; Heffner, John E

    2010-04-01

    Pay-for-performance is a model for health care financing that seeks to link reimbursement to quality. The American Thoracic Society and its members have a significant stake in the development of pay-for-performance programs. To develop an official ATS policy statement addressing the role of pay-for-performance in pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. The statement was developed by the ATS Health Policy Committee using an iterative consensus process including an expert workshop and review by ATS committees and assemblies. Pay-for-performance is increasingly utilized by health care purchasers including the United States government. Published studies generally show that programs result in small but measurable gains in quality, although the data are heterogeneous. Pay-for-performance may result in several negative consequences, including the potential to increase costs, worsen health outcomes, and widen health disparities, among others. Future research should be directed at developing reliable and valid performance measures, increasing the efficacy of pay-for-performance programs, minimizing negative unintended consequences, and examining issues of costs and cost-effectiveness. The ATS and its members can play a key role in the design and evaluation of these programs by advancing the science of performance measurement, regularly developing quality metrics alongside clinical practice guidelines, and working with payors to make performance improvement a routine part of clinical practice. Pay-for-performance programs will expand in the coming years. Pulmonary, critical care and sleep practitioners can use these programs as an opportunity to partner with purchasers to improve health care quality.

  10. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement: Current Challenges Facing Research and Therapeutic Advances in Airway Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Y S; Halayko, Andrew J; Gosens, Reinoud; Panettieri, Reynold A; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Penn, Raymond B

    2017-01-15

    Airway remodeling (AR) is a prominent feature of asthma and other obstructive lung diseases that is minimally affected by current treatments. The goals of this Official American Thoracic Society (ATS) Research Statement are to discuss the scientific, technological, economic, and regulatory issues that deter progress of AR research and development of therapeutics targeting AR and to propose approaches and solutions to these specific problems. This Statement is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on any disease in which AR is observed and/or plays a role. An international multidisciplinary group from within academia, industry, and the National Institutes of Health, with expertise in multimodal approaches to the study of airway structure and function, pulmonary research and clinical practice in obstructive lung disease, and drug discovery platforms was invited to participate in one internet-based and one face-to-face meeting to address the above-stated goals. Although the majority of the analysis related to AR was in asthma, AR in other diseases was also discussed and considered in the recommendations. A literature search of PubMed was performed to support conclusions. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Multiple conceptual, logistical, economic, and regulatory deterrents were identified that limit the performance of AR research and impede accelerated, intensive development of AR-focused therapeutics. Complementary solutions that leverage expertise of academia and industry were proposed to address them. To date, numerous factors related to the intrinsic difficulty in performing AR research, and economic forces that are disincentives for the pursuit of AR treatments, have thwarted the ability to understand AR pathology and mechanisms and to address it clinically. This ATS Research Statement identifies potential solutions for each of these factors and emphasizes the importance of educating the global research community as to the

  11. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: stem cells and cell therapies in lung biology and diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel J; Chambers, Daniel; Giangreco, Adam; Keating, Armand; Kotton, Darrell; Lelkes, Peter I; Wagner, Darcy E; Prockop, Darwin J

    2015-04-01

    The University of Vermont College of Medicine and the Vermont Lung Center, in collaboration with the NHLBI, Alpha-1 Foundation, American Thoracic Society, European Respiratory Society, International Society for Cell Therapy, and the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, convened a workshop, "Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases," held July 29 to August 1, 2013 at the University of Vermont. The conference objectives were to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are all rapidly expanding areas of study that both provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, discuss and debate current controversies, and identify future research directions and opportunities for both basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. This conference was a follow-up to four previous biennial conferences held at the University of Vermont in 2005, 2007, 2009, and 2011. Each of those conferences, also sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, American Thoracic Society, and Respiratory Disease Foundations, has been important in helping guide research and funding priorities. The major conference recommendations are summarized at the end of the report and highlight both the significant progress and major challenges in these rapidly progressing fields.

  12. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report 2015. Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Darcy E; Cardoso, Wellington V; Gilpin, Sarah E; Majka, Susan; Ott, Harald; Randell, Scott H; Thébaud, Bernard; Waddell, Thomas; Weiss, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    The University of Vermont College of Medicine, in collaboration with the NHLBI, Alpha-1 Foundation, American Thoracic Society, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, European Respiratory Society, International Society for Cellular Therapy, and the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, convened a workshop, "Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases," held July 27 to 30, 2015, at the University of Vermont. The conference objectives were to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are all rapidly expanding areas of study that both provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, discuss and debate current controversies, and identify future research directions and opportunities for both basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. This 10th anniversary conference was a follow up to five previous biennial conferences held at the University of Vermont in 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, and 2013. Each of those conferences, also sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, American Thoracic Society, and respiratory disease foundations, has been important in helping guide research and funding priorities. The major conference recommendations are summarized at the end of the report and highlight both the significant progress and major challenges in these rapidly progressing fields.

  13. An official American Thoracic Society research statement: comparative effectiveness research in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine.

    PubMed

    Carson, Shannon S; Goss, Christopher H; Patel, Sanjay R; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Elborn, Stuart; Gerald, Joe K; Gerald, Lynn B; Kahn, Jeremy M; Malhotra, Atul; Mularski, Richard A; Riekert, Kristin A; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Weaver, Terri E; Krishnan, Jerry A

    2013-11-15

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is intended to inform decision making in clinical practice, and is central to patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR). To summarize key aspects of CER definitions and provide examples highlighting the complementary nature of efficacy and CER studies in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. An ad hoc working group of the American Thoracic Society with experience in clinical trials, health services research, quality improvement, and behavioral sciences in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine was convened. The group used an iterative consensus process, including a review by American Thoracic Society committees and assemblies. The traditional efficacy paradigm relies on clinical trials with high internal validity to evaluate interventions in narrowly defined populations and in research settings. Efficacy studies address the question, "Can it work in optimal conditions?" The CER paradigm employs a wide range of study designs to understand the effects of interventions in clinical settings. CER studies address the question, "Does it work in practice?" The results of efficacy and CER studies may or may not agree. CER incorporates many attributes of outcomes research and health services research, while placing greater emphasis on meeting the expressed needs of nonresearcher stakeholders (e.g., patients, clinicians, and others). CER complements traditional efficacy research by placing greater emphasis on the effects of interventions in practice, and developing evidence to address the needs of the many stakeholders involved in health care decisions. Stakeholder engagement is an important component of CER.

  14. An official American Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline: the clinical utility of bronchoalveolar lavage cellular analysis in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Keith C; Raghu, Ganesh; Baughman, Robert P; Brown, Kevin K; Costabel, Ulrich; du Bois, Roland M; Drent, Marjolein; Haslam, Patricia L; Kim, Dong Soon; Nagai, Sonoko; Rottoli, Paola; Saltini, Cesare; Selman, Moisés; Strange, Charlie; Wood, Brent

    2012-05-01

    The clinical utility of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) cell analysis for the diagnosis and management of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) has been a subject of debate and controversy. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) sponsored a committee of international experts to examine all relevant literature on BAL in ILD and provide recommendations concerning the use of BAL in the diagnosis and management of patients with suspected ILD. To provide recommendations for (1) the performance and processing of BAL and (2) the interpretation of BAL nucleated immune cell patterns and other BAL characteristics in patients with suspected ILD. A pragmatic systematic review was performed to identify unique citations related to BAL in patients with ILD that were published between 1970 and 2006. The search was updated during the guideline development process to include published literature through March 2011. This is the evidence upon which the committee's conclusions and recommendations are based. Recommendations for the performance and processing of BAL, as well as the interpretation of BAL findings, were formulated by the committee. When used in conjunction with comprehensive clinical information and adequate thoracic imaging such as high-resolution computed tomography of the thorax, BAL cell patterns and other characteristics frequently provide useful information for the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected ILD.

  15. An official American Thoracic Society statement: Treatment of fungal infections in adult pulmonary and critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Limper, Andrew H; Knox, Kenneth S; Sarosi, George A; Ampel, Neil M; Bennett, John E; Catanzaro, Antonino; Davies, Scott F; Dismukes, William E; Hage, Chadi A; Marr, Kieren A; Mody, Christopher H; Perfect, John R; Stevens, David A

    2011-01-01

    With increasing numbers of immune-compromised patients with malignancy, hematologic disease, and HIV, as well as those receiving immunosupressive drug regimens for the management of organ transplantation or autoimmune inflammatory conditions, the incidence of fungal infections has dramatically increased over recent years. Definitive diagnosis of pulmonary fungal infections has also been substantially assisted by the development of newer diagnostic methods and techniques, including the use of antigen detection, polymerase chain reaction, serologies, computed tomography and positron emission tomography scans, bronchoscopy, mediastinoscopy, and video-assisted thorascopic biopsy. At the same time, the introduction of new treatment modalities has significantly broadened options available to physicians who treat these conditions. While traditionally antifungal therapy was limited to the use of amphotericin B, flucytosine, and a handful of clinically available azole agents, current pharmacologic treatment options include potent new azole compounds with extended antifungal activity, lipid forms of amphotericin B, and newer antifungal drugs, including the echinocandins. In view of the changing treatment of pulmonary fungal infections, the American Thoracic Society convened a working group of experts in fungal infections to develop a concise clinical statement of current therapeutic options for those fungal infections of particular relevance to pulmonary and critical care practice. This document focuses on three primary areas of concern: the endemic mycoses, including histoplasmosis, sporotrichosis, blastomycosis, and coccidioidomycosis; fungal infections of special concern for immune-compromised and critically ill patients, including cryptococcosis, aspergillosis, candidiasis, and Pneumocystis pneumonia; and rare and emerging fungal infections.

  16. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: key concepts and advances in pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Spruit, Martijn A; Singh, Sally J; Garvey, Chris; ZuWallack, Richard; Nici, Linda; Rochester, Carolyn; Hill, Kylie; Holland, Anne E; Lareau, Suzanne C; Man, William D-C; Pitta, Fabio; Sewell, Louise; Raskin, Jonathan; Bourbeau, Jean; Crouch, Rebecca; Franssen, Frits M E; Casaburi, Richard; Vercoulen, Jan H; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Gosselink, Rik; Clini, Enrico M; Effing, Tanja W; Maltais, François; van der Palen, Job; Troosters, Thierry; Janssen, Daisy J A; Collins, Eileen; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Brooks, Dina; Fahy, Bonnie F; Puhan, Milo A; Hoogendoorn, Martine; Garrod, Rachel; Schols, Annemie M W J; Carlin, Brian; Benzo, Roberto; Meek, Paula; Morgan, Mike; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Ries, Andrew L; Make, Barry; Goldstein, Roger S; Dowson, Claire A; Brozek, Jan L; Donner, Claudio F; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2013-10-15

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is recognized as a core component of the management of individuals with chronic respiratory disease. Since the 2006 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Statement on Pulmonary Rehabilitation, there has been considerable growth in our knowledge of its efficacy and scope. The purpose of this Statement is to update the 2006 document, including a new definition of pulmonary rehabilitation and highlighting key concepts and major advances in the field. A multidisciplinary committee of experts representing the ATS Pulmonary Rehabilitation Assembly and the ERS Scientific Group 01.02, "Rehabilitation and Chronic Care," determined the overall scope of this update through group consensus. Focused literature reviews in key topic areas were conducted by committee members with relevant clinical and scientific expertise. The final content of this Statement was agreed on by all members. An updated definition of pulmonary rehabilitation is proposed. New data are presented on the science and application of pulmonary rehabilitation, including its effectiveness in acutely ill individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and in individuals with other chronic respiratory diseases. The important role of pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic disease management is highlighted. In addition, the role of health behavior change in optimizing and maintaining benefits is discussed. The considerable growth in the science and application of pulmonary rehabilitation since 2006 adds further support for its efficacy in a wide range of individuals with chronic respiratory disease.

  17. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: optimal lung function tests for monitoring cystic fibrosis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and recurrent wheezing in children less than 6 years of age.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Allen, Julian; Arets, Bert H G M; Aurora, Paul; Beydon, Nicole; Calogero, Claudia; Castile, Robert G; Davis, Stephanie D; Fuchs, Susanne; Gappa, Monika; Gustaffson, Per M; Hall, Graham L; Jones, Marcus H; Kirkby, Jane C; Kraemer, Richard; Lombardi, Enrico; Lum, Sooky; Mayer, Oscar H; Merkus, Peter; Nielsen, Kim G; Oliver, Cara; Oostveen, Ellie; Ranganathan, Sarath; Ren, Clement L; Robinson, Paul D; Seddon, Paul C; Sly, Peter D; Sockrider, Marianna M; Sonnappa, Samatha; Stocks, Janet; Subbarao, Padmaja; Tepper, Robert S; Vilozni, Daphna

    2013-04-01

    Although pulmonary function testing plays a key role in the diagnosis and management of chronic pulmonary conditions in children under 6 years of age, objective physiologic assessment is limited in the clinical care of infants and children less than 6 years old, due to the challenges of measuring lung function in this age range. Ongoing research in lung function testing in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers has resulted in techniques that show promise as safe, feasible, and potentially clinically useful tests. Official American Thoracic Society workshops were convened in 2009 and 2010 to review six lung function tests based on a comprehensive review of the literature (infant raised-volume rapid thoracic compression and plethysmography, preschool spirometry, specific airway resistance, forced oscillation, the interrupter technique, and multiple-breath washout). In these proceedings, the current state of the art for each of these tests is reviewed as it applies to the clinical management of infants and children under 6 years of age with cystic fibrosis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and recurrent wheeze, using a standardized format that allows easy comparison between the measures. Although insufficient evidence exists to recommend incorporation of these tests into the routine diagnostic evaluation and clinical monitoring of infants and young children with cystic fibrosis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or recurrent wheeze, they may be valuable tools with which to address specific concerns, such as ongoing symptoms or monitoring response to treatment, and as outcome measures in clinical research studies.

  18. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Update on Limb Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maltais, François; Decramer, Marc; Casaburi, Richard; Barreiro, Esther; Burelle, Yan; Debigaré, Richard; Dekhuijzen, P. N. Richard; Franssen, Frits; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Gea, Joaquim; Gosker, Harry R.; Gosselink, Rik; Hayot, Maurice; Hussain, Sabah N. A.; Janssens, Wim; Polkey, Micheal I.; Roca, Josep; Saey, Didier; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Spruit, Martijn A.; Steiner, Michael; Taivassalo, Tanja; Troosters, Thierry; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wagner, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement on limb muscle dysfunction, important progress has been made on the characterization of this problem and on our understanding of its pathophysiology and clinical implications. Purpose: The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS/ERS statement on limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. Methods: An interdisciplinary committee of experts from the ATS and ERS Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Clinical Problems assemblies determined that the scope of this document should be limited to limb muscles. Committee members conducted focused reviews of the literature on several topics. A librarian also performed a literature search. An ATS methodologist provided advice to the committee, ensuring that the methodological approach was consistent with ATS standards. Results: We identified important advances in our understanding of the extent and nature of the structural alterations in limb muscles in patients with COPD. Since the last update, landmark studies were published on the mechanisms of development of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD and on the treatment of this condition. We now have a better understanding of the clinical implications of limb muscle dysfunction. Although exercise training is the most potent intervention to address this condition, other therapies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation, are emerging. Assessment of limb muscle function can identify patients who are at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes, such as exercise intolerance and premature mortality. Conclusions: Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of COPD. However, there are still important gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms of development of this problem

  19. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: update on limb muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Maltais, François; Decramer, Marc; Casaburi, Richard; Barreiro, Esther; Burelle, Yan; Debigaré, Richard; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; Franssen, Frits; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Gea, Joaquim; Gosker, Harry R; Gosselink, Rik; Hayot, Maurice; Hussain, Sabah N A; Janssens, Wim; Polkey, Micheal I; Roca, Josep; Saey, Didier; Schols, Annemie M W J; Spruit, Martijn A; Steiner, Michael; Taivassalo, Tanja; Troosters, Thierry; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wagner, Peter D

    2014-05-01

    Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement on limb muscle dysfunction, important progress has been made on the characterization of this problem and on our understanding of its pathophysiology and clinical implications. The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS/ERS statement on limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. An interdisciplinary committee of experts from the ATS and ERS Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Clinical Problems assemblies determined that the scope of this document should be limited to limb muscles. Committee members conducted focused reviews of the literature on several topics. A librarian also performed a literature search. An ATS methodologist provided advice to the committee, ensuring that the methodological approach was consistent with ATS standards. We identified important advances in our understanding of the extent and nature of the structural alterations in limb muscles in patients with COPD. Since the last update, landmark studies were published on the mechanisms of development of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD and on the treatment of this condition. We now have a better understanding of the clinical implications of limb muscle dysfunction. Although exercise training is the most potent intervention to address this condition, other therapies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation, are emerging. Assessment of limb muscle function can identify patients who are at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes, such as exercise intolerance and premature mortality. Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of COPD. However, there are still important gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms of development of this problem. Strategies for early detection and specific treatments for

  20. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Policy Statement: Enhancing Implementation, Use, and Delivery of Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rochester, Carolyn L; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Holland, Anne E; Lareau, Suzanne C; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Puhan, Milo A; Spruit, Martijn A; Masefield, Sarah; Casaburi, Richard; Clini, Enrico M; Crouch, Rebecca; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Garvey, Chris; Goldstein, Roger S; Hill, Kylie; Morgan, Michael; Nici, Linda; Pitta, Fabio; Ries, Andrew L; Singh, Sally J; Troosters, Thierry; Wijkstra, Peter J; Yawn, Barbara P; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has demonstrated physiological, symptom-reducing, psychosocial, and health economic benefits for patients with chronic respiratory diseases, yet it is underutilized worldwide. Insufficient funding, resources, and reimbursement; lack of healthcare professional, payer, and patient awareness and knowledge; and additional patient-related barriers all contribute to the gap between the knowledge of the science and benefits of PR and the actual delivery of PR services to suitable patients. The objectives of this document are to enhance implementation, use, and delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation to suitable individuals worldwide. Members of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) Pulmonary Rehabilitation Assembly and the European Respiratory Society (ERS) Rehabilitation and Chronic Care Group established a Task Force and writing committee to develop a policy statement on PR. The document was modified based on feedback from expert peer reviewers. After cycles of review and revisions, the statement was reviewed and formally approved by the Board of Directors of the ATS and the Science Council and Executive Committee of the ERS. This document articulates policy recommendations for advancing healthcare professional, payer, and patient awareness and knowledge of PR, increasing patient access to PR, and ensuring quality of PR programs. It also recommends areas of future research to establish evidence to support the development of an updated funding and reimbursement policy regarding PR. The ATS and ERS commit to undertake actions that will improve access to and delivery of PR services for suitable patients. They call on their members and other health professional societies, payers, patients, and patient advocacy groups to join in this commitment.

  1. An official American Thoracic Society public policy statement: Novel risk factors and the global burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Mark D; Anthonisen, Nicholas; Coultas, David; Kuenzli, Nino; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Postma, Dirkje; Romieu, Isabelle; Silverman, Edwin K; Balmes, John R

    2010-09-01

    Although cigarette smoking is the most important cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a substantial proportion of COPD cases cannot be explained by smoking alone. To evaluate the risk factors for COPD besides personal cigarette smoking. We constituted an ad hoc subcommittee of the American Thoracic Society Environmental and Occupational Health Assembly. An international group of members was invited, based on their scientific expertise in a specific risk factor for COPD. For each risk factor area, the committee reviewed the literature, summarized the evidence, and developed conclusions about the likelihood of it causing COPD. All conclusions were based on unanimous consensus. The population-attributable fraction for smoking as a cause of COPD ranged from 9.7 to 97.9%, but was less than 80% in most studies, indicating a substantial burden of disease attributable to nonsmoking risk factors. On the basis of our review, we concluded that specific genetic syndromes and occupational exposures were causally related to the development of COPD. Traffic and other outdoor pollution, secondhand smoke, biomass smoke, and dietary factors are associated with COPD, but sufficient criteria for causation were not met. Chronic asthma and tuberculosis are associated with irreversible loss of lung function, but there remains uncertainty about whether there are important phenotypic differences compared with COPD as it is typically encountered in clinical settings. In public health terms, a substantive burden of COPD is attributable to risk factors other than smoking. To prevent COPD-related disability and mortality, efforts must focus on prevention and cessation of exposure to smoking and these other, less well-recognized risk factors.

  2. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement: Current Understanding and Future Research Needs in Tobacco Control and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Leone, Frank T; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Folan, Patricia; Latzka, Karen; Munzer, Alfred; Neptune, Enid; Pakhale, Smita; Sachs, David P L; Samet, Jonathan; Upson, Dona; White, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Since the mid-20th century, the scientific community has substantially improved its understanding of the worldwide tobacco epidemic. Although significant progress has been made, the sheer enormity and scope of the global problem put it on track to take a billion lives this century. Curbing the epidemic will require maximizing the impact of proven tools as well as the development of new, breakthrough methods to help interrupt the spread of nicotine addiction and reduce the downstream morbidity. Members of the Tobacco Action Committee of the American Thoracic Society queried bibliographic databases, including Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Collaborative, to identify primary sources and reviews relevant to the epidemic. Exploded search terms were used to identify evidence, including tobacco, addiction, smoking, cigarettes, nicotine, and smoking cessation. Evidence was consolidated into three thematic areas: (1) determinants of risk, (2) maternal-fetal exposure, and (3) current tobacco users. Expert panel consensus regarding current gaps in understanding and recommendations for future research priorities was generated through iterative discussion. Although much has been accomplished, significant gaps in understanding remain. Implementation often lags well behind insight. This report identifies a number of investigative opportunities for significantly reducing the toll of tobacco use, including: (1) the need for novel, nonlinear models of population-based disease control; (2) refinement of "real-world" models of clinical intervention in trial design; and (3) understanding of mechanisms by which intrauterine smoke exposure may lead to persistent, tobacco-related chronic disease. In the coming era of tobacco research, pooled talent from multiple disciplines will be required to further illuminate the complex social, environmental and biological codeterminants of tobacco dependence.

  3. Liberation From Mechanical Ventilation in Critically Ill Adults: Executive Summary of an Official American College of Chest Physicians/American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gregory A; Girard, Timothy D; Kress, John P; Morris, Peter E; Ouellette, Daniel R; Alhazzani, Waleed; Burns, Suzanne M; Epstein, Scott K; Esteban, Andres; Fan, Eddy; Ferrer, Miguel; Fraser, Gilles L; Gong, Michelle Ng; Hough, Catherine L; Mehta, Sangeeta; Nanchal, Rahul; Patel, Sheena; Pawlik, Amy J; Schweickert, William D; Sessler, Curtis N; Strøm, Thomas; Wilson, Kevin C; Truwit, Jonathon D

    2017-01-01

    This clinical practice guideline addresses six questions related to liberation from mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. It is the result of a collaborative effort between the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST). A multidisciplinary panel posed six clinical questions in a population, intervention, comparator, outcomes (PICO) format. A comprehensive literature search and evidence synthesis was performed for each question, which included appraising the quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. The Evidence-to-Decision framework was applied to each question, requiring the panel to evaluate and weigh the importance of the problem, confidence in the evidence, certainty about how much the public values the main outcomes, magnitude and balance of desirable and undesirable outcomes, resources and costs associated with the intervention, impact on health disparities, and acceptability and feasibility of the intervention. Evidence-based recommendations were formulated and graded initially by subcommittees and then modified following full panel discussions. The recommendations were confirmed by confidential electronic voting; approval required that at least 80% of the panel members agree with the recommendation. The panel provides recommendations regarding liberation from mechanical ventilation. The details regarding the evidence and rationale for each recommendation are presented in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine and CHEST. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Official Executive Summary of an American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline: Liberation from Mechanical Ventilation in Critically Ill Adults.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gregory A; Girard, Timothy D; Kress, John P; Morris, Peter E; Ouellette, Daniel R; Alhazzani, Waleed; Burns, Suzanne M; Epstein, Scott K; Esteban, Andres; Fan, Eddy; Ferrer, Miguel; Fraser, Gilles L; Gong, Michelle Ng; L Hough, Catherine; Mehta, Sangeeta; Nanchal, Rahul; Patel, Sheena; Pawlik, Amy J; Schweickert, William D; Sessler, Curtis N; Strøm, Thomas; Wilson, Kevin C; Truwit, Jonathon D

    2017-01-01

    This clinical practice guideline addresses six questions related to liberation from mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. It is the result of a collaborative effort between the American Thoracic Society and the American College of Chest Physicians. A multidisciplinary panel posed six clinical questions in a Population, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcomes format. A comprehensive literature search and evidence synthesis was performed for each question, which included appraising the certainty in the evidence (i.e., the quality of evidence) using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. The Evidence-to-Decision framework was applied to each question, requiring the panel to evaluate and weigh the importance of the problem, the confidence in the evidence, the certainty about how much the public values the main outcomes, the magnitude and balance of desirable and undesirable outcomes, the resources and costs associated with the intervention, the impact on health disparities, and the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention. Evidence-based recommendations were formulated and graded initially by subcommittees and then modified after full-panel discussions. The recommendations were confirmed by confidential electronic voting; approval required that at least 80% of the panel members agree with the recommendation. The panel provides recommendations regarding liberation from mechanical ventilation. The details regarding the evidence and rationale for each recommendation are presented in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine and Chest.

  5. An official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians policy statement: the Choosing Wisely top five list in adult pulmonary medicine.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Ouellette, Daniel R; Diamond, Edward; Fan, Vincent S; Maurer, Janet R; Mularski, Richard A; Peters, Jay I; Halpern, Scott D

    2014-06-01

    The American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation's Choosing Wisely campaign aims to curb health-care costs and improve patient care by soliciting lists from medical societies of the top five tests or treatments in their specialty that are used too frequently and inappropriately. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and American College of Chest Physicians created a joint task force, which produced a top five list for adult pulmonary medicine. Our top five recommendations, which were approved by the executive committees of the ATS and American College of Chest Physicians and published by Choosing Wisely in October 2013, are as follows: (1) Do not perform CT scan surveillance for evaluation of indeterminate pulmonary nodules at more frequent intervals or for a longer period of time than recommended by established guidelines; (2) do not routinely offer pharmacologic treatment with advanced vasoactive agents approved only for the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension to patients with pulmonary hypertension resulting from left heart disease or hypoxemic lung diseases (groups II or III pulmonary hypertension); (3) for patients recently discharged on supplemental home oxygen following hospitalization for an acute illness, do not renew the prescription without assessing the patient for ongoing hypoxemia; (4) do not perform chest CT angiography to evaluate for possible pulmonary embolism in patients with a low clinical probability and negative results of a highly sensitive D-dimer assay; (5) do not perform CT scan screening for lung cancer among patients at low risk for lung cancer. We hope pulmonologists will use these recommendations to stimulate frank discussions with patients about when these tests and treatments are indicated--and when they are not.

  6. An official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians policy statement: implementation of low-dose computed tomography lung cancer screening programs in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Gould, Michael K; Arenberg, Douglas A; Au, David H; Fennig, Kathleen; Lamb, Carla R; Mazzone, Peter J; Midthun, David E; Napoli, Maryann; Ost, David E; Powell, Charles A; Rivera, M Patricia; Slatore, Christopher G; Tanner, Nichole T; Vachani, Anil; Wisnivesky, Juan P; Yoon, Sue H

    2015-10-01

    Annual low-radiation-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for lung cancer has been shown to reduce lung cancer mortality among high-risk individuals and is now recommended by multiple organizations. However, LDCT screening is complex, and implementation requires careful planning to ensure benefits outweigh harms. Little guidance has been provided for sites wishing to develop and implement lung cancer screening programs. To promote successful implementation of comprehensive LDCT screening programs that are safe, effective, and sustainable. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) convened a committee with expertise in lung cancer screening, pulmonary nodule evaluation, and implementation science. The committee reviewed the evidence from systematic reviews, clinical practice guidelines, surveys, and the experience of early-adopting LDCT screening programs and summarized potential strategies to implement LDCT screening programs successfully. We address steps that sites should consider during the main three phases of developing an LDCT screening program: planning, implementation, and maintenance. We present multiple strategies to implement the nine core elements of comprehensive lung cancer screening programs enumerated in a recent ACCP/ATS statement, which will allow sites to select the strategy that best fits with their local context and workflow patterns. Although we do not comment on cost-effectiveness of LDCT screening, we outline the necessary costs associated with starting and sustaining a high-quality LDCT screening program. Following the strategies delineated in this policy statement may help sites to develop comprehensive LDCT screening programs that are safe and effective.

  7. An Official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Policy Statement: Implementation of Low-Dose Computed Tomography Lung Cancer Screening Programs in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Gould, Michael K.; Arenberg, Douglas A.; Au, David H.; Fennig, Kathleen; Lamb, Carla R.; Mazzone, Peter J.; Midthun, David E.; Napoli, Maryann; Ost, David E.; Powell, Charles A.; Rivera, M. Patricia; Slatore, Christopher G.; Tanner, Nichole T.; Vachani, Anil; Wisnivesky, Juan P.; Yoon, Sue H.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Annual low-radiation-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for lung cancer has been shown to reduce lung cancer mortality among high-risk individuals and is now recommended by multiple organizations. However, LDCT screening is complex, and implementation requires careful planning to ensure benefits outweigh harms. Little guidance has been provided for sites wishing to develop and implement lung cancer screening programs. Objectives: To promote successful implementation of comprehensive LDCT screening programs that are safe, effective, and sustainable. Methods: The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) convened a committee with expertise in lung cancer screening, pulmonary nodule evaluation, and implementation science. The committee reviewed the evidence from systematic reviews, clinical practice guidelines, surveys, and the experience of early-adopting LDCT screening programs and summarized potential strategies to implement LDCT screening programs successfully. Measurements and Main Results: We address steps that sites should consider during the main three phases of developing an LDCT screening program: planning, implementation, and maintenance. We present multiple strategies to implement the nine core elements of comprehensive lung cancer screening programs enumerated in a recent CHEST/ATS statement, which will allow sites to select the strategy that best fits with their local context and workflow patterns. Although we do not comment on cost-effectiveness of LDCT screening, we outline the necessary costs associated with starting and sustaining a high-quality LDCT screening program. Conclusions: Following the strategies delineated in this policy statement may help sites to develop comprehensive LDCT screening programs that are safe and effective. PMID:26426785

  8. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report. A Framework for Addressing Multimorbidity in Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pulmonary Disease, Critical Illness, and Sleep Disorders.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kevin C; Gould, Michael K; Krishnan, Jerry A; Boyd, Cynthia M; Brozek, Jan L; Cooke, Colin R; Douglas, Ivor S; Goodman, Richard A; Joo, Min J; Lareau, Suzanne; Mularski, Richard A; Patel, Minal R; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Shanawani, Hasan; Slatore, Christopher; Sockrider, Marianna; Sufian, Beth; Thomson, Carey C; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2016-03-01

    Coexistence of multiple chronic conditions (i.e., multimorbidity) is the most common chronic health problem in adults. However, clinical practice guidelines have primarily focused on patients with a single disease, resulting in uncertainty about the care of patients with multimorbidity. The American Thoracic Society convened a workshop with the goal of establishing a strategy to address multimorbidity within clinical practice guidelines. In this Workshop Report, we describe a framework that addresses multimorbidity in each of the key steps of guideline development: topic selection, panel composition, identifying clinical questions, searching for and synthesizing evidence, rating the quality of that evidence, summarizing benefits and harms, formulating recommendations, and rating the strength of the recommendations. For the consideration of multimorbidity in guidelines to be successful and sustainable, the process must be both feasible and pragmatic. It is likely that this will be achieved best by the step-wise addition and refinement of the various components of the framework.

  9. Executive Summary: Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  10. Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  11. Official American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Practice Guidelines: Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Adults and Children.

    PubMed

    Lewinsohn, David M; Leonard, Michael K; LoBue, Philip A; Cohn, David L; Daley, Charles L; Desmond, Ed; Keane, Joseph; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Loeffler, Ann M; Mazurek, Gerald H; O'Brien, Richard J; Pai, Madhukar; Richeldi, Luca; Salfinger, Max; Shinnick, Thomas M; Sterling, Timothy R; Warshauer, David M; Woods, Gail L

    2017-01-15

    Individuals infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) may develop symptoms and signs of disease (tuberculosis disease) or may have no clinical evidence of disease (latent tuberculosis infection [LTBI]). Tuberculosis disease is a leading cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet many questions related to its diagnosis remain. A task force supported by the American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America searched, selected, and synthesized relevant evidence. The evidence was then used as the basis for recommendations about the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease and LTBI in adults and children. The recommendations were formulated, written, and graded using the Grading, Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Twenty-three evidence-based recommendations about diagnostic testing for latent tuberculosis infection, pulmonary tuberculosis, and extrapulmonary tuberculosis are provided. Six of the recommendations are strong, whereas the remaining 17 are conditional. These guidelines are not intended to impose a standard of care. They provide the basis for rational decisions in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in the context of the existing evidence. No guidelines can take into account all of the often compelling unique individual clinical circumstances. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Official American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Practice Guidelines: Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Adults and Children.

    PubMed

    Lewinsohn, David M; Leonard, Michael K; LoBue, Philip A; Cohn, David L; Daley, Charles L; Desmond, Ed; Keane, Joseph; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Loeffler, Ann M; Mazurek, Gerald H; O'Brien, Richard J; Pai, Madhukar; Richeldi, Luca; Salfinger, Max; Shinnick, Thomas M; Sterling, Timothy R; Warshauer, David M; Woods, Gail L

    2017-01-15

    Individuals infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) may develop symptoms and signs of disease (tuberculosis disease) or may have no clinical evidence of disease (latent tuberculosis infection [LTBI]). Tuberculosis disease is a leading cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet many questions related to its diagnosis remain. A task force supported by the American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America searched, selected, and synthesized relevant evidence. The evidence was then used as the basis for recommendations about the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease and LTBI in adults and children. The recommendations were formulated, written, and graded using the Grading, Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Twenty-three evidence-based recommendations about diagnostic testing for latent tuberculosis infection, pulmonary tuberculosis, and extrapulmonary tuberculosis are provided. Six of the recommendations are strong, whereas the remaining 17 are conditional. These guidelines are not intended to impose a standard of care. They provide the basis for rational decisions in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in the context of the existing evidence. No guidelines can take into account all of the often compelling unique individual clinical circumstances. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: The Role of the Pulmonologist in the Diagnosis and Management of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gaga, Mina; Powell, Charles A.; Schraufnagel, Dean E.; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Rabe, Klaus; Hill, Nicholas S.; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is a common problem seen by pulmonologists. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) are professional organizations whose memberships are composed of large numbers of pulmonologists. Purpose: This document describes the key role of pulmonologists in the prevention, early diagnosis, and management of lung cancer. Methods: A committee of ATS and ERS leaders and their oncology groups discussed the activities of pulmonologists in relation to lung cancer in various settings and reviewed available literature on the topic. The content of this statement was approved by the board of directors of both the ATS and ERS. Results: Optimal lung cancer care requires a multidisciplinary team of specialists who care for a significant number of patients on a regular basis. Pulmonologists are responsible for and involved with patients from their initial diagnosis and staging through treatment and restaging. They are often involved with complications, palliative care, and end-of-life care, and thus have an important role in team leadership. Conclusions: Lung cancer is a disease with high mortality, profound effects on the quality of the lives of patients and their families, and an enormous cost and impact on society. To treat lung cancer optimally, care must be prompt, multidisciplinary, and patient-centered. In the entire process, pulmonologists have a key role. Pulmonologists and their professional societies should also enhance lung cancer research and education to provide better treatment options and patient care. PMID:23947517

  14. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report: Use of Animal Models for the Preclinical Assessment of Potential Therapies for Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, R Gisli; Moore, Bethany B; Chambers, Rachel C; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie; Kolb, Martin; Laurent, Geoffrey J; Nanthakumar, Carmel B; Olman, Mitchell A; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Sheppard, Dean; Sime, Patricia J; Tager, Andrew M; Tatler, Amanda L; Thannickal, Victor J; White, Eric S

    2017-05-01

    Numerous compounds have shown efficacy in limiting development of pulmonary fibrosis using animal models, yet few of these compounds have replicated these beneficial effects in clinical trials. Given the challenges associated with performing clinical trials in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), it is imperative that preclinical data packages be robust in their analyses and interpretations to have the best chance of selecting promising drug candidates to advance to clinical trials. The American Thoracic Society has convened a group of experts in lung fibrosis to discuss and formalize recommendations for preclinical assessment of antifibrotic compounds. The panel considered three major themes (choice of animal, practical considerations of fibrosis modeling, and fibrotic endpoints for evaluation). Recognizing the need for practical considerations, we have taken a pragmatic approach. The consensus view is that use of the murine intratracheal bleomycin model in animals of both genders, using hydroxyproline measurements for collagen accumulation along with histologic assessments, is the best-characterized animal model available for preclinical testing. Testing of antifibrotic compounds in this model is recommended to occur after the acute inflammatory phase has subsided (generally after Day 7). Robust analyses may also include confirmatory studies in human IPF specimens and validation of results in a second system using in vivo or in vitro approaches. The panel also strongly encourages the publication of negative results to inform the lung fibrosis community. These recommendations are for preclinical therapeutic evaluation only and are not intended to dissuade development of emerging technologies to better understand IPF pathogenesis.

  15. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: the role of the pulmonologist in the diagnosis and management of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaga, Mina; Powell, Charles A; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Rabe, Klaus; Hill, Nicholas S; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2013-08-15

    Lung cancer is a common problem seen by pulmonologists. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) are professional organizations whose memberships are composed of large numbers of pulmonologists. This document describes the key role of pulmonologists in the prevention, early diagnosis, and management of lung cancer. A committee of ATS and ERS leaders and their oncology groups discussed the activities of pulmonologists in relation to lung cancer in various settings and reviewed available literature on the topic. The content of this statement was approved by the board of directors of both the ATS and ERS. Optimal lung cancer care requires a multidisciplinary team of specialists who care for a significant number of patients on a regular basis. Pulmonologists are responsible for and involved with patients from their initial diagnosis and staging through treatment and restaging. They are often involved with complications, palliative care, and end-of-life care, and thus have an important role in team leadership. Lung cancer is a disease with high mortality, profound effects on the quality of the lives of patients and their families, and an enormous cost and impact on society. To treat lung cancer optimally, care must be prompt, multidisciplinary, and patient-centered. In the entire process, pulmonologists have a key role. Pulmonologists and their professional societies should also enhance lung cancer research and education to provide better treatment options and patient care.

  16. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report: Chemical Inhalational Disasters. Biology of Lung Injury, Development of Novel Therapeutics, and Medical Preparedness.

    PubMed

    Summerhill, Eleanor M; Hoyle, Gary W; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Jugg, Bronwen J; Martin, James G; Matalon, Sadis; Patterson, Steven E; Prezant, David J; Sciuto, Alfred M; Svendsen, Erik R; White, Carl W; Veress, Livia A

    2017-06-01

    This report is based on the proceedings from the Inhalational Lung Injury Workshop jointly sponsored by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT) program on May 21, 2013, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The CounterACT program facilitates research leading to the development of new and improved medical countermeasures for chemical threat agents. The workshop was initiated by the Terrorism and Inhalational Disasters Section of the Environmental, Occupational, and Population Health Assembly of the ATS. Participants included both domestic and international experts in the field, as well as representatives from U.S. governmental funding agencies. The meeting objectives were to (1) provide a forum to review the evidence supporting current standard medical therapies, (2) present updates on our understanding of the epidemiology and underlying pathophysiology of inhalational lung injuries, (3) discuss innovative investigative approaches to further delineating mechanisms of lung injury and identifying new specific therapeutic targets, (4) present promising novel medical countermeasures, (5) facilitate collaborative research efforts, and (6) identify challenges and future directions in the ongoing development, manufacture, and distribution of effective and specific medical countermeasures. Specific inhalational toxins discussed included irritants/pulmonary toxicants (chlorine gas, bromine, and phosgene), vesicants (sulfur mustard), chemical asphyxiants (cyanide), particulates (World Trade Center dust), and respirable nerve agents.

  17. An official American Thoracic Society statement: continuous positive airway pressure adherence tracking systems. The optimal monitoring strategies and outcome measures in adults.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Richard J; Badr, Safwan M; Epstein, Lawrence J; Gay, Peter C; Gozal, David; Kohler, Malcolm; Lévy, Patrick; Malhotra, Atul; Phillips, Barbara A; Rosen, Ilene M; Strohl, Kingman P; Strollo, Patrick J; Weaver, Edward M; Weaver, Terri E

    2013-09-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is considered the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and studies have shown that there is a correlation between patient adherence and treatment outcomes. Newer CPAP machines can track adherence, hours of use, mask leak, and residual apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Such data provide a strong platform to examine OSA outcomes in a chronic disease management model. However, there are no standards for capturing CPAP adherence data, scoring flow signals, or measuring mask leak, or for how clinicians should use these data. American Thoracic Society (ATS) committee members were invited, based on their expertise in OSA and CPAP monitoring. Their conclusions were based on both empirical evidence identified by a comprehensive literature review and clinical experience. CPAP usage can be reliably determined from CPAP tracking systems, but the residual events (apnea/hypopnea) and leak data are not as easy to interpret as CPAP usage and the definitions of these parameters differ among CPAP manufacturers. Nonetheless, ends of the spectrum (very high or low values for residual events or mask leak) appear to be clinically meaningful. Providers need to understand how to interpret CPAP adherence tracking data. CPAP tracking systems are able to reliably track CPAP adherence. Nomenclature on the CPAP adherence tracking reports needs to be standardized between manufacturers and AHIFlow should be used to describe residual events. Studies should be performed examining the usefulness of the CPAP tracking systems and how these systems affect OSA outcomes.

  18. An official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: sleep apnea, sleepiness, and driving risk in noncommercial drivers. An update of a 1994 Statement.

    PubMed

    Strohl, Kingman P; Brown, Daniel B; Collop, Nancy; George, Charles; Grunstein, Ronald; Han, Fang; Kline, Lawrence; Malhotra, Atul; Pack, Alan; Phillips, Barbara; Rodenstein, Daniel; Schwab, Richard; Weaver, Terri; Wilson, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    Sleepiness may account for up to 20% of crashes on monotonous roads, especially highways. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common medical disorder that causes excessive daytime sleepiness, increasing the risk for drowsy driving two to three times. The purpose of these guidelines is to update the 1994 American Thoracic Society Statement that described the relationships among sleepiness, sleep apnea, and driving risk. A multidisciplinary panel was convened to develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of sleepy driving due to OSA. Pragmatic systematic reviews were performed, and the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach was used to formulate and grade the recommendations. Critical outcomes included crash-related mortality and real crashes, whereas important outcomes included near-miss crashes and driving performance. A strong recommendation was made for treatment of confirmed OSA with continuous positive airway pressure to reduce driving risk, rather than no treatment, which was supported by moderate-quality evidence. Weak recommendations were made for expeditious diagnostic evaluation and initiation of treatment and against the use of stimulant medications or empiric continuous positive airway pressure to reduce driving risk. The weak recommendations were supported by very low-quality evidence. Additional suggestions included routinely determining the driving risk, inquiring about additional causes of sleepiness, educating patients about the risks of excessive sleepiness, and encouraging clinicians to become familiar with relevant laws. The recommendations presented in this guideline are based on the current evidence, and will require an update as new evidence and/or technologies becomes available.

  19. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Workshop Report: Evaluation of Respiratory Mechanics and Function in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Peterson-Carmichael, Stacey; Seddon, Paul C.; Cheifetz, Ira M.; Frerichs, Inéz; Hall, Graham L.; Hammer, Jürg; Hantos, Zoltán; van Kaam, Anton H.; McEvoy, Cindy T.; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Pillow, J. Jane; Rafferty, Gerrard F.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Stocks, Janet; Ranganathan, Sarath C.

    2016-01-01

    Ready access to physiologic measures, including respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, and ventilation/perfusion inhomogeneity, could optimize the clinical management of the critically ill pediatric or neonatal patient and minimize lung injury. There are many techniques for measuring respiratory function in infants and children but very limited information on the technical ease and applicability of these tests in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit (PICU, NICU) environments. This report summarizes the proceedings of a 2011 American Thoracic Society Workshop critically reviewing techniques available for ventilated and spontaneously breathing infants and children in the ICU. It outlines for each test how readily it is performed at the bedside and how it may impact patient management as well as indicating future areas of potential research collaboration. From expert panel discussions and literature reviews, we conclude that many of the techniques can aid in optimizing respiratory support in the PICU and NICU, quantifying the effect of therapeutic interventions, and guiding ventilator weaning and extubation. Most techniques now have commercially available equipment for the PICU and NICU, and many can generate continuous data points to help with ventilator weaning and other interventions. Technical and validation studies in the PICU and NICU are published for the majority of techniques; some have been used as outcome measures in clinical trials, but few have been assessed specifically for their ability to improve clinical outcomes. Although they show considerable promise, these techniques still require further study in the PICU and NICU together with increased availability of commercial equipment before wider incorporation into daily clinical practice. PMID:26848609

  20. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Workshop Report: Evaluation of Respiratory Mechanics and Function in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Peterson-Carmichael, Stacey; Seddon, Paul C; Cheifetz, Ira M; Frerichs, Inéz; Hall, Graham L; Hammer, Jürg; Hantos, Zoltán; van Kaam, Anton H; McEvoy, Cindy T; Newth, Christopher J L; Pillow, J Jane; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Stocks, Janet; Ranganathan, Sarath C

    2016-02-01

    Ready access to physiologic measures, including respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, and ventilation/perfusion inhomogeneity, could optimize the clinical management of the critically ill pediatric or neonatal patient and minimize lung injury. There are many techniques for measuring respiratory function in infants and children but very limited information on the technical ease and applicability of these tests in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit (PICU, NICU) environments. This report summarizes the proceedings of a 2011 American Thoracic Society Workshop critically reviewing techniques available for ventilated and spontaneously breathing infants and children in the ICU. It outlines for each test how readily it is performed at the bedside and how it may impact patient management as well as indicating future areas of potential research collaboration. From expert panel discussions and literature reviews, we conclude that many of the techniques can aid in optimizing respiratory support in the PICU and NICU, quantifying the effect of therapeutic interventions, and guiding ventilator weaning and extubation. Most techniques now have commercially available equipment for the PICU and NICU, and many can generate continuous data points to help with ventilator weaning and other interventions. Technical and validation studies in the PICU and NICU are published for the majority of techniques; some have been used as outcome measures in clinical trials, but few have been assessed specifically for their ability to improve clinical outcomes. Although they show considerable promise, these techniques still require further study in the PICU and NICU together with increased availability of commercial equipment before wider incorporation into daily clinical practice.

  1. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: Update of the international multidisciplinary classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Travis, William D; Costabel, Ulrich; Hansell, David M; King, Talmadge E; Lynch, David A; Nicholson, Andrew G; Ryerson, Christopher J; Ryu, Jay H; Selman, Moisés; Wells, Athol U; Behr, Jurgen; Bouros, Demosthenes; Brown, Kevin K; Colby, Thomas V; Collard, Harold R; Cordeiro, Carlos Robalo; Cottin, Vincent; Crestani, Bruno; Drent, Marjolein; Dudden, Rosalind F; Egan, Jim; Flaherty, Kevin; Hogaboam, Cory; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kim, Dong Soon; Kitaichi, Masanori; Loyd, James; Martinez, Fernando J; Myers, Jeffrey; Protzko, Shandra; Raghu, Ganesh; Richeldi, Luca; Sverzellati, Nicola; Swigris, Jeffrey; Valeyre, Dominique

    2013-09-15

    In 2002 the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) defined seven specific entities, and provided standardized terminology and diagnostic criteria. In addition, the historical "gold standard" of histologic diagnosis was replaced by a multidisciplinary approach. Since 2002 many publications have provided new information about IIPs. The objective of this statement is to update the 2002 ATS/ERS classification of IIPs. An international multidisciplinary panel was formed and developed key questions that were addressed through a review of the literature published between 2000 and 2011. Substantial progress has been made in IIPs since the previous classification. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia is now better defined. Respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease is now commonly diagnosed without surgical biopsy. The clinical course of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia is recognized to be heterogeneous. Acute exacerbation of IIPs is now well defined. A substantial percentage of patients with IIP are difficult to classify, often due to mixed patterns of lung injury. A classification based on observed disease behavior is proposed for patients who are difficult to classify or for entities with heterogeneity in clinical course. A group of rare entities, including pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis and rare histologic patterns, is introduced. The rapidly evolving field of molecular markers is reviewed with the intent of promoting additional investigations that may help in determining diagnosis, and potentially prognosis and treatment. This update is a supplement to the previous 2002 IIP classification document. It outlines advances in the past decade and potential areas for future investigation.

  2. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Sleep Apnea, Sleepiness, and Driving Risk in Noncommercial Drivers. An Update of a 1994 Statement

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, Kingman P.; Brown, Daniel B.; Collop, Nancy; George, Charles; Grunstein, Ronald; Han, Fang; Kline, Lawrence; Malhotra, Atul; Pack, Alan; Phillips, Barbara; Rodenstein, Daniel; Schwab, Richard; Weaver, Terri; Wilson, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sleepiness may account for up to 20% of crashes on monotonous roads, especially highways. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common medical disorder that causes excessive daytime sleepiness, increasing the risk for drowsy driving two to three times. The purpose of these guidelines is to update the 1994 American Thoracic Society Statement that described the relationships among sleepiness, sleep apnea, and driving risk. Methods: A multidisciplinary panel was convened to develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of sleepy driving due to OSA. Pragmatic systematic reviews were performed, and the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach was used to formulate and grade the recommendations. Critical outcomes included crash-related mortality and real crashes, whereas important outcomes included near-miss crashes and driving performance. Results: A strong recommendation was made for treatment of confirmed OSA with continuous positive airway pressure to reduce driving risk, rather than no treatment, which was supported by moderate-quality evidence. Weak recommendations were made for expeditious diagnostic evaluation and initiation of treatment and against the use of stimulant medications or empiric continuous positive airway pressure to reduce driving risk. The weak recommendations were supported by very low–quality evidence. Additional suggestions included routinely determining the driving risk, inquiring about additional causes of sleepiness, educating patients about the risks of excessive sleepiness, and encouraging clinicians to become familiar with relevant laws. Discussion: The recommendations presented in this guideline are based on the current evidence, and will require an update as new evidence and/or technologies becomes available. PMID:23725615

  3. An Official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline: Liberation from Mechanical Ventilation in Critically Ill Adults. Rehabilitation Protocols, Ventilator Liberation Protocols, and Cuff Leak Tests.

    PubMed

    Girard, Timothy D; Alhazzani, Waleed; Kress, John P; Ouellette, Daniel R; Schmidt, Gregory A; Truwit, Jonathon D; Burns, Suzanne M; Epstein, Scott K; Esteban, Andres; Fan, Eddy; Ferrer, Miguel; Fraser, Gilles L; Gong, Michelle Ng; Hough, Catherine L; Mehta, Sangeeta; Nanchal, Rahul; Patel, Sheena; Pawlik, Amy J; Schweickert, William D; Sessler, Curtis N; Strøm, Thomas; Wilson, Kevin C; Morris, Peter E

    2017-01-01

    Interventions that lead to earlier liberation from mechanical ventilation can improve patient outcomes. This guideline, a collaborative effort between the American Thoracic Society and the American College of Chest Physicians, provides evidence-based recommendations to optimize liberation from mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. Two methodologists performed evidence syntheses to summarize available evidence relevant to key questions about liberation from mechanical ventilation. The methodologists appraised the certainty in the evidence (i.e., the quality of evidence) using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach and summarized the results in evidence profiles. The guideline panel then formulated recommendations after considering the balance of desirable consequences (benefits) versus undesirable consequences (burdens, adverse effects, and costs), the certainty in the evidence, and the feasibility and acceptability of various interventions. Recommendations were rated as strong or conditional. The guideline panel made four conditional recommendations related to rehabilitation protocols, ventilator liberation protocols, and cuff leak tests. The recommendations were for acutely hospitalized adults mechanically ventilated for more than 24 hours to receive protocolized rehabilitation directed toward early mobilization, be managed with a ventilator liberation protocol, be assessed with a cuff leak test if they meet extubation criteria but are deemed high risk for postextubation stridor, and be administered systemic steroids for at least 4 hours before extubation if they fail the cuff leak test. The American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians recommendations are intended to support healthcare professionals in their decisions related to liberating critically ill adults from mechanical ventilation.

  4. Evaluating Molecular Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Lung Cancer: When Is a Biomarker Ready for Clinical Use? An Official American Thoracic Society Policy Statement.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Peter J; Sears, Catherine Rufatto; Arenberg, Doug A; Gaga, Mina; Gould, Michael K; Massion, Pierre P; Nair, Vish S; Powell, Charles A; Silvestri, Gerard A; Vachani, Anil; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2017-10-01

    Molecular biomarkers have the potential to improve the current state of early lung cancer detection. The goal of this project was to develop a policy statement that provides guidance about the level of evidence required to determine that a molecular biomarker, used to support early lung cancer detection, is appropriate for clinical use. An ad hoc project steering committee was formed, to include individuals with expertise in the early detection of lung cancer and molecular biomarker development, from inside and outside of the Assembly on Thoracic Oncology. Key questions, generated from the results of a survey of the project steering committee, were discussed at an in-person meeting. Results of the discussion were summarized in a policy statement that was circulated to the steering committee and revised multiple times to achieve consensus. With a focus on the clinical applications of lung cancer screening and lung nodule evaluation, the policy statement outlines categories of results that should be reported in the early phases of molecular biomarker development, discusses the level of evidence that would support study of the clinical utility, describes the outcomes that should be proven to consider a molecular biomarker clinically useful, and suggests study designs capable of assessing these outcomes. The application of molecular biomarkers to assist with the early detection of lung cancer has the potential to substantially improve our ability to select patients for lung cancer screening, and to assist with the characterization of indeterminate lung nodules. We have described relevant considerations and have suggested standards to apply when determining whether a molecular biomarker for the early detection of lung cancer is ready for clinical use.

  5. An official American Thoracic Society systematic review: the association between health insurance status and access, care delivery, and outcomes for patients who are critically ill.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Robert A; Noyahr, Lori-Anne; Thornton, J Daryl; Pinto, Ruxandra; Kahn, Jeremy M; Adhikari, Neill K J; Dodek, Peter M; Khan, Nadia A; Kalb, Tom; Hill, Andrea; O'Brien, James M; Evans, David; Curtis, J Randall

    2010-05-01

    One in three Americans under 65 years of age does not have health insurance during some portion of each year. Patients who are critically ill and lack health insurance may be at particularly high risk of morbidity and mortality due to the high cost of intensive care. To systematically review the medical and nonmedical literature to determine whether differences in critical care access, delivery, and outcomes are associated with health insurance status. Nine electronic databases (inception to 11 April 2008) were independently screened and abstracted in duplicate. From 5,508 citations, 29 observational studies met eligibility criteria. Among the general U.S. population, patients who were uninsured were less likely to receive critical care services than those with insurance (odds ratio [OR], 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55-0.56). Once admitted to the intensive care unit, patients who were uninsured had 8.5% (95% CI, 6.0-11.1) fewer procedures, were more likely to experience hospital discharge delays (OR 4.51; 95% CI, 1.46-13.93), and were more likely to have life support withdrawn (OR 2.80; 95% CI, 1.12-7.02). Lack of insurance may confer an independent risk of death for patients who are critically ill (OR 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01-1.33). Patients in managed care systems had 14.3% (95% CI, 11.5-17.2) fewer procedures in intensive care, but were also less likely to receive "potentially ineffective" care. Differences in unmeasured confounding factors may contribute to these findings. Patients in the United States who are critically ill and do not have health insurance receive fewer critical care services and may experience worse clinical outcomes. Improving preexisting health care coverage, as opposed to solely delivering more critical care services, may be one mechanism to reduce such disparities.

  6. An official American Thoracic Society/American Association of Critical-Care Nurses/American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine policy statement: the Choosing Wisely® Top 5 list in Critical Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Scott D; Becker, Deborah; Curtis, J Randall; Fowler, Robert; Hyzy, Robert; Kaplan, Lewis J; Rawat, Nishi; Sessler, Curtis N; Wunsch, Hannah; Kahn, Jeremy M

    2014-10-01

    The high costs of health care in the United States and other developed nations are attributable, in part, to overuse of tests, treatments, and procedures that provide little to no benefit for patients. To improve the quality of care while also combating this problem of cost, the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation developed the Choosing Wisely Campaign, tasking professional societies to develop lists of the top five medical services that patients and physicians should question. To present the Critical Care Societies Collaborative's Top 5 list in Critical Care Medicine and describe its development. Each professional society in the Collaborative nominated members to the Choosing Wisely task force, which established explicit criteria for evaluating candidate items, generated lists of items, performed literature reviews on each, and sought external input from content experts. Task force members narrowed the list to the Top 5 items using a standardized scoring system based on each item's likely overall impact and merits on the five explicit criteria. From an initial list of 58 unique recommendations, the task force proposed a Top 5 list that was ultimately endorsed by each Society within the Collaborative. The five recommendations are: (1) do not order diagnostic tests at regular intervals (such as every day), but rather in response to specific clinical questions; (2) do not transfuse red blood cells in hemodynamically stable, nonbleeding ICU patients with an Hb concentration greater than 7 g/dl; (3) do not use parenteral nutrition in adequately nourished critically ill patients within the first 7 days of an ICU stay; (4) do not deeply sedate mechanically ventilated patients without a specific indication and without daily attempts to lighten sedation; and (5) do not continue life support for patients at high risk for death or severely impaired functional recovery without offering patients and their families the alternative of care focused entirely on comfort

  7. An official American thoracic society statement: position statement on ATS activities for the promotion of respiratory and sleep/wake health and the care of the critically ill in the United States.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lee K; Angus, Derek C; Marin, Matthew G; Balmes, John R; Barker, Alan F; Ewart, Gary; Halbower, Ann C; Lutz, Peter O; Mularski, Richard A; Nathanson, Ian T; Sanders, Mark H; Stewart, George L; Upson, Dona J

    2009-11-15

    The 1997 American Thoracic Society (ATS) statement "A Framework for Health Care Policy in the United States" outlined core principles for the Society's activities in the public health arena. In the succeeding 10 years, profound changes have taken place in the United States health care environment. In addition, the 2005 publication of the Society's Vision highlighted some differences between the original Statement and our current priorities. Therefore, the Health Policy Committee embarked on a re-analysis and re-statement of the Society's attitudes and strategies with respect to health and public policy. This Statement reflects the findings of the Committee. To outline the key aspects of an internal ATS strategy for the promotion of respiratory and sleep/wake health and the care of the critically ill in the United States. Committee discussion and consensus-building occurred both before and after individual members performed literature searches and drafted sections of the document. Comments were solicited on the draft document from ATS committee and assembly chairs and the Executive Committee, resulting in substantive revisions of the final document. Specific strategies are suggested for the ATS in the arenas of research, training and education, patient care, and advocacy so as to enhance the delivery of health care in the fields of respiratory medicine, sleep medicine, and critical care. The American Thoracic Society's Mission, Core Principles, and Vision provide clear guidance for the formulation of specific strategies that will serve to promote improved respiratory health and care of the critically ill in the United States.

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey From The Blue Book, Official ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey From The Blue Book, Official Souvenir View Book Panama Pacific International Exposition - 1915 VIEW FROM THE EAST - Palace of Fine Arts, Baker Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  9. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Official Navy Photograph July 1954 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Official Navy Photograph July 1954 AERIAL VIEW OF FORT LOOKING NORTH - Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine, East Fort Avenue at Whetstone Point, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  10. The Official Ideology of American Law Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dent, George W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the seemingly all-powerful Association of American Law Schools (AALS) and the negative effects of its single-minded obsession with "diversity." He suggests ways in which true diversity of viewpoint might be injected into law school education. The key is to raise awareness and apply the same standards to all…

  11. An official American Thoracic Society Statement: pulmonary hypertension phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Dweik, Raed A; Rounds, Sharon; Erzurum, Serpil C; Archer, Stephen; Fagan, Karen; Hassoun, Paul M; Hill, Nicholas S; Humbert, Marc; Kawut, Steven M; Krowka, Michael; Michelakis, Evangelos; Morrell, Nicholas W; Stenmark, Kurt; Tuder, Rubin M; Newman, John

    2014-02-01

    Current classification of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is based on a relatively simple combination of patient characteristics and hemodynamics. This limits customization of treatment, and lacks the clarity of a more granular identification based on individual patient phenotypes. Rapid advances in mechanistic understanding of the disease, improved imaging methods, and innovative biomarkers now provide an opportunity to define PH phenotypes on the basis of biomarkers, advanced imaging, and pathobiology. This document organizes our current understanding of PH phenotypes and identifies gaps in our knowledge. A multidisciplinary committee with expertise in clinical care (pulmonary, cardiology, pediatrics, and pathology), clinical research, and/or basic science in the areas of PH identified important questions and reviewed and synthesized the literature. This document describes selected PH phenotypes and serves as an initial platform to define additional relevant phenotypes as new knowledge is generated. The biggest gaps in our knowledge stem from the fact that our present understanding of PH phenotypes has not come from any particularly organized effort to identify such phenotypes, but rather from reinterpreting studies and reports that were designed and performed for other purposes. Accurate phenotyping of PH can be used in research studies to increase the homogeneity of study cohorts. Once the ability of the phenotypes to predict outcomes has been validated, phenotyping may also be useful for determining prognosis and guiding treatment. This important next step in PH patient care can optimally be addressed through a consortium of study sites with well-defined goals, tasks, and structure. Planning and support for this could include the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, with industry and foundation partnerships.

  12. An official American Thoracic Society Workshop report: obesity and asthma.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Anne E; Holguin, Fernando; Sood, Akshay; Salome, Cheryl M; Pratley, Richard E; Beuther, David A; Celedón, Juan C; Shore, Stephanie A

    2010-09-01

    The developed world is currently facing an epidemic of obesity. With the increased prevalence of obesity has come the recognition that obesity is a risk factor for asthma. The purpose of this workshop was to bring together experts in the field of asthma, with experts in the field of obesity to review the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding obesity and asthma, with the goal of furthering our understanding of the link between these two disease entities to help define important future directions for research. Speakers were invited to give presentations highlighting recent developments in their area of expertise that were related to obesity and lung disease. These presentations were followed by interactive discussion. A writing committee from among the participants produced a document summarizing the proceedings. The participants found that obesity was a risk factor for asthma in all demographic groups studied. Asthma in the obese may represent a unique phenotype of asthma, with more severe disease that does not respond as well to conventional therapy. Factors that could contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma in the obese include both mechanical factors and altered inflammation and immune responses related to the obese state. There is an urgent need for research to better understand the mechanisms of asthma in the obese, and to develop new therapies specifically targeted to this unique patient population.

  13. An Official American Thoracic Society Statement: Pulmonary Hypertension Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Dweik, Raed A.; Rounds, Sharon; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Archer, Stephen; Fagan, Karen; Hassoun, Paul M.; Hill, Nicholas S.; Humbert, Marc; Kawut, Steven M.; Krowka, Michael; Michelakis, Evangelos; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Stenmark, Kurt; Tuder, Rubin M.; Newman, John

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current classification of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is based on a relatively simple combination of patient characteristics and hemodynamics. This limits customization of treatment, and lacks the clarity of a more granular identification based on individual patient phenotypes. Rapid advances in mechanistic understanding of the disease, improved imaging methods, and innovative biomarkers now provide an opportunity to define PH phenotypes on the basis of biomarkers, advanced imaging, and pathobiology. This document organizes our current understanding of PH phenotypes and identifies gaps in our knowledge. Methods: A multidisciplinary committee with expertise in clinical care (pulmonary, cardiology, pediatrics, and pathology), clinical research, and/or basic science in the areas of PH identified important questions and reviewed and synthesized the literature. Results: This document describes selected PH phenotypes and serves as an initial platform to define additional relevant phenotypes as new knowledge is generated. The biggest gaps in our knowledge stem from the fact that our present understanding of PH phenotypes has not come from any particularly organized effort to identify such phenotypes, but rather from reinterpreting studies and reports that were designed and performed for other purposes. Conclusions: Accurate phenotyping of PH can be used in research studies to increase the homogeneity of study cohorts. Once the ability of the phenotypes to predict outcomes has been validated, phenotyping may also be useful for determining prognosis and guiding treatment. This important next step in PH patient care can optimally be addressed through a consortium of study sites with well-defined goals, tasks, and structure. Planning and support for this could include the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, with industry and foundation partnerships. PMID:24484330

  14. An official american thoracic society statement: work-exacerbated asthma.

    PubMed

    Henneberger, Paul K; Redlich, Carrie A; Callahan, David B; Harber, Philip; Lemière, Catherine; Martin, James; Tarlo, Susan M; Vandenplas, Olivier; Torén, Kjell

    2011-08-01

    Occupational exposures can contribute to the exacerbation as well as the onset of asthma. However, work-exacerbated asthma (WEA) has received less attention than occupational asthma (OA) that is caused by work. The purpose of this Statement is to summarize current knowledge about the descriptive epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and management and treatment of WEA; propose a case definition for WEA; and discuss needs for prevention and research. Information about WEA was identified primarily by systematic searches of the medical literature. Statements about prevention and research needs were reached by consensus. WEA is defined as the worsening of asthma due to conditions at work. WEA is common, with a median prevalence of 21.5% among adults with asthma. Different types of agents or conditions at work may exacerbate asthma. WEA cases with persistent work-related symptoms can have clinical characteristics (level of severity, medication needs) and adverse socioeconomic outcomes (unemployment, reduction in income) similar to those of OA cases. Compared with adults with asthma unrelated to work, WEA cases report more days with symptoms, seek more medical care, and have a lower quality of life. WEA should be considered in any patient with asthma that is getting worse or who has work-related symptoms. Management of WEA should focus on reducing work exposures and optimizing standard medical management, with a change in jobs only if these measures are not successful. WEA is a common and underrecognized adverse outcome resulting from conditions at work. Additional research is needed to improve the understanding of the risk factors for, and mechanisms and outcomes of, WEA, and to inform and evaluate preventive interventions.

  15. Self-perceived video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy proficiency by recent graduates of North American thoracic residencies.

    PubMed

    Boffa, Daniel J; Gangadharan, Sidharta; Kent, Michael; Kerendi, Faraz; Onaitis, Mark; Verrier, Edward; Roselli, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques offer several advantages over traditional open procedures, yet the pathway to minimally invasive proficiency can be difficult to navigate. As a part of an effort of the Joint Council of Thoracic Surgical Education to increase access to this skill set in the general thoracic community, recent graduates of thoracic residencies were surveyed to determine the self-reported achievement of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy proficiency and the merits of various educational opportunities. The objective of this study was to estimate the comfort level of recent graduates with the minimally invasive approach, as this demographic not only reflects the current status of training, but represents the future of the specialty. Surgeons graduating North American thoracic residencies between 2006 and 2008 identifying themselves as practitioners of general thoracic surgery were surveyed. A total of 271 surgeons completed training between 2006 and 2008 and indicated general thoracic to be a part of their practice (84 dedicated thoracic and 187 mixed). One hundred and forty-six surgeons completed the survey (54%) including 74 of 84 (88%) dedicated thoracic surgeons. Overall, 58% of recent graduates who perform general thoracic procedures consider themselves proficient in VATS lobectomies (86% of dedicated thoracic surgeons and 28% of surgeons with a mixed practice, P < 0.0001). Of surgeons considering themselves to be proficient at VATS lobectomies, 66% felt thoracic residency was critical or very important to achieving proficiency. Fellowships after completing board residency, animal labs, and follow-up VATS courses put on by experts were much less consistently beneficial. The vast majority of the 25 dedicated general thoracic surgeons who graduate each year consider themselves proficient in VATS lobectomies, largely due to training in their thoracic residencies. On the other hand, the minority of surgeons performing general

  16. Liberation From Mechanical Ventilation in Critically Ill Adults: An Official American College of Chest Physicians/American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Inspiratory Pressure Augmentation During Spontaneous Breathing Trials, Protocols Minimizing Sedation, and Noninvasive Ventilation Immediately After Extubation.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Daniel R; Patel, Sheena; Girard, Timothy D; Morris, Peter E; Schmidt, Gregory A; Truwit, Jonathon D; Alhazzani, Waleed; Burns, Suzanne M; Epstein, Scott K; Esteban, Andres; Fan, Eddy; Ferrer, Miguel; Fraser, Gilles L; Gong, Michelle Ng; Hough, Catherine L; Mehta, Sangeeta; Nanchal, Rahul; Pawlik, Amy J; Schweickert, William D; Sessler, Curtis N; Strøm, Thomas; Kress, John P

    2017-01-01

    An update of evidence-based guidelines concerning liberation from mechanical ventilation is needed as new evidence has become available. The American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) and the American Thoracic Society (ATS) have collaborated to provide recommendations to clinicians concerning liberation from the ventilator. Comprehensive evidence syntheses, including meta-analyses, were performed to summarize all available evidence relevant to the guideline panel's questions. The evidence was appraised using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach, and the results were summarized in evidence profiles. The evidence syntheses were discussed and recommendations developed and approved by a multidisciplinary committee of experts in mechanical ventilation. Recommendations for three population, intervention, comparator, outcome (PICO) questions concerning ventilator liberation are presented in this document. The guideline panel considered the balance of desirable (benefits) and undesirable (burdens, adverse effects, costs) consequences, quality of evidence, feasibility, and acceptability of various interventions with respect to the selected questions. Conditional (weak) recommendations were made to use inspiratory pressure augmentation in the initial spontaneous breathing trial (SBT) and to use protocols to minimize sedation for patients ventilated for more than 24 h. A strong recommendation was made to use preventive noninvasive ventilation (NIV) for high-risk patients ventilated for more than 24 h immediately after extubation to improve selected outcomes. The recommendations were limited by the quality of the available evidence. The guideline panel provided recommendations for inspiratory pressure augmentation during an initial SBT, protocols minimizing sedation, and preventative NIV, in relation to ventilator liberation. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Cigarette smoking and health. American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    1996-02-01

    Cigarette smoking remains the primary cause of preventable death and morbidity in the United States. Smoking causes lung cancer, COPD, and CHD and contributes significantly to mortality from other conditions such as stroke. Maternal smoking during pregnancy causes low birthweight and perinatal mortality, and it may have lasting impact on the child's physical and cognitive growth. Passive exposure to ETS causes lung cancer and poses particular danger to the respiratory health of young children. Smoking cessation strategies are important, but the should be supplemented by community and policy-level interventions. Workplace or community smoking bans, statewide taxes on tobacco, and antismoking media campaigns may be effective adjuncts to individual cessation strategies. These strategies may be an even more important disincentive to smoking initiation. The expanding horizon of health consequences of smoking and its costs to American society should again challenge public health agencies to develop and implement effective strategies to prevent smoking acquisition by young people. These health effects should also motivate health professionals in other countries where smoking prevalence is increasing, rather than decreasing, to initiate more effective efforts to reverse this trend and minimize the excess morbidity and death that accompany this dangerous habit.

  18. [International Relationship of Japanese General Thoracic Surgeons].

    PubMed

    Okumura, Meinoshin

    2017-01-01

    Japanese thoracic surgeons have created personal relationship with European and North American surgeons. During the last 10 years, official relation between Japanese Association for Chest Surgery(JACS) and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) has been established besides personal interaction, and communication among the thoracic surgeons in Asia was prompted through Asia Thoracoscopic Surgery Education Program( ATEP). International relationship through academic associations is expected to contribute to encouraging general thoracic surgeons.

  19. An official American Thoracic Society/International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation/Society of Critical Care Medicine/Association of Organ and Procurement Organizations/United Network of Organ Sharing Statement: ethical and policy considerations in organ donation after circulatory determination of death.

    PubMed

    Gries, Cynthia J; White, Douglas B; Truog, Robert D; Dubois, James; Cosio, Carmen C; Dhanani, Sonny; Chan, Kevin M; Corris, Paul; Dark, John; Fulda, Gerald; Glazier, Alexandra K; Higgins, Robert; Love, Robert; Mason, David P; Nakagawa, Thomas A; Shapiro, Ron; Shemie, Sam; Tracy, Mary Fran; Travaline, John M; Valapour, Maryam; West, Lori; Zaas, David; Halpern, Scott D

    2013-07-01

    Donation after circulatory determination of death (DCDD) has the potential to increase the number of organs available for transplantation. Because consent and management of potential donors must occur before death, DCDD raises unique ethical and policy issues. To develop an ethics and health policy statement on adult and pediatric DCDD relevant to critical care and transplantation stakeholders. A multidisciplinary panel of stakeholders was convened to develop an ethics and health policy statement. The panel consisted of representatives from the American Thoracic Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine, International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation, Association of Organ Procurement Organizations, and the United Network of Organ Sharing. The panel reviewed the literature, discussed important ethics and health policy considerations, and developed a guiding framework for decision making by stakeholders. A framework to guide ethics and health policy statement was established, which addressed the consent process, pre- and post mortem interventions, the determination of death, provisions of end-of-life care, and pediatric DCDD. The information presented in this Statement is based on the current evidence, experience, and clinical rationale. New clinical research and the development and dissemination of new technologies will eventually necessitate an update of this Statement.

  20. American Thoracic Society Member Survey on Climate Change and Health

    PubMed Central

    Bloodhart, Brittany; Ewart, Gary; Thurston, George D.; Balmes, John R.; Guidotti, Tee L.; Maibach, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS), in collaboration with George Mason University, surveyed a random sample of ATS members to assess their perceptions of, clinical experiences with, and preferred policy responses to climate change. An e-mail containing an invitation from the ATS President and a link to an online survey was sent to 5,500 randomly selected U.S. members; up to four reminder e-mails were sent to nonrespondents. Responses were received from members in 49 states and the District of Columbia (n = 915); the response rate was 17%. Geographic distribution of respondents mirrored that of the sample. Survey estimates’ confidence intervals were ±3.5% or smaller. Results indicate that a large majority of ATS members have concluded that climate change is happening (89%), that it is driven by human activity (68%), and that it is relevant to patient care (“a great deal”/“a moderate amount”) (65%). A majority of respondents indicated they were already observing health impacts of climate change among their patients, most commonly as increases in chronic disease severity from air pollution (77%), allergic symptoms from exposure to plants or mold (58%), and severe weather injuries (57%). A larger majority anticipated seeing these climate-related health impacts in the next 2 decades. Respondents indicated that physicians and physician organizations should play an active role in educating patients, the public, and policy makers on the human health effects of climate change. Overall, ATS members are observing that human health is already adversely affected by climate change and support responses to address this situation. PMID:25535822

  1. American Thoracic Society member survey on climate change and health.

    PubMed

    Sarfaty, Mona; Bloodhart, Brittany; Ewart, Gary; Thurston, George D; Balmes, John R; Guidotti, Tee L; Maibach, Edward W

    2015-02-01

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS), in collaboration with George Mason University, surveyed a random sample of ATS members to assess their perceptions of, clinical experiences with, and preferred policy responses to climate change. An e-mail containing an invitation from the ATS President and a link to an online survey was sent to 5,500 randomly selected U.S. members; up to four reminder e-mails were sent to nonrespondents. Responses were received from members in 49 states and the District of Columbia (n = 915); the response rate was 17%. Geographic distribution of respondents mirrored that of the sample. Survey estimates' confidence intervals were ±3.5% or smaller. Results indicate that a large majority of ATS members have concluded that climate change is happening (89%), that it is driven by human activity (68%), and that it is relevant to patient care ("a great deal"/"a moderate amount") (65%). A majority of respondents indicated they were already observing health impacts of climate change among their patients, most commonly as increases in chronic disease severity from air pollution (77%), allergic symptoms from exposure to plants or mold (58%), and severe weather injuries (57%). A larger majority anticipated seeing these climate-related health impacts in the next 2 decades. Respondents indicated that physicians and physician organizations should play an active role in educating patients, the public, and policy makers on the human health effects of climate change. Overall, ATS members are observing that human health is already adversely affected by climate change and support responses to address this situation.

  2. Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: Guidelines From the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Abman, Steven H; Hansmann, Georg; Archer, Stephen L; Ivy, D Dunbar; Adatia, Ian; Chung, Wendy K; Hanna, Brian D; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Raj, J Usha; Cornfield, David; Stenmark, Kurt R; Steinhorn, Robin; Thébaud, Bernard; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Kuehne, Titus; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Friedberg, Mark K; Earing, Michael; Barst, Robyn J; Keller, Roberta L; Kinsella, John P; Mullen, Mary; Deterding, Robin; Kulik, Thomas; Mallory, George; Humpl, Tilman; Wessel, David L

    2015-11-24

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with diverse cardiac, pulmonary, and systemic diseases in neonates, infants, and older children and contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. However, current approaches to caring for pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension have been limited by the lack of consensus guidelines from experts in the field. In a joint effort from the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society, a panel of experienced clinicians and clinician-scientists was assembled to review the current literature and to make recommendations on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This publication presents the results of extensive literature reviews, discussions, and formal scoring of recommendations for the care of children with pulmonary hypertension.

  3. 78 FR 36571 - North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official Protraction Diagram (OPDs) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM),...

  4. The American Association for Thoracic Surgery 2016 ethics forum: Working virtues in surgical practice.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Larry R

    2017-05-01

    Moral virtues are the complement to ethical principles. They constitute the elements of character that drive habits and daily routines. Certain virtues are especially important in surgery, shaping surgical practice even when no big decisions are at hand. Eight virtues are described and the work they do is explored: trustworthiness, equanimity, empathy, advocacy, compassion, courage, humility, and hope. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. American Thoracic Society documents: an official American Thoracic Society/Society of Thoracic Radiology Clinical Practice Guideline--Evaluation of Suspected Pulmonary Embolism in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ann N; Bull, Todd M; Jaeschke, Roman; Lockwood, Charles J; Boiselle, Phillip M; Hurwitz, Lynne M; James, Andra H; McCullough, Laurence B; Menda, Yusuf; Paidas, Michael J; Royal, Henry D; Tapson, Victor F; Winer-Muram, Helen T; Chervenak, Frank A; Cody, Dianna D; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Stave, Christopher D; Tuttle, Brandi D

    2012-02-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a leading cause of maternal mortality in the developed world. Along with appropriate prophylaxis and therapy, prevention of death from PE in pregnancy requires a high index of clinical suspicion followed by a timely and accurate diagnostic approach. To provide guidance on this important health issue, a multidisciplinary panel of major medical stakeholders was convened to develop evidence-based guidelines for evaluation of suspected pulmonary embolism in pregnancy using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. In formulation of the recommended diagnostic algorithm, the important outcomes were defined to be diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic yield; the panel placed a high value on minimizing cumulative radiation dose when determining the recommended sequence of tests. Overall, the quality of the underlying evidence for all recommendations was rated as very low or low with some of the evidence considered for recommendations extrapolated from studies of the general population. Despite the low quality evidence, strong recommendations were made for three specific scenarios: performance of chest radiography (CXR) as the first radiation-associated procedure; use of lung scintigraphy as the preferred test in the setting of a normal CXR; and performance of computed-tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) rather than digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in a pregnant woman with a nondiagnostic ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) result. The recommendations presented in this guideline are based upon the currently available evidence; availability of new clinical research data and development and dissemination of new technologies will necessitate a revision and update. © RSNA, 2011

  6. An official American Thoracic Society/Society of Thoracic Radiology clinical practice guideline: evaluation of suspected pulmonary embolism in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ann N; Bull, Todd M; Jaeschke, Roman; Lockwood, Charles J; Boiselle, Phillip M; Hurwitz, Lynne M; James, Andra H; McCullough, Laurence B; Menda, Yusuf; Paidas, Michael J; Royal, Henry D; Tapson, Victor F; Winer-Muram, Helen T; Chervenak, Frank A; Cody, Dianna D; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Stave, Christopher D; Tuttle, Brandi D

    2011-11-15

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a leading cause of maternal mortality in the developed world. Along with appropriate prophylaxis and therapy, prevention of death from PE in pregnancy requires a high index of clinical suspicion followed by a timely and accurate diagnostic approach. To provide guidance on this important health issue, a multidisciplinary panel of major medical stakeholders was convened to develop evidence-based guidelines for evaluation of suspected pulmonary embolism in pregnancy using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. In formulation of the recommended diagnostic algorithm, the important outcomes were defined to be diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic yield; the panel placed a high value on minimizing cumulative radiation dose when determining the recommended sequence of tests. Overall, the quality of the underlying evidence for all recommendations was rated as very low or low, with some of the evidence considered for recommendations extrapolated from studies of the general population. Despite the low-quality evidence, strong recommendations were made for three specific scenarios: performance of chest radiography (CXR) as the first radiation-associated procedure; use of lung scintigraphy as the preferred test in the setting of a normal CXR; and performance of computed-tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) rather than digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in a pregnant woman with a nondiagnostic ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) result. The recommendations presented in this guideline are based upon the currently available evidence; availability of new clinical research data and development and dissemination of new technologies will necessitate a revision and update.

  7. An official American Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline: exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Jonathan P; Hallstrand, Teal S; Mastronarde, John G; Kaminsky, David A; Rundell, Kenneth W; Hull, James H; Storms, William W; Weiler, John M; Cheek, Fern M; Wilson, Kevin C; Anderson, Sandra D

    2013-05-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) describes acute airway narrowing that occurs as a result of exercise. EIB occurs in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma, but may also occur in individuals without known asthma. To provide clinicians with practical guidance, a multidisciplinary panel of stakeholders was convened to review the pathogenesis of EIB and to develop evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of EIB. The evidence was appraised and recommendations were formulated using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. Recommendations for the treatment of EIB were developed. The quality of evidence supporting the recommendations was variable, ranging from low to high. A strong recommendation was made for using a short-acting β(2)-agonist before exercise in all patients with EIB. For patients who continue to have symptoms of EIB despite the administration of a short-acting β(2)-agonist before exercise, strong recommendations were made for a daily inhaled corticosteroid, a daily leukotriene receptor antagonist, or a mast cell stabilizing agent before exercise. The recommendations in this Guideline reflect the currently available evidence. New clinical research data will necessitate a revision and update in the future.

  8. An official American Thoracic Society statement: diagnosis and management of beryllium sensitivity and chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed

    Balmes, John R; Abraham, Jerrold L; Dweik, Raed A; Fireman, Elizabeth; Fontenot, Andrew P; Maier, Lisa A; Muller-Quernheim, Joachim; Ostiguy, Gaston; Pepper, Lewis D; Saltini, Cesare; Schuler, Christine R; Takaro, Tim K; Wambach, Paul F

    2014-11-15

    Beryllium continues to have a wide range of industrial applications. Exposure to beryllium can lead to sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD). The purpose of this statement is to increase awareness and knowledge about beryllium exposure, BeS, and CBD. Evidence was identified by a search of MEDLINE. The committee then summarized the evidence, drew conclusions, and described their approach to diagnosis and management. The beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test is the cornerstone of both medical surveillance and the diagnosis of BeS and CBD. A confirmed abnormal beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test without evidence of lung disease is diagnostic of BeS. BeS with evidence of a granulomatous inflammatory response in the lung is diagnostic of CBD. The determinants of progression from BeS to CBD are uncertain, but higher exposures and the presence of a genetic variant in the HLA-DP β chain appear to increase the risk. Periodic evaluation of affected individuals can detect disease progression (from BeS to CBD, or from mild CBD to more severe CBD). Corticosteroid therapy is typically administered when a patient with CBD exhibits evidence of significant lung function abnormality or decline. Medical surveillance in workplaces that use beryllium-containing materials can identify individuals with BeS and at-risk groups of workers, which can help prioritize efforts to reduce inhalational and dermal exposures.

  9. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report: Evaluation and Management of Asthma in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Skloot, Gwen S; Busse, Paula J; Braman, Sidney S; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Dixon, Anne E; Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; Scichilone, Nicola; Prakash, Y S; Pabelick, Christina M; Mathur, Sameer K; Hanania, Nicola A; Moore, Wendy C; Gibson, Peter G; Zieman, Susan; Ragless, Betina B

    2016-11-01

    Asthma in the elderly (>65 yr old) is common and associated with higher morbidity and mortality than asthma in younger patients. The poor outcomes in this group are due, in part, to underdiagnosis and undertreatment. There are a variety of factors related to aging itself that affect the presentation of asthma in the elderly and influence diagnosis and management. Structural changes in the aging lung superimposed on structural changes due to asthma itself can worsen the disease and physiologic function. Changes in the aging immune system influence the cellular composition and function in asthmatic airways. These processes and differences from younger individuals with asthma are not well understood. Phenotypes of asthma in the elderly have not been clearly delineated, but it is likely that age of onset and overlap with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease impact disease characteristics. Physiologic tests and biomarkers used to diagnose and follow asthma in the elderly are generally similar to testing in younger individuals; however, whether they should be modified in aging has not been established. Confounding influences, such as comorbidities (increasing the risk of polypharmacy), impaired cognition and motor skills, psychosocial effects of aging, and age-related adverse effects of medications, impact both diagnosis and treatment of asthma in the elderly. Future efforts to understand asthma in the elderly must include geriatric-specific methodology to diagnose, characterize, monitor, and treat their disease.

  10. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report: Translational Research in Rare Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kristof, Arnold S; Petrof, Basil J; Hamid, Qutayba; Kolb, Martin; Landry, Jennifer S; MacKenzie, Alex; McCormack, Francis X; Murawski, Inga J; Moss, Joel; Rauch, Frank; Rosas, Ivan O; Shapiro, Adam J; Smith, Benjamin M; Thomas, David Y; Trapnell, Bruce C; Young, Lisa R; Zariwala, Maimoona A

    2017-08-01

    Rare respiratory diseases (RRDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that collectively represent a significant health care burden. In recent years, strong advocacy and policy initiatives have led to advances in the implementation of research and clinical care for rare diseases. The development of specialized centers and research networks has facilitated support for affected individuals as well as emerging programs in basic, translational, and clinical research. In selected RRDs, subsequent gains in knowledge have informed the development of targeted therapies and effective diagnostic tests, but many gaps persist. There was therefore a desire to identify the elements contributing to an effective translational research program in RRDs. To this end, a workshop was convened in October 2015 with a focus on the implementation of effective transnational research networks and collaborations aimed at developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Key elements included an emphasis on molecular pathogenesis, the continuing engagement of patient advocacy groups and policy makers, the effective use of preclinical models in the translational research pipeline, and the detailed phenotyping of patient cohorts. During the course of the workshop, current logistical and knowledge gaps were identified, and new solutions or opportunities were highlighted.

  11. Official American Thoracic Society/Japanese Respiratory Society Clinical Practice Guidelines: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Francis X; Gupta, Nishant; Finlay, Geraldine R; Young, Lisa R; Taveira-DaSilva, Angelo M; Glasgow, Connie G; Steagall, Wendy K; Johnson, Simon R; Sahn, Steven A; Ryu, Jay H; Strange, Charlie; Seyama, Kuniaki; Sullivan, Eugene J; Kotloff, Robert M; Downey, Gregory P; Chapman, Jeffrey T; Han, MeiLan K; D'Armiento, Jeanine M; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Henske, Elizabeth P; Bissler, John J; Colby, Thomas V; Kinder, Brent W; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; Brown, Kevin K; Cordier, Jean F; Meyer, Cristopher; Cottin, Vincent; Brozek, Jan L; Smith, Karen; Wilson, Kevin C; Moss, Joel

    2016-09-15

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare cystic lung disease that primarily affects women. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of LAM. Systematic reviews were performed to summarize evidence pertinent to our questions. The evidence was summarized and discussed by a multidisciplinary panel. Evidence-based recommendations were then formulated, written, and graded using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. After considering the panel's confidence in the estimated effects, the balance of desirable (i.e., benefits) and undesirable (i.e., harms and burdens) consequences of treatment, patient values and preferences, cost, and feasibility, recommendations were formulated for or against specific interventions. These included recommendations for sirolimus treatment and vascular endothelial growth factor D testing and recommendations against doxycycline and hormonal therapy. Evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with LAM are provided. Frequent reassessment and updating will be needed.

  12. An official American Thoracic Society statement: update on the mechanisms, assessment, and management of dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Parshall, Mark B; Schwartzstein, Richard M; Adams, Lewis; Banzett, Robert B; Manning, Harold L; Bourbeau, Jean; Calverley, Peter M; Gift, Audrey G; Harver, Andrew; Lareau, Suzanne C; Mahler, Donald A; Meek, Paula M; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2012-02-15

    Dyspnea is a common, distressing symptom of cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular diseases. Since the ATS published a consensus statement on dyspnea in 1999, there has been enormous growth in knowledge about the neurophysiology of dyspnea and increasing interest in dyspnea as a patient-reported outcome. The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS Consensus Statement on dyspnea. An interdisciplinary committee of experts representing ATS assemblies on Nursing, Clinical Problems, Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology, Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and Behavioral Science determined the overall scope of this update through group consensus. Focused literature reviews in key topic areas were conducted by committee members with relevant expertise. The final content of this statement was agreed upon by all members. Progress has been made in clarifying mechanisms underlying several qualitatively and mechanistically distinct breathing sensations. Brain imaging studies have consistently shown dyspnea stimuli to be correlated with activation of cortico-limbic areas involved with interoception and nociception. Endogenous and exogenous opioids may modulate perception of dyspnea. Instruments for measuring dyspnea are often poorly characterized; a framework is proposed for more consistent identification of measurement domains. Progress in treatment of dyspnea has not matched progress in elucidating underlying mechanisms. There is a critical need for interdisciplinary translational research to connect dyspnea mechanisms with clinical treatment and to validate dyspnea measures as patient-reported outcomes for clinical trials.

  13. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement: Impact of Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Susmita; Quan, Stuart F; Almeida, Fernanda; Ayappa, Indu; Batool-Anwar, Salma; Budhiraja, Rohit; Cruse, Peggy E; Drager, Luciano F; Griss, Barbara; Marshall, Nathaniel; Patel, Sanjay R; Patil, Susheel; Knight, Shandra L; Rowley, James A; Slyman, Alison

    2016-05-01

    Mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a highly prevalent disorder in adults; however, whether mild OSA has significant neurocognitive and cardiovascular complications is uncertain. The specific goals of this Research Statement are to appraise the evidence regarding whether long-term adverse neurocognitive and cardiovascular outcomes are attributable to mild OSA in adults, evaluate whether or not treatment of mild OSA is effective at preventing or reducing these adverse neurocognitive and cardiovascular outcomes, delineate the key research gaps, and provide direction for future research agendas. Literature searches from multiple reference databases were performed using medical subject headings and text words for OSA in adults as well as by hand searches. Pragmatic systematic reviews of the relevant body of evidence were performed. Studies were incongruent in their definitions of "mild" OSA. Data were inconsistent regarding the relationship between mild OSA and daytime sleepiness. However, treatment of mild OSA may improve sleepiness in patients who are sleepy at baseline and improve quality of life. There is limited or inconsistent evidence pertaining to the impact of therapy of mild OSA on neurocognition, mood, vehicle accidents, cardiovascular events, stroke, and arrhythmias. There is evidence that treatment of mild OSA in individuals who demonstrate subjective sleepiness may be beneficial. Treatment may also improve quality of life. Future research agendas should focus on clarifying the effect of mild OSA and impact of effective treatment on other neurocognitive and cardiovascular endpoints as detailed in the document.

  14. An Official American Thoracic Society Statement: Update on the Mechanisms, Assessment, and Management of Dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Parshall, Mark B.; Schwartzstein, Richard M.; Adams, Lewis; Banzett, Robert B.; Manning, Harold L.; Bourbeau, Jean; Calverley, Peter M.; Gift, Audrey G.; Harver, Andrew; Lareau, Suzanne C.; Mahler, Donald A.; Meek, Paula M.; O'Donnell, Denis E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dyspnea is a common, distressing symptom of cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular diseases. Since the ATS published a consensus statement on dyspnea in 1999, there has been enormous growth in knowledge about the neurophysiology of dyspnea and increasing interest in dyspnea as a patient-reported outcome. Purpose: The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS Consensus Statement on dyspnea. Methods: An interdisciplinary committee of experts representing ATS assemblies on Nursing, Clinical Problems, Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology, Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and Behavioral Science determined the overall scope of this update through group consensus. Focused literature reviews in key topic areas were conducted by committee members with relevant expertise. The final content of this statement was agreed upon by all members. Results: Progress has been made in clarifying mechanisms underlying several qualitatively and mechanistically distinct breathing sensations. Brain imaging studies have consistently shown dyspnea stimuli to be correlated with activation of cortico-limbic areas involved with interoception and nociception. Endogenous and exogenous opioids may modulate perception of dyspnea. Instruments for measuring dyspnea are often poorly characterized; a framework is proposed for more consistent identification of measurement domains. Conclusions: Progress in treatment of dyspnea has not matched progress in elucidating underlying mechanisms. There is a critical need for interdisciplinary translational research to connect dyspnea mechanisms with clinical treatment and to validate dyspnea measures as patient-reported outcomes for clinical trials. PMID:22336677

  15. Shared Decision Making in ICUs: An American College of Critical Care Medicine and American Thoracic Society Policy Statement.

    PubMed

    Kon, Alexander A; Davidson, Judy E; Morrison, Wynne; Danis, Marion; White, Douglas B

    2016-01-01

    Shared decision making is endorsed by critical care organizations; however, there remains confusion about what shared decision making is, when it should be used, and approaches to promote partnerships in treatment decisions. The purpose of this statement is to define shared decision making, recommend when shared decision making should be used, identify the range of ethically acceptable decision-making models, and present important communication skills. The American College of Critical Care Medicine and American Thoracic Society Ethics Committees reviewed empirical research and normative analyses published in peer-reviewed journals to generate recommendations. Recommendations approved by consensus of the full Ethics Committees of American College of Critical Care Medicine and American Thoracic Society were included in the statement. Six recommendations were endorsed: 1) DEFINITION: Shared decision making is a collaborative process that allows patients, or their surrogates, and clinicians to make healthcare decisions together, taking into account the best scientific evidence available, as well as the patient's values, goals, and preferences. 2) Clinicians should engage in a shared decision making process to define overall goals of care (including decisions regarding limiting or withdrawing life-prolonging interventions) and when making major treatment decisions that may be affected by personal values, goals, and preferences. 3) Clinicians should use as their "default" approach a shared decision making process that includes three main elements: information exchange, deliberation, and making a treatment decision. 4) A wide range of decision-making approaches are ethically supportable, including patient- or surrogate-directed and clinician-directed models. Clinicians should tailor the decision-making process based on the preferences of the patient or surrogate. 5) Clinicians should be trained in communication skills. 6) Research is needed to evaluate decision

  16. Japanese Americans and the Public School Americanization Program of the Progressive Era: The Seattle Public Schools' Official Attitude, 1916-1942.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pak, Yoon K.

    This comparative historical analysis examines the official attitude of the Seattle (Washington) Public Schools toward Americanization and ethnic groups, specifically Japanese Americans, between 1916 and 1942. The paper contains seven major sections including: (1) "Objective and Rationale for Studying Seattle"; (2) "Methodology and…

  17. Evolution and revolution: the formation of today's American Thoracic Society, part 1.

    PubMed

    Murray, John F; Du Melle, Fran; Hopewell, Philip C

    2012-11-15

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS), the preeminent professional organization in the field of respiratory, critical care, and sleep medicine, is now 107 years old. For the most part, the Society's administrative and medical-scientific interests evolved in an orderly fashion, but two "revolutions" took place that should be remembered. What ultimately metamorphosed into the ATS in 1960 began in 1905 as the 34-member American Sanatorium Association, which in 1915 became the medical section of the National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis (NASPT). In 1918, the NASPT became the National Tuberculosis Association and in 1939, the ASA became the American Trudeau Society, cosmetic revisions having no effect on either the medical section-parent relationship or the one-disease orientation of both organizations. After World War II, the narrow focus of the ATS on tuberculosis was progressively enlarged through coalescence of several factors that transformed the practice of pulmonary medicine: the growth of intensive care units and pulmonary function laboratories and the advent of fiberoptic bronchoscopy; the rise of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer coincident with the withering of tuberculosis; and the arrival of pulmonary physician-scientists who sought enrichment through a professional society. The newcomers found a home in the ATS, but it was slow to fulfill their needs for scientific communication and administrative responsibility. The first revolution, the formation of Scientific Assemblies, got the job done quickly and well, as described in Part 1 of this perspective. The second revolution, separation from the American Lung Association, is described in Part 2.

  18. Political conservatism, rigidity, and dogmatism in American foreign policy officials: the 1966 Mennis data.

    PubMed

    Kemmelmeier, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Researchers have established a relationship between political orientation and cognitive styles (A. Chirumbolo, 2002; J. T. Jost, J. Glaser, A. W. Kruglanski, & F. Sulloway, 2003a, 2003b; M. Kemmelmeier, 1997). In this article, the author examined whether this finding is true in the political elite, whether the relationship is linear or curvilinear, and whether interest in politics moderates the relationship between political orientation and cognitive styles. He used a 1966 sample of American foreign policy officials (N = 95) to examine the relationship between self-described conservatism and party identification and individual differences in rigidity and dogmatism. Rigidity was related to self-described conservatism, but this relationship was only significant among participants high in political interest, whereas dogmatism was unconditionally related to party identification. All relationships were linear and did not contain a curvilinear component.

  19. Evolution and revolution: the formation of Today's American Thoracic Society, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, Philip C; Du Melle, Fran; Murray, John F

    2012-12-01

    The major event in the recent history of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) is its separation from the American Lung Association (ALA), resulting in the Society's independence. The seeds of the separation were sown over the course of many years. The fundamental reason driving the separation was the organizational structure of the ALA, with the ATS being a division within the larger organization and having neither the standing to make independent decisions nor the ability to respond effectively to the expectations of a growing and diverse membership. Additional important factors included continual organizational conflicts; ongoing struggles over finances; reluctance by the ALA to provide what the ATS considered to be appropriate support for research; divergence of areas of interest as the Society became more broad based to include critical care and sleep medicine, as well as concerns with medical practice issues; and internationalization of the Society, with an increasing proportion of members residing outside the United States. Once it was decided that the ATS could only exist as an independent organization, the separation agreement was negotiated in less than 3 years. Although there were substantial unknowns immediately after the separation, a unified leadership, a strongly supportive membership, and a skilled and dedicated staff guided the organization through this difficult period, from which the Society emerged as a strong independent professional organization that remains true to the public-minded spirit that guided its formation 107 years ago.

  20. Diagnostic disparity of previous and revised American Thoracic Society guidelines for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Lee; Shapera, Shane; Mittoo, Shikha; Marras, Theodore K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A revised guideline for the diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) was formulated by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) in 2011 to improve disease diagnosis and provide a simplified algorithm for clinicians. The impact of these revisions on patient classification, however, remain unclear. OBJECTIVE: To examine the concordance between diagnostic guidelines to understand how revisions impact patient classification. METHODS: A cohort of 54 patients with either suspected IPF or a working diagnosis of IPF was evaluated in a retrospective chart review, in which patient data were examined according to previous and revised ATS guidelines. Patient characteristics influencing the fulfillment of diagnostic criteria were compared using one-way ANOVA and χ2 tests. RESULTS: Revised and previous guideline criteria for IPF were met in 78% and 83% of patients, respectively. Revised guidelines modified a classification based on previous guidelines in 28% of cases. Fifteen percent of patients meeting previous ATS guidelines failed to meet revised criteria due to a lack of honeycombing on high-resolution computed tomography and the absence of a surgical lung biopsy. Patients failing to meet previous and revised diagnostic criteria for IPF were younger. CONCLUSION: The revised guidelines for the diagnosis of IPF classify a substantial proportion of patients differently than the previous guidelines. PMID:25575178

  1. Advancing Clinical Practice and Policy through Guidelines. The Role of the American Thoracic Society

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    In the face of an overwhelmingly large and growing medical literature, providers often turn to clinical practice guidelines to inform the decisions they make with patients. By systematically appraising the evidence and providing transparent recommendations for practice, guidelines have the potential to improve both bedside decision-making and health policy. This potential has not been fully realized because most guidelines lack transparency, are tainted by conflicts of interest, or fail to employ rigorous methods to appraise the evidence. To address the shortcomings of past guidelines, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published recommendations for trustworthy guidelines, effectively setting the “gold standard” for what constitutes a high-quality guideline. Along with many other groups that develop guidelines, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) is rapidly evolving processes for development and implementation to meet many of the IOM standards. This Pulmonary Perspective describes the rapidly changing landscape of clinical practice guidelines, the role of the ATS in this landscape, and the activities the ATS is engaged in to ensure that the guidelines it produces are of the highest quality with the broadest impact. PMID:23392437

  2. American Thoracic Society and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Implementation Research Workshop Report

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Bruce G.; Krishnan, Jerry A.; Chambers, David A.; Cloutier, Michelle M.; Riekert, Kristin A.; Rand, Cynthia S.; Schatz, Michael; Thomson, Carey C.; Wilson, Sandra R.; Apter, Andrea; Carson, Shannon S.; George, Maureen; Gerald, Joe K.; Gerald, Lynn; Goss, Christopher H.; Okelo, Sande O.; Mularski, Richard A.; Nguyen, Huong Q.; Patel, Minal R.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Weiss, Curtis H.; Wilson, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    To advance implementation research (IR) in respiratory, sleep, and critical care medicine, the American Thoracic Society and the Division of Lung Diseases from the NHLBI cosponsored an Implementation Research Workshop on May 17, 2014. The goals of IR are to understand the barriers and facilitators of integrating new evidence into healthcare practices and to develop and test strategies that systematically target these factors to accelerate the adoption of evidence-based care. Throughout the workshop, presenters provided examples of IR that focused on the rate of adoption of evidence-based practices, the feasibility and acceptability of interventions to patients and other stakeholders who make healthcare decisions, the fidelity with which practitioners use specific interventions, the effects of specific barriers on the sustainability of an intervention, and the implications of their research to inform policies to improve patients’ access to high-quality care. During the discussions that ensued, investigators’ experience led to recommendations underscoring the importance of identifying and involving key stakeholders throughout the research process, ensuring that those who serve as reviewers understand the tenets of IR, managing staff motivation and turnover, and tackling the challenges of scaling up interventions across multiple settings. PMID:26653201

  3. American Thoracic Society and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Implementation Research Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G; Krishnan, Jerry A; Chambers, David A; Cloutier, Michelle M; Riekert, Kristin A; Rand, Cynthia S; Schatz, Michael; Thomson, Carey C; Wilson, Sandra R; Apter, Andrea; Carson, Shannon S; George, Maureen; Gerald, Joe K; Gerald, Lynn; Goss, Christopher H; Okelo, Sande O; Mularski, Richard A; Nguyen, Huong Q; Patel, Minal R; Szefler, Stanley J; Weiss, Curtis H; Wilson, Kevin C; Freemer, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    To advance implementation research (IR) in respiratory, sleep, and critical care medicine, the American Thoracic Society and the Division of Lung Diseases from the NHLBI cosponsored an Implementation Research Workshop on May 17, 2014. The goals of IR are to understand the barriers and facilitators of integrating new evidence into healthcare practices and to develop and test strategies that systematically target these factors to accelerate the adoption of evidence-based care. Throughout the workshop, presenters provided examples of IR that focused on the rate of adoption of evidence-based practices, the feasibility and acceptability of interventions to patients and other stakeholders who make healthcare decisions, the fidelity with which practitioners use specific interventions, the effects of specific barriers on the sustainability of an intervention, and the implications of their research to inform policies to improve patients' access to high-quality care. During the discussions that ensued, investigators' experience led to recommendations underscoring the importance of identifying and involving key stakeholders throughout the research process, ensuring that those who serve as reviewers understand the tenets of IR, managing staff motivation and turnover, and tackling the challenges of scaling up interventions across multiple settings.

  4. Shared Decision Making in Intensive Care Units: An American College of Critical Care Medicine and American Thoracic Society Policy Statement

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Alexander A.; Davidson, Judy E.; Morrison, Wynne; Danis, Marion; White, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Shared decision-making (SDM) is endorsed by critical care organizations, however there remains confusion about what SDM is, when it should be used, and approaches to promote partnerships in treatment decisions. The purpose of this statement is to define SDM, recommend when SDM should be used, identify the range of ethically acceptable decision-making models, and present important communication skills. Methods The American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) and American Thoracic Society (ATS) Ethics Committees reviewed empirical research and normative analyses published in peer-reviewed journals to generate recommendations. Recommendations approved by consensus of the full Ethics Committees of ACCM and ATS were included in the statement. Main Results Six recommendations were endorsed: 1) Definition: Shared decision-making is a collaborative process that allows patients, or their surrogates, and clinicians to make health care decisions together, taking into account the best scientific evidence available, as well as the patient’s values, goals, and preferences. 2) Clinicians should engage in a SDM process to define overall goals of care (including decisions regarding limiting or withdrawing life-prolonging interventions) and when making major treatment decisions that may be affected by personal values, goals, and preferences. 3) Clinicians should use as their “default” approach a SDM process that includes three main elements: information exchange, deliberation, and making a treatment decision. 4) A wide range of decision-making approaches are ethically supportable including patient- or surrogate-directed and clinician-directed models. Clinicians should tailor the decision-making process based on the preferences of the patient or surrogate. 5) Clinicians should be trained in communication skills. 6) Research is needed to evaluate decision-making strategies. Conclusions Patient and surrogate preferences for decision-making roles regarding value

  5. Architectural specialization of the intrinsic thoracic limb musculature of the American badger (Taxidea taxus).

    PubMed

    Moore, Alexis L; Budny, Joseph E; Russell, Anthony P; Butcher, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of the relationships between muscle structure and digging function in fossorial species is limited. Badgers and other fossorial specialists are expected to have massive forelimb muscles with long fascicles capable of substantial shortening for high power and applying high out-force to the substrate. To explore this hypothesis, we quantified muscle architecture in the thoracic limb of the American badger (Taxidea taxus) and estimated the force, power, and joint torque of its intrinsic musculature in relation to the use of scratch-digging behavior. Architectural properties measured were muscle mass, belly length, fascicle length, pennation angle, and physiological cross-sectional area. Badgers possess hypertrophied shoulder flexors/humeral retractors, elbow extensors, and digital flexors. The triceps brachii is particularly massive and has long fascicles with little pennation, muscle architecture consistent with substantial shortening capability, and high power. A unique feature of badgers is that, in addition to elbow joint extension, two biarticular heads (long and medial) of the triceps are capable of applying high torques to the shoulder joint to facilitate retraction of the forelimb throughout the power stroke. The massive and complex digital flexors show relatively greater pennation and shorter fascicle lengths than the triceps brachii, as well as compartmentalization of muscle heads to accentuate both force production and range of shortening during flexion of the carpus and digits. Muscles of most functional groups exhibit some degree of specialization for high force production and are important for stabilizing the shoulder, elbow, and carpal joints against high limb forces generated during powerful digging motions. Overall, our findings support the hypothesis and indicate that forelimb muscle architecture is consistent with specializations for scratch-digging. Quantified muscle properties in the American badger serve as a comparator to evaluate the

  6. Prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD: American College of Chest Physicians and Canadian Thoracic Society Guideline.

    PubMed

    Criner, Gerard J; Bourbeau, Jean; Diekemper, Rebecca L; Ouellette, Daniel R; Goodridge, Donna; Hernandez, Paul; Curren, Kristen; Balter, Meyer S; Bhutani, Mohit; Camp, Pat G; Celli, Bartolome R; Dechman, Gail; Dransfield, Mark T; Fiel, Stanley B; Foreman, Marilyn G; Hanania, Nicola A; Ireland, Belinda K; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Mularski, Richard A; Ornelas, Joseph; Road, Jeremy D; Stickland, Michael K

    2015-04-01

    COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States as well as throughout the rest of the world. An exacerbation of COPD (periodic escalations of symptoms of cough, dyspnea, and sputum production) is a major contributor to worsening lung function, impairment in quality of life, need for urgent care or hospitalization, and cost of care in COPD. Research conducted over the past decade has contributed much to our current understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of COPD. Additionally, an evolving literature has accumulated about the prevention of acute exacerbations. In recognition of the importance of preventing exacerbations in patients with COPD, the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) and Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) joint evidence-based guideline (AECOPD Guideline) was developed to provide a practical, clinically useful document to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the prevention of acute exacerbations according to major categories of prevention therapies. Three key clinical questions developed using the PICO (population, intervention, comparator, and outcome) format addressed the prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD: nonpharmacologic therapies, inhaled therapies, and oral therapies. We used recognized document evaluation tools to assess and choose the most appropriate studies and to extract meaningful data and grade the level of evidence to support the recommendations in each PICO question in a balanced and unbiased fashion. The AECOPD Guideline is unique not only for its topic, the prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD, but also for the first-in-kind partnership between two of the largest thoracic societies in North America. The CHEST Guidelines Oversight Committee in partnership with the CTS COPD Clinical Assembly launched this project with the objective that a systematic review and critical evaluation of the published literature by clinical experts and researchers in the field of COPD would lead to

  7. Development of The American Association for Thoracic Surgery guidelines for low-dose computed tomography scans to screen for lung cancer in North America: recommendations of The American Association for Thoracic Surgery Task Force for Lung Cancer Screening and Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Francine L; Austin, John H M; Field, John K; Jett, James R; Keshavjee, Shaf; MacMahon, Heber; Mulshine, James L; Munden, Reginald F; Salgia, Ravi; Strauss, Gary M; Sugarbaker, David J; Swanson, Scott J; Travis, William D; Jaklitsch, Michael T

    2012-07-01

    The study objective was to establish The American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS) lung cancer screening guidelines for clinical practice. The AATS established the Lung Cancer Screening and Surveillance Task Force with multidisciplinary representation including 4 thoracic surgeons, 4 thoracic radiologists, 4 medical oncologists, 1 pulmonologist, 1 pathologist, and 1 epidemiologist. Members have engaged in interdisciplinary collaborations regarding lung cancer screening and clinical care of patients with, and at risk for, lung cancer. The task force reviewed the literature, including screening trials in the United States and Europe, and discussed local best clinical practices in the United States and Canada on 4 conference calls. A reference library supported the discussions and increased individual study across disciplines. The task force met to review the literature, state of clinical practice, and recommend consensus-based guidelines. Nine of 14 task force members were present at the meeting, and 3 participated by telephone. Two absent task force members were polled afterward. Six unanimous recommendations and supporting work-up algorithms were presented to the Council of the AATS at the 2012 annual meeting in San Francisco, California. Annual lung cancer screening and surveillance with low-dose computed tomography is recommended for smokers and former smokers with a 30 pack-year history of smoking and long-term lung cancer survivors aged 55 to 79 years. Screening may begin at age 50 years with a 20 pack-year history of smoking and additional comorbidity that produces a cumulative risk of developing lung cancer of 5% or greater over the following 5 years. Screening should be undertaken with a subspecialty qualified interdisciplinary team. Patient risk calculator application and intersociety engagement will provide data needed to refine future lung cancer screening guidelines. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by

  8. Survey of International Members of the American Thoracic Society on Climate Change and Health.

    PubMed

    Sarfaty, Mona; Kreslake, Jennifer; Ewart, Gary; Guidotti, Tee L; Thurston, George D; Balmes, John R; Maibach, Edward W

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS), in collaboration with George Mason University, surveyed international members of the society to assess perceptions, clinical experiences, and preferred policy responses related to global climate change. A recruitment email was sent by the ATS President in October 2015 to 5,013 international members. Subsequently, four reminder emails were sent to nonrespondents. Responses were received from 489 members in 68 countries; the response rate was 9.8%. Half of respondents reported working in countries in Asia (25%) or Europe (25%), with the remainder in South America (18%), North America (Canada and Mexico) (18%), Australia or New Zealand (9%), and Africa (6%). Survey estimate confidence intervals were ± 5% or smaller. A high percentage of international ATS survey respondents judged that climate change is happening (96%), that it is driven by human activity (70%), and that it is relevant to patient care ("a great deal"/"a moderate amount") (80%). A majority of respondents also indicated they are already observing health impacts of climate change among their patients; most commonly as increases in chronic disease severity from air pollution (88%), allergic symptoms from exposure to plants or mold (72%), and severe weather injuries (69%). An even larger majority anticipated seeing these climate-related health impacts in the next two decades. Respondents further indicated that physicians and physician organizations should play an active role in educating patients, the public, and policy makers on the human health effects of climate change. International ATS respondents, like their counterparts in the U.S., observed that human health is already adversely affected by climate change, and support responses to address this situation.

  9. Respiratory Health Equality in the United States. The American Thoracic Society Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Jesse; Schraufnagel, Dean E.; Thomas, Alvin; Samet, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Because the frequency of major risk factors for respiratory diseases (e.g., tobacco use) differs across demographic groups (defined by socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, health care access, occupation, or other characteristics), health disparities are commonly encountered in pediatric and adult pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. As part of its policy on respiratory health disparities, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) Executive Committee created a Health Equality Subcommittee of the Health Policy Committee, with an initial mandate of defining respiratory health equality and, as a subsequent task, providing recommendations to the ATS leadership as to how our society may help attain such equality in the United States. After receiving input from the ATS assemblies and committees, the subcommittee developed this document on respiratory health equality. This document defines respiratory health disparities and respiratory health equality, and expands on a recent ATS and European Respiratory Society policy statement on disparities in respiratory health. Attainment of respiratory health equality requires the ending of respiratory health disparities, which can be achieved only through multidisciplinary efforts to eliminate detrimental environmental exposures while promoting a healthy lifestyle, implementing all components of high-quality health care (prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment), and conducting research that will lead to better prevention and management of respiratory diseases for everyone. The ATS recognizes that such efforts must include all stakeholders: members of society at large, governmental and nongovernmental organizations, and other professional societies. The ATS urges all of its members and those of sister societies to work to achieve this laudable goal. PMID:24625275

  10. Respiratory health equality in the United States. The American thoracic society perspective.

    PubMed

    Celedón, Juan C; Roman, Jesse; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Thomas, Alvin; Samet, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Because the frequency of major risk factors for respiratory diseases (e.g., tobacco use) differs across demographic groups (defined by socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, health care access, occupation, or other characteristics), health disparities are commonly encountered in pediatric and adult pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. As part of its policy on respiratory health disparities, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) Executive Committee created a Health Equality Subcommittee of the Health Policy Committee, with an initial mandate of defining respiratory health equality and, as a subsequent task, providing recommendations to the ATS leadership as to how our society may help attain such equality in the United States. After receiving input from the ATS assemblies and committees, the subcommittee developed this document on respiratory health equality. This document defines respiratory health disparities and respiratory health equality, and expands on a recent ATS and European Respiratory Society policy statement on disparities in respiratory health. Attainment of respiratory health equality requires the ending of respiratory health disparities, which can be achieved only through multidisciplinary efforts to eliminate detrimental environmental exposures while promoting a healthy lifestyle, implementing all components of high-quality health care (prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment), and conducting research that will lead to better prevention and management of respiratory diseases for everyone. The ATS recognizes that such efforts must include all stakeholders: members of society at large, governmental and nongovernmental organizations, and other professional societies. The ATS urges all of its members and those of sister societies to work to achieve this laudable goal.

  11. Method to produce American Thoracic Society flow-time waveforms using a mechanical pump.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, J L; Reynolds, J S; Das, M K; Viola, J O

    1997-03-01

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS) recently adopted a new set of 26 standard flow-time waveforms for use in testing both diagnostic and monitoring devices. Some of these waveforms have a higher frequency content than present in the ATS-24 standard volume-time waveforms, which, when produced by a mechanical pump, may result in a pump flow output that is less than the desired flow due to gas compression losses within the pump. To investigate the effects of gas compression, a mechanical pump was used to generate the necessary flows to test mini-Wright and Assess peak expiratory flow (PEF) meters. Flow output from the pump was measured by two different independent methods, a pneumotachometer and a method based on piston displacement and pressure measured within the pump. Measuring output flow based on piston displacement and pressure has been validated using a pneumotachometer and mini-Wright PEF meter, and found to accurately measure pump output. This method introduces less resistance (lower back-pressure) and dead space volume than using a pneumotachometer in series with the meter under test. Pump output flow was found to be lower than the desired flow both with the mini-Wright and Assess meters (for waveform No. 26, PEFs 7.1 and 10.9% lower, respectively). To compensate for losses due to gas compression, we have developed a method of deriving new input waveforms, which, when used to drive a commercially available mechanical pump, accurately and reliably produces the 26 ATS flow-time waveforms, even those with the fastest rise-times.

  12. Diagnosis of stable ischemic heart disease: summary of a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American Association for Thoracic Surgery/Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association/Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Qaseem, Amir; Fihn, Stephan D; Williams, Sankey; Dallas, Paul; Owens, Douglas K; Shekelle, Paul

    2012-11-20

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), American Heart Association (AHA), American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to help clinicians diagnose known or suspected stable ischemic heart disease. Literature on this topic published before November 2011 was identified by using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO, AMED, and SCOPUS. Searches were limited to human studies published in English. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations according to a translation of the ACCF/AHA grading system into ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. This guideline includes 28 recommendations that address the following issues: the initial diagnosis of the patient who might have stable ischemic heart disease, cardiac stress testing to assess the risk for death or myocardial infarction in patients diagnosed with stable ischemic heart disease, and coronary angiography for risk assessment.

  13. The American Association for Thoracic Surgery guidelines for lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography scans for lung cancer survivors and other high-risk groups.

    PubMed

    Jaklitsch, Michael T; Jacobson, Francine L; Austin, John H M; Field, John K; Jett, James R; Keshavjee, Shaf; MacMahon, Heber; Mulshine, James L; Munden, Reginald F; Salgia, Ravi; Strauss, Gary M; Swanson, Scott J; Travis, William D; Sugarbaker, David J

    2012-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in North America. Low-dose computed tomography screening can reduce lung cancer-specific mortality by 20%. The American Association for Thoracic Surgery created a multispecialty task force to create screening guidelines for groups at high risk of developing lung cancer and survivors of previous lung cancer. The American Association for Thoracic Surgery guidelines call for annual lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography screening for North Americans from age 55 to 79 years with a 30 pack-year history of smoking. Long-term lung cancer survivors should have annual low-dose computed tomography to detect second primary lung cancer until the age of 79 years. Annual low-dose computed tomography lung cancer screening should be offered starting at age 50 years with a 20 pack-year history if there is an additional cumulative risk of developing lung cancer of 5% or greater over the following 5 years. Lung cancer screening requires participation by a subspecialty-qualified team. The American Association for Thoracic Surgery will continue engagement with other specialty societies to refine future screening guidelines. The American Association for Thoracic Surgery provides specific guidelines for lung cancer screening in North America. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  14. An official American Thoracic Society systematic review: insurance status and disparities in lung cancer practices and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Slatore, Christopher G; Au, David H; Gould, Michael K

    2010-11-01

    Insurance coverage is an important determinant of access to care and is one potential cause of disparities in lung cancer care outcomes. We performed a systematic review of the available literature to examine the association between insurance status and lung cancer practices and outcomes. We searched multiple electronic databases through November 6, 2008 for studies that examined the association between lung cancer outcomes and insurance status. Two reviewers independently selected studies. One investigator evaluated their quality according to predetermined criteria, and abstracted data about study design, patients' demographic and clinical characteristics, and outcome measures. Of 3,798 potentially relevant studies, 23 met eligibility criteria and were included. Studies reported heterogeneous outcomes among heterogeneous samples of patients that precluded a quantitative synthesis. In general, compared with patients with private or Medicare insurance, patients with Medicaid or no insurance had poorer lung cancer outcomes, including higher incidence rates, later stage at diagnosis, and poorer survival. Overall, patients with Medicaid or no insurance were less likely to undergo curative procedures, but patients without insurance were more likely to receive guideline-concordant care. Patients with Medicaid or no insurance consistently had worse outcomes than other patients with lung cancer. Some of the disparities may be secondary to residual confounding from smoking and other health behaviors, but available data suggest that patients with lung cancer without insurance do poorly because access to care is limited and/or they present with more advanced disease that is less amenable to treatment.

  15. An official American Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline: classification, evaluation, and management of childhood interstitial lung disease in infancy.

    PubMed

    Kurland, Geoffrey; Deterding, Robin R; Hagood, James S; Young, Lisa R; Brody, Alan S; Castile, Robert G; Dell, Sharon; Fan, Leland L; Hamvas, Aaron; Hilman, Bettina C; Langston, Claire; Nogee, Lawrence M; Redding, Gregory J

    2013-08-01

    There is growing recognition and understanding of the entities that cause interstitial lung disease (ILD) in infants. These entities are distinct from those that cause ILD in older children and adults. A multidisciplinary panel was convened to develop evidence-based guidelines on the classification, diagnosis, and management of ILD in children, focusing on neonates and infants under 2 years of age. Recommendations were formulated using a systematic approach. Outcomes considered important included the accuracy of the diagnostic evaluation, complications of delayed or incorrect diagnosis, psychosocial complications affecting the patient's or family's quality of life, and death. No controlled clinical trials were identified. Therefore, observational evidence and clinical experience informed judgments. These guidelines: (1) describe the clinical characteristics of neonates and infants (<2 yr of age) with diffuse lung disease (DLD); (2) list the common causes of DLD that should be eliminated during the evaluation of neonates and infants with DLD; (3) recommend methods for further clinical investigation of the remaining infants, who are regarded as having "childhood ILD syndrome"; (4) describe a new pathologic classification scheme of DLD in infants; (5) outline supportive and continuing care; and (6) suggest areas for future research. After common causes of DLD are excluded, neonates and infants with childhood ILD syndrome should be evaluated by a knowledgeable subspecialist. The evaluation may include echocardiography, controlled ventilation high-resolution computed tomography, infant pulmonary function testing, bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, genetic testing, and/or lung biopsy. Preventive care, family education, and support are essential.

  16. An official European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society technical standard: field walking tests in chronic respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Holland, Anne E; Spruit, Martijn A; Troosters, Thierry; Puhan, Milo A; Pepin, Véronique; Saey, Didier; McCormack, Meredith C; Carlin, Brian W; Sciurba, Frank C; Pitta, Fabio; Wanger, Jack; MacIntyre, Neil; Kaminsky, David A; Culver, Bruce H; Revill, Susan M; Hernandes, Nidia A; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios; Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Mitchell, Katy E; Lee, Annemarie L; Hill, Catherine J; Singh, Sally J

    2014-12-01

    Field walking tests are commonly employed to evaluate exercise capacity, assess prognosis and evaluate treatment response in chronic respiratory diseases. In recent years, there has been a wealth of new literature pertinent to the conduct of the 6-min walk test (6MWT), and a growing evidence base describing the incremental and endurance shuttle walk tests (ISWT and ESWT, respectively). The aim of this document is to describe the standard operating procedures for the 6MWT, ISWT and ESWT, which can be consistently employed by clinicians and researchers. The Technical Standard was developed by a multidisciplinary and international group of clinicians and researchers with expertise in the application of field walking tests. The procedures are underpinned by a concurrent systematic review of literature relevant to measurement properties and test conduct in adults with chronic respiratory disease. Current data confirm that the 6MWT, ISWT and ESWT are valid, reliable and responsive to change with some interventions. However, results are sensitive to small changes in methodology. It is important that two tests are conducted for the 6MWT and ISWT. This Technical Standard for field walking tests reflects current evidence regarding procedures that should be used to achieve robust results. ©ERS 2014.

  17. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report: Obesity and Metabolism. An Emerging Frontier in Lung Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Suratt, Benjamin T; Ubags, Niki D J; Rastogi, Deepa; Tantisira, Kelan G; Marsland, Benjamin J; Petrache, Irina; Allen, Janice B; Bates, Jason H T; Holguin, Fernando; McCormack, Meredith C; Michelakis, Evangelos D; Black, Stephen M; Jain, Manu; Mora, Ana L; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Miller, Yury I; Fessler, Michael B; Birukov, Konstantin G; Summer, Ross S; Shore, Stephanie A; Dixon, Anne E

    2017-06-01

    The world is in the midst of an unprecedented epidemic of obesity. This epidemic has changed the presentation and etiology of common diseases. For example, steatohepatitis, directly attributable to obesity, is now the most common cause of cirrhosis in the United States. Type 2 diabetes is increasingly being diagnosed in children. Pulmonary researchers and clinicians are just beginning to appreciate the impact of obesity and altered metabolism on common pulmonary diseases. Obesity has recently been identified as a major risk factor for the development of asthma and for acute respiratory distress syndrome. Obesity is associated with profound changes in pulmonary physiology, the development of pulmonary hypertension, sleep-disordered breathing, and altered susceptibility to pulmonary infection. In short, obesity is leading to dramatic changes in lung health and disease. Simultaneously, the rapidly developing field of metabolism, including mitochondrial function, is shifting the paradigms by which the pathophysiology of many pulmonary diseases is understood. Altered metabolism can lead to profound changes in both innate and adaptive immunity, as well as the function of structural cells. To address this emerging field, a 3-day meeting on obesity, metabolism, and lung disease was convened in October 2015 to discuss recent findings, foster research initiatives, and ultimately guide clinical care. The major findings arising from this meeting are reported in this document.

  18. An official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice guideline: the diagnosis of intensive care unit-acquired weakness in adults.

    PubMed

    Fan, Eddy; Cheek, Fern; Chlan, Linda; Gosselink, Rik; Hart, Nicholas; Herridge, Margaret S; Hopkins, Ramona O; Hough, Catherine L; Kress, John P; Latronico, Nicola; Moss, Marc; Needham, Dale M; Rich, Mark M; Stevens, Robert D; Wilson, Kevin C; Winkelman, Chris; Zochodne, Doug W; Ali, Naeem A

    2014-12-15

    Profound muscle weakness during and after critical illness is termed intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). To develop diagnostic recommendations for ICUAW. A multidisciplinary expert committee generated diagnostic questions. A systematic review was performed, and recommendations were developed using the Grading, Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Severe sepsis, difficult ventilator liberation, and prolonged mechanical ventilation are associated with ICUAW. Physical rehabilitation improves outcomes in heterogeneous populations of ICU patients. Because it may not be feasible to provide universal physical rehabilitation, an alternative approach is to identify patients most likely to benefit. Patients with ICUAW may be such a group. Our review identified only one case series of patients with ICUAW who received physical therapy. When compared with a case series of patients with ICUAW who did not receive structured physical therapy, evidence suggested those who receive physical rehabilitation were more frequently discharged home rather than to a rehabilitative facility, although confidence intervals included no difference. Other interventions show promise, but fewer data proving patient benefit existed, thus precluding specific comment. Additionally, prior comorbidity was insufficiently defined to determine its influence on outcome, treatment response, or patient preferences for diagnostic efforts. We recommend controlled clinical trials in patients with ICUAW that compare physical rehabilitation with usual care and further research in understanding risk and patient preferences. Research that identifies treatments that benefit patients with ICUAW is necessary to determine whether the benefits of diagnostic testing for ICUAW outweigh its burdens.

  19. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: features and measurements of experimental acute lung injury in animals.

    PubMed

    Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Downey, Gregory; Moore, Bethany B; Groshong, Steve D; Matthay, Michael A; Slutsky, Arthur S; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2011-05-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is well defined in humans, but there is no agreement as to the main features of acute lung injury in animal models. A Committee was organized to determine the main features that characterize ALI in animal models and to identify the most relevant methods to assess these features. We used a Delphi approach in which a series of questionnaires were distributed to a panel of experts in experimental lung injury. The Committee concluded that the main features of experimental ALI include histological evidence of tissue injury, alteration of the alveolar capillary barrier, presence of an inflammatory response, and evidence of physiological dysfunction; they recommended that, to determine if ALI has occurred, at least three of these four main features of ALI should be present. The Committee also identified key "very relevant" and "somewhat relevant" measurements for each of the main features of ALI and recommended the use of least one "very relevant" measurement and preferably one or two additional separate measurements to determine if a main feature of ALI is present. Finally, the Committee emphasized that not all of the measurements listed can or should be performed in every study, and that measurements not included in the list are by no means "irrelevant." Our list of features and measurements of ALI is intended as a guide for investigators, and ultimately investigators should choose the particular measurements that best suit the experimental questions being addressed as well as take into consideration any unique aspects of the experimental design.

  20. An official American Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline: diagnosis, risk stratification, and management of pulmonary hypertension of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Klings, Elizabeth S; Machado, Roberto F; Barst, Robyn J; Morris, Claudia R; Mubarak, Kamal K; Gordeuk, Victor R; Kato, Gregory J; Ataga, Kenneth I; Gibbs, J Simon; Castro, Oswaldo; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Sood, Namita; Hsu, Lewis; Wilson, Kevin C; Telen, Marilyn J; Decastro, Laura M; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Steinberg, Martin H; Badesch, David B; Gladwin, Mark T

    2014-03-15

    In adults with sickle cell disease (SCD), an increased tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) measured by Doppler echocardiography, an increased serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) level, and pulmonary hypertension (PH) diagnosed by right heart catheterization (RHC) are independent risk factors for mortality. A multidisciplinary committee was formed by clinician-investigators experienced in the management of patients with PH and/or SCD. Clinically important questions were posed, related evidence was appraised, and questions were answered with evidence-based recommendations. Target audiences include all clinicians who take care of patients with SCD. Mortality risk stratification guides decision making. An increased risk for mortality is defined as a TRV equal to or greater than 2.5 m/second, an NT-pro-BNP level equal to or greater than 160 pg/ml, or RHC-confirmed PH. For patients identified as having increased mortality risk, we make a strong recommendation for hydroxyurea as first-line therapy and a weak recommendation for chronic transfusions as an alternative therapy. For all patients with SCD with elevated TRV alone or elevated NT-pro-BNP alone, and for patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH with elevated pulmonary artery wedge pressure and low pulmonary vascular resistance, we make a strong recommendation against PAH-specific therapy. However, for select patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH who have elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, we make a weak recommendation for either prostacyclin agonist or endothelin receptor antagonist therapy and a strong recommendation against phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy. Evidence-based recommendations for the management of patients with SCD with increased mortality risk are provided, but will require frequent reassessment and updating.

  1. An official American thoracic society workshop report: comparative pathobiology of fibrosing lung disorders in humans and domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Roman, Jesse; Brown, Kevin K; Olson, Amy; Corcoran, Brendan M; Williams, Kurt J

    2013-12-01

    The clinical outcome of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is poor, with a 50% survival rate at 3 years. Furthermore, current treatments provide little amelioration of symptoms. Despite significant advances in understanding the clinical features and pathobiology of IPF, further advances have been hampered by a lack of suitable animal models of the disease. Interestingly, spontaneously occurring disorders with a similarity to IPF have been recognized in the dog, cat, horse, and donkey. These disorders share clinical and pathologic features with human IPF and are emerging diseases of veterinary importance. To improve awareness about these disorders in domestic animals and stimulate interactions between disciplines, and to facilitate the elucidation of mechanisms of fibrosing lung disorders using a comparative natural-occurrence disease model approach. A 1-day meeting joined physicians, veterinarians, pathologists, researchers, and advocacy experts to discuss information available in this area. A review of the literature was conducted, and an executive committee discussed the findings and prepared a summary statement during subsequent meetings. Clinical, diagnostic, and treatment opportunities were identified, and common areas of interest where collaborative efforts could accelerate discovery regarding etiological factors, methods for early detection, determinants of disease progression, and novel therapies were defined. Comparing fibrosing lung disorders in humans and domestic animals will allow for a better understanding of the similarities and differences among species and may offer novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of spontaneously occurring fibrotic lung diseases.

  2. An official American Thoracic Society systematic review: Influence of psychosocial characteristics on workplace disability among workers with respiratory impairment.

    PubMed

    Slatore, Christopher G; Harber, Philip; Haggerty, Margaret C

    2013-11-01

    Psychosocial characteristics likely play an important role in the severity of workplace disability for workers with a respiratory impairment. We performed a systematic review of the available literature to examine the impact of psychosocial characteristics on workplace disability among workers with a respiratory impairment. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses recommendations, we searched Medline and other published and unpublished sources using the PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials (CENTRAL) search engines from January 1, 1990 through March 8, 2013 for quantitative studies that examined the association of psychosocial characteristics with workplace disability among workers with a respiratory impairment. We also searched related citations and the bibliographies of selected studies and relevant review articles. One investigator abstracted data about study design and quality, psychosocial characteristics, and outcome measures. Of 5,746 potentially relevant studies, 20 met eligibility criteria and were included. Studies reported heterogeneous outcomes among heterogeneous samples of workers that precluded a quantitative synthesis. In general, mental illness was associated with increased workplace disability among workers with respiratory impairments. Few studies adjusted for disease severity, so the independent association of psychosocial characteristics and workplace disability is unclear. Most studies were cross-sectional, so the direction of the association could not be determined. We found only one trial of targeted therapy for the psychosocial condition, which was not effective at reducing disability. Psychosocial characteristics likely influence workplace disability in workers with respiratory impairments. The impact of targeted therapies is unclear and warrants further study.

  3. An official American Thoracic Society research statement: noninfectious lung injury after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: idiopathic pneumonia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Griese, Matthias; Madtes, David K; Belperio, John A; Haddad, Imad Y; Folz, Rodney J; Cooke, Kenneth R

    2011-05-01

    Acute lung dysfunction of noninfectious etiology, known as idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS), is a severe complication following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Several mouse models have been recently developed to determine the underlying causes of IPS. A cohesive interpretation of experimental data and their relationship to the findings of clinical research studies in humans is needed to better understand the basis for current and future clinical trials for the prevention/treatment of IPS. Our goal was to perform a comprehensive review of the preclinical (i.e., murine models) and clinical research on IPS. An ATS committee performed PubMed and OVID searches for published, peer-reviewed articles using the keywords "idiopathic pneumonia syndrome" or "lung injury" or "pulmonary complications" AND "bone marrow transplant" or "hematopoietic stem cell transplant." No specific inclusion or exclusion criteria were determined a priori for this review. Experimental models that reproduce the various patterns of lung injury observed after HSCT have identified that both soluble and cellular inflammatory mediators contribute to the inflammation engendered during the development of IPS. To date, 10 preclinical murine models of the IPS spectrum have been established using various donor and host strain combinations used to study graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This, as well as the demonstrated T cell dependency of IPS development in these models, supports the concept that the lung is a target of immune-mediated attack after HSCT. The most developed therapeutic strategy for IPS involves blocking TNF signaling with etanercept, which is currently being evaluated in clinical trials. IPS remains a frequently fatal complication that limits the broader use of allogeneic HSCT as a successful treatment modality. Faced with the clinical syndrome of IPS, one can categorize the disease entity with the appropriate tools, although cases of unclassifiable IPS will remain. Significant research efforts have resulted in a paradigm shift away from identifying noninfectious lung injury after HSCT solely as an idiopathic clinical syndrome and toward understanding IPS as a process involving aspects of both the adaptive and the innate immune response. Importantly, new laboratory insights are currently being translated to the clinic and will likely prove important to the development of future strategies to prevent or treat this serious disorder.

  4. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Classification, Evaluation, and Management of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, Geoffrey; Deterding, Robin R.; Hagood, James S.; Young, Lisa R.; Brody, Alan S.; Castile, Robert G.; Dell, Sharon; Fan, Leland L.; Hamvas, Aaron; Hilman, Bettina C.; Langston, Claire; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Redding, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is growing recognition and understanding of the entities that cause interstitial lung disease (ILD) in infants. These entities are distinct from those that cause ILD in older children and adults. Methods: A multidisciplinary panel was convened to develop evidence-based guidelines on the classification, diagnosis, and management of ILD in children, focusing on neonates and infants under 2 years of age. Recommendations were formulated using a systematic approach. Outcomes considered important included the accuracy of the diagnostic evaluation, complications of delayed or incorrect diagnosis, psychosocial complications affecting the patient’s or family’s quality of life, and death. Results: No controlled clinical trials were identified. Therefore, observational evidence and clinical experience informed judgments. These guidelines: (1) describe the clinical characteristics of neonates and infants (<2 yr of age) with diffuse lung disease (DLD); (2) list the common causes of DLD that should be eliminated during the evaluation of neonates and infants with DLD; (3) recommend methods for further clinical investigation of the remaining infants, who are regarded as having “childhood ILD syndrome”; (4) describe a new pathologic classification scheme of DLD in infants; (5) outline supportive and continuing care; and (6) suggest areas for future research. Conclusions: After common causes of DLD are excluded, neonates and infants with childhood ILD syndrome should be evaluated by a knowledgeable subspecialist. The evaluation may include echocardiography, controlled ventilation high-resolution computed tomography, infant pulmonary function testing, bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, genetic testing, and/or lung biopsy. Preventive care, family education, and support are essential. PMID:23905526

  5. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Diagnosis, Risk Stratification, and Management of Pulmonary Hypertension of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Klings, Elizabeth S.; Machado, Roberto F.; Barst, Robyn J.; Morris, Claudia R.; Mubarak, Kamal K.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Kato, Gregory J.; Ataga, Kenneth I.; Gibbs, J. Simon; Castro, Oswaldo; Rosenzweig, Erika B.; Sood, Namita; Hsu, Lewis; Wilson, Kevin C.; Telen, Marilyn J.; DeCastro, Laura M.; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Steinberg, Martin H.; Badesch, David B.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In adults with sickle cell disease (SCD), an increased tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) measured by Doppler echocardiography, an increased serum N-terminal pro–brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) level, and pulmonary hypertension (PH) diagnosed by right heart catheterization (RHC) are independent risk factors for mortality. Methods: A multidisciplinary committee was formed by clinician-investigators experienced in the management of patients with PH and/or SCD. Clinically important questions were posed, related evidence was appraised, and questions were answered with evidence-based recommendations. Target audiences include all clinicians who take care of patients with SCD. Results: Mortality risk stratification guides decision making. An increased risk for mortality is defined as a TRV equal to or greater than 2.5 m/second, an NT-pro-BNP level equal to or greater than 160 pg/ml, or RHC-confirmed PH. For patients identified as having increased mortality risk, we make a strong recommendation for hydroxyurea as first-line therapy and a weak recommendation for chronic transfusions as an alternative therapy. For all patients with SCD with elevated TRV alone or elevated NT-pro-BNP alone, and for patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH with elevated pulmonary artery wedge pressure and low pulmonary vascular resistance, we make a strong recommendation against PAH-specific therapy. However, for select patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH who have elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, we make a weak recommendation for either prostacyclin agonist or endothelin receptor antagonist therapy and a strong recommendation against phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy. Conclusions: Evidence-based recommendations for the management of patients with SCD with increased mortality risk are provided, but will require frequent reassessment and updating. PMID:24628312

  6. Official Policy Positions of the National Congress of American Indians for Convention Year 1977-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Congress of American Indians, Washington, DC.

    During its convention year of 1977-78, the National Congress of American Indians held an annual convention in Dallas in September, 1977, an executive council meeting in Washington in January, 1978, a special conference on federal recognition and the impact of the Oliphant decision in Nashville, Tennessee in March, 1978, and a mid-year conference…

  7. Diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a clinical practice guideline update from the American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society.

    PubMed

    Qaseem, Amir; Wilt, Timothy J; Weinberger, Steven E; Hanania, Nicola A; Criner, Gerard; van der Molen, Thys; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Denberg, Tom; Schünemann, Holger; Wedzicha, Wisia; MacDonald, Roderick; Shekelle, Paul

    2011-08-02

    This guideline is an official statement of the American College of Physicians (ACP), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS). It represents an update of the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is intended for clinicians who manage patients with COPD. This guideline addresses the value of history and physical examination for predicting airflow obstruction; the value of spirometry for screening or diagnosis of COPD; and COPD management strategies, specifically evaluation of various inhaled therapies (anticholinergics, long-acting β-agonists, and corticosteroids), pulmonary rehabilitation programs, and supplemental oxygen therapy. This guideline is based on a targeted literature update from March 2007 to December 2009 to evaluate the evidence and update the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable COPD. RECOMMENDATION 1: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that spirometry should be obtained to diagnose airflow obstruction in patients with respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). Spirometry should not be used to screen for airflow obstruction in individuals without respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 2: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) between 60% and 80% predicted, ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS suggest that treatment with inhaled bronchodilators may be used (Grade: weak recommendation, low-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 3: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) <60% predicted, ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend treatment with inhaled bronchodilators (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 4: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that clinicians prescribe monotherapy using either long-acting inhaled

  8. Clinical Equipoise and Shared Decision-making in Pulmonary Nodule Management. A Survey of American Thoracic Society Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Iaccarino, Jonathan M; Simmons, James; Gould, Michael K; Slatore, Christopher G; Woloshin, Steven; Schwartz, Lisa M; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2017-06-01

    Guidelines for pulmonary nodule evaluation suggest a variety of strategies, reflecting the lack of high-quality evidence demonstrating the superiority of any one approach. It is unclear whether clinicians agree that multiple management options are appropriate at different levels of risk and whether this impacts their decision-making approaches with patients. To assess clinicians' perceptions of the appropriateness of various diagnostic strategies, approach to decision-making, and perceived clinical equipoise in pulmonary nodule evaluation. We developed and administered a web-based survey in March and April, 2014 to clinician members of the American Thoracic Society. The primary outcome was perceived appropriateness of pulmonary nodule evaluation strategies in three clinical vignettes with different malignancy risk. We compared responses to guideline recommendations and analyzed clinician characteristics associated with a reported shared decision-making approach. We also assessed clinicians' likelihood to enroll patients in hypothetical randomized trials comparing nodule evaluation strategies. Of 5,872 American Thoracic Society members e-mailed, 1,444 opened the e-mail and 428 eligible clinicians participated in the survey (response rate, 30.0% among those who opened the invitation; 7% overall). The mean number of options considered appropriate increased with pretest probability of cancer, ranging from 1.8 (SD, 1.2) for the low-risk case to 3.5 (1.1) for the high-risk case (P < 0.0001). As recommended by guidelines, the proportion that deemed surgical resection as an appropriate option also increased with cancer risk (P < 0.0001). One-half of clinicians (50.4%) reported engaging in shared decision-making with patients for pulmonary nodule management; this was more commonly reported by clinicians with more years of experience (P = 0.01) and those who reported greater comfort in managing pulmonary nodules (P = 0.005). Although one-half (49.9%) deemed

  9. Resisting Official Knowledge: The Incorporation and Abjection of Race and Poverty in High School American History Textbooks, 1960s-2000s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearl, Benjamin Kelsey

    2014-01-01

    Through an interpretive analysis of how high school American history textbooks depict the urban-riots of the late-1960s, in this article the author discusses how textbooks incorporate and abject official knowledge related to the intersections of race and poverty. Incorporation is related with Raymond Williams' theory of the selective tradition and…

  10. Resisting Official Knowledge: The Incorporation and Abjection of Race and Poverty in High School American History Textbooks, 1960s-2000s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearl, Benjamin Kelsey

    2014-01-01

    Through an interpretive analysis of how high school American history textbooks depict the urban-riots of the late-1960s, in this article the author discusses how textbooks incorporate and abject official knowledge related to the intersections of race and poverty. Incorporation is related with Raymond Williams' theory of the selective tradition and…

  11. The electronic cigarette. Official statement of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) on the efficacy, safety and regulation of electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Jimenez Ruiz, Carlos A; Solano Reina, Segismundo; de Granda Orive, Jose Ignacio; Signes-Costa Minaya, Jaime; de Higes Martinez, Eva; Riesco Miranda, Juan Antonio; Altet Gómez, Neus; Lorza Blasco, Jose Javier; Barrueco Ferrero, Miguel; de Lucas Ramos, Pilar

    2014-08-01

    The electronic cigarette (EC) is a device formed by three basic elements: battery, atomizer and cartridge. When assembled, it looks like a cigarette. The cartridge contains different substances: propylene glycol, glycerine and, sometimes, nicotine. When the user "vapes", the battery is activated, the atomizer is heated and the liquid is drawn in and vaporized. The smoker inhales the mist produced. Various substances have been detected in this mist: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein and some heavy metals. Although these are found in lower concentrations than in cigarettes, they may still be harmful for the human body. Several surveys show that 3-10% of smokers regularly use e-cigarettes. A randomized study has shown that the efficacy of e-cigarettes for helping smokers to quit is similar to nicotine patches. Nevertheless, the study has relevant methodological limitations and reliable conclusions cannot be deduced. This report sets down the Position Statement of the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) on the efficacy and safety of e-cigarettes. This statement declares that e-cigarettes should be regulated as medicinal products. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society Classification of the Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias: Advances in Knowledge since 2002.

    PubMed

    Sverzellati, Nicola; Lynch, David A; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; King, Talmadge E; Travis, William D

    2015-01-01

    In the updated American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), the major entities have been preserved and grouped into (a) "chronic fibrosing IIPs" (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia), (b) "smoking-related IIPs" (respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease and desquamative interstitial pneumonia), (c) "acute or subacute IIPs" (cryptogenic organizing pneumonia and acute interstitial pneumonia), and (d) "rare IIPs" (lymphoid interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis). Furthermore, it has been acknowledged that a final diagnosis is not always achievable, and the category "unclassifiable IIP" has been proposed. The diagnostic interpretation of the IIPs is often challenging because other diseases with a known etiology (most notably, connective tissue disease and hypersensitivity pneumonitis) may show similar morphologic patterns. Indeed, more emphasis has been given to the integration of clinical, computed tomographic (CT), and pathologic findings for multidisciplinary diagnosis. Typical CT-based morphologic patterns are associated with the IIPs, and radiologists play an important role in diagnosis and characterization. Optimal CT quality and a systematic approach are both pivotal for evaluation of IIP. Interobserver variation for the various patterns encountered in the IIPs is an issue. It is important for radiologists to understand the longitudinal behavior of IIPs at serial CT examinations, especially for providing a framework for cases that are unclassifiable or in which a histologic diagnosis cannot be obtained. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  13. American Thoracic Society/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Prescott G; van den Berge, Maarten; Boucher, Richard C; Brightling, Christopher; Burchard, Esteban G; Christenson, Stephanie A; Han, MeiLan K; Holtzman, Michael J; Kraft, Monica; Lynch, David A; Martinez, Fernando D; Reddel, Helen K; Sin, Don D; Washko, George R; Wenzel, Sally E; Punturieri, Antonello; Freemer, Michelle M; Wise, Robert A

    2017-08-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are highly prevalent chronic obstructive lung diseases with an associated high burden of disease. Asthma, which is often allergic in origin, frequently begins in infancy or childhood with variable airflow obstruction and intermittent wheezing, cough, and dyspnea. Patients with COPD, in contrast, are usually current or former smokers who present after the age of 40 years with symptoms (often persistent) including dyspnea and a productive cough. On the basis of age and smoking history, it is often easy to distinguish between asthma and COPD. However, some patients have features compatible with both diseases. Because clinical studies typically exclude these patients, their underlying disease mechanisms and appropriate treatment remain largely uncertain. To explore the status of and opportunities for research in this area, the NHLBI, in partnership with the American Thoracic Society, convened a workshop of investigators in San Francisco, California on May 14, 2016. At the workshop, current understanding of asthma-COPD overlap was discussed among clinicians, pathologists, radiologists, epidemiologists, and investigators with expertise in asthma and COPD. They considered knowledge gaps in our understanding of asthma-COPD overlap and identified strategies and research priorities that will advance its understanding. This report summarizes those discussions.

  14. Insights from the early experience of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry.

    PubMed

    Rumsfeld, John S; Holmes, David R; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Edwards, Fred H; Jacques, Louis B; Mack, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    The current system for postmarket surveillance of medical devices in the United States is limited. To help change this paradigm for transcatheter valve therapies (TVTs), starting with transcatheter aortic valve replacement, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the American College of Cardiology partnered to form the TVT Registry program in close collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The goal of the TVT Registry is to measure and improve quality of care and patient outcomes in clinical practice and to have a pivotal role in the scientific evidence and surveillance for medical devices. Challenges were faced in the early experience of the registry included developing multistakeholder partnerships, data collection requirements, and the use of the registry for pre- and post-market device evaluations. In addressing these challenges, the TVT Registry demonstrates that it is feasible for professional societies to assume a pivotal role in pre- and/or post-market studies, leveraging a clinical registry infrastructure. Sharing the TVT Registry experience may help other professional societies and stakeholders better anticipate and plan for these challenges.

  15. Generation of complex motor patterns in american grasshopper via current-controlled thoracic electrical interfacing.

    PubMed

    Giampalmo, Susan L; Absher, Benjamin F; Bourne, W Tucker; Steves, Lida E; Vodenski, Vassil V; O'Donnell, Peter M; Erickson, Jonathan C

    2011-01-01

    Micro-air vehicles (MAVs) have attracted attention for their potential application to military applications, environmental sensing, and search and rescue missions. While progress is being made toward fabrication of a completely human-engineered MAV, another promising approach seeks to interface to, and take control of, an insect's nervous system. Cyborg insects take advantage of their innate exquisite loco-motor, navigation, and sensing abilities. Recently, several groups have demonstrated the feasibility of radio-controlled flight in the hawkmoth and beetle via electrical neural interfaces. Here, we report a method for eliciting the "jump" response in the American grasshopper (S. Americana). We found that stimulating the metathoracic T3 ganglion with constant-current square wave pulses with amplitude 186 ± 40 μA and frequency 190 ± 13 Hz reproducibly evoked (≥95% success rate) the desired motor activity in N=3 test subjects. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an insect cyborg with a synchronous neuromuscular system.

  16. Value of American Thoracic Society guidelines in predicting infection or colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianfeng; Ma, Xudong; Huang, Yingzi; Mo, Min; Guo, Fengmei; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    The incidence rate of infection by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) can affect the accuracy of etiological diagnosis when using American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines. We determined the accuracy of the ATS guidelines in predicting infection or colonization by MDROs over 18 months at a single ICU in eastern China. This prospective observational study examined consecutive patients who were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) in Nanjing, China. MDROs were defined as bacteria that were resistant to at least three antimicrobial classes, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii. Screening for MDROs was performed at ICU admission and discharge. Risk factors for infection or colonization with MDROs were recorded, and the accuracy of the ATS guidelines in predicting infection or colonization with MDROs was documented. There were 610 patients, 225 (37%) of whom were colonized or infected with MDROs at ICU admission, and this increased to 311 (51%) at discharge. At admission, the sensitivity (70.0%), specificity (31.6%), positive predictive value (38.2%), and negative predictive value (63.5%), all based on ATS guidelines for infection or colonization with MDROs were low. The negative predictive value was greater in patients from departments with MDRO infection rates of 31-40% than in patients from departments with MDRO infection rates of 30% or less and from departments with MDRO infection rates more than 40%. ATS criteria were not reliable in predicting infection or colonization with MDROs in our ICU. The negative predictive value was greater in patients from departments with intermediate rates of MDRO infection than in patients from departments with low or high rates of MDRO infection. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01667991.

  17. Pulmonary Rehabilitation Exercise Prescription in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Review of Selected Guidelines: AN OFFICIAL STATEMENT FROM THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CARDIOVASCULAR AND PULMONARY REHABILITATION.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Chris; Bayles, Madeline Paternostro; Hamm, Larry F; Hill, Kylie; Holland, Anne; Limberg, Trina M; Spruit, Martijn A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with disabling dyspnea, skeletal muscle dysfunction, and significant morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines recommend pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) to improve dyspnea, functional capacity, and quality of life. Translating exercise science into safe and effective exercise training requires interpretation and use of multiple guidelines and recommendations. The purpose of this statement is to summarize for clinicians 3 current chronic obstructive pulmonary disease guidelines for exercise that may be used to develop exercise prescriptions in the PR setting. The 3 guidelines have been published by the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society, and the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation. In addition to summarizing these 3 guidelines, this statement describes clinical applications, explores areas of uncertainty, and suggests strategies for providing effective exercise training, given the diversity of guidelines and patient complexity.

  18. Incidence, Predictors, and Postoperative Complications of Blood Transfusion in Thoracic and Lumbar Fusion Surgery: An Analysis of 13,695 Patients from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Ahmed; Nooh, Anas; Fortin, Maryse; Aldebeyan, Sultan; Jarzem, Peter; Ouellet, Jean; Weber, Michael H

    2016-12-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective To identify predictive factors for blood transfusion and associated complications in lumbar and thoracic fusion surgeries. Methods The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database was used to identify patients who underwent lumbar or thoracic fusion from 2010 to 2013. Multivariate analysis was used to determine predictive factors and postoperative complications associated with transfusion. Results Out of 13,695 patients, 13,170 had lumbar fusion and 525 had thoracic fusion. The prevalence of transfusion was 31.8% for thoracic and 17.0% for lumbar fusion. The multivariate analysis showed that age between 50 and 60, age between 61 and 70, age > 70, dyspnea, American Society of Anesthesiologists class 3, bleeding disease, multilevel surgery, extended surgical time, return to operation room, and higher preoperative blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were predictors of blood transfusion for lumbar fusion. Multilevel surgery, preoperative BUN, and extended surgical time were predictors of transfusion for thoracic fusion. Patients receiving transfusions who underwent lumbar fusion were more likely to develop wound infection, venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism, and myocardial infarction and had longer hospital stay. Patients receiving transfusions who underwent thoracic fusion were more likely to have extended hospital stay. Conclusion This study characterizes incidence, predictors, and postoperative complications associated with blood transfusion in thoracic and lumbar fusion. Pre- and postoperative planning for patients deemed to be at high risk of requiring blood transfusion might reduce postoperative complications in this population.

  19. American Thoracic Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education About Professional Accreditation MOC Career Development Resident & Medical Students Fellows Junior Faculty Training Program Directors ATS Reading List ATS Scholarships Calendar of Events Ethics & COI Job Board Podcasts & Webinars Best of ATS ...

  20. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A; Masoudi, Frederick A; Dehmer, Gregory J; Patel, Manesh R; Smith, Peter K; Chambers, Charles E; Ferguson, T Bruce; Garcia, Mario J; Grover, Frederick L; Holmes, David R; Klein, Lloyd W; Limacher, Marian C; Mack, Michael J; Malenka, David J; Park, Myung H; Ragosta, Michael; Ritchie, James L; Rose, Geoffrey A; Rosenberg, Alan B; Russo, Andrea M; Shemin, Richard J; Weintraub, William S; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Shaw, Leslee; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2012-04-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD

  1. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 Appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A

    2012-02-28

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD

  2. Thoracic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shumway, N E

    2000-07-01

    Experimental orthotopic transplantation of the heart was accomplished in 1959. Long-term survival was achieved in 1965 with a chemical immunosuppression protocol substantially different from that used for renal and hepatic transplants. Performance characteristics of the transplanted denervated heart were found to differ only slightly from normal. It appeared by the time of the Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons in October 1967 that clinical heart transplantation might be justified if the concept of brain death could be legally recognized. The Stanford program in clinical heart transplantation was inaugurated on January 6, 1968 and has been in continuous operation. To date, more than 1000 patients have undergone transplantation of the heart with the 5-year survival at 75%. The first long-term success in lung transplantation occurred at Stanford in 1981, with transplantation of the heart and both lungs. In 1990 the concept of living pulmonary lobar donors was introduced and is slowly finding its clinical role. The steroid-sparing capability of cyclosporine made possible both successful lung and pediatric heart transplantation. Only the donor shortage remains as a substantial barrier to widespread thoracic transplantation. Xenotransplantation is under intense scrutiny, with some encouraging experimental results. Development of the artificial heart continues to offer some relief for patients with end-stage heart disease.

  3. Creating Official Language Policy from Local Practice: The Example of the Native American Languages Act 1990/1992

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warhol, Larisa

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the development of landmark federal language policy in the United States: the Native American Languages Act of 1990/1992 (NALA). Overturning more than two centuries of United States American Indian policy, NALA established the federal role in preserving and protecting Native American languages. Indigenous languages in the…

  4. Creating Official Language Policy from Local Practice: The Example of the Native American Languages Act 1990/1992

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warhol, Larisa

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the development of landmark federal language policy in the United States: the Native American Languages Act of 1990/1992 (NALA). Overturning more than two centuries of United States American Indian policy, NALA established the federal role in preserving and protecting Native American languages. Indigenous languages in the…

  5. Differential gene expression profiles according to the Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society histopathological classification in lung adenocarcinoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Molina-Romero, Camilo; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Ortega-Gómez, Alette; Alanis-Funes, Gerardo J; Avilés-Salas, Alejandro; Avila-Moreno, Federico; Mercado, Gabriela E; Cardona, Andrés F; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Arrieta, Oscar

    2017-08-01

    The current lung cancer classification from the Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society has considerably changed the pathologic diagnosis of lung invasive adenocarcinoma, identifying disease subtypes with substantial implications for medical practice, such as clinical, radiological, molecular, and prognostic differences. We analyzed the differences in the genetic expression of adenocarcinoma subtypes according to the new classification. Microarray gene expression analysis was performed on a cohort of 29 adenocarcinoma patients treated at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología of Mexico from 2008 to 2011. All patients had an available biopsy sample and were classified into 4 different subtypes of adenocarcinoma (2015 World Health Organization classification). Lepidic-predominant adenocarcinoma was the only pattern that exhibited a marked gene expression difference compared with other predominant histologic patterns, revealing genes with significant expression (P < .01). Moreover, we identified 13 genes with specific differential expression in the lepidic-predominant adenocarcinoma that could be used as a gene signature. The lepidic-predominant histologic pattern has a differential gene expression profile compared with all predominant histologic patterns. Additionally, we identified a gene expression signature of 13 genes that have a unique behavior in the lepidic histologic pattern; these 13 genes are candidates for follow-up studies for their potential use as biomarkers or therapeutic targets. Results from this study highlight the importance of the new Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification and exemplify the potential clinical implications of correlating histopathology with exclusive molecular beacons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Thoracic surgery associations, societies, and clubs: which organizations are right for you?

    PubMed

    Schieman, Colin; Grondin, Sean C; Gelfand, Gary A J

    2011-08-01

    Determining which organizations to join can be challenging given the wide selection of associations, societies, and clubs available to practicing thoracic surgeons. This article briefly reviews 7 important North American thoracic surgery organizations (the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, the Canadian Association of Thoracic Surgeons, the General Thoracic Surgical Club, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Southern Thoracic Surgical Association, the Western Thoracic Surgical Association, and Women in Thoracic Surgery). The authors also review the criteria that may assist in deciding which organizations best meet a surgeon's career goals and personal expectations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2016 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-03-06

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stable ischemic heart disease were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and in an effort to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing ACS and stable ischemic heart disease individually. This document presents the AUC for ACS. Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, presence of clinical instability or ongoing ischemic symptoms, prior reperfusion therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, fractional flow reserve testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization. A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range (4 to 6

  8. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Disease : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-06-12

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes and stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing SIHD and acute coronary syndromes individually. This document presents the AUC for SIHD.Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice. These scenarios included information on symptom status; risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing; coronary disease burden; and, in some scenarios, fractional flow reserve testing, presence or absence of diabetes, and SYNTAX score. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt were affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization.A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range of 4 to 6 indicate that

  9. Thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Kagan, K G

    1980-08-01

    The physiologic equilibrium of chest injury patients is frequently precarious, and mild stress during examination and treatment may precipitate acute decompensation and death. This is particularly true with the respiratory system, where the normally large respiratory reserve capacity may be rapidly lost. Accurate assessment of the nature of the thoracic injury and the severity of that injury must be determined in order to formulate a therapeutic plan. Many thoracic injuries, such as pneumothorax, pulmonary contusions, or rib fractures, will be self-limiting. Other conditions must be recognized for their potentially lethal nature and dealt with aggressively, and these include cardiac tamponade, tension pneumothorax, and esophageal perforation. By performing a systematic evaluation of the patient and confirming or denying the presence of all possible types of thoracic injury, the veterinarian may avoid overtreatment of self-limiting lesions and recognize and aggressively treat those with potentially fatal outcomes.

  10. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) is a national accrediting agency of graduate education programs in audiology or speech-language pathology. The CAA currently accredits or or preaccredits 319 programs (247 in speech-language pathology and 72 in…

  11. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: American Board of Funeral Service Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The American Board of Funeral Service Education (ABFSE), Committee on Accreditation (COA), is a national specialized accrediting agency. Its current scope of recognition is the accreditation of institutions and programs awarding diplomas, associate degrees and bachelor's degrees in funeral service or mortuary science. ABFSE is, therefore, both an…

  12. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: American Academy for Liberal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The American Academy for Liberal Education (AALE) was founded in 1992 for "the purpose of supporting and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts teaching and learning through accreditation." AALE's current scope of recognition is for the accreditation and pre-accreditation (Candidacy for Accreditation) of institutions of higher…

  13. An official systematic review of the European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society: measurement properties of field walking tests in chronic respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sally J; Puhan, Milo A; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios; Hernandes, Nidia A; Mitchell, Katy E; Hill, Catherine J; Lee, Annemarie L; Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Troosters, Thierry; Spruit, Martijn A; Carlin, Brian W; Wanger, Jack; Pepin, Véronique; Saey, Didier; Pitta, Fabio; Kaminsky, David A; McCormack, Meredith C; MacIntyre, Neil; Culver, Bruce H; Sciurba, Frank C; Revill, Susan M; Delafosse, Veronica; Holland, Anne E

    2014-12-01

    This systematic review examined the measurement properties of the 6-min walk test (6MWT), incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) and endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT) in adults with chronic respiratory disease. Studies that report the evaluation or use of the 6MWT, ISWT or ESWT were included. We searched electronic databases for studies published between January 2000 and September 2013. The 6-min walking distance (6MWD) is a reliable measure (intra-class correlation coefficients ranged from 0.82 to 0.99 in seven studies). There is a learning effect, with greater distance walked on the second test (pooled mean improvement of 26 m in 13 studies). Reliability was similar for ISWT and ESWT, with a learning effect also evident for ISWT (pooled mean improvement of 20 m in six studies). The 6MWD correlates more strongly with peak work capacity (r=0.59-0.93) and physical activity (r=0.40-0.85) than with respiratory function (r=0.10-0.59). Methodological factors affecting 6MWD include track length, encouragement, supplemental oxygen and walking aids. Supplemental oxygen also affects ISWT and ESWT performance. Responsiveness was moderate to high for all tests, with greater responsiveness to interventions that included exercise training. The findings of this review demonstrate that the 6MWT, ISWT and ESWT are robust tests of functional exercise capacity in adults with chronic respiratory disease. ©ERS 2014.

  14. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: asthma control and exacerbations: standardizing endpoints for clinical asthma trials and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Reddel, Helen K; Taylor, D Robin; Bateman, Eric D; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Boushey, Homer A; Busse, William W; Casale, Thomas B; Chanez, Pascal; Enright, Paul L; Gibson, Peter G; de Jongste, Johan C; Kerstjens, Huib A M; Lazarus, Stephen C; Levy, Mark L; O'Byrne, Paul M; Partridge, Martyn R; Pavord, Ian D; Sears, Malcolm R; Sterk, Peter J; Stoloff, Stuart W; Sullivan, Sean D; Szefler, Stanley J; Thomas, Mike D; Wenzel, Sally E

    2009-07-01

    The assessment of asthma control is pivotal to the evaluation of treatment response in individuals and in clinical trials. Previously, asthma control, severity, and exacerbations were defined and assessed in many different ways. The Task Force was established to provide recommendations about standardization of outcomes relating to asthma control, severity, and exacerbations in clinical trials and clinical practice, for adults and children aged 6 years or older. A narrative literature review was conducted to evaluate the measurement properties and strengths/weaknesses of outcome measures relevant to asthma control and exacerbations. The review focused on diary variables, physiologic measurements, composite scores, biomarkers, quality of life questionnaires, and indirect measures. The Task Force developed new definitions for asthma control, severity, and exacerbations, based on current treatment principles and clinical and research relevance. In view of current knowledge about the multiple domains of asthma and asthma control, no single outcome measure can adequately assess asthma control. Its assessment in clinical trials and in clinical practice should include components relevant to both of the goals of asthma treatment, namely achievement of best possible clinical control and reduction of future risk of adverse outcomes. Recommendations are provided for the assessment of asthma control in clinical trials and clinical practice, both at baseline and in the assessment of treatment response. The Task Force recommendations provide a basis for a multicomponent assessment of asthma by clinicians, researchers, and other relevant groups in the design, conduct, and evaluation of clinical trials, and in clinical practice.

  15. An official American Thoracic Society proceedings: work-related asthma and airway diseases. Presentations and discussion from the Fourth Jack Pepys Workshop on Asthma in the Workplace.

    PubMed

    Tarlo, Susan M; Malo, Jean-Luc

    2013-08-01

    Work-related asthma is a common occupational lung disease. The scope of the Fourth Jack Pepys Workshop that was held in May 2010 went beyond asthma to include discussion of other occupational airway diseases, in particular occupationally related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchiolitis. Aspects explored included public health considerations, environmental aspects, outcome after diagnosis, prevention and surveillance, and other work-related obstructive airway diseases. Consistent methods are needed to accurately estimate the comparative burden of occupation-related airway diseases among different countries. Challenges to accomplishing this include variability in health care delivery, compensation systems, cultural contexts, and social structures. These factors can affect disease estimates, while heterogeneity in occupations and workplace exposures can affect the underlying true prevalence of morbidity. Consideration of the working environment included discussion of practical methods of limiting exposure to respiratory sensitizers, methods to predict new sensitizers before introduction into workplaces, the role of legislated exposure limits, and models to estimate relative validity of various ameliorative measures when complete avoidance of the sensitizer is not feasible. Other strategies discussed included medical surveillance measures and education, especially for young individuals with asthma and new workers about to enter the workforce. Medical outcomes after development of sensitizer-induced occupational asthma are best following earlier diagnosis and removal from further exposure, but a subset may be able to continue working safely provided that exposure is reduced under close follow-up monitoring. It was recognized that occupationally related COPD is common but underappreciated, deserving further study and prevention efforts.

  16. An Official American Thoracic Society Systematic Review: The Effect of Nighttime Intensivist Staffing on Mortality and Length of Stay among Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    PubMed

    Kerlin, Meeta Prasad; Adhikari, Neill K J; Rose, Louise; Wilcox, M Elizabeth; Bellamy, Cassandra J; Costa, Deena Kelly; Gershengorn, Hayley B; Halpern, Scott D; Kahn, Jeremy M; Lane-Fall, Meghan B; Wallace, David J; Weiss, Curtis H; Wunsch, Hannah; Cooke, Colin R

    2017-02-01

    Studies of nighttime intensivist staffing have yielded mixed results. To review the association of nighttime intensivist staffing with outcomes of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. We searched five databases (2000-2016) for studies comparing in-hospital nighttime intensivist staffing with other nighttime staffing models in adult ICUs and reporting mortality or length of stay. We abstracted data on staffing models, outcomes, and study characteristics and assessed study quality, using standardized tools. Meta-analyses used random effects models. Eighteen studies met inclusion criteria: one randomized controlled trial and 17 observational studies. Overall methodologic quality was high. Studies included academic hospitals (n = 10), community hospitals (n = 2), or both (n = 6). Baseline clinician staffing included residents (n = 9), fellows (n = 4), and nurse practitioners or physician assistants (n = 2). Studies included both general and specialty ICUs and were geographically diverse. Meta-analysis (one randomized controlled trial; three nonrandomized studies with exposure limited to nighttime intensivist staffing with adjusted estimates of effect) demonstrated no association with mortality (odds ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.29). Secondary analyses including studies without risk adjustment, with a composite exposure of organizational factors, stratified by intensity of daytime staffing and by ICU type, yielded similar results. Minimal or no differences were observed in ICU and hospital length of stay and several other secondary outcomes. Notwithstanding limitations of the predominantly observational evidence, our systematic review and meta-analysis suggests nighttime intensivist staffing is not associated with reduced ICU patient mortality. Other outcomes and alternative staffing models should be evaluated to further guide staffing decisions.

  17. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report: Presentations and Discussion of the Sixth Jack Pepys Workshop on Asthma in the Workplace.

    PubMed

    Tarlo, Susan M; Malo, Jean-Luc; de Blay, Frédéric; Le Moual, Nicole; Henneberger, Paul; Heederik, Dick; Raulf, Monika; Carlsten, Christopher; Cartier, André

    2017-09-01

    The Sixth Jack Pepys Workshop on Asthma in the Workplace focused on six key themes regarding the recognition and assessment of work-related asthma and airway diseases: (1) cleaning agents and disinfectants (including in swimming pools) as irritants and sensitizers: how to evaluate types of bronchial reactions and reduce risks; (2) population-based studies of occupational obstructive diseases: use of databanks, advantages and pitfalls, what strategies to deal with biases and confounding?; (3) damp environments, dilapidated buildings, recycling processes, and molds, an increasing problem: mechanisms, how to assess causality and diagnosis; (4) diagnosis of occupational asthma and rhinitis: how useful are recombinant allergens (component-resolved diagnosis), metabolomics, and other new tests?; (5) how does exposure to gas, dust, and fumes enhance sensitization and asthma?; and (6) how to determine probability of occupational causality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: epidemiological and clinical, confirmation, and compensation aspects. A summary of the presentations and discussion is provided in this proceedings document. Increased knowledge has been gained in each topic over the past few years, but there remain aspects of controversy and uncertainty requiring further research.

  18. International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society International Multidisciplinary Classification of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Travis, William D.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Geisinger, Kim R.; Yatabe, Yasushi; Beer, David G.; Powell, Charles A.; Riely, Gregory J.; Van Schil, Paul E.; Garg, Kavita; Austin, John H. M.; Asamura, Hisao; Rusch, Valerie W.; Hirsch, Fred R.; Scagliotti, Giorgio; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Huber, Rudolf M.; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Jett, James; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Wistuba, Ignacio; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Aberle, Denise; Brambilla, Christian; Flieder, Douglas; Franklin, Wilbur; Gazdar, Adi; Gould, Michael; Hasleton, Philip; Henderson, Douglas; Johnson, Bruce; Johnson, David; Kerr, Keith; Kuriyama, Keiko; Lee, Jin Soo; Miller, Vincent A.; Petersen, Iver; Roggli, Victor; Rosell, Rafael; Saijo, Nagahiro; Thunnissen, Erik; Tsao, Ming; Yankelewitz, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adenocarcinoma is the most common histologic type of lung cancer. To address advances in oncology, molecular biology, pathology, radiology, and surgery of lung adenocarcinoma, an international multidisciplinary classification was sponsored by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society. This new adenocarcinoma classification is needed to provide uniform terminology and diagnostic criteria, especially for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), the overall approach to small nonresection cancer specimens, and for multidisciplinary strategic management of tissue for molecular and immunohistochemical studies. Methods An international core panel of experts representing all three societies was formed with oncologists/pulmonologists, pathologists, radiologists, molecular biologists, and thoracic surgeons. A systematic review was performed under the guidance of the American Thoracic Society Documents Development and Implementation Committee. The search strategy identified 11,368 citations of which 312 articles met specified eligibility criteria and were retrieved for full text review. A series of meetings were held to discuss the development of the new classification, to develop the recommendations, and to write the current document. Recommendations for key questions were graded by strength and quality of the evidence according to the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. Results The classification addresses both resection specimens, and small biopsies and cytology. The terms BAC and mixed subtype adenocarcinoma are no longer used. For resection specimens, new concepts are introduced such as adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) for small solitary adenocarcinomas with either pure lepidic growth (AIS) or predominant lepidic growth with ≤5 mm invasion (MIA) to define patients who, if they undergo complete resection

  19. International association for the study of lung cancer/american thoracic society/european respiratory society international multidisciplinary classification of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Travis, William D; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nicholson, Andrew G; Geisinger, Kim R; Yatabe, Yasushi; Beer, David G; Powell, Charles A; Riely, Gregory J; Van Schil, Paul E; Garg, Kavita; Austin, John H M; Asamura, Hisao; Rusch, Valerie W; Hirsch, Fred R; Scagliotti, Giorgio; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Huber, Rudolf M; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Jett, James; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Wistuba, Ignacio; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Aberle, Denise; Brambilla, Christian; Flieder, Douglas; Franklin, Wilbur; Gazdar, Adi; Gould, Michael; Hasleton, Philip; Henderson, Douglas; Johnson, Bruce; Johnson, David; Kerr, Keith; Kuriyama, Keiko; Lee, Jin Soo; Miller, Vincent A; Petersen, Iver; Roggli, Victor; Rosell, Rafael; Saijo, Nagahiro; Thunnissen, Erik; Tsao, Ming; Yankelewitz, David

    2011-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histologic type of lung cancer. To address advances in oncology, molecular biology, pathology, radiology, and surgery of lung adenocarcinoma, an international multidisciplinary classification was sponsored by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society. This new adenocarcinoma classification is needed to provide uniform terminology and diagnostic criteria, especially for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), the overall approach to small nonresection cancer specimens, and for multidisciplinary strategic management of tissue for molecular and immunohistochemical studies. An international core panel of experts representing all three societies was formed with oncologists/pulmonologists, pathologists, radiologists, molecular biologists, and thoracic surgeons. A systematic review was performed under the guidance of the American Thoracic Society Documents Development and Implementation Committee. The search strategy identified 11,368 citations of which 312 articles met specified eligibility criteria and were retrieved for full text review. A series of meetings were held to discuss the development of the new classification, to develop the recommendations, and to write the current document. Recommendations for key questions were graded by strength and quality of the evidence according to the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. The classification addresses both resection specimens, and small biopsies and cytology. The terms BAC and mixed subtype adenocarcinoma are no longer used. For resection specimens, new concepts are introduced such as adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) for small solitary adenocarcinomas with either pure lepidic growth (AIS) or predominant lepidic growth with ≤ 5 mm invasion (MIA) to define patients who, if they undergo complete resection, will have 100% or near 100

  20. The American Thoracic Society methods in epidemiologic, clinical, and operations research program. A research capacity-building program in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Buist, A Sonia; Parry, Vivienne

    2013-08-01

    Respiratory diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The greatest impact of many of these diseases is felt in low- and middle-income countries, but their control and management is hampered by lack of accurate estimates of their prevalence, risk factors, and distribution, and knowledge of the social and cultural setting in which they occur. Providing enough information for cost-effective response to respiratory diseases requires research by trained investigators and public health personnel. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) Methods in Epidemiologic, Clinical, and Operations Research (MECOR) Program was launched in 1994 to provide a sustainable means of increasing local and national research capacity aimed at addressing this need. As of March 2013, approximately 1,015 students have completed at least one level of the training program. Post-MECOR, 64% of participants have published a medical paper, 79% have presented at a scientific or academic meeting, 51% have submitted a research protocol for funding, and 42% have had one funded. One-quarter have been awarded an academic or clinical fellowship, and 78% reported that MECOR had made a significant or extremely important contribution to their professional life and accomplishments. Future challenges include funding, recruitment of local faculty, helping to build the research infrastructure in MECOR countries, and providing ongoing mentoring for research.

  1. The Association of American Feed Control Officials Dog and Cat Food Nutrient Profiles: substantiation of nutritional adequacy of complete and balanced pet foods in the United States.

    PubMed

    Dzanis, D A

    1994-12-01

    The Association of American Feed Control Official (AAFCO) formed the Canine (1990-1991) and Feline (1991-1992) Nutrition Expert Subcommittees to update the requirements for substantiation of "complete and balanced" claims for pet foods sold in the United States. There are two means by which a company may substantiate nutritional adequacy for a dog or cat food. The first means is by formulating the food so that nutrient levels fall within the ranges as established in the AAFCO Dog and Cat Food Nutrient Profiles. These profiles replace the National Research Council recommendations as the recognized authority in the United States as that term is applied to AAFCO regulations. Levels of nutrients are based on practical formulations of pet foods with adjustments to account for bioavailability of nutrients in commonly used ingredients. Separate profiles for adult maintenance and growth and reproduction are set, and maximum levels of some nutrients are also established. The second means of substantiation is through the conduct of feeding trials following AAFCO protocols.

  2. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - thoracic; Syphilitic aneurysm; Aneurysm - thoracic aortic ... The most common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of ... high cholesterol, long-term high blood pressure, or who smoke. ...

  3. Normative reference values of thoracic aortic diameter in American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN 6654) arm of National Lung Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    McComb, Barbara L; Munden, Reginald F; Duan, Fenghai; Jain, Amanda A; Tuite, Catherine; Chiles, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to establish normative reference values for thoracic aortic diameter (AD) in participants in the National Lung Screening Trial. Thoracic AD on 322 prevalence computed tomography was recorded at the sinotubular junction, mid-ascending, transverse arch, mid-descending, and diaphragmatic hiatus. Mean AD (cm) and upper limits of normal for men and women were recorded for at each location. Smoking did not correlate with AD. Age, gender, and body surface area (BSA) were the most significant factors. Thoracic AD reference values are reported. They do not correlate with smoking, but they did for age, gender, and BSA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An American Thoracic Society/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Workshop Report: Addressing Respiratory Health Equality in the United States.

    PubMed

    Celedón, Juan C; Burchard, Esteban G; Schraufnagel, Dean; Castillo-Salgado, Carlos; Schenker, Marc; Balmes, John; Neptune, Enid; Cummings, Kristin J; Holguin, Fernando; Riekert, Kristin A; Wisnivesky, Juan P; Garcia, Joe G N; Roman, Jesse; Kittles, Rick; Ortega, Victor E; Redline, Susan; Mathias, Rasika; Thomas, Al; Samet, Jonathan; Ford, Jean G

    2017-05-01

    Health disparities related to race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status persist and are commonly encountered by practitioners of pediatric and adult pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine in the United States. To address such disparities and thus progress toward equality in respiratory health, the American Thoracic Society and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a workshop in May of 2015. The workshop participants addressed health disparities by focusing on six topics, each of which concluded with a panel discussion that proposed recommendations for research on racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. Such recommendations address best practices to advance research on respiratory health disparities (e.g., characterize broad ethnic groups into subgroups known to differ with regard to a disease of interest), risk factors for respiratory health disparities (e.g., study the impact of new tobacco or nicotine products on respiratory diseases in minority populations), addressing equity in access to healthcare and quality of care (e.g., conduct longitudinal studies of the impact of the Affordable Care Act on respiratory and sleep disorders), the impact of personalized medicine on disparities research (e.g., implement large studies of pharmacogenetics in minority populations), improving design and methodology for research studies in respiratory health disparities (e.g., use study designs that reduce participants' burden and foster trust by engaging participants as decision-makers), and achieving equity in the pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine workforce (e.g., develop and maintain robust mentoring programs for junior faculty, including local and external mentors). Addressing these research needs should advance efforts to reduce, and potentially eliminate, respiratory, sleep, and critical care disparities in the United States.

  5. Classification of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease according to the Latin American Thoracic Association (ALAT) staging systems and the global initiative for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (GOLD).

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca, Maria; López Varela, María Victorina; Laucho-Contreras, María Eugenia; Casas, Alejandro; Schiavi, Eduardo; Rey, Alejandra; Silva, Alejandra

    2017-03-01

    Several classification systems use different criteria when assessing COPD stages. The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence and distribution of COPD stagesusing Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) recommendationsand Latin American Thoracic Association (ALAT) guidelinesin a primary-care population. Subjects attending routine primary care visits, ≥40 years of age, current or former smokers or exposed to biomass, completed a questionnaire and performed spirometry. COPD was defined as post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC<0.70 and categorised according to GOLD-2013 criteria and ALAT-2014 guideline. The BODEx index was used to assess the prognostic value of the stratification systems. A total of 1743 subjects completed the interview, 1540 performed acceptable spirometry. COPD prevalence according GOLD-2013 was 20.1% and had a U-shaped stage distribution (group A: 9.3%, B: 4.3%, C: 2.0%, D: 4.6%). According to ALAT, prevalence was 19.7% with a bell-shaped stage distribution (mild: 2.9%, moderate: 9%, severe: 5.4%, very-severe: 2.7%). Approximately 73% of patients were stratified as moderate (45.4%) or severe (27.3%) by ALAT guidelines, whereas using GOLD-2013 criteria the majority of subjects (approximately 69%) were in group A (46.3%) or group B (22.7%). BODE index score increased as COPD worsened according to ALAT stratification. This is not observed with GOLD2013 criteria (similar values for B and C groups). Disease stages differ under ALAT and GOLD-2013 criteria. ALAT identified a greater proportion of COPD subjects in the moderate and severe categories compared with GOLD-2013, where the majority were categorised in group A. Future evaluation of the ALAT classification should address its predictive ability in terms of hospitalizations and mortality. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Prognostic value of the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification in stage IB lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, C-h; Wang, W; Wei, Y; Hu, H-d; Zou, J; Yan, J; Yu, L-k; Yang, R-s; Wang, Y

    2015-10-01

    Patients with pathological stage IB lung adenocarcinoma have a variable prognosis, even if received the same treatment. This study investigated the prognostic value of the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) lung adenocarcinoma classification in resected stage IB lung adenocarcinoma. We identified 276 patients with pathological stage IB adenocarcinoma who had undergone surgical resection at the Nanjing Chest Hospital between 2005 and 2010. The histological subtypes of all patients were classified according to the 2011 IASLC/ATS/ERS international multidisciplinary lung adenocarcinoma classification. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to analyze the correlation between the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification and patients' prognosis. Two hundred and seventy-six patients with pathological stage IB adenocarcinoma had an 86.2% 5-year overall survival (OS) and 80.4% 5-year disease-free survival (DFS). Patients with micropapillary and solid predominant tumors had a significantly worse OS and DFS as compared to those with other subtypes predominant tumors (p = 0.003 and 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the new classification was an independent prognostic factor for both OS and DFS of pathological stage IB adenocarcinoma (p = 0.009 and 0.003). Our study revealed that the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification was an independent prognostic factor of pathological stage IB adenocarcinoma. This new classification is valuable of screening out high risk patients to receive postoperative adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. 76 FR 63654 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Doc No: 2011-26503] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block... American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Official Protraction Diagram (OPD),...

  8. Normative reference values of thoracic aortic diameter in American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN 6654) arm of the National Lung Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    McComb, Barbara L.; Munden, Reginald F.; Duan, Fenghai; Jain, Amanda A.; Tuite, C; Chiles, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to establish reference values for thoracic aortic diameter (AD) in participants in the National Lung Screening Trial. Methods Thoracic AD on 322 prevalence computed tomography was recorded at the sinotubular junction, mid-ascending, transverse arch, mid-descending, and diaphragmatic hiatus. We conducted univariate and multivariate analysis to detect AD-associated risk factors. Results Mean AD and upper limits of normal for men and women were recorded for each each location. Smoking did not correlate with AS. Age, gender, and body surface area (BSA) were the most significant factors. Conclusions Thoracic AD reference values are reported. They do not correlate with smoking, but do age, gender, and body surface area (BSA). PMID:27203287

  9. The Incorporation and Abjection of Official Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearl, Benjamin Kelsey

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, the author analyzes two theoretical perspectives--incorporation and abjection--that inform official knowledge generally and high school American history textbooks specifically. While contemporary textbooks increasingly depict the experiences of historically marginalized groups such as women, African Americans, Latinos, American…

  10. Imaging of thoracic textiloma.

    PubMed

    Ridene, Imene; Hantous-Zannad, Saoussen; Zidi, Asma; Smati, Belhassen; Baccouche, Ines; Kilani, Tarek; Ben Miled-M'rad, Khaoula

    2011-03-01

    Intrathoracic textiloma or gossypiboma, a retained surgical sponge in the thoracic cavity, is an exceptional but serious complication following thoracic or abdominal surgery. The purpose of this work is to highlight the topographic features of thoracic textiloma and to describe imaging aspects, and, particularly, computed tomography (CT) features. Eight patients have been operated in our thoracic surgery department for thoracic gossypiboma. In the past, three patients had undergone hepatic surgery and the five others had a history of thoracic surgery. All the patients had a chest radiograph, five of them had a thoracic ultrasonography, all had a chest CT, and one patient had a chest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In patients with a history of abdominal surgery, the foreign body was located in the parenchyma of the right lower lobe. In the other patients, the foreign body was either intrapleural or mediastinal. Ultrasonography suggested the diagnosis of textiloma in three of the five patients by demonstrating a non-calcified hyperechoic mass with acoustic shadow. At CT, the gossypiboma was a low-attenuating mass containing trapped gas lucencies in six patients and it was a high-attenuating mass in two patients. MRI showed a diaphragmatic defect in one patient with an intrapulmonary gossypiboma that migrated from the abdomen. The CT aspect of thoracic gossypiboma may be different according to pleural or parenchymal location. The spongiform appearance, characteristic in abdominal gossypiboma, is not the only CT presentation of thoracic gossypiboma. The confrontation of the surgical history with the CT signs helps to have a preoperative diagnosis. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interface: The UN Speaks to American Educators. The Major Speeches by UN Officials at the "Global Crossroads" National Assembly, Washington, DC, May 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhagat, Susheila R., Ed.

    Development education, the process of sensitizing citizens of industrialized countries to the problems of the third world, and related issues of global development, has gained acceptance among educators in recent years. To respond to this global approach to development, a National Assembly ("Global Crossroads: Educating Americans for…

  12. Interface: The UN Speaks to American Educators. The Major Speeches by UN Officials at the "Global Crossroads" National Assembly, Washington, DC, May 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhagat, Susheila R., Ed.

    Development education, the process of sensitizing citizens of industrialized countries to the problems of the third world, and related issues of global development, has gained acceptance among educators in recent years. To respond to this global approach to development, a National Assembly ("Global Crossroads: Educating Americans for…

  13. OFFICIAL STS-2 CREW STATION

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1981-04-07

    S81-29900 (May 1981) --- This is the official insignia for STS-2 the United States second space shuttle orbital flight test mission. Crewmen are astronauts Joe H. Engle, commander, and Richard H. Truly, pilot. Their spacecraft, orbiter 102 Columbia, is depicted along with the crew members surnames, and the merged eagle and American flag. The number two is significant, as it applies to the number of crew members as well as the second flight for the Columbia and the second in a series of space shuttle missions. The NASA insignia design for space shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA

  14. Official Basketball Rules for Girls and Women. July 1972 - July 1973. Reprint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC. Div. for Girls and Women's Sports.

    The official American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (AAHPER) rules for girls and women's basketball, July 1972 - July 1973 are listed. Exact court measurements are given as are official scoring rules, timing procedures, duties of officials, definition of playing terms, violations and penalties, and officials' signals.…

  15. Guide to thoracic imaging.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Thoracic imaging is commonly ordered in general practice. Guidelines exist for ordering thoracic imaging but few are specific for general practice. This article summarises current indications for imaging the thorax with chest X-ray and computed tomography. A simple frame-work for interpretation of the chest X-ray, suitable for trainees and practitioners providing primary care imaging in rural and remote locations, is presented. Interpretation of thoracic imaging is best done using a systematic approach. Radiological investigation is not warranted in un-complicated upper respiratory tract infections or asthma, minor trauma or acute-on-chronic chest pain.

  16. Medical management of thoracic aortic aneurysm disease.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Alan C

    2013-03-01

    The patient with thoracic aortic aneurysm disease requires careful evaluation and management over his or her lifetime. This includes assessment for the presence of an underlying genetic disorder, such as Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve disease, or a familial aortic aneurysm syndrome. Screening family members is necessary, inasmuch as up to 20% of first-degree relatives of the patient with a thoracic aortic aneurysm will also have aneurysm disease. Medical therapy is often prescribed, and beta-blocker therapy to reduce the stress on the aortic wall is usually recommended. However, very few clinical trials of pharmacologic therapy in humans with thoracic aortic aneurysm disease have been conducted. Mouse models have led to important discoveries and insight into the pathogenesis of aneurysm syndromes, and there is hope these may lead to effective therapy in people. Several studies are ongoing that examine the role of angiotensin receptor blockers in Marfan syndrome. Lifestyle modification is also important for patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, including restrictions on physical activity, weight lifting, and recommendations about the management of pregnancy. Long-term surveillance of the aorta, even after successful surgery, is necessary for timing of prophylactic surgery and to evaluate for late complications. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is surgery to treat sweating that is much heavier than normal. This condition ... hyperhidrosis . Usually the surgery is used to treat sweating in the palms or face. The sympathetic nerves ...

  18. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... STS Participant User File Research Program Videos Lung Cancer Screening Adoption How to Build Your Academic Career New Technologies in Mitral Valve Replacement Enhanced Recovery Pathways in Thoracic Surgery New STS Clinical Practice Guidelines ...

  19. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Moraites, Eleni; Vaughn, Olushola Akinshemoyin; Hill, Samantha

    2014-10-01

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is a surgical technique most commonly used in the treatment of severe palmar hyperhidrosis in selected patients. The procedure also has limited use in the treatment axillary and craniofacial hyperhidrosis. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is associated with a high rate of the development of compensatory hyperhidrosis, which may affect patient satisfaction with the procedure and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 35th Annual Official Education Construction Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Spending on construction by the nation's education institutions increased in 2008, reversing four years of declines in total annual expenditures, according to "American School & University"'s 35th annual Official Education Construction Report. One of the reasons for the increase in spending was the fact that the majority of the construction…

  1. 34th Annual Official Education Construction Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2008-01-01

    According to American School & University's 34th annual Official Education Construction Report, spending on construction by the nation's school districts and colleges slowed in 2007, representing the fourth consecutive year total expenditures dropped from the year before and setting a low point in spending so far this decade. A difficult economy…

  2. 33rd Annual Official Education Construction Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2007-01-01

    Construction spending by education institutions topped $36 billion in 2006. While strong by historical standards, it represents the third consecutive year that total spending on construction dropped from the year before. According to the "American School & University" 33rd annual Official Education Construction Report, total spending on new,…

  3. Official portrait of Astronaut Vance D. Brand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Official portrait of Astronaut Vance D. Brand. Brand is in the dark blue shuttle flight suit with his helmet under his arm and an American flag behind him. Above and to the right of his head is a view of the shuttle flying.

  4. Official portrait of Astronaut Vance D. Brand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Official portrait of Astronaut Vance D. Brand. Brand is in the dark blue shuttle flight suit with his helmet under his arm and an American flag behind him. Above and to the right of his head is a view of the shuttle flying.

  5. 15 CFR 255.7 - Official notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 255.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE... IN LABORATORY STANDARDIZATION AND TESTING FOR QUALIFIED CITIZENS OF OTHER AMERICAN REPUBLICS § 255.7 Official notification. Each applicant selected by the Director of the National Institute of Standards...

  6. 15 CFR 255.7 - Official notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 255.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE... IN LABORATORY STANDARDIZATION AND TESTING FOR QUALIFIED CITIZENS OF OTHER AMERICAN REPUBLICS § 255.7 Official notification. Each applicant selected by the Director of the National Institute of Standards...

  7. 15 CFR 255.7 - Official notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 255.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE... IN LABORATORY STANDARDIZATION AND TESTING FOR QUALIFIED CITIZENS OF OTHER AMERICAN REPUBLICS § 255.7 Official notification. Each applicant selected by the Director of the National Institute of Standards...

  8. 15 CFR 255.7 - Official notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 255.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE... IN LABORATORY STANDARDIZATION AND TESTING FOR QUALIFIED CITIZENS OF OTHER AMERICAN REPUBLICS § 255.7 Official notification. Each applicant selected by the Director of the National Institute of Standards...

  9. 35th Annual Official Education Construction Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Spending on construction by the nation's education institutions increased in 2008, reversing four years of declines in total annual expenditures, according to "American School & University"'s 35th annual Official Education Construction Report. One of the reasons for the increase in spending was the fact that the majority of the construction…

  10. 34th Annual Official Education Construction Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2008-01-01

    According to American School & University's 34th annual Official Education Construction Report, spending on construction by the nation's school districts and colleges slowed in 2007, representing the fourth consecutive year total expenditures dropped from the year before and setting a low point in spending so far this decade. A difficult economy…

  11. Negotiations Between ABMA Officials and NASA Officials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    In this picture, negotiations are under way between officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on August 11, 1959. Seated at the table with his back to the camera, is Dr. T. Keith Glernan, NASA Administrator. At the head of the table is Major General John Barclay, Commander of ABMA and at the right side of the table are Colonel John G. Zierdt of ABMA and Dr. von Braun.

  12. Negotiations Between ABMA Officials and NASA Officials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    In this picture, negotiations are under way between officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on August 11, 1959. Seated at the table with his back to the camera, is Dr. T. Keith Glernan, NASA Administrator. At the head of the table is Major General John Barclay, Commander of ABMA and at the right side of the table are Colonel John G. Zierdt of ABMA and Dr. von Braun.

  13. Official Position of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology Social Security Administration Policy on Validity Testing: Guidance and Recommendations for Change.

    PubMed

    Chafetz, M D; Williams, M A; Ben-Porath, Y S; Bianchini, K J; Boone, K B; Kirkwood, M W; Larrabee, G J; Ord, J S

    2015-01-01

    The milestone publication by Slick, Sherman, and Iverson (1999) of criteria for determining malingered neurocognitive dysfunction led to extensive research on validity testing. Position statements by the National Academy of Neuropsychology and the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN) recommended routine validity testing in neuropsychological evaluations. Despite this widespread scientific and professional support, the Social Security Administration (SSA) continued to discourage validity testing, a stance that led to a congressional initiative for SSA to reevaluate their position. In response, SSA commissioned the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to evaluate the science concerning the validation of psychological testing. The IOM concluded that validity assessment was necessary in psychological and neuropsychological examinations (IOM, 2015 ). The AACN sought to provide independent expert guidance and recommendations concerning the use of validity testing in disability determinations. A panel of contributors to the science of validity testing and its application to the disability process was charged with describing why the disability process for SSA needs improvement, and indicating the necessity for validity testing in disability exams. This work showed how the determination of malingering is a probability proposition, described how different types of validity tests are appropriate, provided evidence concerning non-credible findings in children and low-functioning individuals, and discussed the appropriate evaluation of pain disorders typically seen outside of mental consultations. A scientific plan for validity assessment that additionally protects test security is needed in disability determinations and in research on classification accuracy of disability decisions.

  14. Thoracic surgery in the real world: does surgical specialty affect outcomes in patients having general thoracic operations?

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Victor A; Saha, Sibu P; Davenport, Daniel L; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2012-04-01

    Most general thoracic operations in the United States are performed by general surgeons. Results obtained by those identified as general surgeons are often compared with those identified as thoracic surgeons. We interrogated the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database over a 5-year period to compare outcomes in patients who underwent similar operations by surgeons identified as either thoracic surgeons or general surgeons. We employed propensity-score matching to minimize confounding when estimating the effect of surgeon identity on postoperative outcomes. During the study period, thoracic surgeons performed 3,263 major pulmonary or esophageal operations, and general surgeons performed 15,057 similar operations. Compared with patients operated on by general surgeons, patients operated on by thoracic surgeons had significant excess multivariate comorbidities, including insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, concurrent pneumonia, congestive heart failure, previous cardiac surgery, dialysis-dependent renal failure, disseminated cancer, prior sepsis, and previous operation within 30 days. Likewise, patients in highest risk categories had operations performed by thoracic surgeons more commonly than by general surgeons. Unadjusted comparisons for mortality and serious morbidity showed significantly worse mortality and pulmonary complications in patients operated on by thoracic surgeons. However, with propensity matching according to surgeon type, thoracic surgeons had significantly fewer serious adverse outcomes compared with general surgeons, and this decreased morbidity occurred in a higher risk cohort. Our results show that patients operated on by thoracic surgeons have higher acuity compared with patients operated on by general surgeons. When patients are matched for comorbidities and serious preoperative risk factors, thoracic surgeons have improved outcomes, especially with regard to

  15. [Blunt thoracic injury].

    PubMed

    Miura, H; Taira, O; Hiraguri, S; Uchida, O; Hagiwara, M; Ikeda, T; Kato, H

    1998-06-01

    Of 161 patients with blunt thoracic injury, 135 were male (83.9%) and 26 were female. The most common cause of injury was traffic accidents (130 patients, 80.7%), followed by falls (22 patients), and crushing (7 patients). There were 46 third decade and 36 second decade patients. Thirty-two patients had single thoracic injury and the other had multiple organ injury. The most common associated injury was head injury (65 patients). Most traffic accidents involved motor cycle accident. Forty-four patients died, 32 within 24 hours, and 4 died to thoracic injury. These 4 patients were shock on arrival and died within 24 hours. The injury severity score, which was under 30 in 78.3% of patients, correlated to the mortality rate. Rib fracture was the most common thoracic injury in 96 patients followed by hemothorax in 91, pulmonary contusion in 79, and pneumothorax in 64. Most of the thoracic injuries were treated conservatively. Thoracotomy was performed in 6 patients. Other than one patient with rupture of the left pulmonary vein, 5 patients recovered. Continued bleeding at a rate of more than 200 ml/h from the chest drainage tube or no recovery from shock and large air leakage preventing re-expansion of the lung are indications for emergency thoracotomy. Thoracotomy should also be considered after conservative treatment in patients with continued air leakage or intrabronchial bleeding negatively affecting respiration. Indications for thoracotomy should be determined individually based on evaluating of vital sign.

  16. An official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report: presentations and discussion of the fifth Jack Pepys Workshop on Asthma in the Workplace. Comparisons between asthma in the workplace and non-work-related asthma.

    PubMed

    Malo, Jean-Luc; Tarlo, Susan M; Sastre, Joaquin; Martin, James; Jeebhay, Mohamed F; Le Moual, Nicole; Heederik, Dick; Platts-Mills, Thomas; Blanc, Paul D; Vandenplas, Olivier; Moscato, Gianna; de Blay, Frédéric; Cartier, André

    2015-07-01

    The fifth Jack Pepys Workshop on Asthma in the Workplace focused on the similarities and differences of work-related asthma (WRA) and non-work-related asthma (non-WRA). WRA includes occupational asthma (OA) and work-exacerbated asthma (WEA). There are few biological differences in the mechanisms of sensitization to environmental and occupational allergens. Non-WRA and OA, when due to high-molecular-weight agents, are both IgE mediated; it is uncertain whether OA due to low-molecular-weight agents is also IgE mediated. Risk factors for OA include female sex, a history of upper airway symptoms, and a history of bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Atopy is a risk factor for OA due to high-molecular-weight agents, and exposure to cleaning agents is a risk factor for both OA and non-WRA. WEA is important among workers with preexisting asthma and may overlap with irritant-induced asthma, a type of OA. Induced sputum cytology can confirm airway inflammation, but specific inhalation challenge is the reference standard diagnostic test. Inhalation challenges are relatively safe, with the most severe reactions occurring with low-molecular-weight agents. Indirect health care costs account for about 50% of total asthma costs. Workers with poor asthma control (WRA or non-WRA) are less likely to be employed. Income loss is a major contributor to the indirect costs of WRA. Overall, asthma outcomes probably are worse for adult-onset than for childhood-onset asthma but better for OA than adult-onset non-WRA. Important aspects of management of OA are rapid and proper confirmation of the diagnosis and reduction of exposure to sensitizers or irritants at work and home.

  17. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Society of Intensive Care Medicine/Society of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Practice Guideline: Mechanical Ventilation in Adult Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fan, Eddy; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Goligher, Ewan C; Hodgson, Carol L; Munshi, Laveena; Walkey, Allan J; Adhikari, Neill K J; Amato, Marcelo B P; Branson, Richard; Brower, Roy G; Ferguson, Niall D; Gajic, Ognjen; Gattinoni, Luciano; Hess, Dean; Mancebo, Jordi; Meade, Maureen O; McAuley, Daniel F; Pesenti, Antonio; Ranieri, V Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Rubin, Eileen; Seckel, Maureen; Slutsky, Arthur S; Talmor, Daniel; Thompson, B Taylor; Wunsch, Hannah; Uleryk, Elizabeth; Brozek, Jan; Brochard, Laurent J

    2017-05-01

    This document provides evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the use of mechanical ventilation in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A multidisciplinary panel conducted systematic reviews and metaanalyses of the relevant research and applied Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for clinical recommendations. For all patients with ARDS, the recommendation is strong for mechanical ventilation using lower tidal volumes (4-8 ml/kg predicted body weight) and lower inspiratory pressures (plateau pressure < 30 cm H2O) (moderate confidence in effect estimates). For patients with severe ARDS, the recommendation is strong for prone positioning for more than 12 h/d (moderate confidence in effect estimates). For patients with moderate or severe ARDS, the recommendation is strong against routine use of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (high confidence in effect estimates) and conditional for higher positive end-expiratory pressure (moderate confidence in effect estimates) and recruitment maneuvers (low confidence in effect estimates). Additional evidence is necessary to make a definitive recommendation for or against the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients with severe ARDS. The panel formulated and provided the rationale for recommendations on selected ventilatory interventions for adult patients with ARDS. Clinicians managing patients with ARDS should personalize decisions for their patients, particularly regarding the conditional recommendations in this guideline.

  18. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Bypass--Temperature Management During Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Engelman, Richard; Baker, Robert A; Likosky, Donald S; Grigore, Alina; Dickinson, Timothy A; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Hammon, John W

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the evidence-based literature supporting temperature management during adult cardiopulmonary bypass, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology tasked the authors to conduct a review of the peer-reviewed literature, including: 1) optimal site for temperature monitoring, 2) avoidance of hyperthermia, 3) peak cooling temperature gradient and cooling rate, and 4) peak warming temperature gradient and rewarming rate. Authors adopted the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association method for development clinical practice guidelines, and arrived at the following recommendations: CLASS I RECOMMENDATIONS: a)The oxygenator arterial outlet blood temperature is recommended to be utilized as a surrogate for cerebral temperature measurement during CPB. (Class I, Level C) b)To monitor cerebral perfusate temperature during warming, it should be assumed that the oxygenator arterial outlet blood temperature under-estimates cerebral perfusate temperature. (Class I, Level C) c)Surgical teams should limit arterial outlet blood temperature to<37°C to avoid cerebral hyperthermia. (Class 1, Level C) d)Temperature gradients between the arterial outlet and venous inflow on the oxygenator during CPB cooling should not exceed 10°C to avoid generation of gaseous emboli. (Class 1, Level C) e)Temperature gradients between the arterial outlet and venous inflow on the oxygenator during CPB rewarming should not exceed 10°C to avoid out-gassing when blood is returned to the patient. (Class 1, Level C) CLASS IIa a)Pulmonary artery or nasopharyngeal temperature recording is reasonable for weaning and immediate post-bypass temperature measurement. (Class IIa, Level C)b)Rewarming when arterial blood outlet temperature ≥30° C: i.To achieve the desired temperature for separation from bypass, it is reasonable to maintain a temperature gradient between

  19. Thoracic arachnoid cyst resection.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Harel

    2014-09-01

    Arachnoid cysts in the spinal cord may be asymptomatic. In some cases arachnoid cysts may exert mass effect on the thoracic spinal cord and lead to pain and myelopathy symptoms. Arachnoid cysts may be difficult to visualize on an MRI scan because the thin walled arachnoid may not be visible. Focal displacement of the thoracic spinal cord and effacement of the spinal cord with apparent widening of the cerebrospinal fluid space is seen. This video demonstrates surgical techniques to remove a dorsal arachnoid cyst causing spinal cord compression. The surgery involves a thoracic laminectomy. The dura is opened sharply with care taken not to open the arachnoid so that the cyst can be well visualized. The thickened arachnoid walls of the cyst are removed to alleviate the compression caused by the arachnoid cyst. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/pgUrl9xvsD0.

  20. Official portrait of the Payload Specialist Millie Hughes-Fulford

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Official portrait of Payload Specialist Millie Hughes-Fulford. She is wearing the blue shuttle flight suit with an American flag in the background and a model of the shuttle orbiter on the table in front of her.

  1. Official portrait of Astronaut Bruce McCandless

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Official Space Shuttle portrait of Astronaut Bruce McCandless, II., attired in the Shuttle Extravehicular activity (EVA) suit with the manned maneuvering unit (MMU) attached and the American flag in the background.

  2. Complete thoracic ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Alphonso, N; Venugopal, P S; Deshpande, R; Anderson, D

    2003-03-01

    Thoracic ectopia cordis is a rare congenital defect with very few reported survivors after surgical correction. We report a case of complete thoracic ectopia cordis with double outlet right ventricle. The diagnosis was established antenatally and a repair was undertaken soon after birth. The child remained stable and was extubated on the fifth post-operative day. Forty-eight hours later the child succumbed to an unexplained respiratory arrest. Also presented is a review of the different surgical strategies for this unusual condition.

  3. Thoracic ectopia cordis

    PubMed Central

    Shad, Jimmy; Budhwani, Keshav; Biswas, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Ectopia cordis is defined as complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. It is a rare congenital defect in fusion of the anterior chest wall resulting in extra thoracic location of the heart. Its estimated prevalence is 5.5–7.9 per million live births. The authors had one such case of a 15-h-old full-term male neonate weighing 2.25 kg with an externally visible, beating heart over the chest wall. The neonate had difficulty in respiration with peripheral cyanosis. Patient died of cardiorespiratory arrest before any surgical intervention could be undertaken inspite of best possible resuscitative measures. PMID:23035158

  4. Thoracic ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Shad, Jimmy; Budhwani, Keshav; Biswas, Rakesh

    2012-09-30

    Ectopia cordis is defined as complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. It is a rare congenital defect in fusion of the anterior chest wall resulting in extra thoracic location of the heart. Its estimated prevalence is 5.5-7.9 per million live births. The authors had one such case of a 15-h-old full-term male neonate weighing 2.25 kg with an externally visible, beating heart over the chest wall. The neonate had difficulty in respiration with peripheral cyanosis. Patient died of cardiorespiratory arrest before any surgical intervention could be undertaken inspite of best possible resuscitative measures.

  5. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  6. Angiographic validation of the American College of Cardiology Foundation-the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Collaboration on the Comparative Effectiveness of Revascularization Strategies study.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Anjan K; Grau-Sepulveda, Maria V; O'Brien, Sean; Abueg, Cassandra; Ponirakis, Angelo; Delong, Elizabeth; Peterson, Eric; Klein, Lloyd W; Garratt, Kirk N; Weintraub, William S; Gibson, C Michael

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to compare angiographic interpretation of coronary arteriograms by sites in community practice versus those made by a centralized angiographic core laboratory. The study population consisted of 2013 American College of Cardiology-National Cardiovascular Data Registry (ACC-NCDR) records with 2- and 3- vessel coronary disease from 54 sites in 2004 to 2007. The primary analysis compared Registry (NCDR)-defined 2- and 3-vessel disease versus those from an angiographic core laboratory analysis. Vessel-level kappa coefficients suggested moderate agreement between NCDR and core laboratory analysis, ranging from kappa=0.39 (95% confidence intervals, 0.32-0.45) for the left anterior descending artery to kappa=0.59 (95% confidence intervals, 0.55-0.64) for the right coronary artery. Overall, 6.3% (n=127 out of 2013) of those patients identified with multivessel disease at NCDR sites had had 0- or 1-vessel disease by core laboratory reading. There was no directional bias with regard to overcall, that is, 12.3% of cases read as 3-vessel disease by the sites were read as <3-vessel disease by the core laboratory, and 13.9% of core laboratory 3-vessel cases were read as <3-vessel by the sites. For a subset of patients with left main coronary disease, registry overcall was not linked to increased rates of mortality or myocardial infarction. There was only modest agreement between angiographic readings in clinical practice and those from an independent core laboratory. Further study will be needed because the implications for patient management are uncertain.

  7. International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification predicts occult lymph node metastasis in clinically mediastinal node-negative lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yi-Chen; Kadota, Kyuichi; Nitadori, Jun-ichi; Sima, Camelia S.; Rizk, Nabil P.; Jones, David R.; Travis, William D.; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We investigated the role of the 2011 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) classification in predicting occult lymph node metastasis in clinically mediastinal node-negative lung adenocarcinoma. METHODS We reviewed lung adenocarcinoma patients who had clinically N2-negative status, were evaluated by preoperative positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) and had undergone lobectomy or pneumonectomy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (n = 297). Tumours were classified according to the 2011 IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. The associations between occult lymph node metastasis and clinicopathological variables were analysed using Fisher's exact test and logistic regression analysis. RESULTS Thirty-two (11%) cN0-1 patients had occult mediastinal lymph node metastasis (pN2) whereas 25% of cN1 patients had pN2 disease. Increased micropapillary pattern was associated with increased risk of pN2 disease (P = 0.001). On univariate analysis, high maximum standard uptake value of the primary tumour on PET/CT (P = 0.019) and the presence of micropapillary (P = 0.014) and solid pattern (P = 0.014) were associated with occult pN2 disease. On multivariable analysis, micropapillary pattern was positively associated with risk of pN2 disease (odds ratio = 3.41; 95% confidence intervals = 1.42–8.19; P = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS The presence of micropapillary pattern is an independent predictor of occult mediastinal lymph node metastasis. Our observations have potential therapeutic implications for management of early-stage lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26377636

  8. Correlation of EGFR mutation status with predominant histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma according to the new lung adenocarcinoma classification of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society.

    PubMed

    Villa, Celina; Cagle, Philip T; Johnson, Melissa; Patel, Jyoti D; Yeldandi, Anjana V; Raj, Rishi; DeCamp, Malcolm M; Raparia, Kirtee

    2014-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations have been identified as predictors of response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer. To investigate the relationship of EGFR mutation status to the histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma according to the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) classification. We screened EGFR mutation in 200 consecutive lung adenocarcinoma resection specimens diagnosed between 2008 and 2011. Among 200 lung adenocarcinomas, EGFR mutations were identified in 41 tumors (20.5%). The mean age in the EGFR-mutant group was 64.8 years and this group consisted of 78% females and 22% males. Most patients with EGFR-positive lung cancers were never-smokers (51%) as compared to 8% with EGFR-negative cancers (P < .001). The most common mutations identified in our population were deletions in exon 19 (22 patients) and L858R in exon 21 (12 patients). Five patients had double mutations. The predominant pattern of adenocarcinoma was lepidic (44%) in EGFR-mutant lung cancers as compared to 69% with acinar pattern in EGFR wild-type lung cancers (P < .001). Of 22 minimally invasive adenocarcinomas, 8 (36%) had EGFR mutations, accounting for 20% of adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations (P < .05). Based on the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification, the predominant subtype of adenocarcinoma was lepidic (44%) in EGFR-mutant lung cancers (P < .001). However, histologic subtype should not be used to exclude patients from tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, since EGFR mutations are found in lung adenocarcinomas of other subtypes.

  9. European perspectives in thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Europe, the old Continent, has been the cradle of thoracic surgery from the beginning of the last century. The structure and the activities of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) activities are directed to enlighten the path, provide the tools and set the standards for a quality inspired practice in thoracic surgery. PMID:24868436

  10. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  11. Hospital Practice of Direct-Home Discharge and 30-Day Readmission After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy (STS/ACC TVT) Registry.

    PubMed

    Dodson, John A; Williams, Mathew R; Cohen, David J; Manandhar, Pratik; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Blaum, Caroline; Zhong, Hua; Rumsfeld, John S; Hochman, Judith S

    2017-08-21

    Nearly 17% of patients are readmitted within 30 days of discharge after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Selected patients are discharged to skilled nursing facilities, yet the association between a hospital's practice to discharge home versus to skilled nursing facilities, and readmission remains unclear. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy (STS/ACC TVT) Registry was used to evaluate readmissions among patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (2011-2015). Hospitals were divided into quartiles (Q1-Q4) based on the percentage of patients discharged directly home. We assessed patient and hospital level characteristics and used hierarchical logistic regression to analyze the association of discharge disposition with 30-day readmission. Our cohort included 18 568 transcatheter aortic valve replacement patients at 329 US hospitals, of whom 69% were discharged directly home. Hospitals in the highest quartile of direct home discharge (Q4) compared with hospitals in the lowest (Q1) were more likely to use femoral access (75.2% versus 60.1%, P<0.001), had fewer patients receiving transfusion (26.4% versus 40.9%, P<0.001), and were more likely to be located in the Southern United States (48.8% versus 18.3%, P<0.001). Median 30-day readmission rate was 17.9%. There was no significant difference in 30-day readmissions among quartiles (P=0.14), even after multivariable adjustment (odds ratio Q4 versus Q1=0.89, 95%CI 0.76-1.04; P=0.15). Factors most strongly associated with 30-day readmission were glomerular filtration rate, in-hospital stroke or transient ischemic attack, and nonfemoral access. There was no statistically significant association between hospital practice of direct home discharge post-transcatheter aortic valve replacement and 30-day readmission. Further research is needed to understand regional variations and optimum strategies for postdischarge care. © 2017 The Authors

  12. Thoracic anesthesia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kozian, Alf; Kretzschmar, Moritz A; Schilling, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The mean age of patients presenting for thoracic surgery is rising steadily, associated with an increased demand for thoracic surgical treatments by geriatric patients. With increasing age, physiologic changes and comorbidities have to be considered. Thoracic anesthesia for elderly patients requires greater specific knowledge. Respiratory mechanics change progressively during aging, and the pharmacology of different drugs is also altered with increasing age. This has implications for the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative management of elderly patients scheduled for thoracic surgery. Special focus has to be placed on preoperative evaluation, the ventilation regime and general intraoperative management. Effective postoperative pain treatment after geriatric thoracic surgery requires careful pain assessment and drug titration. Considering key points of physiology and pharmacology can help to provide best possible care for the increasing number of elderly patients in thoracic surgery. Management of geriatric patients in thoracic surgery offer opportunities for anaesthetic interventions including protective ventilation, use of different anesthetics, anaesthesia monitoring, fluid management and pain therapy.

  13. Robotics in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kernstine, Kemp H

    2004-10-01

    Surgical use of robotics, or computer-assisted surgical systems (CAS), has evolved over the last 10 years; for the treatment of chest diseases, however, the development has really occurred in the last 3 to 4 years. This brief history means that there have been few publications in the medical literature, and those that exist are mostly case reports. Moreover, because of this modest experience, robotic thoracic procedures currently take more time than nonrobotic cases and, thus, are more expensive. The surgical learning curve appears to be steep, especially for the more complex procedures. As surgeons gain greater experience and the complexity and cost of the equipment are reduced, we should expect to see greater utility of CAS in thoracic surgery.

  14. Managment of thoracic empyema.

    PubMed

    Sherman, M M; Subramanian, V; Berger, R L

    1977-04-01

    Over a ten year period, 102 patients with thoracic empyemata were treated at Boston City Hospital. Only three patients died from the pleural infection while twenty-six succumbed to the associated diseases. Priniciples of management include: (1) thoracentesis; (2) antibiotics; (3) closed-tube thoracostomy; (4) sinogram; (5) open drainage; (6) empyemectomy and decortication in selected patients; and (7) bronchoscopy and barium swallow when the etiology is uncertain.

  15. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  16. [Thoracic actinomycosis: three cases].

    PubMed

    Herrak, L; Msougar, Y; Ouadnouni, Y; Bouchikh, M; Benosmane, A

    2007-09-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare condition which, in the thoracic localisation, can mimic cancer or tuberculosis. We report a series of three case of thoracic actinomycosis treated in the Ibn Sina University Thoracic Surgery Unit in Rabat, Morocco. CASE N degrees 1: This 45-year-old patient presented a tumefaction on the left anterior aspect of the chest. Physical examination identified a parietal mass with fistulisation to the skin. Radiography demonstrated a left pulmonary mass. Transparietal puncture led to the pathological diagnosis of actinomycosis. The patient was given medical treatment and improved clinically and radiographically. CASE N degrees 2: This 68-year-old patient presented repeated episodes of hemoptysis. The chest x-ray revealed atelectasia of the middle lobe and bronchial fibroscopy demonstrated the presence of a bud in the middle lobar bronchus. Biopsies were negative. The patient underwent surgery and the histology examination of the operative specimen revealed pulmonary actinomycosis. The patient recovered well clinically and radiographically with antibiotic therapy. CASE N degrees 3: This 56-year-old patient presented cough and hemoptysis. Physical examination revealed a left condensation and destruction of the left lung was noted on the chest x-ray. Left pleuropulmonectomy was performed. Histological analysis of the surgical specimen identified associated Aspergillus and Actinomyces. The outcome was favorable with medical treatment. The purpose of this work was to recall the radiological, clinical, histological, therapeutic, outcome aspects of this condition and to relate the problems of differential diagnosis when can suggest other diseases.

  17. Viroimmunotherapy of Thoracic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Alexander S.; Patel, Manish R.

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and malignant pleural mesothelioma (MM), cause the highest rate of cancer mortality worldwide. Most of these deaths are as a result of NSCLC; however, prognoses for the other two diseases remain as some of the poorest of any cancers. Recent advances in immunotherapy, specifically immune checkpoint inhibitors, have begun to help a small population of patients with advanced lung cancer. People who respond to these immune therapies generally have a durable response and many see dramatic decreases in their disease. However, response to immune therapies remains relatively low. Therefore, intense research is now underway to rationally develop combination therapies to expand the range of patients who will respond to and benefit from immune therapy. One promising approach is with oncolytic viruses. These oncolytic viruses (OVs) have been found to be selective for or have been engineered to preferentially infect and kill cancer cells. In pre-clinical models of different thoracic cancers, it has been found that these viruses can induce immunogenic cell death, increase the number of immune mediators brought into the tumor microenvironment and broaden the neoantigen-specific T cell response. We will review here the literature regarding the application of virotherapy toward augmenting immune responses in thoracic cancers. PMID:28536345

  18. [Surgery for thoracic tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kilani, T; Boudaya, M S; Zribi, H; Ouerghi, S; Marghli, A; Mestiri, T; Mezni, F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is mainly a medical disease. Surgery has been the unique therapeutic tool for a long time before the advent of specific antituberculous drugs, and the role of surgery was then confined to the treatment of the sequelae of tuberculosis and their complications. The resurgence of tuberculosis and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB combined to immunosuppressed patients represent a new challenge for tuberculosis surgery. Surgery may be indicated for a diagnostic purpose in patients with pulmonary, pleural, mediastinal or thoracic wall involvement, or with a therapeutic purpose (drainage, resection, residual cavity obliteration). Modern imaging techniques and the advent of video-assisted thoracic surgery allowed a new approach of this pathology; the majority of diagnostic interventions and selected cases requiring lung resection can be performed through a mini-invasive approach. Patients proposed for aggressive surgery may be treated with the best results thanks to a good evaluation of the thoracic lesions, of the patients' nutritional, infectious and general status combined with a good coordination between the specialized medical team for an optimal preparation to surgery.

  19. Relationship of epidermal growth factor receptor activating mutations with histologic subtyping according to International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society 2011 adenocarcinoma classification and their impact on overall survival

    PubMed Central

    Maturu, Venkata Nagarjuna; Singh, Navneet; Bal, Amanjit; Gupta, Nalini; Das, Ashim; Behera, Digambar

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is limited Indian data on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene activating mutations (AMs) prevalence and their clinicopathologic associations. The current study aimed to assess the relationship between EGFR AM and histologic subtypes and their impact on overall survival (OS) in a North Indian cohort. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of nonsmall cell lung cancer patients who underwent EGFR mutation testing (n = 186) over 3 years period (2012–2014). EGFR mutations were tested using polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing. Patients were classified as EGFR AM, EGFR wild type (WT) or EGFR unknown (UKN). Histologically adenocarcinomas (ADC) were further categorized as per the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society-2011 classification. Results: Overall EGFR AM prevalence was 16.6%. The ratio of exon 19 deletions to exon 21 L858R mutations was 3.17:1. Female sex (P = 0.002), never smoking status (P = 0.002), metastatic disease (P = 0.032), and nonsolid subtype of ADC (P = 0.001) were associated with EGFR AM on univariate logistic regression analysis (LRA). On multivariate LRA, solid ADC was negatively associated with EGFR AM. Median OS was higher in patients with EGFR AM (750 days) as compared to EGFR-WT (459 days) or EGFR-UKN (291 days) for the overall population and in patients with Stage IV disease (750 days vs. 278 days for EGFR-WT, P = 0.024). On univariate Cox proportional hazard (CPH) analysis, smoking, poor performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group ≥ 2), EGFR-UKN status, and solid ADC were associated with worse OS while female sex and lepidic ADC had better OS. On multivariate CPH analysis, lepidic ADC (hazard ratio [HR] =0.12) and EGFR-WT/EGFR-UKN (HR = 2.39 and HR = 3.30 respectively) were independently associated with OS in separate analyses. Conclusions: Histologic subtyping of ADC performed on small biopsies is

  20. NAGWS Volleyball Guide, 1989. Official Rules & Interpretations/Officiating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, Reston, VA. National Association for Girls and Women in Sport.

    This booklet contains the official rules and interpretations for officiating in volleyball competitions. Section 1 states the National Association for Girls and Women in Sport (NAGWS) interscholastic and collegiate volleyball rules for 1989-90. Section 2 presents a summary and descriptions of officiating techniques and mechanics. Study questions…

  1. Nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Nonintubated thoracic surgery has been used in procedures including pleura, lungs and mediastinum. Appropriate anesthesia techniques with or without sedation allow thoracic surgery patients to avoid the potential risks of intubated general anesthesia, particularly for the high-risk patients. However, nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery has some benefits as well as problems. In this review, the background, indication, perioperative anesthetic consideration and management, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed and summarized. PMID:25589994

  2. The History of the Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery at Rush.

    PubMed

    Faber, L Penfield; Liptay, Michael J; Seder, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    The Rush Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery received certification by the American Board of Thoracic Surgery (ABTS) to train thoracic surgical residents in 1962. The outstanding clinical faculty, with nationally recognized technical expertise, was eager to provide resident education. The hallmark of the program has been clinical excellence, dedication to patient care, and outstanding results in complex cardiac, vascular, and general thoracic surgical procedures. A strong commitment to resident education has been carried to the present time. Development of the sternotomy incision, thoracic and abdominal aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy, along with valve replacement, have been the hallmark of the section of cardiovascular surgery. Innovation in bronchoplastic lung resection, aggressive approach to thoracic malignancy, and segmental resection for lung cancer identify the section of general thoracic surgery. A total of 131 thoracic residents have been trained by the Rush Thoracic Surgery program, and many achieved their vascular certificate, as well. Their training has been vigorous and, at times, difficult. They carry the Rush thoracic surgical commitment of excellence in clinical surgery and patient care throughout the country, both in practice groups and academic centers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Penetrating thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Renata; Baisden, Clinton E; Harker, Lori; Calhoon, John H

    2008-01-01

    The initial approach to penetrating thoracic trauma is directed towards the pathophysiologic syndrome upon presentation. Most patients are successfully treated with drainage tubes. The unstable patient may necessitate thoracotomy at the emergency room to drain cardiac tamponade, provide cardiac massage and control bleeding. The guidelines for this procedure are reviewed. Need for further work-up of potential injuries to other mediastinal organs is frequently screened by computerized tomography. Surgery might still be needed, on a less emergent basis, in order to repair injuries to the trachea/esophagus, retained hemothorax, or to rule out diaphragmatic injury. Laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures may be used in specific situations.

  4. COMPARISON BETWEEN THORACIC RADIOGRAPHIC FINDINGS AND POSTMORTEM DIAGNOSIS OF THORACIC DISEASES IN DYSPNEIC COMPANION RATS (RATTUS NORVEGICUS).

    PubMed

    Fouriez-Lablée, Virginie; Vergneau-Grosset, Claire; Kass, Philip H; Zwingenberger, Allison L

    2017-03-01

    Companion rats are often presented to veterinarians for respiratory difficulties. Dyspnea in rats is most commonly due to infectious pneumonia, and thoracic neoplasia can go undiagnosed ante mortem due to a mistaken interpretation of pneumonia. In domestic carnivores, pulmonary nodular patterns have been shown to correlate with lung neoplastic diseases and infectious diseases. The main objective of this retrospective case series study was to determine whether certain radiographic criteria could be correlated with the presence of thoracic infectious disease and neoplastic disease in companion rats. A secondary objective was to determine whether the patient's sex and age were different between rats diagnosed with infectious versus neoplastic disease. Medical records and thoracic radiographs of dyspneic companion rats presented to the University of California at Davis, William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital during the time period from January 2000 to December 2014 were reviewed. Rats with postmortem confirmation of thoracic lesions were included in the study. Thoracic radiographs were evaluated for positioning, lesion distribution, lung lobe involved, pulmonary pattern, mediastinal and pleural lesions by three observers blinded to diagnosis. Thirty rats were included in the study, including 23 rats with an infectious disease and seven with neoplasia. Mediastinal lesions were significantly more prevalent in the group diagnosed with thoracic neoplasia (P = 0.031), in particular cranially (P = 0.048). Although there was an overlap between the two groups, findings indicated that the presence of cranial mediastinal lesions may be helpful for differentiating neoplastic from infectious disease in rats. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  5. American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... much more! class="box-li"> Journal of Nuclear Cardiology Official publication of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Clinical Guidelines Procedures, Appropriate Use Criteria, Information Statements ...

  6. Thoracic damage control surgery.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Roberto; Saad, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery came up with the philosophy of applying essential maneuvers to control bleeding and abdominal contamination in trauma patients who are within the limits of their physiological reserves. This concept was extended to thoracic injuries, where relatively simple maneuvers can shorten operative time of in extremis patients. This article aims to revise the various damage control techniques in thoracic organs that must be known to the surgeon engaged in emergency care. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos surgiu com a filosofia de se aplicar manobras essenciais para controle de sangramento e contaminação abdominal, em doentes traumatizados, nos limites de suas reservas fisiológicas. Este conceito se estendeu para as lesões torácicas, onde manobras relativamente simples, podem abreviar o tempo operatório de doentes in extremis. Este artigo tem como objetivo, revisar as diversas técnicas de controle de dano em órgãos torácicos, que devem ser de conhecimento do cirurgião que atua na emergência.

  7. Long thoracic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wiater, J M; Flatow, E L

    1999-11-01

    Injury to the long thoracic nerve causing paralysis or weakness of the serratus anterior muscle can be disabling. Patients with serratus palsy may present with pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation, and scapular winging with medial translation of the scapula, rotation of the inferior angle toward the midline, and prominence of the vertebral border. Long thoracic nerve dysfunction may result from trauma or may occur without injury. Fortunately, most patients experience a return of serratus anterior function with conservative treatment, but recovery may take as many as 2 years. Bracing often is tolerated poorly. Patients with severe symptoms in whom 12 months of conservative treatment has failed may benefit from surgical reconstruction. Although many surgical procedures have been described, the current preferred treatment is transfer of the sternal head of the pectoralis major tendon to the inferior angle of the scapula reinforced with fascia or tendon autograft. Many series have shown good to excellent results, with consistent improvement in function, elimination of winging, and reduction of pain.

  8. Thoracic and cardiovascular surgery in Japan during 2003: annual report by The Japanese Association for Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kazui, Teruhisa; Wada, Hiromi; Fujita, Hiromasa

    2005-09-01

    The Japanese Association for Thoracic Surgery has conducted annual surveys of thoracic surgery to reveal the statistics of the number of procedures according to the operative category throughout the country since 1986. Here we have summarized the results from our annual survey of thoracic surgery performed during 2003. The incidence of hospital mortality was added to this survey to determine the nationwide status that could be useful not only for surgeons to compare their work with that of others, but also for the association to gain a better understanding of present problems as well as future prospects. Thirty-day mortality (sometimes termed operative mortality) is death within 30 days of operation regardless of the patient's geographic location. Thirty-day mortality includes death within 30 days of operation even though the patient is discharged from the hospital within 30 days of operation. Hospital mortality is death within any time interval after operation if the patient is not discharged from the hospital. Hospital-to-hospital transfer is not considered discharge; transfer to a nursing home or a rehabilitation unit is considered hospital discharge unless the patient subsequently dies of complications of the operation (the definitions of terms are based on the published guidelines of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery (Edmunds LH, et al. Ann Thorac Surg 1996; 62: 932-5)). Thoracic surgery was classified into three categories as cardiovascular, general thoracic and esophageal surgery, and the pertinent data were examined and analyzed in each group. Access to the computerized data is offered to all members of this association. We honor and value your continued kind support.

  9. Official launching of FRIPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, François

    2016-02-01

    Tuesday May 31st, 2016 marks the official launch of FRIPON, a unique interconnected network to search for meteorites. Eventually comprising 100 cameras spread out all over France, FRIPON introduces a night and day 360° watch of the sky. Born from the joint scientific expertise of Observatoire de Paris, of Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, of Université Paris-Sud, of Université Aix-Marseille and of CNRS, this network aims to detect meteorite falls, measure their trajectories and estimate their strewnfields so that field search campaigns can be organized.

  10. Thoracic epidural anaesthesia for awake thoracic surgery in severely dyspnoeic patients excluded from general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gabor; Claret, Antoine; Desbordes, Jacques; Porte, Henri

    2014-11-01

    General anaesthesia (GA) carries high risks of ventilator dependency with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with severe respiratory disease. It also presents an ethical dilemma if surgery remains the only treatment option for patients with advanced terminal chronic respiratory disease. Thoracic epidural anaesthesia for awake thoracic surgery (TEATS) in high-risk patients with dyspnoea at rest could avoid ventilator dependency and speed up recovery even in patients with severe dyspnoea. This retrospective observational study analysed indications, management and outcome of patients contraindicated to GA undergoing awake thoracic surgery with thoracic epidural anaesthesia. From 716 patients requiring thoracic surgery, nine were contraindicated to GA. Eight patients [American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 4] had a maximum grade four of the modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale (MMRC). Two patients (ASA 3, grade 1 MMRC and ASA 4, grade 4 MMRC) refused GA. Patients (female : male ratio 1.25 : 1, age 19-76 years) had the following chronic respiratory diseases: pulmonary fibrosis (n = 2), pulmonary metastases (n = 3), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 1), alveolitis (n = 1) and myopathy (n = 2). Surgical indications were: thoracotomy (n = 6) for pleurectomy to treat recurring pneumothorax (n = 3), pleurostomy (n = 1), emphysema surgery (n = 1), lung biopsy (n = 1) and thoracoscopy (n = 3) for pleural/lung biopsy (n = 2), pneumothorax (n = 1). Lidocaine 20 mg/ml or ropivacaine 7.5 mg/ml was titrated to achieve an anaesthesia level T2-T12. No patient required GA [time of surgery: 46-128 min, mean = 76 min, standard deviation (SD) = 23 min]. Seven patients had light sedation with TCI propofol, remifentanyl or both and remained responsive. Fifty percent of patients received phenylephrine or ephedrine to maintain arterial pressure. Two patients went into hypercapnia, which was reversed with assisted mask ventilation. One patient suffered

  11. Long thoracic nerve paralysis associated with thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuchi, Y; Saitoh, S; Hosaka, M; Uchiyama, S

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of long thoracic nerve palsy associated with thoracic outlet syndrome are reported. Both patients had abnormal posture, with low-set shoulders and winged scapulae. Clinically there was weakness of the serratus anterior muscle with partial denervotion on electromyography. The diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome was based on positive vascular tests and brachial plexus nerve compression symptoms induced by the vascular testing positions. An orthosis that held the shoulder in an elevated position was used in both cases. Complete recovery of shoulder function and relief of the symptoms was achieved in both cases at 8 and 13 months, respectively, after application of the orthosis.

  12. NAGWS Softball Guide 1989. Official Rules/Officiating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Janis

    This booklet, written for coaches of women's softball teams, contains the official National Association for Girls and Women in Sports (NAGWS) rules for the game. Recent rule modifications are included. Statements of philosophy and standards for NAGWS officials are also included. (JD)

  13. NAGWS Volleyball Guide 1990: Official Rules & Interpretations/Officiating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, Reston, VA. National Association for Girls and Women in Sport.

    This guide presents the 1990 update of the National Association for Girls & Women in Sport (NAGWS) interscholastic and collegiate volleyball rules. It includes the official U.S. volleyball rules and a summary of rule changes, definitions of skills and fouls, and a summary of penalties. Officiating techniques and mechanics are covered with a…

  14. Officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    Hermann Oberth (forefront) with officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency at Huntsville, Alabama in 1956. Left to right: Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger (seated); Major General H.N. Toftoy, Commanding Officer and person responsible for 'Project Paperclip,' which took scientists and engineers out of Germany after World War II to design rockets for American military use. Many of the scientists later helped to design the Saturn V rocket that took the Apollo 11 astronauts to the Moon. Dr. Eberhard Rees, Deputy Director, Development Operations Division Wernher von Braun, Director, Development Operations Division.

  15. The evolution of thoracic anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Jay B

    2005-02-01

    The specialty of thoracic surgery has evolved along with the modem practice of anesthesia. This close relationship began in the 1930s and continues today. Thoracic surgery has grown from a field limited almost exclusively to simple chest wall procedures to the present situation in which complex procedures, such as lung volume reduction or lung transplantation, now can be performed on the most severely compromised patient. The great advances in thoracic surgery have followed discoveries and technical innovations in many medical fields. One of the most important reasons for the rapid escalation in the number and complexity of thoracic surgical procedures now being performed has been the evolution of anesthesia for thoracic surgery. There has been so much progress in this area that numerous books and journals are devoted entirely to this subject. The author has been privileged to work with several surgeons who specialized in noncardiac thoracic surgery. As a colleague of 25 years, the noted pulmonary surgeon James B.D. Mark wrote, "Any operation is a team effort... (but) nowhere is this team effort more important than in thoracic surgery, where near-choreography of moves by all participants is essential. Exchange of information, status and plans are mandatory". This team approach between the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesiologist reflects the history of the two specialties. With new advances in technology, such as continuous blood gas monitoring and the pharmacologic management of pulmonary circulation to maximize oxygenation during one-lung ventilation, in the future even more complex procedures may be able to be performed safely on even higher risk patients.

  16. Softball Guide with Official Rules. January 1972 - January 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claussen, Connie, Ed.

    This guide, published by the Division for Girls and Women's Sports (DGWS) of the American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (AAHPER) presents a statement of DGWS beliefs, standards in sports, sources of information and international committee rules. It details various affiliated boards of officials and presents the…

  17. Official portrait Payload specialists Robert Cenker and Gerard Magilton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Official portrait Robert J. Cenker (right) and Gerard Magilton, RCA Payload Specialists for STS 61-C. They are wearing the blue shuttle flight suit. They are sitting in front of a table with their helmets and an American flag behind them.

  18. Surgical repair of a thoracic meningocele in a foal.

    PubMed

    van Hoogmoed, L; Yarbrough, T B; Lecouteur, R A; Hornof, W J

    1999-01-01

    A 6 week old American Paint filly was admitted for evaluation of a dorsal thoracic mass suspected to be a meningocele. The diagnosis was confirmed by plain and contrast enhanced computed tomography. Surgical repair was performed by dissection of the base of the meningocele followed by ligation. No postoperative complications occurred. Contrast enhanced computed tomography was useful to confirm the diagnosis of meningocele and rule out a meningomyelocele.

  19. Risk of rupture or dissection in descending thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Bum; Kim, Kibeom; Lindsay, Mark E; MacGillivray, Thomas; Isselbacher, Eric M; Cambria, Richard P; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2015-10-27

    Current practice guidelines recommend surgical repair of large thoracic aortic aneurysms to prevent fatal aortic dissection or rupture, but limited natural history data exist to support clinical criteria for timely intervention. Of 3247 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm registered in our institutional Thoracic Aortic Center Database, we identified and reviewed 257 nonsyndromic patients (age, 72.4±10.5 years; 143 female) with descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm without a history of aortic dissection in whom surgical intervention was not undertaken. The primary end point was a composite of aortic dissection/rupture and sudden death. Baseline mean maximal aortic diameter was 52.4±10.8 mm, with 103 patients having diameters ≥55 mm. During a median follow-up of 25.1 months (quartiles 1-3, 8.3-56.4 months), definite and possible aortic events occurred in 19 (7.4%) and 31 (12.1%) patients, respectively. On multivariable analyses, maximal aortic diameter at baseline emerged as the only significant predictor of aortic events (hazard ratio=1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.15). Estimated rates of definite aortic events within 1 year were 5.5%, 7.2%, and 9.3% for aortic diameters of 50, 55, and 60 mm, respectively. Receiver-operating characteristic curves for discriminating aortic events were higher for indexed aortic sizes referenced by body size (area under the curve=0.832-0.889) but not significantly different from absolute maximal aortic diameter (area under the curve=0.805). Aortic size was the principal factor related to aortic events in unrepaired descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm. Although the risk of aortic events started to increase with a diameter >5.0 to 5.5 cm, it is uncertain whether repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms in this range leads to overall benefit, and the threshold for repair requires further evaluation. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. 22 CFR 1006.700 - When may the suspending official issue a suspension?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true When may the suspending official issue a suspension? 1006.700 Section 1006.700 Foreign Relations INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Suspension § 1006.700 When may the suspending official issue...

  1. Pediatric thoracic trauma: Current trends.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Erik G; Fitzgerald, Caitlin A; Santore, Matthew T

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric thoracic trauma is relatively uncommon but results in disproportionately high levels of morbidity and mortality when compared with other traumatic injuries. These injuries are often more devastating due to differences in children׳s anatomy and physiology relative to adult patients. A high index of suspicion is of utmost importance at the time of presentation because many significant thoracic injuries will have no external signs of injury. With proper recognition and management of these injuries, there is an associated improved long-term outcome. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the initial evaluation, current management practices, and future directions in pediatric thoracic trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Database Audit in Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Magee, Mitchell J

    2017-08-01

    Administrative data are less accurate and relevant than specialty-specific, procedure-specific, risk-adjusted data collected in voluntary registries such as the Society of Thoracic Surgeons-General Thoracic Surgery Database (GTSD). Voluntary clinical databases must be proven accurate and complete before they are accepted as credible information sources. With substantial growth of the GTSD, an annual audit was initiated in 2010 to assess the completeness, accuracy, and quality of the data collected. The audit process is essential in validating data quality and adding credibility and value to volunteer clinical registries. It serves as an important tool for improvement of patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thoracic Radiculopathy due to Rare Causes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy represents an uncommon spinal disorder that is frequently overlooked in the evaluation of thoracic, or abdominal pain syndrome. The clinical representation of this uncommon disorder is often atypical. With many differential diagnoses to consider, it is not surprising that the cause of thoracic radiculopathy is often not discovered for months, or years, after the symptoms arise. We report two rare cases of thoracic radiculopathy; one case was caused by extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma (EES) along the thoracic paraspinal area, and the other by foraminal stenosis, due to a bony spur of the thoracic vertebra. As such, thoracic radiculopathy should be considered in the diagnosis of patients with thoracic and abdominal pain, especially if initial diagnostic studies are inconclusive. PMID:27446792

  4. Official portrait Sharon Christa McAuliffe, STS 51-L Teacher in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Official portrait Sharon Christa McAuliffe, STS 51-L Teacher in Space. She is wearing the blue Shuttle flight suit and is holding a small model of the Shuttle. There is an American flag in the background.

  5. Official portrait Sharon Christa McAuliffe, STS 51-L Teacher in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Official portrait Sharon Christa McAuliffe, STS 51-L Teacher in Space. She is wearing the blue Shuttle flight suit and is holding a small model of the Shuttle. There is an American flag in the background.

  6. Hereditary Influence in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection.

    PubMed

    Isselbacher, Eric M; Lino Cardenas, Christian Lacks; Lindsay, Mark E

    2016-06-14

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition in that it places patients at risk for aortic dissection or rupture. However, our modern understanding of the pathogenesis of thoracic aortic aneurysm is quite limited. A genetic predisposition to thoracic aortic aneurysm has been established, and gene discovery in affected families has identified several major categories of gene alterations. The first involves mutations in genes encoding various components of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling cascade (FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, TGFB3, SMAD2, SMAD3 and SKI), and these conditions are known collectively as the TGF-β vasculopathies. The second set of genes encode components of the smooth muscle contractile apparatus (ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK, and PRKG1), a group called the smooth muscle contraction vasculopathies. Mechanistic hypotheses based on these discoveries have shaped rational therapies, some of which are under clinical evaluation. This review discusses published data on genes involved in thoracic aortic aneurysm and attempts to explain divergent hypotheses of aneurysm origin. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. 60 and Counting: the history of "the thoracic and cardiovascular surgeon".

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Markus K; Tolksdorf, Marian

    2014-12-01

    The Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon was founded as a scientific journal in 1953, making it one of the oldest publications in this specialty. Bearing the original title Thoraxchirurgie, its first language of publication was German. Although the primary focus lay on thoracic surgery, the concomitantly developing specialty cardiac surgery was also well represented from the start, finally taking over the lead in submissions. After having changed its name to Thoraxchirurgie, Vaskuläre Chirurgie in 1963, it became the official journal of the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery in 1973. With the language of publication having turned into English in 1979, the final title came into effect. This report gives an overview over 60 years of continued development. The history of this journal illustrates not only the transformations of the surgical disciplines reflected but also those of scientific publishing.

  8. Long-term cardiopulmonary function after thoracic sympathectomy: comparison between the conventional and simplified techniques.

    PubMed

    Ponce González, Miguel Angel; Serdá, Gabriel Juliá; Rodriguez Suarez, Pedro; Perez-Peñate, Gregorio; Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Cabrera Navarro, Pedro

    2010-02-01

    sympathectomy resulted in a long-term reduction in FEV(1), FEF(25%-75%), DLCO, and resting and maximal heart rate, as well as a mild but significant increase in airway resistance in the conventional thoracic sympathectomy group, without any clinical consequence to the patient. These changes were unrelated to the level of transection of the thoracic sympathetic chain. 2010 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Aneurysms of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Le Roux, B. T.; Rogers, M. A.; Gotsman, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Selected radiographs from 40 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm serve to illustrate most of the radiographic features of this disease. Surgical techniques are outlined and were used to modify the natural course of the disease in 14 patients, with three postoperative deaths. The remaining 26 patients were either moribund on admission and died shortly afterwards or declined operations and died later. Images PMID:5144643

  10. [Japanese Board Certified Thoracic Surgeon].

    PubMed

    Chihara, Koji

    2017-01-01

    The Japanese Board of General Thoracic Surgery (JBGTS) consisted by Japanese Association of Chest Surgery (JACS) and The Japanese Association of Thoracic Surgery (JATS) has been certified Japanese Board Certified Thoracic Surgeon (JBCTS) since 2004. At present, JBCTS is obtained by being of Certified Surgeon by Japan Surgical Society( JSS), completion of minimum requirement of surgical experience, scientific papers, presentation at medical assembly, learning of postgraduate educational programs, and examination approximate 11 years after graduation of medical school. Thirteen hundreds JBCTS throughout Japan are engaged in operation for 77,000 cases/year, including 38,000 lung cancer patients/year. The operative volume has been growing lineally these 30 years, and operative mortality in lung cancer patients has been less than 1% these several years. Japanese Medical Specialty Board (JMSB) published a guideline of the new system of medical specialty certification system in Jury 2014, in which fundamental structure is consisted by basic specialties of 19 medical fields and following subspecialties and program based system rather than curriculum based system. According to this guideline, JBGTS has been collaborated with JSS in order to establish sequential programs of the 2 specialties, and proposed an improved certification system to accomplish the mission that it educates trainees to be thoracic surgical professionals who is able to perform safe and standalized procedures.

  11. Thoracic Radiation Normal Tissue Injury.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B

    2017-10-01

    Thoracic malignancies are often a difficult group of tumors to treat definitively as the radiation doses needed to achieve a high probability for tumor control are often associated with high rates of radiation-induced toxicities. The lungs are particularly radiosensitive and are susceptible to radiation pneumonitis in the acute and subacute settings and pulmonary fibrosis in the late setting. Acute esophagitis is common and affects patient quality of life. Beyond acute pericarditis, late cardiac toxicities are increasingly being recognized as clinically relevant when delivering thoracic radiotherapy and can affect overall survival. This review details the common and dose-limiting acute and late toxicities associated with thoracic radiation therapy. As radiation-induced toxicities are often amplified with concurrent chemotherapy, this article focuses on the toxicities associated with irradiation for lung cancer, the most common thoracic malignancy, which is often treated with multimodality therapy. The management of radiation-induced toxicities and the changing patterns of toxicities with advanced radiation delivery modalities are also described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Emergency Thoracic US: The Essentials.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Sawatmongkorngul, Sorravit; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2016-01-01

    Acute thoracic symptoms are common among adults visiting emergency departments in the United States. Adults with these symptoms constitute a large burden on the overall resources used in the emergency department. The wide range of possible causes can make a definitive diagnosis challenging, even after clinical evaluation and initial laboratory testing. In addition to radiography and computed tomography, thoracic ultrasonography (US) is an alternative imaging modality that can be readily performed in real time at the patient's bedside to help diagnose many thoracic diseases manifesting acutely and in the trauma setting. Advantages of US include availability, relatively low cost, and lack of ionizing radiation. Emergency thoracic US consists of two main parts, lung and pleura US and focused cardiac US, which are closely related. Acoustic mismatches among aerated lungs, pleura, chest wall, and pathologic conditions produce artifacts useful for diagnosis of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema and help in detection of subpleural, pleural, and chest wall pathologic conditions such as pneumonia, pleural effusion, and fractures. Visual assessment of cardiac contractility and detection of right ventricular dilatation and pericardial effusion at focused cardiac US are critical in patients presenting with acute dyspnea and trauma. Additional US examinations of the inferior vena cava for noninvasive volume assessment and of the groin areas for detection of deep venous thrombosis are often performed at the same time. This multiorgan US approach can provide valuable information for emergency treatment of both traumatic and nontraumatic thoracic diseases involving the lungs, pleura, chest wall, heart, and vascular system. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  13. Electrodiagnostic confirmation of long thoracic nerve palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, P E

    1980-01-01

    Long thoracic nerve latencies were measured in 25 normal subjects. The nerve was stimulated at Erb's point. Monopolar electrodes were used to record the motor evoked response from the serratus anterior muscle. The mean long thoracic nerve latency was 3.9 +/- 0.6 ms. Four athletes with unilateral, isolated long thoracic nerve palsies were compared with the control group and with the uninvolved extremities. Long thoracic nerve latency examinations may help confirm the presence of long thoracic nerve palsy and test proximal nerve conduction. Images PMID:7354356

  14. Comparison of thoracic and abdominal cavity volumes during abdominal CO2 insufflation and abdominal wall lift.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Courtney; Fransson, Boel A; Ragle, Claude A; Mattoon, John; Gay, John M

    2013-06-01

    To compare thoracic and abdominal cavity volumes during abdominal CO2 insufflation and abdominal wall lift (AWL) conditions. In vitro cadaveric study. Mature medium-to-large breed fresh canine cadavers (n = 6). Each cadaver was imaged with computed tomography (CT) under baseline, abdominal CO2 insufflation, and AWL conditions. Measurements of thoracic and abdominal cavities were performed for each condition using image-analyzing software. Resulting volumes for each cadaver were converted to percent change from baseline to normalize the data. The t-tests were used to compare percent changes of both thoracic and abdominal volumes. Thoracic volume significantly decreased from baseline during CO2 insufflation (P < .01). No significant difference in thoracic volume occurred with AWL when compared with baseline. Abdominal volume increased by 80% with CO2 insufflation (95% CI: 56.4-107.0%) but only 25% with AWL (95% CI: 12.3-37.8%). Abdominal CO2 insufflation results in decreased thoracic volume when compared with baseline. AWL preserved thoracic volume similar to baseline. Abdominal volumes achieved with abdominal CO2 insufflation are significantly greater than those attained with AWL. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  15. 21 CFR 1404.935 - Debarring official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Debarring official. 1404.935 Section 1404.935 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.935 Debarring official. (a) Debarring official means an agency official who...

  16. 21 CFR 1404.1010 - Suspending official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspending official. 1404.1010 Section 1404.1010 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.1010 Suspending official. (a) Suspending official means an agency official...

  17. 21 CFR 1404.935 - Debarring official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Debarring official. 1404.935 Section 1404.935 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.935 Debarring official. (a) Debarring official means an agency official who...

  18. 43 CFR 20.201 - Ethics officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ethics officials. 20.201 Section 20.201... Department Ethics Program § 20.201 Ethics officials. (a) Designated Agency Ethics Official refers to the official designated under 5 CFR 2638.201 to coordinate and manage the Department's ethics program. (b)...

  19. 43 CFR 20.201 - Ethics officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ethics officials. 20.201 Section 20.201... Department Ethics Program § 20.201 Ethics officials. (a) Designated Agency Ethics Official refers to the official designated under 5 CFR 2638.201 to coordinate and manage the Department's ethics program. (b) The...

  20. 43 CFR 20.201 - Ethics officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Ethics officials. 20.201 Section 20.201... Department Ethics Program § 20.201 Ethics officials. (a) Designated Agency Ethics Official refers to the official designated under 5 CFR 2638.201 to coordinate and manage the Department's ethics program. (b) The...

  1. 43 CFR 20.201 - Ethics officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ethics officials. 20.201 Section 20.201... Department Ethics Program § 20.201 Ethics officials. (a) Designated Agency Ethics Official refers to the official designated under 5 CFR 2638.201 to coordinate and manage the Department's ethics program. (b) The...

  2. 30 CFR 1.1 - Official emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Official emblem. 1.1 Section 1.1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OFFICIAL EMBLEM AND OMB CONTROL NUMBERS... OFFICIAL EMBLEM § 1.1 Official emblem. The following emblem is established and shall be used as...

  3. 30 CFR 1.1 - Official emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Official emblem. 1.1 Section 1.1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OFFICIAL EMBLEM AND OMB CONTROL NUMBERS... OFFICIAL EMBLEM § 1.1 Official emblem. The following emblem is established and shall be used as...

  4. 43 CFR 20.201 - Ethics officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ethics officials. 20.201 Section 20.201... Department Ethics Program § 20.201 Ethics officials. (a) Designated Agency Ethics Official refers to the official designated under 5 CFR 2638.201 to coordinate and manage the Department's ethics program. (b)...

  5. 5 CFR 919.1010 - Suspending official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspending official. 919.1010 Section 919.1010 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... official. (a) Suspending official means an agency official who is authorized to impose suspension....

  6. 7 CFR 62.207 - Official assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official assessment. 62.207 Section 62.207 Agriculture... Definitions Service § 62.207 Official assessment. Official assessment of an applicant's program shall include: (a) Documentation assessment. Auditors and other USDA officials shall review the applicant's program...

  7. Anatomical variations of the second thoracic ganglion.

    PubMed

    Singh, B; Ramsaroop, L; Partab, P; Moodley, J; Satyapal, K S

    2005-04-01

    In recent years the second thoracic ganglion has gained anatomical significance as an important conduit for sympathetic innervation of the upper extremity. Thoracoscopic excision of the second thoracic ganglion is now widely recognized as affording the most effective treatment option for palmar hyperhidrosis. This study recorded the incidence, location and associated additional neural connections of the second thoracic ganglion. Bilateral dissection of 20 adult cadavers was undertaken, and all neural connections of the second thoracic ganglion were recorded. Nineteen cadavers (95%) demonstrated additional neural connections between the first thoracic ventral ramus and second intercostal nerve. These were classified as either type A (47.5%) or type B (45%) using the intrathoracic ramus (nerve of Kuntz) between the second intercostal nerve and the ventral ramus of the first thoracic nerve as a basis on both right and left sides. The second thoracic ganglion was commonly located (92.5%) in the second intercostal space at the level of the intervertebral disc between the second and third thoracic vertebrae. Fused ganglia between the second thoracic and first thoracic (5%) and stellate (5%) ganglia were noted. These findings should assist the operating surgeon with a clear knowledge of the anatomy of the second thoracic ganglion during thoracoscopic sympathectomy with a view to improving the success rate for upper limb sympathectomy.

  8. NAGWS Softball Guide 1991: Official Rules/Officiating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Janis

    This softball guide presents information on: the National Association for Girls and Women in Sport (NAGWS), rule modifications, softball playing rules, and officiating. Section 1 explains the purpose, beliefs, and services of the NAGWS; provides information on the association's committees and membership application; and explains use of the…

  9. Gamification in thoracic surgical education: Using competition to fuel performance.

    PubMed

    Mokadam, Nahush A; Lee, Richard; Vaporciyan, Ara A; Walker, Jennifer D; Cerfolio, Robert J; Hermsen, Joshua L; Baker, Craig J; Mark, Rebecca; Aloia, Lauren; Enter, Dan H; Carpenter, Andrea J; Moon, Marc R; Verrier, Edward D; Fann, James I

    2015-11-01

    In an effort to stimulate residents and trainers to increase their use of simulation training and the Thoracic Surgery Curriculum, a gamification strategy was developed in a friendly but competitive environment. "Top Gun." Low-fidelity simulators distributed annually were used for the technical competition. Baseline and final video assessments were performed, and 5 finalists were invited to compete in a live setting from 2013 to 2015. "Jeopardy." A screening examination was devised to test knowledge contained in the Thoracic Surgery Curriculum. The top 6 2-member teams were invited to compete in a live setting structured around the popular game show Jeopardy. "Top Gun." Over 3 years, there were 43 baseline and 34 final submissions. In all areas of assessment, there was demonstrable improvement. There was increasing evidence of simulation as seen by practice and ritualistic behavior. "Jeopardy." Sixty-eight individuals completed the screening examination, and 30 teams were formed. The largest representation came from the second-year residents in traditional programs. Contestants reported an average in-training examination percentile of 72.9. Finalists reported increased use of the Thoracic Surgery Curriculum by an average of 10 hours per week in preparation. The live competition was friendly, engaging, and spirited. This gamification approach focused on technical and cognitive skills, has been successfully implemented, and has encouraged the use of simulators and the Thoracic Surgery Curriculum. This framework may capitalize on the competitive nature of our trainees and can provide recognition of their achievements. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 9 CFR 325.5 - Unmarked inspected product transported under official seal between official establishments for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... under official seal between official establishments for further processing; certificate. 325.5 Section... CERTIFICATION TRANSPORTATION § 325.5 Unmarked inspected product transported under official seal between official... other means of conveyance which is sealed by a Program employee with an official seal of the...

  11. 7 CFR 800.4 - Procedures for establishing regulations, official standards, and official criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... standards, and official criteria. 800.4 Section 800.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... regulations, official standards, and official criteria. Notice of proposals to prescribe, amend, or revoke regulations, official standards, and official criteria under the Act shall be published in accordance...

  12. 7 CFR 800.4 - Procedures for establishing regulations, official standards, and official criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... standards, and official criteria. 800.4 Section 800.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... regulations, official standards, and official criteria. Notice of proposals to prescribe, amend, or revoke regulations, official standards, and official criteria under the Act shall be published in accordance...

  13. 7 CFR 800.4 - Procedures for establishing regulations, official standards, and official criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... standards, and official criteria. 800.4 Section 800.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... regulations, official standards, and official criteria. Notice of proposals to prescribe, amend, or revoke regulations, official standards, and official criteria under the Act shall be published in accordance...

  14. 7 CFR 800.4 - Procedures for establishing regulations, official standards, and official criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... standards, and official criteria. 800.4 Section 800.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... regulations, official standards, and official criteria. Notice of proposals to prescribe, amend, or revoke regulations, official standards, and official criteria under the Act shall be published in accordance...

  15. 7 CFR 800.4 - Procedures for establishing regulations, official standards, and official criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... standards, and official criteria. 800.4 Section 800.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... regulations, official standards, and official criteria. Notice of proposals to prescribe, amend, or revoke regulations, official standards, and official criteria under the Act shall be published in accordance...

  16. [Big data in official statistics].

    PubMed

    Zwick, Markus

    2015-08-01

    The concept of "big data" stands to change the face of official statistics over the coming years, having an impact on almost all aspects of data production. The tasks of future statisticians will not necessarily be to produce new data, but rather to identify and make use of existing data to adequately describe social and economic phenomena. Until big data can be used correctly in official statistics, a lot of questions need to be answered and problems solved: the quality of data, data protection, privacy, and the sustainable availability are some of the more pressing issues to be addressed. The essential skills of official statisticians will undoubtedly change, and this implies a number of challenges to be faced by statistical education systems, in universities, and inside the statistical offices. The national statistical offices of the European Union have concluded a concrete strategy for exploring the possibilities of big data for official statistics, by means of the Big Data Roadmap and Action Plan 1.0. This is an important first step and will have a significant influence on implementing the concept of big data inside the statistical offices of Germany.

  17. Chapter 2: Official Programmatic Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roholt, Ross VeLure; Hildreth, R. W.; Baizerman, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Youth civic engagement is a diverse field of practice, with each initiative claiming it has a unique approach. This chapter describes three initiatives, Youth-in-Government, Youth Science Center, and Public Achievement from the point-of-view of program staff. Their view is often privileged; it is the one used for official communication and public…

  18. Access to Federal Officials' Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwaller, Robert

    Part of a continuing series on freedom of information issues, this report reviews the handling of the papers of presidents of the United States after they have left office and alludes briefly to access to papers of other public officials. It specifically discusses the issue of access to the records of President Richard Nixon and discusses some of…

  19. Presenting features of thoracic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed Central

    McLatchie, G R; Young, D G

    1980-01-01

    In a retrospective study carried out at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Glasgow, for the period 1952-79, 7 cases of primary thoracic neuroblastoma were identified. The average age at presentation was 2 years. Respiratory symptoms were the modes of presentation in 2 patients, neurological symptoms in 4, and urinary tract symptoms in 1 patient. Dilatation of the urinary tract was present in 2 cases, and a third had a normal urinary tract but previous infections. After a maximum of 27 years and a minimum of 20 months, 5 of the patients remain well. One child died as a direct result of her tumour, the other from an unrelated tumour 25 years after partial excision of his neuroblastoma. The better prognosis of primary thoracic neuroblastoma and the variability of presentation compared with neuroblastoma in other sites are stressed. PMID:7458396

  20. [Endoscopic thoracic sympatecomy for hyperhidrosis].

    PubMed

    Smati, Belhassen; Marghali, Adel; Abid, Mohamed; Bakhtri, Malek; Ben Youssef, Atef; Mestiri, Taher; Djilani, Habiba; Kilani, Tarek

    2007-06-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a benin affection representing a social and professional problems and occupational handicaps in young patient. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy thus provides a radical treatment for severe palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis. We describe the technique used in our institut and present results From 1995 to 2002, 32 patients were operated on for hyperhidrosis. There were 17 mens and 15 women raging in age from 15 to 32 years The intervention consisting on destruction by electrocoagulation to the sympathetic trunk There was no major complication and the mean postoperative hospital stay was 2 days. The disappearance of the palmar sweating was immediately after operation. 7 patients complained of compensatory sweating Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for hyperhidrosis is a safe effect technique for treating palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis. Compensatry sweeting represent the major that necessite a preable information

  1. Robotic Surgery for Thoracic Disease.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shin-Ichi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgeries have developed in the general thoracic field over the past decade, and publications on robotic surgery outcomes have accumulated. However, controversy remains about the application of robotic surgery, with a lack of well-established evidence. Robotic surgery has several advantages such as natural movement of the surgeon's hands when manipulating the robotic arms and instruments controlled by computer-assisted systems. Most studies have reported the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery based on acceptable morbidity and mortality compared to open or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Furthermore, there are accumulated data to indicate longer operation times and shorter hospital stay in robotic surgery. However, randomized controlled trials between robotic and open or VATS procedures are needed to clarify the advantage of robotic surgery. In this review, we focused the literature about robotic surgery used to treat lung cancer and mediastinal tumor.

  2. Nanotechnology applications in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly evolving field with the potential to significantly impact care across the full spectrum of cancer therapy. Of note, several recent nanotechnological advances show particular promise to improve outcomes for thoracic surgical patients. A variety of nanotechnologies are described that offer possible solutions to existing challenges encountered in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Nanotechnology-based imaging platforms have the ability to improve the surgical care of patients with thoracic malignancies through technological advances in intraoperative tumour localization, lymph node mapping and accuracy of tumour resection. Moreover, nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize adjuvant lung cancer therapy. Common chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin, are being formulated using various nanotechnologies to improve drug delivery, whereas nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging technologies can monitor the tumour microenvironment and facilitate molecularly targeted lung cancer therapy. Although early nanotechnology-based delivery systems show promise, the next frontier in lung cancer therapy is the development of 'theranostic' multifunctional NPs capable of integrating diagnosis, drug monitoring, tumour targeting and controlled drug release into various unifying platforms. This article provides an overview of key existing and emerging nanotechnology platforms that may find clinical application in thoracic surgery in the near future.

  3. Analgesia for small animal thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Pavlidou, Kyriaki; Papazoglou, Lysimachos; Savvas, Ioannis; Kazakos, Georgios

    2009-09-01

    Thoracic surgery in small animals is considered a painful procedure, resulting in alterations in pulmonary function and respiratory mechanics. Modifications in surgical approach and technique and selection of the appropriate analgesic protocol may improve outcomes in dogs and cats after thoracic surgery. Systemic administration of opioids and other agents, intercostal and intrapleural blocks, and epidural analgesia are among the most common options for pain management after thoracic surgery in small animals.

  4. Official STS-1 Crew Insignia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-04-10

    S79-30685 (10 March 1979) --- This is the official insignia for the first space shuttle orbital flight test (STS-1). Crew of the 102 Columbia on STS-1 will be astronauts John W. Young, commander, and Robert L. Crippen, pilot. The artwork was done by artist Robert McCall. The NASA insignia design for space shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA

  5. 7 CFR 58.646 - Official identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.646 Official identification. (a) Only ice cream and.... grades established (nonfat dry milk, whole milk, buttermilk and whey) shall be U.S. Extra Grade or better...

  6. 7 CFR 58.646 - Official identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.646 Official identification. (a) Only ice cream and.... grades established (nonfat dry milk, whole milk, buttermilk and whey) shall be U.S. Extra Grade or better...

  7. 7 CFR 58.646 - Official identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.646 Official identification. (a) Only ice cream and.... grades established (nonfat dry milk, whole milk, buttermilk and whey) shall be U.S. Extra Grade or better...

  8. 7 CFR 58.646 - Official identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.646 Official identification. (a) Only ice cream and.... grades established (nonfat dry milk, whole milk, buttermilk and whey) shall be U.S. Extra Grade or better...

  9. 7 CFR 58.646 - Official identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.646 Official identification. (a) Only ice cream and.... grades established (nonfat dry milk, whole milk, buttermilk and whey) shall be U.S. Extra Grade or better...

  10. 10 CFR 51.125 - Responsible official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATORY FUNCTIONS National Environmental Policy Act-Regulations Implementing Section 102(2) Responsible Official § 51.125 Responsible official. The Executive Director for Operations shall be responsible...

  11. 12 CFR 313.86 - Hearing official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CORPORATE DEBT COLLECTION Administrative Wage Garnishment § 313.86 Hearing official. A hearing official may be any qualified individual, as determined by the FDIC, including an administrative law judge....

  12. Psychosocial functioning of patients after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Lauren D; Staples, Nancy L; Sears, Samuel F; Klodell, Charles T

    2011-06-01

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is considered the treatment modality of choice for patients with disabling hyperhidrosis. However, the psychosocial impact of the intervention has not been systematically studied in American samples before and after sympathectomy. It is expected that the reduction of symptoms is associated with improved psychosocial functioning and quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine psychosocial functioning in patients with hyperhidrosis undergoing thoracic sympathectomy. Patients with hyperhidrosis undergoing evaluation for sympathectomy were recruited from Shands Hospital at the University of Florida. Fifty-one patients completed individual psychological assessment batteries prior to undergoing sympathectomy and at 1-month follow-up, measuring the constructs of health-related quality of life, anxiety, and depression. Repeated-measures analyses of variance revealed that 1 month after sympathectomy, patients reported significant improvements across the domains of physical quality of life (p=0.01), mental quality of life (p=0.005), trait anxiety (p<0.001), and depression (p=0.007). Sympathectomy resulted in increases in health-related quality of life, and decreases in anxiety and depression within 1 month post procedure. Results suggest that sympathectomy exists as an effective treatment choice for both medical and psychosocial outcomes in patients with hyperhidrosis. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 12 CFR 328.1 - Official sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official sign. 328.1 Section 328.1 Banks and... OF MEMBERSHIP § 328.1 Official sign. (a) The official sign referred to in this part shall be 7″ by 3... “symbol” of the Corporation, as used in this part, shall be that portion of the official sign consisting...

  14. 12 CFR 328.1 - Official sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Official sign. 328.1 Section 328.1 Banks and... OF MEMBERSHIP § 328.1 Official sign. (a) The official sign referred to in this part shall be 7″ by 3... “symbol” of the Corporation, as used in this part, shall be that portion of the official sign consisting...

  15. 12 CFR 328.1 - Official sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Official sign. 328.1 Section 328.1 Banks and... OF MEMBERSHIP § 328.1 Official sign. (a) The official sign referred to in this part shall be 7″ by 3... “symbol” of the Corporation, as used in this part, shall be that portion of the official sign consisting...

  16. 12 CFR 328.1 - Official sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Official sign. 328.1 Section 328.1 Banks and... OF MEMBERSHIP § 328.1 Official sign. (a) The official sign referred to in this part shall be 7″ by 3... “symbol” of the Corporation, as used in this part, shall be that portion of the official sign consisting...

  17. 7 CFR 62.207 - Official assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Definitions Service § 62.207 Official assessment. Official assessment of an applicant's program shall include... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Official assessment. 62.207 Section 62.207 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE...

  18. 9 CFR 355.8 - Official number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Official number. 355.8 Section 355.8... IDENTIFICATION AS TO CLASS, QUALITY, QUANTITY, AND CONDITION Inauguration of Inspection § 355.8 Official number. To each plant granted inspection an official number shall be assigned. Such number shall be preceded...

  19. 12 CFR 328.1 - Official sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Official sign. 328.1 Section 328.1 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY ADVERTISEMENT OF MEMBERSHIP § 328.1 Official sign. (a) The official sign referred to in this part shall be 7″ by...

  20. 9 CFR 381.98 - Official seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Official seal. 381.98 Section 381.98... Certificates; Certification Procedures § 381.98 Official seal. The official mark for use in sealing means of... and a serial number as shown below, and any seals approved by the Administrator for applying such...

  1. 46 CFR 501.11 - Official seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Official seal. 501.11 Section 501.11 Shipping FEDERAL... Seal § 501.11 Official seal. (a) Description. Pursuant to section 201(c) of the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended (46 U.S.C. 301(d)), the Commission prescribes its official seal, as adopted by...

  2. 9 CFR 381.98 - Official seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Official seal. 381.98 Section 381.98... Certificates; Certification Procedures § 381.98 Official seal. The official mark for use in sealing means of... and a serial number as shown below, and any seals approved by the Administrator for applying such...

  3. 46 CFR 501.11 - Official seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Official seal. 501.11 Section 501.11 Shipping FEDERAL... Seal § 501.11 Official seal. (a) Description. Pursuant to section 201(c) of the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended (46 U.S.C. 301(d)), the Commission prescribes its official seal, as adopted by...

  4. 46 CFR 501.11 - Official seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Official seal. 501.11 Section 501.11 Shipping FEDERAL... Seal § 501.11 Official seal. (a) Description. Pursuant to section 201(c) of the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended (46 U.S.C. 301(d)), the Commission prescribes its official seal, as adopted by...

  5. 9 CFR 381.98 - Official seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Official seal. 381.98 Section 381.98... Certificates; Certification Procedures § 381.98 Official seal. The official mark for use in sealing means of... and a serial number as shown below, and any seals approved by the Administrator for applying such...

  6. 46 CFR 501.11 - Official seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Official seal. 501.11 Section 501.11 Shipping FEDERAL... Seal § 501.11 Official seal. (a) Description. Pursuant to section 201(c) of the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended (46 U.S.C. 301(d)), the Commission prescribes its official seal, as adopted by...

  7. 9 CFR 381.98 - Official seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official seal. 381.98 Section 381.98... Certificates; Certification Procedures § 381.98 Official seal. The official mark for use in sealing means of... and a serial number as shown below, and any seals approved by the Administrator for applying such...

  8. 46 CFR 501.11 - Official seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Official seal. 501.11 Section 501.11 Shipping FEDERAL... Seal § 501.11 Official seal. (a) Description. Pursuant to section 201(c) of the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended (46 U.S.C. 301(d)), the Commission prescribes its official seal, as adopted by...

  9. 9 CFR 381.98 - Official seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Official seal. 381.98 Section 381.98... Certificates; Certification Procedures § 381.98 Official seal. The official mark for use in sealing means of... and a serial number as shown below, and any seals approved by the Administrator for applying such...

  10. 22 CFR 1429.13 - Official time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Official time. 1429.13 Section 1429.13 Foreign... REQUIREMENTS Miscellaneous § 1429.13 Official time. If the participation of any employee in any phase of any... of the Board designated by the Board, such employee shall be granted official time for such...

  11. 5 CFR 9701.523 - Official time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Official time. 9701.523 Section 9701.523... MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Labor-Management Relations § 9701.523 Official time. (a) Any employee representing an... authorized official time for such purposes, including attendance at impasse proceedings, during the time the...

  12. 5 CFR 9701.523 - Official time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Official time. 9701.523 Section 9701.523... MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Labor-Management Relations § 9701.523 Official time. (a) Any employee representing an... authorized official time for such purposes, including attendance at impasse proceedings, during the time the...

  13. 5 CFR 9701.523 - Official time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Official time. 9701.523 Section 9701.523... MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Labor-Management Relations § 9701.523 Official time. (a) Any employee representing an... authorized official time for such purposes, including attendance at impasse proceedings, during the time the...

  14. Making It as a Sports Official.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Bryant, M. C.

    The purpose of this text is to offer information, including career development strategies, about sports officiating, an occupation that attracts little attention as a source of employment. The book presents fundamental techniques for building successful careers as qualified sports officials and illustrates how sports officiating can be taken from…

  15. 22 CFR 120.26 - Presiding Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Presiding Official. 120.26 Section 120.26 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.26 Presiding Official. Presiding Official means a person authorized by the U.S. Government...

  16. 22 CFR 120.26 - Presiding Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Presiding Official. 120.26 Section 120.26 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.26 Presiding Official. Presiding Official means a person authorized by the U.S. Government...

  17. 22 CFR 120.26 - Presiding Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Presiding Official. 120.26 Section 120.26 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.26 Presiding Official. Presiding Official means a person authorized by the U.S. Government...

  18. 22 CFR 120.26 - Presiding Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Presiding Official. 120.26 Section 120.26 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.26 Presiding Official. Presiding Official means a person authorized by the U.S. Government...

  19. 22 CFR 120.26 - Presiding Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Presiding Official. 120.26 Section 120.26 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.26 Presiding Official. Presiding Official means a person authorized by the U.S. Government...

  20. 7 CFR 51.17 - Official sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Official sampling. 51.17 Section 51.17 Agriculture... Inspection Service § 51.17 Official sampling. Samples may be officially drawn by any duly authorized... time and place of the sampling and the brands or other identifying marks of the containers from which...

  1. 7 CFR 51.17 - Official sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official sampling. 51.17 Section 51.17 Agriculture... Inspection Service § 51.17 Official sampling. Samples may be officially drawn by any duly authorized... time and place of the sampling and the brands or other identifying marks of the containers from which...

  2. 7 CFR 37.10 - Official assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official assessment. 37.10 Section 37.10 Agriculture... ASSESS ORGANIC CERTIFYING AGENCIES § 37.10 Official assessment. Official assessment of an applicant's... completion of an adequacy audit by the auditors. (b) Program assessment. Assessment of a certification...

  3. Insurance Status is Associated with Acuity of Presentation and Outcomes for Thoracic Aortic Operations

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nicholas D.; Brennan, J. Matthew; Zhao, Yue; Williams, Judson B.; Williams, Matthew L.; Smith, Peter K.; Scarborough, John E.; Hughes, G. Chad

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-elective procedure status is the greatest risk factor for postoperative morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing thoracic aortic operations. We hypothesized that uninsured patients were more likely to require non-elective thoracic aortic operation due to decreased access to preventative care and elective surgical services. Methods and Results An observational study of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database identified 51,282 patients who underwent thoracic aortic surgery between 2007–2011 at 940 North American centers. Patients were stratified by insurance status (private insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, other insurance, or uninsured) as well as age < 65 years or age ≥ 65 years to account for differences in Medicare eligibility. The need for non-elective thoracic aortic operation was highest for uninsured patients (71.7%) and lowest for privately insured patients (36.6%). The adjusted risks of non-elective operation were increased for uninsured patients (adjusted risk ratio [ARR], 1.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.70–1.83 for age < 65 years; ARR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.29–1.62 for age ≥ 65 years) as well as Medicaid patients age < 65 years (ARR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.10–1.26) when compared to patients with private insurance. The adjusted odds of major morbidity and/or mortality were further increased for all patients age < 65 years without private insurance (ARRs between 1.13 and 1.27). Conclusions Insurance status was associated with acuity of presentation and major morbidity and mortality for thoracic aortic operations. Efforts to reduce insurance-based disparities in the care of patients with thoracic aortic disease appear warranted and may reduce the incidence of aortic emergencies and improve outcomes after thoracic aortic surgery. PMID:24714600

  4. Assessing Crime as a Problem: The Relationship between Residents' Perception of Crime and Official Crime Rates over 25 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipp, John R.

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the relationship between official crime rates in census tracts and resident perceptions of crime. Using a unique data set that links household-level data from the American Housing Survey metro samples over 25 years (1976-1999) with official crime rate data for census tracts in selected cities during selected years, this study…

  5. Assessing Crime as a Problem: The Relationship between Residents' Perception of Crime and Official Crime Rates over 25 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipp, John R.

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the relationship between official crime rates in census tracts and resident perceptions of crime. Using a unique data set that links household-level data from the American Housing Survey metro samples over 25 years (1976-1999) with official crime rate data for census tracts in selected cities during selected years, this study…

  6. Utilization Trends in Noncardiac Thoracic Imaging, 2002-2014.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Sarah I; Levin, David C; Parker, Laurence; Rao, Vijay M

    2017-03-01

    To analyze recent trends in utilization of the various noncardiac thoracic imaging modalities in the Medicare population. The Medicare Part B databases for 2002 through 2014 were reviewed. All CPT codes pertaining to noninvasive imaging of the thorax were selected and grouped into seven categories: x-ray, CT, computed tomographic angiography (CTA), nuclear scans (noncardiac), MRI, MR angiography, and ultrasound. Yearly utilization rates per 1,000 Medicare beneficiaries were calculated. Medicare physician specialty codes were used to determine how many studies were performed by radiologists versus nonradiologist physicians. The total utilization rate of all chest imaging peaked at 1,090 per 1,000 in 2005, then progressively declined to 913 by 2014 (-16%). In 2002, radiologists' share of thoracic imaging was 87% and increased to 91% by 2014. Among all providers, the total utilization rate of chest CT rose sharply, peaked at 100 in 2007, and has remained steady at around 89-91 in more recent years. The CTA utilization rate rose progressively from 2 in 2002 to 23 in 2014. Utilization rates of nuclear chest imaging decreased steadily after 2002. Chest x-ray rates reached a peak of 976 in 2005 but then declined to 790 in 2014; this change was largely responsible for the decline in total thoracic imaging. Overall thoracic imaging utilization rates have declined in recent years, despite an increase in use of CT and CTA. The decline largely resulted from a decrease in use of chest x-rays. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Calibration of high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taekhee; Thorpe, Andrew; Cauda, Emanuele; Harper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    High flow rate respirable size selective samplers, GK4.126 and FSP10 cyclones, were calibrated for thoracic-size selective sampling in two different laboratories. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) utilized monodisperse ammonium fluorescein particles and scanning electron microscopy to determine the aerodynamic particle size of the monodisperse aerosol. Fluorescein intensity was measured to determine sampling efficiencies of the cyclones. The Health Safety and Laboratory (HSL) utilized a real time particle sizing instrument (Aerodynamic Particle Sizer) and polydisperse glass sphere particles and particle size distributions between the cyclone and reference sampler were compared. Sampling efficiency of the cyclones were compared to the thoracic convention defined by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH)/Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN)/International Standards Organization (ISO). The GK4.126 cyclone showed minimum bias compared to the thoracic convention at flow rates of 3.5 l min(-1) (NIOSH) and 2.7-3.3 l min(-1) (HSL) and the difference may be from the use of different test systems. In order to collect the most dust and reduce the limit of detection, HSL suggested using the upper end in range (3.3 l min(-1)). A flow rate of 3.4 l min(-1) would be a reasonable compromise, pending confirmation in other laboratories. The FSP10 cyclone showed minimum bias at the flow rate of 4.0 l min(-1) in the NIOSH laboratory test. The high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers might be used for higher sample mass collection in order to meet analytical limits of quantification.

  8. Calibration of high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taekhee; Thorpe, Andrew; Cauda, Emanuele; Harper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    High flow rate respirable size selective samplers, GK4.126 and FSP10 cyclones, were calibrated for thoracic-size selective sampling in two different laboratories. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) utilized monodisperse ammonium fluorescein particles and scanning electron microscopy to determine the aerodynamic particle size of the monodisperse aerosol. Fluorescein intensity was measured to determine sampling efficiencies of the cyclones. The Health Safety and Laboratory (HSL) utilized a real time particle sizing instrument (Aerodynamic Particle Sizer) and poly-disperse glass sphere particles and particle size distributions between the cyclone and reference sampler were compared. Sampling efficiency of the cyclones were compared to the thoracic convention defined by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH)/Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN)/International Standards Organization (ISO). The GK4.126 cyclone showed minimum bias compared to the thoracic convention at flow rates of 3.5 l min−1 (NIOSH) and 2.7–3.3 l min−1 (HSL) and the difference may be from the use of different test systems. In order to collect the most dust and reduce the limit of detection, HSL suggested using the upper end in range (3.3 l min−1). A flow rate of 3.4 l min−1 would be a reasonable compromise, pending confirmation in other laboratories. The FSP10 cyclone showed minimum bias at the flow rate of 4.0 l min−1 in the NIOSH laboratory test. The high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers might be used for higher sample mass collection in order to meet analytical limits of quantification. PMID:26891196

  9. Feasibility of endoscopic transesophageal thoracic sympathectomy (with video).

    PubMed

    Turner, Brian G; Gee, Denise W; Cizginer, Sevdenur; Konuk, Yusuf; Karaca, Cetin; Willingham, Field; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Morse, Christopher; Rattner, David W; Brugge, William R

    2010-01-01

    Thoracoscopic sympathectomy is the preferred surgical treatment for patients with disabling palmar hyperhidrosis. Current methods require a transthoracic approach to permit ablation of the thoracic sympathetic chain. To develop a minimally invasive, transesophageal endoscopic technique for a sympathectomy in a swine model. Nonsurvival animal study. Animal trial at a tertiary care academic center. This study involved 8 healthy Yorkshire swine. After insertion of a double-channel gastroscope, a Duette Band mucosectomy device was used to create a small esophageal mucosal defect. A short, 5-cm submucosal tunnel was created by using the tip of the endoscope and biopsy forceps. Within the submucosal space, a needle-knife was used to incise the muscular esophageal wall and permit entry into the mediastinum and chest. The sympathetic chain was identified at the desired thoracic level and was ablated or transected. The animals were killed at the completion of the procedure. Feasibility of endoscopic transesophageal thoracic sympathectomy. The sympathetic chain was successfully ablated in 7 of 8 swine, as confirmed by gross surgical pathology and histology. In 1 swine, muscle fibers were inadvertently transected. On average, the procedure took 61.4+/-24.5 minutes to gain access to the chest, whereas the sympathectomy was performed in less than 3 minutes in all cases. One animal was killed immediately after sympathectomy, before the completion of the observation period, because of hemodynamic instability. Nonsurvival series, animal study. Endoscopic transesophageal thoracic sympathectomy is technically feasible, simple, and can be performed in a porcine model. 2010 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Doctors of Thoracic Surgery: The Division of Thoracic Surgery at Toronto General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Keshavjee, Shaf; Spatafora, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The Division of Thoracic Surgery at Toronto General Hospital has a history of sustained excellence and commitment to patient care, research and innovation in Thoracic Surgery. Doctors of Thoracic Surgery (DOTSR) continues to be a leading thoracic division training surgeons who practice all over the world--impacting the treatment of patients with thoracic disease. Many leaders in our specialty worldwide have directly or indirectly trained in Toronto. At University Health Network and the University of Toronto, this academic division has continued to contribute and thrive in a highly supportive and productive research and clinical environment.

  11. 29 CFR 2703.2 - Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. 2703.2 Section 2703.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL... agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. The Chairman shall appoint...

  12. 31 CFR 0.104 - Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official. 0.104 Section 0.104 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the... Responsibilities § 0.104 Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official....

  13. 29 CFR 2703.2 - Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. 2703.2 Section 2703.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL... agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. The Chairman shall appoint an...

  14. 29 CFR 2703.2 - Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. 2703.2 Section 2703.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL... agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. The Chairman shall appoint an...

  15. 31 CFR 0.104 - Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official. 0.104 Section 0.104 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the... Responsibilities § 0.104 Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official. The...

  16. 31 CFR 0.104 - Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official. 0.104 Section 0.104 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the... Responsibilities § 0.104 Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official. The...

  17. 31 CFR 0.104 - Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official. 0.104 Section 0.104 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the... Responsibilities § 0.104 Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official. The...

  18. 29 CFR 2703.2 - Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. 2703.2 Section 2703.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL... agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. The Chairman shall appoint an...

  19. 49 CFR 604.6 - Government officials on official government business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Government officials on official government...) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Exceptions § 604.6 Government officials on official government business. (a) A recipient may provide charter service to...

  20. 49 CFR 604.6 - Government officials on official government business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Government officials on official government...) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Exceptions § 604.6 Government officials on official government business. (a) A recipient may provide charter service to...

  1. 49 CFR 604.6 - Government officials on official government business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Government officials on official government...) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Exceptions § 604.6 Government officials on official government business. (a) A recipient may provide charter service to...

  2. 49 CFR 604.6 - Government officials on official government business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Government officials on official government...) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Exceptions § 604.6 Government officials on official government business. (a) A recipient may provide charter service to...

  3. 49 CFR 604.6 - Government officials on official government business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Government officials on official government...) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Exceptions § 604.6 Government officials on official government business. (a) A recipient may provide charter service to...

  4. 31 CFR 0.104 - Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official. 0.104 Section 0.104 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the... Responsibilities § 0.104 Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternate Designated Agency Ethics Official....

  5. 29 CFR 2703.2 - Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. 2703.2 Section 2703.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL... agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. The Chairman shall appoint...

  6. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques.

  7. Bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of the left internal mammary artery graft to the anterior descending coronary artery as a surgical strategy has been shown to improve the survival rate and decrease the risk of adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery. These clinical benefits appear to be related to the superior short and long-term patency rates of the internal thoracic artery graft. Although the advantages of using of both internal thoracic arteries (ITA) for bypass grafting have taken longer to prove, recent results from multiple data sets now support these findings. The major advantage of bilateral ITA grafting appears to be improved survival rate, while the disadvantages of complex ITA grafting include the increased complexity of operation, and an increased risk of wound complications. While these short-term disadvantages have been mitigated in contemporary surgical practice, they have not eliminated. Bilateral ITA grafting should be considered the procedure of choice for patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery that have a predicted survival rate of longer than ten years. PMID:23977627

  8. The Thoracic Shape of Hominoids

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2014-01-01

    In hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cadavers were taken to measure the cross-sectional shape of ten equally spaced levels through the sternum (called decisternal levels) and the relative volume of the nine intervening thoracic segments. It was found that the cranial thorax of hominoids is larger and broader (except in the first two decisternal levels) than that of other primates. The cranial thorax of hominoids has a longer dorsoventral diameter because the increase in dorsoventral diameter caused by the increase in the volume of the cranial thorax overcompensates for the decrease caused by the broadening of the cranial thorax. The larger and broader cranial thorax in hominoids can be explained as a locomotor adaptation for scapular gliding and as a respiratory adaptation for reducing the effects of orthograde posture on ventilation-perfusion inequality. PMID:24818026

  9. Evolution of thoracic surgery in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Deslauriers, Jean; Griffith Pearson, F; Nelems, Bill

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Canada’s contributions toward the 21st century’s practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another. OBJECTIVE: To describe the numerous and important achievements of Canadian thoracic surgeons in the areas of surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis, thoracic oncology, airway surgery and lung transplantation. METHOD: Information was collected through reading of the numerous publications written by Canadian thoracic surgeons over the past 100 years, interviews with interested people from all thoracic surgery divisions across Canada and review of pertinent material form the archives of several Canadian hospitals and universities. RESULTS: Many of the developments occurred by chance. It was the early and specific focus on thoracic surgery, to the exclusion of cardiac and general surgery, that distinguishes the Canadian experience, a model that is now emerging everywhere. From lung transplantation in chimera twin calves to ex vivo organ preservation, from the removal of airways to tissue regeneration, and from intensive care research to complex science, Canadians have excelled in their commitment to research. Over the years, the influence of Canadian thoracic surgery on international practice has been significant. CONCLUSIONS: Canada spearheaded the development of thoracic surgery over the past 100 years to a greater degree than any other country. From research to education, from national infrastructures to the regionalization of local practices, it happened in Canada.

  10. Official versus unofficial outbreak reporting through the Internet.

    PubMed

    Woodall, J

    1997-11-01

    Several countries, a number of regional bodies, and a handful of both commercial and not-for-profit outfits and international organizations operate sites on the World Wide Web on which disease outbreaks are reported. But there is only one publicly accessible e-mail service with no subscription cost that reaches health workers and the general public in countries, and remote regions within countries, that are on the far fringes of the Internet. That service is ProMED-mail, a project of the Federation of American Scientists operated by SatelLife, which is a not-for-profit organization that brings medical information to the developing world. ProMED-mail reaches more than 15000 e-mail subscribers in at least 140 countries by a combination of satellite, phone and ground radio links. It receives reports of outbreaks of emerging infectious human, animal and plant diseases from official sources, the media and subscribers, and disseminates them rapidly, without any of the constraints that often delay official reporting. All reports pass first through the hands of a panel of disease experts, to ensure as far as possible reliability and completeness. ProMED-mail has reported outbreaks more rapidly than official sources, and responded to calls for help from doctors battling epidemics, or confronted with baffling cases. It is proving that public participation in outbreak reporting complements official reporting systems in a highly practical way.

  11. Situation criticality and basketball officials' stress levels.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Jason; Basevitch, Itay; Rodenberg, Ryan; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2017-11-01

    Officials are expected to perform impeccably despite the wide range of stressors they experience. A stressor that officials frequently report is situation criticality. Situation criticality is comprised of score differential (i.e., more pressure in close games) and time remaining in a game (i.e., more pressure as time expires), which affects athletes' stress levels. The present study explored the effect of situation criticality on officials' stress levels. High school basketball officials (n = 108) with an average of 18.1 (SD = 11.2) years of officiating experience were given a survey packet containing game situations that varied in criticality. For each game situation (n = 9) officials completed the overall stress and appraisal portions of the Stress Appraisal Measure (SAM). Results revealed that situation criticality has an effect on officials' perceived stress levels. Both threat and challenge appraisals were positively correlated with perceived stress. Overall, these findings indicate that officials' stress levels fluctuate within games depending on score differential and time of game. The findings encourage officials to recognise and manage their stress, possibly through their appraisals. Additionally, the findings can affect the training of officials in the management of stress, as well as prompt the consideration of potential rule changes that reflect the increased situational demands on officials in critical situations (e.g., expanded instant replay).

  12. Key Obama officials leave administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar is one of the latest members of the Obama administration to announce that he is leaving his position near the start of President Obama's second term in office. Salazar, who has served as interior secretary since January 2009, intends to leave the department by the end of March, the department noted on 16 January. Salazar joins a number of other key officials who are planning to leave the administration. They include Environmental Protection Agency administrator Lisa Jackson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration administrator Jane Lubchenco, and U.S. Geological Survey director Marcia McNutt.

  13. Thoracic osteophyte: rare cause of esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, S; Makarawo, T; Norton, R; Collins, F J

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal perforation is a difficult problem in thoracic surgery. Esophageal perforations can be spontaneous, iatrogenic, or malignant. We report two cases of esophageal perforations caused by thoracic osteophytes and different management strategies leading to successful outcomes. An 80-year-old male presented with chest pain and dysphagia following a fall. On endoscopy, an esophageal perforation and foreign body was noted which was confirmed as a thoracic osteophyte on computed tomography scan. He was managed conservatively as he declined surgery. A 63-year-old male was admitted with dysphagia following a food bolus obstruction. Following esophagoscopy and dilatation, there was clinical and radiological evidence of perforation. During surgery, a thoracic osteophyte was identified as the cause of perforation. The perforation was closed in layers and the osteophyte was trimmed. Both patients recovered well. Thoracic osteophytes are a rare cause of esophageal perforations and a high index of suspicion is required in patients with osteoarthritis who present with esophageal perforations.

  14. Thoracic outlet syndrome in whiplash injury.

    PubMed Central

    Capistrant, T D

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-five cases of thoracic outlet syndrome complicating whiplash or cervical strain injury were studied. Thirty cases had confirmation by the demonstration of slowed ulnar nerve conduction velocity (UNCV) through the thoracic outlet. Two distinct groups of patients were found. An acute group, seen an average of 3 1/2 months post injury, had severe neck pain with often mild or incidental thoracic outlet syndrome. A chronic group, with symptoms persisting more than 2 years after cervical injury, often had thoracic outlet symptoms as the predominant complaint. This study suggests that the arm aches and parethesias seen in association with both acute and chronic cervical strain injury are most often secondary to thoracic outlet syndrome. PMID:836089

  15. Athletes' expectations with regard to officiating competence.

    PubMed

    Dosseville, Fabrice; Laborde, Sylvain; Bernier, Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the cues upon which athletes rely when developing their expectations with regard to the competence of sports officials and to examine the sources of information, which are given priority in different kinds of sport (i.e. team, racquet and fighting sports). A questionnaire - the Athlete Perception of Sports Officials Questionnaire (APSO-Q) - was developed in which athletes (N=472) were asked to indicate the influence of 32 cues on their impressions of sports officials. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) yielded a four-factor model (i.e. static cues, psychological, communicational and performance cues). Athletes mostly rely on psychological and personal communication attributes when evaluating officiating competence. Moreover, team players perceived that static cues were more influential when forming their expectations of sports officials than racquet players and fighting contestants. Such findings may have implications for athlete-official relationships and training of sports officials.

  16. Wartime thoracic injury: perspectives in modern warfare.

    PubMed

    Propper, Brandon W; Gifford, Shaun M; Calhoon, John H; McNeil, Jeffrey D

    2010-04-01

    Thoracic injury represents a major source of combat morbidity and mortality. The overall killed-in-action rate has decreased, whereas the died-of-wounds rate has increased; the creation of the Joint Theater Trauma Registry allows for improved documentation. This report seeks to provide a realistic contemporary look at thoracic injury sustained by military forces and civilian casualties during the current wartime experience. The Joint Theater Trauma Registry was queried between 2002 and 2008. Patients receiving treatment for thoracic injuries were identified using International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition, diagnosis and procedure codes. All US soldiers, coalition forces, and local civilians were included in the analysis. There were 33,755 casualties identified during the study period, of which 1,660 patients (4.9%) sustained thoracic injury. Blast mechanism was the most prominent mode of injury, accounting for 45.8%. The mean Injury Severity Score in this cohort of patients was 14.9. A total of 4,232 procedures were performed, resulting in an average of 2.5 thoracic procedures per patient. Fifty percent of casualties were civilian, and 34% were US troops, with the remainder occurring in coalition forces. Overall mortality was 12%. This report provides a realistic account of current wartime thoracic injury. In contrast to previous wars, the majority of thoracic injury is secondary to blast injury as opposed to penetrating trauma, and the resultant mortality rate is higher. This report breaks down thoracic injuries to both US troops and civilian personal and provides realistic expectations for thoracic injury during future combat planning. Copyright (c) 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pedicled and skeletonized single and bilateral internal thoracic artery grafts and the incidence of sternal wound complications: Insights from the Arterial Revascularization Trial.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Umberto; Altman, Douglas G; Gerry, Stephen; Gray, Alastair; Lees, Belinda; Pawlaczyk, Rafal; Flather, Marcus; Taggart, David P

    2016-07-01

    pedicled single internal thoracic artery harvesting, whereas skeletonized single internal thoracic artery harvesting did not add any further benefit when compared with pedicled single internal thoracic artery harvesting. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Successful linking of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database to Social Security data to examine the accuracy of Society of Thoracic Surgeons mortality data.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; O'Brien, Sean M; Shahian, David M; Edwards, Fred H; Badhwar, Vinay; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Sanchez, Juan A; Morales, David L; Prager, Richard L; Wright, Cameron D; Puskas, John D; Gammie, James S; Haan, Constance K; George, Kristopher M; Sheng, Shubin; Peterson, Eric D; Shewan, Cynthia M; Han, Jane M; Bongiorno, Phillip A; Yohe, Courtney; Williams, William G; Mayer, John E; Grover, Frederick L

    2013-04-01

    data describing "mortality within 30 days of surgery" in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons and Social Security Death Master File link reveals that capture of 30-day deaths occurring before discharge is highly accurate, and that these in-hospital deaths represent the majority (79% [13,014/16,565]) of all 30-day deaths. Capture of the remaining 30-day deaths occurring after discharge is less complete and needs improvement. Efforts continue to encourage Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database participants to submit Social Security numbers to the Database, thereby enhancing accurate determination of 30-day life status. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons and Social Security Death Master File linkage can facilitate ongoing refinement of mortality reporting. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ossification of thoracic ligamenta flava

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, S.; Minoru, O.; Russell, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    Although ligamentum flavum ossification (LFO) often occurs in normal persons, there are no reports of its detection on lateral chest radiographs made during screening examinations. Review of 1,744 consecutive lateral chest radiographs identified LFO in 6.2% of males and 4.8% of females. LFO occurred mainly at the intervertebral segments from T9-T10 through T12-L1. Most prevalent was the hook-shaped LFO, protruding inferoirly from the inferior facets into the projections of the intervertabral foramina. Though LFO can cause severe neurologic symptoms, none of the affected persons in this study reported such symptoms. LFO was first visualized radiographically when the subjects were 20-40 years old, and it may be a physiologic condition. The LFO in these cases existed independent of thoracic posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and degenerative osteoarthritis.

  20. [Thoracic nocardiosis - a clinical report].

    PubMed

    Vale, Artur; Guerra, Miguel; Martins, Daniel; Lameiras, Angelina; Miranda, José; Vouga, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia genus microorganisms are ubiquitous, Gram positive aerobic bacterias, responsible for disease mainly in immunocompromised hosts, with cellular immune response commitment. Inhalation is the main form of transmition and pulmonary disease is the most frequent presentation. Dissemination may occur by contiguity and also via hematogenous. The clinical and imaging presentation is not specific, and diagnosis is obtained after identification of Nocardia bacteria in biological samples. Since there are no reliable studies that indicate the best therapeutic option, treatment should be individualized and based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Surgical drainage should also be considered in all patients. The authors present a clinical case of a patient with thoracic nocardiosis, and make a short literature review on the theme.

  1. [Thoracic actinomycosis versus bronchial cancer].

    PubMed

    Brombacher-Frey, I; Wöckel, W; Kreusser, T

    1992-01-01

    We report on 4 thoracic actinomycoses; in three of these four cases a bronchial carcinoma was suspected, and in case No. 2 this carcinoma had been considered to be in a very advanced and inoperable stage. A man of 51 years of age was in a generally run-down condition. He also noticed that his sputum was tinged with blood. The x-ray film showed a large space-occupying growth at the right lung hilus. Repeated perbronchial biopsies of the focus did not yield any diagnosis. Actinomycosis was identified histologically only in the tissue samples obtained via thoracotomy. After a three-month penicillin course the hilar shadow receded. A 61-year old male patient was transferred to our Pneumological Hospital, being strongly suspected of suffering from an extensive bronchial carcinoma, and having multiple intrathoracic space-occupying growths as well as pleural effusions, a pericardial effusion, and an infiltration of the left thoracic wall with fistula formation; however, histological examination of skin biopsies revealed that he was suffering from actinomycosis. Antibiotic therapy cured him completely in a six-month course. In a man of 32 years of age who had been indulging for many years in a severe abuse of nicotin, we suspected a central bronchial carcinoma on the basis of his x-ray, but histology of the tissue taken from the space-occupying growth via diagnostic thoracotomy revealed that this patient, too, suffered from actinomycosis. Complete recession occurred after several months of antibiotic treatment. A woman of 82 years had been an inpatient for several months in another hospital because of relapsing pleuropneumonias on the right side. She was transferred to us as an outpatient after a renewed relapse. We conducted a transcutaneous fine-needle biopsy of the right indurating pleural effusion. A few actinomyces filaments were seen on histological examination of the purulent exudate. Hence, actinomycosis was confirmed. After antibiotic therapy the finding receded

  2. Official Portrait of Astronaut Frank Borman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    This is the official portrait of astronaut Frank Borman. A career Air Force officer from 1950, his assignments included service as a fighter pilot, an operational pilot and instructor, an experimental test pilot and an assistant professor of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics at West Point. When selected by NASA, Frank Borman was an instructor at the Aerospace Research Pilot School at Edwards AFB, California. In 1967 he served as a member of the Apollo 204 Fire Investigation Board, investigating the causes of the fire which killed three astronauts aboard an Apollo spacecraft. Later he became the Apollo Program Resident Manager, heading the team that reengineered the Apollo spacecraft. He also served as Field Director of the NASA Space Station Task Force. Frank Borman retired from the air Force in 1970, but is well remembered as a part of American history as a pioneer in the exploration of space. He is a veteran of both the Gemini 7, 1965 Space Orbital Rendezvous with Gemini 6 and the first manned lunar orbital mission, Apollo 8, in 1968.

  3. Invited review-Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the thoracic cardiovascular system in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Drees, Randi; François, Christopher J; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the thoracic cardiovascular system is offering new diagnostic opportunities in companion animal patients with the increasing availability of multidetector-row computed tomographic (MDCT) units in veterinary facilities. Optimal investigation of the systemic, pulmonary, and coronary circulation provides unique challenges due to the constant movement of the heart, the small size of several of the structures of interest, and the dependence of angiographic quality on various contrast bolus design and patient factors. Technical and practical aspects of thoracic cardiovascular CTA are reviewed in light of the currently available veterinary literature and future opportunities given utilizing MDCT in companion animal patients with suspected thoracic cardiovascular disease. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  4. Thoracic trauma: when and how to intervene.

    PubMed

    Meredith, J Wayne; Hoth, J Jason

    2007-02-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death in patients younger than 40 years of age. Thoracic injuries are common and often can be managed by tube thoracostomy. In many patients, however, the thoracic injuries must be repaired surgically in one of three time periods: immediate, urgent, or delayed thoracotomy. In this article, we describe the general approach to effectively managing thoracic trauma patients. We review common injuries and scenarios that may be encountered by the surgeon and discuss the considerations and variables that enter into the decision-making process for operative intervention.

  5. PET-Based Thoracic Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Houshmand, Sina; Kalbasi, Anusha; Salavati, Ali; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is increasingly being integrated into multiple aspects of oncology. PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become especially important in radiation oncology. With the increasing use of advanced techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy, PET/CT scans have played critical roles in the target delineation of tumors for radiation oncologists delivering conformal treatment techniques. Use of PET/CT is well established in lung cancer and several other thoracic malignancies. This article details the current uses of PET/CT in thoracic radiation oncology with a focus on lung cancer and describes expected future roles of PET/CT for thoracic tumors.

  6. Thoracic ranula: an extremely rare case.

    PubMed

    Pang, Claudine Elizabeth; Lee, Tee Sin; Pang, Kenny Peter; Pang, Yoke Teen

    2005-03-01

    We present the first case of a thoracic ranula which originated from the left submandibular area extending into the subcutaneous tissue planes of the anterior chest wall. The patient had a history of surgery for a previous benign left salivary gland cyst, and presented with an enlarging mass in the anterior chest wall. This was a recurrence of a ranula, with an extension into the anterior thoracic wall. The thoracic ranula was excised, together with ipsilateral sublingual and submandibular glands, via a transcervical approach. No recurrence was detected over a 3-year post-operative follow up.

  7. One-year follow-up period after transumbilical thoracic sympathectomy for hyperhidrosis: outcomes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Huan; Du, Quan; Chen, Long; Yang, Shengsheng; Tu, Yuanrong; Chen, Shengping; Chen, Weisheng

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic sympathectomy is considered the most effective method to treat palmar hyperhidrosis. We developed a novel approach for thoracic sympathectomy in patients with palmar hyperhidrosis through the umbilicus, using an ultrathin gastroscope. The aim of this study was to evaluate the continuing efficacy and patient satisfaction of this innovative surgery. All procedures were performed under general anesthesia and the patients were intubated with a dual-lumen endotracheal tube. After a 5-mm umbilical incision, the muscular parts of the diaphragmatic dome were incised with a needle-knife and the nasal gastroscope was advanced into the thoracic cavity. The sympathetic chain was identified at the desired thoracic level and ablated with hot biopsy forceps. All patients were followed up for at least 1 year after the procedure through clinic visits or telephone/e-mail interviews. From April 2010 to August 2011, a total of 35 patients underwent a transumbilical thoracic sympathectomy. Fifty-seven percent were male patients, with a mean age of 21.2 years (range, 16-33 years). The success rate after 12 months was 97.1% (34 of 35) for isolated palmar hyperhidrosis and 72.2% (13 of 18) for axillary hyperhidrosis. Compensatory sweating was reported in 28.6% of patients at the 1-year follow-up evaluation. There was no mortality, no diaphragmatic hernia, and no Horner syndrome was observed. Quality of life related to hyperhidrosis improved substantially in 27 (77.1%) patients, and improved in 4 (11.4%) patients at 12 months after surgery. A total of 94.3% of patients were satisfied with the excellent cosmetic results of the surgical incision. Transumbilical thoracic sympathectomy is an efficacious alternative to the conventional approach. This technique avoided the chronic pain and chest wall paresthesia associated with the chest incision. In addition, this novel procedure afforded maximum cosmetic benefits. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery

  8. Outcomes in adult congenital heart surgery: analysis of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database.

    PubMed

    Mascio, Christopher E; Pasquali, Sara K; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L; Austin, Erle H

    2011-11-01

    © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Long thoracic nerve neurotization for restoration of shoulder function in C5-7 brachial plexus preganglionic injuries: case report.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Doi, Kazuteru; Hattori, Yasunori; Hoshino, Shushi; Sakamoto, Soutetsu; Arakawa, Yuichiro

    2010-09-01

    C5-7 brachial plexus preganglionic injuries are usually associated with complete paralysis of the long thoracic nerve. This makes it difficult to provide satisfactory shoulder function by neurotizing only the suprascapular nerve, compared with C5 and C6 preganglionic injuries, in which the long thoracic nerve is spared. We present a case report of a 21-year-old man who sustained a C5-7 brachial plexus preganglionic injury and obtained excellent shoulder function by intercostal nerve transfer to the long thoracic nerve in addition to neurotization of the suprascapular nerve. Our report emphasizes the importance of restoring the activity of the long thoracic nerve. Copyright 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery for reversal of thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Randolph H L; Ng, Calvin S H; Wong, Jasper K W; Tsang, Susanna

    2012-03-01

    Thoracic sympathectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis. However, one major complication of such a procedure is compensatory truncal hyperhidrosis. We describe an extreme case of compensatory truncal hyperhidrosis and anhidrosis over the head and neck region which led to a heatstroke. Bilateral reoperative needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery was performed for the reversal of thoracic sympathectomy with an interposition intercostal nerve graft. The patient's truncal hyperhidrosis resolved gradually over 1 month following the reversal procedure.

  11. Teaching Japanese-American Incarceration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miksch, Karen L.; Ghere, David

    2004-01-01

    Few events in American history are so universally deplored as the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. The United States government has acknowledged the error and the injustice that resulted with an official Presidential apology and a Congressional disbursement of reparations to the victims of the incarceration policy. The…

  12. Non-intubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery-technical issues.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gabor; Castillo, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Performing awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is technically more challenging than thoracic surgery under general anesthesia (GA), but it can result in a greater benefit for the patient. Local wound infiltration and lidocaine administration in the pleural space can be considered for ATS. More invasive techniques are local wound infiltration with wound catheter insertion, thoracic wall blocks, selective intercostal nerve blockade, thoracic paravertebral blockade and thoracic epidural analgesia, offering the advantage of a catheter placement which can also be continued for postoperative analgesia.

  13. Nonintubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery: general issues

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management for awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is more difficult than under general anesthesia (GA), being technically extremely challenging for the anesthesiologist. Therefore, thorough preparation and vigilance are paramount for successful patient management. In this review, important considerations of nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery are discussed in view of careful patient selection, anesthetic preparation, potential perioperative difficulties and the management of its complications. PMID:26046051

  14. Calcification of thoracic aorta - solar eclipse sign.

    PubMed

    Dhoble, Abhijeet; Puttarajappa, Chethan

    2008-08-29

    Calcification of thoracic aorta is very common in old people, especially ones with hypertension. This can sometime be visible on plain chest radiograph. We present a case of a male patient who had extensive deposition of calcium in the thoracic aorta. The relationship between aortic calcification and coronary atherosclerosis remains contentious. Computed tomography of the thorax can display this calcification which appears like 'solar eclipse'.

  15. Cardio-thoracic surgical experience in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Mbamendame, Sylvestre; Ngakani Offobo, Silvère; Kaba, Mory Mamadi; Mbourou, Jean Bernard; Diané, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Our experience in cardio-thoracic surgery focuses on thoracic activity. The minimum fare for traumatisms, infectious pathology and tumoral pathology requires, for its improvement, the acquisition of a technical platform and of an adequate medical infrastructure, with a rational organisation of the care sequence. Vascular surgery calls for the training of qualified human resources, and the great demand in heart surgery calls upon the public powers for the construction of infrastructures, and the formation of necessary superstructures. PMID:27904845

  16. Thoracic trauma in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Keneally, Ryan; Szpisjak, Dale

    2013-05-01

    Thoracic injuries are common among civilian trauma and have a high associated mortality. The use of body armor and exposure to different mechanisms of injury in combat setting could lead to different injury patterns and incidences from those found in peacetime. Thoracic trauma incidence rates and mortality risks were calculated from data extracted from the Joint Theatre Trauma Registry. Among patients injured in military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, 10.0% sustained thoracic injuries and had a mortality rate of 10.5%. Penetrating injuries were the most common mechanism of injury. The most common thoracic injury was pulmonary contusion. The highest mortality rate was in the subset of patients with thoracic vascular injuries or flail chest. The variables most strongly associated with mortality were number of units of blood transfused, admission base deficit, international normalization ratio, pH, Abbreviated Injury Scale scores for head and neck regions, and Injury Severity Score. Blunt injuries had the same mortality risk as penetrating injuries. Combat-related thoracic trauma is common and associated with significant mortality in Iraq and Afghanistan.

  17. Clinical innovations in Philippine thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic surgery in the Philippines followed the development of thoracic surgery in the United States and Europe. With better understanding of the physiology of the open chest and refinements in thoracic anesthetic and surgical approaches, Filipino surgeons began performing thoracoplasties, then lung resections for pulmonary tuberculosis and later for lung cancer in specialty hospitals dealing with pulmonary diseases—first at the Quezon Institute (QI) and presently at the Lung Center of the Philippines although some university and private hospitals made occasional forays into the chest. Esophageal surgery began its early attempts during the post-World War II era at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH), a university hospital affiliated with the University of the Philippines. With the introduction of minimally invasive thoracic surgical approaches, Filipino thoracic surgeons have managed to keep up with their Asian counterparts although the problems of financial reimbursement typical of a developing country remain. The need for creative innovative approaches of a focused multidisciplinary team will advance the boundaries of thoracic surgery in the Philippines. PMID:27651936

  18. 39 CFR 962.16 - Disqualification of reviewing official or presiding official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reviewing official or presiding official. If a Respondent believes, in good faith, that the Reviewing Official or Presiding Officer should be disqualified because of personal bias, or other reason, the Respondent may file a timely and sufficient affidavit alleging such belief with supporting evidence. If...

  19. 9 CFR 325.6 - Shipment of paunches between official establishments under official seal; certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... establishments under official seal; certificate. 325.6 Section 325.6 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND... between official establishments under official seal; certificate. Cattle and sheep paunches which have... seal of the Department as prescribed in § 312.5(a) of this subchapter....

  20. 9 CFR 325.6 - Shipment of paunches between official establishments under official seal; certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... establishments under official seal; certificate. 325.6 Section 325.6 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND... between official establishments under official seal; certificate. Cattle and sheep paunches which have... seal of the Department as prescribed in § 312.5(a) of this subchapter....

  1. 9 CFR 325.6 - Shipment of paunches between official establishments under official seal; certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... establishments under official seal; certificate. 325.6 Section 325.6 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND... between official establishments under official seal; certificate. Cattle and sheep paunches which have... seal of the Department as prescribed in § 312.5(a) of this subchapter....

  2. 9 CFR 325.6 - Shipment of paunches between official establishments under official seal; certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... establishments under official seal; certificate. 325.6 Section 325.6 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND... between official establishments under official seal; certificate. Cattle and sheep paunches which have... seal of the Department as prescribed in § 312.5(a) of this subchapter....

  3. 9 CFR 325.6 - Shipment of paunches between official establishments under official seal; certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... establishments under official seal; certificate. 325.6 Section 325.6 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND... between official establishments under official seal; certificate. Cattle and sheep paunches which have... seal of the Department as prescribed in § 312.5(a) of this subchapter....

  4. 9 CFR 381.123 - Official inspection mark; official establishment number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... every inspected and passed poultry product shall bear: (a) The official inspection legend; and (b) The... inspection and placed as follows: (1) Within the official inspection legend in the form required by subpart M of this part; or (2) Outside the official inspection legend elsewhere on the exterior of...

  5. 39 CFR 963.21 - Official record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Official record. 963.21 Section 963.21 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO VIOLATIONS OF THE PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.21 Official record. The transcript of...

  6. 39 CFR 262.2 - Officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Officials. 262.2 Section 262.2 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT DEFINITIONS § 262.2 Officials. (a) Chief Privacy Officer. The Chief Privacy Officer (CPO) is responsible...

  7. 7 CFR 62.213 - Official identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Definitions Service § 62.213 Official identification. The following, as shown in figure 1, constitutes official identification to show product or services produced under an approved USDA, Process Verified... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE...

  8. 45 CFR 99.27 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Official transcript. 99.27 Section 99.27 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE FOR HEARINGS FOR THE CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Hearing Procedures § 99.27 Official transcript. The Department...

  9. 10 CFR 590.314 - Presiding officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Presiding officials. 590.314 Section 590.314 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Procedures § 590.314 Presiding officials. (a) The...

  10. 10 CFR 1017.14 - Designated officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Designation. Prior to being designated as a Reviewing Official, each employee must receive training approved... employees who are approved by DOE or another Government agency to use classification guidance developed by... a DOE Federal or contractor employee be designated as a Reviewing Official are contained...

  11. 39 CFR 954.24 - Official record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Official record. 954.24 Section 954.24 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO THE DENIAL, SUSPENSION, OR REVOCATION OF PERIODICALS MAIL PRIVILEGES § 954.24 Official record. The pleadings, orders...

  12. 39 CFR 954.24 - Official record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Official record. 954.24 Section 954.24 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO THE DENIAL, SUSPENSION, OR REVOCATION OF PERIODICALS MAIL PRIVILEGES § 954.24 Official record. The pleadings, orders...

  13. 39 CFR 954.24 - Official record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Official record. 954.24 Section 954.24 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO THE DENIAL, SUSPENSION, OR REVOCATION OF PERIODICALS MAIL PRIVILEGES § 954.24 Official record. The pleadings, orders...

  14. 39 CFR 954.24 - Official record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Official record. 954.24 Section 954.24 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO THE DENIAL, SUSPENSION, OR REVOCATION OF PERIODICALS MAIL PRIVILEGES § 954.24 Official record. The pleadings, orders...

  15. 39 CFR 954.24 - Official record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Official record. 954.24 Section 954.24 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO THE DENIAL, SUSPENSION, OR REVOCATION OF PERIODICALS MAIL PRIVILEGES § 954.24 Official record. The pleadings, orders...

  16. 16 CFR 0.2 - Official address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official address. 0.2 Section 0.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.2 Official address. The principal office of the Commission is at Washington, DC. All communications to the...

  17. 32 CFR 516.48 - Official information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Official information. 516.48 Section 516.48... PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Release of Information and Appearance of Witnesses Scope Da Personnel As Witnesses in Private Litigation § 516.48 Official information. (a) In instances involving § 516.47(a)(1...

  18. 7 CFR 58.2827 - Official identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture Standard for Ice Cream § 58.2827 Official identification. (a) The official symbol to be used to identify product meeting the USDA standard for ice cream shall be as follows: EC25SE91.017 (b) Ice cream manufacturing plants using this symbol shall be USDA approved as set forth...

  19. 76 FR 42767 - Management Officials Interlocks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Management Officials Interlocks AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS... Management and Budget (OMB) for review, as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act. Today, OTS is soliciting...: Management Officials Interlocks. OMB Number: 1550-0051. Form Number: N/A. Description: OTS uses the requested...

  20. 10 CFR 590.314 - Presiding officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Presiding officials. 590.314 Section 590.314 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Procedures § 590.314 Presiding officials. (a)...

  1. 42 CFR 430.94 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Official transcript. 430.94 Section 430.94 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... official transcripts of testimony, together with any stipulations, briefs, or memoranda of law, are...

  2. 42 CFR 430.94 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Official transcript. 430.94 Section 430.94 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... official transcripts of testimony, together with any stipulations, briefs, or memoranda of law, are...

  3. 7 CFR 58.2827 - Official identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture Standard for Ice Cream § 58.2827 Official identification. (a) The official symbol to be used to identify product meeting the USDA standard for ice cream shall be as follows: EC25SE91.017 (b) Ice cream manufacturing plants using this symbol shall be USDA approved as set forth in...

  4. 7 CFR 58.2827 - Official identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture Standard for Ice Cream § 58.2827 Official identification. (a) The official symbol to be used to identify product meeting the USDA standard for ice cream shall be as follows: EC25SE91.017 (b) Ice cream manufacturing plants using this symbol shall be USDA approved as set forth in...

  5. 7 CFR 58.2827 - Official identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture Standard for Ice Cream § 58.2827 Official identification. (a) The official symbol to be used to identify product meeting the USDA standard for ice cream shall be as follows: EC25SE91.017 (b) Ice cream manufacturing plants using this symbol shall be USDA approved as set forth in...

  6. 7 CFR 58.734 - Official identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Requirements for Processed Cheese Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.734 Official identification. Only process cheese products manufactured and packaged in accordance with the requirements of this part and with...

  7. 10 CFR 603.1310 - Program official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program official. 603.1310 Section 603.1310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in this Part § 603.1310 Program official. A Federal Government program manager, project officer...

  8. 10 CFR 603.1310 - Program official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Program official. 603.1310 Section 603.1310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in this Part § 603.1310 Program official. A Federal Government program manager, project officer...

  9. 10 CFR 603.1310 - Program official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Program official. 603.1310 Section 603.1310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in this Part § 603.1310 Program official. A Federal Government program manager, project officer...

  10. 10 CFR 603.1310 - Program official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Program official. 603.1310 Section 603.1310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in this Part § 603.1310 Program official. A Federal Government program manager, project officer...

  11. 10 CFR 603.1310 - Program official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Program official. 603.1310 Section 603.1310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in this Part § 603.1310 Program official. A Federal Government program manager, project officer...

  12. 10 CFR 590.314 - Presiding officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Presiding officials. 590.314 Section 590.314 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Procedures § 590.314 Presiding officials. (a)...

  13. 49 CFR 511.48 - Official docket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Official docket. 511.48 Section 511.48 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Hearings § 511.48 Official docket. (a)...

  14. 10 CFR 710.36 - Acting officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acting officials. 710.36 Section 710.36 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO CLASSIFIED MATTER OR... Classified Matter or Special Nuclear Material Miscellaneous § 710.36 Acting officials. Except for the...

  15. 10 CFR 710.36 - Acting officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acting officials. 710.36 Section 710.36 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO CLASSIFIED MATTER OR... Classified Matter or Special Nuclear Material Miscellaneous § 710.36 Acting officials. Except for the...

  16. 10 CFR 710.36 - Acting officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acting officials. 710.36 Section 710.36 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO CLASSIFIED MATTER OR... Classified Matter or Special Nuclear Material Miscellaneous § 710.36 Acting officials. Except for the...

  17. 10 CFR 590.314 - Presiding officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... officiating at a conference, oral presentation, or trial-type hearing. The presiding official shall have the... conference, oral presentation, or trial-type hearing shall have the authority to regulate the conduct of the... conference, oral presentation, or trial-type hearing, administering oaths or affirmations, directing...

  18. 22 CFR 1429.13 - Official time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... participation, including necessary travel time, as occurs during the employee's regular work hours and when the... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Official time. 1429.13 Section 1429.13 Foreign... REQUIREMENTS Miscellaneous § 1429.13 Official time. If the participation of any employee in any phase of any...

  19. 22 CFR 1429.13 - Official time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... participation, including necessary travel time, as occurs during the employee's regular work hours and when the... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Official time. 1429.13 Section 1429.13 Foreign... REQUIREMENTS Miscellaneous § 1429.13 Official time. If the participation of any employee in any phase of any...

  20. 22 CFR 1429.13 - Official time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... participation, including necessary travel time, as occurs during the employee's regular work hours and when the... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Official time. 1429.13 Section 1429.13 Foreign... REQUIREMENTS Miscellaneous § 1429.13 Official time. If the participation of any employee in any phase of any...

  1. 22 CFR 1429.13 - Official time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... participation, including necessary travel time, as occurs during the employee's regular work hours and when the... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Official time. 1429.13 Section 1429.13 Foreign... REQUIREMENTS Miscellaneous § 1429.13 Official time. If the participation of any employee in any phase of any...

  2. 39 CFR 963.21 - Official record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Official record. 963.21 Section 963.21 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO VIOLATIONS OF THE PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.21 Official record. The transcript of...

  3. 39 CFR 963.21 - Official record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Official record. 963.21 Section 963.21 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO VIOLATIONS OF THE PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.21 Official record. The transcript of...

  4. 39 CFR 963.21 - Official record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Official record. 963.21 Section 963.21 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO VIOLATIONS OF THE PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.21 Official record. The transcript of...

  5. 39 CFR 963.21 - Official record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Official record. 963.21 Section 963.21 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO VIOLATIONS OF THE PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.21 Official record. The transcript of...

  6. 7 CFR 51.17 - Official sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Official sampling. 51.17 Section 51.17 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) Regulations 1 Inspection Service § 51.17 Official sampling. Samples may be... inspector who drew the samples, showing the time and place of the sampling and the brands or other...

  7. 7 CFR 51.17 - Official sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Official sampling. 51.17 Section 51.17 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) Regulations 1 Inspection Service § 51.17 Official sampling. Samples may be... inspector who drew the samples, showing the time and place of the sampling and the brands or other...

  8. 36 CFR 1150.92 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Official transcript. 1150.92 Section 1150.92 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD PRACTICE AND PROCEDURES FOR COMPLIANCE HEARINGS The Record § 1150.92 Official transcript. The...

  9. 28 CFR 345.71 - Official commendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Official commendations. 345.71 Section 345.71 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Awards Program § 345.71 Official commendations. An inmate worker may...

  10. 28 CFR 345.71 - Official commendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Official commendations. 345.71 Section 345.71 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Awards Program § 345.71 Official commendations. An inmate worker may...

  11. 28 CFR 345.71 - Official commendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Official commendations. 345.71 Section 345.71 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Awards Program § 345.71 Official commendations. An inmate worker may...

  12. 28 CFR 345.71 - Official commendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Official commendations. 345.71 Section 345.71 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Awards Program § 345.71 Official commendations. An inmate worker may...

  13. 28 CFR 345.71 - Official commendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Official commendations. 345.71 Section 345.71 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Awards Program § 345.71 Official commendations. An inmate worker may...

  14. Resident training in a new robotic thoracic surgery program.

    PubMed

    White, Yasmine N; Dedhia, Priya; Bergeron, Edward J; Lin, Jules; Chang, Andrew A; Reddy, Rishindra M

    2016-03-01

    The volume of robot-assisted operations has drastically increased over the past decade. New programs have focused on training surgeons, whereas resident training has lagged behind. The objective of this study was to evaluate our institutional experience with resident participation in thoracic robotic surgery cases since the initiation of our program. The first 100 robotic thoracic surgery cases at our institution were retrospectively reviewed and categorized into three sequential cohorts. Procedure type, patient and operative characteristics, level of resident participation (primary surgeon [PS] or assistant), and postoperative variables were evaluated. Of the first 100 cases, 38% were lung resections, 23% were esophageal operations, and 20% were sympathectomies. The distribution of cases changed over time with the proportion of pulmonary resections significantly increasing. Patient age (P < 0.05), body mass index (P = not significant [NS]), and comorbidities (P = NS) increased over time. Resident participation as PS increased from 33%-59% between the early and late cohorts (P < 0.05). A subset analysis of the 20 lobectomies (7 attending PS, 13 residents) showed similar patient characteristics (P = NS): age (67 versus 69), body mass index (29.5 versus 26.1), and American Society of Anesthesiologists category (2.8 versus 2.8). Operative and postoperative characteristics were also similar (P = NS) regardless of PS: operative time (260 versus 249 min), estimated blood loss (187 versus 203 mL), and length of stay (4.8 versus 4.7 d). Residents can participate as the PS in a variety of thoracic operations during the implementation of a robotics program. Operative time, estimated blood loss, and length of stay were similar regardless of level of resident participation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neurological and functional recovery after thoracic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Brian A.; Leiby, Benjamin E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe neurological and functional outcomes after traumatic paraplegia. Design Retrospective analysis of longitudinal database. Setting Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems. Participants Six hundred sixty-one subjects enrolled in the Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems database, injured between 2000 and 2011, with initial neurological level of injury from T2–12. Two hundred sixty-five subjects had second neurological exams and 400 subjects had Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores ≥6 months after injury. Outcome Measures American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade, sensory level (SL), lower extremity motor scores (LEMS), and FIM. Results At baseline, 73% of subjects were AIS A, and among them, 15.5% converted to motor incomplete. The mean SL increase for subjects with an AIS A grade was 0.33 ± 0.21; 86% remained within two levels of baseline. Subjects with low thoracic paraplegia (T10–12) demonstrated greater LEMS gain than high paraplegia (T2–9), and also had higher 1-year FIM scores, which had not been noted in earlier reports. Better FIM scores were also correlated with better AIS grades, younger age and increase in AIS grade. Ability to walk at 1 year was associated with low thoracic injury, higher initial LEMS, incomplete injury and increase in AIS grade. Conclusion Little neurological recovery is seen in persons with complete thoracic SCI, especially with levels above T10. Persons who are older at the time of injury have poorer functional recovery than younger persons. Conversion to a better AIS grade is associated with improvement in self-care and mobility at 1 year. PMID:25520184

  16. Official STS-4 Crew _Patch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-01-13

    S82-29695 (April 1982) --- This oval shaped artwork is the insignia for the fourth Space Transportation System (STS-4) flight in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) space shuttle Columbia. The Columbia, with its crew of astronauts Thomas K. Mattingly II, and Henry W. Hartsfield Jr. aboard, will launch from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and orbit Earth for approximately one week in summer of 1982. The insignia shows the Columbia trailing our nation's colors in the shape of her flight number, representing the fourth and final flight of the highly successful flight test phase. She then streaks on into the future, entering the exciting operational phase scheduled to begin with STS-5. The NASA insignia design for space shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA

  17. Official STS-3 Crew Insignia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1981-04-07

    S82-26315 (4 Feb. 1982) --- This is the insignia for NASA's third flight (STS-3) of the Space Transportation System's (STS) Columbia, depicted in the middle of the blue sphere against the background of the sun. The Columbia's tail, nose, and top will each be pointed at the sun for long periods to test its thermal response to extremes of temperatures. The three prominent rays represent the third STS flight. The surnames of astronauts Jack R. Lousma, commander, and C. Gordon Fullerton, pilot, flank the vehicle, and the name Columbia appears at the bottom. The spacecraft's payload bay doors are open, and the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm with an experimental payload is extended as it will be on several occasions during the actual flight, scheduled for spring of this year. The artwork was accomplished by space artist Robert C. McCall of Paradise Valley, Arizona. The NASA insignia design for space shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA

  18. STS-66 Official Crew insignia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-01

    STS066-S-001 (October 1994) --- Designed by the crew members, the STS-66 insignia depicts the space shuttle Atlantis launching into Earth orbit to study global environmental change. The payload for the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS-3) and complementary experiments are part of a continuing study of the atmosphere and the sun's influence on it. The space shuttle is trailed by gold plumes representing the astronaut symbol and is superimposed over Earth, much of which is visible from the flight's high inclination orbit. Sensitive instruments aboard the ATLAS pallet in the shuttle payload bay and on the free-flying Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmospheric-Shuttle Pallet Satellite (CHRISTA-SPAS) will gaze down on Earth and toward the sun, illustrated by the stylized sunrise and visible spectrum. The NASA insignia design for space shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA

  19. STS-48 official crew insignia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-08-27

    STS048-S-001 (July 1991) --- Designed by the astronaut crew members, the patch represents the space shuttle orbiter Discovery in orbit about Earth after deploying the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) depicted in block letter style. The stars are those in the northern hemisphere as seen in the fall and winter when UARS will begin its study of Earth's atmosphere. The color bands on Earth's horizon, extending up to the UARS spacecraft, depict the study of Earth's atmosphere. The triangular shape represents the relationship among the three atmospheric processes that determine upper atmospheric structure and behavior: chemistry, dynamics and energy. In the words of the crew members, "This continuous process brings life to our planet and makes our planet unique in the solar system." The NASA insignia design for space shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, it will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA

  20. STS-36 - OFFICIAL CREW INSIGNIA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-11-21

    S89-20157 (November 1989) --- The dominant theme of the STS-36 patch, designed by the five astronaut crew members, is, in their words "...the essential role that space plays in preserving the blessings of freedom and liberty for America." The crew used the eagle to symbolize "our country's commitment to strength and vigilance; its domain is not bound by the limits of Earth but reaches out to the stars." "The Shuttle," they express, "majestically beginning its journey into orbit, demonstrates how man and machine work together for the security of our nation." A crew spokesman went on to say the flag represents the patriotism and love for America possessed by each member of the five-man crew and signifies the honor accorded them through participation in national defense. The NASA insignia design for space shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA

  1. A shifting approach to management of the thoracic aorta in bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Opotowsky, Alexander R; Perlstein, Todd; Landzberg, Michael J; Colan, Steven D; O'Gara, Patrick T; Body, Simon C; Ryan, Liam F; Aranki, Sary; Singh, Michael N

    2013-08-01

    2009 (inflation-adjusted 2009 dollars). There was a marked increase in the use of thoracic aortic surgery among patients with BAV. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pivotal results for the Medtronic Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft System in the VALOR II trial.

    PubMed

    Fairman, Ronald M; Tuchek, J Michael; Lee, W Anthony; Kasirajan, Karthikeshwar; White, Rodney; Mehta, Manish; Lyden, Sean; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Bavaria, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    We report 30-day and 12-month results of endovascular treatment with the Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft System (Medtronic Vascular, Santa Rosa, Calif) in patients with descending thoracic aortic aneurysms of degenerative etiology. The Valiant stent graft is an evolution of the Talent thoracic stent graft (Medtronic Vascular). The VALOR II (Evaluation of the Clinical Performance of the Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft System in the Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aneurysms of Degenerative Etiology in Subjects Who Are Candidates for Endovascular Repair) was a prospective, nonrandomized, pivotal trial conducted at 24 U.S. sites with enrollment between December 2006 and September 2009. Standard follow-up examinations, including physical examination, computed tomography, and chest radiography, were at 1, 6, and 12 months, and annually through 5 years. VALOR II outcomes were compared with those from the pivotal VALOR (Evaluation of the Medtronic Vascular Talent Thoracic Stent Graft System for the Treatment of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms) trial of the Talent stent graft, which enrolled 195 patients with similar enrollment criteria. VALOR II enrolled 160 patients. Compared with VALOR patients, VALOR II patients had similar age and sex distribution but higher rates of cardiovascular risk factors and significantly more severe modified Society for Vascular Surgery/American Association for Vascular Surgery risk scores. Stent graft delivery and deployment were successful in 154 patients (96.3%). Outcomes at 30 days in VALOR II were perioperative mortality, 3.1%; major adverse events, 38.1%; paraplegia, 0.6%; paraparesis, 1.9%; and stroke, 2.5%. At 12 months, after the minimum sample size was reached, 151 patients were evaluated: aneurysm-related mortality was 4.0%, stent graft migration was 2.9%, and endoleak was 13.0%. Through 12 months, there were no ruptures, conversions to open surgery, secondary procedures due to endoleak >30 days, or loss of stent graft patency. The Valiant

  3. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Roguski, Marie; Safain, Mina G; Zerris, Vasilios A; Kryzanski, James T; Thomas, Christine B; Magge, Subu N; Riesenburger, Ron I

    2014-10-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a proliferative lesion of the synovial membranes. Knees, hips, and other large weight-bearing joints are most commonly affected. PVNS rarely presents in the spine, in particular the thoracic segments. We present a patient with PVNS in the thoracic spine and describe its clinical presentation, radiographic findings, pathologic features, and treatment as well as providing the first comprehensive meta-analysis and review of the literature on this topic, to our knowledge. A total of 28 publications reporting 56 patients were found. The lumbar and cervical spine were most frequently involved (40% and 36% of patients, respectively) with infrequent involvement of the thoracic spine (24% of patients). PVNS affects a wide range of ages, but has a particular predilection for the thoracic spine in younger patients. The mean age in the thoracic group was 22.8 years and was significantly lower than the cervical and lumbar groups (42.4 and 48.6 years, respectively; p=0.0001). PVNS should be included in the differential diagnosis of osteodestructive lesions of the spine, especially because of its potential for local recurrence. The goal of treatment should be complete surgical excision. Although the pathogenesis is not clear, mechanical strain may play an important role, especially in cervical and lumbar PVNS. The association of thoracic lesions and younger age suggests that other factors, such as neoplasia, derangement of lipid metabolism, perturbations of humoral and cellular immunity, and other undefined patient factors, play a role in the development of thoracic PVNS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Official portrait of Payload Specialist Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Official portrait of Payload Specialist Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud. He is wearing the blue shuttle flight suit and holding his helmet under his arm. Behind him to the right is the Saudi Arabian flag. To his left is the American flag and a model of the Space Shuttle.

  5. 22 CFR 1006.880 - What factors may influence the debarring official during reconsideration?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true What factors may influence the debarring official during reconsideration? 1006.880 Section 1006.880 Foreign Relations INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Debarment § 1006.880 What factors may influence the...

  6. Education Department Needs an Official "With Clout" to Oversee Foreign-Language Study, Report Says

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millman, Sierra

    2007-01-01

    According to a report released by the National Academies' National Research Council, the U.S. Department of Education needs a high-ranking official to oversee its efforts to expand Americans' proficiency in foreign languages and knowledge of international affairs. The report was prepared by a committee convened to review the "adequacy and…

  7. Thoracic aortic aneurysm: reading the enemy's playbook.

    PubMed

    Elefteriades, John A

    2008-05-01

    The vast database of the Yale Center for Thoracic Aortic Disease--which includes information on 3000 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection, with 9000 catalogued images and 9000 patient-years of follow-up--has, over the last decade, permitted multiple glimpses into the "playbook" of this virulent disease. Understanding the precise behavioral features of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection permits us more effectively to combat this disease. In this monograph, we will first review certain fundamentals--in terms of anatomy, nomenclature, imaging, diagnosis, medical, surgical, and stent treatment. After reviewing these fundamentals, we will proceed with a detailed exploration of lessons learned by peering into the operational playbook of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. Among the glimpses afforded in the behavioral playbook of this disease are the following: 1 Thoracic aortic aneurysm, while lethal, is indolent. Mortality usually does not occur until after years of growth. 2 The aneurysmal ascending thoracic aorta grows slowly: about 0.1 cm per year (the descending aorta grows somewhat faster). 3 Over a patient's lifetime, "hinge points" at which the likelihood of rupture or dissection skyrockets are seen at 5.5 cm for the ascending and 6.5 cm for the descending aorta. Intervening at 5 cm diameter for the ascending and 6 cm for the descending prevents most adverse events. 4 Symptomatic aneurysms require resection regardless of size. 5 The yearly rate of rupture, dissection, or death is 14.1% for a patient with a thoracic aorta of 6 cm diameter. 6 The mechanical properties of the aorta deteriorate markedly at 6 cm diameter (distensibility falls, and wall stress rises)--a finding that "dovetails" perfectly with observations of the clinical behavior of the thoracic aorta. 7 Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection are largely inherited diseases, with a predominantly autosomal-dominant pattern. The specific genetics are being elucidated at the

  8. Thoracic sympathectomy: a review of current indications.

    PubMed

    Hashmonai, Moshe; Cameron, Alan E P; Licht, Peter B; Hensman, Chris; Schick, Christoph H

    2016-04-01

    Thoracic sympathetic ablation was introduced over a century ago. While some of the early indications have become obsolete, new ones have emerged. Sympathetic ablation is being still performed for some odd indications thus prompting the present study, which reviews the evidence base for current practice. The literature was reviewed using the PubMed/Medline Database, and pertinent articles regarding the indications for thoracic sympathectomy were retrieved and evaluated. Old, historical articles were also reviewed as required. Currently, thoracic sympathetic ablation is indicated mainly for primary hyperhidrosis, especially affecting the palm, and to a lesser degree, axilla and face, and for facial blushing. Despite modern pharmaceutical, endovascular and surgical treatments, sympathetic ablation has still a place in the treatment of very selected cases of angina, arrhythmias and cardiomyopathy. Thoracic sympathetic ablation is indicated in several painful conditions: the early stages of complex regional pain syndrome, erythromelalgia, and some pancreatic and other painful abdominal pathologies. Although ischaemia was historically the major indication for sympathetic ablation, its use has declined to a few selected cases of thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease), microemboli, primary Raynaud's phenomenon and Raynaud's phenomenon secondary to collagen diseases, paraneoplastic syndrome, frostbite and vibration syndrome. Thoracic sympathetic ablation for hypertension is obsolete, and direct endovascular renal sympathectomy still requires adequate clinical trials. There are rare publications of sympathetic ablation for primary phobias, but there is no scientific basis to support sympathetic surgery for any psychiatric indication.

  9. Thoracic surgical resident education: a costly endeavor.

    PubMed

    Calhoon, John H; Baisden, Clint; Holler, Ben; Hicks, George L; Bove, Ed L; Wright, Cameron D; Merrill, Walter H; Fullerton, Dave A

    2014-12-01

    We sought to define an accurate measure of thoracic surgical education costs. Program directors from six distinct and differently sized and geographically located thoracic surgical training programs used a common template to provide estimates of resident educational costs. These data were reviewed, clarifying questions or discrepancies when noted and using best estimates when exact data were unavailable. Subsequently, a composite of previously published cost-estimation products was used to capture accurate cost data. Data were then compiled and averaged to provide an accurate picture of all costs associated with thoracic surgical education. Before formal accounting was performed, the estimated average for all programs was approximately $250,000 per year per resident. However, when formal evaluations by the six programs were performed, the annual cost of resident education ranged from $330,000 to $667,000 per year per resident. The average cost of $483,000 per year was almost double the initial estimates. Variability was noted by region and size of program. Faculty teaching costs varied from $208,000 to $346,000 per year. Simulation costs ranged from $0 to $80,000 per year. Resident savings to program ranged from $0 to $135,000 per year and averaged $37,000 per year per resident. Thoracic surgical education costs are considerably higher than initial estimates from program directors and probably represent an unappreciated source of financial burden for cardiothoracic surgical educational programs. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Giant thoracic osteophyte: a distinct clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Neal, Jonathan B; Grottkau, Brian E; Nahed, Brian V; Shin, John H; Walcott, Brian P

    2014-09-01

    Calcified lesions described within the neural axis are classified as either an ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, or ossification of the ligamentum flavum. We aim to describe a unique pathologic entity: the giant thoracic osteophyte. We identified four patients who were surgically treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 2006 to 2012 with unusual calcified lesions in the ventral aspect of the spinal canal. In order to differentiate giant thoracic osteophytes from calcified extruded disc material, disc volumetrics were performed on actual and simulated disc spaces. All patients underwent operative resection of the calcific lesion as they had signs and/or symptoms of spinal cord compression. The lesions were found to be isolated, large calcific masses that originated from the posterior aspect of adjacent thoracic vertebral bodies. Pathological examination was negative for tumor. Adjacent disc volumes were not significantly different from the index disc (p=0.91). A simulated calculation hypothesizing that the calcific mass was extruded disc material demonstrated a significant difference (p=0.01), making this scenario unlikely. In conclusion, giant thoracic osteophyte is a unique and rare entity that can be found in the thoracic spine. The central tenant of surgical treatment is resection to relieve spinal cord compression.

  11. THORACIC RADIOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF CANINE INFLUENZA VIRUS IN SIX DOGS.

    PubMed

    Secrest, Scott A; Sharma, Ajay

    2016-09-01

    Canine influenza virus is an emerging, highly contagious, respiratory pathogen that has not previously been radiographically described. In this retrospective case series study, we describe the thoracic radiographic appearance of confirmed canine influenza virus in six dogs. Radiographic findings varied, but included abnormal unstructured interstitial (one) and unstructured interstitial and alveolar (five) pulmonary patterns, which were distributed cranioventral (four), diffuse (one), and caudodorsal (one). The right middle (five), left cranial (five), and right cranial (four) lung lobes were most commonly affected. Additionally, mild pleural effusion was present in one dog. Intrathoracic lymphadenopathy and cranial mediastinal widening/fluid accumulation were not detected in any dog. Canine influenza virus should be considered as a differential diagnosis for canine patients with respiratory signs and a cranioventral unstructured interstitial to alveolar pulmonary pattern. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  12. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons general thoracic surgery databases: joint standardization of variable definitions and terminology.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Felix G; Falcoz, Pierre E; Kozower, Benjamin D; Salati, Michele; Wright, Cameron D; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgery (ESTS) and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) general thoracic surgery databases collect thoracic surgical data from Europe and North America, respectively. Their objectives are similar: to measure processes and outcomes so as to improve the quality of thoracic surgical care. Future collaboration between the two databases and their integration could generate significant new knowledge. However, important discrepancies exist in terminology and definitions between the two databases. The objective of this collaboration between the ESTS and STS is to identify important differences between databases and harmonize terminology and definitions to facilitate future endeavors.

  13. Change of paradigm in thoracic radionecrosis management.

    PubMed

    Dast, S; Assaf, N; Dessena, L; Almousawi, H; Herlin, C; Berna, P; Sinna, R

    2016-06-01

    Classically, muscular or omental flaps are the gold standard in the management of thoracic defects following radionecrosis debridement. Their vascular supply and antibacterial property was supposed to enhance healing compared with cutaneous flaps. The evolution of reconstructive surgery allowed us to challenge this dogma. Therefore, we present five consecutive cases of thoracic radionecrosis reconstructed with cutaneous perforator flaps. In four patients, we performed a free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap and one patient had a thoracodorsal perforator (TDAP) flap. Median time healing was 22.6 days with satisfactory cutaneous covering and good aesthetic results. There were no flap necrosis, no donor site complications. We believe that perforator flaps are a new alternative, reliable and elegant option that questions the dogma of muscular flaps in the management of thoracic radionecrosis.

  14. National Quality Forum Metrics for Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Anthony; Burfeind, William R

    2017-08-01

    The National Quality Forum (NQF) is a multistakeholder, nonprofit, membership-based organization improving health care through preferential use of valid performance measures. NQF-endorsed measures are considered the gold standard for health care measurement in the United States. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons is the steward of the only six NQF-endorsed general thoracic surgery measures. These measures include one structure measure (participation in a national general thoracic surgery database), two process measures (recording of clinical stage and recording performance status before lung and esophageal resections), and three outcome measures (risk-adjusted morbidity and mortality after lung and esophageal resections and risk-adjusted length of stay greater than 14 days after lobectomy). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Thoracic Ectopia Cordis in an Ethiopian Neonate.

    PubMed

    Tadele, Henok; Chanie, Abeje

    2017-03-01

    Ectopia Cordis is defined as complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. It is a rare congenital defect with failure of fusion of the sternum with extra thoracic location of the heart. The estimated prevalence of this case is 5.5 to 7.9 per million live births. We had a case of a 16-hour-old male neonate weighing 2.9kg with externally visible, beating heart over the chest wall. Initial treatment included covering the heart with sterile-saline soaked dressing, starting systemic antibiotics and supportive care. A staged surgical approach to this defect with the initial aim of replacement of the heart to the thoracic cavity was opted. The neonate died twenty minutes after the surgical intervention due to cardiogenic shock despite adequate resuscitative measures. This case report underscores the missed opportunity of antenatal ultra-sonographic diagnosis and the challenge of Ectopia Cordis treatment in Ethiopia.

  16. 16 CFR 0.2 - Official address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Official address. The principal office of the Commission is at Washington, DC. All communications to the Commission should be addressed to the Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington,...

  17. 16 CFR 0.2 - Official address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Official address. The principal office of the Commission is at Washington, DC. All communications to the Commission should be addressed to the Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington,...

  18. Official portrait of astronaut Carl J. Meade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Official portrait of Carl J. Meade, United States Air Force (USAF) Colonel, member of Astronaut Class 11 (1984), and space shuttle mission specialist. Meade wears a launch and entry suit (LES) with the helmet displayed at his left.

  19. 22 CFR 41.27 - Official visas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... proceeding to or from a specific international conference of an official nature; (xi) Officers and employees... classes referred to or described in paragraphs (c)(1)(i) through (c)(1)(xi) inclusive of this section...

  20. 7 CFR 54.14 - Official certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) MEATS, PREPARED MEATS, AND MEAT PRODUCTS (GRADING, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) Regulations Service § 54.14 Official...

  1. 10 CFR 1017.14 - Designated officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., contractors, or other individuals granted routine access under § 1017.20 as Reviewing Officials. (3... of Information (see definition of the term “Authorizing or Denying Official” in § 1004.2). ...

  2. 10 CFR 1017.14 - Designated officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., contractors, or other individuals granted routine access under § 1017.20 as Reviewing Officials. (3... of Information (see definition of the term “Authorizing or Denying Official” in § 1004.2). ...

  3. Official portrait of astronaut Guy S. Gardner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Official portrait of Guy S. Gardner, United States Air Force Colonel, member of Astronaut Class 9 (1980), and space shuttle pilot. Gardner wears a launch and entry suit (LES) with the helmet displayed on his left.

  4. Official portrait of astronaut Robert C. Springer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Official portrait of astronaut Robert C. Springer, United Stated Marine Corps (USMC) Colonel, member of Astronaut Class 9 (1980), and mission specialist. Springer wears launch and entry suit (LES) while holding helmet.

  5. 43 CFR 4.836 - Official notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Special Procedural Rules Applicable to Practice and Procedure for Hearings, Decisions, and Administrative... the Interior-Effectuation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Hearing § 4.836 Official...

  6. 16 CFR 0.2 - Official address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Official address. The principal office of the Commission is at Washington, DC. All communications to the Commission should be addressed to the Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC...

  7. 5 CFR 1201.64 - Official notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., on his or her own motion or on the motion of a party, may take official notice of matters of common knowledge or matters that can be verified. The parties may be given an opportunity to object to the taking...

  8. 5 CFR 1201.64 - Official notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., on his or her own motion or on the motion of a party, may take official notice of matters of common knowledge or matters that can be verified. The parties may be given an opportunity to object to the taking...

  9. 5 CFR 1201.64 - Official notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., on his or her own motion or on the motion of a party, may take official notice of matters of common knowledge or matters that can be verified. The parties may be given an opportunity to object to the taking...

  10. 5 CFR 1201.64 - Official notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., on his or her own motion or on the motion of a party, may take official notice of matters of common knowledge or matters that can be verified. The parties may be given an opportunity to object to the taking...

  11. Official portrait of astronaut Linda M. Godwin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Official portrait of Linda M. Godwin, Ph.D., member of Astronaut Class 11 (1984), and space shuttle mission specialist. Godwin wears a navy blue flight suit with space shuttle model displayed on table in front of her.

  12. 7 CFR 15.131 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of testimony taken, together with any affidavits, exhibits, depositions, briefs, or memoranda of law... official reporter to the parties and to the public at rates not to exceed the maximum rates fixed by...

  13. 45 CFR 213.28 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... law filed therewith shall be filed with the Department. Transcripts of testimony in hearings may be obtained from the official reporter by the parties and the public at rates not to exceed the maximum...

  14. 36 CFR 1150.92 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... official transcripts of testimony, and any exhibits, briefs, or memoranda of law filed with them, shall be... the parties and the public at rates not to exceed the maximum rates fixed by the contract between...

  15. A Better Handoff for Code Officials

    SciTech Connect

    Conover, David R.; Yerkes, Sara

    2010-09-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program has partnered with ICC to release the new Building Energy Codes Resource Guide: Code Officials Edition. We created this binder of practical materials for a simple reason: code officials are busy learning and enforcing several codes at once for the diverse buildings across their jurisdictions. This doesn’t leave much time to search www.energycodes.gov, www.iccsafe.org, or the range of other helpful web-based resources for the latest energy codes tools, support, and information. So, we decided to bring the most relevant materials to code officials in a way that works best with their daily routine, and point to where they can find even more. Like a coach’s game plan, the Resource Guide is an "energy playbook" for code officials.

  16. 39 CFR 3002.3 - Official seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Commission. (b) Description. (1) On a gold color (yellow) pentagon device, the base-line formed as a “V... Commission” and the date “2006”, all in gold (yellow). (2) The official seal of the Postal...

  17. 39 CFR 3002.3 - Official seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Commission. (b) Description. (1) On a gold color (yellow) pentagon device, the base-line formed as a “V... Commission” and the date “2006”, all in gold (yellow). (2) The official seal of the Postal...

  18. 10 CFR 710.36 - Acting officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL General Criteria and Procedures for Determining Eligibility for Access to Classified Matter or Special Nuclear Material Miscellaneous § 710.36 Acting officials. Except for the...

  19. 10 CFR 710.36 - Acting officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL General Criteria and Procedures for Determining Eligibility for Access to Classified Matter or Special Nuclear Material Miscellaneous § 710.36 Acting officials. Except for the...

  20. MR imaging of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Derek G; Krishnam, Mayil; Saleh, Roya; Tomasian, Anderanik; Finn, J Paul

    2008-05-01

    MR imaging has been incorporated into the diagnostic algorithm for suspected thoracic aortic pathology, challenging CT and invasive catheter angiography as investigations of choice. Techniques, including spin echo, 3-D steady-state free precession, cardiac cine imaging, phase-contrast flow quantification, and high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography, are poised to trump other single competitive modalities. The proliferation of 3-tesla systems has advanced the performance of magnetic resonance, aided by parallel imaging techniques, multiarray surface coils, and powerful gradient coils. This article considers the current status of MR imaging in evaluation of the thoracic aorta, with reference to common clinical indications in clinical practice.

  1. Thoracic pain in a collegiate runner.

    PubMed

    Austin, G P; Benesky, W T

    2002-08-01

    This case study describes the process of examination, re-examination, and intervention for a collegiate runner with mechanical thoracic pain preventing athletic participation and limiting daily function. Unimpaired function fully returned in less than 3 weeks with biweekly sessions to re-establish normal and painfree thoracic mechanics via postural hygiene, exercise, mobilization, and manipulation. The outcome of this case study supports the original hypothesis that the pattern of impairments was in fact responsible for the functional limitations and disability in this athlete. At the time of publication the athlete was without functional limitations and had fully returned to competitive sprinting for the university track team.

  2. Long thoracic neuropathy from athletic activity.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J S; Leonard, J A

    1992-01-01

    Four cases of long thoracic mononeuropathy associated with sports participation are presented. Each patient developed shoulder pain or dysfunction after an acute event or vigorous activity, and demonstrated scapular winging consistent with serratus anterior weakness. The diagnosis was confirmed with electromyography in each case. It is suggested that the athletic activity caused a stretch injury to the long thoracic nerve. Conservative management, consisting of range of motion exercises for the shoulder and strengthening of the serratus anterior muscle, resulted in a favorable outcome in all patients.

  3. The renal disease of thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gruskin, A B; Baluarte, H J; Cote, M L; Elfenbein, I B

    1974-01-01

    In those children with thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy, a genetically determined disorder, who survive infancy, the development of renal disease may be life-threatening. This report will present data obtained in six patients from three families which deals with the renal abnormalities in thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy. Both functional and anatomic abnormalities are described. Abnormalities in solute transport in the proximal tubule may be the earliest sign of renal dysfunction in this syndrome. Early glomerular changes may be more important than previously recognized. Finally, the various phenotypic expressions of this disorder are considered.

  4. Needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery for reversal of thoracic sympathectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Randolph H.L.; Ng, Calvin S.H.; Wong, Jasper K.W.; Tsang, Susanna

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic sympathectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis. However, one major complication of such a procedure is compensatory truncal hyperhidrosis. We describe an extreme case of compensatory truncal hyperhidrosis and anhidrosis over the head and neck region which led to a heatstroke. Bilateral reoperative needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery was performed for the reversal of thoracic sympathectomy with an interposition intercostal nerve graft. The patient's truncal hyperhidrosis resolved gradually over 1 month following the reversal procedure. PMID:22186129

  5. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  6. Mayo Clinic: An Institutional History of General Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gillaspie, Erin A; Nichols, Francis C; Allen, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic was started in Rochester, MN after a 1883 tornado disaster. The Mayo brothers, William and Charles began thoracic surgical procedures early in their career. Dr. Samuel Robinson is recognized as the first thoracic surgeon at Mayo. He was followed by Drs. Harrington and Claret who became famous surgeons. Many other notable surgeons have help to build the thoracic surgical practice into what is today a world renown center of excellence in thoracic surgery.

  7. Thoracic epidural catheter placement using a paramedian approach with cephalad angulation in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Franci, Paolo; Leece, Elizabeth A; Corletto, Federico

    2012-10-01

    To describe a technique for insertion of a thoracic epidural catheter. Clinical report. Dogs (n = 3) undergoing thoracic wall resection and thoracotomy. A paramedian approach with cephalic angulation was used to place a 24-g epidural catheter in 3 dogs. Dogs 1 and 2 had left caudal thoracic wall resection and dog 3 had left thoracotomy. In dog 1, the epidural catheter was inserted at L2-L3 intervertebral space and the tip of the catheter advanced to the level of T13 vertebral body. In dog 2, the epidural catheter was inserted at T12-T13 intervertebral space and the tip of the catheter was advanced to the level of T8 vertebral body. In dog 3, the epidural catheter was inserted at T13-L1 intervertebral space and its tip advanced until reaching the vertebral body of T10. All dogs were administered a combination of bupivacaine and morphine through the epidural catheter to provide intra- and postoperative analgesia. The peridural space was identified and the tip of the catheter was positioned where intended in all dogs. Dog 1 developed transient Horner's syndrome and dog 3 required intraoperative fentanyl during the first part of the procedure. Paramedian approach with cephalad angulation is a suitable technique to place thoracic epidural catheters in dogs. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  8. Postmortem genetic testing should be recommended in sudden cardiac death cases due to thoracic aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Gago-Díaz, Marina; Ramos-Luis, Eva; Zoppis, Silvia; Zorio, Esther; Molina, Pilar; Braza-Boïls, Aitana; Giner, Juan; Sobrino, Beatriz; Amigo, Jorge; Blanco-Verea, Alejandro; Carracedo, Ángel; Brion, María

    2017-04-08

    Acute thoracic aortic dissections and ruptures, the main life-threatening complications of the corresponding aneurysms, are an important cause of sudden cardiac death. Despite the usefulness of the molecular diagnosis of these conditions in the clinical setting, the corresponding forensic field remains largely unexplored. The main goal of this study was to explore and validate a new massive parallel sequencing candidate gene​ assay as a diagnostic tool for acute thoracic aortic dissection autopsy cases. Massive parallel sequencing of 22 thoracic aortic disease candidate genes performed in 17 cases of thoracic aortic dissection using AmpliSeq and Ion Proton technologies. Genetic variants were filtered by location, type, and frequency at the Exome Aggregation Consortium and an internal database and further classified based on the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) recommendations published in 2015. All prioritized results were confirmed by traditional sequencing. From the total of 10 potentially pathogenic genetic variants identified in 7 out of the 17 initial samples, 2 of them were further classified as pathogenic, 2 as likely pathogenic, 1 as possibly benign, and the remaining 5 as variants of uncertain significance, reaching a molecular autopsy yield of 23%, approximately. This massive parallel sequencing candidate gene approach proved useful for the molecular autopsy of aortic dissection sudden cardiac death cases and should therefore be progressively incorporated into the forensic field, being especially beneficial for the anticipated diagnosis and risk stratification of any other family member at risk of developing the same condition.

  9. Management of thoracic trauma and chest wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Spackman, C J; Caywood, D D

    1987-03-01

    This article reviews common causes and types of thoracic trauma in the dog. A triage approach for the diagnosis and immediate treatment of thoracic trauma is presented. Reconstructive procedures of the thoracic wall, which may be necessary following trauma or surgical resection of diseased tissue, are described.

  10. Effect of a combined thoracic and backward lifting exercise on the thoracic kyphosis angle and intercostal muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] This study developed a combined thoracic and backward lifting exercise for thoracic kyphosis angle and intercostal muscle pain. [Subject and Methods] The subject was a 41-year-old man who complained of upper thoracic and intercostal pain. He performed the combined thoracic and backward lifting exercise for 15 days. [Results] The initial VAS score for the intercostal area was 4/10. The VAS score decreased to 1/10 after the thoracic exercise combined with backward lifting. The initial thoracic kyphosis angle was 38° and it decreased to 32° after the exercise period. [Conclusion] Therefore, backward lifting and thoracic extension is a good posture for activating the different layers of muscle that are attached to the ribs. The kyphosis angle is also reduced by providing sufficient resistance during the thoracic exercise.

  11. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Ronan, Grace; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M; Brindis, Ralph G; Kramer, Christopher M; Shaw, Leslee J; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Chen, Jersey; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Hundley, W Gregory; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Kligfield, Paul; Lockwood, Richard; Marine, Joseph Edward; McCully, Robert Benjamin; Messer, Joseph V; O'Gara, Patrick T; Shemin, Richard J; Wann, L Samuel; Wong, John B; Patel, Manesh R; Kramer, Christopher M; Bailey, Steven R; Brown, Alan S; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Lindsay, Bruce D; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Wann, L Samuel; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1-9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG

  12. Aortobronchial Fistula after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR) for Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Melvan, John Nicholas; DeLaRosa, Jacob; Vasquez, Julio C

    2017-03-07

    Continued enlargement of the aneurysm sac after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a known risk after endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. For this reason, periodic outpatient follow-up is required to identify situations that require repair. Here, we describe an aortobronchial fistula (ABF) in a patient lost to follow-up, that presented 3 years after an elective TEVAR done for a primary, descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Our patient arrived in extremis and suffered massive hemoptysis leading to her demise. Computed tomography (CT) angiogram near the time of her death demonstrated a bleeding ABF immediately distal to her previous TEVAR repair. Aortic aneurysmal disease remains life threatening even after repair. Improved endovascular techniques and devices have resulted in decreased need for reintervention. However, this case demonstrates the risk of thoracic aortic disease progression and highlights the importance of establishing consistent, long-term follow-up after TEVAR.

  13. Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgical treatment. Fracture-dislocations of the thoracic and lumbar spine are caused by very high-energy trauma. They can be extremely unstable injuries that often result in serious spinal cord or nerve damage. These injuries require stabilization through surgery. The ...

  14. Aesthetic breast augmentation and thoracic deformities.

    PubMed

    Wolter, T P; Lorenz, S; Neuhann-Lorenz, C

    2010-10-01

    To ensure the best results from aesthetic breast augmentation, preoperative evaluation and adequate patient information are essential. However, assessment of the underlying thoracic shape often is neglected. Patients with obvious deformities are aware of the problematic reconstruction, whereas patients with mild or moderate deformities often are not aware of their condition and fail to see that standard breast augmentation will lead to unsatisfying results. The authors reviewed their charts for patients with breast augmentation and mild to moderate thoracic deformities, then compiled the therapeutic possibilities and the outcome. Of the 548 patients who underwent breast augmentation, 7.1% (n = 39) exhibited low- or midgrade thoracic wall deformities. Almost none of the patients were aware of their deformity. The patients were augmented with silicone-filled, textured round implants. Placement and volume were adapted to the anatomic situation. A reoperation was not performed in any case, and both patient and physician satisfaction was high. The percentage of patients with thoracic deformity in this group was high compared with an overall incidence of less than 2%. This emphasizes the need for cautious physical examination and preoperative documentation. By individualized surgical planning and diligent implant selection, optimal results and patient satisfaction can be achieved.

  15. Thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tomoyuki; Urata, Teruo; Nemoto, Daisuke; Hitomi, Shigemi

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus, an organism considered as a periodontal pathogen but rarely recovered from extraoral specimens. The patient fully recovered through drainage of purulent pleural fluid and administration of antibiotics. The present case illustrates that C. rectus can be a cause of not only periodontal disease but also pulmonary infection.

  16. Thoracic empyema due to migrated gallstones.

    PubMed

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín

    2013-01-01

    Hepatobiliary conditions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of right pleural effusion. Here we present the illustrative images of thoracic empyema due to migrated gallstones in a woman who was treated for laparoscopic cholecystectomy one year before. The gallstones were obtained unexpectedly during a thoracentesis with aid of an Abrams needle. This rare complication is discussed under current literature review.

  17. Thoracic Endoscopic-Assisted Mini-Open Surgery for Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Compression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Shan; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yuan, Qiu-Ming; Liu, Yue; Yang, Qiang; Jiang, Hong-Feng; Wang, Dong-Bin; Ji, Ning; Ma, Xin-Long; Zhang, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation is a common cause of spinal cord compression, especially for the thoracic and thoracolumbar spinal cord, which has limited buffer space in the spinal canal. Spinal cord compression usually causes decreased sensation and paralysis of limbs below the level of compression, urinary and fecal incontinence, and/or urinary retention, which brings great suffering to the patients and usually requires surgical intervention. Thoracotomy or abdominothoracic surgery is usually performed for the thoracolumbar cord compression caused by hard intervertebral disc herniation. However, there is high risk of trauma and complications with this surgery. To reduce the surgical trauma and obtain good visibility, we designed athoracic endoscopic-assisted mini-open surgery for thoracic and thoracolumbar disc herniation, and performed this procedure on 10 patients who suffered from hard thoracic or thoracolumbar spinal cord compression. During the procedure, the thoracic endoscopy provided clear vision of the surgical field with a good light source. The compression could be fully exposed and completely removed, and no nerve root injury or spinal cord damage occurred. All patients achieved obvious recovery of neurological function after this procedure. This technique possesses the merits of minimal trauma, increased safety, and good clinical results. The aim of this study is to introduce this thoracic endoscopic-assisted mini-open surgery technique, and we believe that this technique will be a good choice for the thoracic and thoracolumbar cord compression caused by hard intervertebral disc herniation.

  18. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2–4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7–10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7–10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed – hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in

  19. Thoracic sympathectomy for upper extremity ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hoexum, Frank; Coveliers, Hans M; Lu, Joyce J; Jongkind, Vincent; Yeung, Kakkhee K; Wisselink, Willem

    2016-12-01

    Thoracic sympathectomy is performed in the management of a variety of disorders of the upper extremity. To evaluate the contemporary results of thoracic sympathectomy for upper extremity ischemia a systematic review of the literature was conducted. We performed a PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane search of the literature written in the English language from January 1975 to December 2015. All articles presenting original patient data regarding the effect of treatment on symptoms or on the healing of ulcers were eligible for inclusion. Individual analyses for Primary Raynaud's Disease (PRD) and Secondary Raynaud's Phenomenon (SRP) were performed. We included 6 prospective and 23 retrospective series with a total of 753 patients and 1026 affected limbs. Early beneficial effects of thoracic sympathectomy were noticed in 63-100% (median 94%) of all patients, in 73-100% (median 98%) of PRD patients and in 63-100% (median 94%) of SRP patients. The beneficial effect was noted to lessen over time. Long-term beneficial effects were reported in 13-100% (median 75%) of all patients, in 22-100% (median 58%) of PRD patients, and in 13-100% (median 79%) of SRD patients. Complete or improved ulcer healing was achieved in 33-100% and 25-67% respectively, of all patients. Thoracic sympathectomy can be beneficial in the treatment of upper extremity ischemia in select patients. Although the effect in patients with PRD will lessen over time, it may still reduce the severity of symptoms. In SRD, effects are more often long-lasting. In addition, thoracic sympathectomy may maximize tissue preservation or prevent amputation in cases of digital ulceration.

  20. Thoracic outlet syndromes and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Panegyres, P K; Moore, N; Gibson, R; Rushworth, G; Donaghy, M

    1993-08-01

    The thoracic outlet syndromes encompass the diverse clinical entities affecting the branchial plexus or subclavian artery including cervical ribs or bands. Thoracic outlet syndrome are often difficult to diagnose on existing clinical and electrophysiological criteria and new diagnostic methods are necessary. This study reports our experience with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brachial plexus in 20 patients with suspected thoracic outlet syndrome. The distribution of pain and sensory disturbance varied widely, weakness and wasting usually affected C8/T1 innervated muscles, and electrophysiology showed combinations of reduced sensory nerve action potentials from the fourth and fifth digits, and prolonged F-responses or tendon reflex latencies. The MRI study was interpreted blind. Deviation of the brachial plexus was recorded in 19 out of the 24 symptomatic sides (sensitivity 79%). Absence of distortion was correctly identified in 14 out of 16 asymptomatic sides (specificity 87.5%). The false positive rate was 9.5%. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated all seven cervical ribs visible on plain cervical spine radiographs. Magnetic resonance imaging also showed a band-like structure extending from the C7 transverse process in 25 out of 33 sides; similar structures were detected in three out of 18 sides in control subjects. These MRI bands often underlay the brachial plexus distortion observed in our patients. We also observed instances of plexus distortion by post-traumatic callus of the first rib, and by a hypertrophied serratus anterior muscle. If they did not demonstrate a cervical rib, plain cervical spine radiographs had no value in predicting brachial plexus distortion. We believe MRI to be of potential value in the diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome by: (i) demonstrating deviation or distortion of nerves or blood vessels; (ii) suggesting the presence of radiographically invisible bands; (iii) disclosing other causes of thoracic outlet syndrome