Science.gov

Sample records for ohio coals final

  1. Ohio Coal Testing and Development Facility - Construction and operation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, D.D.

    1996-03-01

    On June 14, 1987, the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) executed a grant agreement with ICF Kaiser Engineers (ICF Kaiser) for the planning and design (Phase I) of a Demonstration Advanced Technology Coal Preparation Facility. Subsequently, on December 1, 1990, OCDO executed a grant agreement with the American Electric Power Service Corporation (AEPSC) through its subsidiary, the Ohio Power Company, for the final design and construction (Phase II), testing and operation (Phase III), and marketing and future operation (Phase IV) of the facility. These phases were subcontracted to ICF Kaiser. AEPSC co-sponsored the project and donated a site at the Central Ohio Coal Company`s Unionville Coal Preparation Plant for locating the test plant. Central Ohio Coal supplied coal handling services, waste-product disposal, and water. The Ohio Power Company provided project oversight, electric power, and the test coals. The test results from the operation of the 30 tph advanced coal cleaning plant demonstrated that combining conventional physical coal cleaning with emerging advanced physical coal cleaning technologies was a cost-effective method to reduce sulfur emissions of Ohio coals. The following is a summary of the key findings of this project.

  2. Ohio Coal Research Consortium fifth year final reports summary, September 1, 1994--February 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    As part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research programs focused on: (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants, and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of eleven studies in these areas.

  3. Ohio Coal Research Consortium fourth year final summary report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    As a part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research program focused on (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of twelve studies in these areas.

  4. Removal of organic and inorganic sulfur from Ohio coal by combined physical and chemical process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Attia, Y.A.; Zeky, M.El.; Lei, W.W.; Bavarian, F.; Yu, S.

    1989-04-28

    This project consisted of three sections. In the first part, the physical cleaning of Ohio coal by selective flocculation of ultrafine slurry was considered. In the second part, the mild oxidation process for removal of pyritic and organic sulfur.was investigated. Finally, in-the third part, the combined effects of these processes were studied. The physical cleaning and desulfurization of Ohio coal was achieved using selective flocculation of ultrafine coal slurry in conjunction with froth flotation as flocs separation method. The finely disseminated pyrite particles in Ohio coals, in particular Pittsburgh No.8 seam, make it necessary to use ultrafine ({minus}500 mesh) grinding to liberate the pyrite particles. Experiments were performed to identify the ``optimum`` operating conditions for selective flocculation process. The results indicated that the use of a totally hydrophobic flocculant (FR-7A) yielded the lowest levels of mineral matters and total sulfur contents. The use of a selective dispersant (PAAX) increased the rejection of pyritic sulfur further. In addition, different methods of floc separation techniques were tested. It was found that froth flotation system was the most efficient method for separation of small coal flocs.

  5. Extraction of potential pollutants from Ohio coal by synergistic use of supercritical fluids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    1990-08-03

    A synergistic supercritical extraction process was developed and its feasibility demonstrated using a semi-batch extraction process unit. The process was found to be effective in selectively cleaning organic sulfur from Ohio coals. Optimal case involved a mixture of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 3}OH, and the removal of organic sulfur ranged from 35 to 55%. Combined with pyrite and mineral matter removal by gravity, the resulting coals would have 20--30% increased heating values and SO{sub 2} emissions would be down to 1.2--1.5 pounds per million Btu, thus meeting compliance requirements. Estimated cleaning cost including pyrite removal is $25 to 45 per ton. The most important cost factor is the operation at high pressures.

  6. Control of toxic metallic emissions formed during the combustion of Ohio coals. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, P.; Owens, T.M.; Wu, Chang-Yu

    1995-02-01

    The objective of the project was to characterize metallic emissions from representative coals and develop strategies for their control. Though metallic emissions from coal combustors have been extensively studied, more studies need to be performed to better characterize the interaction of various species which is required for the selection and design of sorbents for effective control of these emissions. Some coals are rich in sulfur, and utilities using these coals will have to use some form of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD). A technique for FGD is the use of calcium based sorbents, and the degree of metals capture of these sorbents under different conditions will be researched. The objective of the first year of the study was to understand the evolution of metallic aerosol size distributions and the capture characteristics of various sorbents. Also, the metallic emissions resulting from the combustion of two seams of Ohio coals were to be characterized. Studies on the evolution of the metallic aerosol size distributions have been completed and the use of silicon and calcium based sorbents for capture of lead species has been examined. Co-injection of metallic compounds along with organometallic silicon indicated a high degree of capture of lead in a certain temperature regime. Preliminary results with calcium based sorbents also indicate capture of metallic species. To gain a further understanding of the capture processes, in situ optical diagnostic studies were performed in collaboration with researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Spectroscopic studies (laser induced fluorescence coupled with particle scattering) were performed to help understand the mechanisms of metallic species capture.

  7. Northwest Ohio Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Kevin

    2015-03-04

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY When the Toledo Lucas County Port Authority (TLCPA) filed for the Department of Energy EECBG grant in late 2009, it was part of a strategic and Board backed objective to expand the organization’s economic development and financing programs into alternative energy and energy efficiency. This plan was filed with the knowledge and support of the areas key economic development agencies. The City of Toledo was also a key partner with the Mayor designating a committee to develop a Strategic Energy Policy for the City. This would later give rise to a Community Sustainability Strategic Plan for Toledo, Lucas County and the surrounding region with energy efficiency as a key pillar. When the TLCPA signed the grant documents with the DOE in June of 2010, the geographic area was severely distressed economically, in the early stages of a recovery from over a 30% drop in business activity and high unemployment. The TLCPA and its partners began identifying potential project areas well before the filing of the application, continuing to work diligently before the formal award and signing of the grant documents. Strong implementation and actions plans and business and financing models were developed and revised throughout the 3 year grant period with the long term goal of creating a sustainable program. The TLCPA and the City of Toledo demonstrated early leadership by forming the energy improvement district and evaluating buildings under their control including transportation infrastructure and logistics, government services buildings and buildings which housed several for profit and not for profit tenants while completing significant energy efficiency projects that created public awareness and confidence and solid examples of various technologies and energy savings. As was stated in the DOE Award Summary, the undertaking was focused as a commercial program delving into Alternative Energy Utility Districts; what are referred to in Ohio Statute as Energy Special

  8. Field study for disposal of solid wastes from Advanced Coal Processes: Ohio LIMB Site Assessment. Final report, April 1986--November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, A.; Coel, B.J.; Butler, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    New air pollution regulations will require cleaner, more efficient processes for converting coal to electricity, producing solid byproducts or wastes that differ from conventional pulverized-coal combustion ash. Large scale landfill test cells containing byproducts were built at 3 sites and are to be monitored over at least 3 years. This report presents results of a 3-y field test at an ash disposal site in northern Ohio; the field test used ash from a combined lime injection-multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit at the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant. The landfill test cells used LIMB ash wetted only to control dusting in one cell, and LIMB ash wetted to optimize compaction density in the other cell. Both test cells had adequate load-bearing strength for landfill stability but had continuing dimensional instability. Heaving and expansion did not affect the landfill stability but probably contributed to greater permeability to infiltrating water. Leachate migration occurred from the base, but effects on downgradient groundwater were limited to increased chloride concentration in one well. Compressive strength of landfilled ash was adequate to support equipment, although permeability was higher and strength was lower than anticipated. Average moisture content has increased to about 90% (dry weight basis). Significant water infiltration has occurred; the model suggests that as much as 20% of the incident rainfall will pass through and exit as leachate. However, impacts on shallow ground water is minimal. Results of this field study suggest that LIMB ash from combustion of moderate to high sulfur coals will perform acceptably if engineering controls are used to condition and compact the materials, reduce water influx to the landfill, and minimize leachate production. Handling of the ash did not pose serious problems during cell construction; steaming and heat buildup were moderate.

  9. Development of pilot plant for the production of vapor grown carbon fiber from Ohio coal. Final report, July 1997 to July 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Alig, Robert; Burton, David; Kennel, Elliot; Lake, Max

    2000-11-30

    The objective of this project was to develop, build, and operate a pilot-scale plant for the production of Pyrograf-III™ carbon nanofiber from Ohio high-sulfur coal. The fiber production scale-up program was conducted in three phases. In Phase I, the design parameters were developed using a single reactor system, for a process where sulfur bearing coal replaced hydrogen sulfide as the sulfur source. Optimization trials for different reactor tube dimensions were conducted and compared to theoretical predictions for temperature and flow conditions in the reactor as a function of the reactor dimensions. The process was also refined to optimize intrinsic and surface properties of the carbon fiber. Methods of separating fiber from coal ash and de-bulking the fiber were also developed and demonstrated. Under Phase I, a considerable body of knowledge was developed that yielded valuable data bearing on the design of fiber production and handling equipment. The Phase I effort was comprised of complementary programs sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Delphi Chassis Division of General Motors Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC). In Phase II, equipment was designed based upon the body of knowledge developed under Phase I. The pilot plant equipment was designed to have a production capacity up to 100,000 pounds of fiber per year based on a process (PR-11) that generates a fiber diameter of 200 nm and a model indicating energy throughput as the rate-limiting variable. As the program progressed, it become evident that the near-term customers required a fiber with a much smaller diameter, PR-24 grade, to achieve the required performance in the end product. In order to meet the needs of the initial customer base, modifications were made to the pilot plant reactors to produce the smaller diameter fiber. This change in the intrinsic properties of the fiber caused the production capacity to be cut to a

  10. Overview of surface-water quality in Ohio's coal regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westover, Susan; Eberle, Michael

    1987-01-01

    This report is designed to provide the nontechnical audience with some of the results of an 'Assessment of Water Quality in Streams Draining Coal-Producing Areas in Ohio,' by Christine L. Pfaff and others (published by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1981). The purpose of the assessment was to document the occurrence of certain chemical constituents in streams in Ohio's coal region and determine to what extent the presence of these constituents was related to mining. Ohio's most productive coal seams are associated with the Allegheny and Monongahela Formation of Pennsylvanian age. These coals were mined by underground methods very early in Ohio's history. Underground mining continues in the state today; however, surface mining now produces significantly more coal. Acid mine drainage from unreclaimed surface and underground mines has affected surface-water quality in Ohio for many years, and recently has led to establishment of reclamation programs by State and Federal agencies. In their assessment of Ohio's coal region, Pfaff and others sampled 150 sites in small watersheds underlain by the Allegheny and the Monogahela Formations. Each site represented only one of four land-use types (active-mine, unmined, abandoned-mine, or reclaimed). Statistical analysis of data from the unmined, abandoned-mine, and reclaimed sites showed that there were significant differences in pH, specific conductance, alkalinity, and concentrations of sulfate and aluminum among abandoned-mine and unmined sites. Reclaimed sites had average pH values and aluminum concentrations similar to those unmined sites. Average specific conductance and sulfate concentrations were about the same for reclaimed abandoned-mine sites, but were significantly lower at unmined sites; specific conductance and sulfate concentration, in fact, proved to be reliable indicators of basins that had been disturbed by mining. Alkalinity was significantly different for all three land uses, the highest values being found at

  11. Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L.

    1989-08-28

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  12. Hydrology of Area 7, Eastern Coal Province, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engelke, Morris J.; Roth, D.K.; ,

    1981-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey established 24 study areas in Eastern Appalachian Coal Province to appraise the hydrology and water resources from Alabama to Pennsylvania. Chemical, physical, biological, and streamflow data were collected from 138 synoptic sites in Area 7, eastern Ohio. The data are evaluated and presented in this report. Area 7 lies within the drainage basins of Muskingum Rivers and Duck and Willis Creeks in eastern Ohio. Walhounding, Tuscarawas, and Little Muskingum, and Muskingum Rivers and Wills and Duck Creeks are the major streams draining the study area. In Ohio, surface and subsurface coal mining has altered the environment. In areas where land has been reclaimed, the environmental stress expected to be temporary. Hydrologic problems related to coal mining are erosion and sedimentation which degrade water-quality. Based on available sediment data, suspended sediment concentration were highest in abandoned mine areas, followed by currently mined and reclaimed areas, and lowest in unmined areas. Low pH, high specific conductance, high concentrations of iron, sulfate and manganese, increased sediment yields, discoloration of streambeds, limited aquatic vegetation and animal life typify streams draining areas with abandoned mines. In abandoned mine areas, the specific conductance of water ranged from 800 to 2,300 micromhos; pH ranged from 2.8 to 5.8; dissolved-iron concentrations ranged from 1,000 to 85,000 micrograms per liter; dissolved-sulfate concentrations ranged from 14 to 1,200 milligrams per liter and dissolved-manganese concentration commonly exceeded 2,000 micrograms per liter. Red and yellow coloration on the streambeds were precipitates from the hydrolysis of iron, manganese, and sulfate minerals carried into the stream channel by increased sediment erosion from abandoned coal mines. Trace metal concentrations (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, selenium, and zinc) were generally low. Degradation of fish habitat

  13. Automated strip mine and reclamation mapping from ERTS. [Ohio coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettyjohn, W. A.; Rogers, R. H.; Reed, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    In response to the urgent need for a faster and more economical means of generating strip mine and reclamation maps, a study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of using ERTS computer compatible tape for automatic mapping. The procedure uses computer target spectral recognition techniques as a basis for classification. The area encompassed by this investigation includes five counties in eastern Ohio that comprise nearly 7,500 square kilometers (3,000 square miles). The counties have been disrupted by coal mining since the early 1800's, and strip mining has been practiced in all of them. The environmental effects of strip mining are also discussed.

  14. Solar heating system installed at Troy, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System located at Troy-Miami County Public Library, Troy, Ohio. The completed system is composed of tree basic subsystems: the collector system consisting of 3264 square feet of Owens Illinois evacuated glass tube collectors; the storage system which includes a 5000-gallon insulated steel tank; and the distribution and control system which includes piping, pumping and control logic for the efficient and safe operation of the entire system. This solar heating system was installed in an existing facility and is, therefore, a retrofit system. This report includes extracts from the site files, specifications, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  15. The Ohio Schools Pest Management Survey: A Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    In 2001, the Environmental Studies Senior Capstone Seminar class at Denison University helped the state of Ohio work to prevent harmful pesticide use in schools. In cooperation with Ohio State University's Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Schools Program, Denison conducted a statewide survey of school districts to determine current pest…

  16. Characterization of selected Ohio coals to predict their conversion behavior relative to 104 North American Coals. [Factors correlating with liquefaction behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Whitacre, T. P.; Hunt, T. J.; Kneller, W. A.

    1982-02-01

    Twenty-six coal samples from Ohio were collected as washed and seam samples, and lithobodies within the seams. Characterization of these samples included determination of % maceral, % anti R/sub max/, LTA, chlorine content and proximate/ultimate and qualitative mineral analyses. These data were compared to data from a similar project by Yarzab, R.F., et al., 1980 completed at Pennsylvania State University using tetralin as the hydrogen donor solvent. The characteristics of these coals were correlated with liquefaction conversion and other data accrued on 104 North American coals by statistical analyses. Utilizing percent carbon, sulfur, volatile matter, reflectance, vitrinite and total reactive macerals, Q-mode cluster analysis demonstrated that Ohio coals are more similar to the coals of the Interior province than to those of the Appalachian province. Linear multiple regression analysis for the 104 North American coals provided a prediction equation for conversion (R = .96). The predicted conversion values for the samples range from 58.8 to 79.6%, with the Lower Kittanning (No. 5) and the Middle Kittanning (No. 6) coal seams showing the highest predicted percent conversion (respectively, 73.4 and 72.2%). The moderately low FSI values for the No. 5 and No. 6 coals (respectively, 2.5 and 3) and their moderately high alkaline earth content (respectively, 0.69 and 0.74%) suggest that these coals possess the best overall properties for conversion. Stepwise regression has indicated that the most important coal characteristics affecting conversion are, in decreasing order of importance: % volatile matter, % vitrinite and % total sulfur. Conversion processes can be expected to produce higher yields with Ohio coals due to the presence of such mineral catalysts as pyrite and kaolinite. It is believed that the presence of these disposable catalysts increases the marketability of Ohio coals.

  17. Project Emerge, Dayton, Ohio. 1972-73 Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayton City School District, OH.

    Project Emerge, funded under Title VIII of the 1965 Elementary Secondary Education Act, is located in the Model Cities Area, a black-inhabited west side section of Dayton, Ohio. The target school student population is 2,300 of which 20 percent come from families with low incomes. Project Emerge's major objectives are to reduce the dropout rate in…

  18. Correlation chart of Pennsylvanian rocks in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania showing approximate position of coal beds, coal zones, and key stratigraphic units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Trippi, Michael H.; Slucher, Ernie R.

    2010-01-01

    This report contains a simplified provisional correlation chart that was compiled from both published and unpublished data in order to fill a need to visualize the currently accepted stratigraphic relations between Appalachian basin formations, coal beds and coal zones, and key stratigraphic units in the northern, central, and southern Appalachian basin coal regions of Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Appalachian basin coal beds and coal zones were deposited in a variety of geologic settings throughout the Lower, Middle, and Upper Pennsylvanian and Pennsylvanian formations were defined on the presence or absence of economic coal beds and coarse-grained sandstones that often are local or regionally discontinuous. The correlation chart illustrates how stratigraphic units (especially coal beds and coal zones) and their boundaries can differ between States and regions.

  19. From in situ coal to the final coal product: A case study of the Danville Coal Member (Indiana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Padgett, P.L.

    1999-01-01

    A surface coal mine operation and preparation plant in southwestern Indiana was sampled to examine variations in coal quality and coal petrography parameters for the Danville Coal Member of the Dugger Formation (Pennsylvanian-Desmoinesian, Westphalian D). Representative samples from in situ coal, preparation plant feeds, and a final coal product were collected in order to compare coal quality, coal petrography, trace element concentrations, and ash chemistry of the coal to those of the product. Coal quality parameters of the in situ samples and various feeds, coarse refuse, and final product were variable. The quality of the final coal product was best predicted by the coal quality of the clean coal feed (from the middle portions of the seam). Some trace element contents, especially lead and arsenic, varied between the coal feeds and the product. Lead contents increased in the feeds and product compared to the channel sample of the raw coal, possibly due to contamination in the handling process.A surface coal mine operation and preparation plant in southwestern Indiana was sampled to examine variations in coal quality and coal petrography parameters for the Danville Coal Member of the Dugger Formation (Pennsylvanian-Desmoinesian, Westphalian D). Representative samples from in situ coal, preparation plant feeds, and a final coal product were collected in order to compare coal quality, coal petrography, trace element concentrations, and ash chemistry of the coal to those of the product. Coal quality parameters of the in situ samples and various feeds, coarse refuse, and final product were variable. The quality of the final coal product was best predicted by the coal quality of the clean coal feed (from the middle portions of the seam). Some trace element contents, especially lead and arsenic, varied between the coal feeds and the product. Lead contents increased in the feeds and product compared to the channel sample of the raw coal, possibly due to contamination in

  20. Hydrology of area 8, eastern Coal Province, West Virginia and Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friel, E.A.; Ehlke, T.A.; Hobba, W.A.; Ward, S.M.; Schultz, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The hydrology of Area 8 in the Ohio River basin in northwestern West Virginia and southeastern Ohio, is influenced by geology and geologic structure. Rocks underlying the area consist of alternating beds of sandstone, siltstone, shale, limestone, and mudstone. Minable coal is contained within the Pennsylvania and Permian rocks. Coal production in 1980 totaled 6.7 million tons from underground mines and one million tons from surface mines. There is a wide range of soil types (29 soil associations) in five land-resource areas. Precipitation averages about 41 inches annually and is greatest at higher altitudes along the eastern boundary of the area. Average annual runoff ranges from 13 to 29 inches per year. The principal land uses are forest and agriculture. Estimated water use during 1980 was 1,170 million gallons per day. Surface-water quality ranges from excellent to poor. The highest iron, manganese and sulfate concentrations were present in mined areas. Well yields range from less than 1 to 350 gallons per minute. Groundwater from the Mississippian rocks contain lesser amounts of dissolved solids than water from the Lower Pennsylvanian rocks. Water high in chloride content is present in some valley areas. (USGS)

  1. Gate road development at Southern Ohio Coal Company-Meigs Division

    SciTech Connect

    Kidder, N.L.; Latham, J.W. III

    1996-12-31

    Southern Ohio Coal Company`s (SOCCo) Meigs Division, a part of American Electric Power`s Fuel Supply Division, is located in the southeastern Ohio counties of Meigs and Vinton, and consists of two large underground mines and a central coal preparation plant. The division began mining the 54-inch Clarion 4A seam in the early 1970`s, with three underground mines, which first used conventional mining, but changed to continuous mining after only a few years. Longwall mining began in 1978 at the Meigs No. 2 Mine. In 1989, Meigs No. 1 and Raccoon No. 3 Mines were interconnected underground, with the combined mine being named Meigs No. 31. A longwall was installed in Meigs No. 31 in September 1989. The Meigs Division operated three longwalls until 1993, but then reduced to two longwalls (one at each mine) and five continuous miner sections, which are used solely to develop main entries and gateroads for the longwalls. Longwall panel size has steadily increased through the years, growing from the initial 500 ft. wide by 5000 ft. long panels to the present panels which range from 900 to 1100 ft. wide by 10,000 to 13,000 ft. long.

  2. Statistical relationship between pyrite grain size distribution and pyritic sulfur reduction in Ohio coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazumdar, M.; Carlton, R.W.; Irdi, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical relationship between the pyrite particle size distribution and the potential amount of pyritic sulfur reduction achieved by specific-gravity-based separation. This relationship is obtained from data on 26 Ohio coal samples crushed to 14 ?? 28 mesh. In this paper a prediction equation is developed that considers the complete statistical distribution of all the pyrite particle sizes in the coal sample. Assuming that pyrite particles occurring in coal have a lognormal distribution, the information about the particle size distribution can be encapsulated in terms of two parameters only, the mean and the standard deviation of the logarithms of the grain diameters. When the pyritic sulfur reductions of the 26 coal samples are related to these two parameters, a very satisfactory regression equation (R2 = 0.91) results. This equation shows that information on both these parameters is needed for an accurate prediction of potential sulfur reduction, and that the mean and the standard deviation interact negatively insofar as their influence on pyritic sulfur reduction is concerned. ?? 1988.

  3. Determining the Heat Exchange Capacity of Underground Coal Mines in Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. J.; Lopez, D. A.; Leftwich, T. E.; Wolfe, M. E.; Angle, M. P.; Fugitt, F. L.

    2013-12-01

    Conventionally, Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHP) exploit either saturated bedrock/soils or large surface water bodies as the heat source/sink for the heating and cooling systems. In areas with flooded mines or large subsurface water bodies, it is possible to utilize the water within the voids as the heat source/sink in GSHPs. Utilizing the water within subsurface voids a heat exchanger instead of the traditional saturated bedrock/soils has the potential to be more efficient in heating and cooling applications. The water within the void space is a better thermal conductor than bedrock and soils. Additionally, it is possible that, in a saturated void the heat can be carried away from the exchange site at a greater rate, improving the potential for thermal exchange. This study is focused on characterizing the potential overall heat exchange capacity for flooded mine sites within Ohio. To achieve the overall potential exchange capacity, possible maximum and minimum mine water residence times, effective mine volumes, groundwater recharge rates, maximum and minimum possible linear groundwater velocity, groundwater flow direction, and average ambient mine temperatures were calculated using GIS software and groundwater recharge data from the United States Geological Survey, and characteristics of physical parameters for the mines from the Ohio Geological Survey. The potential linear mine water velocities were calculated by creating a theoretical cross sectional area in the direction of estimated groundwater flow with a respective length of the mine in the direction of groundwater flow and width of the coal bed thickness. It was assumed that all of water entering the mine void exited the through the cross sectional area. By dividing the volume of water entering the mine per year by the cross sectional area, the linear groundwater velocities were estimated. By using the specific heat of water at the estimated temperatures and the volumes of water within the mines, possible

  4. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION--A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT, PHASE II: ELEMENT MODES OF OCCURRENCE FOR THE OHIO 5/6/7, WYODAK AND NORTH DAKOTA COAL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Allan Kolker; Stanley J. Mroczkowski; Curtis A. Palmer; Kristen O. Dennen; Robert B. Finkelman; John H. Bullock Jr.

    2002-05-30

    This study reports on the second phase (Phase II) of USGS research activities in support of DOE contract DE-AC22-95PC95101 ''Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion--A Comprehensive Assessment'', funded under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI22-95PC95145. The purpose of the study was to provide a quantitative and semi-quantitative characterization of the modes of occurrence of trace elements in coal samples investigated under Phase II, including (1) Ohio 5/6/7, an Ohio bituminous coal sample blended from the No.5, No.6, and No.7 beds; (2) North Dakota, a lignite sample from the Falkirk Mine, Underwood, ND, and (3) Wyodak, a sub-bituminous coal sample from the Cordero Mine, Gillette, WY. Samples from these coal beds were selected for their range in rank and commercial applicability. Results of this research provide basic information on the distribution of elements in Phase II coal samples, information needed for development of a commercial predictive model for trace-element behavior during coal combustion.

  5. Landslide remediation on Ohio State Route 83 using clean coal combustion by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Payette, R.; Chen, X.Y.; Wolfe, W.; Beeghly, J.

    1995-12-31

    In the present work, a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product was used to reconstruct the failed portion of a highway embankment. The construction process and the stability of the repaired embankment are examined. State Route 83 in Cumberland, Ohio has been damaged by a slow moving slide which has forced the Ohio Department of Transportation to repair the roadway several times. In the most recent repair FGD by-products obtained from American Electric Power`s Tidd PFBC plant were used to construct a wall through the failure plane to prevent further slippage. In order to evaluate the utility of using coal combustion by-products in this type of highway project the site was divided into three test sections. In the first repair section, natural soil removed form the slide area was recompacted and replaced according to standard ODOT construction practices. In the second section the natural soil was field mixed with the Tidd PFBC ash in approximately equal proportions. The third section was all Tidd ash. The three test sections were capped by a layer of compacted Tidd ash or crushed stone to provide a wearing surface to allow ODOT to open the roadway before applying a permanent asphalt surface. Measurement of slope movement as well as water levels and quality have begun at the site in order to evaluate long term project performance. The completion of this project should lead to increased acceptance of FGD materials in construction projects. Monetary savings will be realized in avoiding some of the disposal costs for the waste, as well as in the reduced reliance on alternative engineering materials.

  6. A statistical approach to evaluate the relation of coal mining, land reclamation, and surface-water quality in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hren, Janet; Wilson, K.S.; Helsel, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    Base-flow data from 779 sites in Ohio 's coal region were analyzed statistically to relate land use to selected water-quality characteristics. Sites were classified into five categories: unmined (100 percent unmined land), abandoned (50 percent or more abandoned surface mines), reclaimed (50 percent or more reclaimed surface mines), deep-mined (50 percent or more underground mines), and mixed (all others). Specific conductance , pH, alkalinity, acidity, sulfate, dissolved iron, total iron, and total manganese in streams draining basins in the coal region were the eight characteristics selected for analysis. (USGS)

  7. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): New Lyme, Ashtabula County, Ohio, September 1985. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-27

    The New Lyme Landfill is located near State Route 11 on Dodgeville Road in Ashtabula County, approximately 20 miles south of the City of Ashtabula, Ohio. The landfill occupies about 40 acres of a 100-acre tract. Operations began at the site in 1969, and were initially managed by two farmers. In 1971, the landfill was licensed by the State of Ohio and operations were taken over by a licensed landfill operator. According to documentation, the New Lyme Landfill received household, industrial, commercial, and institutional wastes and construction and demolition debris. However, numerous violations of the license occurred, including: open dumping; improper spreading and compacting of wastes; no State approval for disposal of certain industrial wastes; and excavation of trenches into the shale bedrock. In August 1978, the landfill was closed by the Ashtabula County Health Department. Documents indicate that wastes at the New Lyme Landfill site included: coal tar distillates, asbestos, coal tar, resins and resin tar, paint sludge, oils, paint lacquer thinner, peroxide, corrosive liquids, acetone, xylene, toluene, kerosene, naptha, benzene, linseed oil, mineral oil, fuel oil, chlorinated solvents, 2,4-D, and laboratory chemicals. The selected remedial action is included.

  8. Origin of epigenetic calcite in coal from Antarctica and Ohio based on isotope compositions of oxygen, carbon and strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faure, G.; Botoman, G.

    1984-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of oxygen, carbon and strontium of calcite cleats in coal seams of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and Tuscarawas County, Ohio, contain a record of the conditions a the time of their formation. The Antarctic calcites (?? 18O(SMOW) = +9.14 to +11.82%0) were deposited from waters enriched in 16O whose isotopic composition was consistent with that of meteoric precipitation at low temperature and high latitude. The carbon of the calcite cleats (?? 13C(PDB) = -15.6 to -16.9%0) was derived in part from the coal (?? 13C(PDB) = -23.5 to -26.7%0) as carbon dioxide and by oxidation of methane or other hydrocarbon gases. The strontium ( 87Sr 86Sr = 0.71318-0.72392) originated primarily from altered feldspar grains in the sandstones of the Beacon Supergroup. Calcite cleats in the Kittaning No. 6 coal seam of Ohio (?? 18O(SMOW) = +26.04 to +27.79%0) were deposited from waters that had previously exchanged oxygen, possibly with marine carbonate at depth. The carbon (?? 13C(PDB) = 0.9 to +2.4%0) is enriched in 13C even though that cleats were deposited in coal that is highly enriched in 12C and apparently originated from marine carbonates. Strontium in the cleats ( Sr 87 0.71182-0.71260) is not of marine origin but contains varying amounts of radiogenic 87Sr presumably derived from detrital Rb-bearing minerals in the adjacent sedimentary rocks. The results of this study suggest that calcite cleats in coal of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, were deposited after the start of glaciation in Cenozoic time and that those in Ohio precipitated from formation waters derived from the underlying marine carbonate rocks, probably in the recent geologic past. ?? 1984.

  9. Classification of stream basins in southeastern Ohio according to extent of surface coal mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childress, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Water-quality data were collected from streams grenadine 35 basins in the southeaster-Ohio coal region to evaluate and categorize the effect of surface coal mining on stream quality. The study area is underlain by rocks of Pennsylvanian age, the most important coal-producing formations of which are the Allegheny and Monogahela Formations. The study area contains 276 data-collection sites, each of which was sampled four times over a 3-year period. Water and bed-material samples were collected. Each site was classified as 'abandoned,' reclaimed,' unmined,' or mixed,' depending on the proportion of the drainage basin disturbed by mining, and if mined, on the present condition of the mine. Of the 130 sites in the Monogahela Formation, 18 percent were classified as abandoned, 2 percent as reclaimed, 10 percent as unmined, and 70 percent as mixed. Of the 146 sites in the Allegheny Formation, 14 percent were classified as abandoned, 11 percent as unmined, and 75 percent as mixed. Streams draining the carbonate-bearing Monogahela Formation have a significantly greater buffering capacity than streams draining the Allegheny Formation. THere are significant differences in specific conductance; pH; alkalinity; acidity; hardness; total and dissolve manganese, and aluminum; dissolved nickel, zinc, and sulfate; and dissolved solids among mining-disturbance types in the Allegheny Formation. However, in stream draining the Monogahela Formation, only hardness, sulfur, dissolved solids, and dissolved manganese are significantly different among mining-disturbance types. Discriminant-function analysis of water-quality data was used to classify each 'mixed' site into one of four categories: Abandoned, reclaimed, unmined, or uncertain. In addition, observations in each of the first three categories were classified as strongly, moderately, or weakly characteristic of that category. The discriminant function was based on specific conductance, pH, acidity, dissolved sulfate, dissolved

  10. Pelletization of fine coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1995-12-31

    Coal is one of the most abundant energy resources in the US with nearly 800 million tons of it being mined annually. Process and environmental demands for low-ash, low-sulfur coals and economic constraints for high productivity are leading the coal industry to use such modern mining methods as longwall mining and such newer coal processing techniques as froth flotation, oil agglomeration, chemical cleaning and synthetic fuel production. All these processes are faced with one common problem area--fine coals. Dealing effectively with these fine coals during handling, storage, transportation, and/or processing continues to be a challenge facing the industry. Agglomeration by the unit operation of pelletization consists of tumbling moist fines in drums or discs. Past experimental work and limited commercial practice have shown that pelletization can alleviate the problems associated with fine coals. However, it was recognized that there exists a serious need for delineating the fundamental principles of fine coal pelletization. Accordingly, a research program has been carried involving four specific topics: (i) experimental investigation of coal pelletization kinetics, (ii) understanding the surface principles of coal pelletization, (iii) modeling of coal pelletization processes, and (iv) simulation of fine coal pelletization circuits. This report summarizes the major findings and provides relevant details of the research effort.

  11. Coal Manpower Projections: 1980. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clague, Ewan

    The National Petroleum Council has projected a 1980 bituminous coal production of 910 million tons. On that basis, the study estimates the manpower which will be required to produce that volume of coal. On the assumption of a productivity increase of two percent per year from 1974 onwards, the 1980 coal output will require a work force of…

  12. LEAP: Ohio's Welfare Initiative To Improve School Attendance among Teenage Parents. Ohio's Learning, Earning, and Parenting Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bos, Johannes M.; Fellerath, Veronica

    Ohio's Learning, Earning, and Parenting Program (LEAP) provides all teen parents who receive welfare with a substantial financial incentive to attend school. This is the fifth and annual report from a large-scale evaluation of the program, based on a study of 4,151 teenagers who were randomly assigned to either a program group or a control group.…

  13. Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the bituminous coal resources of the United States, identifies those resources which are potentially amenable to Underground Coal Gasification (UCG), identifies products and markets in the vicinity of selected target areas, identifies UCG concepts, describes the state of the art of UCG in bituminous coal, and presents three R and D programs for development of the technology to the point of commercial viability. Of the 670 billion tons of bituminous coal remaining in-place as identified by the National Coal Data System, 32.2 billion tons or 4.8% of the total are potentially amenable to UCG technology. The identified amenable resource was located in ten states: Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Kentucky, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia, and West Virginia. The principal criteria which eliminated 87.3% of the resource was the minimum thickness (42 inches). Three R and D programs were developed using three different concepts at two different sites. Open Borehole, Hydraulic Fracture, and Electrolinking concepts were developed. The total program costs for each concept were not significantly different. The study concludes that much of the historical information based on UCG in bituminous coals is not usable due to the poor siting of the early field tests and a lack of adequate diagnostic equipment. This information gap requires that much of the early work be redone in view of the much improved understanding of the role of geology and hydrology in the process and the recent development of analytical tools and methods.

  14. A drowned lycopsid forest above the Mahoning coal (Conemaugh Group, Upper Pennsylvanian) in eastern Ohio, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiMichele, W.A.; Eble, C.F.; Chaney, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    Over 800 mud-filled casts of upright lycopsid tree stumps have been documented immediately above the Mahoning coal in an active underground mine located in northwestern Jefferson County, Ohio. The coal body originated as a pod-shaped peat body of ??? 60 km2. Trees are rooted at several levels within a thin (15-40 cm) bone coal directly above the banded coal; they extend upward up to 15 cm into overlying, flat-bedded, carbonaceous mudstones that coarsen up. From a maximum basal diameter of 1.2 m, stumps taper upward to diameters no less than 0.3 m. Within single-entry transects, < 6 m wide that total 2585 m in length, stumps are randomly distributed. The trees are identified as lepidodendrids on the basis of gross morphology, external stem patterns, and attached stigmarian root systems, and provisionally as Lepidophloios or Lepidodendron by associated palynology of the enclosing matrix. Palynological analyses of incremental seam samples indicate an initial dominance of lycopsid spores with lepidodendracean affinities (Lycospora granulata from Lepidophloios hallii), replaced upwards by tree-fern spores, with a reoccurrence of lepidodendracean spores in the upper benches; spores of Sigillaria (Crassispora) are abundant only at the base of the coal. Petrographic analyses indicate a parallel trend from vitrinite-rich to inertinite- and liptinite-rich upward in the coal body. All data indicate that the peat represented by the Mahoning coal was drowned slowly. During the earliest stages of inundation, a lycopsid forest was re-established, only to be subsequently drowned.

  15. Geologic setting and water quality of selected basins in the active coal-mining areas of Ohio, 1987-88

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedam, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents hydrologic data from selected drainage basins in the active coal-mining areas of Ohio from July 1987 through October 1988. The study area is mostly within the unglaciated part of eastern Ohio along the western edge of the Appalachian Plateaus physiographic province. The 1987-88 work is the second phase of a 7-year study to assess baseline water quality in Ohio's coal region. The data collection network consisted of 41 long-term surface-water sites in 21 basins. The sites were measured and sampled twice yearly at low flow. In addition, six individual basins (three each year) selected for a more detailed representation of surface-water and ground-water quality. In 1987, the Sandy Creek, Middle Tuscarawas River and Sugar Creek, and Lower Tuscarawas River basins were chosen. In 1988, the Short and Wheeling Creeks, Upper Wills Creek, and Upper Raccoon Creek basins were chosen. Because of their proximity to the glaciated region and outwash drainage, the basins studied intensively in 1987 contain more shallow productive aquifers than do the basins studied in detail for 1988, in which shallow ground-water sources are very localized. Chemical analyses for 202 surface-water and 24 ground-water samples are presented. For field measurements made at surface-water sites, the specific conductance ranged from 295 to 3150 ? S/cm (microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius). For pH, the range was 2.8 to 8.6. Alkalinity ranged from 5 to 305 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as CaCO3.

  16. Biological upgrading of coal liquids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    A large number of bacterial enrichments have been developed for their ability to utilize nitrogen and sulfur in coal liquids and the model compound naphtha. These bacteria include the original aerobic bacteria isolated from natural sources which utilize heteroatom compounds in the presence of rich media, aerobic nitrogen-utilizing bacteria and denitrifying bacteria. The most promising isolates include Mix M, a mixture of aerobic bacteria; ER15, a pyridine-utilizing isolate; ERI6, an aniline-utilizing isolate and a sewage sludge isolate. Culture optimization experiments have led to these bacteria being able to remove up to 40 percent of the sulfur and nitrogen in naphtha and coal liquids in batch culture. Continuous culture experiments showed that the coal liquid is too toxic to the bacteria to be fed without dilution or extraction. Thus either semi-batch operation must be employed with continuous gas sparging into a batch of liquid, or acid extracted coal liquid must be employed in continuous reactor studies with continuous liquid flow. Isolate EN-1, a chemical waste isolate, removed 27 percent of the sulfur and 19 percent of the nitrogen in fed batch experiments. Isolate ERI5 removed 28 percent of the nitrogen in coal liquid in 10 days in fed batch culture. The sewage sludge isolate removed 22.5 percent of the sulfur and 6.5 percent of the nitrogen from extracted coal liquid in continuous culture, and Mix M removed 17.5 percent of the nitrogen from medium containing extracted coal liquid. An economic evaluation has been prepared for the removal of nitrogen heteroatom compounds from Wilsonville coal liquid using acid extraction followed by fermentation. Similar technology can be developed for sulfur removal. The evaluation indicates that the nitrogen heteroatom compounds can be removed for $0.09/lb of coal liquid treated.

  17. Advanced coal liquefaction research: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, W.; McIlvried, H.G. III

    1988-07-01

    This study had two objectives: (1) To enhance the fundamental understanding of observed differences in the short contact time, donor solvent liquefaction of bituminous and subbituminous coals. (2) To determine if physical refining of subbituminous coals could be used to give a better feedstock for the first stage of two-stage liquefaction processes. Liquefaction studies using microautoclaves were carried out. Results are discussed. 11 refs., 25 figs., 29 tabs.

  18. Coal combustion aerothermochemistry research. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, A.B.; Gat, N.; Denison, M.R.; Cohen, L.M.

    1980-12-15

    On the basis of extensive aerothermochemistry analyses, laboratory investigations, and combustor tests, significant headway has been made toward improving the understanding of combustion phenomena and scaling of high swirl pulverized coal combustors. A special attempt has been made to address the gap between scientific data available on combustion and hardware design and scaling needs. Both experimental and theoretical investigations were conducted to improve the predictive capability of combustor scaling laws. The scaling laws derived apply to volume and wall burning of pulverized coal in a slagging high-swirl combustor. They incorporate the findings of this investigation as follows: laser pyrolysis of coal at 10/sup 6/ K/sec and 2500K; effect of coal particle shape on aerodynamic drag and combustion; effect of swirl on heat transfer; coal burnout and slag capture for 20 MW/sub T/ combustor tests for fine and coarse coals; burning particle trajectories and slag capture; particle size and aerodynamic size; volatilization extent and burnout fraction; and preheat level. As a result of this work, the following has been gained: an increased understanding of basic burning mechanisms in high-swirl combustors and an improved model for predicting combustor performance which is intended to impact hardware design and scaling in the near term.

  19. THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT - PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DEEP SALINE RESERVOIRS AND COAL SEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Mudd; Howard Johnson; Charles Christopher; T.S. Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.

    2003-08-01

    This report describes the geologic setting for the Deep Saline Reservoirs and Coal Seams in the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project area. The object of the current project is to site and design a CO{sub 2} injection facility. A location near New Haven, WV, has been selected for the project. To assess geologic storage reservoirs at the site, regional and site-specific geology were reviewed. Geologic reports, deep well logs, hydraulic tests, and geologic maps were reviewed for the area. Only one well within 25 miles of the site penetrates the deeper sedimentary rocks, so there is a large amount of uncertainty regarding the deep geology at the site. New Haven is located along the Ohio River on the border of West Virginia and Ohio. Topography in the area is flat in the river valley but rugged away from the Ohio River floodplain. The Ohio River Valley incises 50-100 ft into bedrock in the area. The area of interest lies within the Appalachian Plateau, on the western edge of the Appalachian Mountain chain. Within the Appalachian Basin, sedimentary rocks are 3,000 to 20,000 ft deep and slope toward the southeast. The rock formations consist of alternating layers of shale, limestone, dolomite, and sandstone overlying dense metamorphic continental shield rocks. The Rome Trough is the major structural feature in the area, and there may be some faults associated with the trough in the Ohio-West Virginia Hinge Zone. The area has a low earthquake hazard with few historical earthquakes. Target injection reservoirs include the basal sandstone/Lower Maryville and the Rose Run Sandstone. The basal sandstone is an informal name for sandstones that overlie metamorphic shield rock. Regional geology indicates that the unit is at a depth of approximately 9,100 ft below the surface at the project site and associated with the Maryville Formation. Overall thickness appears to be 50-100 ft. The Rose Run Sandstone is another potential reservoir. The unit is located approximately 1

  20. Effects of surface coal-mine reclamation on stream quality in a small watershed near Nelsonville, southeastern Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hindall, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    Abandoned surface coal mines in southeastern Ohio have caused degradation of the area's water resources. A study began in 1981 to determine the effects of abandoned-mine reclamation on water quality in the 'Yost tract' near Nelsonville, Ohio. Data on streamflow, water quality, and sedimentation were collected in Yost Run before, during, and after reclamation of the Yost tract. Results of the study indicate that there has been very little change in the chemical quality of Yost Run 10 months after reclamation; pH remains low, about 3.2-4.1, whereas specific conductance continues to be high, about 1,000 to 2,600 micromhos per centimeter (at 25?) Concentrations of sulfate and dissolved iron also show no appreciable change, remaining about 550 to 1,800 milligrams per liter and 1,300 to 17,000 micrograms per liter, respectively. The suspended-sediment yield for Yost Run is 2,830 tons per square mile per year. The results of the study reflect water-quality conditions for a 10-month period after reclamation, but do not necessarily indicate that the reclamation will prove to be unsuccessful. A longer period of data collection is likely to be needed to measure trends in water quality that may occur as a result of the reclamation.

  1. Coal surface structure and thermodynamics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Wernett, P.C.; Glass, A.S.; Quay, D.; Roberts, J.

    1994-05-01

    Coals surfaces were studied using static surface adsorption measurements, low angle x-ray scattering (LAXS), inverse gas chromatography (IGC) and a new {sup 13}C NMR relaxation technique. A comparison of surface areas determined by hydrocarbon gas adsorption and LAXS led to the twin conclusions that the hydrocarbons had to diffuse through the solid to reach isolated pores and that the coal pores do not form interconnected networks, but are largely isolated. This conclusion was confirmed when IGC data for small hydrocarbons showed no discontinuities in their size dependence as usually observed with porous solids. IGC is capable of providing adsorption thermodynamics of gases on coal surfaces. The interactions of non-polar molecules and coal surfaces are directly proportioned to the gas molecular polarizability. For bases, the adsorption enthalpy is equal to the polarizability interaction plus the heat of hydrogen bond formation with phenol. Amphoteric molecules have more complex interactions. Mineral matter can have highly specific effects on surface interactions, but with most of the molecules studied is not an important factor.

  2. Effects of surface coal mining and reclamation on ground water in small watersheds in the Allegheny Plateau, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberle, Michael; Razem, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The hydrologic effects of surface coal mining in unlimited areas is difficult to predict, partly because of a lack of adequate data collected before and after mining and reclamation. In order to help provide data to assess the effects of surface mining on the hydrology of small basins in the coal fields of the eastern United States, the U.S. Bureau of Mines sponsored a comprehensive hydrologic study at three sites in the Ohio part of the Eastern Coal Province. These sites are within the unqlaciated part of the Allegheny Plateau, and are representative of similar coal-producing areas in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Geological Survey was responsible for the ground-water phase of the study. The aquifer system at each watershed consisted of two localized perched aquifers (top and middle) above a deeper, more regional aquifer. The premining top aquifer was destroyed by mining in each case, and was replaced by spoils during reclamation. The spoils formed new top aquifers that were slowly becoming resaturated at the end of the study period. Water levels in the aquifers were about the same after reclamation as before mining, although levels rose in a few places. It appears that the underclay at the base of the new top aquifers at all three sites prevents significant downward leakage from the top aquifers to lower except in places where the layer may have been damaged during mining. Water in the top aquifers is a calcium sulfate type, whereas calcium bicarbonate type water predominated before mining. The median specific conductance of water in the new top aquifers was about 5 times greater than that of the original top aquifers in two of the watersheds, and 1 1/2 times the level of the original top aquifers in the third. Concentrations of dissolved sulfate, iron, and manganese in the top aquifers before mining generally did not exceed U.S. and Ohio Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water limits, but generally exceeded these limits after

  3. Geochemical and geophysical analysis of shallow aquifer materials in Pennsylvanian coal-bearing strata in east-central Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Haefner, R.J.; Rowe, G.L. Jr. . Water Resources Div.)

    1992-01-01

    Three cores holes were drilled through sandstone, shale, and coal deposits of the Pennsylvanian-age Allegheny Group to provide samples for geochemical and geophysical evaluation of shallow aquifer materials in east-central Ohio. The samples were analyzed for forms of sulfur and carbon, and for more than 40 major and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma scans. Temperature, electrical, caliper, and gamma-ray logs were run in the boreholes to improve definition of the stratigraphy and geohydrologic properties of the shallow aquifers. The stratigraphy in this region is dominated by thick sandstone and shale sequences with minor amounts of limestone and the Middle and Lower Kittanning coal/underclay sequences. Depth profiles of major and trace-element chemistry reveal many trace elements are enriched in the underclay with respect to the overlying sandstone/shale sequences. Pyritic-sulfur contents in the underclay is highly variable and in the shale sequences are less than 1 weight percent. Evaluation of the volume-weighted net-neutralization potential of the entire sampling interval indicates an average deficit of approximately 30 tons of CaCO[sub 3] per 1,000 tons of rock in the resultant spoils after mining of the coal. Aquifer properties were inferred from the interpretation of the geophysical logs. Temperature logs reveal that the coals are the major water-bearing units. Minor fractures were seen in the core; these fractures may control vertical ground-water flow within the sampled interval. Gamma logs proved to be the most effective geophysical tool for correlating stratigraphy between the three holes.

  4. Rheology of coal slurries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ulbrecht, J.J.; Ryan, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental investigations of suspensions of three size distributions of glass spheres in a solution of tetralin and tetrabromoethane were made using a Haake viscometer. The values of viscosity were determined over a range of shear rates from 1 to 1000 sec/sup -1/. The suspending medium is Newtonian with a viscosity of about 9.66 centipoise at 25 +- 1/sup 0/C. At phi less than or equal to 20%, the suspension exhibited Newtonian behavior but at phi greater than or equal to 30%, the suspension exhibited pronounced non-Newtonian behavior. Experimental studies of these three size distributions were also conducted in aqueous solutions of polyvinylpyrrolidone using a pipe loop apparatus. Viscosity was measured over the shear rate range from 600 to 6000 sec./sup -1/. These suspensions having non-Newtonian suspending media, exhibit non-Newtonian behavior at all concentration levels of the solid particles. In the limit of very high shear rates, the suspension viscosity was found to be independent of tube diameter over the range of shear rates and concentrations studied. The rheological behavior of slurries of irregularly-shaped anthracite coal particles was also systematically investigated. The suspending medium consisted of a mixture of anthracene oil and tetrabromoethane. The shear rate was varied from 0.01 to 1000 sec./sup -1/. Volume concentrations range from 0 to 34%. At volume concentrations greater than 29% the slurries exhibited a yield stress and pronounced thixotropic behavior. The relative viscosities of both the model and the coal slurries were found to be dependent on both the shear rate and the particle size. In the case of the coal slurries caution must be exercised with regard to the proper interpretation of the rheological data due to the influences of the measured apparent density of the coal particles, viscometric flow geometry, and time dependent effects.

  5. Vocational-Technical Education Interface with Ohio's High Technology Business and Industrial Sector. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Robert W.

    This study explored the relationship of vocational-technical educational institutions in Ohio with business and industry using high-technology applications. The study attempted to determine what high-technology applications will be adopted by Ohio's business and industry in the next 5 years, what experience the schools have had in working with…

  6. Evaluation of a surface application of limestone for controlling acid mine discharges from abandoned strip mines, Sewellsville, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Geidel, G.; Caruccio, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    A 150-acre drainage basin in an unreclaimed coal strip mine in east-central Ohio was studied and extensively monitored to determine the effect of a surface application of limestone on the ground water quality. Prior to the limestone treatment the ground and surface water of the basin was acidic due to pyrite oxidation in the spoil. The results of this field study and simultaneous laboratory experiments showed that the maximum amount of alkalinity that can be generated by a surface application of limestone is not sufficient to reduce the ground water acidity generated by pyrite oxidation. Additionally, the amount of limestone applied was not sufficient to significantly decrease the rate of pyrite oxidation nor provide neutralization and thereby produce neutral or alkaline discharges from the abandoned coal strip mine sites.

  7. Landslide remediation on Ohio State Route 83 using clean coal combustion by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Payette, R.; Chen, Xi You; Wolfe, W.; Beeghly, J.

    1995-12-31

    The disposal of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products has become a major concern as issues of emission cleansing and landfill costs continue to rise. Laboratory tests conducted at the Ohio State University have shown that dry FGD by-products possess certain engineering properties that have proven desirable in a number of construction uses. As a follow on to the laboratory program, a field investigation into engineering uses of dry FGD wastes was initiated. In the present work, an FGD by-product was used to reconstruct the failed portion of a highway embankment. The construction process and the stability of the repaired embankment are examined.

  8. Surface-water quality of coal-mine lands in Raccoon Creek Basin, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Reclamation, plans to reclaim abandoned surface mines in the Raccoon Creek watershed in southern Ohio. Historic water-quality data collected between 1975 and 1983 were complied and analyzed in terms of eight selected mine-drainage characteristics to develop a data base for individual subbasin reclamation projects. Areas of mine drainage affecting Raccoon Creek basin, the study Sandy Run basin, the Hewett Fork basin, and the Little raccoon Creek basin. Surface-water-quality samples were collected from a 41-site network from November 1 through November 3, 1983, Results of the sampling reaffirmed that the major sources of mine drainage to Raccoon Creek are in the Little Raccoon Creek basin, and the Hewett Fork basin. However, water quality at the mouth of Sandy Run indicated that it is not a source of mine drainage to Raccoon Creek. Buffer Run, Goose Run, an unnamed tributary to Little Raccoon Creek, Mulga Run, and Sugar Run were the main sources of mine drainage sampled in the Little Raccoon Creek basin. All sites sampled in the East Branch Raccoon Creek basin were affected by mine drainage. This information was used to prepare a work plan for additional data collection before, during, and after reclamation. The data will be used to define the effectiveness of reclamation effects in the basin.

  9. Desulfurization of coal by microbiological leaching. Final report, September 1, 1978-June 1, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E.; Murr, L.E.

    1981-02-01

    The microbiological desulfurization of a high sulfur New Mexico (Carthage) coal has been investigated using an adapted strain of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Optimum conditions for this leaching were determined as: pH, 2.0; particle-size, -400 mesh (-37 ..mu..m); pulp density, 25%; and temperature, 35/sup 0/C. Under these conditions approximately 90% of the pyritic sulfur can be removed in 10 days from a coal sample containing 3.43% total sulfur of which 1.95% is pyritic. The rate of oxygen mass transfer into the leach suspensions was also measured and was shown to exceed that required for the oxidation of the pyrite by a factor of three. To study the feasibility of this approach on a semi-industrial scale, larger-scale tank leaching experiments were also conducted. Repeating this program of leaching for an Ohio coal as a basis for comparison produced the same optimum pH, particle size, and pulp density at 35/sup 0/C; and under these conditions 75% of the pyritic sulfur (about 5% of the sample weight) could be removed. The rate of oxygen mass transfer was also similar to the New Mexico coal experiments. From these results, a generalized flow sheet illustrating a possible scheme of pyrite leaching (removal) by the bacteria has been proposed. Finally, large pyrite cubes were cut and polished to expose the (100), (110), (111), and (112) crystal plane orientations. These regimes were separately leached under controlled conditions and it was observed that acid-ferric sulfate leaching is different from acid-bacterial leaching. In addition, leaching rates are different for the different crystal surface orientations.

  10. Reclamation Strategies and Geomorphic Outcomes in Coal Surface Mines of Eastern Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, M.; Jaeger, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Coal surface mining is a significant landscape disturbance in the United States. Since 1977, the reclamation of mined lands has been regulated by the Surface Mine Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA). Prior to the act, many coalfields were left un-reclaimed or partially reclaimed, with highly irregular topology and drainage networks. Under the act, the reverse is often true; adherence to SMCRA often leads to the homogenization of surfaces and channel networks. While both pre and post-SMCRA landscapes are highly altered, they exhibit strongly dissimilar characteristics. We examine pre-SMCRA, post-SMCRA and unmined watersheds at 3 spatial scales in order to compare the geomorphic differences between reclamation strategies. In particular, we attempt to separate anthropogenic factors from pre-existing, natural factors via comparisons to unmined watersheds. Our study design incorporates a 3 scale top-down analysis of 21 independent watersheds (7 of each treatment type). Each watershed has an area of approximately 1km2. All watersheds share similar geography, climate and geology. At the landscape scale, characteristics are derived from 0.762m (2.5ft) resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). At the channel network scale, DEMs, as well as remote sensing data (including the National Wetlands Inventory database) are used. Finally, the reach scale incorporates longitudinal and cross-section surveys (using a total station) as well as a particle size distribution. At each scale, attributes are parameterized for statistical comparison. Post-SMCRA sites are characterized by a general reduction of watershed surface slopes (11.9% median) compared to pre-SMCRA (19.3%) and unmined (19.8%) sites. Both pre and post-SMCRA channel networks are characterized by significant surface impoundments (in the form of remnant headwall trenches on pre-SMCRA sites and engineered retention basins on post-SMCRA sites). Pre-SMCRA outlet reaches have significantly steeper bed slopes (2.79% mean) than

  11. Ground-water quality and geochemistry of aquifers associated with coal in the Allegheny and Monongahela formations, southeastern Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Razem, A.C.; Sedam, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    Ground water from aquifers associated with coal beds in the Allegheny and Monongahela Formations in southeastern Ohio is predominantly a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type. Sodium bicarbonate type water is less common. Isolated areas of sodium chloride and calcium sulfate types also are present. The water is predominantly very hard, and has a median hardness concentration of 258 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate and a median dissolved-solids concentration of 436 milligrams per liter. Few wells contain water with dissolved-solids concentrations in excess of 1,000 milligrams per liter. Bicarbonate concentration in ground water was found to be significantly different among coals, whereas concentrations of bicarbonate, hardness, calcium, magnesium, sodium, iron, manganese, and strontium were significantly different between ground water in the Allegheny and Monongahela Formations. Many constituents are significantly correlated, but few correlation coefficients are high. The presence of sulfate or iron is attributed to the kinetic mechanism operating during the oxidation of pyrite. The position along the sulfide or ferrous-iron oxidation pathways controls the reaction products of pyrite found in solution, and the formation of either the sulfate of iron constituents. The availability and rate of diffusion of oxygen in the formations exerts control on the water quality. Discriminant-function analysis correctly classifies 89 percent of the observations into the Allegheny or Monongahela Formations. As a verifications, 39 of 41 observations from another study were correctly classified by formation. The differences in water chemistry between the Allegheny and the Monongahela Formations are gradational and are attributed the oxidation of iron sulfide. The diffusion and availability of oxygen, which controls the chemical reaction, is regulated by the porosity and permeability of the rock with respect to oxygen and the presence or absence of carbonates, which controls the

  12. Population differentiation in Andropogon virginicus L. between abandoned coal strip mine spoil and old field habitats in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Nellessen, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Populations of Andropogon virginicus L. from abandoned coal mine spoils and old fields in southeastern Ohio were studied to determine whether ecotypic differentiation had occurred. Three mine spoil and three old field populations were paired for reciprocal transplant studies. A uniform garden was also established. Mine spoil and old field populations were compared for differences in demographic patterns, vegetative growth and phenology, reproductive output, and physiology. There were a greater number of seedlings and smaller individuals in the mine spoils, but seed production was similar between habitats. Seeds disperse farther in mine spoils and there was no or very little seedling establishment in 8 to 35 year old fields. Plants attained greater height in mine spoils. Population differentiation between one of the mine sites and one of the old fields was evident for seed weight, numbers of seeds per plant, and plant biomass. The three old field populations also differed from each other in reproductive characteristics. Mine spoil plants contained significantly more nitrogen within seeds despite the fact that mine soils had only half the available nitrogen as old field soils. Old field plants had a higher magnesium content in leaves. Chlorophyll content of leaves was higher for plants in old fields than for plants in mines. Undisturbed plants from both habitats had significantly higher photosynthetic rates than transplants. Old field plants had significantly greater photosynthetic rates than mine plants when grown in the uniform garden even though transpiration rates were similar. Differentiation between some coal mine spoil and old field populations of A. virginicus was evident for height growth, seed weight, photosynthesis, seed nitrogen content, magnesium content, and seed germination. Local population differentiation in plant height, seed weight, and in the timing of plant maturation was also observed.

  13. Modeling carbon and nitrogen dynamics in disturbed ecosystems: A case study of coal surface-mined lands in eastern Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Tristram Lyf O'brien

    The quantification of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in ecosystems is important for (a) understanding changes in ecosystem structure and function with changes in land use, (b) determining sustainability of ecosystems, and (c) balancing the global C budget as it relates to global climate change. Estimating future dynamics of C and N is complicated by the projected changes in climate including increased atmospheric CO2 and temperature. Regional climate change can differ significantly from average global change and should be accounted for if accurate changes in C and N budgets are to be obtained. In the State of Ohio, increased precipitation and existing tropospheric aerosols need to be considered in addition to expected increases in CO2 and temperature. A meso-scale study was conducted to determine regional effects of climate change on C and N cycling within disturbed ecosystems. Objectives of the research were to quantify (a) sediment yield, (b) current C storage in vegetation and soils, and (c) C efflux from soils from both abandoned and rehabilitated coal surface-mined lands in Ohio. A process-based, dynamic model was developed to simulate sediment yield, grassland production, and C and N cycling on mined lands. Verification of plant production and soil erosion submodels with data sets from surface-mined lands in the mid-western U.S. showed r2 values of 99.5% and 97%, respectively. A spatial model was developed with land cover and topographic data in a geographic information system to supply the dynamic model with land area, percent slope, and slope aspect values for the study region. From the land cover theme and other documented sources, the estimated extent of surface-mined lands was 102 km2 of abandoned, unvegetated, surface-mined land and 565 km2 of rehabilitated surface-mined land. Simulations from the dynamic model estimated that unvegetated surface-mined lands in Ohio produce approximately 441,325 t yr-1 of sediment and between 2,000 and 20,000 t yr

  14. Field and laboratory assessment of a coal processing effluent in the Leading Creek Watershed, Meigs County, Ohio.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, A J; Cherry, D S; Currie, R J

    2003-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has not recommended water quality criteria (WQC) to protect aquatic life from elevated sodium and sulfate concentrations, such as those associated with the coal-processing effluent of Meigs County Mine #31. This discharge, received by a tributary of the Leading Creek Watershed (SE Ohio), had a mean specific conductivity (SC) of 8,109 (7,750-8,750) microS/cm and total metal concentrations below acute WQC. The mean 48-h LC(50) for Ceriodaphnia dubia in the effluent was 6,713 +/- 99 microS/cm; mean 48-h survival was 44% for study sites downstream of the effluent. The best indicators of impairment used in this study were Ceriodaphnia fecundity, in situ Corbicula fluminea growth, EPT minus Hydropsychidae (richness and relative abundance), and relative Ephemeroptera abundance. Mayflies, reduced by more than 99% below the effluent, were absent from all but the furthest downstream study site. SC was strongly correlated with Corbicula growth (r = -0.9755, p = 0.0009) and EPT minus Hydropsychidae richness (r = -0.8756, p < 0.0001), suggesting the effluent was primarily responsible for biotic impairment. Our results indicated that SC levels, a measure of dissolved solids, in the Leading Creek Watershed that exceeded approximately 3,700 microS/cm impaired sensitive aquatic fauna.

  15. The use of ethanol to remove sulfur from coal. Final report, September 1991--December 1992; Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, R.L.; Lazarov, L.K.; Prudich, M.E.; Lange, C.A.; Kumar, N.

    1994-03-10

    The initial technical goal in the project was to develop a chemical method for the cost effective removal of both inorganic and organic sulfur from Ohio coals. Verifying and using a process of reacting ethanol vapors with coal under conditions disclosed in U.S. Patent 4,888,029, the immediate technical objectives were to convert a small scale laborative batch process to a larger scale continuous process which can serve as the basis for commercial development of the technology. This involved getting as much information as possible from small scale batch autoclave or fluid bed laboratory reactors for use in pilot plant studies. The laboratory data included material balances on the coal and sulfur, temperature and pressure ranges for the reaction, minimum reaction times at different conditions, the effectiveness of different activators such as oxygen and nitric oxide, the amount and nature of by-products such as sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and acetaldehyde, the effect of coal particle size on the speed and completeness of the reaction, and the effectiveness of the reaction on different Ohio coals. Because the laboratory experiments using the method disclosed in U.S. 4,888,029 were not successful, the objective for the project was changed to develop a new laboratory process to use ethanol to remove sulfur from coal. Using copper as a catalyst and as an H{sub 2}S scavenger, a new laboratory procedure to use ethanol to remove sulfur from coal has been developed at Ohio University and a patent application covering this process was filed in March, 1993. The process is based on the use of copper as a catalyst for the dehydrogenation of ethanol to produce nascent hydrogen to remove sulfur from the coal and the use of copper as a scavenger to capture the hydrogen sulfide formed from the sulfur removed from coal.

  16. 76 FR 38266 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Ohio

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ...]; Federal-Aid Highway Act . 2. Air: Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 7401-7671(q). 3. Land: Land and Water... of Ohio: one additional through lane in each direction on I-75; changes in access for the following interchanges: Galbraith Road (modernize with full access), SR-126 (upgraded access but will lack two...

  17. DOE-GO-14154-1 OHIO FINAL report Velocys 30Sept08

    SciTech Connect

    Terry J. Mazanec

    2008-09-30

    The overall goal of the OHIO project was to develop a commercially viable high intensity process to produce ethylene by controlled catalytic reaction of ethane with oxygen in a microchannel reactor. Microchannel technology provides a breakthrough solution to the challenges identified in earlier development work on catalytic ethane oxidation. Heat and mass transfer limitations at the catalyst surface create destructively high temperatures that are responsible for increased production of waste products (CO, CO2, and CH4). The OHIO project focused on microscale energy and mass transfer management, designed to alleviate these transport limitations, thereby improving catalyst selectivity and saving energy-rich feedstock. The OHIO project evaluated ethane oxidation in small scale microchannel laboratory reactors including catalyst test units, and full commercial length single- and multi-channel reactors. Small scale catalyst and single channel results met target values for ethylene yields, demonstrating that the microchannel concept improves mass and heat transport compared to conventional reactors and results in improved ethylene yield. Earlier economic sensitivity studies of ethane oxidation processes suggested that only modest improvements were necessary to provide a system that provides significant feedstock, energy, and capital benefits compared to conventional steam ethane cracking. The key benefit derived from the OHIO process is energy savings. Ethylene production consumes more energy than any other U.S. chemical process.1 The OHIO process offers improved feedstock utilization and substantial energy savings due to a novel reaction pathway and the unique abilities of microchannel process technology to control the reaction temperature and other critical process parameters. Based on projected economic benefits of the process, the potential energy savings could reach 150 trillion Btu/yr by the year 2020, which is the equivalent of over 25 million barrels of oil.

  18. Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals: potential UCG products and markets. Final report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-31

    The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) The US will continue to require new sources of energy fuels and substitutes for petrochemical feedstocks into the foreseeable future. Most of this requirement will be met using coal. However, the cost of mining, transporting, cleaning, and preparing coal, disposing of ash or slag and scrubbing stack gases continues to rise; particularly, in the Eastern US where the need is greatest. UCG avoids these pitfalls and, as such, should be considered a viable alternative to the mining of deeper coals. (2) Of the two possible product gases LBG and MBG, MBG is the most versatile. (3) The most logical use for UCG product in the Eastern US is to generate power on-site using a combined-cycle or co-generation system. Either low or medium Btu gas (LBG or MBG) can be used. (4) UCG should be an option whenever surface gasification is considered; particularly, in areas where deeper, higher sulfur coal is located. (5) There are environmental and social benefits to use of UCG over surface gasification in the Eastern US. (6) A site could be chosen almost anywhere in the Illinois and Ohio area where amenable UCG coal has been determined due to the existence of existing transportation or transmission systems. (7) The technology needs to be demonstrated and the potential economic viability determined at a site in the East-North-Central US which has commercial quantities of amenable bituminous coal before utilities will show significant interest.

  19. Geologic setting and water quality of selected basins in the active coal-mining areas of Ohio, 1987-88. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Sedam, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    The report presents results of data collected during the second phase (July 1987 through October 1988) of the 7-year study. Specifically, the report (1) presents surface-water-quality data for 21 drainage basins in eastern Ohio where coal mining is currently active, (2) describes the physiographic and geologic settings of six selected basins, and (3) presents, within the same six basins, current water-quality data for several ground-water and surface-water sites selected to represent hydrologic conditions in the basins.

  20. Intergrated study of the Devonian-age black shales in eastern Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.D.; Struble, R.A.; Carlton, R.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Honeycutt, F.M.; Kingsbury, R.H.; Knapp, N.F.; Majchszak, F.L.; Stith, D.A.

    1982-09-01

    This integrated study of the Devonian-age shales in eastern Ohio by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey is part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The six areas of research included in the study are: (1) detailed stratigraphic mapping, (2) detailed structure mapping, (3) mineralogic and petrographic characterization, (4) geochemical characterization, (5) fracture trace and lineament analysis, and (6) a gas-show monitoring program. The data generated by the study provide a basis for assessing the most promising stratigraphic horizons for occurrences of natural gas within the Devonian shale sequence and the most favorable geographic areas of the state for natural gas exploration and should be useful in the planning and design of production-stimulation techniques. Four major radioactive units in the Devonian shale sequence are believed to be important source rocks and reservoir beds for natural gas. In order of potential for development as an unconventional gas resource, they are (1) lower and upper radioactive facies of the Huron Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, (2) upper Olentangy Shale (Rhinestreet facies equivalent), (3) Cleveland Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, and (4) lower Olentangy Shale (Marcellus facies equivalent). These primary exploration targets are recommended on the basis of areal distribution, net thickness of radioactive shale, shows of natural gas, and drilling depth to the radioactive unit. Fracture trends indicate prospective areas for Devonian shale reservoirs. Good geological prospects in the Devonian shales should be located where the fracture trends coincide with thick sequences of organic-rich highly radioactive shale.

  1. Chemical quality, benthic organisms, and sedimentation in streams draining coal-mined lands in Raccoon Creek basin, Ohio, July 1984 through September 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Reclamation, plans widespread reclamation of abandoned coal mines in the Raccoon Creek basin in southeastern Ohio. Throughout Raccoon Creek basin, chemical, biological, and suspended-sediment data were collected from July 1984 through September 1986. Chemical and biological data collected at 17 sites indicate that the East Branch, Brushy Creek, Hewett Fork, and Little Raccoon Creek subbasins, including Flint Run, are affected by drainage from abandoned coal mines. In these basins, median pH values ranged from 2.6 to 5.1, median acidity values ranged from 20 to 1,040 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as CaCo3, and median alkalinity values ranged from 0 to 4 mg/L as CaCo3. Biological data indicate that these basins do not support diverse populations because of degraded water systems. Suspended-sediment yields of 70.7 tons per square mile per year at the headwaters of Raccoon Creek and 54.5 tons per square mile per year near the month of Raccoon Creek indicate that cumulative sedimentation from erosion of abandoned-mine lands is not excessive in the basin.

  2. Health assessment for Coshocton, City Landfill, Coshocton, Ohio, Region 5. CERCLIS No. OHD980509830. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-02

    The Coshocton City Landfill site is located about 3.5 miles southeast of Coshocton, Ohio. Contaminants found in high concentrations at the site include acetone, chlorinated phenols, phthalates, and xylenes. Potential contaminant-migration pathways include dermal contact with or ingestion of ground water, surface water, soils, and/or leachate. The site is of potential public health concern because of the potential for exposure to the contaminants through domestic usage of the ground water, dermal contact and/or inhalation, and the potential for physical injury for remedial workers and trespassers.

  3. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Coy, R. G.; Braden, R. P.

    1980-09-01

    The Solar Energy System installed at Columbus Technical Institute, Columbus, Ohio was installed as a part of a new construction of a college building. The building will house classrooms and laboratories, administrative offices and three lecture halls. The Solar Energy System consists of 4096 square feet (128 panels) Owens/Illinois Evacuated Glass Tube Collector Subsystem, and a 5000 gallon steel tank below ground storage system, hot water is circulated between the collectors and storage tank, passing through a water/lithium bromide absorption chiller to cool the building. Extracts from the site files specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  4. Solvent-emissions reduction study at Newark AFB, Ohio. Final report, Aug 88-Apr 89

    SciTech Connect

    Ayer, J.; Wolbach, C.D.

    1990-05-01

    The objective of this effort was to collect baseline Freon emissions data, and subsequently recommend potential emission control alternatives to minimize Freon emissions that result from routine maintenance and repair operations conducted at Newark AFB, Ohio. Newark AFB, Ohio, uses a number of solvents to clean and maintain electronic guidance devices. The solvent most often used in this application is 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane, a solvent commonly known by the DuPont Company trademark Freon 113TM (hereafter referred to as Freon). Newark AFB purchases large quantities of Freon (nearly 600,000 pounds annually), and in previous years, lost nearly all of it (555,000 pounds) as unrecovered Freon vapor. Freon is one of a general class of chemicals known as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Scientific evidence strongly suggests that CFC emissions are responsible for the depletion of the protective ozone layer surrounding the earth's atmosphere. For this reason, the U.S. air Force must reduce and eventually eliminate CFC emissions from Air Force facilities. Several steps have been taken to reduce the quantity of Freon emitted from the more than 100 emission point sources at Newark AFB. For example, the recovery of solvent vapors emitted from more than half of the point sources at the facility is achieved with limited success by the use of two carbon adsorption (CA) systems.

  5. Formation and retention of methane in coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  6. Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury and Fine Particulate Matter from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2008-12-31

    As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, evaluated the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation involved two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring included the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station contains sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO2, O3, etc.). Laboratory analyses of time-integrated samples were used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Nearreal- time measurements were used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 30 months of field data were collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data provides mercury, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis includes (1) development of updated inventories of mercury emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport

  7. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Final report, September 19, 1988--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

    1992-12-31

    This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO{sub 2} emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R&D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

  8. The use of ethanol to remove sulfur from coal. Final report, September 1991--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-15

    In developing the new Ohio University procedure the thermodynamic limitations of the reactions for removal of both pyritic and organic sulfur from coal at 400--600{degrees}C were studied using copper as a very strong H{sub 2}S-acceptor. Copper serves as a catalyst for ethanol dehydrogenation to form nascent hydrogen. Copper also serves as a scavenger to form copper sulfide from the hydrogen sulfide evolved during the reaction. Copper sulfide in turn serves as a catalyst for organic sulfur hydrodesulfurization reactions. If the coal to be desulfurized contains pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) or FeS, the copper scavenger effect reduces any back reaction of hydrogen sulfide with the iron and increases the removal of sulfur from the carbonaceous material. The desired effect of using copper can be achieved by using copper or copper containing alloys as materials of construction or as liners for a regenerable reactor. During the time period that Ohio Coal Development Office supported this work, small scale (560 grams) laboratory experiments with coals containing about 3.5% sulfur have achieved up to 90% desulfurization at temperatures of 500{degrees}C when using a copper reactor. Results from the autoclave experiments have identified the nature of the chemical reactions taking place. Because the process removes both pyritic and organic sulfur in coal, the successful scale up of the process would have important economic significance to the coal industry. Even though this and other chemical processes may be relatively expensive and far from being commercial, the reason for further development is that this process may hold the promise of achieving much greater sulfur reduction and of producing a cleaner coal than other methods. This would be especially important for small or older power plants and industrial boilers.

  9. Coal slurry tanker movements of western coal to east coast utilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rieber, M.

    1983-02-01

    From four western coal areas, coal slurry pipelines of 10 MMTY and 25 MMTY are designed and costed (1982 basis) for coal delivery to three ports. Supertankers are routed around South America, Panamax through the Panama Canal. Tanker characteristics are specified statistically and costs determined. A tidewater utility alternative is investigated. Based on western coal prices, adjusted for quality differentials, plus transport costs, delivered coal costs are compared to current east coast delivered steam coal prices. The proposed system is not economically feasible at current prices but may become commercial as steam coal demand increases and eastern coal prices rise.

  10. X-ray Computed Tomography of coal: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maylotte, D.H.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.; Lamby, E.J.

    1986-12-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a method of mapping with x-rays the internal structures of coal. The technique normally produces 2-D images of the internal structures of an object. These images can be recast to create pseudo 3-D representations. CT of coal has been explored for a variety of different applications to coal and coal processing technology. In a comparison of CT data with conventional coal analyses and petrography, CT was found to offer a good indication of the total ash content of the coal. The spatial distribution of the coal mineral matter as seen with CT has been suggested as an indicator of coal washability. Studies of gas flow through coal using xenon gas as a tracer have shown the extremely complicated nature of the modes of penetration of gas through coal, with significant differences in the rates at which the gas can pass along and across the bedding planes of coal. In a special furnace designed to allow CT images to be taken while the coal was being heated, the pyrolysis and gasification of coal have been studied. Gasification rates with steam and CO/sub 2/ for a range of coal ranks have been obtained, and the location of the gasification reactions within the piece of coal can be seen. Coal drying and the progress of the pyrolysis wave into coal have been examined when the coal was subjected to the kind of sudden temperature jump that it might experience in fixed bed gasifier applications. CT has also been used to examine stable flow structures within model fluidized beds and the accessibility of lump coal to microbial desulfurization. 53 refs., 242 figs., 26 tabs.

  11. State summaries: Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the value of coal and industrial minerals sold in Ohio amounted to $1.5 billion, an increase of 7% from 2004. Coal production for the year increased 4.7% from 2004, totalling 22.3 Mt. Aggregate production totalled 114 Mt, a 4% decrease from 2004. In 2005, the state's salt sales amounted to $132 million. Production of industrial sandstone and conglomerate as well as dimension stone and limestone also increased.

  12. Using the sun and waste wood to heat a central Ohio home. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The description of a house in Ohio built on a south facing slope with two levels above ground on the north, east, and west sides and three levels exposed to the southern winter Sun is presented. The floor plan, a general history of the project, the operation of the system, the backup heat source (wood), the collection of data, and the procedure for determining actual heat loss are described. Additionally, the calculation of the solar contribution percentage and the amount of mass to be included in the greenhouse and problems with an indirect gain wall are discussed. The location of the wood stove in the system is noted. The east wall temperature data are given. Soil temperature, air infiltration, thermal comfort, and energy usage are discussed. (MCW).

  13. Full menu restaurant computer simulations: Volume 12 -- Toledo, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This research project investigated and modeled full menu restaurants to gain a better understanding of the proper and competitive applications of electric equipment. The simulation process began by compiling a list of typical full menu restaurant characteristics. Sources of information included drawings and specifications for actual restaurants along with discussions with architects, design engineers, kitchen consultants, hood and cooking appliance manufacturers, and utility staff. Based on those characteristics, a detailed baseline model of a typical full menu restaurant was developed. Appropriate electric and gas rate structures for full menu restaurants were used to calculate energy costs for each simulation. Eighty options were simulated. After reviewing the full menu restaurant simulation results, several technologies were selected, based primarily on energy cost reduction, for two best technologies simulations. This report provides a detailed description of the modeling process and results for full menu restaurants in Toledo, Ohio. Other restaurant type and location combinations are discussed in other reports.

  14. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey, Huntington quadrangle: Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The Huntington quadrangle of Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia covers 7250 square miles of the easternmost Midwestern Physiographic Province. Paleozoic exposures dominate the surface. These Paleozoics deepen toward the east from approximately 500 feet to a maximum depth of 8000 feet. Precambrian basement is thought to underlie the entire area. No known uranium deposits exist in the area. One hundred anomalies were found using the standard statistical analysis. Some high uranium concentration anomalies that may overlie the stratigraphic equivalent of the Devonian-Mississippian New Albany or Chattanooga Shales may represent significant levels of naturally occurring uranium. Future studies should concentrate on this unit. Magnetic data are largely in concurrence with existing structural interpretations but suggest some complexities in the underlying Precambrian.

  15. Enhancement of surface properties for coal beneficiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Aplan, F.F.

    1992-01-30

    This report will focus on means of pyrite removal from coal using surface-based coal cleaning technologies. The major subjects being addressed in this study are the natural and modulated surface properties of coal and pyrite and how they may best be utilized to facilitate their separation using advanced surface-based coal cleaning technology. Emphasis is based on modified flotation and oil agglomerative processes and the basic principles involved. The four areas being addressed are: (1) Collectorless flotation of pyrite; (2) Modulation of pyrite and coal hydrophobicity; (3) Emulsion processes and principles; (4) Evaluation of coal hydrophobicity.

  16. Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

    1995-05-01

    Plastic coals are important feedstocks in coke manufacture, coal liquefaction, gasification, and combustion. During these processes, the thermoplastic behavior of these coals is also important since it may contribute to desirable or undesirable characteristics. For example, during liquefaction, the plastic behavior is desired since it leads to liquid-liquid reactions which are faster than solid-liquid reactions. During gasification, the elastic behavior is undesired since it leads to caking and agglomeration of coal particles which result in bed bogging in fixed or fluidized bed gasifiers. The plastic behavior of different coals was studied using a fast-response plastometer. A modified plastometer was used to measure the torque required to turn at constant angular speed a cone-shaped disk embedded in a thin layer of coal. The coal particles were packed between two metal plates which are heated electrically. Heating rates, final temperatures, pressures, and durations of experiment ranged from 200--800 K/s, 700--1300 K, vacuum-50 atm helium, and 0--40 s, respectively. The apparent viscosity of the molten coal was calculated from the measured torque using the governing equation of the cone-and-plate viscometer. Using a concentrated suspension model, the molten coal`s apparent viscosity was related to the quantity of the liquid metaplast present during pyrolysis. Seven coals from Argonne National Laboratory Premium Coal Sample Bank were studied. Five bituminous coals, from high-volatile to low-volatile bituminous, were found to have very good plastic behavior. Coal type strongly affects the magnitude and duration of plasticity. Hvb coals were most plastic. Mvb and lvb coals, though the maximum plasticity and plastic period were less. Low rank coals such as subbituminous and lignite did not exhibit any plasticity in the present studies. Coal plasticity is moderately well correlated with simple indices of coal type such as the elemental C,O, and H contents.

  17. Effects of highway deicing chemicals on shallow unconsolidated aquifers in Ohio--final report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunze, Allison E.; Sroka, Bernard N.

    2004-01-01

    As a result of concerns about salt intrusion into drinking water aquifers, the effects of highway deicing chemicals on shallow aquifers were studied at eight locations in Ohio from 1988 through 2002. The study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Ohio Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration. Sites were selected along major undivided highways where drainage is by open ditches and ground-water flow is approximately perpendicular to the highway. Records of deicer application rates were kept, and apparent movement of deicing chemicals through shallow, unconsolidated aquifers was monitored by means of periodic measurements of specific conductance and concentrations of dissolved sodium, calcium, and chloride. The State routes monitored were the following: State Route (SR) 3 in Ashland County, SR 84 in Ashtabula County, SR 29 in Champaign County, SR 4 in Clark County, SR 2 in Lucas County, SR 104 in Pickaway County, SR 14 in Portage County, and SR 97 in Richland County. The study began in 1988 with background data collection, extensive literature review, and site selection. This process, including drilling of wells at numerous test sites and the eight selected sites, lasted 3 years. Routine groundwater sampling at 4- to 6-week intervals began in January 1991 and continued through September 1999. A multilevel, passive flow ground-water sampling device was constructed and used. Other conditions monitored on a regular basis included ground-water level (monitored continuously), specific conductance, air and soil temperature, precipitation,chloride concentration in soil samples, and deicing-chemical application times and rates. Evidence from water analysis, specific-conductance measurements, and surface-geophysical measurements indicates that three of the eight sites (Ashtabula County, Lucas County, and Portage County sites) were affected by direct application of deicing chemicals. Climatic data collected during the study

  18. Magnetic relaxation - coal swelling, extraction, pore size. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1994-10-26

    The aim of the contract was to employ electron and nuclear magnetic relaxation techniques to investigate solvent swelling of coals, solvent extraction of coals and molecular interaction with solvent coal pores. Many of these investigations have appeared in four major publications and a conference proceedings. Another manuscript has been submitted for publication. The set of Argonne Premium Coals was chosen as extensively characterized and representative samples for this project.

  19. Mixture design and performance prediction of rubber-modified asphalt in Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, R.Y.

    1997-08-01

    Appropriate disposal of scrap tires has been a major environmental concern over the years, mainly due to potential fire and health hazards associated with uncontrolled stockpiling. Primarily driven by this environmental concern, the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) of 1991 has required each State to begin incorporating scrap tire rubber into its asphalt paving materials. Although in the revision of the original ISTEA, the mandate has been eliminated, there remains a language of encouraging the use of crumb rubbers in asphalt paving materials. Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) desires to develop the mix design procedure, construction practice, and performance specifications for crumb rubber modified asphalt paving materials. This research was conducted to develop the needed design and construction guidance for meeting the ODOT anticipated needs. Specifically, the objectives of this research encompass the following scope: (1) investigation of the rheological properties of asphalt-rubber binder to determine optimum content of crumb rubber, (2) development of optimum mix design for various applications, including both wet and dry mix processes, (3) characterization of mechanical properties of recommended paving mixtures, including resilient modulus, fatigue cracking behavior, low-temperature thermal cracking resistance, water sensitivity test, incremental creep test and loaded wheel track test, and (4) comparison of performance of selected paving mixes.

  20. Analysis of photographic records of coal pyrolysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dodoo, J.N.D.

    1991-10-01

    Bituminous coals upon heating undergo melting and pyrolytic decomposition with significant parts of the coal forming an unstable liquid that can escape from the coal by evaporation. The transient liquid within the pyrolyzing coal causes softening or plastic behavior that can influence the chemistry and physics of the process. Bubbles of volatiles can swell the softened coal mass in turn affecting the combustion behavior of the coal particles. The swelling behavior of individual coal particles has to be taken into account both as the layout as well as for the operation of pyrolysis, coking and performance of coal-fired boilers. Increased heating rates generally increase the amount of swelling although it is also known that in some cases, even highly swelling coals can be transformed into char with no swelling if they are heated slowly enough. The swelling characteristics of individual coal particles have been investigated by a number of workers employing various heating systems ranging from drop tube and shock tube furnaces, flow rate reactors and electrical heating coils. Different methods have also been employed to determine the swelling factors. The following sections summarize some of the published literature on the subject and outline the direction in which the method of analysis will be further extended in the study of the swelling characteristics of hvA bituminous coal particles that have been pyrolyzed with a laser beam.

  1. Mercury and other trace elements in Ohio River fish collected near coal-fired power plants: Interspecific patterns and consideration of consumption risks.

    PubMed

    Reash, Robin J; Brown, Lauren; Merritt, Karen

    2015-07-01

    Many coal-fired electric generating facilities in the United States are discharging higher loads of Hg, Se, and other chemicals to receiving streams due to the installation of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) air pollution control units. There are regulatory concerns about the potential increased uptake of these bioaccumulative trace elements into food webs. We evaluated the concentrations of As, total Hg (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), and Se in Ohio River fish collected proximal to coal-fired power plants, of which 75% operate FGD systems. Fillet samples (n = 50) from 6 fish species representing 3 trophic levels were analyzed. Geometric mean fillet concentrations of THg (wet wt), MeHg (wet wt), and Se (dry wt) in 3 species were 0.136, 0.1181, and 3.19 mg/kg (sauger); 0.123, 0.1013, and 1.56 mg/kg (channel catfish); and 0.127, 0.0914, and 3.30 mg/kg (hybrid striped bass). For all species analyzed, only 3 fillet samples (6% of total) had MeHg concentrations that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) human health criterion (0.3 mg/kg wet wt); all of these were freshwater drum aged ≥ 19 y. None of the samples analyzed exceeded the USEPA proposed muscle and whole body Se thresholds for protection against reproductive effects in freshwater fish. All but 8 fillet samples had a total As concentration less than 1.0 mg/kg dry wt. Mean Se health benefit values (HBVSe ) for all species were ≥ 4, indicating that potential Hg-related health risks associated with consumption of Ohio River fish are likely to be offset by adequate Se concentrations. Overall, we observed no measurable evidence of enhanced trace element bioaccumulation associated with proximity to power plant FGD facilities, however, some enhanced bioaccumulation could have occurred in the wastewater mixing zones. Furthermore, available evidence indicates that, due to hydraulic and physical factors, the main stem Ohio River appears to have low net Hg methylation potential. PMID:25586716

  2. Mercury and other trace elements in Ohio River fish collected near coal-fired power plants: Interspecific patterns and consideration of consumption risks.

    PubMed

    Reash, Robin J; Brown, Lauren; Merritt, Karen

    2015-07-01

    Many coal-fired electric generating facilities in the United States are discharging higher loads of Hg, Se, and other chemicals to receiving streams due to the installation of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) air pollution control units. There are regulatory concerns about the potential increased uptake of these bioaccumulative trace elements into food webs. We evaluated the concentrations of As, total Hg (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), and Se in Ohio River fish collected proximal to coal-fired power plants, of which 75% operate FGD systems. Fillet samples (n = 50) from 6 fish species representing 3 trophic levels were analyzed. Geometric mean fillet concentrations of THg (wet wt), MeHg (wet wt), and Se (dry wt) in 3 species were 0.136, 0.1181, and 3.19 mg/kg (sauger); 0.123, 0.1013, and 1.56 mg/kg (channel catfish); and 0.127, 0.0914, and 3.30 mg/kg (hybrid striped bass). For all species analyzed, only 3 fillet samples (6% of total) had MeHg concentrations that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) human health criterion (0.3 mg/kg wet wt); all of these were freshwater drum aged ≥ 19 y. None of the samples analyzed exceeded the USEPA proposed muscle and whole body Se thresholds for protection against reproductive effects in freshwater fish. All but 8 fillet samples had a total As concentration less than 1.0 mg/kg dry wt. Mean Se health benefit values (HBVSe ) for all species were ≥ 4, indicating that potential Hg-related health risks associated with consumption of Ohio River fish are likely to be offset by adequate Se concentrations. Overall, we observed no measurable evidence of enhanced trace element bioaccumulation associated with proximity to power plant FGD facilities, however, some enhanced bioaccumulation could have occurred in the wastewater mixing zones. Furthermore, available evidence indicates that, due to hydraulic and physical factors, the main stem Ohio River appears to have low net Hg methylation potential.

  3. State Criminal Justice Telecommunications (STACOM). Final Report. Volume II: Requirements Analysis and Design of Ohio Criminal Justice Telecommunications Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, J. E.; And Others

    Requirements analysis and design for the Ohio Criminal Justice Telecommunications Network are provided in this report on the application in the state of Ohio of techniques developed by the STACOM Project. These techniques focus on the identification of user requirements and network designs for criminal justice networks on a state-wide basis.…

  4. Final safety assessment of Coal Tar as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Coal Tar is a semisolid by-product obtained in the destructive distillation of bituminous coal, which functions in cosmetic products as a cosmetic biocide and denaturant--antidandruff agent is also listed as a function, but this is considered an over-the-counter (OTC) drug use. Coal Tar is a nearly black, viscous liquid, heavier than water, with a naphthalene-like odor and a sharp burning taste, produced in cooking ovens as a by-product in the manufacture of coke. Crude Coal Tar is composed of 48% hydrocarbons, 42% carbon, and 10% water. In 2002, Coal Tar was reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be used in four formulations, all of which appear to be OTC drug products. Coal Tar is monographed by the FDA as Category I (safe and effective) OTC drug ingredient for use in the treatment of dandruff, seborrhoea, and psoriasis. Coal Tar is absorbed through the skin of animals and humans and is systemically distributed. In short-term studies, mice fed a diet containing Coal Tar found it unpalatable, but no adverse effects were reported other than weight loss; rats injected with Coal Tar experienced malaise in one study and decreased water intake and increased liver weights in another; rabbits injected with Coal Tar residue experienced eating avoidance, respiratory difficulty, sneezing, and weight loss. In a subchronic neurotoxicity study using mice, a mixture of phenols, cresols, and xylenols at concentrations approximately equal to those expected in Coal Tar extracts produced regionally selective effects, with a rank order of corpus striatum > cerebellum > cerebral cortex. Coal Tar applied to the backs of guinea pigs increases epidermal thickness. Painting female rabbits with tar decreases the absolute and relative weights of the ovaries and decreased the number of interstitial cells in the ovary. Four therapeutic Coal Tar preparations used in the treatment of psoriasis were mutagenic in the Ames assay. Urine and blood from patients treated with Coal Tar

  5. 77 FR 15966 - Ohio: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ...; Definition of Solid Waste; Toxicity Characteristic, Checklist 199, March 13, 2002 (67 FR 11251); ] NESHAPS...; Final Rule: Methods Innovation Rule and SW-846 Final Update IIIB, Checklist 208, June 14, 2005 (70 FR... (RCRA). The agency published a proposed rule on September 14, 2011 at ] 76 FR 56708 and provided...

  6. Investigation of the use of fly-ash based autoclaved cellular concrete blocks in coal mines for air duct work. Final report, January 25, 1993--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, M.L.

    1995-06-19

    Coal mines are required to provide ventilation to occupied portions of underground mines. Concrete block is used in this process to construct air duct walls. However, normal concrete block is heavy and not easy to work with and eventually fails dramatically after being loaded due to mine ceiling convergence and/or floor heave. Autoclaved cellular concrete block made from (70{plus_minus}%) coal fly ash is lightweight and less rigid when loaded. It is lighter and easier to use than regular concrete block for underground mine applications. It has also been used in surface construction around the world for over 40 years. Ohio Edison along with eight other electric utility companies, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and North American Cellular Concrete constructed a mobile demonstration plant to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block from utility fly ash. To apply this research in Ohio, Ohio Edison also worked with the Ohio Coal Development Office and CONSOL Inc. to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block not only from coal ash but also from LIMB ash, SNRB ash, and PFBC ash from various clean coal technology projects sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the potential for beneficial use of fly ash and clean coal technology by-products in the production of lightweight block.

  7. Molecular accessibility in solvent swelled coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, L.D.

    1994-04-01

    The conversion of coal by an economically feasible catalytic method requires the catalyst to diffuse into the coal sample so that hydrogenation catalysis can occur from within as well as the normal surface catalysis. Thus an estimate of the size, shape, and reactivity, of the pores in the coal before and after the swelling with different solvents is needed so that an optimum sized catalyst will be used. This study characterizes the accessible area found in Argonne Premium Coal Samples (APCS) using a EPR spin probe technique. The properties deduced in this manner correlate well with the findings deduced from SANS, NMR, SEM, SAXS and light scattering measurements. The use of nitroxide spin probes with swelling solvents is a simple way in which to gain an understanding of the pore structure of coals, how it changes in the presence of swelling solvents and the chemistry that occurs at the pore wall. Hydrogen bonding sites occur primarily in low-rank coals and vary in reactive strength as rank is varied. Unswelled coals contain small, spherical pores which disappear when coal is swelled in the presence of polar solvents. Swelling studies of polystyrene-divinyl benzene copolymers implied that coal is polymeric, contains significant quantities of covalent cross-links and the covalent cross-link density increases with rank.

  8. Extraction, separation, and analysis of high sulfur coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olesik, S.V.; Pekay, L.A.; Larkins, W. Jr.

    1992-05-31

    The work described in this report studies the removal of sulfur by oxidative interaction of various cupric salts with coal and also considers the possibility of removing organic sulfur by the selective interaction of supercritical ethanol with the organic coal matrix. Either one of these methods could potentially be used to pretreat coals before burning. The primary purpose of these studies is to ascertain the nature of the chemical reactions occurring, the chemical composition of the resultant products, and information on possible reaction mechanisms. This information should allow prediction of reasonable reaction conditions for the removal of organosulfur compound from coal.

  9. Advanced physical fine coal cleaning spherical agglomeration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The project included process development, engineering, construction, and operation of a 1/3 tph proof-of-concept (POC) spherical agglomeration test module. The POC tests demonstrated that physical cleaning of ultrafine coal by agglomeration using heptane can achieve: (1) Pyritic sulfur reductions beyond that possible with conventional coal cleaning methods; (2) coal ash contents below those which can be obtained by conventional coal cleaning methods at comparable energy recoveries; (3) energy recoveries of 80 percent or greater measured against the raw coal energy content; (4) complete recovery of the heptane bridging liquid from the agglomerates; and (5) production of agglomerates with 3/8-inch size and less than 30 percent moisture. Test results met or exceeded all of the program objectives. Nominal 3/8-inch size agglomerates with less than 20 percent moisture were produced. The clean coal ash content varied between 1.5 to 5.5 percent by weight (dry basis) depending on feed coal type. Ash reductions of the run-of-mine (ROM) coal were 77 to 83 percent. ROM pyritic sulfur reductions varied from 86 to 90 percent for the three test coals, equating to total sulfur reductions of 47 to 72 percent.

  10. Near-extinction and final burnout in coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, R.H.; Davis, K.A.

    1994-02-01

    The late stages of char combustion have a special technological significance, as carbon conversions of 99% or greater are typically required for the economic operation of pulverized coal fired boilers. In the present article, two independent optical techniques are used to investigate near-extinction and final burnout phenomenas. Captive particle image sequences, combined with in situ optical measurements on entrained particles, provide dramatic illustration of the asymptotic nature of the char burnout process. Single particle combustion to complete burnout is seen to comprise two distinct stages: (1) a rapid high-temperature combustion stage, consuming about 70% of the char carbon and ending with near-extinction of the heterogeneous reactions due to a loss of global particle reactivity, and (2) a final burnout stage occurring slowly at lower temperatures. For particles containing mineral matter, the second stage can be further subdivided into: (2a) late char combustion, which begins after the near-extinction event, and converts carbon-rich particles to mixed particle types at a lower temperature and a slower rate; and (2b) decarburization of ash -- the removal of residual carbon inclusions from inorganic (ash) frameworks in the very late stages of combustion. This latter process can be extremely slow, requiring over an order of magnitude more time than the primary rapid combustion stage. For particles with very little ash, the loss of global reactivity leading to early near-extinction is clearly related to changes in the carbonaceous char matrix, which evolves over the course of combustion. Current global kinetic models used for the prediction of char combustion rates and carbon burnout in boilers do not predict the asymptotic nature of char combustion. More realistic models accounting for the evolution of char structure are needed to make accurate predictions in the range of industrial interest.

  11. Coal-sand attrition system and its importance in fine coal cleaning. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, R.K.; Zhu, Qinsheng

    1993-08-01

    It is known that ultra-fine coals are prerequisite for the deep cleaning of most US coal seams if environmental pollution arising from the use of such coals is to be minimized. Therefore, the production of finely liberated coal particles in conjunction with reduced heavy metal contaminants at low costs is desirable, if not mandatory. The liberation of intimately disseminated impurities from the coal matrix therefore, demands that the material be ground to a high degree of fineness. Similarily, some technologies for coal utilization require superfine particles (i.e., sizes less than ten microns). This implies additional costs for coal preparation plants due to the high energy and media costs associated with fine grinding operations. Besides, there are problems such as severe product contaminations due to media wear and impairment of the quality of coal. Hence, proper choice of grinding media type is important from the viewpoints of cost reduction and product quality. The use of natural quartz sand as grinding media in the comminution of industrial minerals in stirred ball mills has been indicated. The advantages of natural sand compared to steel media include low specific energy inputs, elimination of heavy metal contaminants and low media costs. In this work, the effect of rotor speed, solids concentration and feed-size are studied on four coals in conjunction with silica sand and steel shot. The results obtained are used to evaluate the suitability of silica sands as an alternative grinding media. for coal. Coal-sand and coal-steel systems are compared in terms of specific energy consumption, product fineness, media/wear contaminationanalysis and calorific values, liberation spectrum and particle shape characteristics. In general cleaner flotation concentrate was obtained from coals when they were ground with sand media. The zeta potential of coals was found to be different and lower when they ground with sand.

  12. Low-rank coal thermal properties and diffusivity: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, W.F.

    1987-06-01

    This project developed techniques for measuring thermal properties and mass diffusivities of low-rank coals and coal powders. Using the concept of volume averaging, predictive models have been developed for these porous media properties. The Hot Wire Method was used for simultaneously measuring the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of both consolidated and unconsolidated low-rank coals. A new computer-interfaced experiment is presented and sample container designs developed for both coal powders and consolidated coals. A new mathematical model, based upon volume averaging, is presented for the prediction of these porous media properties. Velocity and temperature effects on liquid-phase dispersion through unconsolidated coal were determined. Radioactive tracer data were used to determine mass diffusivities. A new predictive mathematical model is presented based upon volume averaging. Vapor-phase diffusivity measurements of organic solvents in consolidated lignite coal are reported. An unsteady-state pressure response experiment with microcomputed-based data acquisition was developed to estimate dispersion coefficients through consolidated lignite coals. The mathematical analysis of the pressure response data provides the dispersion coefficient and the adsorption coefficient. 48 refs., 59 figs., 17 tabs.

  13. Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, W. G.; Reasoner, J. W.; Hower, J. C.; Yates, L. P.; Clark, C. P.; Davis, E.; Fitzpatrick, A.; Irefin, A.; Jiminez, A.; Jones, T. M.

    1984-02-01

    A group of 40 hvb coals, mostly from western Kentucky fields, has been examined with regard to ASTM Gieseler plastometric properties. Twenty-nine of these coals have also been studied over a range of temperatures by isothermal Gieseler plastometry. Raw Gieseler data provide melting and coking slopes and readily calculable fluidity spans. Maximum fluidity by slope intersection is a more consistent measure than observed maximum fluidity. Isothermal slopes and maximum fluidities follow Arrhenius temperature dependencies, with activation energies related systematically to fluid properties. These freshly sampled coals are also characterized by chemical, physical and petrographic criteria, by quantitative solvent extractions, by pyrolysis gas chromatography, by Fourier Transform infrared analysis of coals and extraction residues, by the HPLC analysis of coal extracts, and by optical microscopy of coals and Gieseler semi-coke residues. Multiple linear regression analysis yields three-term expressions which estimate maximum fluidities (both ASTM and isothermal) with R values of .90 to .92. Slopes and critical temperatures are similarly predictable. Plastometer experiments with selected coals under superatmospheric pressures show both melting slopes and maximum fluidities to be sharply increased, the latter by one to three orders of magnitude. Some suggestions are offered to accommodate this new information into the general body of knowledge concerning the phenomenon of plasticity in mid-ranked coals. 81 references, 28 figures, 40 tables.

  14. Diffusion of gases in New Mexico coals: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, F.L.; Smith, D.M.

    1987-02-01

    As part of the first phase of this study, characterization of the pore volume and surface area of coal was principally undertaken while the more extensive and complex diffusivity and high-pressure adsorption experiments were being built. The careful characterization work resulted in new understanding of the limitations of mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption analysis for coal. Our results indicate that as the size of coal particles in a sample decreases, a spurious, intruded-pore volume is indicated in mercury porosimetry. Furthermore, at higher pressures of Hg, the penetration of Hg may actually be a measure of micropore crushing rather than pore structure information. Nitrogen adsorption measurements do not reflect the total surface area of the coal which is easily accessed and measured by carbon dioxide. At the same time we found that condensation of nitrogen and NMR relaxation experiments may lead to significantly new interpretations of coal porosity. We find that measurements of condensation of nitrogen gives a direct measure of large pore volume that can be contrasted to total pore volumes. Preliminary NMR results show remarkable differences in apparent pore structure for similar New Mexico coals. The extension of basic science of coal structure and development of a potential new method for characterization of coal are major, long range impacts of this work. 41 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Development of the electroacoustic dewatering (EAD) process for fine/ultrafine coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.P.; Kim, B.C.; Menton, R.; Senapati, N.; Criner, C.L.; Jirjis, B.; Muralidhara, H.S.; Chou, Y.L.; Wu, H.; Hsieh, P.; Johnson, H.R.; Eason, R.; Chiang, S.M.; Cheng, Y.S.; Kehoe, D.

    1991-10-31

    Battelle (Columbus, Ohio) undertook development of its electro-acoustic (EAD) process to demonstrate its commercial potential for continuous dewatering of fine and ultrafine coals. The pilot plant and laboratory results, provided in this report, show that a commercial-size EAD machine is expected to economically achieve the dewatering targets for {minus}100 mesh and {minus}325 mesh coals. The EAD process utilizes a synergistic combination of electric and acoustic (e.g., ultrasonic) fields in conjunction with conventional mechanical processes, such as belt presses, screw presses, plate and frame filter presses, and vacuum filters. The application of EAD is typically most beneficial after a filter cake is formed utilizing conventional mechanical filtration. (VC)

  16. Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Thomas

    2012-01-26

    This SBIR program will result in improved LTA cell technology which is the fundamental building block of the Direct Coal ECL concept. As described below, ECL can make enormous efficiency and cost contributions to utility scale coal power. This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

  17. Thermal maturity patterns in Pennsylvanian coal-bearing rocks in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania: Chapter F.2 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Trippi, Michael H.; Hower, James C.; Grady, William C.; Levine, Jeffrey R.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal maturation patterns of Pennsylvanian strata in the Appalachian basin and part of the Black Warrior basin were determined by compiling previously published and unpublished percent-vitrinite-reflectance (%R0) measurements and preparing isograd maps on the basis of the measurements. The isograd values range from 0.6 %R0 in Ohio and the western side of the Eastern Kentucky coal field to 5.5 %R0 in the Southern field in the Pennsylvania Anthracite region, Schuylkill County, Pa. The vitrinite-reflectance values correspond to the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) coal-rank classes of high-volatile C bituminous to meta-anthracite, respectively. In general, the isograds show that thermal maturity patterns of Pennsylvanian coals within the Appalachian basin generally decrease from east to west. In the Black Warrior basin of Alabama, the isograds show a circular pattern with the highest values (greater than 1.6 %R0) centered in Jefferson County, Ala. Most of the observed patterns can be explained by variations in the depth of burial, variations in geothermal gradient, or a combination of both; however, there are at least four areas of higher ranking coal in the Appalachian basin that are difficult to explain by these two processes alone: (1) a set of west- to northwest-trending salients centered in Somerset, Cambria, and Fayette Counties, Pa.; (2) an elliptically shaped, northeast-trending area centered in southern West Virginia and western Virginia; (3) the Pennsylvania Anthracite region in eastern Pennsylvania; and (4) the eastern part of the Black Warrior coal field in Alabama. The areas of high-ranking coal in southwestern Pennsylvania, the Black Warrior coal field, and the Pennsylvania Anthracite region are interpreted here to represent areas of higher paleo-heat flow related to syntectonic movement of hot fluids towards the foreland associated with Alleghanian deformation. In addition to the higher heat flow from these fluids, the Pennsylvania

  18. Geologic setting and water quality of selected basins in the active coal-mining areas of Ohio, 1989-91, with a summary of water quality for 1985-91

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedam, A.C.; Francy, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents streamwater- and ground-water-quality data collected to characterize the baseline water quality for 21 drainage basins in the coal-mining region of eastern Ohio. The study area is mostly within the unglaciated part of eastern Ohio along the western edge of the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province. The data collected from 1989-91 and presented in this report represent the third and final phase of a 7-year study to assess baseline water quality in Ohio's coal region during 1985-1991. During 1989-91, 246 samples from 41 streamwater sites were collected periodically from a long-term site network. Ranges and medians of measurements made at the long-term streamwater sites were following: specific conductance, 270 to 5,170 and 792 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius; pH, 2.7 to 9.1 and 7.8; alkalinity, 1 to 391 and 116 mg/L (milligrams per liter). Ranges and medians of laboratory analyses of the same samples were the following: dissolved sulfate, 13 to 2,100 and 200 mg/L; dissolved aluminum, <10 to 17,000 and 300 ? /L (micrograms per liter); dissolved iron, <10 to 53,000 and 60 ? /L; and dissolved manganese, <10 to 17,000 and 295 ? /L. The ranges for concentrations of total recoverable aluminum, iron, and manganese were similar to the ranges of concentrations found for dissolved constituents. Medians of total recoverable aluminum and iron were about 10 times greater than the medians of dissolved aluminum and iron. During 1989-91, once-only sample collections were done at 45 streamwater sites in nine basins chosen for synoptic sampling. At several sites in the Middle Hocking River basin and Leading Creek basin, water had low pH and high concentrations of dissolved aluminum, iron and manganese. These water-quality characteristics are commonly associated with ace mine drainage. Throughout the entire 7-year study (1985-91), medians for most constituents at the long-term streamwater-sampling sites were fairly consistent, despite the

  19. 75 FR 44978 - Notice of Availability of the Wright Area Coal Final Environmental Impact Statement That Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ..., WYW172388, WYW172685, WYW173408, WYW176095] Notice of Availability of the Wright Area Coal Final Environmental Impact Statement That Includes Four Federal Coal Lease- by-Applications, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of... Area Coal project that contains four Federal coal Lease-by-Applications (LBAs), and by this...

  20. Biodegradation and bioconversion of coals by fungi: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, B.

    1988-03-07

    The project obtained in laboratory culture new varieties of fungi capable of bioconverting solid coals directly to liquid products, and characterized the rate and extent of bioconversion activity on a variety of coal types. Several hundred fungal isolates were screened for bioconversions of weathered lignite. At least 30 apparently unique strains displayed lignite biconversion activity. Each of the new lignite-solubilizing strains was assayed for comparative activity on three different weathered, Gulf Coast lignites. Different strains exhibited differing degrees of activity on the different lignites. Degeree of natural weathering appeared to be positively correlated with biosolubility of the three lignites. Taxonomic studies were made on selected fungal isolates; identifications to level of genus were made where possible. Cultures of some of the selected strains were sent to several research laboratories where the new strains have been applied to coal bioconversion research. Selected fungal strains were tested for bioconversions of other coals. Some of the highly weathered, higher-ranked coals were solubilized; others, even though weathered, were resistant to bioconversion. A quantitative assay technique was developed and, applied to selected fungi acting on several coals. Time-course measurements revealed marked differences in pattern, rate, and degree of solubilization of different coals by different organisms. 15 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Gaseous phase coal surface modification. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Okoh, J.M.; Pinion, J.; Thiensatit, S.

    1992-05-07

    In this report, we present an improved, feasible and potentially cost effective method of cleaning and beneficiating ultrafine coal. Increased mechanization of mining methods and the need towards depyritization, and demineralization have led to an increase in the quantity of coal fines generated in recent times. For example, the amount of {minus}100 mesh coal occurring in coal preparation plant feeds now typically varies from 5 to 25% of the total feed. Environmental constraints coupled with the greatly increased cost of coal have made it increasingly important to recover more of these fines. Our method chemically modifies the surface of such coals by a series of gaseous phase treatments employing Friedel-Crafts reactions. By using olefins (ethene, propene and butene) and hydrogen chloride catalyst at elevated temperature, the surface hydrophobicity of coal is enhanced. This increased hydrophobicity is manifest in surface phenomena which reflect conditions at the solid/liquid interphase (zeta potential) and those which reflect conditions at the solid/liquid/gas interphases (contact angle, wettability and floatability).

  2. Inhibition of retrogressive reactions in coal/petroleum co-processing. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Tomic, J.

    1993-05-25

    The objective of this study was to examine the processes in coal/petroleum coprocessing systems which led to coke formation. Specifically, the interactions between the petroleum residue and coal, leading to retrogressive products, were investigated. Five coals were reacted with five model compounds in order to investigate the coal conversions in a variety of solvents and to determine the role of the solvent in promoting or inhibiting coal conversion. The selected model compounds range from paraffinic to fully aromatic and were chosen as representative of types of compounds that are found in petroleum residua. Coprocessing experiments were conducted using the five coals and three petroleum residua. The effect of temperature on coal conversions was crucial. The coal conversions at 350 and 400{degree}C seem to be governed by the nature of the coal and to a lesser extent by the petroleum residua. Negative coal conversions were observed above 400{degree}C indicating that retrogressive processes had occurred. At temperatures higher than 400{degree}C, the petroleum residua undergo physical and chemical transformations and the influence of the petroleum residua on coal conversions is significant. The structural features of the residues indicated that the residues were predominately coal-derived. An overall increase in aromaticity was observed with increasing temperature which was also accompanied by loss of oxygen functional groups. The retrogressive reactions with non-caking coals involve carbonyl and carboxyl group leading to a final solid characterized by a cross-linked structure. In the case of caking coal, these reactions are governed by loss of aromatic oxygen groups and loss of alkyl groups.

  3. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation. Final report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F.; Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C.; Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W.; Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R.

    1992-03-01

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal`s emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  4. Applied research and evaluation of process concepts for liquefaction and gasification of western coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, W. H.

    1980-09-01

    Fourteen sections, including five subsections, of the final report covering work done between June 1, 1975 to July 31, 1980 on research programs in coal gasification and liquefaction have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  5. Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

  6. Research engine test of coal slurry fuels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-02-01

    The program discussed in this report involved evaluation of the combustion characteristics of several coal slurry fuels in a single cylinder test engine operating under conditions simulating medium size and speed commercial diesel engines. Baseline performance was established using a reference DF-2 test fuel. Slurry fuels tested included: (1) 45% of a low volatile coal in diesel fuel; (2) 40% of cleaned of a cleaned high-volatile coal in a carrier containing 91% methanol and 9% water; and (3) 41% cleaned, high volatile coal in methanol. The testing program demonstrated the importance of several engine operating and fuel composition parameters on engine and ancillary system performance: (1) coal particle top size of 38 microns was identified as the limiting value for the test equipment utilized in this study; coal volatility affects burnout, but ignition is unaffected as long as the slurry carrier provides the ignition source; coal ash content affects the wear rate, but wear rate is not linear with ash content or total ash throughput; and engine components may require modifications in order to handle fuels containing abrasive solid materials. These tests demonstrated that slurry fuels are a viable alternative to highly refined petroleum fuels in medium speed diesel engine applications. However, additional research is required before widespread application of these fuels can occur. The study demonstrated the lack of available information on the microscale mechanisms of slurry fuel atomization, ignition, and combustion in the diesel engine combustion chamber environment. Also, the problems of burning a coal/water slurry in the engine were not addressed. 12 references, 51 figures, 14 tables.

  7. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The configuration of the subscale combustor has evolved during the six years of this program from a system using only an impact separator to remove particulates to a system which also included a slagging cyclone separator before the lean-quench combustor. The system also now includes active slag tapping after the impact separator rather than a bucket to collect the slag. The subscale 12 MM Btu/hr (higher heating value, HHV) slagging combustor has demonstrated excellent coal-fired operation at 6 atm. The combustor has fired both coal-water mixtures (CWM) and pulverized coal (PC). Three Wyoming subbituminous coals and two bituminous coals have been successfully fired in the TVC. As a result of this active testing, the following conclusions may be drawn: (1) it was possible to achieve the full design thermal capacity of 12 MM Btu/hr with the subscale slagging combustor, while burning 100% pulverized coal and operating at the design pressure of 6 atm; (2) because of the separate-chamber, rich-lean design of the subscale slagging combustor, NO{sub x} emissions that easily meet the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) limits were achieved; (3) carbon burnout efficiency was in excess of 99% when 100% coal-fired; (4) ninety percent of the ash can be separated as slag in the impact separator, and a total 98 to 99% removed with the addition of the slagging cyclone separator; (5) Objectives for third-stage exit temperature (1850{degrees}F), and exit temperature pattern factor (14%) were readily achieved; (6) overall pressure loss is currently an acceptable 5 to 6% without cyclone separator and 7 to 9% with the cyclone; and (7) feeding pulverized coal or sorbent into the combustor against 6 atm pressure is achievable.

  8. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.W.

    1992-11-30

    This report documents studies on the effects of gas sorption on coal, with the intent of eventually evaluating how sorption and strain affect permeability. These studies were, carried out at the University of Alabama during the period from 1989 through 1992. Two major experimental methods were developed and used. In the strain experiments, electronic strain gauges were attached to polished blocks of coal in order to measure linear and volumetric swelling due to gas sorption. The effects of bedding plane orientation, of gas type, and of coal type were investigated. In the gravimetric experiment the weight of small samples of coal was measured during exposure to high pressure gases. Sample measurements were corrected for buoyancy effects and for sample swelling, and the results were plotted in the form of Langmuir isotherms. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of grain size, coal type, moisture, and of sorbant gas. The advantage of this method is that it can be applied to very small samples, and it enabled comparison liptinite versus vitrinite concentrates, and kerogen rich versus kerogen depleted oil shales. Also included is a detailed discussion of the makeup of coal and its effect on gas sorption behavior.

  9. Steam conditioning of coal for synfuels production: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, R.A.; Zhou, P.; Brandes, S.D.

    1988-11-01

    Conditioning of coal in steam was explored as a means of improving the yield and quality of condensable product obtainable in the mild gasification of coal. The possibility of lowering the pressure needed for steam conditioning was examined. Yields of conditioning volatiles and yields of pyridine extract from conditioned Illinois No. 6 coal, at conditioning temperatures from 500 to 760/degree/F and pressures from one to fifty atm, show that steam conditioning is successful at the lower pressures as well. An important new steam conditioning regime at atmospheric pressure has been tentatively identified with a maximum at about 570/degree/F (300/degree/C) where the yield of extract plus volatiles is one-third greater than that for raw coal. The yields of volatiles released during conditioning of Mississippi lignite in steam and in helium were determined in the temperature range 500 to 750/degree/F at atmospheric pressure and at 50 atm. The yields were surprisingly high. Pyridine extractions of Mississippi lignite were conducted on samples conditioned in steam at 1 and 50 atm. For comparison, extraction yields were also determined for samples conditioned in helium. A fluidized bed steam mild gasification test facility has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. Mild gasification runs were made using both raw and steam conditioned Illinois No. 6 coal. At 1026/degree/F the yield of condensable product from conditioned coal is raised to 37.4 wt % daf, 15% (relative) higher than for raw coal (conditioning volatiles not included). Moreover, the molecular weight is reduced 31%. 9 refs., 33 figs., 19 tabs.

  10. The single electron transfer chemistry of coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Flowers, R.A. II

    1994-12-31

    This research addressed electron donar properties and radical reactions in coal. Solid residues from pyridine Soxhlet extractions of Pocahontas No. 3, Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh No. 8, Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals were exposed to 4-vinylpyridine vapors and swelled. All of the 4-vinylpyridine could not be removed under vacuum at 100{degree}C. Diffuse reflectance FTIR revealed the presence of poly-(4-vinylpyridine) in the Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals. EPR spectra displayed the loss of inertinite radicals in Upper Freeport, Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak residues after exposure to 4-vinylpyridine. There was little change in the vitrinite radical density or environment. The molecule N,N{prime}-Diphenyl-p-phenylene diamine (DPPD) was exposed to the solid residues from pyridine Soxhlet extractions of the above coals. Diffuse reflectance FTIR failed to detect the imine product from radical reaction with DPPD. EPR spectra displayed the loss of inertinite radicals in Upper Freeport and Wyodak residues. 7,7,8,8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and Tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) were deposited into coals in pyridine. FTIR indicated complete conversion of TCNQ to a material with a singly occupied LUMO. In TCNE the LUMO is about 30% occupied. TCNQ and TCNE were deposited into the pyridine extracts and residues of Illinois No. 6 and Pittsburgh No. 8 coals. Only a small amount of the TCNQ and TCNE displayed nitrile shifts in the IR spectrum of a material with an occupied LUMO. It has been concluded that TCNQ must be part of the aromatic stacks in coal and the TCNQ LUMO is part of an extended band.

  11. Heavy-liquid benefication of fine coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, D.V. Jr.; Simmons, F.J.

    1983-03-01

    Heavy-Liquid Benefication of Fine Coal is a multitask, fundamental research program directed towards development of a basic understanding of the rheology of fine-coal/heavy-liquid slurries and methods of obtaining useful rheological data, and the application of this understanding to the development of a heavy-liquid fine-coal benefication pilot test facility utilizing cyclone technology. The project duration was two years beginning October 1980, with a total contract cost of $331,000. The major milestones were identified as: (1) the development of a reliable, accurate method for the measurement of the viscosity of various solid/heavy-liquid slurry systems; (2) a survey of a limited number of organic true-heavy-liquids and the choice of one that was representative of this class of liquids for utilization in this project; (3) the evaluation of the rheology of the coal/heavy-liquid and coal/water/magnetite slurry systems using a matrix of parameters including size distribution, solids concentration and density distribution; (4) the design, construction and testing of a one-ton-per-hour pilot-scale cyclone-based true-heavy-liquid, fine-coal benefication facility; and (5) evaluation of the coal cleaning performance and process economics of the pilot facility as compared to state-of-the-art technology. The first nine months of this effort were devoted to the rheological studies, with an effort over the next six months directed towards the design, construction and evaluation of the heavy liquid cyclone (HLC) pilot facility. 35 figures, 14 tables.

  12. Coal desulfurization by bacterial treatment and column flotation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.

    1994-06-01

    A review of the literature showed that bacterial leaching, using the microorganism Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, was a very effective technique for removing pyrite from coal, as it could dissolve even the finest pyrite particles without the need for expensive reagents or extreme processing conditions. Unfortunately, bacterial leaching is also rather slow, and so the initial goal of this research was to decrease the leaching time as much as possible. However, this still left the bacteria needing approximately a week to remove half of the pyritic sulfur, and so a faster technique was sought. Since it had been reported in the literature that T. ferrooxidans could be used to depress the flotation of pyrite during froth flotation of coal, this was investigated further. By studying the recovery mechanisms of coal-pyrite in froth flotation, it was found that pyrite was being recovered by entrainment and by locking to coal particles, not by true flotation of hydrophobic pyrite. Therefore, no pyrite depressant could be of any significant benefit for keeping pyrite out of the coal froth product, and it was much more important to prevent entrainment from occurring. Countercurrent flotation columns were invented to essentially eliminate entrainment effects, by washing the froth and reducing mixing of the froth and tailings products. Existing flotation columns tend to be quite simple, and in order to give reasonable product quality they must be very tall (typically 30--45 feet). As a result, they have difficulty in handling the high froth volumes which occur in coal flotation, and are awkward to install in existing plants. The bulk of this project therefore concentrated on developing an improved coal flotation column, and testing it under actual plant conditions.

  13. Surface magnetic enhancement for coal cleaning. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J.Y.

    1992-10-01

    The program consisted of a fundamental study to define the chemistry for the interactions between magnetic reagent and mineral and coal particles, a laboratory study to determine the applicability of this technology on coal cleaning, and a parameter study to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of this technology for desulfurization and de-ashing under various processing schemes. Surface magnetic enhancement using magnetic reagent is a new technology developed at the Institute. This technology can be applied to separate pyrite and other minerals particles from coal with a magnetic separation after adsorbing magnetic reagent on the surface of pyrite and other minerals particles. Particles which have absorbed magnetic reagent are rendered magnetic. The adsorption can be controlled to yield selectivity. Thus, the separation of traditionally nonmagnetic materials with a magnetic separator can be achieved. Experiments have been performed to demonstrate the theoretical fundamentals and the applications of the technology. Adsorbability, adsorption mechanisms, and adsorption selectivity are included in the fundamental study. The effects of particle size, magnetic reagent dosage, solid contents, magnetic matrix, applied magnetic field strengths, retention times, and feed loading capacities are included in the application studies. Three coals, including Illinois No. 6, Lower Kittanning and Pocahontas seams, have been investigated. More than 90% pyritic sulfur and ash reductions have been achieved. Technical and economic feasibilities of this technology have been demonstrated in this study. Both are competitive to that of the froth flotation approach for coal cleaning.

  14. Healy Clean Coal Project: Healy coal firing at TRW Cleveland Test Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, T.; Petrill, E.; Sheppard, D.

    1991-08-01

    A test burn of two Alaskan coals was conducted at TRW`s Cleveland test facility in support of the Healy Clean Coal Project, as part of Clean Coal Technology III Program in which a new power plant will be constructed using a TRW Coal Combustion System. This system features ash slagging technology combined with NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} control. The tests, funded by the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) and TRW, were conducted to verify that the candidate Healy station coals could be successfully fired in the TRW coal combustor, to provide data required for scale-up to the utility project size requirements, and to produce sufficient flash-calcined material (FCM) for spray dryer tests to be conducted by Joy/NIRO. The tests demonstrated that both coals are viable candidates for the project, provided the data required for scale-up, and produced the FCM material. This report describes the modifications to the test facility which were required for the test burn, the tests run, and the results of the tests.

  15. Utilization of coal-associated minerals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Slonaker, J. F.; Akers, D. J.; Alderman, J. K.

    1980-01-01

    Under contract number DE-AS21-77ET10533 with the US-DOE several methods of utilizing coal associated by-products were examined for potential commercial use. Such use could transform a costly waste disposal situation into new materials for further use and could provide incentive for the adoption of new coal utilization processes. Several utilization processes appear to have merit and are recommended for further study. Each process is discussed separately in the text of this report. Common coal cleaning processes were also examined to determine the effect of such processes on the composition of by-products. Data obtained in this portion of the research effort are reported in the Appendix. Information of this type is required before utilization processes can be considered. A knowledge of the mineral composition of these materials is also required before even simple disposal methods can be considered.

  16. Studies of low rank coal stabilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Pittsburgh Research Center, tested feed coal and product samples from Wyoming and Montana for thermal stability in the adiabatic oven and sealed flask apparatus. The results indicated that the products had higher thermal stabilities in comparison with the feed coals. However, both the products samples and feed coals exhibited high spontaneous combustion potentials. A report on these studies was submitted in December 1995. Experiments were also completed in the adiabatic oven to determine the rate of decrease in the heating rate of a reactive sample on exposure to pulses of moist air, and moist nitrogen. The results indicated that with each succeeding pulse, longer time were required to reach selected elevated temperatures. The results also indicated some level of synergy between water and oxygen in the heat generation reaction. The data and results were transmitted to Dr. Dennis Finseth upon completion of the experiments.

  17. Dewatering of ultrafine coal: Final report, August 1984-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Shiao-Hung; Klinzing, G.E.; Morsi, B.I.; Tierney, J.W.; Badgujar, M.; Binkley, T.; Cheng, Yisun; Huang, Suxuan; Qamar, I.; Venkatadri, R.

    1986-12-01

    The surfactant, Aerosol-OT, was used to wash distilled water cakes. In previous studies, cakes were washed with Triton X-114. The dewatering performance and influence on cake structure of the two reagents are compared. Also, filter cakes were analyzed using an image analysis system and micrographic analysis of coal particles was initiated. In the area of theoretical modelling, the concept of bond-flow correlation greatly improved the network model predicting the experimental desaturation curves. Predicted results for treated cakes suggested that the effect of the presence of surface-active agents was adequately accounted for. The effects of the various operating conditions on the filtration/dewatering characteristics of the 10 ..mu..m coal particles were assessed and comparisons with the -32 mesh coal were made as to its trends in response to changes in the operating conditions. 20 refs., 75 figs., 17 tabs.

  18. Demonstrated reserve base for coal in New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, G.K.

    1995-02-01

    The new demonstrated reserve base estimate of coal for the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, is 11.28 billion short tons. This compares with 4.429 billion short tons in the Energy Information Administration`s demonstrated reserve base of coal as of January 1, 1992 for all of New Mexico and 2.806 billion short tons for the San Juan Basin. The new estimate includes revised resource calculations in the San Juan Basin, in San Juan, McKinley, Sandoval, Rio Arriba, Bernalillo and Cibola counties, but does not include the Raton Basin and smaller fields in New Mexico. These estimated {open_quotes}remaining{close_quotes} coal resource quantities, however, include significant adjustments for depletion due to past mining, and adjustments for accessibility and recoverability.

  19. Recovery and reconnaissance of the Leading Creek watershed, Meigs County, Ohio, following a dewatering of Meigs {number_sign}31 coal mine

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, R.J.; Astin, L.E.; Yeager, M.M.; Cherry, D.S.; Hassel, J.H. van |

    1995-12-31

    A database has been developed before and after the dewatering of the Meigs {number_sign}31 deep coal mine in Meigs County, Ohio, three years ago. This strategy was to compare potential recovery of the watershed in the mainstem of Leading Creek as well as to reconnaissance the tributaries for point-source input into the creek. After the dewatering process, {approximately} half of the 31-mile Leading Creek mainstem received a discharge of conductivity, low pH, high metals (iron, manganese, copper, aluminum), and total suspended solids (TSS). Most forms of aquatic life in the creek were depleted in the impacted areas, but recovery has been encouraging. Relative fish abundance has returned to pre-event levels, while benthic macroinvertebrates show recovery in two key stream segments. Reconnaissance of the watershed indicated that the system is uniquely segregated with high sedimentation from agricultural input in the upper half and abandoned mined land (AML) discharges in the lower. The AML-influenced tributaries were intermittently toxic throughout the year with 48-hr LC50 values of 14.6--6.0% effluent at Thomas Fork tributary. Macroinvertebrate assemblages in many of the AML and agriculturally influenced tributaries ranged from 0--3 taxa. The consequence of erosion/sedimentation loading is being addressed relative to autochromous input of in-stream AML/TSS input versus that from allochthomous input from stream bank/land use management.

  20. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-08-01

    In an effort to develop new disposable catalysts for direct coal liquefaction, several types of clay-supported pyrrhotite catalysts were prepared and tested. These included iron-pillared montmorillonite, mixed iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite, iron-impregnated montmorillonite, and iron oxometallate-impregnated montmorillonite.

  1. Biological production of ethanol from coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the ``wild strain`` produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  2. Evaluation of hyperbaric filtration for fine coal dewatering. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.; Hogg, R.; Fonseca, A.

    1996-08-15

    The main objectives of the project were to investigate the fundamental aspects of particle-liquid interaction in fine coal dewatering, to conduct laboratory and pilot plant studies on the applicability of hyperbaric filter systems and to develop process conditions for dewatering of fine clean coal to less than 20% moisture. The program consisted of three phases, namely Phase 1 -- Model Development, Phase 2 -- Laboratory Studies, Phase 3 -- Pilot Plant Testing. The Pennsylvania State University led efforts in Phase 1, the University of Kentucky in Phase 2, and CONSOL Inc. in Phase 3 of the program. All three organizations were involved in all the three phases of the program. The Pennsylvania State University developed a theoretical model for hyperbaric filtration systems, whereas the University of Kentucky conducted experimental studies to investigate fundamental aspects of particle-liquid interaction and application of high pressure filter in fine coal dewatering. The optimum filtration conditions identified in Phase 1 and 2 were tested in two of the CONSOL Inc. coal preparation plants using an Andritz Ruthner portable hyperbaric filtration unit.

  3. Basic properties of coals and other solids. Final report, September 1, 1989--August 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Arnett, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    The previous project dissected the heats of interactions of a series of coals into components that represented Bronsted acidity, hydrogen-bonding acidity and dispersion force interactions through comparison with the simple prototype solid acids: sulfonic acid resin, silica, and graphitized carbon black respectively. The present grant has emphasized the interaction of basic components in the coal with strong Bronsted acids and boron trichloride, a very strong Lewis acid, with a brief examination of the interactions of the coals with phenols as weaker hydrogen-bonding acids. We have also compared several coals with liquids derived from them at Wilsonville and Exxon. Finally, we have examined the effect of citric acid washing on several coals.

  4. Perminalized Alethopteris from the Upper Pennsylvanian of Ohio and Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Mickle, J.E.; Rothwell, G.W.

    1982-03-01

    Fern-like foliage referable to Alethopteris Steinberg has been discovered in coal balls of Late Pennsylvanian age from near Staubenville, Ohio, and Berryville, Illinois. Pinnule morphology is described from specimens preserved on coal-ball surfaces.

  5. Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-31

    As a result of the investigations carried out during Phase 1 of the Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Generation Systems (Combustion 2000), the UTRC-led Combustion 2000 Team is recommending the development of an advanced high performance power generation system (HIPPS) whose high efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions will enable the US to use its abundant coal resources to satisfy current and future demand for electric power. The high efficiency of the power plant, which is the key to minimizing the environmental impact of coal, can only be achieved using a modern gas turbine system. Minimization of emissions can be achieved by combustor design, and advanced air pollution control devices. The commercial plant design described herein is a combined cycle using either a frame-type gas turbine or an intercooled aeroderivative with clean air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a coal-fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The best performance from the cycle is achieved by using a modern aeroderivative gas turbine, such as the intercooled FT4000. A simplified schematic is shown. In the UTRC HIPPS, the conversion efficiency for the heavy frame gas turbine version will be 47.4% (HHV) compared to the approximately 35% that is achieved in conventional coal-fired plants. This cycle is based on a gas turbine operating at turbine inlet temperatures approaching 2,500 F. Using an aeroderivative type gas turbine, efficiencies of over 49% could be realized in advanced cycle configuration (Humid Air Turbine, or HAT). Performance of these power plants is given in a table.

  6. High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Greenhalgh, M.L.

    1992-12-01

    Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

  7. Surface Properties of Photo-Oxidized Bituminous Coals: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Natural weathering has a detrimental effect on the hydrophobic nature of coal, which in turn can influence clean-coal recovery during flotation. Few techniques are available that can establish the quality of coal surfaces and that have a short analysis time to provide input for process control. Luminescence emissions which can be quantified with an optical microscope and photometer system, are measurably influenced by degree of weathering as well as by mild storage deterioration. In addition, it has been shown that when vitrinite is irradiated with a relatively high intensity flux of violet- or ultraviolet- light in the presence of air, photo-oxidation of the surface occurs. The combination of measuring the change in luminescence emission intensity with degree of surface oxidation provided the impetus for the current investigation. The principal aim of this research was to determine whether clear correlations could be established among surface oxygen functionality, hydrophobicity induced by photo-oxidation, and measurements of luminescence intensity and alteration. If successful, the project would result in quantitative luminescence techniques based on optical microscopy that would provide a measure of the changes in surface properties as a function of oxidation and relate them to coal cleanability. Two analytical techniques were designed to achieve these goals. Polished surfaces of vitrain bands or a narrow size fraction of powdered vitrain concentrates were photo-oxidized using violet or ultraviolet light fluxes and then changes in surface properties and chemistry were measured using a variety of near-surface analytical techniques. Results from this investigation demonstrate that quantitative luminescence intensity measurements can be performed on fracture surfaces of bituminous rank coals (vitrains) and that the data obtained do reveal significant variations depending upon the level of surface oxidation. Photo-oxidation induced by violet or ultraviolet light

  8. Development and testing of commercial-scale, coal-fired combustion systems: Phase III. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Based on studies that indicated a large potential for significantly increased coal-firing in the commercial sector, the U.S. Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) sponsored a multi-phase development effort for advanced coal combustion systems. This Final Report presents the results of the last phase (Phase III) of a project for the development of an advanced coal-fired system for the commercial sector of the economy. The project performance goals for the system included dual-fuel capability (i.e., coal as primary fuel and natural gas as secondary fuel), combustion efficiency exceeding 99 percent, thermal efficiency greater than 80 percent, turndown of at least 3:1, dust-free and semi-automatic dry ash removal, fully automatic start-up with system purge and ignition verification, emissions performance exceeding New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and approaching those produced by oil-fired, Commercial-sized units, and reliability, safety, operability, maintainability, and service life comparable to oil-fired units. The program also involved a site demonstration at a large facility owned by Striegel Supply Company, a portion of which was leased to MTCI. The site, mostly warehouse space, was completely unheated and the advanced coal-fired combustion system was designed and sized to heat this space. Three different coals were used in the project, one low and one high sulfur pulverized Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, and a micronized low volatile, bituminous coal. The sorbents used were Pfizer dolomitic limestone and an Anvil lime. More than 100 hours of screening test`s were performed to characterize the system. The parameters examined included coal firing rate, excess air level, ash recycle rate, coal type, dolomitic limestone feed rate, and steam injection rate. These tests indicated that some additional modifications for coal burning in the system were required.

  9. Investigation of formation of nitrogen compounds in coal combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, D.W.; Crane, I.D.; Wendt, J.O.L.

    1983-10-01

    This is the final report on DOE contract number DE-AC21-80MC14061. It concerns the formation of nitrogen oxide from fuel-bound nitrogen during coal combustion. The work reported was divided into three tasks. They addressed problems of time-resolving pyrolysis rates of coal under simulated combustion conditions, the combustion of the tar that results from such pyrolysis, and theoretical modeling of the pyrolysis process. In all of these tasks, special attention was devoted to the fate of coal nitrogen. The first two tasks were performed by Exxon Research and Engineering Company. 49 references.

  10. Language Development Component: All Day Kindergarten Program 1992-1993. Ohio Disadvantaged Pupil Program Fund. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jessie; And Others

    This report describes the All Day Kindergarten (ADK) Program undertaken at 18 elementary schools in Columbus, Ohio, and presents an evaluation of the language development component of the program. ADK provides an extra half day of instruction, using a language-based curriculum to reinforce the skills, concepts, and educational experiences taught…

  11. CLASSIFICATION OF HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION, HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY OF THE LITTLE MIAMI RIVER WATERSHED IN SOUTHWEST OHIO, USA (FINAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document and associated land use/land cover (LULC) coverage, entitled Classification of High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA, is the result of a collaborative effort among an interdisci...

  12. Innovative coal-fueled diesel engine injector. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of this research investigation was to develop an electronic coal water slurry injection system in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of CWS at various engine load and speed conditions without external ignition sources. The combination of the new injection system and the TICS is designed to reduce injector nozzle spray orifice wear by lowering the peak injection pressure requirements. (VC)

  13. Utah coal core methane desorption project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Utah Geological and Mineral Survey under a cooperative grant, FG21-80MC14257 as amended, with the Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, has collected one hundred fifty two coal core samples for determination of methane content by the ''Direct Method.'' These samples along with available samples from previous work have been examined petrographically to determine possible relationships with gas content. Reflectance, maceral analysis, fluorescence analysis, long proximate, and ultimate analyses have been determined.

  14. Enhanced coal hydrogasification via oxidative pretreatment. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.

    1992-04-16

    The gasification of coal char by hydrogen is much slower than in steam or carbon dioxide; moreover, hydrogasification rate in pure hydrogen decreases sharply with conversion for most carbons. To overcome this kinetic behavior, the oxidation of the char prior to and during hydrogasification has been investigated as a means of enhancing hydro gasification rate. Kinetic rate studies under well-characterized conditions have been complemented by careful surface analyses to characterize oxygen on the char surface prior to and during hydrogasification.

  15. MHD coal combustor technology. Final report, phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The design, performance, and testing of a 20-MW coal combustor for scaleup to 50 MW for use in an MHD generator are described. The design incorporates the following key features: (1) a two-stage combustor with an intermediate slag separator to remove slag at a low temperture, thus minimizing enthalpy losses required for heating and vaporizing the slag; (2) a first-stage pentad (four air streams impinging on one coal stream) injector design with demonstrated efficient mixing, promoting high carbon burnout; (3) a two-section first-stage combustion chamber; the first stage using a thin slag-protected refractory layer and the second section using a thick refractory layer, both to minimize heat losses; (4) a refractory lining in the slag separator to minimize heat losses; (5) a second-stage combustor, which provided both de-swirl of the combustion products exiting from the slag separator and simple mixing of the vitiated secondary air and seed; (6) a dense-phase coal feed system to minimize cold carrier gas entering the first-stage combustors; (7) a dry seed injection system using pulverized K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ with a 1% amorphous, fumed silicon dioxide additive to enhance flowability, resulting in rapid vaporization and ionization and ensuring maximum performance; and (8) a performance evaluation module (PEM) of rugged design based on an existing, successfully-fired unit. (WHK)

  16. Healy Clean Coal Project, Healy, Alaska final Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-14

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) provides the mechanism to evaluate the integrated coal combustion/emission control system being demonstrated by the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP) as part-of the third solicitation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT-III). The EMP monitoring is intended to satisfy two objectives: (1) to develop the information base necessary for identification, assessment, and mitigation of potential environmental problems arising from replication of the technology and (2) to identify and quantify project-specific and site-specific environmental impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents (Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision). The EMP contains a description of the background and history of development of the project technologies and defines the processes that will take place in the combustion and spray dryer absorber systems, including the formation of flash-calcined material (FCM) and its use in sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal from the flue gases. It also contains a description of the existing environmental resources of the project area. The EMP includes two types of environmental monitoring that are to be used to demonstrate the technologies of the HCCP: compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring. Compliance monitoring activities include air emissions, wastewater effluents, and visibility. Monitoring of these resources provide the data necessary to demonstrate that the power plant can operate under the required state and federal statutes, regulations, and permit requirements.

  17. Advanced concepts in coal liquefaction: Optimization of reactor configuration in coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, V.R.; Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.

    1994-11-01

    The overall objective of this Project was to find the ways to effectively reduce the cost of coal liquids to about dollar 25 per barrel of crude oil equivalent. The work described herein is primarily concerned with the testing at the laboratory scale of three reactor configuration concepts, namely (1) a fixed-bed plug-flow reactor as a ``finishing reactor`` in coal liquefaction, (2) three-stage well-mixed reactors in series, and (3) interstage stream concentration/product separation. The three reactor configurations listed above were tested during this project using a 20 cc tubing microreactor, a fixed-bed plug flow reactor, and a two-stage modified Robinson-Mahoney reactor system. The reactor schemes were first evaluated based on theoretical modelling studies, then experimentally evaluated at the microautoclave level and laboratory scale continuous operations. The fixed-bed ``finishing reactor`` concept was evaluated in both the upflow and the downflow modes of operation using a partially converted coal-solvent slurry as feed. For most of the testing of concepts at the microautoclave level, simulated coal, recycle oil, and slurry feedstocks were either specially prepared (to represent a specific state of coal/resid conversion) and/or obtained from HRI`s other ongoing bench-scale and PDU scale coal liquefaction experiments. The three-stage continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and interstage product stream separation/concentration concepts were tested using a simulated three-stage CSTR system by employing a laboratory-scale ebullated-bed system and a modified version of the HRI`s existing Robinson-Mahoney fixed catalyst basket reactor system. This testing was conducted as a fourteen day long continuous run, divided into four Conditions to allow for a comparison of the new three-stage CSTR and interstage product concentration concepts with a two-stage CSTR baseline configuration.

  18. Changes in ground-water quality resulting from surface coal mining of small watershed in Jefferson County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hren, Janet

    1986-01-01

    Two samples were collected from each of six wells in a small watershed in Jefferson County, Ohio, in 1984. The watershed was mined and reclamation begun in 1980. Data collected from 1976 through 1982 indicate that ground-water quality was still changing at that time. The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent ground-water quality continued to change 4 years after mining. The upper saturated zone was destroyed by mining and replaced by spoiled material during reclamation. A new saturated zone then formed in the spoils material. The premining median concentrations of sulfate, manganese, and dissolved solids in the upper saturated zone were 84 milligrams per liter (mg/L). 30 micrograms per liter (?g/L), and 335 mg/L, respectively. The postmining median concentrations of these constituents in the upper-zone wells disturbed by mining were 360 mg/L, 595 ?g/L, and 814 mg/L, respectively. Concentrations of these constituents were still increasing in 1984 in the upper saturated zone. In the area not disturbed by mining, concentrations have remained nearly at premining levels. The premining median concentrations of sulfate, manganese, and dissolved solids in the middle saturated zone were 47 mg/L, 10 ?g/L and 405 mg/L, respectively. The postmining median concentrations were 390 mg/L, 490 ?g/L, and 959 mg/L, respectively. In the middle saturated zone, concentrations of these constituents also were still increasing in 1984, probably due to mixing with water if the upper saturated zone.

  19. Characterization and evaluation of washability of Alaskan coals: Fifty selected seams from various coal fields: Final technical report, September 30, 1976-February 28, 1986. [50 coal seams

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.D.

    1986-09-01

    This final report is the result of a study initiated in 1976 to obtain washability data for Alaskan coals, to supplement the efforts of the US Department of Energy in their ongoing studies on washability of US coals. Washability characteristics were determined for fifty coal samples from the Northern Alaska, Chicago Creek, Unalakleet, Nenana, Matanuska, Beluga, Yentna and Herendeen Bay coal fields. The raw coal was crushed to 1-1/2 inches, 3/8 inch, 14 mesh and 65 mesh top sizes, and float-sink separations were made at 1.30, 1.40 and 1.60 specific gravities. A limited number of samples were also crushed to 200 and 325 mesh sizes prior to float-sink testing. Samples crushed to 65 mesh top size were also separated at 1.60 specific gravity and the float and sink products were characterized for proximate and ultimate analyses, ash composition and ash fusibility. 72 refs., 79 figs., 57 tabs.

  20. Kinetics assisted design of catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Foley, H.C.; Calkins, W.H.; Scouten, C.

    1998-02-01

    The thermal and catalytic reactions of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (NBBM), a resid and coal model compound, were examined. Catalytic reaction of NBBM was carried out at 400 C under hydrogen with a series of transition metal-based catalytic materials including Fe(CO){sub 4}PPh{sub 3}, Fe(CO){sub 3}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}, Fe(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}CS{sub 2}, Fe(CO){sub 5}, Mo(CO){sub 6}, Mn{sub 2}(CO){sub 10}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoS{sub 2}. Experimental findings and derived mechanistic insights were organized into molecular-level reaction models for NBBM pyrolysis and catalysis. Hydropyrolysis and catalysis reaction families occurring during NBBM hydropyrolysis at 420 C were summarized in the form of reaction matrices which, upon exhaustive application to the components of the reacting system, yielded the mechanistic reaction model. Each reaction family also had an associated linear free energy relationship (LFER) which provided an estimate of the rate constant k{sub i} given a structural property of species i or its reaction. Including the catalytic reaction matrices with those for the pyrolysis model provided a comprehensive NBBM catalytic reaction model and allowed regression of fundamental LFER parameters for the catalytic reaction families. The model also allowed specification of the property of an optimal catalyst. Iron, molybdenum and palladium were predicted to be most effective for model compound consumption. Due to the low costs associated with iron and its disposal, it is a good choice for coal liquefaction catalysis and the challenge remains to synthesize small particles able to access the full surface area of the coal macromolecule.

  1. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Final report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L.

    1994-07-01

    Integration of innovative steps into new advanced processes have the potential to reduce costs for producing liquid fuels. In this program, objective is to develop a new approach to liquefaction that generates an all distillate product slate at a reduced cost of about US$25/barrel of crude oil equivalent. A Counterflow Reactor was developed in cooperation with GfK mbH, Germany. Advantages are low hydrogen recycle rates and low feed preheating requirements. Coal/heavy oil slurry is injected into the top of the reactor while the recycle gas and make up hydrogen is introduced into the bottom; hydrogenation products are withdrawn from the top. PU study resulted in distillable oil yields up to 74 wt % on feed (dry ash free) from coprocessing feed slurries containing 40 wt % Vesta subbituminous coal and 60 wt % Cold Lake heavy vacuum tower bottoms. Technologies developed separately by CED and ARC were combined. A 1-kg/hr integrated continuous flow bench scale unit was constructed at the ARC site in Devon, Alberta, based on modifications to a unit at Nisku, Alberta (the modified unit was used in the preliminary economic evaluation).

  2. Study of ammonia removal in coal gasification processes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.; Tong, G.T.; McCarty, J.G.

    1988-09-01

    The objective of this program was to investigate the removal of fuel-bound nitrogen that appears as ammonia and hydrogen cyanide in coal gas in the temperature range 540/degree/ to 870/degree/C and the pressure range 1 to 20 atm. Following a comprehensive literature search, catalytic decomposition was selected as the most promising concept. Ten catalysts were tested at two temperatures in three different simulated coal gas streams containing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide impurities. A proprietary nickel catalyst (HTSR-1) exhibited high activity at 800/degree/C and excellent physical stability. An Ir-promoted nickel catalyst (G-65/star/) had significant activity for removing ammonia in the temperature range 550/degree/ to 600/degree/C but physically deteriorated at higher temperature. Other tested catalysts were inferior in performance to these two catalysts. Parametric studies were conducted with HTSR-1 and G-65/star/ catalysts to determine the rate of ammonia removal as a function of temperature, pressure, space velocity, and concentrations of ammonia, hydrogen, and steam. The influence of several other impurities commonly present in the hot gas was studied also. 27 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

  4. Highly dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction. Phase 1 final report, August 23--November 22, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wilson, R.B.; Ghaly, O.

    1995-03-22

    The ultimate goal of this project is to develop novel processes for making the conversion of coal into distillable liquids competitive to that of petroleum products in the range of $25/bbl. The objectives of Phase 1 were to determine the utility of new precursors to highly dispersed catalysts for use of syngas atmospheres in coal liquefaction, and to estimate the effect of such implementation on the cost of the final product. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Tasks 1 and 2 are the analyses and liquefaction experiments, respectively, and Task 3 deals with the economic effects of using these methods during coal liquefaction. Results are presented on the following: Analytical Support--screening tests and second-stage conversions; Laboratory-Scale Operations--catalysts, coal conversion in synthetic solvents, Black Thunder screening studies, and two-stage liquefaction experiments; and Technical and economic Assessment--commercial liquefaction plant description, liquefaction plant cost; and economic analysis.

  5. Ohio incinerator battle continues

    SciTech Connect

    Melody, M.

    1993-05-01

    Waste Technologies Industries (WTI; East Liverpool, Ohio) is trying to wing what it hopes will be its final battle in a 13-year, $160 million war with the government, and community and environmental groups. The company since 1980 has sought EPA approval to operate a hazardous waste incinerator in East Liverpool, Ohio. WTI late last year conducted a pre-test burn, or shakedown, during which the incinerator burned certain types of hazardous waste. The test demonstrates the incinerator's performance under normal operating conditions, Regulatory authorities, including EPA and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA), monitored activity during the shakedown, which was limited to 720 hours of operation. In accordance with RCRA requirements, the company in March conducted a trial burn to demonstrate that the incinerator meets permit standards. WTI's permit specifies three performance parameters the incinerator must meet -- particulate and hydrogen chloride emissions limits, and destruction removal efficiencies (DREs).

  6. Re-Use of Clean Coal Technology By-Products in the Construction of Low Permeability Liners. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, William E.; Butalia, Tarunjit S.; Walker, Harold; Mitsch, William

    2005-07-15

    This final project report presents the results of a research program conducted at The Ohio State University from January 3, 2000 to June 30, 2005 to investigate the long-term use of stabilized flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials in the construction of low permeability liners for ponds and wetlands. The objective of the research program was to establish long-term field-verified time-dependent relationships for the performance of liners constructed from stabilized FGD byproducts generated in Ohio. The project objective was accomplished with a coordinated program of testing and analyzing small-scale laboratory specimens under controlled conditions, mediumscale wetland experiments, and monitoring of a full-scale FGD-lined pond facility. Although the specific uses directly addressed by this report include liners for surface impoundments, the results presented in this study are also useful in other applications especially in the design of daily covers and liners for landfills, seepage cutoff walls and trenches, and for nutrient retention and pollution mitigation wetlands. The small-scale laboratory tests and monitoring of the full-scale FGD lined facility (capacity of one million gallons) shows that stabilized FGD materials can be used as low permeability liners in the construction of water and manure holding ponds. Actual long-term permeability coefficients in the range of 10-7 cm/sec (3 x 10-9 ft/sec) can be obtained in the field by compacting lime and fly ash enriched stabilized FGD materials. Leachate from the FGD material meets Ohio’s non-toxic criteria for coal combustion by-products, and for most potential contaminants the national primary and secondary drinking water standards are also met. The low permeability non-toxic FGD material investigated in this study poses very minimal risks, if any, for groundwater contamination. The FGD wetland experiments indicated no significant differences in phosphorus retention between the clay and FGD

  7. Thermally induced structural changes in coal combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Flagan, R.C.; Gavalas, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of the temperature-time history during coal devolitization and oxidation on the physical properties and the reactivity of resulting char were studied experimentally for temperatures and residence times typical of pulverized combustion. Experiments were also carried out at somewhat lower temperatures and correspondingly longer residence times. An electrically heated laminar flow reactor was used to generate char and measure the rates of oxidation at gas temperatures about 1600K. Partially oxidized chars were extracted and characterized by gas adsorption and mercury porosimetry, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and oxidation in a thermogravimetric analysis system (TGA). A different series of experiments was conducted using a quadrople electrodynamic balance. Single particles were suspended electrodynamically and heated by an infrared laser in an inert or oxygen-containing atmosphere. During the laser heating, measurements were taken of particle mass, size/shape, and temperature.

  8. Flexible roof drill for low coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brummert, L.V.

    1982-01-01

    Contract number DE-AC22-74ET11205 provided for the continued testing of a flexible roof drill system which allows the operator to drill roof bolt holes longer than seam height. The system was mounted on a modified Fletcher LTDO bolting machine. The objective of the contract is to establish the reliability of the flexible drill from extended life testing in an operating coal mine and by laboratory life testing. The reliability goal is 1000 mean-holes-between-failures. The underground test was conducted in the GEX-Colorado, Incorporated, Roadside Mine in Palisade, Colorado. The underground test concluded with the drilling for and installation of 12,361 four-foot roof bolts. The laboratory test consisted of the simulated drilling of 20,000 eight-foot long holes. The reliability goal was achieved with an associated confidence level greater than 99%.

  9. Hydrogen separation by ceramic membranes in coal gasification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gavalas, G.R.

    1993-08-01

    The general objective of this project was to develop hydrogen permselective membranes for hydrogen production from coal gas. The project consisted of the following tasks: (i) membrane preparation and characterization, (ii) membrane stability testing, and (iii) analysis and economic evaluation of a membrane-assisted ammonia from coal process. Several oxides (SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in dense (or nonporous) form were identified to be permselective to hydrogen at elevated temperatures. To obtain reasonable permeance it is necessary that the membrane consists of a thin selective layer of the dense oxide supported on or within the pores of a porous support tube (or plate). Early in the project we chose porous Vycor tubes (5mm ID, 7 mm OD, 40 {Angstrom} mean pore diameter) supplied by Corning Inc. as the membrane support. To form the permselective layer (SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) we employed chemical vapor deposition using the reaction of the chloride (SiCl{sub 4}, etc.) vapor and water vapor at high temperatures. Deposition of the selective layer was carried out in a simple concentric tube reactor comprising the porous support tube surrounded by a wider concentric quartz tube and placed in an electrically heated split tube furnace. In one deposition geometry (the opposing reactants or two-sided geometry) the chloride vapor in nitrogen carrier was passed through the inner tube while the water vapor also in nitrogen carrier was passed in the same direction through the annulus between the two tubes. In the other (two-sided) geometry the chloride-containing stream and the water-containing stream were both passed through the inner tube or both through the annulus.

  10. Energy Policy Act Transportation Rate Study: Final Report on Coal Transportation

    EIA Publications

    2000-01-01

    This is the final in a series of reports prepared for the U.S. Congress by the Secretary of Energy on coal distribution and transportation rates as mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates, of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486).

  11. Kinetics of coal conversion to soluble products. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.

    1994-04-12

    The objectives of this work are (1) to measure the kinetics of the conversion of coals to soluble products under model liquefaction conditions using GPS techniques to count the number of bonds broken; (2) to analyze these data using kinetic schemes based on the behavior of crosslinked macromolecular networks. The product was Soxhlet extracted with pyridine until the pyridine solution was clear. A gel permeation chromatogram of the pyridine soluble is shown in Figure 2A. The improved mass sensitive detector system requires only about 500 ng to acquire a chromatogram having fairly good S/N ratio. Apparently, no disturbance is caused by the remaining tetralin and naphthalene formed by dehydrogenation of tetralin. These seriously affect the lower molecular weight region when IR or UV detectors are used. It is a notable advantage of the mass sensitive detector that suitable adjustment of the nebulizer and of the evaporator completely suppressed the contribution of solvent to the chromatogram. The molecular weight distribution of liquefaction product appears to be almost unimodal if the small shoulder at the lower elution volume side is neglected.

  12. Evaluation of data gathered from unmineable coal seams. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) programs directed at gas recovery from unconventional sources INTERCOMP Resource Development and Engineering, Inc. (INTERCOMP) is under contract to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to provide for the reduction of uncertainties in critical parameters related to the methane recovery from unmineable coals in the United States. To accomplish this objective INTERCOMP has assisted in test site selection, planning, and monitoring when requested and evaluated the results of test in terms of methane production potential and economics for selected well sites, geologic settings, and geographical areas. This is a continuation of two earlier contracts in which an optimized test program was specified and in which the results of that program were partially implemented and evaluated. In this report INTERCOMP's effort in assisting the Bureau of Mines to understand the nature of a communication problem between the vertical dewatering hole and the three horizontal degasification legs in the Emerald Mines Horizontal Drilling project is described. Recommendations made by INTERCOMP on how to determine the amount of communication and the answers to several other questions asked are given in the section Assistance in Test Planning. The use of INTERCOMP's numerical simulation model was necessary in this effort. The section entitled Resource Assessment gives the evaluation of each specific well site tested for methane production that furnished to INTERCOMP by METC.

  13. The mechanism of hydrogen incorporation in coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of the research was to determine the detailed molecular mechanism for the introduction of hydrogen into coal when it is heated in an atmosphere of H{sub 2} in the absence of catalysts and to use this information as a baseline for the study of catalyzed processes. The plan was to study the reaction of model compounds with D{sub 2} in a glass-lined reactor of the authors` design and, by determining the distribution of D atoms in the reaction products, to deduce the reaction mechanism(s). As of the date of this report (Nov. 1995), the authors have, they believe conclusively, demonstrated the mechanism of the thermal process. They have studied several gas-phase reactions and, recently, have extended these to surface-immobilized models. The data are consistent in their support of the proposed sequence. Within the past year, they have begun to look at catalyzed hydrothermolysis and, while the work is at an early stage, they can draw a few significant conclusions, presented in the report.

  14. Biological upgrading of coal-derived synthesis gas: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barik, S.; Johnson, E.R.; Ko, C.W.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1986-10-01

    The technical feasibility of the biological conversion of coal synthesis gas to methane has been demonstrated in the University of Arkansas laboratories. Cultures of microorganisms have been developed which achieve total conversion in the water gas shift and methanation reactions in either mixed or pure cultures. These cultures carry out these conversions at ordinary temperatures and pressures, without sulfur toxicity. Several microorganisms have been identified as having commercial potential for producing methane. These include a mixed culture of unidentified bacteria; P. productus which produces acetate, a methane precursor; and Methanothrix sp., which produces methane from acetate. These cultures have been used in mixed reactors and immobilized cell reactors to achieve total CO and H/sub 2/ conversion in a retention time of less than two hours, quite good for a biological reactor. Preliminary economic projections indicate that a biological methanation plant with a size of 5 x 10/sup 10/ Btu/day can be economically attractive. 42 refs., 26 figs., 86 tabs.

  15. Long-term effects of surface coal mining on ground-water levels and quality in two small watersheds in eastern Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, W.L.; Jones, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Two small watersheds in eastern Ohio that were surface mined for coal and reclaimed were studied during 1986-89. Water-level and water-quality data were compared with similar data collected during previous investigations conducted during 1976-83 to determine long-term effects of surface mining on the hydrologic system. Before mining, the watersheds were characterized by sequences of flat-lying sedimentary rocks containing two major coal seams and underclays. An aquifer was present above each of the underclays. Surface mining removed the upper aquifer, stripped the coal seam, and replaced the sediment. This created a new upper aquifer with different hydraulic and chemical characteristics. Mining did not disturb the middle aquifer. A third, deeper aquifer in each watershed was not studied. Water levels were continuously recorded in one well in each aquifer. Other wells were measured every 2 months. Water levels in the upper aquifers reached hydraulic equilibrium from 2 to 5 years after mining ceased. Water levels in the middle aquifers increased more than 5 feet during mining and reached equilibrium almost immediately thereafter. Water samples were collected from three upper-aquifer well, a seep from the upper aquifer, and the stream in each watershed. Two samples were collected in 1986 and 1987, and one each in 1988 and 1989. In both watersheds, sulfate replaced bicarbonate as the dominant upper-aquifer and surface-water anion after mining. For the upper aquifer of a watershed located in Muskingum County, water-quality data were grouped into premining and late postmining time periods (1986-89). The premining median pH and concentration of dissolved solids and sulfate were 7.6, 378 mg/L (milligrams per liter), and 41 mg/L, respectively. The premining median concentrations of iron and manganese were 10? /L (micrograms per liter) and 25?, respectively. The postmining median values of pH, dissolved solids, and sulfate were 6.7, 1,150 mg/L, and 560 mg/L, respectively

  16. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  17. Geophysical investigations of the Western Ohio-Indiana region. Final report, October 1986--September 1992: Volume 10

    SciTech Connect

    Ruff, L.; LaForge, R.; Thorson, R.; Wagner, T.; Goudaen, F.

    1994-01-01

    Earthquake activity in the Western Ohio-Indiana region has been monitored with a seismograph network consisting of nine stations located in west-central Ohio and four stations located in Indiana. Six local and regional earthquakes have been recorded from October 1990 to September 1992 with magnitudes ranging from 0.6 to 5.0. A total of 36 local and regional earthquakes have been recorded in the past 6-year period (October 1986 to September 1992). Overall a total of 78 local and regional earthquakes have been recorded since the network went into operation in 1977. There was a peak in seismicity in 1986, including the July 12, 1986 St. Marys` event (mb=4.5), followed by an anomalously low level of seismicity for about 2 years. The most unusual feature of the seismicity in the past.year is the occurrence of three earthquakes in Indiana. The locations of the felt earthquakes are scattered across central Indiana; an area that had been aseismic. Analysis of arrival time data accumulated over the past 14 years shows that the Anna region crustal structure is ``slower`` than the average mid-continent crustal structure. This implies that the proposed Keewenawan rift in the Anna region has a different structure than that of other Keewenawan rifts in the mid-continent.

  18. Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-30

    The objective of the main project is to identify the current developmental status of MCFC systems and address those technical issues that need to be resolved to move the technology from its current status to the demonstration stage in the shortest possible time. The specific objectives are separated into five major tasks as follows: Stack research; Power plant development; Test facilities development; Manufacturing facilities development; and Commercialization. This Final Report discusses the M-C power Corporation effort which is part of a general program for the development of commercial MCFC systems. This final report covers the entire subject of the Unocal 250-cell stack. Certain project activities have been funded by organizations other than DOE and are included in this report to provide a comprehensive overview of the work accomplished.

  19. Getting on Board: A Review of Transportation Options for Ohioans with Disabilities and Recommendations for Systems Change. Final Report to the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council on Grant Project 98-4, Transportation. [and] Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Michael J.; Frazier, Dennis G.; Tonks, Gary

    This final report of the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council's (ODDC) project on transportation presents an evaluation of the current transportation options available to Ohioans with disabilities and offers recommendations to improve these options. The first section provides an overview of the ODDC transportation project including its…

  20. Management of solid wastes from the Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) clean coal technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Musiol, W.F. Jr.; Czuczwa, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    The objectives of this project were to characterize by-products from a pilot Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) process and to develop processes directed toward the safe and economic use or disposal of these wastes. Because LIDS is a developing Clean Coal technology, a database of chemical and physical characteristics of the by-product was first developed. During the course of this project, it was found that the waste alone did not form high-strength products sufficient for use in construction and engineering applications. Therefore, the project was redirected to evaluate the by-product as a soil-cement and Portland cement raw material, agricultural liming agent, backfill/landfill material component, and mine reclamation/neutralizing agent. Based on these evaluations, the most viable uses for the LIDS byproduct include use in mine reclamation or as a neutralization agent. If soluble sulfites can be minimized by avoiding a dolomitic LIDS reagent, use as an agricultural liming agent has promise. Interest from an Ohio utility in the LIDS process suggests possible application of results at the demonstration or commercial stages.

  1. Socuy coal mine. Phase 1. Engineering services. Final report. Volume 1. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The report presents a five-year mine plan, conceptual life-of-mine sequence, and a detailed cost estimate for the Socuy Coal Mine in Venezuela. Volume 1 contains the Phase I - Engineering Services Final Report and is divided into: Executive Summary; (1) Introduction; (2) Data Review; (3) Mining Criteria; (4) Geology; (5) Geotechnical; (6) Groundwater Hydrology; (7) Surface Water Hydrology; (8) Socuy Mine Plan; (9) Socuy Cost Estimate; (10) References; and Appendix A: Quality Summary Report.

  2. Development of environment assessment screening criteria for coal conversion solid wastes. Final draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-12

    The overall objective of this project was to devise a scientifically-sound and cost-effective battery of screening bioassays which can be used in the assessment of the environmental and health effects of various coal conversion solid wastes. The project consisted of the following 5 discrete tasks: review of existing health and environmental effects information; identification and selection of relevant assessment criteria (bioassay methods); application of selected bioassay battery to coal conversion waste samples; evaluation of the test battery and recommendations for future analysis of coal conversion wastes; and preparation of draft and final reports. This report has been organized to describe the results of the work done under each of these project tasks. The report describes the methods utilized in searching the literature and the criteria used to evaluate information obtained from the different literature references. Results of this study strongly suggest the need for using a battery of bioassays for proper assessment of coal conversion solid wastes. The inclusion of different biological systems (rodents, microorganisms, plants, algae) and the use of different end-points allows a more accurate toxicological profile, since the different assays are indicative of different deleterious biological activities, i.e., acutely toxic, mutagenic, phytotoxic. The DMSO and the carbonic acid extraction procedure yielded a combined leachate that was adequate for health effects evaluation but that was still large incompatible with the environmental effects bioassays.

  3. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Final report, October 10, 1994--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Parekh, B.K.; Meloy, T.

    1997-12-31

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium is a group comprised of representatives from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, that was formed to pursue research in areas related to the treatment and processing of fine coal. Each member performed research in their respective areas of expertise and the report contained herein encompasses the results that were obtained for the three major tasks that the Consortium undertook from October, 1994 through March, 1997. In the first task, conducted by Virginia Polytechnic Institute, novel methods (both mechanical and chemical) for dewatering fine coal were examined. In the second task, the Center for Applied Energy Research examined novel approaches for destabilization of [highly stable] flotation froths. And in the third task, West Virginia University developed physical and mathematical models for fine coal spirals. The Final Report is written in three distinctive chapters, each reflecting the individual member`s task report. Recommendations for further research in those areas investigated, as well as new lines of pursuit, are suggested.

  4. Rheology of coal-water slurries prepared by the high-pressure roll mill grinding of coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; De, A.

    1996-08-01

    The preparation of coal water slurries to replace fuel oil for direct combustion has become an important field in modem coal technology. The U.S. Department of Energy has planned or has underway several demonstration projects to burn coal-water slurries to replace fuel oil is attractive not only because there is an assured domestic supply of coal, but also on various technoeconomic grounds. Coal-water slurries combine the handling flexibility of fuel oil in power plants and various other industrial applications. This report discusses the rheology of coal-water slurries and the correlation to the coal preparation by grinding with a choke-fed high pressure roll mill. Performance of the roll mills and energy consumption are described.

  5. Coal Combustion Products Extension Program

    SciTech Connect

    Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

    2006-01-11

    This final project report presents the activities and accomplishments of the ''Coal Combustion Products Extension Program'' conducted at The Ohio State University from August 1, 2000 to June 30, 2005 to advance the beneficial uses of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highway and construction, mine reclamation, agricultural, and manufacturing sectors. The objective of this technology transfer/research program at The Ohio State University was to promote the increased use of Ohio CCPs (fly ash, FGD material, bottom ash, and boiler slag) in applications that are technically sound, environmentally benign, and commercially competitive. The project objective was accomplished by housing the CCP Extension Program within The Ohio State University College of Engineering with support from the university Extension Service and The Ohio State University Research Foundation. Dr. Tarunjit S. Butalia, an internationally reputed CCP expert and registered professional engineer, was the program coordinator. The program coordinator acted as liaison among CCP stakeholders in the state, produced information sheets, provided expertise in the field to those who desired it, sponsored and co-sponsored seminars, meetings, and speaking at these events, and generally worked to promote knowledge about the productive and proper application of CCPs as useful raw materials. The major accomplishments of the program were: (1) Increase in FGD material utilization rate from 8% in 1997 to more than 20% in 2005, and an increase in overall CCP utilization rate of 21% in 1997 to just under 30% in 2005 for the State of Ohio. (2) Recognition as a ''voice of trust'' among Ohio and national CCP stakeholders (particularly regulatory agencies). (3) Establishment of a national and international reputation, especially for the use of FGD materials and fly ash in construction applications. It is recommended that to increase Ohio's CCP utilization rate from 30% in 2005 to 40% by 2010, the CCP Extension Program be

  6. Sequential low-temperature depolymerization and liquefaction of US coal. Final report, January 1, 1987--January 1, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Shabtai, J.S.; Wiser, W.H.

    1992-05-01

    Based on the above described differences in the reactivity of intercluster linkages, an effective new procedure for low-temperature coal depolymerization-liquefaction was proposed and initially examined in our laboratory and then further developed in the framework of this project. The pre-extraction with THF removes most of the easily extractable material within the coal network, leaving the porous system of the coal more susceptible to catalyst impregnation. During subsequent impregnation, the FeCl{sub 3} catalyst becomes uniformly dispersed in the coal particles as recently demonstrated by electron probe microscopy. The partial depolymerization of the coal during the HT step involves preferential hydrogenolytic cleavage of alkylene (e.g. , methylene), benzyl etheric, cycloalkyl etheric, and some activated thioetheric linkages. The following BCD step completes the coal depolymerization by base-catalyzed hydrolysis (or alcoholysis) of diaryl etheric, aryl cycloalkyl etheric, diaryl thioetheric, and other bridging groups. Depolymerized coal samples obtained by the above sequential HT-BCD treatment consist of mixtures of low molecular weight products, composed primarily of monocluster compounds. In the final step, the depolymerized product undergoes exhaustive heteroatom removal, partial ring hydrogenation, and some C-C hydrogenolysis to yield a light hydrocarbon oil. As demonstrated in the present work this procedure has the advantages of very high overall coal conversion to low molecular weight hydrocarbon oils. It also provides very valuable structural information on the fundamental building units of the coal structure.

  7. Direct comparison of XAFS spectroscopy and sequential extraction for arsenic speciation in coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huggins, Frank E.; Huffman, G.P.; Kolker, A.; Mroczkowski, S.; Palmer, C.A.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The speciation of arsenic in an Ohio bituminous coal and a North Dakota lignite has been examined by the complementary methods of arsenic XAFS spectroscopy and sequential extraction by aqueous solutions of ammonium acetate, HCl, HF, and HNO3. In order to facilitate a more direct comparison of the two methods, the arsenic XAFS spectra were obtained from aliquots of the coal prepared after each stage of the leaching procedure. For the aliquots, approximately linear correlations (r2 > 0.98 for the Ohio coal, > 0.90 for the ND lignite) were observed between the height of the edge-step in the XAFS analysis and the concentration of arsenic measured by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Results from the leaching sequence indicate that there are two major arsenic forms present in both coals; one is removed by leaching with HCl and the other by HNO3. Whereas the XAFS spectral signatures of the arsenic leached by HCl are compatible with arsenate for both coals, the arsenic leached by HNO3 is identified as arsenic associated with pyrite for the Ohio coal and as an As3+ species for the North Dakota lignite. Minor arsenate forms persist in both coals after the final leaching with nitric acid. The arsenate forms extracted in HCl are believed to be oxidation products derived from the other major arsenic forms upon exposure of the pulverized coals to air.

  8. Ohio EPA Teachers Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus.

    In an effort to provide teachers in Ohio with assistance in environmental education, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has produced this teachers kit. It is designed to describe what the Ohio EPA is doing to protect Ohio's air, land, and water. The background information provides an historical account of some of the events that have…

  9. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  10. Coal Reserves Data Base report. Final report on the Demonstrated Reserve Base (DRB) of coal in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.W.; Glass, G.B.

    1991-12-05

    The Coal Reserves Data Base (CRDB) Program is a cooperative data base development program sponsored by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The objective of the CRDB Program is to involve knowledgeable coal resource authorities from the major coal-bearing regions in EIA`s effort to update the Nation`s coal reserves data. This report describes one of two prototype studies to update State-level reserve estimates. The CRDB data are intended for use in coal supply analyses and to support analyses of policy and legislative issues. They will be available to both Government and non-Government analysts. The data also will be part of the information used to supply United States energy data for international data bases and for inquiries from private industry and the public. (VC)

  11. Bioprocessing of lignite coals using reductive microorganisms. Final technical report, September 30, 1988--March 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-03-29

    In order to convert lignite coals into liquid fuels, gases or chemical feedstock, the macromolecular structure of the coal must be broken down into low molecular weight fractions prior to further modification. Our research focused on this aspect of coal bioprocessing. We isolated, characterized and studied the lignite coal-depolymerizing organisms Streptomyces viridosporus T7A, Pseudomonas sp. DLC-62, unidentified bacterial strain DLC-BB2 and Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium strain DLC-21. In this research we showed that these bacteria are able to solubilize and depolymerize lignite coals using a combination of biological mechanisms including the excretion of coal solublizing basic chemical metabolites and extracellular coal depolymerizing enzymes.

  12. Chemical kinetics and transport processes in supercritical fluid extraction of coal. Final report, August 10, 1990--December 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, B.J.; Smith, J.M.; Wang, M.; Zhang, C.J.

    1993-02-01

    The overall objective of this project was to study the supercritical fluid extraction of hydrocarbons from coal. Beyond the practical concern of deriving products from coal, the research has provided insights into the structure, properties, and reactivities of coal. Information on engineering fundamentals of coal thermolysis and extraction, including physical and chemical processes, is presented in this final report. To accomplish the goals of the project we developed continuous-flow experiments for fixed-bed samples of coal that allow two types of analysis of the extract: continuous spectrophotometric absorbance measurements of the lumped concentration of extract, and chromatographic determinations of molecular-weight distributions as a function of time. Thermolysis of coal yields a complex mixture of many extract products whose molecular-weight distribution (MWD) varies with time for continuous-flow, semibatch experiments. The flow reactor with a differential, fixed bed of coal particles contacted by supercritical t-butanol was employed to provide dynamic MWD data by means of HPLC gel permeation chromatography of the extract. The experimental results, time-dependent MWDs of extract molecules, were interpreted by a novel mathematical model based on continuous-mixture kinetics for thermal cleavage of chemical bonds in the coal network. The parameters for the MWDs of extractable groups in the coal and the rate constants for one- and two-fragment reaction are determined from the experimental data. The significant effect of temperature on the kinetics of the extraction was explained in terms of one- and two-fragment reactions in the coal.

  13. Potential for thermal coal and Clean Coal Technology (CCT) in the Asia-Pacific. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.J.; Long, S.

    1991-11-22

    The Coal Project was able to make considerable progress in understanding the evolving energy situation in Asia and the future role of coal and Clean Coal Technologies. It is clear that there will be major growth in consumption of coal in Asia over the next two decades -- we estimate an increase of 1.2 billion metric tons. Second, all governments are concerned about the environmental impacts of increased coal use, however enforcement of regulations appears to be quite variable among Asian countries. There is general caution of the part of Asian utilities with respect to the introduction of CCT`s. However, there appears to be potential for introduction of CCT`s in a few countries by the turn of the century. It is important to emphasize that it will be a long term effort to succeed in getting CCT`s introduced to Asia. The Coal Project recommends that the US CCT program be expanded to allow the early introduction of CCT`s in a number of countries.

  14. Nitration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal combustors and exhaust streams: Final report, September 1, 1991--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.; Cho, S.; Hildemann, L.; Niksa, S.

    1995-02-01

    The objectives of this three-year project were to (1) identify the conditions which promote the nitration of PAH during primary combustion, reburning, hot gas cleanup, and particulate removal; and (2) investigate the potential relationship between NOx abatement and PAH nitration. Meeting the objectives of this program involved two broad tasks: (1) Preparing the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under closely monitored pulverized fuel (p. f.) firing conditions; and, (2) analyzing the PAH samples to monitor extents of nitration, ring number distribution, etc. A novel coal flow reactor burning actual coal products that operates over the domains of heating rates, temperatures, fuel-equivalence ratios, and residence times in utility boilers was used to generate the coal tar samples. The distribution of products obtained from primary, secondary, and oxidative pyrolysis of two coal types, Pittsburgh No. 8 and Dietz, were analyzed, with emphasis on the nitrogen-containing species generated. The coal tax samples collected from the coal flow reactor were fractionated based on their size and polarity using gravity flow column chromatography. After examining how the sample fractionation depended on the coal type and pyrolysis conditions, the relatively nonpolar fraction was further analyzed via high performance liquid chromatography, to characterize the ring number distribution of the polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) present. Finally, gas chromatographic techniques were utilized to measure the amount of nitrogen-containing PAC present, and to investigate how much of these nitrogen-containing species consist of nitro-PAH.

  15. Feasibility study for utilization of landfill gas at the Royalton Road Landfill, Broadview Heights, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-09-01

    The technical viability of landfill gas recovery has been previously demonstrated at numerous sites. However, the economics of a full scale utilization system are dependent on proper market conditions, appropriate technologies, landfill gas quantity and quality, and public/purchaser acceptance. The specific objectives of this feasibility study were to determine: The available markets which might purchase landfill gas or landfill gas derived energy products; An extraction system concept design and to perform an on-site pumping test program; The landfill gas utilization technologies most appropriate for the site; Any adverse environmental, health, safety, or socioeconomic impacts associated with the various proposed technologies; The optimum project economics, based on markets and processes examined. Findings and recommendations were presented which review the feasibility of a landfill gas utilization facility on the Royalton Road Landfill. The three identified utilization alternatives are indeed technically feasible. However, current market considerations indicate that installation of a full scale system is not economically advisable at this time. This final report encompasses work performed by SCS Engineers from late 1980 to the present. Monitoring data from several extraction and monitoring wells is presented, including pumping rates and gas quality and quantity analysis. The Market Analysis Data Form, local climatological data, and barometric pressure data are included in the appendix section. 33 figures, 25 tables.

  16. Technical data. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    This volume includes a description of the railway to transport the coal; possible unbalance in the electrical power supply is considered in detail, as well as communications, signalling, etc. The railway will also be used to transport ashes and sludges for waste disposal. Coal fines in the coal supply will be burned to generate power. A very brief description of the coal gasification plant and its components is accompanied by a printout of the dates final engineering is to be completed. Permit applications are listed and socio-economic factors are discussed. The financing plan is discussed in some detail: basically, a loan guarantee from the Synthetic Fuels Corporation; equity provided by investment tax credit, deferred taxes, AFUDC and the sponsors; price support; and gas purchase agreement (this whole section includes several legal details.). (LTN)

  17. Effect of coal quality on maintenance costs at utility plants. Final report. [Effect of ash and sulfur content of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, E.C. Jr.

    1980-06-01

    In an attempt to determine if correlation exists between coal quality, as measured by its ash and sulfur contents, and the maintenance cost at utility plants, an examination was made of the actual maintenance cost experience of selected portions of five TVA coal-fired power plants as a function of the fuel quality consumed during an extended period of time. The results indicate that, according to our decision rules developed in compliance with accepted statistical practices, correlation does exist in many portions of the coal-fired plants for which sufficient maintenance cost records were available. The degree of correlation varies significantly among the individual portions of a particular plant as well as among the various plants. However, the indicators are sufficient to confirm that a change (within the design constraints of the unit) in the ash and/or sulfur content of the coal being consumed by a utility boiler will have a proportionate effect on the maintenance cost at the plant. In the cases examined, each percent variation in ash content could have a monetary effect of from $0.05 to $0.10 per ton of coal consumed. Similarly, each percent variation in sulfur content could influence maintenance costs from $0.30 to $0.50 per ton of coal. Since these values are based on preliminary analysis of limited data, they must be approached with caution and not removed from the context in which they are presented. However, if borne out by further study, the potential magnitude of such savings may be sufficient to justify the acquisition of superior coal supplies, either by changing the source and/or using preparation to obtain a lower ash and sulfur fuel.

  18. Re-Use of Clean Coal Technology By-Products in the Construction of Low Permeability Liners. Final report, 10/1/1996 - 3/31/2000

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, William E.; Butalia, Tarunjit S.; Whitlach, Jr., E. Earl; Mitsch, William

    2000-12-31

    This final project report presents the results of a research program conducted at The Ohio State University from October 1, 1996 to March 31, 2000 to investigate the use of stabilized flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials in the construction of low permeability liners. The objective of the research program was to establish field-verified time-dependent relationships for the performance of liners constructed from stabilized FGD by-products generated in Ohio. The project objective was accomplished with a coordinated program of testing and analyzing small scale laboratory specimens under controlled conditions, medium-scale wetland mesocosms, and a full-scale pond facility. Although the specific uses directly addressed by this report include liners for surface impoundments, the results presented in this study are also useful in other applications including design of daily cover and liners for landfills, seepage cutoff walls and trenches and for nutrient retention and pollution mitigation wetlands. The small scale laboratory tests, medium scale mesocosm wetland experiments, and construction and monitoring of a full-scale FGD lined facility (capacity of one million gallons) shows that stabilized FGD materials can be used as low permeability liners in the construction of water and manure holding ponds, and constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment. Actual permeability coefficients in the range of 10-7 cm/sec (3 x 10-9 ft/sec) can be obtained in the field by properly compacting lime and fly ash enriched stabilized FGD materials. Leachate from the FGD material meets Ohio’s non-toxic criteria for coal combustion by-products, and for most potential contaminants the national primary and secondary drinking water standards are also met. The low permeability non-toxic FGD material investigated in this study poses very minimal risks, if any, for groundwater contamination. Constructed FGD-lined wetlands offer the opportunity for increased phosphorous

  19. Evaluation of the effect of solvent modification and coal pretreatment and beneficiation on liquefaction: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, D.; Miller, R.N.; Hoover, D.S.; Givens, E.N.; Schweighardt, F.K.; Tarrer, A.R.; Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Luckie, P.

    1985-03-01

    An extensive research program was conducted to ascertain ways to improve oil yields and process economics of direct coal liquefaction. The effects of removing heteroatoms from the solvent, pretreating coal by several techniques (including solvent extraction, oxidation, grinding, and ion exchange), and beneficiating coal by removing mineral species were investigated in both catalytic and noncatalytic coal liquefaction reactions. Additionally, fundamental studies were carried out to explain the role of heteroatoms in catalytic coal liquefaction. The effects of process variables, catalysts and mode of catalyst addition, solvent properties, and recycle of SRC on oil production and coal conversion were also studied. 9 refs., 12 figs., 72 tabs.

  20. Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

    1991-05-01

    The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to ``conventional`` technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

  1. Concepts for protection against catastrophic events from coal mining. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.T.; Kern, J.R.; Sparks, J.P.; Stingelin, R.W.

    1989-11-06

    The report identifies hazards which may result from coal mining and identifies associated preventive, mitigative, and recovery adjustments. It documents an analysis of the alternatives available to provide protection against catastrophic events. The environmental risks addressed are those that occur beyond the period of time when normal surface and underground mining and reclamation operations have been completed. Residual hazards investigated include: ground water pollution, loss of aquifer, surface water pollution, subsidence, landslides, mine fires, impoundment failures, and mine seal failures. Hazard adjustments investigated include: land use management programs, recovery and restoration programs, insurance programs, special trust funds, bonds and guarantees, disaster assistance programs, regulatory requirements, and litigative approaches. Effective regulation of mine operations to prevent the creation of hazard including the control of final land-form was found to be the most efficient adjustment. The report includes a comprehensive 30-page annotated bibliography of hazards and related adjustments.

  2. Evaluation of dense-phase ultrafine coal (DUC) as a fuel alternative for oil- and gas-designed boilers and heaters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    Utility and industrial firms currently using oil- and gas-fired boilers have an interest in substitution of coal for oil and gas as the primary boiler fuel. This interest stems from coal`s two main advantages over oil and gas-lower cost and security of supply. Recent efforts in the area of coal conversion have been directed to converting oil- and gas- fired boilers which were originally designed for coal-firing or were designed with some coal-firing capability. Boilers designed exclusively for oil- or gas-firing have not been considered viable candidates for coal conversion because they generally require a significant capacity derating and extensive and costly modifications. As a result, conversion of boilers in this class to coal-firing has generally been considered unattractive. Renewed interest in the prospects for converting boilers designed exclusively for oil- and gas-firing to coal firing has centered around the concept of using ``ultra fine`` coal as opposed to ``conventional grind`` pulverized coal. The main distinction being the finer particle size to which the former is ground. This fuel type may have characteristics which ameliorate many of the boiler problems normally associated with pulverized coal-firing. The overall concept for ultrafine coal utilization is based on a regional large preparation plant with distribution of a ready to fire fuel directly to many small users. This differs from normal practice in which final coal sizing is performed in pulverizers at the user`s site.

  3. Impact of government regulations on leadtimes of coal facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.; Carboni, J.V.; Shah, D.V.; White, J.M. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The ability of the US to increase coal use depends on the leadtimes required to bring from inception into operation: (1) new coal use facilities such as powerplants, industrial boilers, coke ovens, and coal-based synfuel plants; and (2) new coal facilities including surface mines, deep mines, coal preparation plants, and railroad lines. This study examines the effect of government regulations on the leadtimes for the following ten facilities: surface mines on federal land; surface mines - private surface/private coal; underground coal mines; coal preparation plants; railroad lines; coal-fired electric generating plants; coal-fired industrial facilities; coke plants; synthetic fuels; and transmission lines. Environmental activities consume a significant portion of critical path time for all facilities. The time spent for obtaining permits and licenses account for as much as 63% of total critical path time in the case of a new railroad line servicing a coal mine in the western US. For surface mines, permitting accounts for 33% of total project critical path; for underground mines, it is 43%. Permitting requires 26 and 42% of the critical paths for new industrial facilities and power plants, respectively. Long durations of critical environmental activities account for much of the uncertainty surrounding the approval of large coal projects. Government regulations have also affected the way companies conduct their business. Dealing with government regulations has become as important to the completion of new coal facilities as project financing, design, and construction.

  4. Water, Ohio's Remarkable Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Carrie J.

    Information on water and water resources in Ohio is presented in seven sections. Water from Ohio streams, water storage, lakes in Ohio, and ground water are discussed in the first section ("Water, A Part of the Earth"). A brief discussion on the ecosystem is provided in the second section ("Water and Life"). Topics discussed in the third section…

  5. ARSENIC AND OHIO UTILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on arsenic removal drinking water treatment systems that are likely to be used in Ohio for arsenic removal. Because most Ohio ground water contain significant amounts of iron, iron removal processes will play a major role in treating Ohio gro...

  6. Correlation chart of Pennsylvanian rocks in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania showing approximate position of coal beds, coal zones, and key stratigraphic units: Chapter D.2 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Trippi, Michael H.; Slucher, Ernie R.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Because of the many names used to identify individual coal beds and coal zones in the historic Appalachian basin coal-mining districts, coal bed designations may differ even more than stratigraphic nomenclature. In eastern Kentucky, northwest of the Pine Mountain thrust fault on the Cumberland overthrust sheet, for example, coal beds or coal zones equivalent to the Lower Elkhorn coal zone (within the Pikeville Formation) are identified also as the Eagle coal zone, Pond Creek coal zone, and Blue Gem coal bed (fig. 1). Southeast of the Pine Mountain thrust fault, yet still in Kentucky, equivalent coals in this same interval are known as the Imboden and Rich Mountain. Moreover, this same interval of coal is identified as the Blue Gem coal in Tennessee, the Imboden coal bed or Campbell Creek or Pond Creek coal zones in Virginia, and the Eagle coal zone in West Virginia.

  7. Evaluation of technology modifications required to apply clean coal technologies in Russian utilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The report describes the following: overview of the Russian power industry; electric power equipment of Russia; power industry development forecast for Russia; clean coal technology demonstration program of the US Department of Energy; reduction of coal TPS (thermal power station) environmental impacts in Russia; and base options of advanced coal thermal power plants. Terms of the application of clean coal technology at Russian TPS are discussed in the Conclusions.

  8. Coal demand and price projections. Volume 2. Forecast tables. Final topical report, January-December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, F.E.; Watkins, J.A.

    1994-02-01

    Hill and Associates, Inc. performed a series of coal market and price forecasts for the Gas Research Institute (GRI) to determine both the supply constraints on available quantities of coal and the projected coal prices from each U.S. coal supply region into each National Energy Reliability Council (NERC) and GRI demand region. Volume II contains the forecast tables and includes the same set of appendixes as Volume I.

  9. A new approach in ultrapurification of coal by selective flocculation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moudgil, B.M.

    1992-04-01

    The specific objective of the present investigation is to develop a mathematical and computational model to elicit values of active sites ({phi}) and fractional surface coverage ({theta}) which would yield optimum separation of coal from coal pyrite and coal refuse. Attempts are to be made to select appropriate flocculants and experimental conditions to obtain {phi} and {theta} values as dictated by the theoretical model so as to achieve the desired separation in naturally occurring samples of fine coal. (VC)

  10. Combustion characteristics of dry coal-powder-fueled adiabatic diesel engine: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kakwani, R.M.; Kamo, R.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at investigating the combustion characteristics of dry coal powder fueled diesel engine. During this program, significant achievements were made in overcoming many problems facing the coal-powder-fueled engine. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept was used to enhance the combustion of coal powder fuel. The major coal-fueled engine test results and accomplishments are as follows: design, fabrication and engine testing of improved coal feed system for fumigation of coal powder to the intake air; design, fabrication and engine testing of the TICS chamber made from a superalloy material (Hastelloy X); design, fabrication and engine testing of wear resistant chrome oxide ceramic coated piston rings and cylinder liner; lubrication system was improved to separate coal particles from the contaminated lubricating oil; control of the ignition timing of fumigated coal powder by utilizing exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and variable TICS chamber temperature; coal-fueled engine testing was conducted in two configurations: dual fuel (with diesel pilot) and 100% coal-fueled engine without diesel pilot or heated intake air; cold starting of the 100% coal-powder-fueled engine with a glow plug; and coal-fueled-engine was operated from 800 to 1800 rpm speed and idle to full load engine conditions.

  11. Surface electrochemical control for fine coal and pyrite separation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, M.E.; Bodily, D.M.; Hu, Weibai; Chen, Wanxiong; Huang, Qinping; Liang, Jun; Riley, A.M.; Li, Jun; Wann, Jyi-Perng; Zhong, Tingke; Zhu, Ximeng

    1993-01-20

    Laboratory flotation tests were carried out on three coals and on coal pyrite. Floatability measurements included natural floatability, flotation with a xanthate collector and salt flotation. The ranking of the floatability of the three coals were: Upper Freeport > Pittsburgh > Illinois. The floatability of mineral pyrite and coal pyrite increased markedly with xanthate concentration, but decreased with increased pH. In general, coal pyrite was more difficult to float than mineral pyrite. This was attributed to the presence of surface carbonaceous and mineral matter, since floatability of coal pyrite improved by acid pretreatment. Flotation tests demonstrated that the floatability of coal and mineral pyrite was greatly enhanced by the presence of an electrolyte. Flotation was also enhanced by the addition of modifiers such as CuSO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2} and EDTA. Lime additions markedly reduced the floatability of coal pyrite. Enhanced floatability of coal pyrite resulted when the pyrite was anodically oxidized in a specially constructed electrochemical flotation cell Pretreatment in potential ranges previously observed for polysulfide and sulfur film formation resulted in the enhanced floatability. While interesting trends and influences, both chemical and electrochemical, markedly improved the floatability of coal, there is little hope for reverse flotation as an effective technology for coal/coal-pyrite separations. The effects of poor liberation and entrainment appear overriding.

  12. The role of catalyst precursor anions in coal gasification. Final technical report, September 1991--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Abotsi, G.M.K.

    1995-01-01

    The utilization of coal is currently limited by several factors, including the environmental impacts of coal use and the lack of cost-effective technologies to convert coal into useful gaseous and liquid products. Several catalysts have been evaluated for coal gasification and liquefaction. The activities of the catalysts are dependent on many factors such as the method of catalyst addition to the coal and the catalyst precursor type. Since catalyst addition to coal is frequently conducted in aqueous solution, the surface chemistry of colloidal coal particles will be expected to exert an influence on catalyst uptake. However, the effects of the various coal gasification catalyst precursors on the interfacial properties of coal during catalyst loading from solution has received little attention. The aim of this study is to ascertain the influence of the metal salts (i): calcium acetate (Ca(OOCCH{sub 3}){sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) or calcium nitrate (Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) and (ii): potassium acetate (KOOCCH{sub 3}), potassium chloride (KCl), potassium nitrate (KNO{sub 3}), potassium carbonate (K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) and potassium sulfate (K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) on the electrokinetic and adsorptive properties of coal and determine the relationship, if any, between coal surface electrokinetic properties, and catalyst loading and eventually its effects on the reactivities of coal chars.

  13. Impact of government regulations on leadtimes of coal facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The ability of the US to increase coal use depends on the leadtimes required to bring from inception into operation: (1) new coal use facilities such as powerplants, industrial boilers, coke ovens, and coal-based synfuel plants; and (2) new coal facilities including surface mines, deep mines, coal preparation plants, and railroad lines. This study examines the effect of government regulations on the leadtimes for the following ten facilities: surface mines on federal land; surface mines - private surface/private coal; underground coal mines; coal preparation plants; railroad lines; coal-fired electric generating plants; coal-fired industrial facilities; coke plants; synthetic fuels; and transmission lines. These appendices contain summaries of legislation affecting the above coal facilities. Discussed are: the Clean Air Act; National Environmental Policy Act; Federal Coal Leasing Amendments Act; Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act; Federal Land Policy and Management Act; River and Harbors Act; Federal Mine Health and Safety Amendments Act; Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act; National Historic Preservation Act; Endangered Species Act; the Clear Water Act; and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. (DMC)

  14. Anaerobic biprocessing of low rank coals. Final technical report, September 12, 1990--August 10, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.

    1993-08-05

    Coal solubilization under aerobic conditions results in oxygenated coal product which, in turn, makes the coal poorer fuel than the starting material. A novel approach has been made in this project is to remove oxygen from coal by reductive decarboxylation. In Wyodak subbituminous coal the major oxygen functionality is carboxylic groups which exist predominantly as carboxylate anions strongly chelating metal cations like Ca{sup 2+} and forming strong macromolecular crosslinks which contribute in large measure to network polymer structure. Removal of the carboxylic groups at ambient temperature by anaerobic organisms would unravel the macromoleculer network, resulting in smaller coal macromolecules with increased H/C ratio which has better fuel value and better processing prospects. These studies described here sought to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal liquefaction. Efforts were made to establish anaerobic microbial consortia having decarboxylating ability, decarboxylate coal with the adapted microbial consortia, isolate the organisms, and characterize the biotreated coal products. Production of CO{sup 2} was used as the primary indicator for possible coal decarboxylation.

  15. Heavy-liquid-beneficiation of fine coal, Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, F.J.; Keller, D.V. Jr.

    1984-11-01

    Heavy-Liquid-Beneficiation of Fine Coal is a two-phase multitask fundamental research program directed towards the development of a basic understanding of the rheology of fine-coal/heavy-liquid slurries and the application of this understanding to the development and operation of a heavy-liquid fine-coal benefication pilot test facility using cyclone technology. (HLC)

  16. Development and Dissemination of a Manual for Developing Coal Mining Curricula. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oglesby, Elizabeth H.; Katz, D. S.

    This report describes and summarizes the purposes, activities, major findings, and recommendations of three coal-related study reports: (1) An Assessment of Employment and Training needs for Coal and Gasification Occupations, (2) A Manual for Competency-Matched Instructional Resources for Developing Coal Mining Curricula, and (3) The Preparation…

  17. Thermal coal requirements and prospects for clean coal technologies in the Asia-Pacific Region. Final technical report, October 1994--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.J.

    1998-03-01

    The overall goal of the Cooperative Agreement (October 1994 to September 1997) was to provide general support and advice to the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) on the likely opportunities for U.S. coal trade and potential for U.S. Clean Coal Technologies in the Asia-Pacific Region. Over the three year Cooperative Agreement, assistance evolved toward greater emphasis on support for the U.S. Department of Energy`s role as chair of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation`s (APEC) Experts{close_quote} Group on Clean Fossil Energy. Responsibilities included assistance in arranging for all Technical Seminars, technical papers for these seminars and final editing, publishing and distribution of 500 copies of the proceedings. In addition, the East-West Center was called upon to host annual APEC Subcommittee Meetings, and periodic ad hoc planning meetings. The East-West Center played an active role in working with counterpart APEC and energy policy people throughout Asia, and advising the U.S. Department of Energy on options to enhance energy and Clean Coal Technology cooperation with various Asian nations, particularly People`s Republic of China (hereafter China) Towards the end of the Cooperative Agreement, increased emphasis was placed on the potential for gas fuels in Asian markets (natural gas, coalbed methane and gasification of coal).

  18. The potential for underground coal gasification in Indiana. Final report to the Indiana Center for Coal Technology Research (CCTR)

    SciTech Connect

    John Rupp; Evgeny Shafirovich; Arvind Varma; Maria Mastalerz; Agnieszka Drobniak

    2009-03-15

    The preliminary feasability assessment analyses the potential for underground coal gasification within Indiana. A review of existing worldwide operations and geological requirements demonstrates that the application of UCG practices in Indiana has very significant potential benefits, but careful analysis of the specific geological conditions, physical and chemical properties of coals, water resources, coupled with an assessment of the state-of-the-art technologies must be conducted to identify potential UCG sites and to determine the feasibility of employing this technology in Indiana. Of particular importance is the relatively small number of active and successful operators of UCG projects around the world and that collaborations with one or two among them could be beneficial for all concerned. There are significant opportunities for economic development that will provide dividends for first movers in the Illinois basin. The report recommends nine 'promising zones' for UCG in two large coal deposits (the Springfield and Seelyville coal beds) in Knox, Gibson, Vanderburgh, Warrick and Posey counties. 69 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs., 1 app.

  19. Development of advanced, dry, SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} emission control technologies for high-sulfur coal. Final report, April 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Amrhein, G.T.

    1994-12-23

    Dry Scrubbing is a common commercial process that has been limited to low- and medium-sulfur coal applications because high-sulfur coal requires more reagent than can be efficiently injected into the process. Babcock & Wilcox has made several advances that extend dry scrubbing technologies to higher sulfur coals by allowing deposit-free operation at low scrubber exit temperatures. This not only increases the amount of reagent that can be injected into the scrubber, but also increases SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate, at pilot scale, that advanced, dry-scrubbing-based technologies can attain the performance levels specified by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions while burning high-sulfur coal, and that these technologies are economically competitive with wet scrubber systems. The use of these technologies by utilities in and around Ohio, on new or retrofit applications, will ensure the future of markets for high-sulfur coal by creating cost effective options to coal switching.

  20. Job Training and Fulfillment Study. An Examination of Aspirations, Needs and Solutions for ADC Mothers in the Cincinnati, Ohio Area. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innovative Consultants, Inc., Cincinnati, OH.

    A study was conducted to provide much-needed, in-depth qualitative information and direction regarding the experiences, attitudes, value systems, and aspirations of various segments of the Aid to Dependent Children (ADC) recipients. Eight focus groups, each composed of 8 to 10 persons, were conducted in May 1990 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Discussion…

  1. Analytical method for the evaluation of sulfur functionalities in American coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Attar, A.

    1983-05-01

    This investigation consisted of the following 6 tasks: (1) improve the instrumentation for the sulfur functional groups analysis and make it more reliable. (2) create a set of reference standards of sulfur-containing compounds. (3) examine the sulfur groups distribution in untreated and desulfurized coals. (4) examine the sulfur functionalities in raw and processed coals, i.e., liquefied coals. (5) determine the distribution of sulfur functionalities in modified coals. (6) prepare computer programs for calculations related to the distribution of sulfur functional groups in coal. Each task is discussed and results are presented. Appendix A contains the computer program used to interpret the data. 31 references, 56 figures, 17 tables.

  2. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1990-- April 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1992-02-15

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science (CFFLS) is currently engaged in a three year contract with the US Department of Energy investigating a range of research topics dealing with direct coal liquefaction. This report summarizes the results of this program in its second year, from May 1, 1990 to April 30, 1991. Accomplishments for this period are presented for the following tasks: Iron-based catalysts for coal liquefaction, exploratory research on coal conversion, novel coal liquefaction concepts, and novel catalysts for coal liquefaction.

  3. Characterization and supply of coal based fuels. Volume 1, Final report and appendix A (Topical report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Studies and data applicable for fuel markets and coal resource assessments were reviewed and evaluated to provide both guidelines and specifications for premium quality coal-based fuels. The fuels supplied under this contract were provided for testing of advanced combustors being developed under Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) sponsorship for use in the residential, commercial and light industrial (RCLI) market sectors. The requirements of the combustor development contractors were surveyed and periodically updated to satisfy the evolving needs based on design and test experience. Available coals were screened and candidate coals were selected for further detailed characterization and preparation for delivery. A team of participants was assembled to provide fuels in both coal-water fuel (CWF) and dry ultrafine coal (DUC) forms. Information about major US coal fields was correlated with market needs analysis. Coal fields with major reserves of low sulfur coal that could be potentially amenable to premium coal-based fuels specifications were identified. The fuels requirements were focused in terms of market, equipment and resource constraints. With this basis, the coals selected for developmental testing satisfy the most stringent fuel requirements and utilize available current deep-cleaning capabilities.

  4. Selective flotation of fossil resin from Western coal. Final report, July 1, 1990--May 25, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.F.; Miller, J.D.

    1992-05-25

    The proof-of-concept test program was designed to clarify a number of concerns that have been raised by coal companies who own the valuable resin resource. First, from laboratory bench-scale flotation experiments, a froth product from cleaner flotation containing more than 80% hexane-extractable resin at higher than 80% recovery can be produced. Pilot-plant testing was initiated to demonstrate the selective flotation of fossil resin and to establish a better confidence level in the new technology. Second, pilot-plant testing was designed to evaluate the effect and impact of random variation in slurry solids concentration and feed grade on this new selective fossil resin flotation technology. The flotation performance obtained under these industrial conditions is more realistic for process evaluation. Third, more accurate operating cost data was to be obtained for economic analysis. Fourth, sufficient quantities of the fossil resin concentrate were to be produced from the test program for evaluation by potential industrial users. Fifth, and finally, optimum levels for the operating variables were to be established. Such information was required for eventual scale-up and design of a fossil resin flotation plant. The pilot-plant proof-of-concept testing of selective resinate flotation has demonstrated that: (1) technically, the new flotation technologies discovered at the University of Utah and then improved upon by Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc. provide a highly efficient means to selectively recover fossil resin from coal. The proof-of-concept continuous flotation circuit (about 0.1 tph) resulted in fossil resin recovery with the same separation efficiency as was obtained from laboratory bench-scale testing (more than 80% recovery at about 80% concentrate grade); and (2) economically, the selective flotation process has been shown to be sufficiently profitable to justify the development of a fossil resin industry based on this new flotation process.

  5. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite. Final technical report, September 1990--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, Dawei

    1996-01-01

    This project seeks to advance the fundamental understanding of the physico-chemical processes occurring at the pyrite/aqueous interface, in the context of coal cleaning, coal desulfurization, and acid mine drainage. Central to this research is the use of synthetic microsize particles of pyrite as model microelectrodes to investigate the semiconductor electrochemistry of pyrite. The research focuses on: (a) the synthesis of microsize particles of pyrite in aqueous solution at room temperature, (b) the formation of iron sulfide complex, the precursor of FeS or FeS{sub 2}, and (c) the relationship between the semiconductor properties of pyrite and its interfacial electrochemical behavior in the dissolution process. In Chapter 2, 3 and 4, a suitable protocol for preparing microsize particles of pyrite in aqueous solution is given, and the essential roles of the precursors elemental sulfur and ``FeS`` in pyrite formation are investigated. In Chapter 5, the formation of iron sulfide complex prior to the precipitation of FeS or FeS{sub 2} is investigated using a fast kinetics technique based on a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. The stoichiometry of the iron sulfide complex is determined, and the rate and formation constants are also evaluated. Chapter 6 provides a summary of the semiconductor properties of pyrite relevant to the present study. In Chapters 7 and 8, the effects of the semiconductor properties on pyrite dissolution are investigated experimentally and the mechanism of pyrite dissolution in acidic aqueous solution is examined. Finally, a summary of the conclusions from this study and suggestions for future research are presented in Chapter 9.

  6. Structure of coal: new approaches to characterizing organonitrogen and organosulfur functionalities in coal and coal liquids. Final report. [Finnigan triple quadrupole mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the application of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to the analysis of coal-related materials. A Finnigan Triple State Quadrupole mass spectrometer was used for most of the results obtained in this study. Both collision energy (0 to 30 eV) and collision gas pressure (0 to 2.5 mtorr, typically argon) have significant effects on the spectra. Increasing the collision energy or collision pressure results in an increased fragmentation of the selected ion. The analytical utility of different chemical ionization (CI) reagent gases is shown. The MS/MS spectra of a selected ion obtained by isobutane and ammonia CI are identical, which paves the way for development of MS/MS libraries. A library is being developed especially for the analysis of coal-related materials. Three principal MS/MS scan modes (daughter, parent and neutral loss) are utilized in the analysis of coal-related materials. Parent and neutral loss scans characterize the complex mixture for particular chemical moieties (functional groups, structure type), while daughter scans are used for identification of specific components. SRC II was the principal sample studied by CI. Laser desorption methodology for coal analysis was developed. Other fuel-related materials were examined to generalize the analytical methodology being developed for the coal-related materials, including shale oil and diesel exhaust particulates. 35 references, 50 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Rate enhancement for catalytic upgrading coal naphthas. Final of final technical progress report, July 1991--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this project is to remove sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen from naphtha derived from coal liquefaction. The project is concerned with the development of hydrotreating catalysts. This period, a ruthenium sulfide catalyst has been studied.

  8. Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Badgley, P.R.

    1992-09-01

    This report, entitled ``Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,`` describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.

  9. Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R.C. Jr.; Jamison, P.R.

    1996-03-01

    The Mulled Coal process is a technology which has evolved from a line of investigations which began in the 1970`s. There was a major breakthrough in 1990, and since then, with significant support from DOE-PETC, the technology has progressed from the conceptual stage to a proven laboratory process. It is a simple process which involves the addition of a low cost specifically formulated reagent to wet fine coal by mixing the two in a pug mill. Although the converted material (Mulled Coal) retains some of its original surface moisture, it handles, transports, and stores like dry coal. But, unlike thermally dried fine coal Mulled Coal is not dusty, it will not rewet, and it causes no fugitive dust problems. This project was designed to advance the technology from the status of a process which works well in the laboratory to the status of a technology which is fully ready for commercialization. Project objectives were to: 1. Prove the concept that the technology can be used to produce Mulled Coal of a consistent quality, on a continuous basis, at a convincing rate of production, and at a major preparation plant which produces fine clean coal on a commercial basis. 2. Prove the concept that Mulled Coal, either as a blend with coarser clean coal or as a stand-alone fuel will successfully pass through a representative cross section of conventional coal storage, handling and transportation environments without causing any of the problems normally associated with wet fine coal. 3 Test the design and reliability of Mulled Coal circuit equipment and controls. 4. Test the circuit over a wide range of operating conditions. 5. Project scale-up designs for major equipment components and control circuits. 6. Forecast capital and operating costs for commercial circuits ranging from 25 TPH to 75 TPH. This report describes the work, the test results, and conclusions at each step along the way.

  10. Impacts of the extended-weight coal haul road system. Final research report, December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pigman, J.; Crabtree, J.; Agent, K.; Graves, C.; Deacon, J.

    1995-12-01

    The Extended-Weight Coal Haul Road System, created by the Kentucky Legislature in 1986, consists of all roads which carry over 50,000 tons of coal in a calendar year. Trucks hauling coal on this system are authorized to exceed normal weight limits through the payment of an annual decal fee. A research study was initiated in July of 1992 to analyze the impacts of the extended-weight system. Analyses in this report are based on the following: historical data on coal production and transportation: data from coal decal applications; interviews of legislators, transportation officials, coal company representatives, and coal trucking representatives; newspaper articles; vehicle classification data; analyses of pavement costs; pavement rideability data; and accident data. Primary conclusions include; (1) The extended-weight system has apparently been somewhat successful in accomplishing the objective of enhancing the competitiveness and economic viability of the Kentucky coal industry; (2) Overall accident rates did not increase as a result of implementation of the extended-weight system, but the fatal accident injury rates were significantly higher on the extended-weight system and for trucks operating with the coal decal; (3) Advance-warning flashers have been evaluated and recommended as a means of reducing intersection accidents involving heavy/coal trucks; (4) The coal-decal fee structure results in a net annual loss in Road Fund revenue of approximately $2 million; (5) Forty percent of revenue from decal fees are allocated to counties even though county-maintained roads comprise only eight percent of the extended-weight system; (6) Heavier weights of coal-decal trucks add approximately $9 million annually to the pavement overlay costs; (7) Road users throughout the state are subsidizing the movement of Kentucky coal by participating in the cost of maintaining and improving the highway system; and (8) Possibly reflecting the increased funding of extended-weight roads.

  11. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Final technical progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal Process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal. The SynCoal Process enhances low-rank, western coals, usually with a moisture content of 25 to 55 percent, sulfur content of 0.5 to 1.5 percent, and heating value of 5,5000 to 9,000 British thermal units per pound (Btu/lb), by producing a stable, upgraded, coal product with a moisture content as low as 1 percent, sulfur content as low as 0.3 percent, and heating value up to 12,000 Btu/lb. During this reporting period, the primary focus for the ACCP Demonstration Project team was to expand SynCoal market awareness and acceptability for both the products and the technology. The ACCP Project team continued to focus on improving the operation, developing commercial markets, and improving the SynCoal products as well as the product`s acceptance.

  12. New reagents for coal desulfurization. Final technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, D.H.; Kalembasa, S.; Olson, D.; Wang, S.; Warfel, L.

    1991-12-31

    The primary goal of this project was development and exploration of potential new desulfurization reagents for the removal of ``organic sulfur`` from Illinois coals by mild chemical methods. Potential new desulfurization reagents were investigated using organic sulfur compounds of the types thought to be present in coals. Reagents included low-valent metal complexes based on nickel and on iron as well as possible Single Electron Transfer reagents. Soluble coal extracts served as second generation model compounds during this reagent development project.

  13. Biodesulfurization techniques: Application of selected microorganisms for organic sulfur removal from coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, B.B.

    1993-08-01

    As an alternative to post-combustion desulfurization of coal and pre-combustion desulfurization using physicochemical techniques, the microbial desulfurization of coal may be accomplished through the use of microbial cultures that, in an application of various microbial species, may remove both the pyritic and organic fractions of sulfur found in coal. Organisms have been isolated that readily depyritize coal but often at prohibitively low rates of desulfurization. Microbes have also been isolated that may potentially remove the organic-sulfur fraction present in coal (showing promise when acting on organic sulfur model compounds such as dibenzothiophene). The isolation and study of microorganisms demonstrating a potential for removing organic sulfur from coal has been undertaken in this project. Additionally, the organisms and mechanisms by which coal is microbially depyritized has been investigated. Three cultures were isolated that grew on dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model organic-sulfur compound, as the sole sulfur source. These cultures (UMX3, UMX9, and IGTS8) also grew on coal samples as the sole sulfur source. Numerous techniques for pretreating and ``cotreating`` coal for depyritization were also evaluated for the ability to improve the rate or extent of microbial depyritization. These include prewashing the coal with various solvents and adding surfactants to the culture broth. Using a bituminous coal containing 0.61% (w/w) pyrite washed with organic solvents at low slurry concentrations (2% w/v), the extent of depyritization was increased approximately 25% in two weeks as compared to controls. At slurry concentrations of 20% w/v, a tetrachloroethylene treatment of the coal followed by depyritization with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans increased both the rate and extent of depyritization by approximately 10%.

  14. National Coal Study and related research. Final report from Round Three of the study

    SciTech Connect

    Attfield, M.

    1984-01-01

    Results of the National Coal Study are presented. Thirty-two coal mines were visited and 5275 miners were examined during a 5-year period. The incidence and progression of coalworkers pneumoconiosis was studied. Longitudinal declines in 1 second forced expiratory volume (FEV1) in coal miners were investigated. The author suggests that the degree and progression of pneumoconiosis was reduced by applying the 2mg/m/sup 3/ dust standard.

  15. Evaluation of respiratory protection in coal preparation plants. Contract report (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Surface coal mine (SIC-1211) and preparation facility operations were studied to determine respirable dust and vapor hazards and the effectiveness of respiratory protective equipment. Eight coal preparation facilities were surveyed. Dust samples were taken at strip mining, raw coal processing, coal preparation and coal loading operations, and at quality control laboratories. Area and personal air samples and area samples of methyl isobutyl carbinol (108112) (MIBC) were collected and quantitative respirator fit tests were performed. Concentrations of respirable coal dust in excess of Mining Safety and Health Administration's (MSHA's) permissible exposure limits (PEL) were found only in one coal loader at one facility. Respirable dust concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 2.73 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/cu m). The highest concentrations were measured on workers performing surface mine and coal loading activities. Only 1 out of 80 personal samples was greater than 2mg/cu m. Out of 51 area samples of respirable coal dust, 15 exceeded the MSHA PEL. Only 72 percent of the workers tested used acceptable respiratory protection. The occurrence of facial hair was significant in the workers who did not obtain satisfactory protection. The authors recommend that engineering controls be implemented to reduce dust concentrations, and a respiratory protection program be implemented.

  16. Oxidative derivatization and solubilization of coal. Final report. Period: October 1, 1986 - April 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, J.G.; Porowski, E.N.; Straub, A.M.

    1988-05-01

    We investigated the solubilization of coal by oxidative means to produce motor fuels. Nitric acid was used in the first of two approaches taken to cleave aliphatic linkages in coal and reduce the size of its macrostructure. Mild conditions, with temperatures up to a maximum of 75 C, and nitric acid concentrations below 20% by weight, characterize this process. The solid product, obtained in high yields, is soluble in polar organic solvents. Lower alcohols, methanol in particular, are of interest as carrier solvents in diesel fuel applications. Coals investigated were New York State peat, Wyodak subbituminous coal, North Dakota lignite, and Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The lower tank coals were easily converted and appear well suited to the process, while the bituminous Illinois No. 6 and Pitt Seam coals were unreactive. We concentrated our efforts on Wyodak coal and North Dakota lignite. Reaction conditions with regards to temperature, acid concentration, and time were optimized to obtain high product selectivity at maximum conversion. A continuous process scheme was developed for single pass coal conversions of about 50% to methanol-soluble product.

  17. Analysis of residential coal stove emissions. Final report, June 1982-July 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, M.; Bresler, W.E.; Iden, R.B.; Hayes, T.L.; Rogers, S.E.

    1983-12-01

    The report gives results of an evaluation, in cooperation with the State of Vermont's Agency of Environmental Conservation, of emissions generated by anthracite and bituminous coal used for residential heating. A residential coal stove was operated with both coals, while comparing high and low burn rate operations. A second stove, a commercial stove designed for wood burning but modified by the manufacturer for coal, was also tested with both coals. Combustion gases were collected by two techniques: evacuated glass bulbs and a Modified Method 5 sampling train. Volatile species were analyzed by direct gas mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography using selective detectors. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed by high resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. High levels of particulates, total organics, and sulfur dioxide were found in the emissions from bituminous coal combustion in a residential coal stove. High PAH emissions were found with both bituminous and anthracite combustion. The stove converted from wood to coal burning proved to be highly polluting, especially when used with bituminous coal.

  18. Effect of reagent access on the reactivity of coals. Final report. [Maleic anhydride; dialkylmaleates

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.

    1983-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the extent to which the mass transport of reagents into solid coals limits the reactivity of those coals. The purpose of task one is to determine the effect of reagent access on the acid catalyzed depolymerization of coals using phenols and/or alkyl phenyl ethers. For task two, the purpose is to determine the effect of coal swelling on its rate of reaction with a dienophile. Work on depolymerization of coals in hot, acidic phenol has been completed. The conclusion is that due to incomplete depolymerization, the complications of competing Friedel-Crafts alkylation, and the condensation reactions of the solvent, the depolymerization of coals in hot, acidic phenol is not a useful technique for solubilizing coals for structural investigations. In task two, the rate of the Diels-Alder reaction between bituminous coals and maleic anhydride was found to be diffusion controlled. The observations of simple Fickian diffusion and reaction rate constants much slower than the Diels-Alder reaction of maleic anhydride and anthracene have no other reasonable explanation than rate limiting mass transport. The diffusion rates were found to be independent of the degree of solvent swelling of the coal. In addition, the dependence of the observed rates on temperature and the size of the dienophile were measured. Results obtained using a series of dialkylmaleates are presented. Size was found to play only a small role as long as the reagent is planar. 2 tables.

  19. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chunshan Song; Schobert, H.H.; Parfitt, D.P.

    1997-11-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that dispersed catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on exploring novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction and the effectiveness of temperature-programmed liquefaction using dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research was to explore novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular precursors, that could be used in low concentrations but exhibit relatively high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. We have synthesized and tested various catalyst precursors in liquefaction of subbituminous and bituminous coals and in model compound studies to examine how do the composition and structure of the catalytic precursors affect their effectiveness for coal liquefaction under different reaction conditions, and how do these factors affect their catalytic functions for hydrogenation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, for cleavage of C-C bonds in polycyclic systems such as 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, for hydrogenolysis of C-O bond such as that in dinaphthylether, for hydrodeoxygenation of phenolic compounds and other oxygen-containing compounds such as xanthene, and for hydrodesulfurization of polycyclic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene. The novel bimetallic and monometallic precursors synthesized and tested in this project include various Mo- and Fe-based compounds.

  20. Composition of coal dusts and their cytotoxicity on alveolar macrophages. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.Y.; Lee, S.L.; Sheehan, C.E.; Wang, Y.

    1996-09-01

    Coal mine dust is produced from complex materials consisting of organic sedimentary strata, inorganic minerals, and trace elements. The dust varies in its chemical compositions and is capable of causing lung injury and damage when inhaled. The purpose of this study was to perform scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive spectrometry, wavelength-dispersive spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction analyses of three coal dusts, and examine their effects on rat lung alveolar macrophages (AMs) in cell culture. The coal dusts were obtained from coal surfaces of anthracite, meager, and fat coal mines. The AMs were harvested in bronchoalveolar lavage from adult male Wistar rats and were cultured in Eagle`s medium at 37 deg C. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and lactate dehydrogenase (LD) released by cultured AMs were measured by radioimmunoassay and enzymatic methods, respectively, 24 hours after addition of coal dust. Cytotoxicity was evident in AM culture of all three coal dusts, which caused the release of LD and PGE2. The release was dose-dependent. In summary, our study shows that all three coal dusts exhibit cytotoxicity to AMs and suggests that the pathogenesis of coal associated with pulmonary disease may be linked to the elemental compositions and mineralogic components.

  1. Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, ``Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.`` This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft{sup 2} cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

  2. Evaluation of freshwater mussels in the lower Ohio River in relation to the Olmstead locks and dam project: 1995, 1996, and 1997 studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, B.S.; Miller, A.C.

    1998-09-01

    Surveys were conducted in 1995, 1996, and 1997 to assess community characteristics, population demography of dominant species, status of endangered species, and characteristics of nonindigenous populations of freshwater bivalves in the lower Ohio River. Data will be used to analyze impacts of construction and operation of a new lock and dam at River Mile (RM) 964.4. The greatest focus has been on a mussel bed just downstream of the project. Density categories of <20, 20 to 50, and >50 individuals per square meter are reasonable for delineating low-, moderate-, and high-density assemblages within this bed. Density >200 individuals per square meter is occasionally measured, but always describes a location heavily dominated by recent recruits. The native mussel community of the lower Ohio River is dominated by Fusconaia ebena. Dominance of this species was high at RM 967 (near Olmsted, IL), typically exceeding 80 percent of the community. At RM 957 (near Post Creek, IL), F. ebena is much less dominant (33 percent). Species richness is similar at both locations. The F. ebena population in the lower Ohio River is heavily dominated by a single-year class (probably 1990) of recent recruits. Prior to the exceptional recruitment in 1990, this population was dominated by a very abundant 1981 cohort.

  3. Synergistic Utilization of Coal Fines and Municipal Solid Waste in Coal-Fired Boilers. Phase I Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    V. Zamansky; P. Maly; M. Klosky

    1998-06-12

    A feasibility study was performed on a novel concept: to synergistically utilize a blend of waste coal fines with so-called E-fuel for cofiring and reburning in utility and industrial boilers. The E-fuel is produced from MSW by the patented EnerTech's slurry carbonization process. The slurry carbonization technology economically converts MSW to a uniform, low-ash, low-sulfur, and essentially chlorine-free fuel with energy content of about 14,800 Btu/lb.

  4. Integrated system for coal-methanol liquefaction and slurry pipeline transportation. Final report. [In slurry transport

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, W.F.; Davidson, J.K.; Horton, J.H.; Summers, C.W.

    1980-03-31

    The engineering economics of an integrated coal-to-methanol conversion system and coal-in-methanol transportation system are examined, under the circumstances of the western coalfields, i.e., long distances from major markets and scarcity of water in the vicinity of the mines. The transportation economics are attractive, indicating tariffs of approximately 40 cents per million Btu per thousand miles for the coal-methanol pipeline vs 60 cents via coal-water pipelines and upwards of a dollar via rail. Energy consumption is also less in the coal-methanol pipeline than in the coal-water pipeline, and about equal to rail. It is also concluded that, by a proper marriage of the synthetic fuel (methanolization) plant to the slurrification plant, most, and in some cases all, of the water required by the synthetic fuel process can be supplied by the natural moisture of the coal itself. Thus, the only technology which presently exists and by which synthetic fuel from western coal can displace petroleum in the automotive fuel market is the integrated methanol conversion and tranportation system. The key element is the ability of the methanol slurry pipeline to accept and to deliver dry (1 to 5% moisture) coal, allowing the natural coal moisture to be used as synthesis feedstock in satisfaction of the large water requirement of any synthetic fuel plant. By virtue of these unique properties, this integrated system is seen as the only means in the foreseeable future whereby western coal can be converted to synthetic fuel and moved to distant markets.

  5. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Final report, October 1988--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II; Bielaga, B.A.

    1991-12-01

    The overall objective of this project was to use molecular genetics to develop strains of bacteria with enhanced ability to remove sulfur from coal, and to obtain data that will allow the performance and economics of a coal biodesulfurization process to be predicted. (VC)

  6. Secondary economic impact of acid deposition control legislation in six coal producing states: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.; Guthrie, S.J.

    1988-12-01

    Among the difficult policy questions on the US environmental agenda is what to do about emissions to the earth's atmosphere of pollutants that may result in ''acid rain''. The Congress has considered several pieces of legislation spelling out potential approaches to the problem and setting goals for emission reduction, mostly emphasizing the control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Significant policy concern is the dollar costs to the nation's economy of achieving the intended effects of the legislation and the potential impacts on economic activity---in particular, losses of both coal mining and secondary service sector employment in states and regions dependent on the mining of high sulfur coal. There are several direct economic effects of regulations such as the acid rain control legislation. One of the more obvious effects was the switching from high sulfur coal to low sulfur coal. This would result in increases in employment and coal business procurements in low sulfur coal mining regions, but also would result in lower employment and lower coal business procurements in high sulfur coal mining areas. The potential negative effects are the immediate policy concern and are the focus of this report. 15 refs., 1 fig., 17 tabs.

  7. Lignin-assisted coal depolymerization. [Final] technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Muchmore, C.B.; Koropchak, J.A.; Kim, Jong Won

    1992-12-31

    Liquefaction of an Illinois bituminous and a caustic lignin was studied in an initial hydrogen pressure of 140 psig. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range of 325-375{degree}C in tetralin. The addition of lignin to coal was found to be synergistic in that it significantly improves the quality and yield of the liquid products obtained. Kinetic data for coal conversion enhancement due to lignin addition were obtained. A mathematical model describing the reaction chemistry, using lignin, has been proposed and developed. The analysis of the results indicates that the intermediates produced from lignin were responsible for enhancement in coal depolymerization rate, however, the intermediates are short-lived as compared to the time needed for a significant coal conversion yield. Coal depolymerization rate was found to be a function of time; compared to processing coal alone, it doubled upon reacting coal with lignin at 375{degree}C and after 67 minutes from the beginning of the experiment. Overall mass recoveries of 95--98% of the total mass charged to the reactor were obtained. A careful statistical analysis of the data shows that coal depolymerization yield is enhanced by 11.9% due to the lignin addition. The liquids obtained were examined for their elemental composition, and molecular weight determination by size exclusion chromatography. The stability of liquid products was characterized by determining their solubility in pentane and benzene, and by evaluating the molecular weight.

  8. Heterofunctionality interaction with donor solvent coal liquefaction. Final progress report, August 1982-April 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Cronauer, D.C.

    1984-05-01

    This project was undertaken to understand the role of the coal liquefaction solvent through a study of the interaction between the hydrogen donor solvent characteristics and the heterofunctionality of the solvent. Specifically, hydroxyl- and nitrogen-containing solvents were studied and characterized. A series of coal liquefaction experiments were carried out at 450/sup 0/C in a continuous feed stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) to observe the effect of adding phenolics to anthracene oil (AO) and SRC-II recycle solvents. The addition of phenol to AO at a ratio of 5/65 resulted in a nominal increase in coal conversion to THF solubles, but the amount of asphaltenes more than doubled resulting in a sizable net loss of solvent. The addition of m-cresol to both AO and SRC-II solvents had a positive effect on coal conversion to both THF and pentane solubles (oils). The partial removal of an OH-concentrate from SRC-II solvent was carried out using Amberlyst IRA-904 ion exchange resin. The resin-treated oil was only marginally better than raw SRC-II recycle solvent for coal liquefaction. Hydroaromatics having nitrogen functionality should be good solvents for coal liquefaction considering their effective solvent power, ability to penetrate and swell coal, and their ability to readily transfer hydrogen, particularly in the presence of oxygen functionality. However, these benefits are overshadowed by the strong tendency of the nitrogen-containing species to adduct with themselves and coal-derived materials.

  9. Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

    1987-04-01

    Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  10. Studies for the stabilization of coal-oil mixtures. Final report, August 1978-May 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Botsaris, G.D.; Glazman, Y.M.; Adams-Viola, M.

    1981-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of the stabilization of coal-oil mixtures (COM) was developed. Aggregation of the coal particles was determined to control both the sedimentation and rheological properties of the COM. Sedimentation stability of COM prepared with coal, 80% < 200 mesh, is achieved by particle aggregation, which leads to the formation of a network of particles throughout the oil. The wettability of coal powders was evaluated by the Pickering emulsion test and a spherical agglomeration test to assess its effect on the stability of various COM formulations. Sedimentation stability of hydrophilic coal-oil-water mixtures (COWM) involves the formation of water bridges between the coal particles, while less stabilization of oleophilic COWM is achieved by the formation of an emulsion. Anionic SAA were least sensitive to the coal type and enhanced the aggregation stability of the suspension. The effect of cationic SAA, nonionic SAA and polymer additives depended upon the specific chemical structure of the SAA, the water content of the COM and the type of coal. The sedimentation stability of ultrafine COM was not directly due to the fineness of the powder but due to the formation of a network of flocculated particles.

  11. Research and development of rapid hydrogenation for coal conversion to synthetic motor fuels (riser cracking of coal). Final report, April 1, 1976-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, D. A.; Beeson, J. L.; Oberle, R. D.

    1981-02-01

    The objective of the program described was to develop a noncatalytic process for the hydropyrolysis of lignite and coal to produce high-octane blending gasoline constituents, methane, ethane, and carbon oxides. The process would operate in a balanced plant mode, using spent char to generate process hydrogen by steam-oxygen gasification. The technical program included the construction and operating of a bench-scale unit (5-10 lb/hr), the design, construction, and operation of a process development unit (PDU) (100 lb/hr), and a final technical and economic assessment of the process, called Riser Cracking of Coal. In the bench-scale unit program, 143 runs were made investigating the effects of pressure, temperature, heating rate, residence time, and particle size, processing North Dakota lignite in hydrogen. Some runs were made in which the hydrogen was preheated to pyrolysis temperatures prior to contact with the coal, and, also, in which steam was substituted for half of the hydrogen. Attempts to operate the bench-scale unit at 1200 psig and 1475/sup 0/F were not successful. Depth of carbon conversion was found to be influenced by hydrogen pressure, hydrogen-to-coal ratio, and the severity of the thermal treatment. The composition of hydrocarbon liquids produced was found to change with severity. At low severity, the liquids contained sizable fractions of phenols and cresols. At high severity, the fraction of phenols and cresols was much reduced, with an attendant increase in BTX. In operating the PDU, it was necessary to use more oxygen than was planned to achieve pyrolysis temperatures because of heat losses, and portions of hydrocarbon products were lost through combustion with a large increase in carbon oxide yields. Economic studies, however, showed that selling prices for gasoline blending stock, fuel oil, and fuel gas are competitive in current markets, so that the process is held to warrant further development.

  12. Development of techniques for evaluation of coal-waste leachate problems. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Michalovic, J.G.; Fisher, J.C.

    1983-07-15

    A study was conducted to develop techniques to assess coal-waste leachate problems. A review of current literature and a survey of governmental agencies was performed to determine the state-of-the-art and the amount of information available with respect to coal-refuse piles. It was found that the existing data were somewhat limited with respect to the quantity and quality of leachate produced from refuse piles. An in depth study of two coal refuse sites was performed that focused on leachate characteristics based on physical and chemical composition of the refuse piles. A laboratory leaching test was developed using coal refuse sampled at the sites that allowed an evaluation of the coal refuse from the quality of leachate generated.

  13. Temperature effects on chemical structure and motion in coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maciel, G.E.

    1996-09-30

    The objective of this project was to apply recently developed, state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to examine in situ changes in the chemical structure and molecular/macromolecular motion in coal as the temperature is increased above room temperature. Although alterations in the chemical structure of coal have been studied previously by {sup 13}C NMR, using quenched samples, the goal of this project was to examine these chemical structural changes, and changes in molecular/macromolecular mobility that may precede or accompany the chemical changes, at elevated temperatures, using modern {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR techniques, especially {sup 1}H dipolar-dephasing techniques and related experiments pioneered in the laboratory for examining pyridine-saturated coals. This project consisted of the following four primary segments and related efforts on matters relevant to the first four tasks. (1) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure and mobility as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (2) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure, mobility and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (3) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure/mobility as a function of temperature over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (4) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure, dynamics and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (5) Related matters relevant to the first four tasks: (a) {sup 1}H CRAMPS NMR characterization of oil shales and their kerogen concentrates; and (b) improved quantitation in {sup 13}C MAS characterization of coals.

  14. Development of the chemical and electrochemical coal cleaning (CECC) process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Basilio, C.I.

    1992-05-01

    The Chemical and Electrochemical Coal Cleaning (CECC) process developed at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University was studied further in this project. This process offers a new method of physically cleaning both low- and high-rank coals without requiring fine grinding. The CECC process is based on liberating mineral matter from coal by osmotic pressure. The majority of the work was conducted on Middle Wyodak, Pittsburgh No. 8 and Elkhorn No. 3 coals. The coal samples were characterized for a variety of physical and chemical properties. Parametric studies were then conducted to identify the important operating parameters and to establish the optimum conditions. In addition, fundamental mechanisms of the process were studied, including mineral matter liberation, kinetics of mineral matter and pyrite dissolution, ferric ion regeneration schemes and alternative methods of separating the cleaned coal from the liberated mineral matter. The information gathered from the parametric and fundamental studies was used in the design, construction and testing of a bench-scale continuous CECC unit. Using this unit, the ash content of a Middle Wyodak coal was reduced from 6.96 to 1.61% at a 2 lbs/hr throughput. With an Elkhorn No. 3 sample, the ash content was reduced from 9.43 to 1.8%, while the sulfur content was reduced from 1.57 to 0.9%. The mass balance and liberation studies showed that liberation played a more dominant role than the chemical dissolution in removing mineral matter and inorganic sulfur from the different bituminous coals tested. However, the opposite was found to be the case for the Wyodak coal since this coal contained a significant amount of acid-soluble minerals.

  15. Integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant: Conceptual design and costing. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McHale, E.T.; Paul, A.D.; Bartis, J.T.; Korkmaz, M.

    1992-12-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, a study was conducted to provide DOE with a reliable, documented estimate of the cost of producing coal-water fuel (CWF). The approach to the project was to specify a plant capacity and location, identify and analyze a suitable coal, and develop a conceptual design for an integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant. Using this information, a definitive costing study was then conducted, on the basis of which an economic and sensitivity analysis was performed utilizing a financial evaluation model to determine a price for CWF in 1992. The design output of the integrated plant is 200 tons of coal (dry basis) per hour. Operating at a capacity factor of 83 percent, the baseline design yields approximately 1.5 million tons per year of coal on a dry basis. This is approximately equivalent to the fuel required to continuously generate 500 MW of electric power. The CWF produced by the plant is intended as a replacement for heavy oil or gas in electric utility and large industrial boilers. The particle size distribution, particularly the top size, and the ash content of the coal in the CWF are specified at significantly lower levels than is commonly found in typical pulverized coal grinds. The particle top size is 125 microns (vs typically 300m{mu} for pulverized coal) and the coal ash content is 3.8 percent. The lower top size is intended to promote complete carbon burnout at less derating in boilers that are not designed for coal firing. The reduced mineral matter content will produce ash of very fine particle size during combustion, which leads to less impaction and reduced fouling of tubes in convective passages.

  16. Characterization of silica in the lungs of autopsied coal miners. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    A two-part study was conducted to investigate silica in lungs of coal miners at autopsy. The prevalence of silicosis at death in coal miners in relation to mining and job categories was investigated in the first part. Lung-tissue sections submitted to the National Coal Workers Autopsy Study (NCWAS) for the period 1971 through 1980 were assessed for the presence of silicotic lesions in the pulmonary parenchyma and tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Silicosis usually occurred against a background of coal workers' pneumoconiosis; only 7.2% of lungs without coal workers' pneumoconiosis showed silicosis. Transportation workers showed the highest prevalence of silicosis, while workers primarily engaged in surface activities at underground mines have the lowest prevalence. Geographical area affected the prevalence of silicosis. The number of years spent in underground mining was found to be clearly correlated with prevalence and severity of silicosis. The second part studied the particle-size distributions and number of particles in coal miners' lungs. Particulate burdens were determined for lung specimens from 21 coal miners by scanning electron-microscope-based automated image analysis. Results were compared with those for urban dwellers. In spite of the specimens being chosen to represent a wide range of exposure and medical history, particle-size data were similar.

  17. Combustion and gasification characteristics of chars from four commercially significant coals of different rank. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nsakala, N.Y.; Patel, R.L.; Lao, T.C.

    1982-09-01

    The combustion and gasification kinetics of four size graded coal chars were investigated experimentally in Combustion Engineering's Drop Tube Furnace System (DTFS). The chars were prepared in the DTFS from commercially significant coals representing a wide range of rank; these included a Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam hvAb coal, an Illinois No. 6 Seam hvCb coal, a Wyoming Sub C, and a Texas Lignite A. Additionally, a number of standard ASTM and special bench scale tests were performed on the coals and chars to characterize their physicochemical properties. Results showed that the lower rank coal chars were more reactive than the higher rank coal chars and that combustion reactions of chars were much faster than the corresponding gasification reactions. Fuel properties, temperature, and reactant gas partial pressure had a significant influence on both combustion and gasification, and particle size had a mild but discernible influence on gasification. Fuel reactivities were closely related to pore structure. Computer simulation of the combustion and gasification performances of the subject samples in the DTFS supported the experimental findings.

  18. Development of high energy density fuels from mild gasification of coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    METC has concluded that MCG technology has the potential to simultaneously satisfy the transportation and power generation fuel needs in the most cost-effective manner. MCG is based on low temperature pyrolysis, a technique known to the coal community for over a century. Most past pyrolysis developments were aimed at maximizing the liquids yield which results in a low quality tarry product requiring significant and capital intensive upgrading. By properly tailoring the pyrolysis severity to control the liquid yield-liquid quality relationship, it has been found that a higher quality distillate-boiling liquid can be readily ``skimmed`` from the coal. The resultant liquids have a much higher H/C ratio than conventional pyrolytic tars and therefore can be hydroprocessed at lower cost. These liquids are also extremely enriched in l-, 2-, and 3-ring aromatics. The co-product char material can be used in place of coal as a pulverized fuel (pf) for power generation in a coal combustor. In this situation where the original coal has a high sulfur content, the MCG process can be practiced with a coal-lime mixture and the calcium values retained on the char can tie up the unconverted coal sulfur upon pf combustion of the char. Lime has also been shown to improve the yield and quality of the MCG liquids.

  19. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Final technical report, September 1990--February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Shams, K.G.

    1994-07-01

    Recent research efforts in direct coal liquefaction are focused on lowering the level of reaction severity, identification and determination of the causes of retrogressive reactions, and improving the economics of the process. Ambient pretreatment of coals using methanol and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid was extensively studied in connection with low severity coal liquefaction. Ambient pretreatment of eight Argonne coals using methanol/HCl improved THF-soluble conversions 24.5 wt % (maf basis) for Wyodak subbituminous coal and 28.4 wt % for Beulah-Zap lignite with an average increase of 14.9 wt % for the eight Argonne coals at 623 K (350{degrees}C) reaction temperature and 30 minutes reaction time. Optimal pretreatment conditions were determined using Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coals. Acid concentration was the most important pretreatment variable studied; liquefaction reactivity increased with increasing acid concentration up to 2 vol %. The FTIR spectra of treated and untreated Wyodak coal samples demonstrated formation of carboxylic functional groups during pretreatment, a result of divalent (Ca, Mg) cationic bridge destruction. The extent of liquefaction reactivity directly correlated with the amount of calcium removed during pretreatment, and results from calcium ``addback`` experiments supported the observation that calcium adversely affected coal reactivity at low severity reaction conditions. Model compound studies using benzyl phenyl ether demonstrated that calcium cations catalyzed retrogressive reactions, inhibited hydrogenation reactions at low severity reaction conditions, and were more active at higher reaction temperatures. Based on kinetic data, mechanisms for hydrogenation-based inhibition and base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are proposed. The base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are shown to occur via a hydrogen abstraction mechanism where hydrogenation inhibition reactions are shown to take place via a surface quenching mechanism.

  20. Characterization of organic nitrogen in IBCSP coals. Final technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kruge, M.A.

    1991-12-31

    The overall objective of this study was to determine the content and distribution of organic nitrogen in a series of IBCSP coals and their isolated macerals. The specific objectives were: to determine the bulk nitrogen contents for coals, isolated macerals, oxidation products and residues, solvent extracts and their liquid chromatographic fractions, and pyrolyzates; to determine the distribution of organic nitrogen in all coal derivatives enumerated in Objective 1 which are Gas Chromatography (GC)-amenable. This will be accomplished by GC-Thermionic Specific Detectors; to determine the molecular structure of the major nitrogen compounds detected in Objective 2, using mass spectrometry.

  1. Evaluation of the effects of coal-mine reclamation on water quality in Big Four Hollow near Lake Hope, southeastern Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, V.E.

    1985-01-01

    A subsurface clay dike and mine-entrance hydraulic seals were constructed from July 1979 through May 1980 by the Ohio Department if Natural Resources, Division of Reclamation to reduce acidic mine drainage from abandoned drift-mine complex 88 into Big Four Hollow Creek. Big Four Hollow Creek flows into Sandy Run--the major tributary to Lake Hope. A data-collection program was established in 1979 by the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate effects of drift-mine sealing on surface-water systems of the Big Four Hollow Creek and Sandy Run area just below the mine. Data collected by private consultants from 1970 through 1971 near the mouth of Big Four Hollow Creek (U.S. Geological Survey station 03201700) show that pH ranged from 2.7 to 4.8, with a median of 3.1. The calculated iron load was 50 pounds per day. Data collecetd near the mouth of Big Four Hollow Creek (station 03201700) from 1971 through 1979 (before dike construction) show the daily pH ranged from 2.1 to 6.7; the median was 3.6. The daily specific conduction ranged from 72 to 3,500 microsiements per centimeter at 25? Celsius and averaged 770. The estimated loads of chemical constituents were: Sulfate, 1,100 pounds per day: iron, 54 pounds per day: and manganese, 12 pounds per day. All postconstruction data collected at station 03201700 through the end of the project, May 1980 through June 30, 1983, show that the daily pH ranged from 2.4 to 7.7, with a median of 3.7. Daily specific conductance ranged from 87 to 3,200 microsiemens per centimeter and averaged 1,200. The estimated loads of chemical constituents for this period were: Sulfate, 1,000 pounds per day: iron, 44 pounds per day: and manganese, 16 pounds per day. Standard nonparametric statistical tests were performed on the data collected before and after reclamation. Differences at the 95-percent confidence level were found in the before- and after-reclamation data sets for specific conductance, aluminum, and manganese at station 03201700. Data

  2. ADVANCED PLACEMENT IN OHIO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Council on Advanced Placement, Columbus.

    THE DOCUMENT PRESENTS A DESCRIPTION OF THE ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM IN OHIO. ANSWERS ARE GIVEN TO KEY QUESTIONS ON THE FUNCTION OF ADVANCED PLACEMENT, ACADEMIC AREAS COVERED, PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION, COSTS, BENEFITS, VARIOUS ORGANIZATIONAL PATTERNS, STUDENT PARTICIPANTS, COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN OHIO AND REPRESENTATIVE NATIONAL INSTITUTIONS…

  3. Ohio Environmental Education Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melvin, Ruth W.

    This is a guide to regional sites in Ohio which can be studied in regard to resource management; land use; the quality of air, water, soil; and reclamation. The first section of the guide includes brief descriptions of Ohio's natural features at the present time, accounts of past appearances and events, and predictions for the future. In the…

  4. Pelletizing/reslurrying as a means of distributing and firing clean coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conkle, H.N.

    1992-09-29

    Battelle-Columbus and Amax Research & Development conducted a program to develop a process to transport, handle, store, and utilize ultra-fine, ultra-clean (UFUC) coals. The primary objective was to devise a cost-effective method, based on conventional pelletization techniques, to transform the sludge-like filter cake produced in advanced flotation cleaning processes into a product which could be used like lump coal. A secondary objective was the production of a pellet which could be readily converted into a coal water fuel (CWF) because the UFUC coal would ultimately be used as CWF. The resulting product would be a hard, waterproof pellet which could be easily reduced to small particle sizes and formulated with water into a liquid fuel.

  5. McHuchuma/Katewaka coal fired power plant feasibility study. Final report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-22

    This study, conducted by Black and Veatch International, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report assesses the feasibility for the development of a new coal fueled power plant in Tanzania at the Mchuchuma/Katewaka coal concession area. Volume 3, the Main Report, is divided into the following sections: (1.0) Introduction; (2.0) Power System Development Studies; (3.0) Conceptual Design Summary of the Mchuchuma Coal Fired Power Plant; (4.0) Fuel Supply Evaluation; (5.0) Transmission System Evaluation; (6.0) Power Plant Site and Infrastructure Evaluation; (7.0) Environmental Impact Assessment; (8.0) Institutional Aspects; (9.0) Financial Evaluation and Benefit Analysis; (10.0) Sources of Finance; Appendix (A) Preliminary Design of Mchuchuma Coal Plant.

  6. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1996-03-01

    Research on sulfate and metal (Mo, Sn) promoted Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts in the current year focused on optimization of conditions. Parameters varied included temperature, solvent, solvent-to-coal ratio, and the effect of presulfiding versus in situ sulfiding. Oil yields were found to increase approximately proportionately with both temperature and solvent-to-coal ratio. The donor solvent, tetralin, proved to give better total conversion and oil yields than either 1-methylnaphthalene or Wilsonville recycle oil. A significant enhancement of both total liquefaction yields and oil yields from lignites and subbituminous coals has been achieved by incorporating iron into the coal matrix by cation exchange. A study has been conducted on the synthesis of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten catalysts using a laser pyrolysis technique.

  7. Cleavage and crosslinking of polymeric coal structures during pyrolysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McMillen, D.F.; Malhotra, R.

    1992-02-01

    The ultimate objective of this project was to develop a better understanding of volatiles production to help optimize the yield and character of condensable coproducts during coal pyrolysis or mild gasification. The specific objectives were to (1) Develop pyrolysis procedures that minimize secondary reactions; and (2) Develop coal pretreatments that current knowledge suggests will prorate bond scission or prevent retrograde reactions. Our approach was to study the pyrolysis of coals and tar-loaded coals by using several techniques that span a range of heating rates and pressures. Slow-heating pyrolyses were performed at low pressures in the inlet of a field ionization mass spectrometer and at atmospheric pressures in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Moderately rapid-heating pyrolyses were performed in a vacuum TGA apparatus and in sealed silica ampules heated in a molten-salt bath. The fastest heating rates were achieved with laser pyrolysis at about 30,000 X/s. The high tar yield seen in this work where the entire volume of the coal particle becomes hot and fluid at very nearly the same time, taken together with the evident non-vapor transport of the tar under these conditions, emphasizes the importance of better understanding the development of fluidity during coal heating. This specifically includes the profound effects--long-recognized but poorly understood that mild oxidation has in suppressing coal fluidity. It also includes the more recently recognized fact that heating in the presence of an inert gas produced substantially greater fluidity than does heating in the presence of combustion gases, even if the conditions are very fuel rich and all the oxygen itself has already been consumed when the coal particles are encountered.

  8. Coal-fueled diesel technology development. Final report, March 3, 1988--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-31

    Since 1979, the US Department of Energy has been sponsoring Research and Development programs to use coal as a fuel for diesel engines. In 1984, under the partial sponsorship of the Burlington Northern and Norfolk Southern Railroads, GE completed a 30-month study on the economic viability of a coal-fueled locomotive. In response to a GE proposal to continue researching the economic and technical feasibility of a coal-fueled diesel engine for locomotives, DOE awarded a contract to GE Corporate Research and Development for a three-year program that began in March 1985 and was completed in 1988. That program was divided into two parts: an Economic Assessment Study and a Technical Feasibility Study. The Economic Assessment Study evaluated the benefits to be derived from development of a coal-fueled diesel engine. Seven areas and their economic impact on the use of coal-fueled diesels were examined; impact on railroad infrastructure, expected maintenance cost, environmental considerations, impact of higher capital costs, railroad training and crew costs, beneficiated coal costs for viable economics, and future cost of money. The Technical Feasibility Study used laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to investigate the combustion of coal. The major accomplishments of this study were the development of injection hardware for coal water slurry (CWS) fuel, successful testing of CWS fuel in a full-size, single-cylinder, medium-speed diesel engine, evaluation of full-scale engine wear rates with metal and ceramic components, and the characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions. Full combustion of CWS fuel was accomplished at full and part load with reasonable manifold conditions.

  9. Dewatering studies of fine clean coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.

    1992-12-31

    Physical cleaning of ultra-fine coal using advanced froth flotation technique provides a low ash product; however, the amount of water associated with clean coal is high. Economic removal of water from the froth will be important for commercial applicability of the advanced flotation processes. The main objective of the present research program is to study and understand dewatering characteristics of ultra-fine clean coal and to develop process parameters to effectively reduce the moisture to less than 20 percent in the clean coal product. The research approach utilized synergistic effect of metal ions and surfactant addition to lower the moisture of clean coal using the conventional vacuum dewatering technique. The studies have identified a combinations of metal ions and surfactants in providing a 22 percent moisture filter cake. Surface chemical study indicated a direct correlation between the point-of-zero charge (PZC) of metal ion/fine coal system and lowering of moisture in the filter cake. Adsorption of either metal ions or surfactants alone did not provide a significant reduction of moisture in the filter cake. However, a combination of the two provided a filter cake containing about 22 percent moisture. Filtration tests conducted using a laboratory vacuum drum filter indicated that the results obtained in batch filtration could be reproduced on a continuous filtration unit. FT-IR studies indicated that anionic surfactant and metal ions form complex species which adsorbs on the fine coal and results in improved moisture reduction during filtration. Recommendations are offered for testing this novel dewatering process on a pilot scale at a coal preparation plant in Illinois.

  10. Fundamental research on novel process alternatives for coal gasification: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, A H; Knight, R A; Anderson, G L; Feldkirchner, H L; Babu, S P

    1986-10-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology has conducted a fundamental research program to determine the technical feasibility of and to prepare preliminary process evaluations for two new approaches to coal gasification. These two concepts were assessed under two major project tasks: Task 1. CO/sub 2/-Coal Gasification Process Concept; Task 2. Internal Recirculation Catalysts Coal Gasification Process Concept. The first process concept involves CO/sub 2/-O/sub 2/ gasification of coal followed by CO/sub 2/ removal from the hot product gas by a solid MgO-containing sorbent. The sorbent is regenerated by either a thermal- or a pressure-swing step and the CO/sub 2/ released is recycled back to the gasifier. The product is a medium-Btu gas. The second process concept involves the use of novel ''semivolatile'' materials as internal recirculating catalysts for coal gasification. These materials remain in the gasifier because their vapor pressure-temperature behavior is such that they will be in the vapor state at the hotter, char exit part of the reactor and will condense in the colder, coal-inlet part of the reactor. 21 refs., 43 figs., 43 tabs.

  11. Superacid Catalyzed Coal Conversion Chemistry. Final Technical Report, September 1, 1983-September 1, 1986

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Olah, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    This research project involved the study of a raw comparatively mild coal conversion process. The goal of the project was to study model systems to understand the basic chemistry involved and to provide a possible effective pretreatment of coal which significantly improves liquefaction-depolymerization under mild conditions. The conversion process operates at relatively low temperatures (170 degrees C) and pressures and uses an easily recyclable, stable superacid catalysts (HF-BF{sub 3}). It consequently offers an attractive alternative to currently available processes. From the present studies it appears that the modification of coal structure by electrophilic alkylation and subsequent reaction of alkylated coal with HF-BF{sub 3}-H{sub 2} system under mild conditions considerably improves the extractability of coal in pyridine and cyclohexane. On the other hand, nitration of coal and its subsequent reaction with HF-BF{sub 3}H{sub 2} decreases the pyridine and cyclohexane extractability. Study of model compounds under conditions identical with the superacidic HF/BF{sub 3}/H{sub 2} system provided significant information about the basic chemistry of the involved cleavage-hydrogenation reactions.

  12. Burning of suspended coal-water slurry droplet with oil as combustion additive. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, S.C.

    1984-10-01

    The combustion of single coal-water slurry droplet with oil as combustion additive (CWOM) has been studied. In this study, the droplet is suspended on a fine quartz fiber and is exposed to the hot combustion product of propane (C/sub 3/H/sub 8/) and air. The results are documented in a movie series. The combustion of CWOM with various combinations of concentrations are compared with that of coal-water slurry and water-oil mixture droplets. The combustion of coal-water slurry is enhanced significantly due to the presence of emulsified kerosene. The enhancement is also dependent upon the mixing procedure during preparation of CWOM. The presence of emulsified kerosene induces local boil-off and combustion that coal particles are splashed as fire works during the early evaporation stage of droplet heat-up. After particle splashing, blow-holes appear on the droplet surface. The popcorn and swelling phenomena usually occurred in coal-water-slurry combustion is greatly reduced. Significant combustion enhancement occurs with the use of kerosene in an amount of about 15 percent of the overall CWOM. This process of using kerosene as combustion additive may provide obvious advantage for the combustion of bituminous coal-water slurry. 4 references, 6 figures.

  13. Determining the radiative properties of pulverized-coal particles from experiments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Menguec, M.P.

    1992-02-01

    A comprehensive coupled experimental-theoretical study has been performed to determine the effective radiative properties of pulverized-coal/char particles. The results obtained show that the ``effective`` scattering phase function of coal particles are highly forward scattering and show less sensitivity to the size than predicted from the Lorenz-Mie theory. The main reason for this is the presence of smaller size particles associated with each larger particle. Also, the coal/char particle clouds display more side scattering than predicted for the same size range spheres, indicating the irregular shape of the particles and fragmentation. In addition to these, it was observed that in the visible wavelength range the coal absorption is not gray, and slightly vary with the wavelength. These two experimental approaches followed in this study are unique in a sense that the physics of the problem are not approximated. The properties determined include all uncertainties related to the particle shape, size distribution, inhomogeneity and spectral complex index of refraction data. In order to obtain radiative property data over a wider wavelength spectrum, additional ex-situ experiments have been carried out using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrometer. The spectral measurements were performed over the wavelength range of 2 to 22 {mu}m. These results were interpreted to obtain the ``effective`` efficiency factors of coal particles and the corresponding refractive index values. The results clearly show that the coal/char radiative properties display significant wavelength dependency in the infrared spectrum.

  14. BIOREMEDIATION TECHNIQUES ON CRUDE OIL CONTAMINATED SOILS IN OHIO. Final report includes the quarterly report that ended 12/31/1996

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Hodges; Richard J. Simmers

    1997-05-30

    The purpose of this study is to define the optimum limits of chemical and physical conditions that reduce soil salinity and maximize indigenous aerobic microbiological populations in the bioremediation of oil field waste solids. Specifically, the study centers around treatment of surface contained oily waste having low density and limited solubility in water. Successful remediation is defined by total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) reduction to 1% and no hydrocarbon or salinity impact on ground water resources. The Department of Energy, the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission have encouraged oil and gas producing states to identify and develop improved methods such as this to reduce, recycle or treat solid waste generated with the exploration and development of domestic petroleum resources (IOGCC, 1995). With encouragement and funding assistance through the Department of Energy, Ohio is developing these bioremediation practices to protect soil and water resources. Ohio produced 8,300,000 barrels of crude oil in 1996 from wells operated by 4310 registered owners (ODNR, 1996). Good well site housekeeping can minimize spills, however accidental spills inevitably occur with oil production of this magnitude. Development of sound environmental and economical clean-up procedures is essential.

  15. Thermodynamic and rheological properties of solid-liquid systems in coal processing. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kabadi, V.N.

    1995-06-30

    The work on this project was initiated on September 1, 1991. The project consisted of two different tasks: (1) Development of a model to compute viscosities of coal derived liquids, and (2) Investigate new models for estimation of thermodynamic properties of solid and liquid compounds of the type that exist in coal, or are encountered during coal processing. As for task 1, a model for viscosity computation of coal model compound liquids and coal derived liquids has been developed. The detailed model is presented in this report. Two papers, the first describing the pure liquid model and the second one discussing the application to coal derived liquids, are expected to be published in Energy & Fuels shortly. Marginal progress is reported on task 2. Literature review for this work included compilation of a number of data sets, critical investigation of data measurement techniques available in the literature, investigation of models for liquid and solid phase thermodynamic computations. During the preliminary stages it was discovered that for development of a liquid or solid state equation of state, accurate predictive models for a number of saturation properties, such as, liquid and solid vapor pressures, saturated liquid and solid volumes, heat capacities of liquids and solids at saturation, etc. Most the remaining time on this task was spent in developing predictive correlations for vapor pressures and saturated liquid volumes of organic liquids in general and coal model liquids in particular. All these developments are discussed in this report. Some recommendations for future direction of research in this area are also listed.

  16. Preparation and analyses of low-rank coals for combustion applications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, F.J.; Maas, D.J.

    1986-10-01

    The preparation of low-ash and low-sodium micronized low-rank coal (LRC) fuels for test firing in a gas-turbine combustor module is described in this report. Four subbituminous coals and one lignite were examined for their amenability to the preparation of high-quality powder and coal-water slurry fuels (CSF). The data base included the proximate, ultimate, ash composition, trace element, heating value, and free swelling index determinations and the slurry rheology for the raw coals and for the same coals after various physical separations, chemical treatments and hydrothermal processing. Eagle Butte subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin was selected for preparation of ''available-quality'' and ''improved-quality'' micronized powder and slurry fuels for the combustion tests. This coal was cleaned in a dense-medium separator for preparation of available-quality fuels. Two advanced beneficiation steps were added for preparation of improved-quality fuels. The additional steps were (1) acid treatment to remove sodium and soluble ash minerals and (2) hydrothermal processing at 330/sup 0/C to improve the heating value and the rheology of the CSF. Twenty-four hundred pounds (dry basis) of minus 30-micrometer fuel were prepared for the combustion testing. A conceptual design was developed and costed for a 650,000 tpy improved-quality micronized CSF plant fueling 100 MW of gas-turbine generating capacity. The plant would be located adjacent to a mine in northeastern Wyoming. The capital construction cost for the plant was estimated to be $86.9 million and the operating cost for the plant (including amortization) was projected to be $4.55 per million Btu (HHV), FOB plant. The operating cost could be reduced to $3.22/MBtu if the plant were scaled for 500 MW of generating capacity instead of 100 MW. 19 refs., 12 figs., 31 tabs.

  17. Impact of hydrogen partial pressure on coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, D.; Hoover, D.S.; Schweighardt, F.K.

    1984-06-01

    This program was conducted to determine the effects of hydrogen partial pressure on the SRC-I direct coal liquefaction process and SRC-I Demonstration Plant design. A native solvent was produced in quantity and slurried with Kentucky number 9 Mulford coal in a series of coal liquefaction runs under varying hydrogen gas rates, temperatures, residence times, and hydrogen partial pressures. The results showed that hydrogen partial pressure significantly affected product distribution; the magnitude of the effect was comparable to changes in temperature and residence time. Also, the impact of hydrogen partial pressure was enhanced by increases in both temperature and residence time. Operating at low hydrogen partial pressure did not show any apparent advantage; it reduced coal conversion, reduced oil yield, and had a detrimental effect on the yield distribution of other products. An increase in hydrogen partial pressure had the following effects: increased coal conversion; increased conversion of asphaltenes and preasphaltenes to lighter products; significantly increased the oil yield; increased light gas yields; decreased sulfur content in the SRC; increased hydrogen content of the recycle solvent; and increased hydrogen consumption. This study strongly suggests that further studies should be conducted to optimize the effects of hydrogen partial pressure on the process, both within and, preferably, beyond the constraints of the current basic SRC-I design, considering the major impact of this variable on the process. 10 references, 37 figures, 10 tables.

  18. Development and evaluation of coal/water mixture combustion technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffee, R.S.; Rossmeissl, N.P.; Skolnik, E.G.; McHale, E.T.

    1981-08-01

    The objective was to advance the technology for the preparation, storage, handling and combustion of highly-loaded coal/water mixtures. A systematic program to prepare and experimentally evaluate coal/water mixtures was conducted to develop mixtures which (1) burn efficiently using combustion chambers and burners designed for oil, (2) can be provided at a cost less than that of No. 6 oil, and (3) can be easily transported and stored. The program consisted of three principal tasks. The first was a literature survey relevant to coal/water mixture technology. The second involved slurry preparation and evaluation of rheological and stability properties, and processing techniques. The third consisted of combustion tests to characterize equipment and slurry parameters. The first task comprised a complete search of the literature, results of which are tabulated in Appendix A. Task 2 was involved with the evaluation of composition and process variables on slurry rheology and stability. Three bituminous coals, representing a range of values of volatile content, ash content, and hardness were used in the slurries. Task 3 was concerned with the combustion behavior of coal/water slurry. The studies involved first upgrading of an experimental furnace facility, which was used to burn slurry fuels, with emphasis on studying the effect on combustion of slurry properties such as viscosity and particle size, and the effect of equipment parameters such as secondary air preheat and atomization.

  19. Industrial pulverized coal low-NO{sub x} burner. Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    Arthur D. Little, Inc., jointly with its university partner, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and its industrial partner, Hauck Manufacturing Corporation, is developing a low NO{sub x} pulverized coal burner for use in industrial processes, including those which may require preheated air or oxygen enrichment. The design of the burner specifically addresses the critical performance requirements of industrial systems, namely: high heat release rates, short flames, even heat flux distribution, and high combustion efficiency. The design is applicable to furnaces, industrial boilers, and cement kilns. The development program for this burner includes a feasibility analysis, performance modelling, development of the burner prototype design, and assessment of the economic viability of the burner. The Phase 1 activities covered by this report consisted of three principal tasks: preliminary burner design; fluid flow/combustion modelling and analyses; and market evaluation. The preliminary design activities included the selection of a design coal for the Phase 1 design, preliminary design layout, and preliminary sizing of the burner components. Modelling and analysis were conducted for the coal pyrolysis zone, the rich combustion zone and the lean bumout zone. Both chemical kinetics and one-dimensional coal combustion modelling were performed. The market evaluation included a review of existing industrial coal use, identification of potential near- and long-term markets and an assessment of the optimum burner sizes.

  20. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1997-01-15

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 {micro}m) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. In this investigation a hybrid process--Micro-agglomerate flotation--which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation was studied. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles and to use froth flotation to separate these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units will be relatively large agglomerates (30--50 {micro}m in size) rather than fine coal particles (1--10 {micro}m) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is demonstrated in this study that the process is very sensitive to fluctuations in operating parameters. It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases as well as the agitation conditions in order to promote selectivity. Both kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors play a critical role in determining overall system response.

  1. Estimation of NO{sub x} emissions from pulverized coal-fired utility boilers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wildman, D.J.; Smouse, S.M.

    1995-05-01

    The formation of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) during pulverized-coal combustion in utility boilers is governed by many factors, including the boiler`s design characteristics and operating conditions, and coal properties. Presently, no simple, reliable method is publicly available to estimate NO{sub x} emissions from any coal-fired boiler. A neural network back-propagation algorithm was previously developed using a small data set of boiler design characteristics and operating conditions, and coal properties for tangentially fired boilers. This initial effort yielded sufficient confidence in the use of neural network data analysis techniques to expand the data base to other boiler firing modes. A new neural network-based algorithm has been developed for all major pulverized coal-firing modes (wall, opposed-wall, cell, and tangential) that accurately predicts NO{sub x} emissions using 11 readily available data inputs. A sensitivity study, which was completed for all major input parameters, yielded results that agree with conventional wisdom and practical experience. This new algorithm is being used by others, including the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). EPRI has included the algorithm in its new software for making emissions compliance decisions, the Clean Air Technology Workstation.

  2. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    There are several ceramic materials which are currently being considered for use as structural elements in coal combustion and coal conversion systems because of their thermal and mechanical properties. These include alumina (refractories, membranes, heat engines); silicon carbide and silicon nitride (turbine engines, internal combustion engines, heat exchangers, particulate filters); zirconia (internal combustion engines, turbine engines, refractories); and mullite and cordierite (particulate filters, refractories, heat exchangers). High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, and zirconia. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products and determination of the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time. 145 refs., 29 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Photochemical coal dissolution. Final technical progress report, September 30, 1993--September 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1997-05-01

    A flowing solvent photochemical reactor was designed, built and tested. A modified ACE photochemical reactor, lamp and power supply were employed. They were modified to accommodate a silica column-constrained dispersed coal sample and a solvent flowing through the silica/coal column to sweep away coal extract. Before each experiment the column was packed with the mixture of silica and coal in the annular space around the lamp. A reflective aluminum surface (foil) reflected any light-transmitted through the column for multiple passes back through the sample. A variable speed Rainin Rabbit Plus peristaltic pump was interfaced to an IBM XT computer via a Gilson RS232/RS422 converter. The purpose of the computer control was to vary the speed of the pump so as to control the absorbance of the solution of coal extract in the solvent. Absorbances at a chosen wavelength were measured by a Spec 21 spectrophotometer with a flow cell connected to the column effluent port. A signal proportional to transmittance from the Spec 21 was delivered to the computer through a Keithley DAS 801 A/D plug-in the computer. The analysis of the Spec 21 signal and control of the pump speed was based on a QuickBasic computer program written by us.

  4. Conceptual design of a coal-fired MHD retrofit. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-01

    Coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) technology is ready for its next level of development - an integrated demonstration at a commercial scale. The development and testing of MHD has shown its potential to be the most efficient, least costly, and cleanest way to burn coal. Test results have verified a greater than 99% removal of sulphur with a potential for greater than 60% efficiency. This development and testing, primarily funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has progressed through the completion of its proof-of-concept (POC) phase at the 50 MWt Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) and 28 MWt Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), thereby, providing the basis for demonstration and further commercial development and application of the technology. The conceptual design of a retrofit coal-fired MHD generating plant was originally completed by the MHD Development Corporation (MDC) under this Contract, DE-AC22-87PC79669. Thereafter, this concept was updated and changed to a stand-alone MHD demonstration facility and submitted by MDC to DOE in response to the fifth round of solicitations for Clean Coal Technology. Although not selected, that activity represents the major interest in commercialization by the developing industry and the type of demonstration that would be eventually necessary. This report updates the original executive summary of the conceptual design by incorporating the results of the POC program as well as MDC`s proposed Billings MHD Demonstration Project (BMDP) and outlines the steps necessary for commercialization.

  5. Coal-liquid fuel/diesel engine operating compatibility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J.G.; Martin, F.W.

    1983-09-01

    This work is intended to assess the possibilities of using coal-derived liquids (CDL) represented by a specific type (SRC II) and shale-derived distillate fuel in blends of petroleum-derived fuels in medium-speed, high-output, heavy-duty diesel engines. Conclusions are as follows: (1) Blends of solvent refined coal and diesel fuel may be handled safely by experienced diesel engine mechanics. (2) A serious corrosion problem was found in the fuel pump parts when operating with solvent refined coal blended with petroleum. It is expected that a metallurgy change can overcome this problem. (3) Proper selection of materials for the fuel system is required to permit handling coal-derived liquid fuels. (4) A medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine can be operated on blends of solvent refined coal and petroleum without serious consequences save the fuel system corrosion previously mentioned. This is based on a single, short durability test. (5) As represented by the product evaluated, 100% shale-derived distillate fuel may be used in a medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine without significant consequences. (6) The shale product evaluated may be blended with petroleum distillate or petroleum residual materials and used as a fuel for medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engines. 7 references, 24 figures, 20 tables.

  6. US bituminous coal test program in the British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) gasifier. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    de Souza, M.D.; Tart, K.R.; Eales, D.F.; Turna, O.

    1991-12-01

    The BGL moving-bed, slagging-gasification process is an extension of the commercially proven Lurgi dry-ash, moving-bed gasification process. British Gas and Lurgi have demonstrated the process over an 11-year period at the 350 and 500 t/d scale at British Gas` Westfield Development Center, Scotland, with a wide variety of US and British coals. British Gas also installed a gas purification and HICOM methanation plant at Westfield to treat approximately 190,000 sft{sup 3}/h of purified syngas. Objectives are: To demonstrate the suitability of US bituminous coals as feed-stocks in the BGL gasification process; to provide performance data for use in designing commercial-scale BGL-based gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plants; and to evaluate the performance of the British Gas HICOM process for methanation of US coal-derived syngas.

  7. Environmental aspects of the Brandon woods coal ash site. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, R.W.; Price, R.

    1994-05-01

    The Maryland Power Plant Research Program (PPRP) has evaluated the potential environmental effects of coal ash used as structural fill material at the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BG E) Brandon Woods Energy Business Park. The main purpose of the evaluation was to assess the potential for leachate constituents derived from the coal ash to affect ground and surface water quality. Ground water conditions at the site were evaluated using the water level readings collected from 21 shallow and deep monitoring wells installed by BG E prior to site development, and ground water quality data collected from the time the facility began coal ash filling operations in 1982 to December 1990. The absence of ground water quality degradation downgradient of the ash indicates that several site conditions minimize potential adverse enviromental impacts from leachate generation.

  8. Catalytic coal liquefaction. Final technical report, June 1, 1981-May 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, S.W.

    1984-07-01

    Molybdenum catalysts (both supported and unsupported) have been examined in various stages of preparation and use with respect to BET surface area and low temperature oxygen chemisorption. The results are detailed. X-ray diffraction has been used to characterize ammonium molybdate - after calcination, heated in tetralin under nitrogen and after use in an autoclave. Metal salts have been tested for catalytic effects by heating a tetralin-coal mixture (without hydrogen) at a loading of 1% of the coal. Only ammonium heptamolybdate and stannous chloride had a large incremental effect (based on blank runs with tetralin and catalyst without coal). Differences in liquefaction behavior in tubing bombs and in autoclaves are explained by thermodynamic considerations based on the gas to liquid volume in the two cases. (LTN)

  9. Solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process. Volume II. Sections V-XIV. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This report documents the completion of development work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process by The Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Co. The work was initiated in 1966 under Office of Coal Research, US Department of Interior, Contract No. 14-01-0001-496 and completed under US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-79ET10104. This report discusses work leading to the development of the SRC-I and SRC-II processes, construction of the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant for the successful development of these processes, and results from the operation of this pilot plant. Process design data generated on a 1 ton-per-day Process Development Unit, bench-scale units and through numerous research projects in support of the design of major demonstration plants are also discussed in summary form and fully referenced in this report.

  10. Methane from coal deposits technical evaluation and database. Final report, October 1991-March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, C.M.; Paul, G.S.; Kuuskraa, V.A.

    1994-12-01

    Continued efficient extraction of natural gas from coal seams in the United States will require improved extraction technologies and innovative field practices beyond those in use today. The route selected for timely technology transfer is (1) the publication of the `Quarterly Review of Methane from Coal Seams Technology`; (2) the operation of Natural Gas Supply Information Centers at four geographically dispersed locations; (3) the organization and operation of forums, workshops, short courses, and symposia. To compliment the technologic developments undertaken by other facets of the GRI R&D program, the assessment of new and emerging technologies and their potential impact on cost-effective production of methane from coal seams is also required. An important aspect of this is the use of GRI-development reservoir simulators to provide low-cost insight on reservoir characteristics and the impact of varying technological developments on well and field performance.

  11. Wyoming coal-conversion project. Final technical report, November 1980-February 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming; contains list of appendices with title and identification

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    This final technical report describes what WyCoalGas, Inc. and its subcontractors accomplished in resolving issues related to the resource, technology, economic, environmental, socioeconomic, and governmental requirements affecting a project located near Douglas, Wyoming for producing 150 Billion Btu per day by gasifying sub-bituminous coal. The report summarizes the results of the work on each task and includes the deliverables that WyCoalGas, Inc. and the subcontractors prepared. The co-venturers withdrew from the project for two reasons: federal financial assistance to the project was seen to be highly uncertain; and funds were being expended at an unacceptably high rate.

  12. Thermodynamic model for calorimetric and phase coexistence properties of coal derived fluids. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kabadi, V.N.

    1992-10-01

    The work on this project was initiated on September 1, 1989. The project consisted of three different tasks. 1. A thermodynamic model to predict VLE and calorimetric properties of coal liquids. 2. VLE measurements at high temperature and high pressure for coal model compounds and 3. Chromatographic characterization of coal liquids for distribution of heteroatoms. The thermodynamic model developed is an extension of the previous model developed for VLE of coal derived fluids (DOE Grant no. FG22-86PC90541). The model uses the modified UNIFAC correlation for the liquid phase. Some unavailable UNIFAC interactions parameters have been regressed from experimental VLE and excess enthalpy data. The model is successful in predicting binary VLE and excess enthalpy data. Further refinements of the model are suggested. An apparatus for the high pressure high temperature VLE data measurements has been built and tested. Tetralin-Quinoline is the first binary system selected for data measurements. The equipment was tested by measuring 325{degree}C isotherm for this system and comparing it with literature data. Additional isotherms at 350{degree}C and 370{degree}C have been measured. The framework for a characterization procedure for coal derived liquids has been developed. A coal liquid is defined by a true molecular weight distribution and distribution of heteroatoms as a function of molecular weights. Size exclusions liquid chromatography, elemental analysis and FTIR spectroscopy methods are used to obtain the molecular weight and hetroatom distributions. Further work in this area should include refinements of the characterization procedure, high temperature high pressure VLE data measurements for selective model compound binary systems, and improvement of the thermodynamic model using the new measured data and consistent with the developments in the characterization procedure.

  13. Steam pretreatment for coal liquefaction. Final report, September 26, 1990--March 18, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, R.A.; Balogh-Nair, V.; Ivanenko, O.; Brathwaite, C.

    1995-10-16

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the use of subcritical steam to pretreat coal for slurry liquefaction, allowing liquefaction to be carried out at lower severity and improving product yield and quality. Samples of Illinois No. 6 coal were pretreated in 750 psia steam at 340{degree}C for 15 minutes. These samples, as well as raw coal, were liquefied at high (400{degree}C, 30 min.) and low (385{degree}C, 15 min.) severity conditions under 1500 psia hydrogen with tetralin as the donor solvent. Improved yields were obtained at both conditions. (Improved yields were not obtained at a liquefaction temperature of 350{degree}C as that put the sample into the region of retrogressive reactions). The deleterious effects of slow heating and exposure of the sample to air were demonstrated. Under low severity conditions, steam pretreatment more that doubled the oil yield, increasing it from 12.5 to 29 wt %. Tests were also conducted with aromatic ethers as model compounds. These were exposed to inert gas and steam at pretreatment conditions and in some cases to liquid water at 315{degree}C. {alpha}-Benzylnaphthyl ether and {alpha}- naphthylmethyl phenyl ether show little difference in conversion and product distribution when the thermolysis atmosphere is changed from inert gas to steam. However when these compounds were reacted in the presence of 5 {angstrom} zeolite, the yields of the thermolysis products improved. Zeolite proved effective in suppressing isomerization of the starting materials. These results suggested that zeolites might be beneficial in steam pretreatment of coal and in coal liquefaction. Pretreatment and liquefaction of mixtures of coal and zeolites increases yields of asphaltenes and preasphaltenes.

  14. View of planer from east (Cincinnati Planer Co. Ohio via ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of planer from east (Cincinnati Planer Co. Ohio via W.E. Shipley Co. Metal Working Machinery of Philadelphia, Pa.) - East Broad Top Railroad & Coal Company, Machine Shop, State Route 994, West of U.S. Route 522, Rockhill Furnace, Huntingdon County, PA

  15. SOURCES OF MERCURY WET DEPOSITION IN EASTERN OHIO, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the fall of 2002, an enhanced air monitoring site was established in Steubenville, Ohio as part of a multi-year comprehensive mercury monitoring and source apportionment study to investigate the impact of local and regional coal combustion sources on atmospheric mercury deposi...

  16. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules. Final technical report, September 15, 1986--September 14, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.; Kim, S.; Hwang, D.; Chen, C.C.; Chiou, Z.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of our research was to obtain fundamental information regarding the functional dependence of the diffusion coefficient of coal molecules on the ratio of molecule to pore diameter. That is, the objective of our study was to examine the effect of molecule size and configuration on hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules through as porous medium. To best accomplish this task, we circumvented the complexities of an actual porous catalyst by using a well defined porous matrix with uniform capillaric pores, i.e., a track-etched membrane. In this way, useful information was obtained regarding the relationship of molecular size and configuration on the diffusion rate of coal derived macromolecules through a pore structure with known geometry. Similar studies were performed using a pellet formed of porous alumina, to provide a link between the idealized membranes and the actual complex pore structure of real catalyst extrudates. The fundamental information from our study will be useful toward the tailoring of catalysts to minimize diffusional influences and thereby increase coal conversion and selectivity for desirable products. (VC)

  17. Land application of coal combustion by-products: Use in agriculture and land reclamation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, M.E.

    1995-06-01

    Land application of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) can prove beneficial for a number of reasons. The data presented in this survey provide a basis for optimizing the rates and timing of CCBP applications, selecting proper target soils and crops, and minimizing adverse effects on soil properties, plant responses, and groundwater quality.

  18. Thermal treatment for chlorine removal from coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Muchmore, C.B.; Hesketh, H.E.; Chen, Han Lin

    1992-12-31

    It is the goal of this research to provide the technical basis for development of a process to remove chlorine from coal prior to combustion, based on a thermal treatment process. Under the reaction conditions employed, the behavior of other trace elements of concern will also be evaluated. The recovery of the chlorine removed from the coal as a marketable byproduct, calcium chloride suitable for use as a road deicer, is also being investigated using a novel absorption/crystallization device. This report presents chlorine removal and energy balances obtained on a series of runs performed at 385{degrees}C, and information on the purity of calcium chloride produced by neutralization of the hydrogen chloride trapped in the absorber. The importance of subjecting the coal to a preheating period before exposure for a few minutes at higher temperature has been verified. Chlorine removal of approximately 84% with about 90% energy recovery in the treated coal has been attained. Calcium chloride of nearly 50% purity has been produced from the absorber solution of the tube furnace. When the bench scale dechlorination unit is complete, the larger quantities of by-product calcium chloride produced should permit upgrading the product by recrystallization.

  19. Ultrasonic characterization of coal liquefaction products. Final report, April 11, 1979-February 11, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Leffert, C. B.; Weisman, L.; Moore, D.

    1980-02-29

    The Wayne State University ultrasonic device and technique was used successfully to calibrate coal-derived 0 to 45% wt % asphaltene-in-oil mixtures (2 wt % increments) for transmitted signal strength versus temperature (25 to 100/sup 0/C). Computer-aided cross plots of the transmitted signal strength versus concentration of asphaltene showed that a wide range of concentration and temperature exists where the viscosity-dominated (lower temperature) sound absorption is such that a single-valued number for the concentration of the asphaltene can be obtained from measurement of the sample temperature and transmitted signal strength and thus obtain a measure of the quality of the coal-derived product. Sufficient samples were not provided to obtain a complete calibration of added particulate matter of ash and undissolved coal at all asphaltene in oil concentrations; however, calibrations were made of added ash to three concentrations of asphaltene-in-oil and the data showed the greatest effect at the higher temperatures indicating (as planned) that sound attenuation from Rayleigh scattering is predominant with the suspended particles. We conclude from these two sets of measurements that there is a excellent expectation that the Wayne State ultrasonic device and technique could be used to simultaneously measure (on-line) the suspended particle concentration as well as the quality of the coal-derived product.

  20. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. Final technical report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M.

    1994-12-31

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal. slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. In the present research project we retrieved five drill cores from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment, and installed three samplers in one of the core holes. The solids were chemically and mineralogically analyzed. Display of the mineralogical data on a cross section showed that pyrite was randomly distributed through much of the length of the coal slurry impoundment. Trace concentrations of heavy metals were correlated with pyrite in the core solids. Water samples were collected and analyzed. The water analyses showed that nutrients are insufficient to support plant growth without supplemental fertilization. The analytical data will provide background information necessary for the development of a predictive computer model of the kinetics of pyrite oxidation at near-neutral pH conditions. Programming of a computerized model to simulate pyrite oxidation under near-neutral pH conditions was begun. The program includes ideas from Morel and Hering (1993) and species are calculated in terms of 7 components of known concentrations. The ionic strength of the solution, the species activity coefficients, and the activities are calculated iteratively.

  1. Low-rank coal research: Volume 1, Control technology, liquefaction, and gasification: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, G.F.; Collings, M.E.; Schelkoph, G.L.; Steadman, E.N.; Moretti, C.J.; Henke, K.R.; Rindt, J.R.; Hetland, M.D.; Knudson, C.L.; Willson, W.G.

    1987-04-01

    Volume I contains articles on SO/sub x//NO/sub x/ control, waste management, low-rank direct liquefaction, hydrogen production from low-rank coals, and advanced wastewater treatment. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  2. Improved utilization of coal derived fly ash in concrete. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Cerkanowicz, T.

    1994-02-01

    Successful use of coal derived fly-ash in the formulation of mortar and concrete currently depends on long term testing of the suitability of sample fly ash-concrete formulations prior to fly ash acceptance. Existing mm have proven unreliable and have not provided correlation between formulated mortar and concrete strength and fly-ash/combustor/coal properties or characteristics. This investigation represents a study of the interrelationship between the fly ash formation processes, the fly ash properties, and the mortar and concrete quality as reflected in compressive strength development and resistance to acid/sulfate degradation. Given the properties of the fly ash used and the conditions under which the combustion and fly ash collection was carried out, the optimum use of the captured ash in the mortar and concrete formulation could be defined. Further, the results were used to develop an innovative fly ash quality test to define optimum use of the fly ash. It was the intent of this investigation to increase the market for coal fly ash through its use in cement products. The development of new cement products through replacement of cement with coal fly ash to lower costs and provide comparable or superior compressive strength and resistance to acid/sulfate degradation was undertaken.

  3. H-coal fluid dynamics. Final report, August 1, 1977-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-16

    This report presents the results of work aimed at understanding the hydrodynamic behavior of the H-Coal reactor. A summary of the literature search related to the fluid dynamic behavior of gas/liquid/solid systems has been presented. Design details of a cold flow unit were discussed. The process design of this cold flow model followed practices established by HRI in their process development unit. The cold fow unit has been used to conduct experiments with nitrogen, kerosene, or kerosene/coal char slurries, and HDS catalyst, which at room temperature have properties similar to those existing in the H-Coal reactor. Mineral oil, a high-viscosity liquid, was also used. The volume fractions occupied by gas/liquid slurries and catalyst particles were determined by several experimental techniques. The use of a mini-computer for data collection and calculation has greatly accelerated the analysis and reporting of data. Data on nitrogen/kerosene/HDS catalyst and coal char fines are presented in this paper. Correlations identified in the literature search were utilized to analyze the data. From this analysis it became evident that the Richardson-Zaki correlation describes the effect of slurry flow rate on catalyst expansion. Three-phase fluidization data were analyzed with two models.

  4. Documentation of the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Herhal, A J; Britton, S G; Minnucci, C A

    1982-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the methodologies used to develop the 1979 Demonstrated Reserve Base (DRB) of coal. The main body of this report summarizes the methodological procedures used to develop each state reserve estimate. The appendices to the report provide a detailed description of the entire DRB process for each state.

  5. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems. Volume 1, sections 1--5: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A.; Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M.; Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A.

    1992-11-01

    The inorganic constituents or ash contained in pulverized coal significantly increase the environmental and economic costs of coal utilization. For example, ash particles produced during combustion may deposit on heat transfer surfaces, decreasing heat transfer rates and increasing maintenance costs. The minimization of particulate emissions often requires the installation of cleanup devices such as electrostatic precipitators, also adding to the expense of coal utilization. Despite these costly problems, a comprehensive assessment of the ash formation and had never been attempted. At the start of this program, it was hypothesized that ash deposition and ash particle emissions both depended upon the size and chemical composition of individual ash particles. Questions such as: What determines the size of individual ash particles? What determines their composition? Whether or not particles deposit? How combustion conditions, including reactor size, affect these processes? remained to be answered. In this 6-year multidisciplinary study, these issues were addressed in detail. The ambitious overall goal was the development of a comprehensive model to predict the size and chemical composition distributions of ash produced during pulverized coal combustion. Results are described.

  6. CRA/EPRI coal market analysis system: integration and other improvements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Press, J.

    1981-12-01

    Current models of the coal market assume demand to be exogenous and, effectively, unresponsive to price. At the same time models of electric utility capacity expansion assume the prices of fuels to be exogenous. In fact the coal market and utility planning are interdependent. Integration of a coal model with a utility capacity planning model would allow investigation of the simultaneous operation of the two areas of activity. Modifications to the CRA/EPRI Coal Market Analysis System (CMAS) to enable such integration with the Gordian Utility Capacity Expansion Model have been designed and partially implemented. Some modifications were required to accomplish the interface and some to keep the CMAS to a reasonable size for computer implementation. In addition, other improvements were made to the CMAS apart from the requirements of integration. The theory and mechanics of integration using linear programming decomposition techniques have been developed with special application to the CMAS. Several alternative methods are discussed with one chosen for this particular investigation.

  7. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite. Final technical report, September 1990--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, D.

    1996-01-01

    This project is concerned with the physiochemical processes occuring at the pyrite/aqueous interface, in the context of coal cleaning, desulfurization, and acid mine drainage. The use of synthetic particles of pyrite as model electrodes to investigate the semiconductor electrochemistry of pyrite is employed.

  8. Molten salt coal gasification process development unit. Phase 1. Volume 2. Commercial plant study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, Arthur L.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a test program conducted on the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process, which included the design, construction, and operation of a Process Development Unit (PDU). This process, coal is gasified by contacting it with air in a turbulent pool of molten sodium carbonate. Sulfur and ash are retained in the melt, and a small stream is continuously removed from the gasifier for regeneration of the salt. The process can handle a wide variety of feed materials, including highly caking coals, and produces a gas relatively free from tars and other impurities. The gasification step is carried out at approximately 1800/sup 0/F. The PDU was designed to process 1 ton per hour of coal at pressures up to 20 atm. It is a completely integrated facility including systems for feeding solids to the gasifier, regenerating sodium carbonate for reuse, and removing sulfur and ash in forms suitable for disposal. Five extended test runs were made. The observed product gas composition was quite close to that predicted on the basis of earlier small-scale tests and thermodynamic considerations. All plant systems were operated in an integrated manner. Test data and discussions regarding plant equipment and process performance are presented. The program also included a commercial plant study which showed the process to be attractive for use in a combined cycle, electric power plant. The report is presented in two volumes, Volume 1, PDU Operations, and Volume 2, Commercial Plant Study.

  9. Phase formation during supercritical solvent deashing of solvent-refined coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, J.D. Jr.; Verhoff, F.H.

    1982-11-01

    A constant volume high temperature - pressure phase contacting cell was used in conjunction with an x-ray measurement technique to experimentally determine the volumes of the phases that are formed when supercritical solvents are contacted with solvent refined coal. A material balance technique is used in conjunction with the x-ray data to determine the mass of the phases. The constant volume technique can be used to independently vary temperature and pressure. In addition to temperature pressure variation, the ratio of solvent to solvent refined coal was a major parameter in this investigation. Solvent/W. SRC ratios of 2, 3 and 4 were investigated. Experiments were conducted on the following five systems: Wilsonville Solvent Refined Coal (W. SRC) - Heptane, W. SRC - Toluene, W. SRC - Pyridine, Asphaltene - Toluene and Preasphaltene - Toluene. Pyridine dissolved virtually all of the solvent refined coal. Toluene dissolved intermediate quantities and Heptane dissolved the least. A solubility maximum was observed with the W. SRC - Toluene system. The maximum solubility occurred significantly below the critical point of toluene and at temperatures above the critical point, dissolved solutes were rejected. Qualitatively the same behavior was observed with the asphaltene - toluene system. Toluene did not dissolve preasphaltenes. The maximum solubility with the W. SRC - Toluene system was found to be pressure insensitive at a toluene/W. SRC ratio of 3:1. At a ratio of 4:1 the maximum solubility was more pressure sensitive. 50 figures, 45 tables.

  10. Pollutants from coal conversion processes. Final technical report, September 1, 1980-August 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Felder, R.M.; Ferrell, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    A devolatilized Kentucky bituminous coal, a North Carolina peat, and a New Mexico subbituminous coal have been gasified with steam and oxygen in a pilot-scale fluidized-bed reactor. The reactor was operated at pressures of 570 to 840 kPa (80 to 120 psia), molar steam-to-carbon feed ratios of 0.6 to 1.9, and average bed temperatures of 795 to 1010/sup 0/C (1460 to 1850/sup 0/F). The coal feed rate ranged from 14 to 33 kg/h (30 to 73 lb/h). The reactor effluents were analyzed for major components and potentially hazardous minor components using gas chromatography; tars and wastewaters condensed from the product were analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy, capillary column gas chromatography, and high pressure liquid chromatography; and the feed coals, spent chars, and condensed phase streams were analyzed for selected trace metals using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The experimental results were used to provide a basis for the formulation and evaluation of a mathematical model of the gasifier. The model assumes instantaneous devolatilization of coal at the top of the fluidized-bed, instantaneous combustion of carbon at the bottom of the bed, and steam/carbon gasification and water gas shift reaction in a single perfectly mixed isothermal stage. The effects of various operating parameters and phenomena on reactor performance were determined using the model. As would be expected, carbon conversion and make gas production both increase with bed temperature, steam-to-carbon feed ratio, and solid-phase space time. Both also go up with pressure, but above about 1.7 MPa the increases are negligible. At the temperatures studied, the water-gas shift reaction falls short of equilibrium for pressures lower than 2.1 MPa (confirming experimental results), but the reaction is close to equilibrium at pressures above this value. 25 references, 16 figures, 11 tables.

  11. Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor. Final report, March 15, 1990--July 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.

    1992-09-11

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the combustion of coal and coal wastes in a rotary kiln reactor with limestone addition for sulfur control. The rationale for the project was the perception that rotary systems could bring several advantages to combustion of these fuels, and may thus offer an alternative to fluid-bed boilers. Towards this end, an existing wood pyrolysis kiln (the Humphrey Charcoal kiln) was to be suitably refurbished and retrofitted with a specially designed version of a patented air distributor provided by Universal Energy, Inc. (UEI). As the project progressed beyond the initial stages, a number of issues were raised regarding the feasibility and the possible advantages of burning coals in a rotary kiln combustor and, in particular, the suitability of the Humphrey Charcoal kiln as a combustor. Instead, an opportunity arose to conduct combustion tests in the PEDCO Rotary Cascading-Bed Boiler (RCBB) commercial demonstration unit at the North American Rayon CO. (NARCO) in Elizabethton, TN. The tests focused on anthracite culm and had two objectives: (a) determine the feasibility of burning anthracite culms in a rotary kiln boiler and (b) obtain input for any further work involving the Humphrey Charcoal kiln combustor. A number of tests were conducted at the PEDCO unit. The last one was conducted on anthracite culm procured directly from the feed bin of a commercial circulating fluid-bed boiler. The results were disappointing; it was difficult to maintain sustained combustion even when large quantities of supplemental fuel were used. Combustion efficiency was poor, around 60 percent. The results suggest that the rotary kiln boiler, as designed, is ill-suited with respect to low-grade, hard to burn solid fuels, such as anthracite culm. Indeed, data from combustion of bituminous coal in the PEDCO unit suggest that with respect to coal in general, the rotary kiln boiler appears inferior to the circulating fluid bed boiler.

  12. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1996-03-01

    Extensive research continued on catalysts based on novel anion-treated (mainly sulfated) oxides and oxyhydroxides of iron [Fe{sub x}O{sub y}/SO{sub 4}]. In addition, sulfated oxides of tin as well as molybdenum promoted iron oxides were used. Incorporation of small amounts of sulfate, molybdate, or tungstate anions by wet precipitation/impregnation methods was found to increase the surface acidic character of iron oxides; more importantly, it reduced the grain sizes significantly with corresponding increases in specific surface areas. These anion-treated iron and tin oxides were more active for direct coal liquefaction and coal-heavy oil coprocessing than their untreated counterparts. With these catalyst systems, higher conversion levels are obtained as compared to the soluble precursors of iron and molybdenum at the same catalyst metalloading (3500 ppm iron and 50 ppm molybdenum with respect to coal). Sulfated iron oxides and oxyhydroxides were equally active as coal liquefaction catalysts. The sulfate, molybdate, and tungstate anions were found to have similar promotional effects on the properties and activities of iron oxides. One step in the synthesis of anion-treated iron and tin oxides is precipitation as hydroxides using either urea or ammonium hydroxide. The catalysts prepared using urea as a precipitation agent were more reproducible than those using ammonium, hydroxide in terms of activities and properties. These catalysts/catalyst precursors were characterized by several techniques to determine their physical (size and structure related) and chemical (acidity) properties. Sulfated and molybdated iron oxides were found to have grain sizes as small as 10-20 nm. An attempt was made to correlate the physicochemical properties of these catalysts with their activity for coal liquefaction.

  13. Effects of coal-derived trace species on performance of molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The Carbonate Fuel Cell is a very promising option for highly efficient generation of electricity from many fuels. If coal-gas is to be used, the interactions of coal-derived impurities on various fuel cell components need to be understood. Thus the effects on Carbonate Fuel Cell performance due to ten different coal-derived contaminants viz., NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, HC{ell}, H{sub 2}Se, AsH{sub 3}, Zn, Pb, Cd, Sn, and Hg, have been studied at Energy Research Corporation. Both experimental and theoretical evaluations were performed, which have led to mechanistic insights and initial estimation of qualitative tolerance levels for each species individually and in combination with other species. The focus of this study was to investigate possible coal-gas contaminant effects on the anode side of the Carbonate Fuel Cell, using both out-of-cell thermogravimetric analysis by isothermal TGA, and fuel cell testing in bench-scale cells. Separate experiments detailing performance decay in these cells with high levels of ammonia contamination (1 vol %) and with trace levels of Cd, Hg, and Sn, have indicated that, on the whole, these elements do not affect carbonate fuel cell performance. However, some performance decay may result when a number of the other six species are present, singly or simultaneously, as contaminants in fuel gas. In all cases, tolerance levels have been estimated for each of the 10 species and preliminary models have been developed for six of them. At this stage the models are limited to isothermal, benchscale (300 cm{sup 2} size) single cells. The information obtained is expected to assist in the development of coal-gas cleanup systems, while the contaminant performance effects data will provide useful basic information for modeling fuel cell endurance in conjunction with integrated gasifier/fuel-cell systems (IGFC).

  14. The ability of subsoils to attenuate metals in coal pile leachate. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zelmanowitz, S.; Boyle, W.C.; Armstrong, D.E.; Park, J.K.

    1992-09-01

    Research was performed to investigate potential groundwater contamination due to coal pile leachates. Laboratory-generated and field-collected coal pile leachates were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved ions, pH, and chelation potential of the organic acids. Two soil column studies were performed. Column study 1 involved leaching three soils (sand, a silt loam, and a silt loam with 4% CaCO{sub 3} added) with dilute sulfuric acid solutions at pH 1.5, 3.5, and 5.6. Column leachates were analyzed for pH, dissolved silica, cations, and anions. During the second column study pH 1.5 synthetic coal pile leachate was leached through the three soils. Redox potential, pH, dissolved cations and anions of column leachates were determined. A batch experiment was performed in which Plano silt loam with and without CaCO{sub 3} was equilibrated with synthetic coal pile leachate containing 0, 50 or 100 mg/L fulvic acids (FAs). Equilibrated solutions were analyzed for pH, DOC, Fe, Zn and Cd. Field-collected coal pile leachate was more acidic and generally contained higher metals concentrations than did the laboratory-generated leachates. The DOC of the field leachate was lower than levels likely to leach out of surface soils. Both silt loam soils were able to buffer pH 3.5 acid, but the sand was not. None of the soils were able to buffer pH 1.5 acid for the entire leaching period. The sand exhibited the lowest buffering ability and the silt loam at low flowrate and silt loam with CaCO{sub 3} showed the most buffering. Breakthrough of metals in synthetic coal pile leachate corresponded with soil buffering capacity. Metals were most mobile on the sand and least mobile on the silt loam with CaCO{sub 3}. For all soils, metals in column effluents reached input levels or above during leaching. In the batch study, FAs at 50 and 100 mg/L decreased iron and zinc attenuation on silt loam with CaCO{sub 3}, did not affect metals attenuation on silt loam without CaCO{sub 3}.

  15. Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    This report describes the gravity separation equipment models available in the Coal Cleaning Simulator developed by Aspen Technology, Inc. This flowsheet simulator was developed in collaboration with ICF Kaiser Engineers, a subcontractor to Aspen Technology, Inc., and CQ Inc., a subcontractor to ICF Kaiser Engineers. The algorithms and FORTRAN programs for modeling gravity separation, which include calculations for predicting process performance, and calculations for equipment sizing and costing, were developed by ICF Kaiser Engineers. Aspen Technology integrated these and other models into the ASPEN PLUS system to provide a simulator specifically tailored for modeling coal cleaning plants. ICF Kaiser Engineers also provided basic documentation for these models; Aspen Technology, Inc. has incorporated the information into this topical report. The report documents both the use and the design bases for the models, and provides to the user a good understanding of their range of applicability and limitations.

  16. BLAST FURNACE GRANULAR COAL INJECTION SYSTEM. Final Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-10-01

    Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC) requested financial assistance from the Department of Energy (DOE), for the design, construction and operation of a 2,800-ton-per-day blast furnace granulated coal injection (BFGCI) system for two existing iron-making blast furnaces. The blast furnaces are located at BSC's facilities in Burns Harbor, Indiana. The demonstration project proposal was selected by the DOE and awarded to Bethlehem in November 1990. The design of the project was completed in December 1993 and construction was completed in January 1995. The equipment startup period continued to November 1995 at which time the operating and testing program began. The blast furnace test program with different injected coals was completed in December 1998.

  17. Rate enhancement for catalytic upgrading coal naphthas. Final technical progress report for period ending September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1994-12-31

    In a preceding publication, we have reported on the hydrotreatment of coal-derived naphtha over bulk second row transition metal sulfides. The Group VIII metal sulfides of ruthenium and rhodium of this row were shown to possess higher activity for hydrodesulfurization (as well as hydrodenitrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation) than molybdenum sulfide which is the major constituent of commercial hydrotreatment (HT) catalysts. It is therefore of interest to study the hydrodesulfurization of the naphtha over the transition metal sulfides in greater detail. The objectives of this study include the characterization of the type of sulfur compounds in coal-derived naphtha and to compare the relative activities and the kinetics of conversion of these compounds over each of the bulk second row transition metal sulfides. A further objective is to study the impact of the conversion kinetics of individual sulfur compounds on the kinetics of total sulfur removal over each of these catalysts.

  18. Cyclone reburn using coal-water fuel: Pilot-scale development and testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eckhart, C.F.; DeVault, R.F.

    1991-10-01

    There is an ongoing effort to develop retrofit technologies capable of converting oil- and/or gas-fired boilers to coal combustion. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an improved portion of a previously developed retrofit system designed for the purpose of converting oil/gas boilers. This improvement would almost entirely eliminate the use of premium fuels, thereby significantly increasing the economical attractiveness of the system. Specifically, the goals in this program were to replace natural gas as a reburning fuel with coal-water fuel (CWF). The advantages of such a system include: (1) increased return on investment (ROI) for conversions; (2) nearly complete elimination of premium oil or gas fuel; (3) a more integrated approach to the conversion of oil- or gas-designed boilers to CWF.

  19. Supercritical fluid thermodynamics for coal processing. Final report, September 15, 1988--September 14, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, F.; Eckert, C.A.

    1988-09-15

    The main objective of this research is to develop an equation of state that can be used to predict solubilities and tailor supercritical fluid solvents for the extraction and processing of coal. To meet this objective we have implemented a two-sided. approach. First, we expanded the database of model coal compound solubilities in higher temperature fluids, polar fluids, and fluid mixtures systems. Second, the unique solute/solute, solute/cosolvent and solute/solvent intermolecular interactions in supercritical fluid solutions were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. These results increased our understanding of the molecular phenomena that affect solubility in supercritical fluids and were significant in the development of an equation of state that accurately reflects the true molecular makeup of the solution. (VC)

  20. Performance of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor. Task 2, Pilot scale combustion tests: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toqan, M.A.; Paloposki, T.; Yu, T.; Teare, J.D.; Beer, J.M.

    1989-12-01

    Under contract from DOE-PETC, Combustion Engineering, Inc. undertook the lead-role in a multi-task R&D program aimed at development of a new burner system for coal-based fuels; the goal was that this burner system should be capable of being retrofitted in oil- or gas-fired industrial boilers, or usable in new units. In the first phase of this program a high efficiency advanced coal combustor was designed jointly by CE and MIT. Its burner is of the multiannular design with a fixed shrouded swirler in the center immediately surrounding the atomizer gun to provide the ``primary act,`` and three further annuli for the supply of the ``secondary air.`` The degree of rotation (swirl) in the secondary air is variable. The split of the combustion air into primary and secondary air flows serves the purpose of flame stabilization and combustion staging, the latter to reduce NO{sub x} formation.

  1. Development of a Coal Quality Expert. Final technical progress report No. 12, [January 1--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-12

    During the past quarter, Tasks 3, 4, 5, and 6 were active. Task 3 Pilot Scale Combustion Testing activity included data analysis of pilot- and bench-scale combustion samples in support of the development of CQE slogging and fouling models. Under Task 4, field testing at the fifth host utility site -- New England Power Service Company`s Brayton Point Unit 3 -- was completed in March with the testing of the alternate coal. Test plans were finalized for the sixth and final field test to be performed at Brayton Point Unit 2 in April 1993. Tasks 5 and 6 activities were directed at design and development of CQE base classes and objects, continued formulation and integration of CQE algorithms and submodels, development of the user interface prototype, and preparation of the Fireside Advisor.

  2. Combustion of dense streams of coal particles. Final report, August 29, 1990--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Annamalai, K.; Gopalakrishnan, C.; Du, X.

    1994-05-01

    The USA consumes almost 94 quads of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} BTU or 1.05 {times} 10{sup 15} KJ). The utilities account for about 30 quads of fossil energy where coal is predominantly used as energy source. The coal is ground to finer size and fired into the boiler as dense suspension. Under dense conditions, the particles burn at slower rate due to deficient oxygen within the interparticle spacing. Thus interactions exist amongst the particles for dense clouds. While the earlier literature dealt with combustion processes of isolated particles, the recent research focusses upon the interactive combustion. The interactive combustion studies include arrays consisting of a finite number of particles, and streams and clouds of a large number of particles. Particularly stream combustion models assume cylindrical geometry and predict the ignition and combustion characteristics. The models show that the ignition starts homogeneously for dense streams of coal particles and the ignition time show a minimum as the stream denseness is increased, and during combustion, there appears to be an inner flame within the stream and an outer flame outside the stream for a short period of time. The present experimental investigation is an attempt to verify the model predictions. The set-up consists of a flat flame burner for producing hot vitiated gases, a locally fluidizing feeder system for feeding coal particles, a particle collection probe for collecting particles and an image processing system for analyzing the flame structure. The particles are introduced as a stream into the hot gases and subsequently they ignite and burn. The ash % of fired and collected particles are determined and used to estimate the gasification efficiency or burnt fraction. The parametric studies include gas temperature, oxygen % in gases, residence time, and A:F ratio of the stream.

  3. Control of pyrite surface chemistry in physical coal cleaning. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Yoon, R.H.; Richardson, P.E.

    1993-05-19

    In Part I, Surface Chemistry of Coal Pyrite the mechanisms responsible for the inefficient rejection of coal pyrite were investigated using a number of experimental techniques. The test results demonstrate that the hydrophobicity of coal pyrite is related to the surface products formed during oxidation in aqueous solutions. During oxidation, a sulfur-rich surface layer is produced in near neutral pH solutions. This surface layer is composed mainly of sulfur species in the form of an iron-polysulfide along with a smaller amount of iron oxide/hydroxides. The floatability coal pyrite increases dramatically in the presence of frothers and hydrocarbon collectors. These reagents are believed to absorb on the weakly hydrophobic pyrite surfaces as a result of hydrophobic interaction forces. In Part III, Developing the Best Possible Rejection Schemes, a number of pyrite depressants were evaluated in column and conventional flotation tests. These included manganese (Mn) metal, chelating agents quinone and diethylenetriamine (DETA), and several commercially-available organic depressants. Of these, the additives which serve as reducing agents were found to be most effective. Reducing agents were used to prevent pyrite oxidation and/or remove oxidation products present on previously oxidized surfaces. These data show that Mn is a significantly stronger depressant for pyrite than quinone or DETA. Important factors in determining the pyrite depression effect of Mn include the slurry solid content during conditioning, the addition of acid (HCl), and the amount of Mn. The acid helps remove the oxide layer from the surface of Mn and promotes the depression of pyrite by Mn.

  4. Molten salt coal gasification process development unit. Phase 1. Volume 1. PDU operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, A.L.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a test program conducted on the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process, which included the design, construction, and operation of a Process Development Unit. In this process, coal is gasified by contacting it with air in a turbulent pool of molten sodium carbonate. Sulfur and ash are retained in the melt, and a small stream is continuously removed from the gasifier for regeneration of sodium carbonate, removal of sulfur, and disposal of the ash. The process can handle a wide variety of feed materials, including highly caking coals, and produces a gas relatively free from tars and other impurities. The gasification step is carried out at approximately 1800/sup 0/F. The PDU was designed to process 1 ton per hour of coal at pressures up to 20 atm. It is a completely integrated facility including systems for feeding solids to the gasifier, regenerating sodium carbonate for reuse, and removing sulfur and ash in forms suitable for disposal. Five extended test runs were made. The observed product gas composition was quite close to that predicted on the basis of earlier small-scale tests and thermodynamic considerations. All plant systems were operated in an integrated manner during one of the runs. The principal problem encountered during the five test runs was maintaining a continuous flow of melt from the gasifier to the quench tank. Test data and discussions regarding plant equipment and process performance are presented. The program also included a commercial plant study which showed the process to be attractive for use in a combined-cycle, electric power plant. The report is presented in two volumes, Volume 1, PDU Operations, and Volume 2, Commercial Plant Study.

  5. Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Final report, September 1992--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

    1994-11-01

    The focus of much current work being performed by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the Department of Energy on hot coal-derived fuel gas desulfurization is in the use of zinc-based sorbents. METC has shown interest in formulating and testing manganese-based pellets as alternative effective sulfur sorbents in the 700 to 1200{degree}C temperature range. To substantiate the potential superiority of Mn-based pellets, a systematic approach toward the evaluation of the desulfurizing power of single-metal sorbents is developed based on thermodynamic considerations. This novel procedure considered several metal-based sorbents and singled out manganese oxide as a prime candidate sorbent capable of being utilized under a wide temperature range, irrespective of the reducing power (determined by CO{sub 2}/CO ratio) of the fuel gas. Then, the thermodynamic feasibility of using Mn-based pellets for the removal of H{sub 2}S from hot-coal derived fuel gases, and the subsequent oxidative regeneration of loaded (sulfided) pellets was established. It was concluded that MnO is the stable form of manganese for virtually all commercially available coal-derived fuel gases. In addition, the objective of reducing the H{sub 2}S concentration below 150 ppMv to satisfy the integrated gasification combined cycle system requirement was shown to be thermodynamically feasible. A novel process is developed for the manufacture of Mn-based spherical pellets which have the desired physical and chemical characteristics required.

  6. Life assessment and emissions monitoring of Indian coal-fired power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    At the request of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the traveler, along with Dr. R. P. Krishnan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee spent three weeks in India planning and performing emissions monitoring at the coal-fired Vijayawada Thermal Power Station (VTPS). The coordination for the Indian participants was provided by BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore. The trip was sponsored by the PETC under the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Government of India (GOI)P Alternate Energy Resources Development (AERD) Project. The AERD Project is managed by PETC, and ORNL is providing the technical coordination and support for four coal projects that are being implemented with BHEL, Trichy. The traveler, after briefing the USAID mission in New Delhi visited BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore to coordinate and plan the emissions test program. The site selection was made by BHEL, CPRI, TVA, and PETC. Monitoring was performed for 4 days on one of the 4 existing 210 MW coal-fired boilers at the VTPS, 400 km north of Madras, India.

  7. Flow characteristics of coal-water mixtures. Final report, September 1, 1981-September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Ekmann, J.; Wildman, D.; Mathur, M.; Klinzing, G.

    1986-01-01

    Coal water mixtures have been transported in a recirculating test loop facility. A complete description of the test facility is given. Details of slurry preparation and handling procedures, as well as test procedures, are presented. Test results that examine additive effectiveness and effects of slurry age are discussed. Parametrization tests were conducted on temperature, particle size distribution, concentration, coal type, and pipe diameter. Metzner-Reed coefficients were calculated for the different concentrations and particle size distributions. During this series, different commercial instrumentation was tested for reliability with coal-water slurries. Tests were conducted at different pH values to quantify the effect of pH on pressure drop. Transient behavior was studied during step changes in the mass flow rate. Visualization of flow patterns in bends and elbows was studied using slurries prepared with a white vinyl powder. Three commercially available slurries and two mixes under commercial development were tested. Handling and transport problems are discussed. Several of the classical correlations were applied to the data with limited success. A modeling approach developed for horizontal turbulent flow was modified for laminar flow. Results of this effort show an improvement over classical methods. Correlations for homogeneous flow around bends and elbows are modified for slurries. 16 refs., 38 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Co-firing high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.P.; Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

    1997-11-30

    This project was designed to evaluate the combustion performance of and emissions from a fluidized bed combustor during the combustion of mixtures of high sulfur and/or high chlorine coals and municipal solid waste (MSW). The project included four major tasks, which were as follows: (1) Selection, acquisition, and characterization of raw materials for fuels and the determination of combustion profiles of combination fuels using thermal analytical techniques; (2) Studies of the mechanisms for the formation of chlorinated organics during the combustion of MSW using a tube furnace; (3) Investigation of the effect of sulfur species on the formation of chlorinated organics; and (4) Examination of the combustion performance of combination fuels in a laboratory scale fluidized bed combustor. Several kinds of coals and the major combustible components of the MSW, including PVC, newspaper, and cellulose were tested in this project. Coals with a wide range of sulfur and chlorine contents were used. TGA/MS/FTIR analyses were performed on the raw materials and their blends. The possible mechanism for the formation of chlorinated organics during combustion was investigated by conducting a series of experiments in a tube furnace. The effect of sulfur dioxide on the formation of molecular chlorine during combustion processes was examined in this study.

  9. Development of the LICADO coal cleaning process. Final report, October 1, 1987--April 2, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-31

    Development of the liquid carbon dioxide process for the cleaning of coal was performed in batch, variable volume (semi-continuous), and continuous tests. Continuous operation at feed rates up to 4.5 kg/hr (10-lb/hr) was achieved with the Continuous System. Coals tested included Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh, Illinois No. 6, and Middle Kittanning seams. Results showed that the ash and pyrite rejections agreed closely with washability data for each coal at the particle size tested (-200 mesh). A 0.91 metric ton (1-ton) per hour Proof-of-Concept Plant was conceptually designed. A 181 metric ton (200 ton) per hour and a 45 metric ton (50 ton) per hour plant were sized sufficiently to estimate costs for economic analyses. The processing costs for the 181 metric ton (200 ton) per hour and 45 metric ton (50 ton) per hour were estimated to be $18.96 per metric ton ($17.20 per ton) and $11.47 per metric ton ($10.40 per ton), respectively for these size plants. The costs for the 45 metric ton per hour plant are lower because it is assumed to be a fines recovery plant which does not require a grinding circuit of complex waste handling system.

  10. Healy Clean Coal Project, Healy FCM testing at Niro Air Pollution Control Pilot Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    In September, 1991, pilot testing was performed at the Niro Air Pollution Control Pilot Plant in Copenhagen, Denmark in support of the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP), which is part of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Ill Program. The HCCP is a proposed new coal fired power plant, located in Healy, Alaska. It consists of a TRW entrained combustion system, coupled with a limestone calciner, which operates in synergism with a Joy/Niro Spray Dryer Absorber (SDA) system equipped with a lime activation system that is designed to increase the utilization of the calcined product for sulfur capture in the SDA. The pilot tests, which were funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA), were conducted to investigate the characteristics of the TRW combustor/limestone calciner product, referred to as Flash Calcined Material (FCM) with respect to its ability to remove S0{sub 2 } in the Joy/Niro Activated Recycle SDA system. This report describes the pilot facility, the test objectives and methods, and the results of the tests.

  11. EDS coal liquefaction process development: Phase V. Final technical progress report, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1984-02-01

    All objectives in the EDS Cooperative Agreement for Phases III-B through V have been achieved for the RCLU pilot plants. EDS operations have been successfully demonstrated in both the once-through and bottoms recycle modes for coals of rank ranging from bituminous to lignitic. An extensive data base detailing the effects of process variable changes on yields, conversions and product qualities for each coal has been established. Continuous bottoms recycle operations demonstrated increased overall conversion and improved product slate flexibility over once-through operations. The hydrodynamics of the liquefaction reactor in RCLU were characterized through tests using radioactive tracers in the gas and slurry phases. RCLU was shown to have longer liquid residence times than ECLP. Support work during ECLP operations contributed to resolving differences between ECLP conversions and product yields and those of the small pilot plants. Solvent hydrogenation studies during Phases IIIB-V of the EDS program focused on long term activity maintenance of the Ni-MO-10 catalyst. Process variable studies for solvents from various coals (bituminous, subbituminous, and lignitic), catalyst screening evaluations, and support of ECLP solvent hydrogenation operations. Product quality studies indicate that highly cyclic EDS naphthas represent unique and outstanding catalytic reforming feedstocks. High volumes of high octane motor gasoline blendstock are produced while liberating a considerable quantity of high purity hydrogen.

  12. Pilot plant evaluation of Exxon Donor Solvent residue for the Texaco Coal Gasification Process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Robin, A.M.; Child, C.A.

    1984-05-01

    The objectives of this project were to (1) gain experience with Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) Illinois No. 6 coal liquefaction residue in the 15-t/d Montebello gasifier and (2) identify satisfactory operating conditions for the 200-t/d TVA gasifier. Conclusions are as follows: (1) EDS residue in water slurry form is an excellent feedstock for the Texaco Coal Gasification Process. The optimum operation in the MRL pilot plant was achieved at an oxygen-to-residue feed ratio of about 0.87 lb/lb. Operating at this ratio resulted in a high carbon conversion and the production of 28 SCF of CO+H/sub 2/ per pound of residue feed. (2) EDS residue will make an excellent feed stock for the coal gasification demonstration plant at TVA. Based upon the work described in this report, recommendations for the TVA TCGP demonstration plant test run on this feedstock have been developed and provided to the appropriate parties. 6 figures, 8 tables.

  13. Direct liquefaction of low-rank coal. Final technical report, July 13, 1994--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hetland, M.D.; Rindt, J.R.

    1996-02-01

    A multistep direct liquefaction process specifically aimed at low- rank coals has been developed at the Energy & Environmental Research Center. The process consists of a preconversion treatment to prepare the coal for solubilization, solubilization of the coal in the solvent, and polishing using a phenolic solvent or solvent blend to complete solubilization of the remaining material. The product of these three steps can then be upgraded during a traditional hydrogenation step. This project addresses two research questions necessary for the further development and scaleup of this process: 1) determination of the recyclability of the solvent used during solubilization and 2) determination of the minimum severity required for effective hydrotreatment of the liquid product. The project was performed during two tasks: the first consisting of ten recycle tests and the second consisting of twelve hydrotreatment tests performed at various conditions. This project showed that the solvent could be recycled during the preconversion, solubilization and polishing steps of the multistep process and that lower-severity conditions can be used to successfully hydrotreat the product of the multistep process. The success of this project indicates that additional studies should be performed to evaluate the liquid-phase reactions taking place during batch tests in which the gas flow is continuous (i.e., the gas effects would be negligible). In addition, the entire multistep process (including hydrotreatment) should be evaluated during continuous unit operations. 2 refs., 11 figs., 27 tabs.

  14. Coal-fluid properties with an emphasis on dense phase. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Klinzing, G.E.

    1985-04-01

    Many fossil fuel energy processes depend on the movement of solids by pneumatic transport. Despite the considerable amount of work reported in the literature on pneumatic transport, the design of new industrial systems for new products continues to rely to a great extent on empiricism. A pilot-scale test facility has been constructed at Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC), equipped with modern sophisticated measuring techniques (such as Pressure Transducers, Auburn Monitors and Micro Motion Mass Flow Meters) and an automatic computer-controlled data acquisition system to study the effects of particle pneumatic transport. Pittsburgh Seam and Montana Rosebud coals of varying size consist and moisture content were tested in the atmospheric and pressurized coal flow test loops (AP/CFTL and HP/CFTL) at PETC. The system parameters included conveying gas velocity, injector tank pressure, screw conveyor speed, pipe radius and pipe bends. In this report, results from the coal flow tests were presented and analyzed. Existing theories and correlations on two phase flows were reviewed. Experimental data were compared with values calculated from empirically or theoretically derived equations available in the literature and new correlations were proposed, when applicable, to give a better interpretation of the data and a better understanding of the various flow regimes involved in pneumatic transport. 55 refs., 56 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Development of a coal combustion product (CCP) database system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O`Leary, E.M.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

    1997-09-01

    Nearly 90 million tons of coal combustion products (CCPs) are produced annually in the United States. The value of CCPs is well established by research and commercial practice; however, only 25% of these products are utilized. The objective of this project was to develop a computer program containing a database of advanced analytical and comprehensive engineering information on CCPs, accessible through a user-friendly interface. Version 1.0 of the ACAA CCP Data Manager was specifically designed to: perform multiple-criteria queries to produce a set of sample for in-depth study; view and print standard test reports, such as C618 reports; compare and contrast analytical results in graphs and tables; graph utilization information by application and region; and save data to a file for use in other computer applications, such as spreadsheet programs. The program was designed to contain descriptive information about a given CCP sample, including sample formation data (material type, sample location, fuel type, collection device etc.), combustion system design data (steam generator type, furnace type, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control information, ash-handling configurations), test data (chemical, mineralogical, and physical characterization data), and utilization potential of the CCP. The location of the plant is identified by region. The database has been initially populated with information on over 800 CCP samples, taken from the Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC). An installation package and user`s guide was developed for unlimited distribution by the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA).

  16. Improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Tong, G.T.; Chan, Y.W.; Huang, H.W.; McCarty, J.G.

    1989-02-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS)reaction is the established technology for the production of liquid fuels from coal by an indirect route using coal-derived syngas (CO + H{sub 2}). Modern FTS catalysts are potassium- and copper-promoted iron preparations. These catalysts exhibit moderate activity with carbon monoxide-rich feedstocks such as the syngas produced by advanced coal gasification processes. However, the relatively large yields of by-product methane and high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes detract from the production of desired liquid products in the C{sub 5}-C{sub 16} range needed for motor and aviation fuel. The goal of this program is to decrease undesirable portions of the FTS hydrocarbon yield by altering the Schultz-Flory polymerization product distribution through design and formulation of improved catalysts. Two approaches were taken: (1) reducing the yield of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes by using highly dispersed catalysts produced from surface-confined multiatomic clusters on acid supports and (2) suppressing methane production by uniformly pretreating active, selective conventional FTS catalysts with submonolayer levels of sulfur.

  17. Project to develop and demonstrate methods to eliminate frozen-coal-handling problems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    This paper represents an evaluation of methods of removing frozen coal from railroad hopper cars. The work was based on a careful study of previous methods and examination of innovative methods proposed. It was found that chemical freeze conditioning and side release additives helped for temperatures above 5/sup 0/F but were of marginal benefit for lower temperatures. Further, the effectiveness varied with the particular material and the amount and method of application, and was not well correlated with the price. An innovative method United Coal liked and continued development at their own expense involved an auger/air cannon system in which the auger penetrated the frozen crust to within 2 to 3 feet of the bottom hopper doors and then an air blast from a tank at 140 to 350 psi freed the coal. This was particularly effective when used in connection with the existing overhead shaker facility. Other methods were also evaluated. Some were too expensive in energy, damaged the cars, or were ineffective (or in some cases dangerous). (LTN)

  18. Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.; Scaroni, A.; Miller, B.; Choudhry, V.

    1992-12-31

    The overall objective of this proposed research program was to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples were prepared as 100% plant coal, 90% plant coal/10% fines, 85% plant coal/15% fines, and 80% plant coal /20% fines with a particle size distribution of 70% passing through {minus}200 mesh size. The plant coal and recovered coal fines were obtained from the Randolph Preparation Plant of Peabody Coal Co., Marissa, IL. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace was used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace was used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. The burning profile of the plant coal and the three blends was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Results indicated slower burning of the blends due to low volatile matter and oxidized coal particles. Combustion emissions of these samples were determined in the down-fired combustor, while relative ignition temperatures were determined in the drop tube furnace. Chemical composition of ashes were analyzed to establish a correlation with their respective ash fusion temperatures. Overall study of these samples suggested that the blended samples had combustion properties similar to the original plant coal. In other words, flames were stable under identical firing rates of approximately 200,000 Btu`s/hr and 25% excess air. CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub x}, were similar to each other and within the experimental error. Combustion efficiency of 99{sup +}% was achievable. Ash chemical analysis of each sample revealed that slagging and fouling should not be different from each other.

  19. Computer simulation of coal preparation plants. Part 2. User's manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gottfried, B.S.; Tierney, J.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report describes a comprehensive computer program that allows the user to simulate the performance of realistic coal preparation plants. The program is very flexible in the sense that it can accommodate any particular plant configuration that may be of interest. This allows the user to compare the performance of different plant configurations and to determine the impact of various modes of operation with the same configuration. In addition, the program can be used to assess the degree of cleaning obtained with different coal feeds for a given plant configuration and a given mode of operation. Use of the simulator requires that the user specify the appearance of the plant configuration, the plant operating conditions, and a description of the coal feed. The simulator will then determine the flowrates within the plant, and a description of each flowrate (i.e., the weight distribution, percent ash, pyritic sulfur and total sulfur, moisture, and Btu content). The simulation program has been written in modular form using the Fortran language. It can be implemented on a great many different types of computers, ranging from large scientific mainframes to IBM-type personal computers with a fixed disk. Some customization may be required, however, to ensure compatibility with the features of Fortran available on a particular computer. Part I of this report contains a general description of the methods used to carry out the simulation. Each of the major types of units is described separately, in addition to a description of the overall system analysis. Part II is intended as a user's manual. It contains a listing of the mainframe version of the program, instructions for its use (on both a mainframe and a microcomputer), and output for a representative sample problem.

  20. Investigation of international experience with pulverized coal fires and explosions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, J.N.; Hamilton, T.B.; McNaughton, W.P.

    1993-06-01

    In the early 1980s there were indications that not only were pulverized coal (p.c.) mill fires and explosions a major cause of electric utility down time, but that the incidence of foreign p.c. mill explosions was lower than in the US. This study was established to survey foreign utility experience with p.c. fires and explosions and to relate this to US experience. Sources of foreign p.c. technology were located and visits made to Japan, Australia, England, France, Germany, and Switzerland. Pulverized coal mill manufacturers, operators, researchers and regulators were visited. The results indicate that (1) the conditions necessary for p.c. explosions are known, (2) all p.c. mill systems have the potential to be exploded, (3) there are no p.c. mill design or operating secrets held by foreign sources not known in the US, (4) p.c. mill fires and explosions in foreign countries have the same scenarios as in the US, (5) undiscovered fires in p.c. mill systems are the major cause of p.c. mill explosions, (6) p.c. mill fire and explosion rates tend to correlate with coal type fed to the mill (as described by the fuel ratio) and operator familiarity and caution in operating p.c. mill systems, (7) for a number of reasons, it was not possible to calculate explosion rates in foreign countries that could be compared directly to US experience; however, it was possible to note aspects of foreign operating experience, mill modifications, and pulverizer research that could provide guidance for US and Canadian utilities seeking to continue improving their pulverizer operations. Research on p.c. explosions is reviewed along with implications of the research into operating procedures. Operator experience, training and vigilance can be a significant factor in reducing the risk. Recommendations are made to increase operator efforts to identify and fight fires that would traditionally be undiscovered.

  1. Northern Powder River basin coal, Montana. Final environmental statement, regional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This environmental statement is in two parts: a regional analysis and a site-specific analysis of coal development in the northern Powder River basin region of Montana. The regional analysis addresses cumulative impacts of coal development in the region by 1990, with emphasis on industry proposals that now require or have recently required action by Federal and state authorities. A site-specific analysis of the proposed mining and reclamation plan for the Pearl mine makes up volumes 2 and 4 of this FES. Total annual coal production from the designated region of southeastern Montana is estimated at about 39 million tons by 1980, 50 million tons by 1985, and 53 million tons by 1990. The Big Sky, Pearl, and Spring Creek mines would collectively produce approximately 15% of the total by 1980, 26.5% by 1985, and 25% by 1990. Three impacts were determined to be locally significant. The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for total suspended particulates would frequently be exceeded near all three minesites during mine life. Degradation of air quality would cause subtle injury to vegetation within about 1 mile of the mines and about 4 miles of the generating units, slightly reducing vegetative productivity. Wildlife populations, primarily antelope, mule deer, and sage grouse, would be significantly reduced during mine life and probably for several decades after mining. No threatened or endangered species would be adversely affected.Social impacts would be significant in Colstrip and Forsyth - comparable to those experienced during the construction of Colstrip units 1 and 2. At least during the 2 or 3 years of most rapid growth, local governments, formal and informal institutions, and social networks in Colstrip and Forsyth would not be able to meet the demands placed on them. Comment letters and responses are included.

  2. Feasibility study for Mindanao coal-fired power plant. Final report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The report covers the results of a feasibility study conducted for the installation of a 2 x 100 MW coal-fired power plant at the Naga site on Sibuguey Bay. An overview of the powersector in the Philippines and a review of the environmental standards for the plan design are included in the report. The study is divided into the following sections: (1) Introduction; (2) Overview of Electric Power Sector; (3) Environmental Standards Review; (4) Project Description; (5) Plant Design; (6) Project Schedule; (7) Project Cost Estimates; (8) Operations and Maintenance Plan; (9) Economic Analysis. Appendices A-H follows.

  3. The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

    1991-11-01

    The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950{degree}C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800{degree} to 950{degree}C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na{sub 2}O, NaCl, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820{degree}. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 {mu}m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

  4. Autopsy studies of coal miners' lungs. Phase 2. Final report August 77-July 80

    SciTech Connect

    Ruckley, V.A.; Chapman, J.S.; Collings, P.L.; Douglas, A.N.; Fernie, J.M.

    1981-11-01

    This report is based on a post mortem study of the lungs and hearts of various groups of coal workers drawn from an original cohort of 500 men. The men had worked in collieries which took part in Pneumoconiosis Field Research and which covered the range of mining conditions in Britain. The aim of the study was to relate pathological evidence of pneumoconiosis, emphysema and bronchitis and the radiographic appearances of pneumoconiosis to both the dust retained in the lung and the respirable dust to which the men were exposed. Also included were studies of right-sided heart disease and respiratory function during life in relation to lung pathology.

  5. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems. Volume 2, Sections 6 and 7: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A.; Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M.; Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A.

    1992-11-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of the mechanisms governing the ash aerosol size segregated composition resulting from the combustion of pulverized coal in a laboratory scale down-flow combustor are described. The results of modeling activities used to interpret the results of the experiments conducted under his subtask are also described in this section. Although results from the entire program are included, Phase II studies which emphasized: (1) alkali behavior, including a study of the interrelationship between potassium vaporization and sodium vaporization; and (2) iron behavior, including an examination of the extent of iron-aluminosilicate interactions, are highlighted. Idealized combustion determination of ash particle formation and surface stickiness are also described.

  6. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems. Volume 3, Appendices: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A.; Kang, Shim-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M.; Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A.

    1992-11-01

    This report contains the computer codes developed for the coal combustion project. In Subsection B.1 the FORTRAN code developed for the percolative fragmentation model (or the discrete model, since a char is expressed as a collection of discrete elements in a discrete space) is presented. In Subsection B.2 the code for the continuum model (thus named because mineral inclusions are distributed in a continuum space) is presented. A stereological model code developed to obtain the pore size distribution from a two-dimensional data is presented in Subsection B.3.

  7. The OhioView Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1998-01-01

    The Ohio View Consortium is a group of universities, colleges, K-12 schools, libraries, and local and State government agencies in the State of Ohio working with the USGS and NASA to provide affordable, integrated access to and delivery of U.S. Government satellite and geospatial data. The Ohio View Project is a pilot project that combines the USGS activities in providing an integrated information access and delivery capability with the activities of the Ohio View Consortium 

  8. Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bausch, M.

    1993-12-31

    Results of research pertaining to chemical reactions that aim to selectively cleave C-S bonds in model compounds as well as Illinois coal are summarized. Chemical reactions that result in carbon-sulfur bond cleavage are an essential aspect of any protocol designed to remove organic sulfur from coal. In the second year of the project ``Protocols for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Sulfur Bonds in Coal`` investigations of reactions in which organic sulfur-containing coal model compounds are subjected to different conditions of temperature, solvent mixtures, reagents, and radiation have been completed. A series of reactions have been undertaken in which physically cleaned Illinois coal has been subjected to many of the same reaction conditions that were shown, via the use of model sulfides, to result in substantial C-S bond cleavage and or sulfur oxidation. Therefore, summarized in this final report are results of the investigations of the photooxidation reactions of coal model sulfones and sulfides; the photolytic desulfurization of coal; and various other topics, including a summary of endeavors aimed at initiating C-S bond cleavage reactions using oxidation/chlorination/desulfurization protocols, and various tellurium reagents.

  9. Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal. Interim final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bausch, M.

    1993-12-31

    This report presents results of research pertaining to chemical reactions that aim to selectively cleave C-S bonds in model compounds as well as Illinois coal. Chemical reactions that result in carbon-sulfur bond cleavage are an essential aspect of any protocol designed to remove organic sulfur from coal. In the second year of the project {open_quotes}Protocols for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Sulfur Bonds in Coal, the author has completed investigations of reactions in which organic sulfur-containing coal model compounds are subjected to different conditions of temperature, solvent mixtures, reagents, and radiation. He has also undertaken a series of reactions in which physically cleaned Illinois coal has been subjected to many of the same reaction conditions that were shown, via the use of model sulfides, to result in substantial C-S bond cleavage and or sulfur oxidation. Therefore, summarized in this interim final report are results of the investigations of the photooxidation reactions of coal model sulfones and sulfides; the photolytic desulfurization of coal; and various other topics, including a summary of the endeavors aimed at initiating C-S bond cleavage reactions using oxidation/chlorination/desulfurization protocols, and various tellurium reagents. Important experiments remain to be completed on this project; therefore, efforts in these areas will continue through the end of calendar year 1993.

  10. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing the SNOX innovative clean coal technology demonstration. Volume 1, Sampling/results/special topics: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This study was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE during 1993. The motivation for those assessments was the mandate in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments that a study be made of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electric utilities. The report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1: Sampling describes the sampling effort conducted as the basis for this study; Results presents the concentration data on HAPs in the several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations conducted with those data; and Special Topics report on issues such as comparison of sampling methods and vapor/solid distributions of HAPs. Volume 2: Appendices include quality assurance/quality control results, uncertainty analysis for emission factors, and data sheets. This study involved measurements of a variety of substances in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at the Innovative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration (ICCT) of the Wet Sulfuric Acid-Selective Catalytic Reduction (SNOX) process. The SNOX demonstration is being conducted at Ohio Edison`s Niles Boiler No. 2 which uses cyclone burners to burn bituminous coal. A 35 megawatt slipstream of flue gas from the boiler is used to demonstrate SNOX. The substances measured at the SNOX process were the following: 1. Five major and 16 trace elements, including mercury, chromium, cadmium, lead, selenium, arsenic, beryllium, and nickel; 2. Acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate); 3. Ammonia and cyanide; 4. Elemental carbon; 5. Radionuclides; 6. Volatile organic compounds (VOC); 7. Semi-volatile compounds (SVOC) including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); and 8. Aldehydes.

  11. Tech Prep Ohio Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    Tech prep programs integrate academic, occupational, and employability during the last 2 years of high school and the first 2 years of college, combining the best of college-prep academics with the best of vocational and technical education. The Ohio Tech Prep program, jointly administered by the Ohio Board of Regents and the Ohio Department of…

  12. Federally owned coal and Federal lands in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tewalt, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessed five coal beds or coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions for the National Coal Resource Assessment: the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay coal zone, the Pond Creek coal zone, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. The assessment produced stratigraphic and geochemical databases and digital coal maps, or models, which characterized the coal beds and coal zones. Using the assessment models, the USGS estimated original and remaining (unmined) resources for these coal beds or zones. The Appalachian Basin assessment was conducted in collaboration with the State geological surveys of West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, Kentucky, and Virginia.

  13. Novel technique for coal pyrolysis and hydrogenation product analysis. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Pfefferle, L.D.; Boyle, J.

    1993-03-15

    A microjet reactor coupled to a VUV photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been used to obtain species measurements during high temperature pyrolysis and oxidation of a wide range of hydrocarbon compounds ranging from allene and acetylene to cyclohexane, benzene and toluene. Initial work focused on calibration of the technique, optimization of ion collection and detection and characterization of limitations. Using the optimized technique with 118 nm photoionization, intermediate species profiles were obtained for analysis of the hydrocarbon pyrolysis and oxidation mechanisms. The ``soft`` ionization, yielding predominantly molecular ions, allowed the study of reaction pathways in these high temperature systems where both sampling and detection challenges are severe. Work has focused on the pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures representative of coal pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis products. The detailed mass spectra obtained during pyrolysis and oxidation of hydrocarbon mixtures is especially important because of the complex nature of the product mixture even at short residence times and low primary reactant conversions. The combustion community has advanced detailed modeling of pyrolysis and oxidation to the C4 hydrocarbon level but in general above that size uncertainties in rate constant and thermodynamic data do not allow us to a priori predict products from mixed hydrocarbon pyrolyses using a detailed chemistry model. For pyrolysis of mixtures of coal-derived liquid fractions with a large range of compound structures and molecular weights in the hundreds of amu the modeling challenge is severe. Lumped models are possible from stable product data.

  14. High performance materials in coal conversion utilization. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    McCay, T.D.; Boss, W.H.; Dahotre, N.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the research conducted at the University of Tennessee Space Institute on high performance materials for use in corrosive environments. The work was supported by a US Department of Energy University Coal Research grant. Particular attention was given to the silicon carbide particulate reinforced alumina matrix ceramic composite manufactured by Lanxide Corporation as a potential tubular component in a coal-fired recuperative high-temperature air heater. Extensive testing was performed to determine the high temperature corrosion effects on the strength of the material. A computer modeling of the corrosion process was attempted but the problem proved to be too complex and was not successful. To simplify the situation, a computer model was successfully produced showing the corrosion thermodynamics involved on a monolithic ceramic under the High Performance Power System (HIPPS) conditions (see Appendix A). To seal the material surface and thus protect the silicon carbide particulate from corrosive attack, a dense non porous alumina coating was applied to the material surface. The coating was induced by a defocused carbon dioxide laser beam. High temperature corrosion and strength tests proved the effectiveness of the coating. The carbon dioxide laser was also used to successfully join two pieces of the Lanxide material, however, resources did not allow for the testing of the resulting joint.

  15. Prediction of thermodynamic properties of coal derivatives. Final technical report, September 1, 1987--February 28, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Donohue, M.D.

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this research program is to understand the relationship between macroscopic thermodynamic properties and the various types of intermolecular forces. Since coal-derived liquids contain a wide variety of compounds, a theory capable of successfully predicting the thermophysical properties for coal processes must take into account the molecular shapes and all significant intermolecular forces: dispersion forces, anisotropic forces due to dipoles and quadrupoles, as well as Lewis acid-base interactions. We have developed the Acid-Base-Perturbed-Anisotropic-Chain Theory (ABPACT), a comprehensive theory that is capable of predicting the thermophysical properties for many systems where these different intermolecular forces are present. The ABPACT can treat non-polar compounds, polar compounds and compounds that associate through Lewis acid-base interactions. In addition to our theoretical work, we have used computer simulations to evaluate (and in some cases correct) the assumptions made in this theory. We also have conducted experiments to help us better understand the interplay of different kinds of interactions in multicomponent mixtures.

  16. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired gasification plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Under the Fine Particulate Control/Air Toxics Program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been performing comprehensive assessments of toxic substance emissions from coal-fired electric utility units. An objective of this program is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in evaluating hazardous air pollutant emissions as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has also performed comprehensive assessments of emissions from many power plants and provided the information to the EPA. The DOE program was implemented in two. Phase 1 involved the characterization of eight utility units, with options to sample additional units in Phase 2. Radian was one of five contractors selected to perform these toxic emission assessments.Radian`s Phase 1 test site was at southern Company Service`s Plant Yates, Unit 1, which, as part of the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program, was demonstrating the CT-121 flue gas desulfurization technology. A commercial-scale prototype integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) power plant was selected by DOE for Phase 2 testing. Funding for the Phase 2 effort was provided by DOE, with assistance from EPRI and the host site, the Louisiana Gasification Technology, Inc. (LGTI) project This document presents the results of that effort.

  17. Combustion of pulverized coal in vortex structures. Final report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gollahalli, S.R.; Butuk, N.

    1996-03-01

    The objectives of the project were: (i) to understand the effects of heating one of the streams on the characteristics of shear layers, (ii) to investigate the changes in the characteristics of large scale vortex structures in the shear layer caused by the introduction of inert solid particles in one of the feed streams; (iii) to understand the effects of pyrolyzing solids on the shear layer behavior; and (iv) to study the effects of combustion of particles and their pyrolysis products on the shear layer structure, heat release rate, and pollutant emission characteristics. An experimental facility for generating two-dimensional shear layers containing vortex structures has been designed and fabricated. The experimental facility is essentially a low speed wind tunnel designed to (i) provide two gas streams, initially with uniform velocity profiles and isotropic turbulence, mixing at the end of a splitter plate, (ii) introduce vorticity by passively perturbing one of the streams, (iii) allow heating of one of the streams to temperatures high enough to cause pyrolysis of coal particles, and (iv) provide a natural gas flame in one of the streams to result in ignition and burning of coal particles.

  18. Coal extraction by aprotic dipolar solvents. Final report. [Tetramethylurea, hexa-methylphosphoramide

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, J T

    1985-12-01

    The overall goals of this project were to examine the rate and amount of extraction of coals at low temperature by a class of solvents with a generic structure to include tetramethylurea (TMU) and hexa-methylphosphoramide (HMPA) and to examine the nature of the extracted coal chemicals. The class of solvents with similar action, however, can be classified as aprotic, base solvents or, somewhat more broadly, specific solvents. The action of solvents by this last classification was then examined to postulate a mechanism of attack. Experimental work was conducted to explain the specific solvent attack including (1) pure solvent extraction, (2) extraction in mixtures with otherwise inert solvents and inhibitors, and (3) extraction with simultaneous catalytic enhancement attempts including water-gas shift conversion. Thus nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas-chromatograph mass spectrometer (GC-MS) analysis of extract molecules and extraction with high-pressure CO in TMU (plus 2% H2O) was performed. Effects of solvent additives such as cumene and quinone of large amounts of inert solvents such as tetralin, liminone, or carbon disulfide on extraction were also determined. Results are discussed. 82 refs., 36 figs., 37 tabs.

  19. Diffusion of gases in coals and chars: Final report, September 15, 1985--September 14, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Eight PSOC coals representing a wide range of rank and geographic origin have been subjected to a wide range of pore structure analysis methods as well as gas diffusion measurements. Pore structure analysis techniques employed included carbon dioxide and nitrogen adsorption, helium pycnometry, mercury porosimetry, and low-field NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements. In principle, NMR pore structure analysis avoids many of the problems associated with conventional pore structure methods such as pore structure changes during drying, sample compression, network/percolation effects, pore shape assumptions, and a limited pore size range. Spin-lattice relaxation measurements were conducted at a proton frequency of 20 MHz and 303 K using water contained in the coal pores. Pore size distributions were obtained via deconvolution of the NMR relaxation measurements using the method of regularization and application of the ''two fraction-fast exchange'' model of pore fluid behavior. A qualitative comparison of the NMR pore size distributions and surface areas (CO/sub 2//N/sub 2/) yielded good agreement. Monodisperse and bidisperse pore size distributions were noted with pore volume in the size range of <0.5 nm to 0.5 ..mu..m. Effective diffusivities of methane and nitrogen were measured at 303 K and ambient pressure using a pulse tracer analysis method. 37 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 2, Participants program final summary evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-05-01

    This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process develpment, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

  1. Microbial recovery of metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sperl, P.L.; Sperl, G.T.

    1995-07-01

    This project was initiated on October 1, 1989, for the purpose of recovering metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Two catalyst types were the subject of the contract. The first was a Ni-No catalyst support on alumina (Shell 324), the catalyst used in a pilot scale coal liquefaction facility at Wilsonville, Alabama. The second material was an unsupported ammonium molybdate catalyst used in a pilot process by the Department of Energy at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This material was obtained in late February 1990 but has not been pursued since the Mo content of this particular sample was too low for the current studies and the studies at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center have been discontinued. The object of the contract was to treat these spent catalysts with microorganisms, especially Thiobacillus ferrooxidans , but also other Thiobacillus spp. and possibly Sulfolobus and other potential microorganisms, to leach and remove the metals (Ni and Mo) from the spent catalysts into a form which could be readily recovered by conventional techniques.

  2. Combustion of ultrafine coal/water mixtures and their application in gas turbines: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toqan, M.A.; Srinivasachar, S.; Staudt, J.; Varela, F.; Beer, J.M.

    1987-10-01

    The feasibility of using coal-water fuels (CWF) in gas turbine combustors has been demonstrated in recent pilot plant experiments. The demands of burning coal-water fuels with high flame stability, complete combustion, low NO/sub x/ emission and a resulting fly ash particle size that will not erode turbine blades represent a significant challenge to combustion scientists and engineers. The satisfactory solution of these problems requires that the variation of the structure of CWF flames, i.e., the fields of flow, temperature and chemical species concentration in the flame, with operating conditions is known. Detailed in-flame measurements are difficult at elevated pressures and it has been proposed to carry out such experiments at atmospheric pressure and interpret the data by means of models for gas turbine combustor conditions. The research was carried out in five sequential tasks: cold flow studies; studies of conventional fine-grind CWF; combustion studies with ultrafine CWF fuel; reduction of NO/sub x/ emission by staged combustion; and data interpretation-ignition and radiation aspects. 37 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Oxide-supported metal carbonyls: novel catalysts for the liquefaction of coal. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Melson, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Coal liquefaction, hydrodesulfurization (HDS), and hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) catalysts have been investigated increasingly in recent years because of the need to understand how to develop more selective and stable materials for coal utilization. One catalyst that has been used extensively for HDS and subjected to numerous characterization and model reaction studies is Co-Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. In these studies, the catalyst preparation technique has usually involved the incipient-wetness impregnation of ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with ammonium molybdates and cobalt nitrates. Such a technique leads to a variety of surface species, bulk-like and monolayer forms, which have been described and can be controlled by alterations in the preparation techniques and materials. However, certain structural and chemical factors of the catalysts, e.g., Co and Mo reducibility and dispersion or surface speciation at low and high metal concentrations, seem to be independent of such alterations. To investigate whether these factors can be affected by preparation techniques and to develop oxide-supported, metal catalysts having controlled metal dispersions and speciation, a catalyst preparation technique using metal carbonyls with an extraction process to metal-load oxide supports has been developed (J.E. Crawford, G.A. Melson, L.E. Makovsky, F.R. Brown, J. Catal., 83: 454 (1983)). This report discusses the surface and bulk characterization, and presents initial HDS and liquefaction results, for these catalysts. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Control of fan erosion in coal-fired power plants: Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sverdrup, E.F.; Menguturk, M.; Glasser, A.D.

    1981-08-01

    This EPRI sponsored project examines ways of controlling fly-ash erosion in power plant fans. Computer calculations of particle trajectories and resulting erosion damage show the relative erosion tolerance of various fans. Airfoil centrifugal fans commonly used for induced-draft service have the highest fly-ash erosion tolerance. The erosivity of fly ash from burning bituminous coals, subbituminous coals, and lignites was studied. Fly ash of the highest silica content showed nearly the full range of erosivity indicating that silica content by conventional chemical analysis is not a reliable predictor of expected erosion rates. Work is continuing to speed commercialization of field-replaceable erosion armor for electric utility fans. If the equivalent added protection of 0.2 to 0.3 in. of steel is required, chrome-plated steel shields can be used and still be within the weight limits that will not overstress most fans. If the erosion rates are so high that the equivalent of 0.3 to 0.6 in. of steel are required, shields with advanced coatings will be required. The factors in obtaining highly erosion-resistant coatings are shown and the erosion resistances of promising advanced coatings compared.

  5. Bio-oxidation of thiocyanates typical of coal conversion effluents. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, R. D.; Mattson, L.; Lubon, P.

    1981-01-08

    Thiocyanates have been found in most coal conversion and coke plant effluents. The objectives of this study were to develop data for the biological degradation fate kinetics of thiocyanate removal, and to develop material balance information for the fate of sulfur and nitrogen resulting from such bio-decomposition of aqueous thiocyanates. A literature review of thiocyanate bio-degradation indicates that while much biochemistry information is available, little information in the biological processing arena is known. Based on both batch and continuous culture experiments utilizing an activated sludge type of system with strictly thiocyanate degradating organisms, the specific utilization rate for SCN degradation was found to follow a substrate inhibition biokinetic relationship as: d(SCN)/dt-X = 2.24/(1 + (5/SCN) + (SCN/1340)/sup 6/) where; d(SCN)/dt-X = lb SCN used/lb biomass-day, SCN = mg/L SCN in effluent. The observed biomass sludge production rate was quantified as a function of sludge age in the bio-reactor. The major metabolic by-products of SCN aerobic biodegradation are ammonia and sulfate, with such formation being stochiometric with SCN. High levels of SCN in coal conversion and Stretford system effluents may lead to biological nitrification process requirements to be added to the wastetreatment scheme for compliance with BAT effluent ammonia discharge restrictions.

  6. Experimental studies on the group ignition of a cloud of coal particles. Volume 1, Experimental results: Final report, August 15, 1988--October 15, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Annamalai, K.; Ruiz, M.; Vadakkath, A.; Gopalakrishnan, C.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objectives of this work are to formulate a model to simulate transient coal pyrolysis, ignition, and combustion of a cloud of coal particles and to compare results of the program with those reported in the literature elsewhere. The present work is reported in the following order. An introduction to group combustion is given followed by a review of earlier works. Next, the relevance of the present work to practical application and spray combustion modeling is discussed. A group combustion model is then presented for a spherical cloud of coal particles along with a set of dimensional and nondimensional equations. Finally, nonsteady results are generated for pyrolysis, ignition, and combustion of a cloud of coal particles. (VC)

  7. The use of NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.; Miknis, F.P.; Wallace, J.C. Jr.; Butcher, C.H.; Mitzel, J.M.; Turner, T.F.; Hurtubise, R.J.

    1995-02-01

    Western Research Institute has conducted a study of different methods of coal drying as pretreatment steps before liquefaction. The objectives of this study were to develop a combined chemical dehydration/nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for measuring the moisture content of coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during drying, and to determine the effects of different drying methods on liquefaction reactivity of coals. Different methods of drying were investigated to determine whether coal drying can be accomplished without reducing the reactivity of coals toward liquefaction. Drying methods included thermal, microwave, and chemical dehydration. Coals of rank lignite to high volatile bituminous were studied. Coals that were dried or partially dried thermally and with microwaves had lower liquefaction conversions than coals containing equilibrium moisture contents. However, chemically dried coals had conversions equal to or greater than the premoisturized coals. The conversion behavior is consistent with changes in the physical structure and cross linking reactions because of drying. Thermal and microwave drying appear to cause a collapse in the pore structure, thus preventing donor solvents such as tetralin from contacting reactive sites inside the coals. Chemical dehydration does not appear to collapse the pore structure. These results are supported by the solvent swelling measurements in which the swelling ratios of thermally dried and microwave-dried coals were lower than those of premoisturized coals, indicating a greater degree of cross linking in the dried coals. The swelling ratios of the chemically dried coals were greater than those of the premoisturized coals because the pore structure remaining unchanged or increased when water was removed. These results are consistent with the NMR results, which did not show significant changes in coal chemical structure.

  8. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction infratechnology and generic technology development: Final report, October 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sendlein, L.V.A.

    1987-06-29

    During the first year of its research program, the Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science has made significant progress in many areas of coal liquefaction and coal structure research. Research topics for which substantial progress has been made include integrated coal structure and liquefaction studies, investigation of differential liquefaction processes, development and application of sophisticated techniques for structural analysis, computer analysis of multivariate data, biodesulfurization of coal, catalysis studies, co-processing of coal and crude oil, coal dissolution and extraction processes, coal depolymerization, determination of the liquefaction characteristics of many US coals for use in a liquefaction database, and completion of a retrospective technology assessment for direct coal liquefaction. These and related topics are discussed in considerably more detail in the remainder of this report. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base.

  9. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report, September 20, 1991--September 19, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    One of the main goals for competitive coal liquefaction is to decrease gas yields to reduce hydrogen consumption. Complexing this element as methane and ethane decreases process efficiently and is less cost effective. To decrease the gas yield and increase the liquid yield, an effective preconversion process has been explored on the basis of the physically associated molecular nature of coal. Activities have been focused on two issues: (1) maximizing the dissolution of associated coal and (2) defining the different reactivity associated with a wide molecular weight distribution. Two-step soaking at 350{degrees}C and 400{degrees}C in a recycle oil was found to be very effective for coal solubilization. No additional chemicals, catalysts, and hydrogen are required for this preconversion process. High-volatile bituminous coals tested before liquefaction showed 80--90% conversion with 50--55% oil yields. New preconversion steps suggested are as follows: (1) dissolution of coal with two-step high-temperature soaking, (2) separation into oil and heavy fractions of dissolved coal with vacuum distillation, and (3) selective liquefaction of the separated heavy fractions under relatively mild conditions. Laboratory scale tests of the proposed procedure mode using a small autoclave showed a 30% increase in the oil yield with a 15--20% decrease in the gas yield. This batch operation projects a substantial reduction in the ultimate cost of coal liquefaction.

  10. 78 FR 53275 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ...? On December 2, 2011 (76 FR 75464), EPA issued a final determination that the Parkersburg-Marietta and... standard. On November 30, 2012 (77 FR 71383, 77 FR 71371), EPA published notices proposing to approve Ohio..., 2012, requests for redesignation. On June 26, 2013 (78 FR 38256, 78 FR 38247), EPA...

  11. Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.L.; Mishulovich, A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. These residues are composed largely of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. Since the residues are used as an integral component of the cement and not just as additives to concrete, larger amounts of the residues can be utilized. The process uses submerged combustion to melt blends of coal combustion residues with lime, clay, and/or sand. The submerged combustion melter utilizes natural gas-oxidant firing directly into a molten bath to provide efficient melting of mineral-like materials. Use of this melter for cement production has many advantages over rotary kilns including very little, if any, grinding of the feed material, very low emissions, and compact size. During the first year of the program, samples of coal combustion residues were blended and mixed, as needed; with lime, clay, and/or sand to adjust the composition. Six mixtures, three with fly ash and three with bottom ash, were melted in a laboratory-scale furnace. The resultant products were used in mortar cubes and bars which were subjected to ASTM standard tests of cementitious properties. In the hydraulic activity test, mortar cubes were found to have a strength comparable to standard mortar cements. In the compressive strength test, mortar cubes were found to have strengths that exceeded ASTM blended cement performance specifications. In the ASR expansion test, mortar bars were subjected to alkali-silica reaction-induced expansion, which is a problem for siliceous aggregate-based concretes that are exposed to moisture. The mortar bars made with the products inhibited 85 to 97% of this expansion. These results show that residue-based products have an excellent potential as ASR-preventing additions in concretes.

  12. Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project: Public final design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This Public Final Design Report describes the 70 MW(e) Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant under construction in Brilliant, Ohio. This project is receiving cost-sharing from the US Department of Energy (DOE), and is being administered by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center in accordance with DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-87 MC24132.000. The project is also receiving costsharing from the State of Ohio. This award is being administered by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project is the first utility-scale demonstration project in the US. Its objective is to demonstrate that the Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) combined-cycle technology is an economic, reliable, and environmentally superior alternative to conventional technology in using high-sulfur coal to generate electricity. Detailed design of the plant began in May 1987, leading to the start of construction in April 1988. First coal fire occurred in November 1990, and the three-year test program began in February 1991.

  13. Annual Coal Distribution

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    The Annual Coal Distribution Report (ACDR) provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing state. All data for the report year are final and this report supersedes all data in the quarterly distribution reports.

  14. Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bausch, M.

    1992-12-31

    Summarized in the final technical report for our project ``Protocols for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Sulfur Bonds in Coal`` are results of research pertaining to chemical reactions that aim to selectively cleave C-S bonds in model compounds as well as Illinois coal. Removal of the organic sulfur in coal constitutes one of the major challenges facing fossil fuel scientists today. A cost-effective means of desulfurizing Illinois coal is, at present, non-existent. Research in our group aims to develop a simple protocol for sulfur removal by gaining understanding of how various additives and reaction conditions, including solvents, bases, added reagents, catalysts, oxidizing agents, electron acceptors, temperature, pressure, and light energy, can enhance the rates of C-S bond cleavage in Illinois coal and coal model compounds. These experiments have been at the focus of our research effort for the past twelve months. Previous quarterly reports described research results in which simple aromatic and aliphatic sulfides were allowed to react with (a) Lewis Acids such as zinc chloride and tin chloride; (b) electron accepting substrates such as 9-fluorenone and benzoquinone; (c) strong bases such as NaOH and KOH; (d) radical initiators such as AIBN; (e) neat solvents at reflux temperatures and higher temperatures; (f) molecular oxygen in the presence of dyes or sensitizers such as anthracene. In this final report, we report on additional experiments involving the photooxidation of organic sulfides, as well as some experiments aimed at evaluating and comparing the reactivities of simple organic sulfones with their sulfidyl analogues. Also contained in this final report is a brief summary of the research described in the previous three quarterly reports for ``Protocols for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Sulfur Bonds in Coal.``

  15. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

  16. Solids throttling valves for coal conversion and utilization development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sine, G.C.

    1980-11-01

    A complete test system to test, evaluate, and develop control valves for slurry letdown service in coal liquefaction plants is needed. The site identified for the test system was the SRC II Pilot Plant located at Ft. Lewis, Washington. The US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, requested a test system design that would enable testing of various configuration letdown valves that would be compatible with the existing facility and have minimum impact on Pilot Plant operations. Drawings and specifications for such a test system were prepared, coordinated with Ft. Lewis personnel, revised to reflect Ft. Lewis operating personnel comments, and approved for use by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. These drawings and specifications will enable the test system to be built, installed, and integrated with the existing facility by a general contractor.

  17. Fire safety appraisal of residential wood and coal stoves in New York state. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lassoie, J.P.; Provencher, R.W.; Goff, G.R.; Brown, T.L.

    1983-04-01

    This study was designed to identify solid fuel (wood and coal) residential heating safety problems and associated causes, and the barriers to correction of these problems in NYS. Based on the research findings, recommendations were developed regarding public and private policies and services, legislation, and financial systems designed to improve the State's solid fuel heating safety situation. Data on solid fuel use was obtained via randomly conducted phone surveys, in-home resident interviews and solid fuel burning system inspections, and a mail survey of fire department chiefs. The most important barriers to safety were those of homeowner complacency (i.e., a sense of security grounded in ignorance -- in the nonpejorative sense) and apathy, with the former being the primary attitudinal barrier. The appendices vol. is the survey used.

  18. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the

  19. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the

  20. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the

  1. Renewable wood fuel: Fuel feed system for a pulverized coal boiler. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This report evaluates a pilot test program conducted by New York State Gas & Electric Corporation to evaluate the feasibility of co-firing a pulverized coal plant with renewable wood fuels. The goal was to establish that such a co-firing system can reduce air emissions while maintaining good operational procedures and cost controls. The test fuel feed system employed at Greenidge Station`s Boiler 6 was shown to be effective in feeding wood products. Emission results were promising and an economic analysis indicates that it will be beneficial to pursue further refinements to the equipment and systems. The report recommends further evaluation of the generation and emission impacts using woods of varied moisture contents and at varied Btu input rates to determine if a drying system would be a cost-effective option.

  2. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  3. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  4. Documentation of the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States. Final report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Herhal, A J; Britton, S G; Minnucci, C A

    1982-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the methodologies used to develop the 1979 Demonstrated Reserve Base (DRB) of coal. All primary source documents used to prepare the 1979 DRB were reviewed. Using the methodologies and documentation found in the 1979 DRB published report as a guide, each of the state-level published reserve estimates were re-derived. In those cases where the estimates could not be reproduced, EIA personnel from the Eastern and Western Energy Data Offices were consulted and the differences, for the most part, were resolved. Throughout this report an attempt was made to describe the information flow that was an integral part of the DRB development. Particular attention and emphasis was given to those instances where deviations from standard, published EIA procedures were used to derive the DRB estimates. The main body of this report summarizes the methodological procedures used to develop each state reserve estimate.

  5. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Hua, D.W.

    1996-02-01

    During the 3 year term of the project, new methods have been developed for characterizing the pore structure of porous materials such as coals, carbons, and amorphous silica gels. In general, these techniques revolve around; (1) combining multiple techniques such as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and adsorption of contrast-matched adsorbates or {sup 129}Xe NMR and thermoporometry (the change in freezing point with pore size), (2) combining adsorption isotherms over several pressure ranges to obtain a more complete description of pore filling, or (3) applying NMR ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}) techniques with well-defined porous solids with pores in the large micropore size range (>1 nm).

  6. Selenium transformation in coal mine spoils: Its environmental impact assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harness, J.; Atalay, A.; Koll, K.J.; Zhang, H.; Maggon, D.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this program was to conduct an environmental impact assessment study for selenium from coal mine spoils. The use of in-situ lysimetry to predict selenium speciation, transformation, and mobility under natural conditions was evaluated. The scope of the study was to construct and test field-scale lysimeter and laboratory mini-column to assess mobility and speciation of selenium in coal mine overburden and soil systems; to conduct soil and groundwater sampling throughout the state of Oklahoma for an overall environmental impact assessment of selenium; and to conduct an in-depth literature review on the solubility, speciation, mobility, and toxicity of selenium from various sources. Groundwater and surface soil samples were also collected from each county in Oklahoma. Data collected from the lysimeter study indicated that selenium in the overburden of the abandoned mine site was mainly found in the selenite form. The amount of selenite found was too low and immobile to be of concern to the environment. The spoil had equilibrated long enough (over 50 years) that most of the soluble forms of selenium have already been lost. Examination of the overburden indicated the presence of pyrite crystals that precipitated over time. The laboratory mini-column study indicated that selenite is quite immobile and remained on the overburden material even after leaching with dilute acid. Data from groundwater samples indicated that based on the current permissible level for selenium in groundwater (0.01 mg Se/L), Oklahoma groundwater is widely contaminated with the element. However, according to the new regulation (0.05 mg Se/L), which is to be promulgated in 1992, only 9 of the 77 counties in the state exceed the limit.

  7. Gasifier feed: Tailor-made from Illinois coals. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlinger, H.P. III; Lytle, J.M.; Frost, R.R.; Lizzio, A.A.; Kohlenberger, L.B.; Brewer, K.K. |||

    1992-12-31

    The main purpose of this project was to produce a feedstock from preparation plant fines from an Illinois (IL) coal that is ideal for a slurry fed, slagging, entrained-flow coal gasifier. The high-sulfur content and high-Btu value of IL coals are Particularly advantageous in such a gasifier; preliminary-calculations indicate that the increased cost of removing sulfur from the gas from a high-sulfur coal is more than offset b the increased revenue from the sale of the elemental sulfur; additionally the high-Btu IL coal concentrates more energy into the slurry of a given coal to water ratio. The Btu is--higher not only because of the hither Btu value of the coal but also because IL coal requires less water to produce a pumpable slurry than western coal, i.e., as little as 30--35% water may be used for IL coal as compared to approximately 45% for most western coals. During the contract extension, additional coal testing was completed confirming the fact that coal concentrates can be made from plant waste under a variety of flotation conditions 33 tests were conducted, yielding an average of 13326 Btu with 9.6% ash while recovering 86.0%-Of the energy value.

  8. MIGRATORY LABOR IN OHIO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BINGHAM, SALLY

    OHIO HAS BECOME A HIGHLY INDUSTRIALIZED STATE WITH INSUFFICIENT QUALIFIED LOCAL FARM WORKERS TO MEET HARVEST DEMANDS. MIGRANT WORKERS HAVE FILLED THAT NEED, DOING MOSTLY "STOOP WORK" AND WORKING IN FOOD PROCESSING PLANTS. THE ANNUAL WORKER PLAN HAS PROVIDED FOR MORE EFFICIENT SCHEDULING OF MIGRANTS. CONSTRUCTIVE PROGRAMS HAVE BEEN DEVELOPED FOR…

  9. Ohio Career Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This resource is designed to provide Ohio labor market information for use with advisory committees to stimulate and inform dialogue about the current evaluation and future planning of programs. It provides reports for 23 career fields in 6 career clusters. Each report highlights careers and occupations in the field and answers these questions:…

  10. 2014 Ohio Remediation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In fulfillment of Ohio Revised Code 3333.041 (A) (1) the Chancellor has published a listing by school district of the number of the 2013 high school graduates who attended a state institution of higher education in academic year 2013-2014 and the percentage of each district's graduates required by the institution to enroll in a remedial course in…

  11. Ohio Biotechnology Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lavonna; Bowermeister, Bob; Boudreau, Joyce

    This document, which lists the biotechnology competencies identified by representatives from biotechnology businesses and industries as well as secondary and post-secondary educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing college tech prep programs that will prepare students from secondary through…

  12. Ohio School Design Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio School Facilities Commission, Columbus.

    This manual presents guidance to facility designers, school administrators, staff, and students for the development of school facilities being constructed under Ohio's Classroom Facilities Assistance Program. It provides critical analysis of individual spaces and material/system components necessary for the construction of elementary and secondary…

  13. Ohio Agriscience Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Robert D., II, Comp.; Waidelich, William D., Comp.

    This document, which is intended for Ohio agriculture teachers, contains lesson plans for an eight-unit competency-based course in agriscience. Each lesson plan contains some or all of the following items: (1) unit title; (2) competency/terminal performance objective; (3) competency builders/pupil performance objectives; (4) list of applied…

  14. Coal liquefaction model compounds. Final report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, J.J.; Gilbert, K.E.

    1994-12-31

    This final report is divided into sections dealing with tetralin pyrolysis, chroman pyrolysis, molecular mechanics of organometallic systems, and pi conjugated biradicals. Experiments performed and results are discussed for each area of study.

  15. Simulation of coal and char nitrogen reactions in combustion. [Final report, September 1992--August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpaty, S.K.

    1993-10-01

    The observed rate of increase of N{sub 2}O (0.18% to 0.26% annually) is a matter of increasing concern both because N{sub 2}O is a greenhouse gas and has a major and unfavorable influence on the ozone layer (Weiss, 1981). The combustion contribution to the overall nitrous oxide budget is difficult to assess; yet the emission of N{sub 2}O from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) has been identified in the past few years as significant. It was concluded in the European workshop, 1988 that the emission level from a coal-fired fluidized bed boiler is 50--200 ppM but it is only 1--20 ppM in boilers equipped with other types of combustion devices. For this reason it is worthwhile to investigate the emissions from FBC more thoroughly. Gaseous fuels (Miller and Bowman, 1989), but the N{sub 2}O emissions under fluidized bed conditions is poorly understood. In fluidized bed combustion, N{sub 2}O can arise from homogeneous gas phase reactions involving amines and cyano species (Hiltunen et al, 1991) or it can be formed from heterogeneous reactions (eg. char oxidation). Removal of N{sub 2}O can be brought about by gas phase reactions or by catalytic or non-catalytic heterogeneous reduction on char/limestone. This work was carried out with an objective of enhancing the fundamental understanding of coal and char nitrogen reaction pathways in fluidized bed combustion environment. The formation and destruction of HCN and N{sub 2}O under variety of influential parameters were investigated. This simulation contained a nonisothermal single particle combustion in a preheated reactor and a gas phase reaction are designed to stimulate the nitrogen chemistry in a circulating fluidzied bed. The LSODE differential equation solver used for single particle combustion and the CHEMKIN package, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, was applied for gas phase reactions. This computational work was done as an exploratory research program under the solicitation of the DOE fossil energy utilization.

  16. Development and testing of a commercial scale coal-fired combustion system -- Phase 3. Final technical progress report, September 26, 1990--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Litka, A.; Breault, R.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of work performed in the development and testing of a coal-fired space heating system for the commercial market sector. Although coal is the most plentiful energy resource in the US, its use since World War II has been largely restricted to utility power generation for environmental and economic reasons. Within the commercial sector, oil and natural gas are the predominant heating fuels for office buildings, apartment complexes, and similar structures. Generally, these buildings require firing rates of 1 to 10 million Btu/hr. The objective of this program was to design, build, and test a coal-based heating system for this sector, and determine the economic viability and market potential for the system. Coal water slurry (CWS) fuel was chosen as the fuel form for this development effort. CWS eliminates the need to use dry pulverized coal with its attendant handling, metering, and dusting problems, as well as its explosive potential. A brief description of the overall system design is given in this report, as well as a discussion of the unique features of the system configuration and key components. This is followed by a summary of the testing performed, including a comparison between system performance and program goals. Finally, the results of the economic evaluation are presented, along with a commercialization plan for the technology. A key issue in the eventual commercialization of the technology is the availability of a competitively priced coal water slurry fuel. Predicted prices and availability of CWS are discussed.

  17. Biomass resources for energy in Ohio: The OH-MARKAL modeling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakya, Bibhakar

    The latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change have indicated that human activities are directly responsible for a significant portion of global warming trends. In response to the growing concerns regarding climate change and efforts to create a sustainable energy future, biomass energy has come to the forefront as a clean and sustainable energy resource. Biomass energy resources are environmentally clean and carbon neutral with net-zero carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, since CO2 is absorbed or sequestered from the atmosphere during the plant growth. Hence, biomass energy mitigates greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions that would otherwise be added to the environment by conventional fossil fuels, such as coal. The use of biomass resources for energy is even more relevant in Ohio, as the power industry is heavily based on coal, providing about 90 percent of the state's total electricity while only 50 percent of electricity comes from coal at the national level. The burning of coal for electricity generation results in substantial GHG emissions and environmental pollution, which are responsible for global warming and acid rain. Ohio is currently one of the top emitters of GHG in the nation. This dissertation research examines the potential use of biomass resources by analyzing key economic, environmental, and policy issues related to the energy needs of Ohio over a long term future (2001-2030). Specifically, the study develops a dynamic linear programming model (OH-MARKAL) to evaluate biomass cofiring as an option in select coal power plants (both existing and new) to generate commercial electricity in Ohio. The OH-MARKAL model is based on the MARKAL (MARKet ALlocation) framework. Using extensive data on the power industry and biomass resources of Ohio, the study has developed the first comprehensive power sector model for Ohio. Hence, the model can serve as an effective tool for Ohio's energy planning, since it evaluates economic and environmental

  18. Utilization of fuel cells to beneficially use coal mine methane. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.T.; O`Brien, D.G.; Miller, A.R.; Atkins, R.; Sanders, M.

    1996-03-01

    DOE has been given the responsibility to encourage industry to recover and use methane that is currently being released to the atmosphere. At this time the only method being employed at the Left Fork Mine to remove methane is the mine ventilation system. The methane content was measured at one one-hundredth of a percent. To prevent this methane from being vented to the atmosphere, degasification wells are proposed. To use the coal mine methane, it is proposed to use phosphoric-acid fuel cells to convert methane to electric power. These fuel cells contain (1) a steam reformer to convert the methane to hydrogen (and carbon dioxide), (2) the fuel cell stack, and (3) a power conditioner that provides 200 kW of 60 Hz alternating current output. The environmental impacts and benefits of using this technology ware summarized in the report. The study indicates the methane emission reduction that could be achieved on a national and Global level. The important point being that this technology is economically viable as is demonstrated in the report.

  19. Improving the stability of coal slurries: Final report. [Polygalacturonic acid and gum tragacanth

    SciTech Connect

    Fogler, H.S.

    1988-12-01

    Polysaccharides were found to stabilize colloidal dispersions (such as coal particles and polystyrene latex particles) even at high ionic strengths. The stability studies with various kinds of polysaccharides showed that rod-like molecules (such as poly (galacturonic acid) and gum tragacanth) are much more effective stabilizers than highly-branched molecules such as arabinogalactan. This effective stabilization with the rod-like molecules was found to result from the adsorption of polysaccharides on the particles, i.e., the steric stabilization mechanism. The stability depends significantly on the solution pH, the molecular weight and the surface charge of particles. Adsorption isotherms, the zeta potential and the conformation of adsorbed molecules (the steric layer thicknesses) were measured as a function of the solution pH, the molecular weight and the surface charge. Photon correlation spectroscopy studies showed that the conformation of adsorbed molecules is strongly dependent on the solution pH, the molecular weight and the surface charge, suggesting that the dependence of stability on these parameters is due to the change of the conformation of the molecules adsorbed on the surface. In addition, the solution pH has a significant effect on the flocculation behavior of particles and can be modulated to bring about peptization of particles. This type of stabilization is referred to as electrosteric stabilization whereby steric stabilization is induced by changing the electrical properties of the system (the solution pH in this case). 41 refs., 43 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Epidemiological study of Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) workers. Final report, August 1982-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, C.P.; Weiss, N.S.; Bailey, W.J.

    1986-03-31

    This program was initiated for the purpose of monitoring the health status of Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) workers and determining the potential long-term health effects associated with exposure to SRC process materials. The three SRC facilities studied include the SRC pilot plant at Ft. Lewis, Washington (from 1974 through 1981), the P-99 process unit located at Harmarville, Pennsylvania (from 1975 through mid-1981, and benchscale work from October 1984 to the present) and the Merriam Research Laboratory at Merriam, Kansas (from 1962 through May 1984). The methods employed for data collection are described and the success of each discussed. Data collected on each worker included medical history, job history/exposure data, demographic data, lifestyle factors, reproductive history, current vital status, and death information, if applicable. In light of the dramatic cut-back in SRC activities consistent with the overall industry phase-down of synfuel research, coupled with the termination from employment of over 85% of the cohort, the decision was made by Chevron (formerly Gulf) not to extend the project beyond the end of 1985. Therefore, this report describes the work completed through June of 1985 in terms of updating the individual data files, describing the work performed, and presenting descriptive statistics as appropriate. Due to the limited nature of the data collected to date, and the incompleteness of data on many individuals because of short service, no statistical analyses or risk assessments were performed. 4 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Assessment of instrumentation needs for advanced coal power plant applications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.T.; Fischer, W.H.; Lipka, J.V.; Rutkowski, M.D.; Zaharchuk, R.

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify contaminants, identify instrumentation needs, assess available instrumentation and identify instruments that should be developed for controlling and monitoring gas streams encountered in the following power plants: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion, and Gasification Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell. Emphasis was placed on hot gas cleanup system gas stream analysis, and included process control, research and environmental monitoring needs. Commercial process analyzers, typical of those currently used for process control purposes, were reviewed for the purpose of indicating commercial status. No instrument selection guidelines were found which were capable of replacing user interaction with the process analyzer vendors. This study leads to the following conclusions: available process analyzers for coal-derived gas cleanup applications satisfy current power system process control and regulatory requirements, but they are troublesome to maintain; commercial gas conditioning systems and in situ analyzers continue to be unavailable for hot gas cleanup applications; many research-oriented gas stream characterization and toxicity assessment needs can not be met by commercially available process analyzers; and greater emphasis should be placed on instrumentation and control system planning for future power plant applications. Analyzers for specific compounds are not recommended other than those needed for current process control purposes. Instead, some generally useful on-line laser-based and inductively coupled plasma methods are recommended for further development because of their potential for use in present hot gas cleanup research and future optimization, component protection and regulation compliance activities. 48 refs., 21 figs., 26 tabs.

  2. Testing of refractories in co-containing coal gasification atmospheres. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, T.; Heystek, H.

    1983-03-01

    Based on test data obtained on refractory samples exposed for 1000 hours to three steam-containing high-Btu atmospheres of different compositions at 500/sup 0/ C and 1000 psig it would appear that for the conditions tested commercial intermediate alumina insulating or dense refractory concretes would perform adequately as linings for dry-ash coal gasifiers. CO disintegration was not observed in commercial refractories reported to contain Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ exposed to a high-Btu gas composition containing CO whether or not NH/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/S were present. In the 90 pct alumina dense concrete with a 0.1 pct iron (as Fe) powder addition it was found that the strength and abrasion resistance were adversely affected by the presence of CO, but only when NH/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/S were not present. The presence of H/sub 2/S in a gas composition appear to retard or prevent CO disintegration of refractories containing additions of iron or iron oxide. Strength and abrasion resistance increases were noted for intermediate alumina castables exposed to the high-Btu atmospheres when compared to air exposures. Decreases in strength values occurred for the high alumina materials. This is characteristic of the results obtained in earlier studies of refractories following similar exposures at temperatures of 730/sup 0/ to 1100/sup 0/ C. 6 figures.

  3. Organic material emissions from holding ponds at coal-fired power generation facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rosecrance, A.E.; Colby, B.N.

    1980-03-01

    A literature survey of organic chemical emissions from holding or ash ponds which are used by most coal-fired utilities to collect process waste materials has been conducted. Only a small quantity of compound-specific information was available concerning surface runoff and none was available for groundwater seepage or atmospheric emissions. Approximately 140 Kg/day of organic material is predicted to be present in surface runoff of a hypothetical 1000 MW facility of which only 3.5 Kg/day, or 2.6% of the total, is accounted for by specific compounds. Of the compounds identified, only phenol is near a level (97 ..mu..g/l) of potential environmental significance. Due to the lack of information describing holding pond emissions, a survey of known holding pond influents was undertaken to assess which processes were most likely to be associated with the organic chemical content of the pond. Of the process wastes directed into the pond, cooling tower blowdown, water treatment wastes and boiler blowdown are identified as the major contributors of organic material. Organic chemical additives, which are used to control bacterial buildup, scale formation, pitting, corrosion, pH stability, and solid dispersion, account for approximately 96% of the organic pond influents. The majority of these materials do not represent an environmental hazard; however, they may undergo chemical reactions in the pond which increase their environmental significance.

  4. Materials testing in a gas turbine operating on coal-derived gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.J.; Lyell, G.D.

    1992-11-01

    An aero derived gas turbine engine, the Olympus SK30 ran for 1166 hours on coal derived (slagger) gas at the British Gas site at Westfield, Fife, Scotland. Slagger gas is low in calorific value and high in sulphur content. A ``rainbow`` HP turbine assembly, with a range of corrosion protective overlay coatings on both the vanes and blades was installed to evaluate the protection offered by the various coatings against the highly sulphurous slagger gas. A detailed metallurgical inspection was carried out on a random selection of the coated vanes and blades. None of the components examined showed evidence of any serious erosion. It was concluded that the operating time was too short to cause extensive damage to the coatings. However, the various coatings showed different degrees of degradation and may be ranked as follows: 1. Platinum Aluminide, LDC-2E, 2. Platinum Aluminide, RT22A, 3. Pack Aluminide, 4. EB-PVD* Coating Co-29Cr-5Al-O.34Y, GT-29, 5. EB-PVD* Coating Co-23Cr-lOA1-0.34Y, BC-21 Electron Beam-Plasma Vapour Deposit.

  5. Thermal treatment for chlorine removal from coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Muchmore, C.B.; Hesketh, H.E.; Chen, Han Lin

    1992-12-31

    It was the goal of this research to provide the technical basis for development of a process to remove chlorine from coal prior to combustion, based on a thermal treatment process. Reaction rate constants and activation energy have been determined, and energy and mass balances performed. Substitution of a synthetic flue gas (7% 0{sub 2}, 12% CO{sub 2}, 81% N{sub 2}) for nitrogen in the tube furnace resulted in at least equivalent chlorine removal (85.5%) compared to nitrogen. The fluidized bed dechlorination system modifications have resulted in a steady increase in performance, the most recent run providing 64% reduction in chlorine concentration. Addition of supplemental heat to the column should permit attainment of the slightly higher temperatures required to attain over 80% removal of the chlorine. Calcium chloride by-product of 67% purity has been produced. A bench scale catenary grid concentrator with supplemental heating coils and limited insulation is capable of concentrating CaCl{sub 2} solution up to essentially 40%, with no sign of scale or plugging. Further development of the process should include a thorough evaluation of the use of combustion gases to serve as the fluidizing medium and to provide the energy for the thermal dechlorination process.

  6. Application of the SULF-X process to coal conversion and utilization. Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, E.; Bramer, H.C.; New, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Pittsburgh Environmental and Energy Systems, Inc. contracted with the Department of Energy to demonstrate the efficacy of an iron sulfide flue gas treatment system (FGT) for removing sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) and to correlate process variables to system performance. Laboratory and bench-scale testing was conducted with the SULF-X process, using both synthesized gas and actual flue gas from a coal-fired furnace. Laboratory tests resulted in 95% SO/sub 2/ removal and up to 95% NO/sub x/ removal. The bench-scale system demonstrated similar SO/sub 2/ removal efficiencies, but achieved only 39% NO/sub x/ removal due to relatively high oxygen concentrations in the flue gas and insufficient liquid-gas interfacial area within the absorber. Elemental sulfur was recovered during the regeneration steps. Total capital investment for the SULF-X system was estimated to be $91 to $103 per kilowatt (electric), compared to $90/kw for sodium solution scrubbing, $78 to $83/kw for magnesia slurry scrubbing and $74/kw for limestone slurry scrubbing. Annual operating costs for the SULF-X system were estimated to be 5.44 to 6.90 mills per kilowatt-hour, compared to 4.96 to 5.22 for sodium, 3.68 to 3.99 for magnesia and 3.73 to 4.25 for limestone. 6 references, 6 figures, 9 tables.

  7. Characterization and optimization of sorbents utilized for emission control during coal gasification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Huque, Z.; Mei, D.; Zhou, J.

    1998-07-14

    To overcome the shortage of components required for high temperature operation required by current IGCC and PFBC systems, researchers recently have decided that the power systems can be optimized within an operation temperature range of 343 to 538 C. The findings of this research work support the use of iron oxides as an efficient, disposable hot gas desulfurization sorbent candidate to meet the temperature range of 343 to 538 C to further optimize its application for hot gas desulfurization. A parametric study was performed to characterize the controlling parameters dominating the absorption process of hydrogen sulfide by waste iron oxide as a sorbent alternative within a stringent environment with the use of simulated KRW reducing gas. The major parameters studied for hot gas desulfurization with the use of waste iron oxide; mixed in coal ash and reacted with hot sulfurized gas; in hot gas stream include (1) dust cake permeability during heavy dust loading, (2) feasibility of dust cake removal with current back pulse cleaning technology, (3) the reaction temperature, (4) the space velocity of the gas stream. Based on the parametric testing performed on hot gas desulfurization and particulate filtration, the test results of this study indicate that the simultaneous operation of hot gas desulfurization and particulate filtration is feasible. The significant savings of capital investment, system operation and maintenance justify the use of iron oxides as an excellent candidate for hot gas cleanup.

  8. New concept for coal wettability evalution and modulation. Final report 1 January 1992--30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Weibai; Zou, Yuzhi; Wang, Qingping

    1995-12-31

    The study was concerned with a new concept for coal surface wettability evaluation and modulation. The objectives of the work were to study the fundamental surface chemistry for the evaluation of the surface wettability and floatability of coal nd minerals. A new separation strategy will contribute to the advanced selective separation of coal and pyrite. The theories of wettability and floatability of coal and mineral are discussed. A new concept of kinetic wettability, kinetic floatability, and kinetic collectability has been explored. In addition, their evaluation and correlation have been established. Some practical applications to improve the advanced selective flotation of coal and pyrite have been suggested.

  9. The Ohio River Basin Energy Facility siting model. Volume 2: Sites and on-line dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, G. L.; Bailey, R. E.; Jansen, S. D.; Randolph, J. C.; Jones, W. W.; Gordon, S. I.

    1981-09-01

    The siting model developed for the Ohio River Basin Energy Study, and specifically designed for regional policy analysis is included. The region includes 423 counties in an area that consists of all of Kentucky and substantial portions of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Detailed schedules of county-level sites and on-line dates for coal-fired and nuclear-fueled generating unit additions for each ORBES scenario are included.

  10. The chemical enhancement of the triboelectric separation of coal from pyrite and ash: A novel approach for electrostatic separation of mineral matter from coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, R.M.; DiMare, S.; Sabatini, J.

    1992-02-01

    Arthur D. Little, Inc., under contract to the US DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, has developed a triboelectric separation device for coal beneficiation, that employs an entrained-flow, rotating-cylinder concept. The described apparatus has been used to test the efficacy of chemical pretreatment and in-situ treatment of coal on separation efficiency. Coal particle entrainment is achieved with gaseous carbon dioxide and particle collection is accomplished by an electrostatic plate separator. The triboelectric separation device incorporates instrumentation for the direct measurement of charge in the dilute-phase particle stream. Some of the pretreatment materials investigated under this project to modify the surface charging characteristics of the coal included oleic acid, sodium oleate, quinoline and dicyclohexylamine. Ammonia and sulfur dioxide at a concentration up to 1000 ppM was used for in-situ treatment of the coal, with carbon dioxide as the carrier/inerting gas. Nitrogen was used earlier in the test program as the carrier/inerting gas for the coal, but a severe arcing problem was encountered in the electrostatic collector with nitrogen as the carrier gas. This problem did not occur when carbon dioxide was used. The report covers the chemical treatment employed, and summarizes and interprets the results achieved. In addition, an economic analysis of a full scale system based on this concept is presented.

  11. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Final report. Part IV. A petrographic and chemical model for the evolution of the Tradewater Formation coals in Western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Graese, A.M.; Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A depositional model for the coals of the Tradewater Formation and associated rock units was constructed as a predictive device for the occurrence of economically important low sulfur coal. Twenty-one cores were examined and ninety-eight coal samples were analyzed for maceral, ash, and sulfur contents. These data were then analyzed to determine regional variation as well as vertical variation in single coal columns. Core data indicate that the majority of the Tradewater rocks consist of irregularly distributed, coarsening-upward, fine-grained detrital material which was deposited in shallow bodies of water. Minor fossiliferous shales and limestones suggest a marine influence. Less common coarse-grained, fining-upward sequences appear to be deposits of meandering channels. Like the detrital rocks, the coal seams are also irregularly distributed and exhibit variable petrographic and chemical properties reflecting changes in the Eh and pH of the coal swamp waters as well as detrital influx into the swamps. These swamps were relatively limited in extent and probably occupied the upper reaches of the tidal zone. The lack of significant stratigraphic and geographic trends in the regional data suggests that this mode of deposition was widespread and continued for a long period of time. 42 references, 19 figures, 9 tables.

  12. Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Crelling, J.C.; Case, E.R.

    1993-12-31

    A potentially new use for Illinois coal is as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. During the first phase of this project a number of the objectives were realized, specifically: (1) a blast furnace sampling system was developed and used successfully to collect samples inside an active furnace; (2) two sets of blast furnace samples were collected and petrographic analysis showed that char derived from injected coal is entering the reduction zone of the furnace; (3) a coal/char sampling probe was designed and fabricated; (4) the completion of a program of reactivity experiments on the injected coal char, blast furnace coke and Herrin No. 6 char. The results of the reactivity experiments indicate that Herrin No. 6 coal is similar or even superior to coals now being used in blast furnace injection and that additional testing is warranted.

  13. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 1, Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Gutterman, C.; Chander, S.

    1994-12-31

    The overall objective of this project was to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrated coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. Heterofunctional solvents were the most effective in swelling coals. Also solvent blends such as isopropanol/water were more effective than pure solvents alone. Impregnating slurry catalysts simultaneously during coal swelling showed that better uptake was achieved with nonswelling solvent and higher impregnation temperature. Some enhancement in initial coal conversion was seen liquefying SO{sub 2}-treated Black Thunder coal with slurry catalysts, and also when hydrogen donor liquefaction solvents were used. Noncatalytic reactions showed no benefit from SO{sub 2} treatment. Coupling coal swelling and SO{sub 2} treatment with slurry catalysts was also not beneficial, although high conversion was seen with continuous operation and long residence time, however, similar high conversion was observed with untreated coal. SO{sub 2} treatment is not economically attractive unless it provides about 17% increase in coal reactivity. In most cases, the best results were obtained when the coal was untreated and the slurry catalyst was added directly into the reactor. Foster Wheeler`s ASCOT process had better average liquid yields than either Wilsonville`s vacuum tower/ROSE combination or delayed coking process. This liquid product also had good quality.

  14. Recovery of coal fines from preparation plant effluents. Final technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhry, V.

    1991-12-31

    The objectives of this project were to test and demonstrate the feasibility of recovering coal fines that are currently disposed of with coal preparation plant effluent streams and producing a fine clean coal product that can be blended with the plant coarse clean coal. This recovery was effected by means of Michigan Technological University`s static tube flotation process, which was successfully demonstrated on a number of raw coals to reject 85% of the pyritic sulfur and recover 90% of the combustible matter. Under this project, the process parameters for the technology were modified for this application in order to recover a low-ash, low-sulfur clean coal that is, at a minimum, compatible with the quality of the clean coal currently produced by the preparation plant.

  15. Gasifier feed: Tailor-made from Illinois coals. Interim final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlinger, H.P. III; Lytle, J.; Frost, R.R.; Lizzio, A.; Kohlenberger, L.; Brewer, K.

    1992-12-31

    The main purpose of this project is to produce a feedstock from preparation plant fines from an Illinois coal that is ideal for a slurry fed, slagging, entrained-flow coal gasifier. The high sulfur content and high Btu value of Illinois coals are particularly advantageous in such a gasifier; preliminary calculations indicate that the increased cost of removing sulfur from the gas from a high sulfur coal is more than offset by the increased revenue from the sale of the elemental sulfur; additionally the high Btu Illinois coal concentrates more energy into the slurry of a given coal to water ratio. The Btu is higher not only because of the higher Btu value of the coal but also because Illinois coal requires less water to produce a pumpable slurry than western coal, i.e., as little as 30--35% water may be used for Illinois coal as compared to approximately 45% for most western coals. Destec Energy, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Dow Chemical Company, will provide guidelines and test compatibility of the slurries developed for gasification feedstock. Williams Technologies, Inc., will provide their expertise in long distance slurry pumping, and test selected products for viscosity, pumpability, and handleability. The Illinois State Geological Survey will study methods for producing clean coal/water slurries from preparation plant wastes including the concentration of pyritic sulfur into the coal slurry to increase the revenue from elemental sulfur produced during gasification operations, and decrease the pyritic sulfur content of the waste streams. ISGS will also test the gasification reactivity of the coals.

  16. Matrix isolation spectroscopy and the stability of polycyclic aromatics in coal ash: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, G.; Wehry, R.L.

    1987-06-01

    Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy (MIS) overcomes some limitations of conventional molecular fluorescence and infrared (IR) spectroscopies by producing spectra having perhaps 10 times narrower spectral peaks. Analyte molecules are prevented from interacting with each other (or any other foreign molecules) because they are surrounded by an inert solid matrix (e.g., N/sub 2/, Ar, Ne, or Kr) at temperatures <20 K. For IR applications, such matrices exhibit no spectral interferences (phonon peaks occur at <85 cm/sup -1/). When interfaced with conventional gas chromatography (GC), MIS can usually resolve coeluting compounds in complex organic mixtures and is particularly effective for analysis of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC). Often, pretreatment is not necessary if there are <10 different compounds in the sample. Owing to the low energy throughput of MIS, combining with dispersive IR is not an effective technique, whereas combining with Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet (uv)-visible fluorescence is. Also, matrix-isolation (MI) combinations with other methods, such as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), Raman spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), may be useful. Laser excitation provides a sensitivity of <1 mg/kg. Resolution can be improved using a monochromatic laser, a polarized excitation source and polarized emitted fluorescence, and measuring fluorescence decay time. A separate study showed that PAC are photochemically stabilized in coal ash because of its carbonaceous matter (pie-pie bonding and porosity effect). Nonphotochemical degradation (generally oxidation) occurs for specific PAC (especially those containing a benzylic C-atom, e.g., fluorene).

  17. A computational model for coal transport and combustion. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.

    1995-03-01

    In this project, a comprehensive theoretical, computational and experimental study directed toward providing a fundamental understanding of particulate flows as applied to coal transport is performed. Thermodynamically admissible constitutive expressions for the phasic stress tensors, heat and fluctuation energy flux vectors for turbulent multiphase flows were derived. The material parameters of the model were evaluated from the limiting conditions of rapid flows of dry spherical granular particles, and single-phase turbulent fluid flows. The case of simple shear flows of glass beads-water mixtures was studied. The model was extended to cover chemically active gas-solid flows. A thermodynamically consistent model for rapid flows of granular materials in a rotating frame of reference, along with a transport equation for the granular kinetic stress tensor was developed. The model parameters for the special case of spherical nearly elastic particles were evaluated. The results for the granular stresses and the normal stress differences were compared with the available simulation data and good agreement was observed. Effects of frictional loss of energy on rapid granular shear flows were studied. The previously developed kinetic based model was used and the mean velocity, the fluctuation kinetic energy and the solid volume fraction profiles were evaluated under a variety of conditions and different friction coefficients. A computational model for analyzing rapid granular in complex geometries was developed. The discrete element scheme was used and the granular flow down a chute was analyzed. The results were compared with the available experimental data, the model predictions, and the existing simulation results, and good agreements were observed. The model was used to analyze granular flows in a duct with an obstructing block. The effect of boundary condition was also included and the granular gravity flow was analyzed in details.

  18. Fire-safety appraisal of residential wood and coal stoves in New York State. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lassoie, J.P.; Provencher, R.W.; Goff, G.R.; Brown, T.L.

    1983-04-01

    This study was designed to identify solid fuel (wood and coal) residential heating safety problems and associated causes, and the barriers to correction of these problems in New York State. Data on solid fuel use was obtained via randomly conducted phone surveys, in-home resident interviews and solid fuel burning system inspections, and a mail survey of fire department chiefs. The study found that solid fuel (primarily wood) was a major heat source in 707,000, or 18% of the State's households (excluding Metropolitan New York City and southern Westchester County). Based on a safety evaluation system of 15 quantifiable installation, maintenance, and operation criteria developed during this study, the State's solid fuel heating systems were classified as being either safe (5.5%), unsafe (24.7%), hazardous (57.7%), or extremely hazardous (12.1%). The most important barriers to safety were those of homeowner complacency and apathy, with the former being the primary attitudinal barrier. Availability and affordability of safety information, and professional installation and inspection services generally were adequate; however, none of these had a substantial effect on the overall safety of the State's solid fuel systems. Results of the fire chief survey reflected a consensus of opinion on several key solid fuel safety issues. Fire chiefs believed that mandatory compliance by solid fuel users may be necessary for substantial improvement of the solid fuel safety situation due to the prevalence of certain attitudinal barriers. Recommendations designed to correct this situation through new, aggressive information and education programs and/or mandatory rules and regulations are presented and discussed. In addition, recommendations are presented for monitoring solid fuel safety, for cost assistance for homeowners to encourage the use of competent professionals, and for future research efforts. 25 references, 4 figures, 97 tables.

  19. Novel catalysts for upgrading coal-derived liquids. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.T.; Savage, P.E.; Briggs, D.E.

    1995-03-31

    Research described in this report was aimed at synthesizing and evaluating supported Mo oxynitrides and oxycarbides for the selective removal of nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen from model and authentic coal-derived liquids. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported oxynitrides and oxycarbides were synthesized via the temperature programmed reaction of supported molybdenum oxides or hydrogen bronzes with NH{sub 3} or an equimolar mixture of CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}. Phase constituents and composition were determined by X-ray diffraction, CHN analysis, and neutron activation analysis. Oxygen chemisorption was used to probe the surface structure of the catalysts. The reaction rate data was collected using specially designed micro-batch reactors. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported Mo oxynitrides and oxycarbides were competitively active for quinoline hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), benzothiophene hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and benzofuran hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). In fact, the HDN and HDO specific reaction rates for several of the oxynitrides and oxycarbides were higher than those of a commercial Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hydrotreatment catalyst. Furthermore, the product distributions indicated that the oxynitrides and oxycarbides were more hydrogen efficient than the sulfide catalysts. For HDN and HDS the catalytic activity was a strong inverse function of the Mo loading. In contrast, the benzofuran hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) activities did not appear to be affected by the Mo loading but were affected by the heating rate employed during nitridation or carburization. This observation suggested that HDN and HDS occurred on the same active sites while HDO was catalyzed by a different type of site.

  20. Testing of refractories in CO-containing coal-gasification atmospheres. Final report. [Alumina concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, T.; Heystek, H.

    1983-03-01

    In this experiment a series of alumina concretes were exposed to gas environments B and C. Test temperature and pressure were maintained at 500/sup 0/C and 1000 psig. Conclusion are as follows: (1) based on test data obtained on refractory samples exposed for 1000 hours to three steam-containing high-Btu atmospheres of different compositions at 500/sup 0/C and 1000 psig it would appear that for the conditions tested commercial intermediate alumina insulating or dense refractory concretes would perform adequately as linings for dry-ash coal gasifiers; (2) CO disintegration was not observed in commercial refractories reported to contain Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ exposed to a high-Btu gas composition containing CO whether or not NH/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/S were present. In the 90 pct alumina dense concrete with a 0.1 pct iron (as Fe) powder addition it was found that the strength and abrasion resistance were adversely affected by the presence of CO, but only when NH/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/S were not present; (3) the presence of H/sub 2/S in a gas composition appear to retard or prevent CO disintegration of refractories containing additions of iron or iron oxide; and (4) strength and abrasion resistance increases were noted for intermediate alumina castables exposed to the high-Btu atmospheres when compared to air exposures. Decreases in strength values occurred for the high alumina materials. This is characteristic of the results obtained in earlier studies for refractories following similar exposures at temperatures of 730/sup 0/-1100/sup 0/C. 6 figures, 1 table.

  1. Synthesis of model compounds for coal liquefaction research. Final report, April 15, 1990--April 14, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    Coal liquefaction investigations required the availability of model compounds for mechanistic investigations. Towards this end, IITRI was funded to develop an approach for the synthesis of one of the target compound. This study was carried out in several phases as outlined here. Initial synthetic investigations on obtaining 2-tetrolol was carried out using high pressure and temperature reduction with Raney nickel catalyst. The next step consisted in incorporation of a hydroxymethyelene group at the C-3 position. This was successfully carried out utilizing 2-tetrolol, formaldehyde, and calcium oxide. An alternate improved method was developed using 3-carboxyl-2-naphthol. This required less time, gave a cheer product in higher yield. Efforts at the introduction of a chloromethylene group only yielded polymeric material or starting material in spite of protection the phenolic group by various groups. They synthesis of 3, 5-dimethyl-6- bromobenzyl chloride was successfully carried out by performing the Blank reaction of 2, 4-dimethyl bromobenzene. The product was characterized by GC/MS. Purification was not possible, as it was a complex mixture. Efforts at converting it to the acetate followed by separation to was not feasible. Unlike in the case of 2- hydroxyteralol, hydroxymetylation by established procedure yielded only the starting materials. Commercially available 4-methoxy-1- maphthaldehyde was protected as the ethylene acetal. The Wittig reagent 3-chlorobenzyl phosphonium bromide was prepared and condensed with 4-methoxy-1-napthaldehyde successfully and proved that the overall synthetic approach was proceeding in the desired direction. All the necessary intermediates have been synthesized,and we have demonstrated using model compounds, that the synthetic objective can be attained.

  2. Refining of fossil resin flotation concentrate from western coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.F.; Miller, J.D.

    1995-02-16

    During the past several years, significant research efforts have been made to develop process technology for the selective flotation of fossil resin from western coals. As a result of these efforts, several new flotation technologies have been developed. Operation of a proof-of-concept continuous flotation circuit showed the selective flotation process to be sufficiently profitable to justify the development of a fossil resin industry. However, little attention has been given to the refining of the fossil resin flotation concentrate although solvent refining is a critical step for the fossil resin to become a marketable product. In view of this situation, DOE funded this two-year project to evaluate the following aspects of the fossil resin refining technology: 1) Characterization of the fossil resin flotation concentrate and its refined products; 2) Kinetics of fossil resin extraction; 3) Effects of operating variables on solvent extraction; 4) Extraction solvents; 5) Proof-of-concept continuous refining tests; and 6) Technical and economic analysis. The results from this research effort have led to the following conclusions: Hexane- or heptane-refined fossil resin has a light-yellow color, a melting point of 140 - 142{degrees}C, a density of 1.034 gram/cm, and good solubility in nonpolar solvents. Among the four solvents evaluated (hexane, heptane, toluene and ethyl acetate), hexane is the most appropriate solvent based on overall technical and economic considerations. Batch extraction tests and kinetic studies suggest that the main interaction between the resin and the solvent is expected to be the forces associated with solvation phenomena. Temperature has the most significant effect on extraction rate. With hexane as the solvent, a recovery of 90% cam be achieved at 50{degrees}C and 10% solids concentration with moderate agitation for 1 hour.

  3. The Springdale project: Applying constructed wetland treatment to coal combustion by-product leachate. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rightnour, T.A.; Hoover, K.L.

    1998-11-01

    The Springdale constructed wetland treatment system was completed in 1995 under an Electric Power Research Institute tailored collaboration agreement with Allegheny Power to test the operational and economic feasibility of using constructed wetland technologies to treat coal combustion by-product leachate. The system design incorporates an oxidation/precipitation basin, vegetated wetlands, manganese-oxidizing rock drains, an organic upflow cell, an algal uptake basin, and a greenhoused phytoremediation research facility. Influent and effluent chemical loadings to the individual system components have been monitored for a period of two years. Results show the system to be highly effectively in treating aqueous metals, with concentration reductions for the primary parameters being 98% for iron, 92% for manganese, and 71% for aluminum, along with significant reductions in other trace metals and concurrent improvements in pH and alkalinity. NPDES compliance has been achieved for all aqueous metals parameters except boron, which does not appear to be treatable by any means on this site. A cost comparison to four conventional chemical treatment alternatives indicates that capital investment would be comparable between constructed wetlands and chemical treatment, while significant long-term savings are predicted for the constructed wetland system due to lower operational and maintenance costs. The estimated 50 year present value savings for the constructed wetland system is approximately $1.271 million over the least expensive chemical treatment alternative, and $3.731 million over the most expensive. Operational and maintenance cost savings are primarily the result of lower on-site labor and lower waste disposal costs due to denser sludge formation in the wetland system.

  4. Columbus, Ohio's RDF experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, H.A. )

    1988-01-01

    This is a presentation on the Columbus, Ohio Trash Burning Power Plant from its original design assumptions and considerations to its start-up and operation. Problems associated with an infant technology and subsequent modifications to make it one of the most successful operations are today discussed in non-technical detail. By the end of 1987, the Columbus plant successfully disposed of its 1,600,00th ton of trash following its start-up in December 1983.

  5. Extraction and desulfurization of chemically degraded coal with supercritical fluids. Final report, July 1, 1983-December 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.W.; Muchmore, C.B.; Kent, A.C.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes the progress made in the research entitled ''Extraction and Desulfurization of Chemically Degraded Coal with Supercritical Fluids.'' The desulfurization of coal, employing ethanol or methanol as solvent under supercritical conditions, has demonstrated its ability to selectively remove sulfur from the coal matrix. The objectives of the research are these: (1) to obtain rate data for supercritical extraction and desulfurization of coal, and to determine the desulfurization selectivity ratio for various coals; (2) to study the effect of chemical pretreatment of coal on desulfurization potential; and (3) to determine the characteristics of the desulfurized solid char and to measure and evaluate the liquid and gaseous streams. The experimental investigations have been carried out in two reactor systems, a semicontinuous reactor and a batch reactor. Experimental data obtained have indicated the following achievements: (1) the extraction and desulfurization of coal with supercritical ethanol is first order in nature, and the activation energies for coal extracted and sulfur removed are 30.3 and 21.0 Kcal, respectively; (2) the desulfurization selectivity ratio is found to be between 2.96 to 4.38 for four Illinois coal samples studied; (3) the effect of KOH pretreatment indicates an improvement of supercritical desulfurization potential; and (4) the evalution of product streams reveals that supercritical desulfurization generates a high Btu gas and coal-derived liquid in addition to the desulfurized solid product. 2 references, 5 tables, 9 figures.

  6. Subcontracted R and D final report: SRC-I phase equilibrium and enthalpy data for coal liquefaction and solvent recovery areas. Vol. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, D.C.; Chu, I.C.; Kidnay, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1984-03-01

    The Enthalpy Program was a 20-month project initiated on January 18, 1982 by the International Coal Refining Company (ICRC) and under the technical direction of Professor Arthur J. Kidnay and Professor V.F. Yesavage at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), Golden, Colorado. The objective of the program was to gather enthalpy data on representative pure model compounds, mixtures of model compounds, and selected coal-derived liquid samples furnished by ICRC. A copy of the technical agreement between ICRC and CSM is included in this report as Appendix A. This final report contains a complete description of the calorimeter and the experimental procedures used, separate data sections for each experimental task, and a copy of the technical agreement between ICRC and CSM. Data are presented for 11 coal liquid fractions. Each section of this report is organized to stand alone; thus, there are no general lists of references, tables of notation, or overall data tables.

  7. The mobile phase in coals: Its nature and modes of release: Final report: Part 1, Structural inferences from dry catalytic hydrogenation of a subbituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Terrer, M.T.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1986-12-01

    In a study to provide insight into the two component structural model of coal and the mechanisms of coal liquefaction, an approach was adopted in which a subbituminous coal was reacted with hydrogen in the presence of an impregnated molybdenum sulphide catalyst and in the absence of solvent. Reactions were conducted at temperatures between 300 and 400/sup 0/C and for reaction times up to 180 min. The composition and yields of gaseous products, chloroform-soluble liquids and insoluble residues were followed as a function of the reaction conditions by means of different analytical and characterization techniques: gas chromatography; /sup 1/H NMR; elemental analysis; FTIR; solvent swelling in pyridine. 105 refs., 20 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Coal miners' mortality in relaton to radiological category, lung function and exposure to airborne dust. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Jacobsen, M.; Steele, R.C.

    1981-06-01

    This report describes mortality among 29,553 British coal miners. They represent 93.5% of 31,611 men who were surveyed radiologically at 24 coal mines in the period 1953 through 1958. The main aim of the work was to consider risks of death attributed to various underlying causes, as recorded on death certificates, in relation to radiological signs of pneumoconiosis, measures of lung function, and exposure to respirable coal mine dust.

  9. Superacid Catalyzed Depolymerization and Conversion of Coals. Final Technical Report. [HF:BF{sub 2}/H{sub 2}

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Olah, G.

    1980-01-01

    We were interested in applying superacid catalyzed cleavage-depolymerization and ionic hydrogenation low temperature conversion of coal to liquid hydrocarbon, as well as obtaining information about the reactions involved and the structure of intermediates of the coal liquefaction process. In order to show the feasibility of our proposed research we have carried out preliminary investigation in these areas. Preceding our work there was no practical application of a superacid system to coal liquefaction. We carried out an extensive study of the potential of the HF:BF{sub 3}/H{sub 2} system for coal hydroliquefaction. Under varying conditions of reactant ratio, reaction time and temperature, we were able to obtain over 95% pyridine extractible product by treating coal in HF:BF{sub 3}:H{sub 2} system at approx. 100 degrees C for 4 hours. The coal to acid ratio was 1:5 and FB{sub 3} at 900 psi and H{sub 2} at 500 psi were used. These are extremely encouraging results in that the conditions used are drastically milder than those used in any known process, such as Exxon donor solvent and related processes. The cyclohexane extractibility of the treated coal was as high as 27% and the yield of liquid distillate at 400 degrees C/5 x 10{sup -3}/sup torr/ was approx. 30%. The infrared spectrum of product coal, extracts and distillates were distinctly different from the starting coal and show a significant increase in the amount of saturates. The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of cyclohexane extract of the treated coal shows essentially all aliphatic photons. The spectra of other treated coal extracts show increased amounts and types of aliphatic protons as well as significant amounts of protons bound to unsaturated sites. This again indicates that the HF-BF{sub 3} system is depolymerizing the coal to small fragments which are soluble in non-polar solvents.

  10. Dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and psoriasis drug products containing coal tar and menthol for over-the-counter human use; amendment to the monograph. Final rule

    SciTech Connect

    2006-03-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule amending the final monograph (FM) for over-the-counter (OTC) dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and psoriasis drug products to include the combination of 1.8 percent coal tar solution and 1.5 percent menthol in a shampoo drug product to control dandruff. FDA did not receive any comments or data in response to its previously proposed rule to include this combination. This final rule is part of FDA's ongoing review of OTC drug products.

  11. Dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and psoriasis drug products containing coal tar and menthol for over-the-counter human use; amendment to the monograph. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2007-03-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule amending the final monograph (FM) for over-the-counter (OTC) dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and psoriasis drug products to include the combination of 1.8 percent coal tar solution and 1.5 percent menthol in a shampoo drug product to control dandruff. FDA did not receive any comments or data in response to its previously proposed rule to include this combination. This final rule is part of FDA's ongoing review of OTC drug products. PMID:17447341

  12. Characteristics of American coals in relation to their conversion into clean-energy fuels. Final report. [1150 samples of US coals

    SciTech Connect

    Spackman, W.; Davis, A.; Walker, P.L.; Lovell, H.L.; Vastola, F.J.; Given, P.H.; Suhr, N.H.; Jenkins, R.G.

    1982-06-01

    To further characterize the Nation's coals, the Penn State Coal Sample Bank and Data Base were expanded to include a total of 1150 coal samples. The Sample Bank includes full-seam channel samples as well as samples of lithotypes, seam benches, and sub-seam sections. To the extent feasible and appropriate basic compositional data were generated for each sample and validated and computerized. These data include: proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, sulfur forms analysis, calorific value, maceral analysis, vitrinite reflectance analysis, ash fusion analysis, free-swelling index determination, Gray-King coke type determination, Hardgrove grindability determination, Vicker's microhardness determination, major and minor element analysis, trace element analysis, and mineral species analysis. During the contract period more than 5000 samples were prepared and distributed. A theoretical and experimental study of the pyrolysis of coal has been completed. The reactivity of chars, produced from all ranks of American coals, has been studied with regard to reactivity to air, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/ and steam. Another area research has concerned the catalytic effect of minerals and various cations on the gasification processes. Combustion of chars, low volatile fuels, coal-oil-water-air emulsions and other subjects of research are reported here. The products of this research can be found in 23 DOE Technical Research Reports and 49 published papers. As another mechanism of technology transfer, the results have been conveyed via more than 70 papers presented at a variety of scientific meetings. References to all of these are contained in this report.

  13. Effects of calcium magnesium acetate on the combustion of coal-water slurries. Final project report, 1 September 1989--28 February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.; Metghalchi, H.; Cumper, J.; Atal, A.; Estrada, K.R.; Murphy, B.; Steciak, J.; Hottel, H.C.; Simons, G.

    1993-07-01

    To conduct studies on the combustion of coal water fuels (CWFs) an appropriate facility was designed and constructed. The main components were (1) a high-temperature isothermal laminar flow furnace that facilitates observation of combustion events in its interior. The design of this system and its characterization are described in Chapter 1. (2) Apparatus for slurry droplet/agglomerate particle generation and introduction in the furnace. These devices are described in Chapters 1 and 3 and other attached publications. (3) An electronic optical pyrometer whose design, construction theory of operation, calibration and performance are presented in Chapter 2. (4) A multitude of other accessories, such as particle fluidization devices, a suction thermometer, a velocimeter, high speed photographic equipment, calibration devices for the pyrometer, etc., are described throughout this report. Results on the combustion of CWF droplets and CWF agglomerates made from micronized coal are described in Chapter 3. In the same chapter the combustion of CWF containing dissolved calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) axe described. The combustion behavior of pre-dried CWF agglomerates of pulverized grain coal is contrasted to that of agglomerates of micronized coal in Chapter 4. In the same chapter the combustion of agglomerates of carbon black and diesel soot is discussed as well. The effect of CMA on the combustion of the above materials is also discussed. Finally, the sulfur capture capability of CMA impregnated micronized and pulverized bituminous coals is examined in Chapter 5.

  14. Ultrasound-promoted chemical desulfurization of Illinois coals. Final technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, S.S.

    1991-12-31

    The overall objectives of the program were to investigate the use of ultrasound to promote coal desulfurization reactions and to evaluate chemical coal desulfurization schemes under mild conditions through a fundamental understanding of their reaction mechanisms and kinetics. The ultimate goal was to develop an economically feasible mild chemical process to reduce the total sulfur content of Illinois Basin Coals, while retaining their original physical characteristics, such as calorific value and volatile matter content. During the program, potential chemical reactions with coal were surveyed under various ultrasonic irradiation conditions for desulfurization, to formulate preliminary reaction pathways, and to select a few of the more promising chemical processes for more extensive study.

  15. 78 FR 26739 - Notice of Final Action on Petition From Earthjustice To List Coal Mines as a Source Category and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ..., the Acting EPA Administrator, Bob Perciasepe, signed a letter denying a petition to add coal mines to... pollution control, Intergovernmental relations. Dated: April 30, 2013. Bob Perciasepe, Acting...

  16. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities: Phase 1 final report. Volume 1: Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Morrison, J.L.; Pisupati, S.V.

    1997-01-31

    The first phase of a three-phase project investigating the development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities has been completed. The objectives of the project are to: decrease DOD`s dependence on foreign oil and increase its use of coal; promote public and private sector deployment of technologies for utilizing coal-based fuels in oil-designed combustion equipment; and provide a continuing environment for research and development of coal-based fuel technologies for small-scale applications at a time when market conditions in the US are not favorable for the introduction of coal-fired equipment in the commercial and industrial capacity ranges. The Phase 1 activities were focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water mixtures (MCWMs) and dry, micronized coal (DMC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. The specific objective in Phase 1 was to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil-designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWM or DMC. This was achieved through a project consisting of fundamental, pilot-sale, and demonstration-scale activities investigating coal beneficiation and preparation, and MCWM and DMC combustion performance. In addition, detailed engineering designs and an economic analysis were conducted for a boiler located at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, near Crane, Indiana. Results are reported on MCWM and DMC combustion performance evaluation; engineering design; and cost/economic analysis.

  17. Kinetics of coal combustion. 4th quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, N.

    1986-03-01

    The report describes the work performed by the three labs involved in the investigation of coal combustion under the TRW contract. The investigation is divided into three tasks. In the first task, coal volatiles combustion is investigated on a flat flame burner at TRW. The burner and the fuel feed system are described. The determination of the chemical rate parameters from the burning velocity as a function of the flame temperature is discussed as well. The second task, determination of global volatile combustion rates in a well stirred reactor, is performed by Ohio State University. The analytical approach to that task is discussed. Finally, char combustion is investigated at Caltech. A description of some preliminary char characterization measurements is given.

  18. Exploration for deep coal

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-15

    The most important factor in safe mining is the quality of the roof. The article explains how the Rosebud Mining Co. conducts drilling and exploration in 11 deep coal mine throughout Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rosebud uses two Atlas Copco CS10 core drilling rigs mounted on 4-wheel drive trucks. The article first appeared in Atlas Copco's in-house magazine, Deep Hole Driller. 3 photos.

  19. Planning and initiation of detailed engineering design for the Great Plains coal gasification project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    During the course of detailed engineering it was expected that preliminary engineering documents would need to be modified. In a number of instances, however, especially for flow diagrams and specifications, the revised preliminary engineering documents became the final approved for construction (AFC) documents. P and ID's and plot plans were updated as a result of the detailed piping design. Equipment data sheets which initially contained basic process data were made mechanically complete and then further updated to reflect the equipment actually purchased. The initial issue of the preliminary engineering documents represent a necessary baseline for monitoring project design changes. Foundation work, equipment specifications and status of engineering in the various process operations are discussed.

  20. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    . The body of this report compares these for all of the samples in the test section. The 'Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program' is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy's Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100 F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles Unit No.1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 29 months of operation. The second section was removed in August of 2003. Its evaluation has been completed and is the subject of this report. The final section remains in service and is expected to be removed in the spring of 2005. This paper describes the program; its importance, the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system, materials utilized, and experience to date. This report briefly reviews the results of the evaluation of the first section and then presents the results of the evaluation of the second section.

  1. Underground coal gasification: Development of theory, laboratory experimentation, interpretation, and correlation with the Hanna field tests: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gunn, R.D.; Krantz, W.B.

    1987-03-01

    The following report is a description of a 7 year effort to develop a theoretical understanding of the underground coal gasification process. The approach used is one of the mathematical model development from known chemical and principles, simplification of the models to isolate important effects, and through validation of models to isolate important effects, and through validation of models with laboratory experiments and field test data. Chapter I contains only introductory material. Chapter II describes the development of two models for reverse combustion: a combustion model and a linearized model for combustion front instability. Both models are required for realistic field predictions. Chapter III contains a discussion of a successful forward gasification model. Chapter IV discusses the spalling-enhanced-drying model is applicable to prediction of cavity growth and subsidence. Chapter VI decribes the correct use of energy and material balances for the analysis of UCG field test data. Chapter VII shows how laboratory experiments were used to validate the models for reverse combustion and forward gasification. It is also shown that laboratory combustion tube experiments can be used to simulate gas compositions expected from field tests. Finally, Chapter VII presents results from a comprehensive economic analysis of UCG involving 1296 separate cases. 37 refs., 49 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Reducing the moisture content of clean coals. Volume 2, High-G solid-bowl centrifuge: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kehoe, D.

    1992-12-01

    Coal moisture content can profoundly effect the cost of burning coal in utility boilers. Because of the large effect of coal moisture, the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO) contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute to investigate advanced coal dewatering methods at its Coal Quality Development Center. This report contains the test result on the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge, the second of four devices to be tested. The high-G solid-bowl centrifuge removes water for coal by spinning the coal/water mixture rapidly in a rotating bowl. This causes the coal to cling to the sides of the bowl where it can be removed, leaving the water behind. Testing was performed at the CQDC to evaluate the effect of four operating variables (G-ratio, feed solids concentration, dry solids feed rate, and differential RPM) on the performance of the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge. Two centrifuges of different bowl diameter were tested to establish the effect of scale-up of centrifuge performance. Testing of the two centrifuges occurred from 1985 through 1987. CQDC engineers performed 32 tests on the smaller of the two centrifuges, and 47 tests on the larger. Equations that predict the performance of the two centrifuges for solids recovery, moisture content of the produced coal, and motor torque were obtained. The equations predict the observed data well. Traditional techniques of establishing the performance of centrifuge of different scale did not work well with the two centrifuges, probably because of the large range of G-ratios used in the testing. Cost of operating a commercial size bank of centrifuges is approximately $1.72 per ton of clean coal. This compares well with thermal drying, which costs $1.82 per ton of clean coal.

  3. Ultrafine calcium aerosol: Generation and use as a sorbent for sulfur in coal combustion. Volume 1, Experimental work: Final report, August 1, 1988--October 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.K.; Nahar, N.U.; Stewart, G.D.; Prudich, M.E.

    1991-11-01

    Studies conducted at Ohio University and elsewhere have demonstrated that ultrafine aerosols, which have the highest surface area per unit mass, have enhanced potential to efficiently remove sulfur dioxide form combustion gases. Therefore it is proposed to generate a very fine aerosol calcium-rich sorbent (or similar aerosols) for gas conditioning. The aerosol will be generated by vaporization of the sorbent compound and subsequent homogeneous nucleation. In experimental studies liquids as well as solids will be converted into ultrafine aerosols by using suitable aerosol generator. The aerosol generator could be a simple bubbler or a flame spray jet using powders of calcium ``Compounds. Studies will then be carried out, to determine the dynamics of sulfur dioxide capture by the ultrafine aerosol. The primary objective of this research was to generate fine aerosols and to use them for coal combustion SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} gas removal purposes. From the background study on the dry scrubbing system, it can be concluded that the most important experimental parameters are addition ratio, reactor temperature, residence time, total inlet flow rate and inlet SO{sub 2} concentration. Addition ratio is the inlet molar ratio of calcium to sulfur. Before any experimentation, it was necessary to decide and investigate the values of each of the parameters. Each of these parameters were investigated individually and the effects on SO{sub 2} removal were determined.

  4. Investigation into the effects of trace coal syn gas species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cell anodes, PhD. thesis, Russ College of Engineering and Technology of Ohio University

    SciTech Connect

    Trembly, Jason P.

    2007-06-01

    Coal is the United States’ most widely used fossil fuel for the production of electric power. Coal’s availability and cost dictates that it will be used for many years to come in the United States for power production. As a result of the environmental impact of burning coal for power production more efficient and environmentally benign power production processes using coal are sought. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) combined with gasification technologies represent a potential methodology to produce electric power using coal in a much more efficient and cleaner manner. It has been shown in the past that trace species contained in coal, such as sulfur, severely degrade the performance of solid oxide fuel cells rendering them useless. Coal derived syngas cleanup technologies have been developed that efficiently remove sulfur to levels that do not cause any performance losses in solid oxide fuel cells. The ability of these systems to clean other trace species contained in syngas is not known nor is the effect of these trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. This works presents the thermodynamic and diffusion transport simulations that were combined with experimental testing to evaluate the effects of the trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The results show that some trace species contained in coal will interact with the SOFC anode. In addition to the transport and thermodynamic simulations that were completed experimental tests were completed investigating the effect of HCl and AsH3 on the performance of SOFCs.

  5. Novel nanodispersed coal liquefaction catalysts: Molecular design via microemulsion-based synthesis. Final technical report, October 1990--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Boakye, E.; Vittal, M.

    1995-04-01

    This report described the synthesis of Molybdenum Sulfides in microemulsions by acidification of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate. Molybdenum Sulfides have been shown to be potential coal liquefaction catalysts. The importance of particle size, temperature effects, and coal surface chemistry to impregnation are discussed.

  6. Advanced NMR approaches in the characterization of coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Maciel, G.E.

    1993-09-30

    This project addressed two main goals and one much smaller one. The main goals were (1) to improve the significance, reliability and information content in high-resolution NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) characterization of coal samples and (2) to develop chemically informative NMR imaging techniques for coal. The minor goal was to explore advanced features of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) as a technique for coal characterization; this included the development of two DNP probes and the examination of DNP characteristics of various carbonaceous samples, including coals. {sup 13}C NMR advances for coal depended on large-sample MAS devices, employing either cross-polarization (CP) or direct polarization (DP) approaches. CP and DP spin dynamics and their relationships to quantitation and spin counting were elucidated. {sup 1}H NMR studies, based on CRAMPS, dipolar dephasing and saturation with perdeuteropyridine, led to a {sup 1}H NMR-based elucidation of chemical functionality in coal. {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR imaging techniques, based on magic-angle spinning and rotating magnetic field gradients, were developed for introducing chemical shift information (hence, chemical detail) into the spatial imaging of coal. The TREV multiple-pulse sequence was found to be useful in the {sup 1}H CRAMPS imaging of samples like coal.

  7. Composition of natural gas and crude oil produced from 10 wells in the Lower Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone, Trumbull County, Ohio: Chapter G.7 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burruss, Robert A.; Ryder, Robert T.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Natural gases and associated crude oils in the “Clinton” sandstone, Medina Group sandstones, and equivalent Tuscarora Sandstone in the northern Appalachian basin are part of a regional, continuous-type or basin-centered accumulation. The origin of the hydrocarbon charge to regional continuoustype accumulations is poorly understood. We have analyzed the molecular and stable isotopic composition of gases and oils produced from 10 wells in the “Clinton” sandstone in Trumbull County, Ohio, in an initial attempt to identify the characteristics of the accumulated fluids. The analyses show that the fluids have remarkably uniform compositions that are similar to previously published analyses of oils (Cole and others, 1987) and gases (Laughrey and Baldasarre, 1998) in Early Silurian reservoirs elsewhere in Ohio; however, geochemical parameters in the oils and gases suggest that the fluids have experienced higher levels of thermal stress than the present-day burial conditions of the reservoir rocks. The crude oils have an unusual geochemical characteristic: they do not contain detectable levels of sterane and triterpane biomarkers. The origin of these absences is unknown.

  8. Exploration of coal-based pitch precursors for ultra-high thermal conductivity graphite fibers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, G.V.

    1996-12-27

    Goal was to explore the utility of coal-based pitch precursors for use in ultra high thermal conductivity carbon (graphite) fibers. From graphite electrode experience, it was established that coal-based pitches tend to form more highly crystalline graphite at lower temperatures. Since the funding was limited to year 1 effort of the 3 year program, the goal was only partially achieved. The coal-base pitches can form large domain mesophase in spite of high N and O contents. The mesophase reactivity test performed on one of the variants of coal-based pitch (DO84) showed that it was not a good candidate for carbon fiber processing. Optimization of WVU`s isotropic pitch process is required to tailor the pitch for carbon fiber processing. The hetero atoms in the coal pitch need to be reduced to improve mesophase formation.

  9. Process and analytical studies of enhanced low severity co-processing using selective coal pretreatment. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.M.; Miller, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    The findings in the first phase were as follows: 1. Both reductive (non-selective) alkylation and selective oxygen alkylation brought about an increase in liquefaction reactivity for both coals. 2. Selective oxygen alkylation is more effective in enhancing the reactivity of low rank coals. In the second phase of studies, the major findings were as follows: 1. Liquefaction reactivity increases with increasing level of alkylation for both hydroliquefaction and co-processing reaction conditions. 2. the increase in reactivity found for O-alkylated Wyodak subbituminous coal is caused by chemical changes at phenolic and carboxylic functional sites. 3. O-methylation of Wyodak subbituminous coal reduced the apparent activation energy for liquefaction of this coal.

  10. Diffusion of gases in New Mexico coals. Technical report (Final), 15 January 1986-30 September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, F.L.; Smith, D.M.

    1987-02-01

    As part of the first phase of the study, characterization of the pore volume and surface area of coal was principally undertaken while the more-extensive and complex diffusivity and high-pressure adsorption experiments were being built. The careful characterization work resulted in new understanding of the limitations of mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption analysis for coal. Results indicate that as the size of coal particles in a sample decreases, a spurious, intruded-pore volume is indicated in mercury porosimetry. Furthermore, at higher pressures of Hg, the penetration of Hg may actually be a measure of micropore crushing rather than pore structure information. Nitrogen adsorption measurements do not reflect the total surface area of the coal which is easily accessed and measured by carbon dioxide. At the same time the authors found that condensation of nitrogen and NMR relaxation experiments may lead to significantly new interpretations of coal porosity.

  11. Ohio Health Technology Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Joyce; Miller, Lavonna F.

    This document, which was jointly developed by representatives from a broad cross-section of Ohio's health care industries and educators representing Ohio's schools and colleges, is intended as a foundation for developing an integrated delivery system to prepare students for careers in health care. The document's introductory section presents…

  12. Ohio: Library and Information Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byerly, Greg

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development, current status, and future goals and plans of library and information networks in Ohio. Highlights include OCLC; OhioLINK, incorporating state-assisted universities, two-year colleges, the state library, and private university libraries; a school library network; a public library information network; a telecommunications…

  13. Financing Public Libraries in Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, Frederick D.

    This study is an outgrowth of the plans and programs set in motion by the study of professor Ralph Blasingame, Rutgers University Graduate School, in 1968, and the 1969 legislation setting up the Ohio Library Development Plan (OLDP). Its purposes are to describe the system of financing public libraries in Ohio, to identify problem areas, and to…

  14. Correlation chart of Pennsylvanian rocks in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania showing approximate position of coal beds, coal zones, and key stratigraphic units: Chapter D.2 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Trippi, Michael H.; Slucher, Ernie R.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    In other regions of the basin, group and formation boundaries are more difficult to identify over extensive areas. One example is the placement of the contact between the New River Formation and the overlying Kanawha Formation—a boundary that is not easily defined beyond the area where these units were first defined in West Virginia. At the type section of the Kanawha Formation, the base of the Lower Douglas coal zone (fig. 1) defines the contact between the Kanawha Formation and the underlying New River Formation (Rice and others, 1994b). However, subsequent mapping has demonstrated that the Lower Douglas coal zone is regionally discontinuous and in many parts of West Virginia is absent (Blake and others, 2002). Where absent, the Nuttall Sandstone Member of the underlying New River Formation sometimes occurs in the stratigraphic position of the Lower Douglas coal zone. Yet, even the Nuttall Sandstone Member has been found to be regionally discontinuous and of varying thickness throughout its extent, features that hinder its u

  15. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coal. Final report. Part III. Petrographic characterization of the Upper Elkhorn No. 2 coal zone of eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Raione, R.P.; Hower, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the study of the Upper Elkhorn No. 2 coal zone in the Big Sandy Reserve District and the surrounding area of eastern Kentucky. The seams were analyzed using megascopic and microscopic petrography and chemical methods. The Upper Elkhorn No. 2 consists predominantly of clarain. A fair degree of correlation of fusain bands and clay partings between data sites is apparent. Microscopically, the vitrinite group of macerals are dominant. A rank increase from high volatile B to high volatile A bituminous to the southwest was noted. Pseudovitrinite is associated negatively with vitrinite and has a higher reflectance and microhardness than vitrinite. Both factors may indicate source material and/or environmental differences in the respective origins of the maceral. High inertinite and lipinite areas, low ash and sulfur contents, and the distribution of thin coals may be indicative of paleotopographic highs. 62 references, 26 figures, 8 tables.

  16. Performance of a diesel engine operating on raw coal-diesel fuel and solvent refined coal-diesel fuel slurries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, H.P.

    1980-03-01

    Performance tests using an 11 kW single cylinder diesel engine were made to determine the effects of three different micronized coal-fuel oil slurries being considered as alternative fuels. Slurries containing 20, 32, and 40%-wt micronized raw coal in No. 2 fuel oil were used. Results are presented indicating the changes in the concentrations of SO/sub X/ and NO/sub X/ in the exhaust, exhaust opacity, power and efficiency, and in wear rates relative to operation on fuel oil No. 2. The engine was operated for 10 h at full load and 1400 rpm on al fuels except the 40%-wt slurry. This test was discontinued because of extremely poor performance.

  17. Hydraulic-fracture design rationale for the recovery of methane from coal seams. Final report, February 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.H.; Bell, G.J.; Morales, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment pressures during coal-seam hydraulic-fracture operations usually demonstrate an early, steep pressure rise and overall treatment pressure very high, often exceeding the lithostatic pressure. In addition, the instantaneous shut-in pressures are high following a fracture treatment, while closure pressures are in agreement with measured in-situ stresses. However, there are cases for coal treatments where pressures remain at low levels comparable to other formations. This observed wide range of treatment responses cannot be explained by conventional-modeling approaches. An investigation into the physical causes of the unusual behavior of coal-seam stimulations resulted in the identification of new physical mechanisms for further consideration. Blockages of the fracture by coal chips and plugging of an advancing fracture tip by coal fines carried ahead of or within the fluid-treatment pad are mechanisms that consistently explain all of the observed behavior. Hydraulic-fracture design codes, which included the description of the coal fines accumulation at the fracture periphery, were used to assist in the design of hydraulic-fracture treatments at the Gas Research Institute, Multiple Coal Seam Field Project, at Rock Creek in Alabama.

  18. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) process bench studies with bituminous coal. Final report, [October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported herein are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using bituminous coal concluded at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE contract during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with the application of coal cleaning methods and solids separation methods to the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) Process. Additionally a predispersed catalyst was evaluated in a thermal/catalytic configuration, and an alternative nickel molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for the CTSL process. Three coals were evaluated in this program: Bituminous Illinois No. 6 Burning Star and Sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The tests involving the Illinois coal are reported herein, and the tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico coals are described in Topical Report No. 1. On the laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects are reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests, such as tests on rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids, and cleaned coals, are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL process are described in the CTSL Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  19. Ground penetrating radar coal measurements demonstration at the U.S. Bureau of Mines Research Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, D.; Guerrier, J.; Martinez, M.

    1994-01-04

    In situ and near real-time measurements of coal seam thickness have been identified by industry as a highly desirable component of robotic mining systems. With it, a continuous mining machine can be guided close to the varying boundary of the seam while the cutting operation is underway. This provides the mining operation the ability to leave behind the high-sulfur, high-particulate coal which is concentrated near the seam boundary. The result is near total recovery of high quality coal resources, an increase in mining efficiency, and opportunities for improved safety through reduction in personnel in the most hazardous coal cutting areas. In situ, real-time coal seam measurements using the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) ground penetrating radar (GPR) technology were shown feasible by a demonstration in a Utah coal mine on April 21, 1994. This report describes the October 18, 1994 in situ GPR measurements of coal seam thickness at the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) robotic mining testing laboratory. In this report, an overview of the measurements at the USBM Laboratory is given. It is followed by a description of the technical aspects of the STL frequency modulated-continuous wave (FM-CW) GPR system. Section 4 provides a detailed description of the USBM Laboratory measurements and the conditions under which they were taken. Section 5 offers conclusions and possibilities for future communications.

  20. Coal combustion: Effect of process conditions on char reactivity. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Zygourakis, K.

    1996-02-01

    Coal utilization involves two major stages: coal pyrolysis and char combustion. Figure 1.1 summarizes the steps of these processes. During the pyrolysis stage, heated particles from plastic coals soften, swell and release their volatiles before resolidifying again. During the combustion or gasification stage, char particles may ignite and fragment as the carbon is consumed leaving behind a solid ash residue. Process conditions such as pyrolysis heating rate, heat treatment temperature, pyrolysis atmosphere, and particle size are shown to chemically and physically affect the coal during pyrolysis and the resulting char. Consequently, these pyrolysis conditions as well as the combustion conditions such as the oxygen concentration and combustion temperature affect the char reactivity and ignition phenomena during the combustion stage. Better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of coal pyrolysis and char combustion is needed to achieve greater and more efficient utilization of coal. Furthermore, this knowledge also contributes to the development of more accurate models that describe the transient processes involved in coal combustion. The project objectives were to investigate the effect of pyrolysis conditions on the macropore structure and subsequent reactivity of chars.

  1. Coal-fired power-plant-capital-cost estimates. Final report. [Mid-1978 price level; 13 different sites

    SciTech Connect

    Holstein, R.A.

    1981-05-01

    Conceptual designs and order-of-magnitude capital cost estimates have been prepared for typical 1000-MW coal-fired power plants. These subcritical plants will provide high efficiency in base load operation without excessive efficiency loss in cycling operation. In addition, an alternative supercritical design and a cost estimate were developed for each of the plants for maximum efficiency at 80 to 100% of design capacity. The power plants will be located in 13 representative regions of the United States and will be fueled by coal typically available in each region. In two locations, alternate coals are available and plants have been designed and estimated for both coals resulting in a total of 15 power plants. The capital cost estimates are at mid-1978 price level with no escalation and are based on the contractor's current construction projects. Conservative estimating parameters have been used to ensure their suitability as planning tools for utility companies. A flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system has been included for each plant to reflect the requirements of the promulgated New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions. The estimated costs of the FGD facilities range from 74 to 169 $/kW depending on the coal characteristics and the location of the plant. The estimated total capital requirements for twin 500-MW units vary from 8088 $/kW for a southeastern plant burning bituminous Kentucky coal to 990 $/kW for a remote western plant burning subbituminous Wyoming coal.

  2. Low/medium Btu coal-gasification assessment program for potential users in New Jersey. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, J.; Schavlan, S.; Ku, W. S.; Piascik, T. M.; Hynds, J. A.; West, A.

    1981-01-01

    In order to evaluate the potential for coal utilization, a preliminary technical and economic assessment of district coal gasification in New Jersey was conducted. This evaluation addressed the possibility of installing a coal gasification plant to use a high sulfur eastern coal to produce a medium Btu content gas (MBG) having a heating value of approximately 300 Btu/SCF. In addition, the work also appraised the regulatory, environmental and marketing, and financial considerations of such a facility. The preliminary study evaluation has manifested an overall technical and economic feasibility for producing a medium Btu quality gas (MBG) from coal at PSE and G's Sewaren Generating Station in New Jersey. The production of MBG for use in on-site power plant boilers or for distribution to industrial customers appears to be economically attractive. The economic attractiveness of MBG is very dependent on the location of sufficient numbers of industrial customers near the gasification facilities and on high utilization of the gasification plant. The Sewaren Generating Station was identified as potentially the most suitable site for a gasification plant. The Texaco Coal Gasification Process was selected as the gasifier type due to a combination of efficiency and pilot plant experience. It is projected that a nominal 2000 tons-per-day coal gasification plant would supply supplemental utility boiler fuel, fuel grade methanol and some by-products.

  3. Coal-fueled diesel system for stationary power applications -- Technology development. Final report, March 1988--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Cooper-Bessemer and Arthur D. Little have developed the technology to enable coal-water slurry to be utilized in large-bore, medium-speed diesel engines. The target application is modular power generation in the 10 to 100 MW size, with each plant using between two and eight engines. Such systems are expected to be economically attractive in the non-utility generation market after 2000, when oil and natural gas prices are expected to escalate rapidly compared to the price of coal. During this development program, over 1,000 hours of prototype engine operation have been achieved on coal-water slurry (CWS), including over 100 hours operation of a six-cylinder, 1.8 MW engine with an integrated emissions control system. Arthur D. Little, Inc., managed the coal-fueled diesel development, with Cooper-Bessemer as the principal subcontractor responsible for the engine design and testing. Several key technical advances which enable the viability of the coal-fueled diesel engine were made under this program. Principal among them are the development and demonstration of (1) durable injection nozzles; (2) an integrated emissions control system; ad (3) low-cost clean coal slurry formulations optimized for the engine. Significant advances in all subsystem designs were made to develop the full-scale Cooper-Bessemer coal engine components in preparation for a 100-hour proof-of-concept test of an integrated system, including emissions controls. The Clean Coal Diesel power plant of the future will provide a cost-competitive, low-emissions, modular, coal-based power generation option to the non-utility generation, small utility, independent power producer, and cogeneration markets. Combined cycle efficiencies will be approximately 48% (lower heating value basis) and installed cost will be approximately $1,300/kW (1992 dollars).

  4. Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Kuushraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.; Sawyer, W.K.; Esposito, P.R.

    1983-07-01

    The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Lower and Middle Huron) in Ohio is estimated to range from 6.2 to 22.5 Tcf, depending on the stimulation method and pattern size selected. This estimate of recovery is based on the integration of the most recent data and research on the Devonian Age gas-bearing shales of Ohio. This includes: (1) a compilation of the latest geologic and reservoir data for the gas in-place; (2) analysis of the key productive mechanisms; and, (3) examination of alternative stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering this gas. Beyond a comprehensive assembly of the data and calculation of the technically recoverable gas, the key findings of this report are as follows: a substantial volume of gas is technically recoverable, although advanced (larger scale) stimulation technology will be required to reach economically attractive gas production rates in much of the state; well spacing in certain of the areas can be reduced by half from the traditional 150 to 160 acres per well without severely impairing per-well gas recovery; and, due to the relatively high degree of permeability anisotropy in the Devonian shales, a rectangular, generally 3 by 1 well pattern leads to optimum recovery. Finally, although a consistent geological interpretation and model have been constructed for the Lower and Middle Huron intervals of the Ohio Devonian shale, this interpretation is founded on limited data currently available, along with numerous technical assumptions that need further verification. 11 references, 21 figures, 32 tables.

  5. Investigation of the effect of coal particle sizes on the interfacial and rheological properties of coal-water slurry fuels: Final report, July 1, 1994-June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kihm, K.D.

    1996-10-01

    The scope of the project is two fold: (1) examining particle size effect on interfacial properties of CWS fuels by measuring static and dynamic surface tension properties of specially prepared CWS samples containing different ranges of coal particle sizes, and (2) studying the effect of particle size on CWS atomization characteristics by measuring mean diameters of several different CWS sprays generated by sonic air blasting. The results show that both static and dynamic surface tensions decrease with increasing coal particle size and mean droplet diameter of CW-S sprays also decreases with increasing coal particle size. Based on the experimental evidence we conjecture that three different energies are competing in slurry atomization: (1) the internal capillary holding between particles and water, (2) the interfacial surface tensile energy at the slurry surface contacting air, and (3) the external air blast shear energy acting against the former two energies. The internal capillary holding force decreases with increasing particle size. This force is believed to play a major role in determining the effect of particle size on CWS atomization.

  6. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume I, Part 1. Final report, September 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this program was the development of a predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. The foundation to describe coal specific conversion behavior was AFR`s Functional Group and Devolatilization, Vaporization and Crosslinking (DVC) models, which had been previously developed. The combined FG-DVC model was integrated with BYU`s comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model for combustion and coal gasification, PCGC-2, and a one-dimensional model for fixed-bed gasifiers, FBED-1. Progress utilizing these models is described.

  7. Clean Coal Technology III: 10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption final project performance and economics report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, F.E.

    1995-08-01

    The 10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) program is a government and industry co-funded technology development. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the performance of the GSA system in treating a 10 MW slipstream of flue gas resulting from the combustion of a high sulfur coal. This project involves design, fabrication, construction and testing of the GSA system. The Project Performance and Economics Report provides the nonproprietary information for the ``10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Project`` installed at Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Shawnee Power Station, Center for Emissions Research (CER) at Paducah, Kentucky. The program demonstrated that the GSA flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) technology is capable of achieving high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (greater than 90%), while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), without any negative environmental impact (section 6). A 28-day test demonstrated the reliability and operability of the GSA system during continuous operation. The test results and detailed discussions of the test data can be obtained from TVA`s Final Report (Appendix A). The Air Toxics Report (Appendix B), prepared by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EERC) characterizes air toxic emissions of selected hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from the GSA process. The results of this testing show that the GSA system can substantially reduce the emission of these HAP. With its lower capital costs and maintenance costs (section 7), as compared to conventional semi-dry scrubbers, the GSA technology commands a high potential for further commercialization in the United States. For detailed information refer to The Economic Evaluation Report (Appendix C) prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors.

  8. Final Report on an Objective Evaluation of the Present and Potential Structure and Functions of the Ohio Cooperative Extension Service to the Agriculture and Allied Interests Study Committee (July 24, 1964).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishel, W.L.; And Others

    A number of structure and policy changes are proposed for the Ohio Cooperative Extension Service to orient it toward the state's current needs. Demographic and economic trends in the state have been in the direction of urban and suburban growth and industrial and commercial employment, with only a small percentage of the population now engaged in…

  9. Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS process). Final report, May 1, 1990--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    ARCTECH has developed a novel process (MicGAS) for direct, anaerobic biomethanation of coals. Biomethanation potential of coals of different ranks (Anthracite, bitumious, sub-bitumious, and lignites of different types), by various microbial consortia, was investigated. Studies on biogasification of Texas Lignite (TxL) were conducted with a proprietary microbial consortium, Mic-1, isolated from hind guts of soil eating termites (Zootermopsis and Nasutitermes sp.) and further improved at ARCTECH. Various microbial populations of the Mic-1 consortium carry out the multi-step MicGAS Process. First, the primary coal degraders, or hydrolytic microbes, degrade the coal to high molecular weight (MW) compounds. Then acedogens ferment the high MW compounds to low MW volatile fatty acids. The volatile fatty acids are converted to acetate by acetogens, and the methanogens complete the biomethanation by converting acetate and CO{sub 2} to methane.

  10. TVA coal-gasification commercial demonstration plant project. Volume 5. Plant based on Koppers-Totzek gasifier. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    This volume presents a technical description of a coal gasification plant, based on Koppers-Totzek gasifiers, producing a medium Btu fuel gas product. Foster Wheeler carried out a conceptual design and cost estimate of a nominal 20,000 TPSD plant based on TVA design criteria and information supplied by Krupp-Koppers concerning the Koppers-Totzek coal gasification process. Technical description of the design is given in this volume.

  11. Evaluation of the effect of coal cleaning of fugitive elements. Part II. Analytical methods. Final report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Bosshart, R.E.; Price, A.A.; Ford, C.T.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains the analytical and test methods which were used routinely at Bituminous Coal Research, Inc. during the project. The procedures contained herein should aid coal industry laboratories and others, including commercial laboratories, who might be required to determine trace elements in coal. Some of the procedures have been presented in previous BCR reports; however, this report includes additional procedures which are described in greater detail. Also presented are many as the more basic coal methods which have been in use at BCR for many years, or which have been adapted or refined from other standard reference sources for coal and water. The basis for choosing specific analytical procedures for trace elements in coal is somewhat complex. At BCR, atomic absorption was selected as the basic method in the development of these procedures. The choice was based on sensitivity, selectivity, accuracy, precision, practicability, and economy. Whenever possible, the methods developed had to be both adequate and amenable for use by coal industry laboratories by virtue of relative simplicity and cost. This is not to imply that the methods described are simple or inexpensive; however, atomic abosrption techniques do meet these criteria in relation to more complex and costly methods such as neutron activation, mass spectrometry, and x-ray fluorescence, some of which require highly specialized personnel as well as access to sophisticated nuclear and computational facilities. Many of the analytical procedures for trace elements in coal have been developed or adapted specifically for the BCR studies. Their presentation is the principal purpose of this report.

  12. Subcontracted R and D final report: analysis of samples obtained from GKT gasification test of Kentucky coal. Nonproprietary version

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.V.

    1983-09-01

    A laboratory test program was performed to obtain detailed compositional data on the Gesellshaft fuer Kohle-Technologie (GKT) gasifier feed and effluent streams. GKT performed pilot gasification tests with Kentucky No. 9 coal and collected various samples which were analyzed by GKT and the Radian Corporation, Austin, Texas. The coal chosen had good liquefaction characteristics and a high gasification reactivity. No organic priority pollutants or PAH compounds were detected in the wash water, and solid waste leachates were within RCRA metals limits.

  13. Flash pyrolysis of coal in reactive and non-reactive gases: Final report, October 1, 1982--September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compile a process chemistry data base for the flash pyrolysis of several ranks of coal. The process of flash pyrolysis is defined in terms of reaction conditions as follows: (1) Rapidly heating coal particles to temperatures above approximately 400/degree/C at rates ranging from hundreds to thousands of degrees per second; (2) maintaining a relatively short residence time of the coal particles at reaction temperature and pressure, on the order of less than one second to tens of seconds; and (3) rapidly cooling the reaction system, at rates on the order of hundreds of degrees per second, to temperatures below about 300/degree/C. In this manner, yields of gases and lighter liquids tend to increase and the yields of heavier oils, tars, and chars decrease. A number of methods can be used to obtain the rapid heat up rate of the coal particles. The optimum method, from a process point of view, is by the use of a preheated gas stream which is rapidly mixed with the coal feed material. Thus, this report covers the flash pyrolysis of coal particles mixed and entrained with preheated reactive and non-reactive gases. 16 refs., 15 tabs., 27 figs.

  14. Desulfurization of coal: Enhanced selectivity using phase transfer catalysts. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1997-05-01

    Due to environmental problems related to the combustion of high sulfur Illinois coal, there continues to be interest in the development of viable pre-combustion desulfurization processes. Recent studies by the authors have obtained very good sulfur removals but the reagents that are used are too expensive. Use of cheaper reagents leads to a loss of desired coal properties. This study investigated the application of phase transfer catalysts to the selective oxidation of sulfur in coal using air and oxygen as oxidants. The phase transfer catalyst was expected to function as a selectivity moderator by permitting the use of milder reaction conditions than otherwise necessary. This would enhance the sulfur selectivity and help retain the heating value of the coal. The use of certain coal combustion wastes for desulfurization, and the application of cerium (IV) catalyzed air oxidations for selective sulfur oxidation were also studied. If successful this project would have lead to the rapid development of a commercially viable desulfurization process. This would have significantly improved the marketability of Illinois coal. However, the phase transfer catalysts, the cerium and the scrubber sledge did not catalize the sulfur removal significantly.

  15. Consortium for coal log pipeline research and development. Final technical progress report, August 10, 1993--August 9, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Marrero, T.R.

    1996-10-01

    The main objective of this project was to conduct intensive research and development of the Coal Log Pipeline (CLP). Specifically, the R & D was to concentrate on previously neglected and insufficiently studied aspects of CLP which were deemed significant. With improvements in these areas, CLP could be implemented for commercial use within five years. CLP technology is capable of transporting coal logs for long distances. The many potential advantages of CLP over truck and railroad transportation include: lower freight costs, less energy consumption, less air pollution, decreased environmental problems, increased safety, and improved reliability. Previous studies have shown that CLP is advantageous over slurry pipeline technology. First, CLP uses one-third the water required by a coal slurry pipeline. Second, CLP provides easier coal dewatering. Third, the CLP conveying capacity of coal is twice as much as a slurry transport line of equal diameter. In many situations, the cost for transporting each ton of coal is expected to be less expensive by CLP as compared to other competing modes of transportation such as: truck, unit train and slurry pipeline.

  16. 78 FR 28242 - Proposed Information Collection; Cleanup Program for Accumulations of Coal and Float Coal Dusts...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... were published (35 FR 17097, November 20, 1970) as part of a final rule that implemented requirements... Coal and Float Coal Dusts, Loose Coal, and Other Combustibles AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health... program for accumulations of coal and float coal dusts, loose coal, and other combustibles in...

  17. Preliminary technical data report: WyCoalGas project water system. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The WyCoalGas, Inc. Proposed coal gasification plant site is approximately 16 miles north of Douglas, Wyoming, located generally in Sections 27 and 34, T35N, R70W of the sixth prinicpal meridian. The plant site is located in typical high plateau plains of central Wyoming. Climate in the area is typical of semi-arid central Wyoming and is subject to wide variations in temperature. Precipitation in the area averages about 14 inches per year, of which about 10 inches fall during the April-September irrigation season. Projected water requirements at the plant site are 6020 acre-feet per year. Since the proposed plant site is not near any major streams or rivers, water must be transported to it. Water will be supplied from four sources - two surface water and two groundwater. The two surface water sources are LaPrele Reservoir and flood flows from the North Platte River with a 1974 appropriations date. LaPrele Reservoir is located approximately 14 miles west of Douglas, Wyoming, and is shown on Figure A-1. Water will be released from LaPrele Reservoir and flow down LaPrele Creek to the North Platte River. Water from the North Platte River will be diverted at a point in Section 7 of T33N, R71W. The LaPrele water and excess water from the North Platte will be pumped from the river and stored in Panhandle Reservoir No. 1, which is also referred to as Combs Reservoir. A pipeline will convey water from Panhandle Reservoir No. 1 to the coal gasification plant site. The two groundwater sources are located north of Douglas and west of Douglas.

  18. Desulfurization of Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils and alkali. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, Ruozhi

    1997-05-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an inexpensive method to remove organic sulfur from pyrite-free and mineral-free coal using base, air, and readily available farm products. This is accomplished by treating coals with impregnating coals with polyunsaturated offs, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover, the oils are environmentally safe; they produce no noxious products and improve burning qualities of the solid products. IBC-108 coal, (contains only 0.4% pyrite and 2.7% organic sulfur) was first treated with Na{sub 4}OH at two different concentrations and four different times, and with NH{sub 4}OH at two different concentrations and two different temperatures. Pretreating IBC-108 coal with bases removes 13% to 23% of the sulfur, and NaOH is a better treatment than NH{sub 4}OH in most of the experiments. Higher temperatures, higher base concentrations, and longer treatment times remove more sulfur. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is more effective than NaOH for oil extraction after the oil treatment. To test for effectiveness of sulfur removal, eight coal samples were treated with NaOH (two concentrations at four different times) were further treated with linseed oil at three temperatures, four different times, and two oil to coal ratios. The combination of NaOH pretreatment, then oil treatment, followed by Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} extraction, removes 23% to 50% of the sulfur. The best result is achieved by pretreating with 5% NaOH for 20 hr (23% sulfur removal) followed by oil treatment at 100{degrees}C for 5 hr with a 1:1 oil to coal ratio (50% sulfur removal in total). More sulfur is removed with a 1:1 oil to coal ratio than a 1:10 ratio under most conditions.

  19. Microchemistry of Illinois coals - impact for sulfur removal. Final report, 1 July 1983-30 June 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of elements (C, N, O, S, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, and Fe) has been determined by point-to-point microanalysis of several maceral components of three samples of Illinois coal. The point-to-point variations for C, Si, Fe, and pyritic S were much greater in the exinites than in the vitrinites. The carbon content of exinites ranged from 40 to 70 weight percent and averaged 52 to 57%. The carbon content of vitrinites was higher, averaging 68 to 82%. The organic sulfur content of vitrinites was nearly the same as that of exinites, but the pyritic sulfur was much higher in the exinites. Both iron and silicon were higher in exinites than in vitrinites. In vitrinites, silicon ranged from 0.01 to 0.30% while iron was generally less than 0.1%. Nitrogen, sodium, and magnesium contents of these coals were near the limit of detectability, and no significant variations were noted. The organic sulfur content of the No. 5 coal and one of the No. 6 coals was in the range of 0.2 to 0.6%, while the other No. 6 coal had organic sulfur above 1% and total sulfur of 3.84%. The organic sulfur was easily distinguished from the pyritic or sulphatic sulfur forms by the local iron content and the variation in the sample current. The solvent-reacted samples showed only small changes in average composition. The differential thermal analysis curves for all three of the coals are remarkably alike, from room temperature to 850/sup 0/C. The microanalyzed residues showed large reductions of organic sulfur content but only small changes in carbon content after heating. Coal samples heated in a microwave oven to 200/sup 0/C for up to thirty minutes did not show significant changes in composition. 6 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  20. Innovative process for concentration of fine particle coal slurries. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rajchel, M.; Ehrlinger, H.P.; Harnett, D.; Fonseca, A.; Maurer, R.

    1997-05-01

    Williams Technologies, Inc. And Clarke Rajchel Engineering are developing a technology (patent pending) to produce high quality coal water slurries from preparation plant fine coal streams. The WTI/CRE technology uses the novel implementation of high-shear cross-flow separation which replaces and enhances conventional thickening processes by surpassing normally achievable solids loadings. Dilute ultra-fine (minus 100 mesh) solids slurries can be concentrated to greater than 60 weight percent and remixed, as required, with de-watered coarser fractions to produce pumpable, heavily loaded coal slurries. The permeate (filtrate) resulting from this process has been demonstrated to be crystal clear and totally free of suspended solids. The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the WTI/CRE coal slurry production process technology at the pilot scale. The technology can enable Illinois coal producers and users to realize significant cost and environmental benefits both by eliminating fine coal waste disposal problems and producing an IGCC fuel to produce power which meets all foreseeable clean air standards. Testing was also directed at concentrating mine tailings material to produce a tailings paste which can be mine-back- filled, eliminating the need for tailings ponds. During the grant period, a laboratory-scale test apparatus (up to 3 GPM feed rate) was assembled and operated to demonstrate process performance over a range of feed temperatures and pressures. A dilute coal/water slurry from Consol, Inc.`s Rend Lake Preparation Plant was concentrated with the process to a maximum recorded solids loading of 61.9% solids by weight. Analytical results from the concentrate were evaluated by Destec Energy for suitability as an IGCC fuel.

  1. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30

    health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible welds for batteries

  2. Automated microscopy methods for measuring pyritic sulfur content of coal and determining degree of liberation of pyrite in coal: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chaparro, L.F.

    1987-07-25

    The objective of this project is to develop an automated procedure, to be implemented in an IBAS image analyzer, to determine size, shape and degree of liberation of pyrite particles in a coal matrix. This procedure is to work in real time conditions and with minimal intervention from the operator. Our approach is to create from the original microscopic image a three level image with the following components: epoxy, coal macerals and pyrite to simplify the calculations. Enhancing the original image by histogram scaling and median filtering, we segment it and form the three level image. After the boundaries of the pyrite particles are defined, we mask the surroundings of the particle to estimate the degree of liberation. The percentage of epoxy included in the mask is defined as the degree of liberation of the particle. Size and shape factor values are simultaneously calculated for each of the analyzed particles. These particles are classified according to their maximum diameter, shape factor and degree of liberation by the program. 6 refs., 18 figs.

  3. Development of a coal/water-slurry-fueled diesel engine for industrial cogeneration: Final and summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Nydick, S.E.

    1987-02-01

    Purpose of the program was to foster the long-range development of a coal/water slurry fuel fired slow-speed, two-stroke diesel engine for efficient and economical power generation in the 8 to 30 MW range for use in industrial cogeneration applications. Five Topical Reports have been prepared. This report contains a short description of the process used to select four coal/water slurries for testing in a single cylinder, slow-speed engine and the test facility and a summary of the program results. The program results conclusively showed that the thermal efficiency of a coal/water engine is comparable to that of a diesel fueled engine and produces considerably lower amounts of exhaust emissions. Furthermore, it appears that the slight decrease in efficiency observed for some of the slurries is related to the additional friction at the piston/ring cylinder liner interface when firing coal/water slurry fuels, rather than any differences in combustion. The engine wear, particularly at the piston ring/cylinder liner interface, is considerably greater than that which occurs with liquid fuels. However, it is concluded that by means of technological advances in materials, design changes and new lubrication concepts, are reliable and economical coal/water slurry slow speed engine could be developed.

  4. Assessment of pulverized-coal-fired combustion performance: Final report for the period September 1980--September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, W.F.; Clark, W.; Pohl, J.H.; Payne, R.

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this program was to evaluate an engineering analysis procedure which could be used to assess the impact on thermal performance of converting gas and oil fired equipment to coal. The program consisted of four major tasks: (1) Engineering Analysis. The objective was to evaluate currently available models which could be used to predict combustor performance and to define a procedure which could be used to assess the impact of a coal firing in a boiler or furnace; (2) Reactor Studies. The purpose was to evaluate, under controlled conditions, the radiative properties of fly ash clouds; (3) Pilot Scale Experiments. This involved a combustion trial with gas and coals which were burned at 0.7 /times/ 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr in a pilot-scale combustor. The purpose was to verify and supplement the results of the small-scale reactor studies on the radiant properties of coal flames at larger scale; (4) Reporting. Engineering analysis procedures were used to identify those fuels related properties which had a major impact on the thermal performance of furnaces. The major result of the study is that thermal performance of coal-fired furnaces is dominated by the formation of fly ash deposits on the heat transfer surfaces. The key parameters which influence thermal performance are: thickness, thermal conductivity, and surface emissivity or absorptivity. 105 refs., 170 figs., 29 tabs.

  5. Regulatory facility guide for Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O.; Rymer, A.C.

    1994-02-28

    The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

  6. Studies of in-situ calcium based sorbents in advanced pressurized coal conversion systems. Final report, June 1991--October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Katta, S.; Shires, P.J.; Campbell, W.M.; Henningsen, G.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of this project was to obtain experimental data on the reactions of calcium-based sorbents in both air-blown coal gasification systems and second generation fluid bed coal combustion systems (partial gasification) as well as stabilization of the spent sorbent produced. The project consisted of six tasks: Tasks 1 and 2 dealt mostly with project-related activities and preparation of test equipment, Task 3 -- study on sulfidation of calcium-based sorbents, Task 4 -- kinetic studies on calcium-catalyzed carbon gasification reactions, and Task 5 -- oxidation of CaS present in LASHs and DASHs (mixtures of coal ash and limestone or dolomite respectively) to CaSO{sub 4} and absorption of SO{sub 2} on various solids, and Task 6 -- economic evaluation of the most promising CaS oxidation method developed under this program. Experimental studies were conducted primarily to address Task 5 issues, and are discussed in this report.

  7. "An Economic Process for Coal Liquefaction to Liquid Fuels" SBIR Phase II -- Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguli, Partha Sarathi

    2009-02-19

    The current commercial processes for direct coal liquefaction utilize expensive backmix-flow reactor system and conventional catalysts resulting in incomplete and retrogressive reactions that produce low distillate liquid yield and high gas yield, with high hydrogen consumption. The new process we have developed, which uses a less expensive reactor system and highly active special catalysts, resulted in high distillate liquid yield, low gas yield and low hydrogen consumption. The new reactor system using the special catalyst can be operated smoothly for direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Due to high hydrogenation and hydrocracking activities of the special catalysts, moderate temperatures and high residence time in each stage of the reactor system resulted in high distillate yield in the C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F range with no 650{degrees}F{sup +} product formed except for the remaining unconverted coal residue. The C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F distillate is more valuable than the light petroleum crude. Since there is no 650{degrees}F{sup +} liquid product, simple reforming and hydrotreating of the C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F product will produce the commercial grade light liquid fuels. There is no need for further refinement using catalytic cracking process that is currently used in petroleum refining. The special catalysts prepared and used in the experimental runs had surface area between 40-155 m{sup 2}/gm. The liquid distillate yield in the new process is >20 w% higher than that in the current commercial process. Coal conversion in the experimental runs was moderate, in the range of 88 - 94 w% maf-coal. Though coal conversion can be increased by adjustment in operating conditions, the purpose of limiting coal conversion to moderate amounts in the process was to use the remaining unconverted coal for hydrogen production by steam reforming. Hydrogen consumption was in the range of 4.0 - 6.0 w% maf-coal. A preliminary economic analysis of the new coal liquefaction process was

  8. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 2 - hydrogenative and hydrothermal pretreatments and spectroscopic characterization using pyrolysis-GC-MS, CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR and FT-IR

    SciTech Connect

    Chunshan Song; Hatcher, P.G.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    It has been indicated by DOE COLIRN panel that low-temperature catalytic pretreatment is a promising approach to the development of an improved liquefaction process. This work is a fundamental study on effects of pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. The main objectives of this project are to study the coal structural changes induced by low-temperature catalytic and thermal pretreatments by using spectroscopic techniques; and to clarify the pretreatment-induced changes in reactivity or convertibility of coals. As the second volume of the final report, here we summarize our work on spectroscopic characterization of four raw coals including two subbituminous coals and two bituminous coals, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-extracted but unreacted coals, the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been thermally pretreated. in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent, and the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been catalytically pretreated in the presence of a dispersed Mo sulfide catalyst in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent.

  9. Weathering effects on the structure and reactivity of US coals: Final report, July 15, 1984-July 14, 1987. [Many data

    SciTech Connect

    Meuzelaar, H.L.C.; Hill, G.R.; Yun, Yongseung; Jakab, E.; Windig, W.; Urban, D.; Yon, Kyung Yol; Oestreich, J.; East, J.

    1987-01-01

    This report covers the work performed from July 1984 to July 1987 under the project entitled ''Weathering Effects on Structure and Reactivity of US Coals'' (grant number FG22-84PC70798). The main objectives of the study were to investigate the structural changes in coal during the weathering process as well as to develop a simple, reliable weathering index, which can monitor indirectly the weathering-induced changes in physical and chemical properties. Although there have been numerous publications on structure and reactivity of coal, most data reported in the literature thus far have been obtained on coal samples of uncertain weathering status and therefore need to be interpreted with great caution. Weathering has a profound effect on many important coal properties such as heating value, caking characteristics, acidity, flotability and reactivity in liquefaction, combustion and gasification processes. The objective of developing a weathering index is to predict these coal property changes due to weathering without resorting to real-time measurements or pilot plant runs. This report is comprised of four main chapters: I. Structural Changes due to Weathering; II. Material Balance in Weathering Process; III. Development of a Reliable Weathering Index; and IV. Proposed Weathering Mechanisms. A battery of sophisticated analytical tools and techniques was employed during this study. Pyrolysis mass spectrometry in time-integrated, as well as in time-resolved modes with computer-aided data analysis techniques (such as factor and discriminant analysis), gas chromatography, thermogravimetry/mass spectrometry and solvent extraction were used for determining the role of oxygen during the weathering process. Pyrolysis mass spectrometry, Free Swelling Index and a novel slurry pH technique were employed as weathering indicators. 170 refs.

  10. Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Final technical report, September 30, 1992--January 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kramlich, J.C.; Chenevert, B.; Park, Jungsung; Hoffman, D.A.; Butcher, E.K.

    1996-07-19

    Coal ash, and particularly fine fly ash, remain one of the principal practical and environmental problems in coal-based power generation. In particular, submicron aerosols are identified with direct inhalation risk. Submicron ash is thought to arise from mineral vaporization during char combustion, followed by nucleation, condensation and coagulation to yield an aerosol. While aerosols are predominantly made out of volatile alkali minerals, they also can include refractory oxides that are chemically reduced to more volatile forms within the char particle and vaporized. Most of the ash of size greater than 1 {mu}m is generated by agglomeration of mineral as the char particle bums out. These two principal mechanisms are thought to account for most of the ash generated in coal combustion. Previous research has shown that various forms of coal treatment can influence the yields of fine ash from combustion. The research reported here investigates various forms of treatment, including physical coal cleaning, aerodynamic sizing, degree of grinding, and combinations of these on both aerosol yields and on yields of fine residual ash (1-4 {mu}m). The work also includes results from the combustion of artificial chars that include individual mineral elements. This research shows that these various forms of coal treatment can significantly change ash characteristics. While none of the treatments affected the bulk of the residual ash size distribution significantly, the yield of the ash aerosol mode (d<0.5 {mu}m) and fine residual ash mode (1-4 {mu}m) are changed by the treatments.

  11. Graphic values for some organic constituents of beneficiated coal samples. [Final] technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlenberger, L.B.; Lytle, J.M.; Kruse, C.W.; Chaven, C.

    1992-12-31

    Graphic techniques exist which can accurately predict values for calorific value, organic sulfur, and several other constituents of the organic portion of beneficiated coal sample fractions. These techniques also permit a determination of coal rank to be made without the use of approximations required in the standard procedure. In beneficiation studies, plots of the calorific value of each fraction vs its ash content invariably produce straight lines. The Y axis intercept is the mineral-matter-free Btu value used (on the moist basis) to determine coal rank, and the X axis intercept is a value we will call ``maximum ash.`` These two constants permit us to calculate all future Btu values of fractions of this coal from the ash, alone. Plots of organic sulfur vs ash sometimes produce lines which are straight and at other times curved. In any event, they can be used to read off values of organic sulfur corresponding to a particular ash value in lieu of analyses. When all values truly represent only organic sulfur, the X axis intercept must occur at the same maximum ash value obtained from the Btu/ash curve. When the line is straight, the Y axis intercept is the mineral-matter-free organic sulfur, and all future organic sulfur values may be calculated from these two constants and the ash. Fractions of IBC-101 with varying ash contents were produced by froth flotation. The various fractions were analyzed by the coal analysis laboratory and the particular data type was plotted in each case vs the individual ash content of each fraction, using Lotus 123 and Freelance software packages. These plots permit more accurate determination of mineral matter, Btu, organic sulfur, and organic and inorganic carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and volatile matter. This information represents a more complete knowledge of coal. In addition, the plots permit accurate estimation of these values from ash and total sulfur analyses alone and thus can save time and analytical expense.

  12. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Final report, September 21, 1989--November 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Liu, P.K.T.; Webster, I.A.

    1992-12-31

    Membrane reactors are today finding extensive applications for gas and vapor phase catalytic reactions (see discussion in the introduction and recent reviews by Armor [92], Hsieh [93] and Tsotsis et al. [941]). There have not been any published reports, however, of their use in high pressure and temperature liquid-phase applications. The idea to apply membrane reactor technology to coal liquid upgrading has resulted from a series of experimental investigations by our group of petroleum and coal asphaltene transport through model membranes. Coal liquids contain polycyclic aromatic compounds, which not only present potential difficulties in upgrading, storage and coprocessing, but are also bioactive. Direct coal liquefaction is perceived today as a two-stage process, which involves a first stage of thermal (or catalytic) dissolution of coal, followed by a second stage, in which the resulting products of the first stage are catalytically upgraded. Even in the presence of hydrogen, the oil products of the second stage are thought to equilibrate with the heavier (asphaltenic and preasphaltenic) components found in the feedstream. The possibility exists for this smaller molecular fraction to recondense with the unreacted heavy components and form even heavier undesirable components like char and coke. One way to diminish these regressive reactions is to selectively remove these smaller molecular weight fractions once they are formed and prior to recondensation. This can, at least in principle, be accomplished through the use of high temperature membrane reactors, using ceramic membranes which are permselective for the desired products of the coal liquid upgrading process. An additional incentive to do so is in order to eliminate the further hydrogenation and hydrocracking of liquid products to undesirable light gases.

  13. Area terrace pit coal mining systems: volume 2--appendices. Open file report (final) Sep 1977-Jul 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F.; Simon, C.; Stoddard, M.; Verma, M.; White, M.

    1980-10-01

    This report is principally concerned with the engineering and economic feasibility of area surface coal mining systems other than draglines. This analysis evaluates shovel-trucks, shovel-crusher-conveyors, and shovel-rail excavation and haulage systems for an assortment of geologic environments and production rates in the Powder River Basin (PRB). Shovel-trucks, front-end loader-trucks, and shovel-crusher-conveyors were studied in a multiseam, dipping geologic area of the Four Corners region. The Texas lignite engineering and economic research involved bucket-wheel excavators (BWE), BWE-backhoes, and scraper-backhoe combinations for overburden and coal excavation.

  14. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3 industrial boiler retrofit. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R.L.; Thornock, D.E.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W.; McGowan, J.G.

    1998-03-01

    Economics and/or political intervention may one day dictate the conversion from oil or natural gas to coal in boilers that were originally designed to burn oil or gas. In recognition of this future possibility the US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technical Center (DOE-FETC) supported a program led by ABB Power Plant Laboratories with support from the Energy and Fuels Research Center of Penn State University with the goal of demonstrating the technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting a gas/oil designed boiler to burn micronized coal. In support of the overall goal the following specific objectives were targeted: develop a coal handling/preparation system that can meet the technical and operational requirements for retrofitting microfine coal on a boiler designed for burning oil or natural gas; maintain boiler thermal performance in accordance with specifications when burning oil or natural gas; maintain NOx emissions at or below 0.6 lb NO{sub 2} per million Btu; achieve combustion efficiencies of 98% or higher; and determine economic payback periods as a function of key variables.

  15. 76 FR 45612 - Notice of Availability of the Buckskin Mine Hay Creek II Coal Lease-by-Application Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ...) to prepare an EIS for the Hay Creek II coal lease application in the Federal Register (72 FR 72750... EPA on March 12, 2010, (75 FR 11882). A 60-day comment period on the Draft EIS commenced with... Availability and Notice of Public Hearing in the Federal Register on March 12, 2010, (75 FR 11906). The...

  16. Evaluation of improved materials for stationary diesel engines operating on residual and coal based fuels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Experimental results to date from an on-going research program on improved materials for stationary diesel engines using residual or coal-based fuels are presented with little discussion of conclusions about these results. Information is included on ring and liner wear, fuel oil qualities, ceramic materials, coatings, test procedures and equipment, and tribology test results. (LCL)

  17. Revised users manual, Pulverized Coal Gasification or Combustion: 2-dimensional (87-PCGC-2): Final report, Volume 2. [87-PCGC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1987-12-01

    A two-dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and non-reactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. Recent code revisions and additions are described. The model, referred to as 87-PCGC-2, is applicable to cylindrical axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using either a flux method or discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a Lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. Several multi-step coal devolatilization schemes are included along with a heterogeneous reaction scheme that allows for both diffusion and chemical reaction. Major gas-phase reactions are modeled assuming local instantaneous equilibrium, and thus the reaction rates are limited by the turbulent rate mixing. A NO/sub x/ finite rate chemistry submodel is included which integrates chemical kinetics and the statistics of the turbulence. The gas phase is described by elliptic partial differential equations that are solved by an iterative line-by-line technique. Under-relaxation is used to achieve numerical stability. The generalized nature of the model allows for calculation of isothermal fluid mechanicsgaseous combustion, droplet combustion, particulate combustion and various mixtures of the above, including combustion of coal-water and coal-oil slurries. Both combustion and gasification environments are permissible. User information and theory are presented, along with sample problems. 106 refs.

  18. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume I, Part 2. Final report, September 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes work pertaining to the development of models for coal gasification and combustion processes. This volume, volume 1, part 2, contains research progress in the areas of large particle oxidation at high temperatures, large particle, thick-bed submodels, sulfur oxide/nitrogen oxides submodels, and comprehensive model development and evaluation.

  19. Strength and consolidation characteristics of coal refuse for design and construction of disposal facilities: Applications of research findings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.H.

    1987-08-01

    The use of coal refuse properties for the short-term stability analysis of disposal facilities is illustrated in the report. Three types of disposal facilities are considered: waste embankments constructed of combined or fine refuse, refuse dams constructed by upstream method, and sandwich construction by placing coarse and fine refuse in alternate layers. Detailed procedures are presented to determine the factor of safety at the end of construction using the REAME computer program developed at the University of Kentucky. The results of analysis show that limiting the maximum moisture content of combined or fine refuse in waste embankments and keeping the construction of refuse dams at a slower pace are very important for short-term stability. Due to the granular nature of coarse and fine refuse, the use of sandwich construction appears to be an efficient and economical disposal method. To compare the properties of coal refuse from the Western Coal Field with those from the Eastern Coal Field reported previously, test results on combined and fine refuse taken from two sites in Colorado are presented.

  20. VHF EPR analysis of organic sulfur in coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, R.B.; Belford, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    A direct and non-destructive technique called very High Frequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (VHF EPR) utilizing instrumentation and application techniques developed in this laboratory, is proving to be a practical and sensitive analytical method for the organic sulfur in coal. Research during this past year (1992--1993) was very successful in terms of obtaining spectrochemical information on organic sulfur in coal both quantitatively (amount of organic sulfur) and qualitatively (form and distribution of organic sulfur). Starting in this funding year, the authors have begun to develop and use a two-species model (non-exchanging and axially symmetric) for the simulation of VHF EPR coal spectra. Such a model provides quantitative information on the total concentration of sulfur species that can be directly related to the organic sulfur content as measured by conventional chemical methods. Utilizing the newly developed method, they have analyzed the VHF EPR spectra from some sub-bituminous coals containing organic sulfur in the range from 2% to 12% and a number of maceral blends. Excellent quantitative agreement is achieved between VHF EPR results and chemical analyses. In addition, the modelling of VHF EPR spectra of coal provides detailed spectral parameters. These parameters can be related to the molecular structures of the paramagnetic species giving rise to the EPR signals, as demonstrated by our study of the model compounds. The foundation of VHF EPR analysis of aromatic sulfur radicals has been firmly established based on careful investigations of the molecular and electronic structures of the thiophenic model compounds. The results validate the theoretical soundness of the method and carry important practical implications.

  1. Modeled impacts of surface coal mining on dissolved solids in the Tongue River, Southeastern Montana. Water-resources investigations (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, P.F.

    1981-10-01

    A computer model has been developed for assessing potential increases in dissolved solids of streams as a result of leaching of overburden materials used to backfill pits in surface coal-mining operations in southeastern Montana. The model allows spatial and temporal simulation of streamflow and dissolved-solids loads and concentrations for user-defined plans of surface coal mining and agricultural development. The model specifically addresses the Tongue River from the Tongue River Dam to Miles City, Montana and its three major tributaries. Provision is made to simulate releases from the present Tongue River Reservoir or the increased releases expected from a larger dam and reservoir proposed as a replacement for the present Tongue River Reservoir. The model routes an input quantity of streamflow and dissolved solids from the upstream end to the downstream end of a stream reach while algebraically accounting for gains and losses of streamflow and dissolved solids within the stream reach.

  2. Microbial recovery of metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Final and quarterly report, July 1994--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sandbeck, K.A.; Cleveland, D.

    1995-08-01

    Research is reported on the recovery of molybdenum and nickel from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Mo release from spent coal liquefaction catalysts has been shown to be dependent upon many parameters, but release is dominated by microbial growth. The microbial Mo release is a rapid process requiring less than one week for 90% of the releaseable Mo to be solubilized from whole washed (THF) catalyst. It could be expected that the rates would be even greater with crushed catalyst. Efforts were centered on optimizing the parameters that stimulate microbial growth and action and further efforts centered on catalyst pre-treatment prior to microbial bio-leaching. Recent experiments suggest that hydrogen peroxide promises to be an effective pre-treatment wash. Hydrogen peroxide was also found to be an effective and economical agent for metals solubilization per se and could promote solubilization without subjecting the catalyst to microbial growth.

  3. Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development. Final report, September 28, 1990--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kakwani, R.M.; Winsor, R.E.; Ryan, T.W. III; Schwalb, J.A.; Wahiduzzaman, S.; Wilson, R.P. Jr.

    1993-09-01

    The goal of this program was to study the feasibility of operating a Detroit Diesel Series 149 engine at high speeds using a Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) fuel. The CWS-fueled 149 engine is proposed for the mine-haul off-highway truck and work boat marine markets. Economic analysis studies indicate that, for these markets, the use of CWS fuel could have sufficient operating cost savings, depending upon the future diesel fuel price, emission control system capital and operating costs, and maintenance and overhaul costs. A major portion of the maintenance costs is expected to be due to lower life and higher cost of the CWS injectors. Injection and combustion systems were specially designed for CWS, and were installed in one cylinder of a Detroit Diesel 8V-149TI engine for testing. The objective was to achieve engine operation for sustained periods at speeds up to 1,900 rpm with reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate. A computer simulation predicted autoignition of coal fuel at 1,900 rpm would require an average droplet size of 18 microns and 19:1 compression ratio, so the injection system, and pistons were designed accordingly. The injection system was capable of supplying the required volume of CWS/injection with a duration of approximately 25 crank angle degrees and peak pressures on the order of 100 mpa. In addition to the high compression ratio, the combustion system also utilized hot residual gases in the cylinder, warm inlet air admission and ceramic insulated engine components to enhance combustion. Autoignition of CWS fuel was achieved at 1900 rpm, at loads ranging from 20--80 percent of the rated load of diesel-fuel powered cylinders. Limited emissions data indicates coal burnout rates in excess of 99 percent. NO{sub x} levels were significantly lower, while unburned hydrocarbon levels were higher for the CWS fueled cylinder than for corresponding diesel-fuel powered cylinders.

  4. Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents. Final report, September 1987--January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.

    1991-05-01

    The primary objective of the project was the investigation of the pore structure and reactivity changes occurring in metal/metal oxide sorbents used for desulfurization of hot coal gas during sulfidation and regeneration, with particular emphasis placed on the effects of these changes on the sorptive capacity and efficiency of the sorbents. Commercially available zinc oxide sorbents were used as model solids in our experimental investigation of the sulfidation and regeneration processes.

  5. A novel concept for high conversion of coal to liquids. Final report, 1 September 1988--31 August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, W.H.; Shabtai, J.

    1994-04-01

    A batch microreactor was designed and fabricated as a means of investigating maximum yields of liquids obtainable in very short reaction times of the order of a few seconds, and the maximum ratios of liquids/hydrocarbon (HC) gases obtainable under those conditions. A Wyodak sub-bituminous coal, crushed and sieved to {minus}200 mesh particle size, was used in the experiments, with a temperature of 500{degrees}C and a pressure of 1500 psi. The fine coal particles were fed dry to the reactor and heated to reaction temperature in times of one to two seconds. At a time of 3 seconds at reaction temperature, in a single pass a liquid yield of 60% by weight of the coal was obtained, accompanied by a ratio of liquids/(HC) gases of 30/1. When the unreacted solids were recycled to the reactor, and the results combined with those of the first pass, a liquid yield of 82% by weight of the coal was achieved, accompanied by a ratio of liquids/HC gases of 30/1. This ratio represents only about 3 wt percent HC gases, much lower that is produced in current advanced technologies, and represents a large saving in hydrogen consumption. A simulated distillation technique was applied to the liquids. The liquid product contained 86% by weight (of the liquids) total distillables (boiling point below 538{degrees}C), including 70% by weight of low-boiling fractions in the gasoline, kerosene and gas oil range (boiling point up to 325{degrees}C). The liquid product exhibited a H/C ratio of 1.5, which is considerably higher than observed in current advanced technologies for the primary liquids. Several catalysts were investigated. Iron catalysts, specifically ferric chloride hexahydrate and ferric sulfate pentahydrate, each produced these high conversions and high ratios of liquids/HC gases.

  6. Carbonation as a binding mechanism for coal/calcium hydroxide pellets. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, D.M.; Lytle, J.M.; Hackley, K.C.; Strickland, R.; Berger, R.; Schanche, G.

    1992-12-31

    In this project, the ISGS is investigating the pelletization of fine coal with calcium hydroxide, a sulfur-capturing sorbent. The objective is to produce a readily-transportable fuel which will burn in compliance with the recently passed Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA). To improve the economics of pelletizing, carbonation, or, the reaction of carbon dioxide with calcium hydroxide, which produces a binding matrix of calcium carbonate, is being investigated as a method of hardening pelletized coal fines. This year, pellets were produced from 28 {times} 0 coal fines collected from an Illinois preparation plant using a laboratory version of a California Pellet Mill (CPM), a commercially available pellet machine. The CPM effectively pelletized coal fines at the moisture content they were dewatered to at the plant. Carbonation nearly doubled the strength of pellets containing 10 wt % calcium hydroxide. Other results from this year`s work indicate that inclusion of calcium hydroxide into pellets resulted in chlorine capture of approximately 20 wt % for combustion tests conducted at both 850 and 1100{degrees}C. Arsenic emissions were reduced from near 38 wt% at 850 C to essentially nil with inclusion of 10 wt % calcium hydroxide into the pellets. At 110{degrees}C, arsenic emissions were reduced from about 90 wt % to about 15 wt %. Sodium emissions, however, increased with the addition of calcium hydroxide. At 850{degrees}C, sodium capture dropped from about 98 wt % to 73 wt % for pellets containing 10 wt % calcium hydroxide; at 1100{degrees}C, capture dropped from about 92 wt % to about 20 wt %.

  7. Liquefaction of bituminous coals using disposable ore catalysts and hydrogen. Final report, February 7, 1982-July 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, V.K.

    1982-09-01

    There are a number of problems associated with the production of liquid fuels from coal. The most complex is the use of commercial catalysts which are expensive, with short life, and cannot be recovered or regenerated. The objective of this study was to conduct experiments on coal hydrogenation using low cost mineral ores as disposable catalysts. Coal samples from Blacksville Mine, Pittsburgh Bed were hydrogenated using a number of ores, ore concentrates and industrial waste products as catalysts. Experiments were also conducted using a commercial catalyst (Harshaw Chemicals, 0402T) and no catalyst at all to compare the results. Since iron pyrite has been reported to be a good disposable catalyst, experiments were also conducted using pyrite individually as well as in admixture with other ores or concentrates. The liquefaction was conducted at 425/sup 0/C under 2000 psig (13,790 kPa) hydrogen pressure for a reaction time of 30 minutes using SRC-II heavy distillate as a vehicle oil. The conclusions of this study are as follows: (a) Results of liquefaction using two cycle technique showed that the catalytic activity of iron pyrite could be enhanced by adding materials like limonite, laterite or red mud. Iron pyrite in admixture with limonite ore or molybdenum oxide concentrate gave the best results among all the binary mixtures studied. (b) Iron pyrite with molybdenum oxide concentrate and cobaltic hydroxide cake (metal loading in each case the same as in Harshaw catalyst) gave results which compared favorably with those obtained using the Harshaw catalyst. It is recommended that work on this project should be continued exploring other ores and their mixtures for their catalytic activity for coal liquefaction.

  8. Coal char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.

    1995-07-01

    A series of investigations of coal and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion is reported for a suite of coals ranging in rank from lignite to low-volatile (lv) bituminous coal under combustion conditions similar to those found in commercial-scale boilers. Experimental measurements are described that utilize identical particle sizing characteristics to determine initial and final size distributions. Mechanistic interpretation of the data suggest that coal fragmentation is an insignificant event and that char fragmentation is controlled by char structure. Chars forming cenospheres fragment more extensively than solid chars. Among the chars that fragment, large particles produce more fine material than small particles. In all cases, coal and char fragmentation are seen to be sufficiently minor as to be relatively insignificant factors influencing fly ash size distribution, particle loading, and char burnout.

  9. Public health assessment for petitioned public health assessment addendum, fields brook (specifically concerning radiological contaminants at Reactive Metals Incorporated) Ashtabula, Ashtabula County, Ohio, Region 5, Cerclis No. OHD980614572. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-09

    The RMI Extrusion Plant, a subsidiary of Reactive Metals, Inc., subcontractor to the Department of Energy (DOE), is in the northeastern corner of Ashtabula County, Ohio, about three miles east of the center of the city of Ashtabula. Sampling of environmental media on site (air, soil, sediments, surface water, and groundwater), has shown contamination with uranium, technetium-99, and trichloroethylene (TCE). Off-site samples have shown only a small area of uranium-contaminated soil, just outside the northeastern fence. Analysis of the environmental data show that there is no apparent public health hazard associated with the RMI facility.

  10. Na/Ca catalyzation of Illinois coals for gasification. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; McCormick, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Gasification for power generation via IGCC processes is expected to become an important market for high sulfur Illinois Basin coals. Fluid-bed gasifiers have significant advantages over entrained flow processes. These advantages include ease of control, large turndown capacity, high thermal efficiency, and moderate oxygen and steam requirements. Three of the most pressing technical problems in fluid-bed gasification of Illinois coals are the caking tendency, high sulfur content, and low carbon conversion and consequent large char recycle required in most systems. This program explores the use of gasification catalysts to attack these three problems. The catalysts are sodium/calcium mixtures. Another advantage of using catalysts is that gasification temperature might be lowered, leading to less expensive materials of construction and a reduction in alkali vaporization. The results of this study indicate that these catalysts can reduce or eliminate the caking of Illinois coals. Loadings below 1 weight % were effective if the catalyst was added by impregnation at low pH (below about 5). An Na/Ca molar ratio of greater than 1 also leads to lower catalyst requirement.

  11. Solid waste management of coal conversion residuals from a commercial-size facility: environmental engineering aspects. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, J.; Neufeld, R. D.; Shapiro, M. A.

    1980-11-30

    Major residuals generated by the conversion process and its auxiliary operations include: (a) coal preparation wastes; (b) gasifier ash; (c) liquefaction solids-char; (d) tail gas or flue gas desulfurization sludge; (e) boiler flyash and bottom ash; (f) raw water treatment sludge, and; (g) biosludges from process wastewater treatment. Recovered sulfur may also require disposal management. Potential environmental and health impacts from each of the residues are described on the basis of characterization of the waste in the perspective of water quality degradation. Coal gasification and liquefaction systems are described in great detail with respect to their associated residuals. Management options are listed with the conclusion that land disposal of the major residual streams is the only viable choice. On-site versus off-site disposal is analyzed with the selection of on-site operations to reduce political, social and institutional pressures, and to optimize the costs of the system. Mechanisms for prevention of leachate generation are described, and various disposal site designs are outlined. It is concluded that co-disposal feasibility of some waste streams must be established in order to make the most preferred solid waste management system feasible. Capacity requirements for the disposal operation were calculated for a 50,000 bbl/day coal liquefaction plant or 250 million SCF/day gasification operation.

  12. Bioenergetic studies of coal sulfur oxidation by extremely thermophilic bacteria. Final report, September 15, 1992--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.M.; Han, C.J.

    1997-12-31

    Thermoacidophilic microorganisms have been considered for inorganic sulfur removal from coal because of expected improvements in rates of both biotic and abiotic sulfur oxidation reactions with increasing temperature. In this study, the bioenergetic response of the extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon, Metallosphaera sedula, to environmental changes have been examined in relation to its capacity to catalyze pyrite oxidation in coal. Given an appropriate bioenergetic challenge, the metabolic response was to utilize additional amounts of energy sources (i.e., pyrite) to survive. Of particular interest were the consequences of exposing the organism to various forms of stress (chemical, nutritional, thermal, pH) in the presence of coal pyrite. Several approaches to take advantage of stress response to accelerate pyrite oxidation by this organism were examined, including attempts to promote acquired thermal tolerance to extend its functional range, exposure to chemical uncouplers and decouplers, and manipulation of heterotrophic and chemolithotrophic tendencies to optimize biomass concentration and biocatalytic activity. Promising strategies were investigated in a continuous culture system. This study identified environmental conditions that promote better coupling of biotic and abiotic oxidation reactions to improve biosulfurization rates of thermoacidophilic microorganisms.

  13. Microbial strain improvement for organosulfur removal from coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II

    1992-12-31

    IGT has developed a microbial culture of Rhodococcus rhodochrous, designated as IGTS8, that is capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds in a range of organosulfur model compounds and is capable of removing organic sulfur from coal and petroleum without significantly sacrificing the calorific value of the fuel. Although IGTS8 possesses the ability to specifically remove organic sulfur from coal, a major research need is to develop improved strains of microorganisms that possess higher levels of desulfurization activity and therefore will permit more favorable biodesulfurization process conditions: faster rates, more complete removal, and smaller reactor size. Strain improvement is the single most important aspect to the development of a practical coal biodesulfurization process and accordingly is the focus of research in this project. The first steps in obtaining high levels of expression of desulfurization genes are to identify specific DNA fragments that encode desulfurization genes and to identify a DNA fragment that encodes a promoter/regulatory element that is capable of functioning at high levels in Rhodococcus rhodochrous. Both of these goals have been accomplished during the first year of this two-year research program.

  14. Bioconversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels. Final technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.

    1991-12-31

    The use of coal-derived synthesis gas as an industrial feedstock for production of fuels and chemicals has become an increasingly attractive alternative to present petroleum-based chemicals production. However, one of the major limitations in developing such a process is the required removal of catalyst poisons such as hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and other trace contaminants from the synthesis gas. Purification steps necessary to remove these are energy intensive and add significantly to the production cost, particularly for coals having a high sulfur content such as Illinois coal. A two-stage, anaerobic bioconversion process requiring little or no sulfur removal is proposed, where in the first stage the carbon monoxide (CO) gas is converted to butyric and acetic acids by the CO strain of Butyribacterium methylotrophicum. In the second stage, these acids along with the hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas are converted to butanol, ethanol, and acetone by an acid utilizing mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum. 18 figs., 18 tabs.

  15. Utilization of coal-water fuels in fire-tube boilers. Final report, October 1990--August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, T.; Melick, T.; Morrison, D.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this DOE sponsored project was to successfully fire coal-water slurry in a fire-tube boiler that was designed for oil/gas firing and establish a data base that will be relevant to a large number of existing installations. Firing slurry in a fire-tube configuration is a very demanding application because of the extremely high heat release rates and the correspondingly low furnace volume where combustion can be completed. Recognizing that combustion efficiency is the major obstacle when firing slurry in a fire-tube boiler, the program was focused on innovative approaches for improving carbon burnout without major modifications to the boiler. The boiler system was successfully designed and operated to fire coal-water slurry for extended periods of time with few slurry related operational problems. The host facility was a 3.8 million Btu/hr Cleaver-Brooks fire-tube boiler located on the University of Alabama Campus. A slurry atomizer was designed that provided outstanding atomization and was not susceptible to pluggage. The boiler was operated for over 1000 hours and 12 shipments of slurry were delivered. The new equipment engineered for the coal-water slurry system consisted of the following: combustion air and slurry heaters; cyclone; baghouse; fly ash reinjection system; new control system; air compressor; CWS/gas burner and gas valve train; and storage tank and slurry handling system.

  16. Microbial strain improvement for organosulfur removal from coal. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II

    1993-12-31

    IGT has developed a microbial culture of Rhodococcus rhodochrous, designated as IGTS8, that is capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds in a range of organosulfur model compounds and is capable of removing organic sulfur from coal and petroleum without significantly sacrificing the calorific value of the fuel. Although IGTS8 possesses the ability to specifically remove organic sulfur from coal, a major research need is to develop improved strains of microorganisms that possess higher levels of desulfurization activity and therefore will permit more favorable biodesulfurization process conditions: faster rates, more complete removal, and smaller reactor size. Strain improvement is the single most important aspect to the development of a practical coal biodesulfurization process and accordingly is the focus of research in this project. During the past year, significant progress was made toward improving the biodesulfurization capabilities of Rhodococcus Rhodochrous IGTS8. The main objective was to identify and characterize strong promoters of IGTS8. The DNA sequencing of the promoter region and chloramphenicol resistance gene of pRF2, as well as six mutant promoters, was determined. The 16S structural gene of IGTS8 was isolated and used to identify the putative promoter of this gene. Four promoter probe vectors were constructed and are currently being used to analyze the strength of Rhodococcus promoters: from the IGTS8 genome, mutants of promoters from the chloramphenicol resistance gene of pRF2, the promoter from the 16S RNA gene, and various strong inducible promoters.

  17. Coal desulfurization by chlorinolysis production and combustion test evaluation of product coals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Daly, D.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory-scale screening tests were carried out on coal from Harrison County, Ohio to establish chlorination and hydrodesulfurization conditions for the batch reactor production of chlorinolysis and chlorinolysis-hydrodesulfurized coals. In addition, three bituminous coals, were treated on the lab scale by the chlorinolysis process to provide 39 to 62% desulfurization. Two bituminous coals and one subbituminous coal were then produced in 11 to 15 pound lots as chlorinolysis and hydrodesulfurized coals. The chlorinolysis coals had a desulfurization of 29-69%, reductions in voltatiles and hydrogen. Hydrodesulfurization provided a much greater desulfurization (56-86%), reductions in volatiles and hydrogen. The three coals were combustion tested in the Penn State ""plane flame furnace'' to determine ignition and burning characteristics. All three coals burned well to completion as: raw coals, chlorinolysis processed coals, and hydrodesulfurized coals. The hydrodesulfurized coals experienced greater ignition delays and reduced burning rates than the other coals because of the reduced volatile content. It is thought that the increased open pore volume in the desulfurized-devolatilized coals compensates in part for the decreased volatiles effect on ignition and burning.

  18. Coal resources of selected coal beds and zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie; Tewalt, Susan; Bragg, Linda

    2002-01-01

    The Appalachian Basin is one of the most important coal-producing regions in the world. Bituminous coal has been mined in the basin for the last three centuries, and the cumulative production is estimated at 34.5 billion short tons. Annual production in 1998 was about 452 million short tons; the basin's production is mostly in the northern (32 percent) and central (63 percent) coal regions. The coal is used primarily within the Eastern United States for electric power generation, but some of it is suitable for metallurgical uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is completing a National Coal Resource Assessment of five coal-producing regions of the United States, including the Appalachian Basin. The USGS, in cooperation with the State geological surveys of Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, has completed a digital coal resource assessment of five of the top-producing coal beds and coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions -- the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay and Pond Creek coal zones, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. Of the 93 billion short tons of original coal in these units, about 66 billion short tons remain.

  19. Staying the Course: Racing for Ohio's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Debra Kay

    2010-01-01

    With the change in Ohio's Operating Standards in July of 2002, students across Ohio began losing school library learning opportunities. District after district made financially based decisions to minimize, and in a few cases totally eliminate, school library programs. Across the state, many of Ohio's children lost precious learning opportunities.…

  20. 21 CFR 808.85 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ohio. 808.85 Section 808.85 Food and Drugs FOOD... EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.85 Ohio. (a) The following Ohio medical device requirement is...