Science.gov

Sample records for oil structured lipid

  1. Structure of some intact lipids of petrel stomach oils.

    PubMed

    Watts, R; Warham, J

    1976-06-01

    The stomach or proventricular oils from 16 species of petrel have been analyzed and the carbon number distributions of the wax esters, triglycerides, and diacylglyceryl ethers are reported. The wax esters have been fractionated further into less and more polar species. To determine whether any intermolecular specificity existed, carbon number distributions for each lipid class were calculated, assuming random esterifications. The tirglyceride and diacylglyceryl ether compositions observed were all found to aggree closely with those calculated. The wax esters from three petrel species were found to have greater proportions of the middle range species with carbon numbers 34-38 than calculated. However, most of the lipids examined had random structures which have been found to be characteristic of marine sources. The results in general support the belief that the oils are derived directly from dietary sources rather than synthesis by the proventricular glands. PMID:933721

  2. Characterization of a rice bran oil structured lipid.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Brenda H; Akoh, Casimir C

    2009-04-22

    Rice bran oil (RBO) was enzymatically modified in a continuous packed bed bioreactor to incorporate caprylic acid with Lipozyme RM IM as biocatalyst. The reaction product was purified by short-path distillation. Rice bran oil structured lipid (RBOSL) contained 32.1 mol % caprylic acid. Positional analysis revealed 0.7 mol % caprylic acid at the sn-2 position and 47.8 mol % caprylic acid at the sn-1,3 positions. Composition of free fatty acids and smoke point of RBO and RBOSL were not significantly different. Saponification value, iodine value, and viscosity of RBO were significantly different from those of RBOSL. The color of RBOSL was darker, more yellow and less green than RBO. Volatile compounds in RBO and RBOSL were determined by GC-MS. Melting onset temperatures of RBO and RBOSL were not significantly different, while melting end point temperatures and melting enthalpies were significantly different. This characterization study results will help determine potential food applications of RBOSL. PMID:19284800

  3. Co-administration of trientine and flaxseed oil on oxidative stress, serum lipids and heart structure in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Ali; Heidarian, Esfandiar

    2013-08-01

    The administration of flaxseed oil or flaxseed oil plus trientine in diabetic rats reduced triglyceride, very low density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol. Furthermore, the combined treatment significantly increased superoxide dismutase activity and attenuated serum Cu2+. The results suggest that the administration of flaxseed oil plus trientine is useful in controlling serum lipid abnormalities, oxidative stress, restoring heart structure, and reducing serum Cu2+ in diabetic rats.

  4. Lipids, Proteins, and Structure of Seed Oil Bodies from Diverse Species.

    PubMed

    Tzen, JTC.; Cao, Yz.; Laurent, P.; Ratnayake, C.; Huang, AHC.

    1993-01-01

    Oil bodies isolated from the mature seeds of rape (Brassica napus L.), mustard (Brassica juncea L.), cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), flax (Linus usitatis simum), maize (Zea mays L.), peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), and sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) had average diameters that were different but within a narrow range (0.6-2.0 [mu]m), as measured from electron micrographs of serial sections. Their contents of triacylglycerols (TAG), phospholipids, and proteins (oleosins) were correlated with their sizes. The correlation fits a formula that describes a spherical particle surrounded by a shell of a monolayer of phospholipids embedded with oleosins. Oil bodies from the various species contained substantial amounts of the uncommon negatively charged phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol, as well as small amounts of free fatty acids. These acidic lipids are assumed to interact with the basic amino acid residues of the oleosins on the surface of the phospholipid layer. Isoelectrofocusing revealed that the oil bodies from the various species had an isoelectric point of 5.7 to 6.6 and thus possessed a negatively charged surface at neutral pH. We conclude that seed oil bodies from diverse species are very similar in structure. In rapeseed during maturation, TAG and oleosins accumulated concomitantly. TAG-synthesizing acyltransferase activities appeared at an earlier stage and peaked during the active period of TAG accumulation. The concomitant accumulation of TAG and oleosins is similar to that reported earlier for maize and soybean, and the finding has an implication for the mode of oil body synthesis during seed maturation. PMID:12231682

  5. Potential use of avocado oil on structured lipids MLM-type production catalysed by commercial immobilised lipases.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Eduardo; Soto, Carmen; Olivares, Araceli; Altamirano, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Structured Lipids are generally constituents of functional foods. Growing demands for SL are based on a fuller understanding of nutritional requirements, lipid metabolism, and improved methods to produce them. Specifically, this work was aimed to add value to avocado oil by producing dietary triacylglycerols (TAG) containing medium-chain fatty acids (M) at positions sn-1,3 and long-chain fatty acids (L) at position sn-2. These MLM-type structured lipids (SL) were produced by interesterification of caprylic acid (CA) (C8:0) and avocado oil (content of C18:1). The regiospecific sn-1,3 commercial lipases Lipozyme RM IM and TL IM were used as biocatalysts to probe the potential of avocado oil to produce SL. Reactions were performed at 30-50°C for 24 h in solvent-free media with a substrate molar ratio of 1∶2 (TAG:CA) and 4-10% w/w enzyme content. The lowest incorporation of CA (1.1% mol) resulted from Lipozyme RM IM that was incubated at 50°C. The maximum incorporation of CA into sn-1,3 positions of TAG was 29.2% mol. This result was obtained at 30°C with 10% w/w Lipozyme TL IM, which is the highest values obtained in solvent-free medium until now for structured lipids of low-calories. This strategy opens a new market to added value products based on avocado oil.

  6. Solvent-free enzymatic synthesis of feruloylated structured lipids by the transesterification of ethyl ferulate with castor oil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shangde; Zhu, Sha; Bi, Yanlan

    2014-09-01

    A novel enzymatic route of feruloylated structured lipids synthesis by the transesterification of ethyl ferulate (EF) with castor oil, in solvent-free system, was investigated. The transesterification reactions were catalysed by Novozym 435, Lipozyme RMIM, and Lipozyme TLIM, among which Novozym 435 showed the best catalysis performance. Effects of feruloyl donors, reaction variables, and ethanol removal on the transesterification were also studied. High EF conversion (∼100%) was obtained under the following conditions: enzyme load 20% (w/w, relative to the weight of substrates), reaction temperature 90 °C, substrate molar ratio 1:1 (EF/castor oil), 72 h, vacuum pressure 10 mmHg, and 200 rpm. Under these conditions, the transesterification product consisted of 62.6% lipophilic feruloylated structured lipids and 37.3% hydrophilic feruloylated lipids.

  7. Composition and oxidative stability of a structured lipid from amaranth oil in a milk-based infant formula.

    PubMed

    Pina-Rodriguez, Ashanty M; Akoh, Casimir C

    2010-03-01

    Amaranth oil can be enzymatically modified to match breast milk fat analog requirements. We have developed a structured lipid (SL) from amaranth oil that, in combination with milk fat, delivers recommended amounts of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) with palmitic acid specifically esterified at the sn-2 position of the triacylglycerol (TAG) backbone. The aim of this study was to study the final fatty acid (FA) contribution and oxidation stability of an infant formula prepared using the structured lipid DCAO (DHA-containing customized amaranth oil). DCAO was included as complementary fat in a "prototype" infant formula, and prepared in parallel with a "control" infant formula under the same processing conditions. The same ingredients but different complementary fat sources were used. A blend of the most commonly used vegetable oils (palm olein, soybean, coconut, and high-oleic sunflower oils) for infant formula was used instead of DCAO in the "control" formula. Additionally, "prototype" and "control" infant formulas were compared to a "commercial" product in terms of FA composition. The oxidative stability index (OSI) of the extracted fats from "prototype,"control," and "commercial" infant formulas were evaluated and compared to the OSI of the substrate fat replacers used. DCAO was the least stable compared to other fat analogs. The use of commercial antioxidants in DCAO containing products should prevent oxidation and therefore increase their stability. PMID:20492217

  8. Potential Use of Avocado Oil on Structured Lipids MLM-Type Production Catalysed by Commercial Immobilised Lipases

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Eduardo; Soto, Carmen; Olivares, Araceli; Altamirano, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Structured Lipids are generally constituents of functional foods. Growing demands for SL are based on a fuller understanding of nutritional requirements, lipid metabolism, and improved methods to produce them. Specifically, this work was aimed to add value to avocado oil by producing dietary triacylglycerols (TAG) containing medium-chain fatty acids (M) at positions sn-1,3 and long-chain fatty acids (L) at position sn-2. These MLM-type structured lipids (SL) were produced by interesterification of caprylic acid (CA) (C8:0) and avocado oil (content of C18:1). The regiospecific sn-1,3 commercial lipases Lipozyme RM IM and TL IM were used as biocatalysts to probe the potential of avocado oil to produce SL. Reactions were performed at 30–50°C for 24 h in solvent-free media with a substrate molar ratio of 1∶2 (TAG:CA) and 4–10% w/w enzyme content. The lowest incorporation of CA (1.1% mol) resulted from Lipozyme RM IM that was incubated at 50°C. The maximum incorporation of CA into sn-1,3 positions of TAG was 29.2% mol. This result was obtained at 30°C with 10% w/w Lipozyme TL IM, which is the highest values obtained in solvent-free medium until now for structured lipids of low-calories. This strategy opens a new market to added value products based on avocado oil. PMID:25248107

  9. Empty nano and micro-structured lipid carriers of virgin coconut oil for skin moisturisation.

    PubMed

    Noor, Norhayati Mohamed; Khan, Abid Ali; Hasham, Rosnani; Talib, Ayesha; Sarmidi, Mohamad Roji; Aziz, Ramlan; Aziz, Azila Abd

    2016-08-01

    Virgin coconut oil (VCO) is the finest grade of coconut oil, rich in phenolic content, antioxidant activity and contains medium chain triglycerides (MCTs). In this work formulation, characterisation and penetration of VCO-solid lipid particles (VCO-SLP) have been studied. VCO-SLP were prepared using ultrasonication of molten stearic acid and VCO in an aqueous solution. The electron microscopy imaging revealed that VCO-SLP were solid and spherical in shape. Ultrasonication was performed at several power intensities which resulted in particle sizes of VCO-SLP ranged from 0.608 ± 0.002 µm to 44.265 ± 1.870 µm. The particle size was directly proportional to the applied power intensity of ultrasonication. The zeta potential values of the particles were from -43.2 ± 0.28 mV to -47.5 ± 0.42 mV showing good stability. The cumulative permeation for the smallest sized VCO-SLP (0.608 µm) was 3.83 ± 0.01 µg/cm(2) whereas for larger carriers it was reduced (3.59 ± 0.02 µg/cm(2)). It is concluded that SLP have the potential to be exploited as a micro/nano scale cosmeceutical carrying vehicle for improved dermal delivery of VCO.

  10. Empty nano and micro-structured lipid carriers of virgin coconut oil for skin moisturisation.

    PubMed

    Noor, Norhayati Mohamed; Khan, Abid Ali; Hasham, Rosnani; Talib, Ayesha; Sarmidi, Mohamad Roji; Aziz, Ramlan; Aziz, Azila Abd

    2016-08-01

    Virgin coconut oil (VCO) is the finest grade of coconut oil, rich in phenolic content, antioxidant activity and contains medium chain triglycerides (MCTs). In this work formulation, characterisation and penetration of VCO-solid lipid particles (VCO-SLP) have been studied. VCO-SLP were prepared using ultrasonication of molten stearic acid and VCO in an aqueous solution. The electron microscopy imaging revealed that VCO-SLP were solid and spherical in shape. Ultrasonication was performed at several power intensities which resulted in particle sizes of VCO-SLP ranged from 0.608 ± 0.002 µm to 44.265 ± 1.870 µm. The particle size was directly proportional to the applied power intensity of ultrasonication. The zeta potential values of the particles were from -43.2 ± 0.28 mV to -47.5 ± 0.42 mV showing good stability. The cumulative permeation for the smallest sized VCO-SLP (0.608 µm) was 3.83 ± 0.01 µg/cm(2) whereas for larger carriers it was reduced (3.59 ± 0.02 µg/cm(2)). It is concluded that SLP have the potential to be exploited as a micro/nano scale cosmeceutical carrying vehicle for improved dermal delivery of VCO. PMID:27463789

  11. Achene Structure, Development and Lipid Accumulation in Sunflower Cultivars Differing in Oil Content at Maturity

    PubMed Central

    MANTESE, ANITA I.; MEDAN, DIEGO; HALL, ANTONIO J.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Sunflower cultivars exhibit a wide range of oil content in the mature achene, but the relationship between this and the dynamics of oil deposition in the achene during grain filling is not known. Information on the progress, during the whole achene growth period, of the formation of oil bodies in the components of the achene and its relationship with variations in final oil content is also lacking. • Methods The biomass dynamics of achene components (pericarp, embryo, oil) in three cultivars of very different final oil concentration (30–56 % oil) were studied. In parallel, anatomical sections were used to follow the formation of oil and protein bodies in the embryo, and to observe pericarp anatomy. • Key Results In all cultivars, oil bodies were first observed in the embryo 6–7 daa after anthesis (daa). The per-cell number of oil bodies increased rapidly from 10–12 daa until 25–30 daa. Oil bodies were absent from the outer cell layers of young fruit and from mature pericarps. In mature embryos, the proportion of cell cross-sectional area occupied by protein bodies increased with decreasing embryo oil concentration. The sclerenchymatic layer of the mature pericarp decreased in thickness and number of cell layers from the low-oil cultivar to the high-oil cultivar. Different patterns of oil accumulation in the embryo across cultivars were also found, leading to variations in ripe embryo oil concentration. In the high-oil cultivar, the end of oil deposition coincided with cessation of embryo growth, while in the other two cultivars oil ceased to accumulate before the embryo achieved maximum weight. • Conclusions Cultivar differences in mature achene oil concentration reflect variations in pericarp proportion and thickness and mature embryo oil concentration. Cultivar differences in protein body proportion and embryo and oil mass dynamics during achene growth underlie variations in embryo oil concentration. PMID:16675608

  12. Levels of bioactive lipids in cooking oils: olive oil is the richest source of oleoyl serine

    PubMed Central

    Leishman, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Background Rates of osteoporosis are significantly lower in regions of the world where olive oil consumption is a dietary cornerstone. Olive oil may represent a source of oleoyl serine (OS), which showed efficacy in animal models of osteoporosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that OS as well as structurally analogous N-acyl amide and 2-acyl glycerol lipids are present in the following cooking oils: olive, walnut, canola, high heat canola, peanut, safflower, sesame, toasted sesame, grape seed, and smart balance omega. Methods Methanolic lipid extracts from each of the cooking oils were partially purified on C-18 solid-phase extraction columns. Extracts were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and 33 lipids were measured in each sample, including OS and bioactive analogs. Results Of the oils screened here, walnut oil had the highest number of lipids detected (22/33). Olive oil had the second highest number of lipids detected (20/33), whereas grape-seed and high-heat canola oil were tied for lowest number of detected lipids (6/33). OS was detected in 8 of the 10 oils tested and the levels were highest in olive oil, suggesting that there is something about the olive plant that enriches this lipid. Conclusions Cooking oils contain varying levels of bioactive lipids from the N-acyl amide and 2-acyl glycerol families. Olive oil is a dietary source of OS, which may contribute to lowered prevalence of osteoporosis in countries with high consumption of this oil. PMID:26565552

  13. Antithrombotic lipid minor constituents from vegetable oils. Comparison between olive oils and others.

    PubMed

    Karantonis, Haralabos C; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi; Demopoulos, Constantinos A

    2002-02-27

    Many epidemiological studies suggest that vegetable oils and especially olive oil present a protective effect against atherosclerosis. In this study, total lipids (TL) of Greek olive oils and seed oils of four kinds, namely, soybean, corn, sunflower, and sesame oil, were separated into total polar lipids (TPL) and total neutral lipids (TNL) via a novel extraction procedure. TPL and TNL of olive oil were fractionated by HPLC for further study. Each lipid fraction from HPLC separation along with TL, TPL, and TNL lipid samples from oils were tested in vitro for their capacity to induce or to inhibit washed rabbit platelet aggregation. Comparison between olive and seed oils supports the superiority of olive oil as high levels of platelet activating factor (PAF) antagonists have been detected, mainly in TPL. In addition, the structure of the most active fraction from olive oil was elucidated, as a glycerol-glycolipid. Because it has already been reported that PAF plays a pivotal role in atherogenesis, the existence of PAF agonists and antagonists in vegetable oils may explain their protective role against atherosclerosis.

  14. Tracking Structural Changes in Lipid-based Multicomponent Food Materials due to Oil Migration by Microfocus Small-Angle X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Svenja K; Roth, Stephan V; Santoro, Gonzalo; Vieira, Josélio; Heinrich, Stefan; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-05-13

    One of the major problems in the confectionery industry is chocolate fat blooming, that is, the formation of white defects on the chocolate surface due to fat crystals. Nevertheless, the mechanism responsible for the formation of chocolate fat blooming is not fully understood yet. Chocolate blooming is often related to the migration of lipids to the surface followed by subsequent recrystallization. Here, the migration pathway of oil into a cocoa butter matrix with different dispersed particles was investigated by employing microfocus small-angle X-ray scattering and contact angle measurements. Our results showed that the chocolate powders get wet by the oil during the migration process and that the oil is migrating into the pores within seconds. Subsequently, cocoa butter is dissolved by the oil, and thus, its characteristic crystalline structure is lost. The chemical process provoked by the dissolution is also reflected by microscopical changes of the surface morphology of chocolate model samples after several hours from the addition of oil to the sample. Finally, the surface morphology was investigated before and after oil droplet exposure and compared to that of water exposure, whereby water seems to physically migrate through the particles, namely cocoa powder, sucrose, and milk powder, which dissolve in the presence of water. PMID:25894460

  15. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation.

  16. Dietary rosemary oil alleviates heat stress-induced structural and functional damage through lipid peroxidation in the testes of growing Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Türk, Gaffari; Çeribaşı, Ali O; Şimşek, Ülkü G; Çeribaşı, Songül; Güvenç, Mehmet; Özer Kaya, Şeyma; Çiftçi, Mehmet; Sönmez, Mustafa; Yüce, Abdurrauf; Bayrakdar, Ali; Yaman, Mine; Tonbak, Fadime

    2016-01-01

    Supplementation of natural antioxidants to diets of male poultry has been reported to be effective in reducing or completely eliminating heat stress (HS)-induced reproductive failures. In this study, the aim is to investigate whether rosemary oil (RO) has a protective effect on HS-induced damage in spermatozoa production, testicular histologic structures, apoptosis, and androgenic receptor (AR) through lipid peroxidation mechanisms in growing Japanese quail. Male chicks (n=90) at 15-days of age were assigned to two groups. The first group (n=45) was kept in a thermo-neutral (TN) room at 22°C for 24h/d. The second group (n=45) was kept in a room with a greater ambient temperature of 34°C for 8h/d (from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM) and 22°C for 16h/d. Animals in each of these two groups were randomly assigned to three subgroups (RO groups: 0, 125, 250ppm), consisting of 15 chicks (six treatment groups in 2×3 factorial design). Each of subgroups was replicated three times with each replicate including five chicks. The HS treatment significantly reduced the testicular spermatogenic cell counts, amount of testicular Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic marker) and amount of AR. In addition, it significantly increased testicular lipid peroxidation, Bax (apoptotic marker) immunopositive staining, and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in conjunction with some histopathologic damage. Dietary supplementation of RO to diets of quail where the HS treatment was imposed alleviated HS-induced almost all negative changes such as increased testicular lipid peroxidation, decreased numbers of spermatogenic cells, and decreased amounts of Bcl-2 and AR, increased ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and some testicular histopathologic lesion. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of RO for growing male Japanese quail reared in HS environmental conditions alleviates the HS-induced structural and functional damage by providing a decrease in lipid peroxidation.

  17. Dynamic Heterogeneity in Lipid Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othon, Christina; Dadashvand, Neda

    2015-03-01

    We have characterized the temperature and pressure dependent scaling of dynamic heterogeneity in a homogenous liquid phase of a lipid monolayer using time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy (TRFA) microscopy. Rotational diffusion is far more sensitive to highly correlated motions than translational diffusion due to the enhanced influence of nearest neighbor interactions. Highly correlated motion results in regions of high-density, low mobility lipids, and low-density, high mobility lipids; and are observed as the bimodal distribution of rotational correlation times. For biological lipid membranes the presence of highly correlated motion will greatly influence the rates of protein sorting and self-assembly, as particles suspended in the fluid can become kinetically trapped. Rotational diffusion timescales (~ ns) are far shorter than the lifetime of dynamic clusters and lipid raft-like structures (~ 10 μs), and thus the distribution of rotational correlation times can provide critical insight into the presence of these structures. We have characterized rotational dynamic distributions for a variety of phosphocholine moieties, and found dynamics consistent with highly correlated motion. Using the proximity to the phase transition, and the scaling of the temperature dependence of the heterogeneity we apply theoretical models developed for other condensed matter systems help us define limits on the size and lifetime of dynamic clusters in lipid structures. corresponding author

  18. [Effects of essential oil on lipid peroxidation and lipid metabolism in patients with chronic bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Siurin, S A

    1997-01-01

    Natural concentrations of some essential oils were examined for effects on the system lipid peroxidation-antioxidant defense and lipid metabolism in 150 patients with chronic bronchitis. Lowering of plasm levels of dienic conjugates and ketons, activation of catalase in red cells characteristic of antioxidant effect were observed in exposure to essential oils of rosemary, basil, fir, eucalyptus. Lavender essential oil promotes normalization of the level of total lipids, ratio of total cholesterol to its alpha-fraction. PMID:9490339

  19. [Effect of five kinds of vegetable seed oil on serum lipid and lipid peroxidation in rats].

    PubMed

    Guo, Y; Cai, X; Zhao, X; Shi, R

    2001-01-01

    The effects of vegetable seed oil on hyperlipidemia induced by high lipid diet in rats. Male adult Wistar rats were fed on the test diet containing 94% high lipid diet and 6% lard pinon seed oil, perilla seed oil, blackcurrent seed oil, borage seed oil and evening primrose seed oil respectively for 3 weeks. The results showed that the vale of trilyceride(TG), total cholesterol(TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), LDL-C/HDL-C(high density lipoprotein cholesterol) ratio increased and the vale of HDL-C/TC ratio and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase(LCAT) activity decreased in the groups with vegetable seed oil were less than that of the control group. The results suggested that all the five kinds of vegetable seed oil had the effect of regulating lipid metabolism of hyperlipidemia rats to some extent. Pinon seed oil and borage seed oil may be well suited for the prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:11255765

  20. Structure and function of seed lipid-body-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Purkrtova, Zita; Jolivet, Pascale; Miquel, Martine; Chardot, Thierry

    2008-10-01

    Many organisms among the different kingdoms store reserve lipids in discrete subcellular organelles called lipid bodies. In plants, lipid bodies can be found in seeds but also in fruits (olives, ...), and in leaves (plastoglobules). These organelles protect plant lipid reserves against oxidation and hydrolysis until seed germination and seedling establishment. They can be stabilized by specific structural proteins, namely the oleosins and caleosins, which act as natural emulsifiers. Considering the putative role of some of them in controlling the size of lipid bodies, these proteins may constitute important targets for seed improvement both in term of oil seed yield and optimization of technological processes for extraction of oil and storage proteins. We present here an overview of the data on the structure of these proteins, which are scarce, and sometimes contradictory and on their functional roles. PMID:18926488

  1. Lipids: From Chemical Structures, Biosynthesis, and Analyses to Industrial Applications.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Nakamura, Yuki; Harwood, John

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are one of the major subcellular components, and play numerous essential functions. As well as their physiological roles, oils stored in biomass are useful commodities for a variety of biotechnological applications including food, chemical feedstocks, and fuel. Due to their agronomic as well as economic and societal importance, lipids have historically been subjected to intensive studies. Major current efforts are to increase the energy density of cell biomass, and/or create designer oils suitable for specific applications. This chapter covers some basic aspects of what one needs to know about lipids: definition, structure, function, metabolism and focus is also given on the development of modern lipid analytical tools and major current engineering approaches for biotechnological applications. This introductory chapter is intended to serve as a primer for all subsequent chapters in this book outlining current development in specific areas of lipids and their metabolism. PMID:27023229

  2. Avocado oils and hepatic lipid metabolism in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Werman, M J; Neeman, I; Mokady, S

    1991-02-01

    The effect of various avocado oils on liver metabolism was studied in growing female rats. The rats were fed diets containing 10% (w/w) avocado oil for 4 wk. In comparison with rats fed refined avocado oil obtained from cored fruit by centrifugal separation, rats fed unrefined avocado oil obtained by organic solvent extraction from intact fruit, or its unsaponifiable components, showed a significant increase in total liver lipogenesis as well as in phospholipid and triglceride synthesis. Rats fed avocado-seed oil exhibited enhanced [1-14C]acetate incorporation into total liver lipids but showed the same distribution of label in the three main lipid classes as that of rats fed refined avocado oil. In addition, a significant reduction of triglycerides and protein content of plasma very-low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein fractions was observed in rats fed avocado-seed oil as compared with rats fed refined oil. Electron micrographs suggested that the alterations in hepatic lipogenesis are related to the marked proliferation of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum, which is known to be associated with induction of enzymes involved with lipid biosynthesis. The differences between the animals fed seed oil and those fed the unrefined oils, in the distribution of label within the main lipid classes, indicate that more than one factor is involved in the alterations caused by these oils.

  3. Effects of flavonoid glycosides obtained from a Ginkgo biloba extract fraction on the physical and oxidative stabilities of oil-in-water emulsions prepared from a stripped structured lipid with a low omega-6 to omega-3 ratio.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Gan, Lu-Jing; Zhang, Hua; Shin, Jung-Ah; Lee, Ki-Teak; Hong, Soon-Taek

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we have produced a structured lipid with a low ω6/ω3 ratio by lipase-catalysed interesterification with perilla and grape seed oils (1:3, wt/wt). A Ginkgo biloba leaf extract was fractionated in a column packed with HP-20 resin, producing a flavonoid glycoside fraction (FA) and a biflavone fraction (FB). FA exhibited higher antioxidant capacity than FB, showing 58.4 mmol gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g-of-total-phenol-content, 58.8 mg quercetin equivalent (QUE)/g-of-total-flavonoid-content, 4.5 mmol trolox/g-of-trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity, 0.14 mg extract/mL-of-free-radical-scavenging-activity (DPPH assay, IC50), and 2.3 mmol Fe2SO4 · 7H2O/g-of-ferric-reducing-antioxidant-power. The oil-in-water emulsion containing the stripped structured lipid as an oil phase with FA exhibited the highest stability and the lowest oil globule diameters (d43 and d32), where the aggregation was unnoticeable by Turbiscan and particle size analyses during 30 days of storage. Furthermore, FA was effective in retarding the oxidation of the emulsions.

  4. Induction of lipid peroxidation in biomembranes by dietary oil components.

    PubMed

    Udilova, Natalia; Jurek, Daniela; Marian, Brigitte; Gille, Lars; Schulte-Hermann, Rolf; Nohl, Hans

    2003-11-01

    Prooxidant formation and resulting lipid peroxidation are supposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of various diseases including cancer. Cancer risk is possibly influenced by the composition of diet with high intake of fat and red meat being harmful and high consumption of fruits and vegetables being protective. Since dietary oils may contain potential prooxidants, the aim of the present study was to prove (i) whether oxidative stress in biomembranes may be induced by dietary oils and if, (ii) which impact it has on the viability and proliferation of cultured colon (carcinoma) cells. Lipid hydroperoxide content in dietary oils increased after heating. Linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LOOH) and/or oils with different hydroperoxide contents induced lipid peroxidation in liposomes, erythrocyte ghosts and colon cells. Upon incubation with liposomes, both LOOH and heated oil induced lipid peroxidation only in the presence of iron and ascorbate. LOOH was sufficient to start lipid peroxidation of erythrocyte ghosts. LOOH incorporates into the lipid bilayer decreasing membrane fluidity and initiating lipid peroxidation in the lipid phase. When cultured cells (IEC18 intestinal epithelial cells, SW480 and HT29/HI1 colon carcinoma cells) were exposed to LOOH, they responded by cell death both via apoptosis and necrosis. Cells with higher degree of membrane unsaturation were more susceptible and antioxidants (vitamin E and selenite) were protective indicating the involvement of oxidative stress. Thus, peroxidation of biomembranes can be initiated by lipid hydroperoxides from heated oils. Dietary consumption of heated oils may lead to oxidative damage and to cell death in the colon. This may contribute to the enhanced risk of colon cancer due to regenerative cell proliferation.

  5. Phase structure of liposome in lipid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianxi; Li, Yuzhuo; Mueller, Anja

    2011-11-01

    Gas microbubbles present in ultrasound imaging contrast agents are stabilized by lipid aggregates that typically contain a mixture of lipids. In this study, the phase structure of the lipid mixtures that contained two or three lipids was investigated using three different methods: dynamic light scattering, (1)H NMR, and microfluidity measurements with fluorescence probes. Three lipids that are commonly present in imaging agents (DPPC, DPPE-PEG, and DPPA) were used. Two types of systems, two-lipid model systems and simulated imaging systems were investigated. The results show that liposomes were the dominant aggregates in all the samples studied. The polar PEG side chains from the PEGylated lipid lead to the formation of micelles and micellar aggregates in small sizes. In the ternary lipid systems, almost all the lipids were present in bilayers with micelles absent and free lipids at very low concentration. These results suggest that liposomes, not micelles, contribute to the stabilization of microbubbles in an ultrasound imaging contrast agent.

  6. Lipid classification, structures and tools☆

    PubMed Central

    Fahy, Eoin; Cotter, Dawn; Sud, Manish; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2012-01-01

    The study of lipids has developed into a research field of increasing importance as their multiple biological roles in cell biology, physiology and pathology are becoming better understood. The Lipid Metabolites and Pathways Strategy (LIPID MAPS) consortium is actively involved in an integrated approach for the detection, quantitation and pathway reconstruction of lipids and related genes and proteins at a systems-biology level. A key component of this approach is a bioinformatics infrastructure involving a clearly defined classification of lipids, a state-of-the-art database system for molecular species and experimental data and a suite of user-friendly tools to assist lipidomics researchers. Herein, we discuss a number of recent developments by the LIPID MAPS bioinformatics core in pursuit of these objectives. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Lipodomics and Imaging Mass Spectrometry. PMID:21704189

  7. Further characterization of theobroma oil-beeswax admixtures as lipid matrices for improved drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Attama, A A; Schicke, B C; Müller-Goymann, C C

    2006-11-01

    There is an increasing interest in lipid based drug delivery systems due to factors such as better characterization of lipidic excipients and formulation versatility and the choice of different drug delivery systems. It is important to know the thermal characteristics, crystal habit, texture, and appearance of a new lipid matrix when determining its suitability for use in certain pharmaceutical application. It is line with this that this research was embarked upon to characterize mixtures of beeswax and theobroma oil with a view to applying their admixtures in drug delivery systems such as solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers. Admixtures of theobroma oil and beeswax were prepared to contain 25% w/w, 50% w/w, and 75% w/w of theobroma oil. The admixtures were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), and isothermal heat conduction microcalorimetry (IMC). The melting behavior and microstructures of the lipid admixtures were monitored by polarized light microscopy (PLM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study the internal structures of the lipid bases. DSC traces indicated that the higher melting peaks were roughly constant for the different admixtures, but lower melting peaks significantly increased (p < 0.05). The admixture containing 25% w/w of theobroma oil possessed highest crystallinity index of 95.6%. WAXD studies indicated different reflections for the different lipid matrices. However, new interferences were detected for all the lipid matrix admixtures between 2theta = 22.0 degrees and 2theta = 25.0 degrees. The lipid matrices containing 50% w/w and 25% w/w of theobroma oil showed absence of the weak reflection characteristic of pure theobroma oil, while there was disappearance of the strong intensity reflection of beeswax in all the lipid matrix admixtures at all stages of the study. PLM micrographs revealed differences with regard to

  8. Virgin coconut oil improves hepatic lipid metabolism in rats--compared with copra oil, olive oil and sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Arunima, S; Rajamohan, T

    2012-11-01

    Effect of virgin coconut oil (VCO) on lipid levels and regulation of lipid metabolism compared with copra oil (CO), olive oil (OO), and sunflower oil (SFO) has been reported. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed different oils at 8% level for 45 days along with synthetic diet. Results showed that VCO feeding significantly lowered (P < 0.05) levels of total cholesterol, LDL+ VLDL cholesterol, Apo B and triglycerides in serum and tissues compared to rats fed CO, OO and SFO, while HDL-cholesterol and Apo A1 were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in serum of rats fed VCO than other groups. Hepatic lipogenesis was also down regulated in VCO fed rats, which was evident from the decreased activities of enzymes viz., HMG CoA reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. In addition, VCO significantly (P < 0.05) increased the activities of lipoprotein lipase, lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase and enhanced formation of bile acids. Results demonstrated hypolipidemic effect of VCO by regulating the synthesis and degradation of lipids.

  9. Comprehensive analysis of lipid composition in crude palm oil using multiple lipidomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Wei Fun; Wenk, Markus R; Shui, Guanghou

    2014-05-20

    Palm oil is currently the leading edible oil consumed worldwide. Triacylglycerol (TAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) are the dominant lipid classes in palm oil. Other lipid classes present in crude palm oil, such as phospholipids and galactolipids, are very low in abundance. These low-abundance lipids constitute key intermediates in lipid biosynthesis. In this study, we applied multiple lipidomic approaches, including high-sensitivity and high-specificity multiple reaction monitoring, to comprehensively quantify individual lipid species in crude palm oil. We also established a new liquid chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry method that allows direct quantification of low-abundance galactolipids in palm oil without the need for sample pretreatment. As crude palm oil contains large amounts of neutral lipids, our direct-detection method circumvents many of the challenges encountered with conventional lipid quantification methods. This approach allows direct measurement of lipids with no hassle during sample preparation and is more accurate and precise compared with other methods.

  10. Intravenous fish oil lipid emulsion promotes a shift toward anti-inflammatory proresolving lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Brian T; Le, Hau D; Fitzgerald, Jonathan M; Wang, Samantha; Seamon, Kyle; Gura, Kathleen M; Gronert, Karsten; Puder, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN)-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a life-threatening complication of the administration of PN. The development of PNALD may be partly due to the composition of the lipid emulsion administered with PN: soybean oil-based lipid emulsions (SOLE) are associated with liver disease, while fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLE) are associated with prevention and improvement of liver disease. The objective of this study was to determine how the choice of lipid emulsion modified the production of bioactive lipid mediators (LMs). We utilized a mouse model of steatosis to study the differential effect of FOLE and SOLE. We subsequently validated these results in serum samples from a small cohort of human infants transitioning from SOLE to FOLE. In mice, FOLE was associated with production of anti-inflammatory, proresolving LMs; SOLE was associated with increased production of inflammatory LMs. In human infants, the transition from SOLE to FOLE was associated with a shift toward a proresolving lipidome. Together, these results demonstrate that the composition of the lipid emulsion directly modifies inflammatory homeostasis.

  11. Influence of encapsulated functional lipids on crystal structure and chemical stability in solid lipid nanoparticles: Towards bioactive-based design of delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Hanna; Gömmel, Christina; Leuenberger, Bruno H; Weiss, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of physicochemical properties of encapsulated functional lipids--vitamin A, β-carotene and ω-3 fish oil--on the structural arrangement of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). The relationship between the crystal structure and chemical stability of the incorporated bioactive lipids was evaluated with different emulsifier compositions of a saponin-rich, food-grade Quillaja extract alone or combined with high-melting or low-melting lecithins. The major factors influencing the structural arrangement and chemical stability of functional lipids in solid lipid dispersions were their solubility in the aqueous phase and their crystallization temperature in relation to that of the carrier lipid. The results showed that the stabilization of the α-subcell crystals in the lattice of the carrier lipid is a key parameter for forming stable solid lipid dispersions. This study contributes to a better understanding of SLN as a function of the bioactive lipid.

  12. The supramolecular chemistry of lipid oxidation and antioxidation in bulk oils

    PubMed Central

    Budilarto, Elizabeth S; Kamal-Eldin, Afaf

    2015-01-01

    The microenvironment formed by surface active compounds is being recognized as the active site of lipid oxidation. Trace amounts of water occupy the core of micro micelles and several amphiphilic minor components (e.g., phospholipids, monoacylglycerols, free fatty acids, etc.) act as surfactants and affect lipid oxidation in a complex fashion dependent on the structure and stability of the microemulsions in a continuous lipid phase such as bulk oil. The structures of the triacylglycerols and other lipid-soluble molecules affect their organization and play important roles during the course of the oxidation reactions. Antioxidant head groups, variably located near the water-oil colloidal interfaces, trap and scavenge radicals according to their location and concentration. According to this scenario, antioxidants inhibit lipid oxidation not only by scavenging radicals via hydrogen donation but also by physically stabilizing the micelles at the microenvironments of the reaction sites. There is a cut-off effect (optimum value) governing the inhibitory effects of antioxidants depending inter alias on their hydrophilic/lipophilic balance and their concentrations. These complex effects, previously considered as paradoxes in antioxidants research, are now better explained by the supramolecular chemistry of lipid oxidation and antioxidants, which is discussed in this review. PMID:26448722

  13. Oleaster oil positively modulates plasma lipids in humans.

    PubMed

    Belarbi, Meriem; Bendimerad, Soraya; Sour, Souad; Soualem, Zoubida; Baghdad, Choukri; Hmimed, Sara; Chemat, Farid; Visioli, Francesco

    2011-08-24

    The olive tree had been domesticated during the early Neolithic in the Near East, and more than 1000 different cultivars have been identified to date. However, examples of wild olive trees (Olea europaea oleaster) can still be found in the Mediterranean basin. Evidence of oleaster use for oil production can be found in historical and sacred texts, such as the Odyssey, the Holey Koran, and the Holey Bible. While the nutritional and healthful properties of olive oil are actively being explored, there are no data on the human actions of oleaster oil. Therefore, we investigated the effect of prolonged, i.e., 1 month, consumption of oleaster oil on the lipid profile of a 40 healthy Algerian subjects (aged 27.9 ± 3.85 years), as compared to nonconsumers from the same area. Plasma urea, creatinine, and uric acid concentrations and glycemia did not significantly differ, at the end of the study, between controls and oleaster-oil-supplemented subjects. Conversely, we recorded significant decreases of plasma triglyceride concentration (-24.8%; p < 0.05), total cholesterol (-12.13%; p < 0.05), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) (-24.39%; p < 0.05) in oleaster-oil-treated subjects. Concomitantly, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations were significantly increased (17.94%; p < 0.05) by oleaster oil administration. In conclusion, we show that oil obtained from feral olive trees, i.e., oleasters, improves the plasma lipid profile of healthy volunteers.

  14. Oleaster oil positively modulates plasma lipids in humans.

    PubMed

    Belarbi, Meriem; Bendimerad, Soraya; Sour, Souad; Soualem, Zoubida; Baghdad, Choukri; Hmimed, Sara; Chemat, Farid; Visioli, Francesco

    2011-08-24

    The olive tree had been domesticated during the early Neolithic in the Near East, and more than 1000 different cultivars have been identified to date. However, examples of wild olive trees (Olea europaea oleaster) can still be found in the Mediterranean basin. Evidence of oleaster use for oil production can be found in historical and sacred texts, such as the Odyssey, the Holey Koran, and the Holey Bible. While the nutritional and healthful properties of olive oil are actively being explored, there are no data on the human actions of oleaster oil. Therefore, we investigated the effect of prolonged, i.e., 1 month, consumption of oleaster oil on the lipid profile of a 40 healthy Algerian subjects (aged 27.9 ± 3.85 years), as compared to nonconsumers from the same area. Plasma urea, creatinine, and uric acid concentrations and glycemia did not significantly differ, at the end of the study, between controls and oleaster-oil-supplemented subjects. Conversely, we recorded significant decreases of plasma triglyceride concentration (-24.8%; p < 0.05), total cholesterol (-12.13%; p < 0.05), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) (-24.39%; p < 0.05) in oleaster-oil-treated subjects. Concomitantly, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations were significantly increased (17.94%; p < 0.05) by oleaster oil administration. In conclusion, we show that oil obtained from feral olive trees, i.e., oleasters, improves the plasma lipid profile of healthy volunteers. PMID:21761860

  15. Oil is on the agenda: Lipid turnover in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Amélie A; Feussner, Ivo

    2016-09-01

    Lipases hydrolyze ester bonds within lipids. This process is called lipolysis. They are key players in lipid turnover and involved in numerous metabolic pathways, many of which are shared between organisms like the mobilization of neutral or storage lipids or lipase-mediated membrane lipid homeostasis. Some reactions though are predominantly present in certain organisms, such as the production of signaling molecules (endocannabinoids) by diacylglycerol (DAG) and monoacylglycerol (MAG) lipases in mammals and plants or the jasmonate production in flowering plants. This review aims at giving an overview of the different functional classes of lipases and respective well-known activities, with a focus on the most recent findings in plant biology for selected classes. Here we will put an emphasis on the physiological role and contribution of lipases to the turnover of neutral lipids found in seed oil and other vegetative tissue as candidates for increasing the economical values of crop plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27155216

  16. Structured lipids via lipase-catalyzed incorporation of eicosapentaenoic acid into borage (Borago officinalis L.) and evening primrose (Oenothera biennis L.) oils.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, S P J Namal; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2002-01-30

    Enzymatic acidolysis of borage oil (BO) or evening primrose oil (EPO) with eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3; EPA) was studied. Of the six lipases that were tested in the initial screening, nonspecific lipase PS-30 from Pseudomonas sp. resulted in the highest incorporation of EPA into both oils. This enzyme was further studied for the influence of enzyme load, temperature, time, type of organic solvent, and mole ratio of substrates. The products from the acidolysis reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC). The highest incorporation of EPA in both oils occurred at 45-55 degrees C and at 150-250 enzyme activity units. One unit of lipase activity was defined as nanomoles of fatty acids (oleic acid equivalents) produced per minute per gram of enzyme. Time course studies indicated that EPA incorporation was increased up to 26.8 and 25.2% (after 24 h) in BO and EPO, respectively. Among the solvents examined, n-hexane served best for the acidolysis of EPA with both oils. The effect of the mole ratio of oil to EPA was studied from 1:1 to 1:3. As the mole ratio of EPA increased, the incorporation increased from 25.2-26.8 to 37.4-39.9% (after 24 h). The highest EPA incorporations of 39.9 and 37.4% in BO and EPO, respectively, occurred at the stoichiometric mole ratio of 1:3 for oil to EPA. PMID:11804516

  17. Structured lipids via lipase-catalyzed incorporation of eicosapentaenoic acid into borage (Borago officinalis L.) and evening primrose (Oenothera biennis L.) oils.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, S P J Namal; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2002-01-30

    Enzymatic acidolysis of borage oil (BO) or evening primrose oil (EPO) with eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3; EPA) was studied. Of the six lipases that were tested in the initial screening, nonspecific lipase PS-30 from Pseudomonas sp. resulted in the highest incorporation of EPA into both oils. This enzyme was further studied for the influence of enzyme load, temperature, time, type of organic solvent, and mole ratio of substrates. The products from the acidolysis reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC). The highest incorporation of EPA in both oils occurred at 45-55 degrees C and at 150-250 enzyme activity units. One unit of lipase activity was defined as nanomoles of fatty acids (oleic acid equivalents) produced per minute per gram of enzyme. Time course studies indicated that EPA incorporation was increased up to 26.8 and 25.2% (after 24 h) in BO and EPO, respectively. Among the solvents examined, n-hexane served best for the acidolysis of EPA with both oils. The effect of the mole ratio of oil to EPA was studied from 1:1 to 1:3. As the mole ratio of EPA increased, the incorporation increased from 25.2-26.8 to 37.4-39.9% (after 24 h). The highest EPA incorporations of 39.9 and 37.4% in BO and EPO, respectively, occurred at the stoichiometric mole ratio of 1:3 for oil to EPA.

  18. Preparation and characterization of novel lipid carriers containing microalgae oil for food applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Li; Dong, Xu-Yan; Wei, Fang; Zhong, Juan; Liu, Bo; Yao, Ming-Hao; Yang, Mei; Zheng, Chang; Quek, Siew-Young; Chen, Hong

    2014-02-01

    This work investigated the suitability of lipid carriers as potential encapsulation method to improve the physical and chemical stability of microalgae oil high in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Lipid carriers with various oil contents were successfully prepared by a microfluidization method using stearic acid as solid lipid, microalgae oil as liquid lipid, and poloxamer 188 as surfactant. Results show that the mean particle diameter of the lipid carriers was in the range of 300 to 350 nm with the polydispersity index below 0.2. The lipid carriers were found to have spherical shape when examined under the transmission electron microscope. Data from the encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity indicate high distribution of microalgae oil throughout the lipid carriers and good physical stability as reflected by the particle size and size distribution during storage. Furthermore, the lower DPPH scavenging activity of lipid carriers compared with that of free microalgae oil suggests better chemical stability of microalgae oil encapsulated in lipid carriers. The addition of microalgae oil into lipid phase could disturb the crystalline order and form lattice defects to enable encapsulation of DHA as revealed by the results from differential scanning calorimetery. Current results suggest that this type of novel lipid carriers could be an efficient and promising carrier system for delivery of microalgae oil.

  19. The Effect of Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion and Soybean Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion on Cholestasis Associated with Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leilei; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Jiejin; Qian, Yan; Ling, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To retrospectively study the effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsion and soybean oil-based lipid emulsion on cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. Methods. Soybean oil-based lipid emulsion and fish oil-based lipid emulsion had been applied in our neonatology department clinically between 2010 and 2014. There were 61 qualified premature infants included in this study and divided into two groups. Soybean oil group was made up of 32 premature infants, while fish oil group was made up of 29 premature infants. Analysis was made on the gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, age at which feeding began, usage of lipid emulsions, and incidence of cholestasis between the two groups. Results. There were no statistical differences in terms of gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, and age at which feeding began. Besides, total incidence of cholestasis was 21.3%, and the days of life of occurrence of cholestasis were 53 ± 5.0 days. Incidence of cholestasis had no statistical difference in the two groups. Conclusion. This study did not find the different role of fish oil-based lipid emulsions and soybean oil-based lipid emulsions in cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. PMID:27110237

  20. The Effect of Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion and Soybean Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion on Cholestasis Associated with Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition in Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leilei; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Jiejin; Qian, Yan; Ling, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To retrospectively study the effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsion and soybean oil-based lipid emulsion on cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. Methods. Soybean oil-based lipid emulsion and fish oil-based lipid emulsion had been applied in our neonatology department clinically between 2010 and 2014. There were 61 qualified premature infants included in this study and divided into two groups. Soybean oil group was made up of 32 premature infants, while fish oil group was made up of 29 premature infants. Analysis was made on the gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, age at which feeding began, usage of lipid emulsions, and incidence of cholestasis between the two groups. Results. There were no statistical differences in terms of gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, and age at which feeding began. Besides, total incidence of cholestasis was 21.3%, and the days of life of occurrence of cholestasis were 53 ± 5.0 days. Incidence of cholestasis had no statistical difference in the two groups. Conclusion. This study did not find the different role of fish oil-based lipid emulsions and soybean oil-based lipid emulsions in cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants.

  1. Preventive effect of cinnamon essential oil on lipid oxidation of vegetable oil

    PubMed Central

    Keshvari, Mahtab; Asgary, Sedigheh; Jafarian-dehkordi, Abbas; Najafi, Somayeh; Ghoreyshi-Yazdi, Seyed Mojtaba

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lipid oxidation is the main deterioration process that occurs in vegetable oils. This process was effectively prevented by natural antioxidants. Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Cinnamon) is rich with antioxidants. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of cinnamon on malondialdehyde (MDA) rate production in two high consumption oils in Iranian market. METHODS Chemical composition of cinnamon essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). 200 µl each oil, 50 µl tween 20, and 2 ml of 40 Mm AAPH solutions were mixed and the prepared solution was divided into four glass vials. Respectively, 50 µl of 500, 1000 and 2000 ppm of cinnamon essential oil were added to three glass vials separately and one of the glass vials was used as the control. All of the glass vials were incubated at 37° C water bath. Rate of MDA production was measured by thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test at the baseline and after the 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 5 hours. RESULTS Compounds of cinnamon essential oil by GC-MS analysis such as cinnamaldehyde (96.8%), alpha-capaene (0.2%), alpha-murolene (0.11%), para-methoxycinnamaldehyde (0.6%) and delta-cadinen (0.4%) were found to be the major compounds. For both oils, maximum rate of MDA production was achieved in 5th hours of heating. Every three concentrations of cinnamon essential oil significantly decreased MDA production (P < 0.05) in comparison with the control. CONCLUSION Essential oil of cinnamon considerably inhibited MDA production in studied oils and can be used with fresh and heated oils for reduction of lipid peroxidation and adverse free radicals effects on body. PMID:24302936

  2. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  3. Chemical and structural investigation of lipid nanoparticles: drug-lipid interaction and molecular distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantachaisilp, Suranan; Meejoo Smith, Siwaporn; Treetong, Alongkot; Pratontep, Sirapat; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Rungsardthong Ruktanonchai, Uracha

    2010-03-01

    Lipid nanoparticles are a promising alternative to existing carriers in chemical or drug delivery systems. A key challenge is to determine how chemicals are incorporated and distributed inside nanoparticles, which assists in controlling chemical retention and release characteristics. This study reports the chemical and structural investigation of γ-oryzanol loading inside a model lipid nanoparticle drug delivery system composed of cetyl palmitate as solid lipid and Miglyol 812® as liquid lipid. The lipid nanoparticles were prepared by high pressure homogenization at varying liquid lipid content, in comparison with the γ-oryzanol free systems. The size of the lipid nanoparticles, as measured by the photon correlation spectroscopy, was found to decrease with increased liquid lipid content from 200 to 160 nm. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) measurements of the medium chain triglyceride of the liquid lipid has confirmed successful incorporation of the liquid lipid in the lipid nanoparticles. Differential scanning calorimetric and powder x-ray diffraction measurements provide complementary results to the 1H-NMR, whereby the crystallinity of the lipid nanoparticles diminishes with an increase in the liquid lipid content. For the distribution of γ-oryzanol inside the lipid nanoparticles, the 1H-NMR revealed that the chemical shifts of the liquid lipid in γ-oryzanol loaded systems were found at rather higher field than those in γ-oryzanol free systems, suggesting incorporation of γ-oryzanol in the liquid lipid. In addition, the phase-separated structure was observed by atomic force microscopy for lipid nanoparticles with 0% liquid lipid, but not for lipid nanoparticles with 5 and 10% liquid lipid. Raman spectroscopic and mapping measurements further revealed preferential incorporation of γ-oryzanol in the liquid part rather than the solid part of in the lipid nanoparticles. Simple models representing the distribution of γ-oryzanol and

  4. Development of Extraction Techniques for the Detection of Signature Lipids from Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Borglin, Sharon; Geller, Jil; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry; Mason, Olivia

    2010-05-17

    Pure cultures, including Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanococcus maripaludus, were combined with model oil samples and oil/diesel mixtures to optimize extraction techniques of signature lipids from oil in support of investigation of microbial communities in oil deposit samples targets for microbial enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Several techniques were evaluated, including standard phospholipid extraction, ether linked lipid for Archaeal bacterial detection, and high pressure extractiontechniques. Recovery of lipids ranged from 50-80percent as compared to extraction of the pure culture. Extraction efficiency was evaluated by the use of internal standards. Field samples will also be tested for recovery of signature lipids with optimized extraction techniques.

  5. Removal of lipid soluble process chemicals from biological materials by extraction with naturally occurring oils or synthetic substitutes thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, K.R.; Orme, T.W.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a method of removing lipid soluble process chemicals from biological materials comprising blood plasma and fractions thereof containing the lipid soluble process chemicals. The lipid soluble process chemical is a virus attenuating solvent having a high flash point, a detergent, or a mixture thereof. It comprises bringing the biological materials containing the lipid soluble process chemicals into contact with an effective amount of a naturally occurring oil extracted from a plant or an animal or a synthetic compound of similar chemical structure. Also described is a method of removing lymphokine inducing phorbol esters from lympholkine-containing biological material. It comprises bringing the biological materials containing the phorbol esters into contact with an effective amount of a naturally occurring oil extracted from a plant or an animal or a synthetic compound of similar chemical structure so as to remove 80% or more of the phorbol esters.

  6. Protection and viability of fruit seeds oils by nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) nanosuspensions.

    PubMed

    Krasodomska, Olga; Paolicelli, Patrizia; Cesa, Stefania; Casadei, Maria Antonietta; Jungnickel, Christian

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we focused on the development of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for dermal application. The NLC matrix was designed as a protective reservoir of biological active compounds that naturally occur in domestic fruit seed oils. Over the years, emulsions, as a popular physicochemical form of personal care products, were refined in order to obtain the best possible penetration into the skin of any bioactive compound introduced in the formulation, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In fact, the bioactive components are useful only if they are able to penetrate the skin unchanged. Therefore, an alternate way to deliver naturally occurring PUFAs is needed. NLCs present a novel delivery and protection system for the PUFAs. The cold pressed fruit seed oils obtained from waste material were used in this paper: blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, strawberry and plum. Thermodynamic (DSC) and structural techniques ((1)H NMR) were applied in order to characterize the obtained systems in terms of seed oil incorporation into the NLC, and oxidative stability tests were used to confirm the protective quality of the systems. During the formulation optimization process the most stable nanosuspension with the best seed oil incorporation was a mixture of 4% nonionic emulsifiers, 88% water and 6% lipids with a ratio of 6:2, wax:oil. The oxidative stability tests showed that the NLC was an effective method of protection of the PUFAs.

  7. Protection and viability of fruit seeds oils by nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) nanosuspensions.

    PubMed

    Krasodomska, Olga; Paolicelli, Patrizia; Cesa, Stefania; Casadei, Maria Antonietta; Jungnickel, Christian

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we focused on the development of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for dermal application. The NLC matrix was designed as a protective reservoir of biological active compounds that naturally occur in domestic fruit seed oils. Over the years, emulsions, as a popular physicochemical form of personal care products, were refined in order to obtain the best possible penetration into the skin of any bioactive compound introduced in the formulation, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In fact, the bioactive components are useful only if they are able to penetrate the skin unchanged. Therefore, an alternate way to deliver naturally occurring PUFAs is needed. NLCs present a novel delivery and protection system for the PUFAs. The cold pressed fruit seed oils obtained from waste material were used in this paper: blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, strawberry and plum. Thermodynamic (DSC) and structural techniques ((1)H NMR) were applied in order to characterize the obtained systems in terms of seed oil incorporation into the NLC, and oxidative stability tests were used to confirm the protective quality of the systems. During the formulation optimization process the most stable nanosuspension with the best seed oil incorporation was a mixture of 4% nonionic emulsifiers, 88% water and 6% lipids with a ratio of 6:2, wax:oil. The oxidative stability tests showed that the NLC was an effective method of protection of the PUFAs. PMID:27348480

  8. Korean pine nut oil replacement decreases intestinal lipid uptake while improves hepatic lipid metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shuang; Park, Soyoung; Lim, Yeseo; Shin, Sunhye

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Consumption of pine nut oil (PNO) was shown to reduce weight gain and attenuate hepatic steatosis in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). The aim of this study was to examine the effects of PNO on both intestinal and hepatic lipid metabolism in mice fed control or HFD. MATERIALS/METHODS Five-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed control diets containing 10% energy fat from either Soybean Oil (SBO) or PNO, or HFD containing 15% energy fat from lard and 30% energy fat from SBO or PNO for 12 weeks. Expression of genes related to intestinal fatty acid (FA) uptake and channeling (Cd36, Fatp4, Acsl5, Acbp), intestinal chylomicron synthesis (Mtp, ApoB48, ApoA4), hepatic lipid uptake and channeling (Lrp1, Fatp5, Acsl1, Acbp), hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) lipolysis and FA oxidation (Atgl, Cpt1a, Acadl, Ehhadh, Acaa1), as well as very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) assembly (ApoB100) were determined by real-time PCR. RESULTS In intestine, significantly lower Cd36 mRNA expression (P < 0.05) and a tendency of lower ApoA4 mRNA levels (P = 0.07) was observed in PNO-fed mice, indicating that PNO consumption may decrease intestinal FA uptake and chylomicron assembly. PNO consumption tended to result in higher hepatic mRNA levels of Atgl (P = 0.08) and Cpt1a (P = 0.05). Significantly higher hepatic mRNA levels of Acadl and ApoB100 were detected in mice fed PNO diet (P < 0.05). These results suggest that PNO could increase hepatic TAG metabolism; mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and VLDL assembly. CONCLUSIONS PNO replacement in the diet might function in prevention of excessive lipid uptake by intestine and improve hepatic lipid metabolism in both control diet and HFD fed mice. PMID:27698954

  9. Korean pine nut oil replacement decreases intestinal lipid uptake while improves hepatic lipid metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shuang; Park, Soyoung; Lim, Yeseo; Shin, Sunhye

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Consumption of pine nut oil (PNO) was shown to reduce weight gain and attenuate hepatic steatosis in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). The aim of this study was to examine the effects of PNO on both intestinal and hepatic lipid metabolism in mice fed control or HFD. MATERIALS/METHODS Five-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed control diets containing 10% energy fat from either Soybean Oil (SBO) or PNO, or HFD containing 15% energy fat from lard and 30% energy fat from SBO or PNO for 12 weeks. Expression of genes related to intestinal fatty acid (FA) uptake and channeling (Cd36, Fatp4, Acsl5, Acbp), intestinal chylomicron synthesis (Mtp, ApoB48, ApoA4), hepatic lipid uptake and channeling (Lrp1, Fatp5, Acsl1, Acbp), hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) lipolysis and FA oxidation (Atgl, Cpt1a, Acadl, Ehhadh, Acaa1), as well as very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) assembly (ApoB100) were determined by real-time PCR. RESULTS In intestine, significantly lower Cd36 mRNA expression (P < 0.05) and a tendency of lower ApoA4 mRNA levels (P = 0.07) was observed in PNO-fed mice, indicating that PNO consumption may decrease intestinal FA uptake and chylomicron assembly. PNO consumption tended to result in higher hepatic mRNA levels of Atgl (P = 0.08) and Cpt1a (P = 0.05). Significantly higher hepatic mRNA levels of Acadl and ApoB100 were detected in mice fed PNO diet (P < 0.05). These results suggest that PNO could increase hepatic TAG metabolism; mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and VLDL assembly. CONCLUSIONS PNO replacement in the diet might function in prevention of excessive lipid uptake by intestine and improve hepatic lipid metabolism in both control diet and HFD fed mice.

  10. Short-term menhaden oil rich diet changes renal lipid profile in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Ossani, Georgina P; Denninghoff, Valeria C; Uceda, Ana M; Díaz, Maria L; Uicich, Raúl; Monserrat, Alberto J

    2015-01-01

    Weanling male Wistar rats fed a choline-deficient diet develop acute kidney injury. Menhaden oil, which is a very important source of omega-3 fatty acids, has a notorious protective effect. The mechanism of this protection is unknown; one possibility could be that menhaden oil changes renal lipid profile, with an impact on the functions of biological membranes. The aim of this work was to study the renal lipid profile in rats fed a choline-deficient diet with menhaden oil or vegetable oil as lipids. Rats were divided into 4 groups and fed four different diets for 7 days: choline-deficient or choline-supplemented diets with corn and hydrogenated oils or menhaden oil. Serum homocysteine, vitamin B12, and folic acid were analyzed. Renal lipid profile, as well as the fatty acid composition of the three oils, was measured. Choline-deficient rats fed vegetable oils showed renal cortical necrosis. Renal omega-6 fatty acids were higher in rats fed a cholinedeficient diet and a choline-supplemented diet with vegetable oils, while renal omega-3 fatty acids were higher in rats fed a choline-deficient diet and a choline-supplemented diet with menhaden oil. Rats fed menhaden oil diets had higher levels of renal eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. Renal myristic acid was increased in rats fed menhaden oil. The lipid renal profile varied quickly according to the type of oil present in the diet.

  11. Structure of Cholesterol in Lipid Rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppozini, Laura; Meinhardt, Sebastian; Armstrong, Clare L.; Yamani, Zahra; Kučerka, Norbert; Schmid, Friederike; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2014-11-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano-or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking, and lipid or protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules, we observe raftlike structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to ordering of the cholesterol molecules in the raftlike structures were observed and indexed by two different structures: a monoclinic structure of ordered cholesterol pairs of alternating direction in equilibrium with cholesterol plaques, i.e., triclinic cholesterol bilayers.

  12. Recent Research Trends on the Enzymatic Synthesis of Structured Lipids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hee; Akoh, Casimir C

    2015-08-01

    Structured lipids (SLs) are lipids that have been chemically or enzymatically modified from their natural biosynthetic form. Because SLs are made to possess desired nutritional, physicochemical, or textural properties for various applications in the food industry, many research activities have been aimed at their commercialization. The production of SLs by enzymatic procedures has a great potential in the future market because of the specificity of lipases and phospholipases used as the biocatalysts. The aim of this review is to provide concise information on the recent research trends on the enzymatic synthesis of SLs of commercial interest, such as medium- and long-chain triacylglycerols, human milk fat substitutes, cocoa butter equivalents, trans-free or low-trans plastic fats (such as margarines and shortenings), low-calorie fats/oils, health-beneficial fatty acid-rich fats/oils, mono- or diacylglycerols, and structurally modified phospholipids. This limited review covers 108 research articles published between 2010 and 2014 which were searched in Web of Science. PMID:26189491

  13. Recent Research Trends on the Enzymatic Synthesis of Structured Lipids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hee; Akoh, Casimir C

    2015-08-01

    Structured lipids (SLs) are lipids that have been chemically or enzymatically modified from their natural biosynthetic form. Because SLs are made to possess desired nutritional, physicochemical, or textural properties for various applications in the food industry, many research activities have been aimed at their commercialization. The production of SLs by enzymatic procedures has a great potential in the future market because of the specificity of lipases and phospholipases used as the biocatalysts. The aim of this review is to provide concise information on the recent research trends on the enzymatic synthesis of SLs of commercial interest, such as medium- and long-chain triacylglycerols, human milk fat substitutes, cocoa butter equivalents, trans-free or low-trans plastic fats (such as margarines and shortenings), low-calorie fats/oils, health-beneficial fatty acid-rich fats/oils, mono- or diacylglycerols, and structurally modified phospholipids. This limited review covers 108 research articles published between 2010 and 2014 which were searched in Web of Science.

  14. Effect of essential oil of Hyssopus officinalis on the lipid composition of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Ghfir, B; Fonvieille, J L; Koulali, Y; Ecalle, R; Dargent, R

    1994-06-01

    Addition of the essential oil of Hyssopus officinalis to the culture medium of Aspergillus fumigatus induced alterations in both growth and lipid composition of this mould. Total lipids and sterols were reduced, whereas total phospholipids were increased. There were alterations in the proportions of fatty acids, neutral lipid and phospholipid fractions.

  15. Effect of essential oil of Hyssopus officinalis on the lipid composition of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Ghfir, B; Fonvieille, J L; Koulali, Y; Ecalle, R; Dargent, R

    1994-06-01

    Addition of the essential oil of Hyssopus officinalis to the culture medium of Aspergillus fumigatus induced alterations in both growth and lipid composition of this mould. Total lipids and sterols were reduced, whereas total phospholipids were increased. There were alterations in the proportions of fatty acids, neutral lipid and phospholipid fractions. PMID:7935731

  16. Lipid self-assembled structures for reactivity control in food.

    PubMed

    Sagalowicz, L; Moccand, C; Davidek, T; Ghanbari, R; Martiel, I; Negrini, R; Mezzenga, R; Leser, M E; Blank, I; Michel, M

    2016-07-28

    Lipid self-assembled structures (SASs) have recently gained considerable interest for their potential applications, especially for sustained nutrient release and protein crystallization. An additional property, which is underexploited, is their ability to control chemical reactions in food products. Here, we concentrate on SASs formed by phospholipids (PLs) and monoglycerides (MGs), those compounds being the most natural surfactants and therefore, the best compatible with food products, in view of providing new functionalities through the formation of SASs. In this work, the phase behaviour of these amphiphiles when mixed with oil and water is described and compared. Subsequently, we address the influence of these structures to the oxidation and Maillard-type reactions. Finally, we show that SASs formed by MGs can strongly increase the yield of key aroma impact compounds generated by Maillard-type reactions when compared with the reaction performed in aqueous precursor solutions. Various SASs are compared. In particular, addition of oil to a reversed bicontinuous structure formed by MG leads to a reversed microemulsion, which, considering its low viscosity, is particularly suitable for food products and act as a very efficient reactor system. The influence of oil and precursors on phase behaviour is discussed and related to the efficiency of the Maillard reactions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298441

  17. Phase behavior of ternary mannosylerythritol lipid/water/oil systems.

    PubMed

    Worakitkanchanakul, Wannasiri; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Morita, Tomotake; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Rujiravanit, Ratana; Chavadej, Sumaeth; Minamikawa, Hiroyuki; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-02-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are glycolipid biosurfactants (BS) abundantly produced from renewable resources by yeast strains of the genus Pseudozyma. In this study, the ternary phase behaviors of two types of MELs, i.e. MEL-A and MEL-B, mixed with water and oil were investigated at 25 degrees C based on polarized optical microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). When n-decane was used as an oil phase, diacetylated MEL-A formed single-phase water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsion in a remarkably large region. MEL-A, with a negative spontaneous curvature, also formed sponge (L(3)), reverse bicontinuous cubic (V(2)), and lamellar (L(alpha)) phases. Meanwhile, monoacetylated MEL-B, with the opposite configuration of the erythritol moiety, gave single-phase bicontinuous microemulsion and showed a triangular phase diagram dominated by the L(alpha) phase, suggesting that MEL-B has an almost zero spontaneous curvature. Moreover, we succeeded in preparation of oil-in-liquid crystal (O/LC) emulsion in the biphasic L(alpha)+O region of the MEL-B/water/n-decane system. The obtained gel-like emulsion was stable for at least 1 month. These results clearly demonstrated that the difference in the number of acetyl group on the headgroup and/or the chirality of the erythritol moiety drastically changed the phase behavior of MELs. Accordingly, these MELs would be quite distinctive from conventional BS hitherto reported, and would have great potential for the preparation of microemulsion and LC-based emulsion. PMID:19070997

  18. Wrinkled1 Accelerates Flowering and Regulates Lipid Homeostasis between Oil Accumulation and Membrane Lipid Anabolism in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Shao, Jianhua; Tang, Shaohua; Shen, Qingwen; Wang, Tiehu; Chen, Wenling; Hong, Yueyun

    2015-01-01

    Wrinkled1 (WRI1) belongs to the APETALA2 transcription factor family; it is unique to plants and is a central regulator of oil synthesis in Arabidopsis. The effects of WRI1 on comprehensive lipid metabolism and plant development were unknown, especially in crop plants. This study found that BnWRI1 in Brassica napus accelerated flowering and enhanced oil accumulation in both seeds and leaves without leading to a visible growth inhibition. BnWRI1 decreased storage carbohydrates and increased soluble sugars to facilitate the carbon flux to lipid anabolism. BnWRI1 is localized to the nucleus and directly binds to the AW-box at proximal upstream regions of genes involved in fatty acid (FA) synthesis and lipid assembly. The overexpression (OE) of BnWRI1 resulted in the up-regulation of genes involved in glycolysis, FA synthesis, lipid assembly, and flowering. Lipid profiling revealed increased galactolipids monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), and phosphatidylcholine (PC) in the leaves of OE plants, whereas it exhibited a reduced level of the galactolipids DGDG and MGDG and increased levels of PC, phosphatidylethanolamide, and oil [triacylglycerol (TAG)] in the siliques of OE plants during the early seed development stage. These results suggest that BnWRI1 is important for homeostasis among TAG, membrane lipids and sugars, and thus facilitates flowering and oil accumulation in B. napus. PMID:26635841

  19. Surface structure and properties of plant seed oil bodies.

    PubMed

    Tzen, J T; Huang, A H

    1992-04-01

    Storage triacylglycerols (TAG) in plant seeds are present in small discrete intracellular organelles called oil bodies. An oil body has a matrix of TAG, which is surrounded by phospholipids (PL) and alkaline proteins, termed oleosins. Oil bodies isolated from mature maize (Zea mays) embryos maintained their discreteness, but coalesced after treatment with trypsin but not with phospholipase A2 or C. Phospholipase A2 or C exerted its activity on oil bodies only after the exposed portion of oleosins had been removed by trypsin. Attempts were made to reconstitute oil bodies from their constituents. TAG, either extracted from oil bodies or of a 1:2 molar mixture of triolein and trilinolein, in a dilute buffer were sonicated to produce droplets of sizes similar to those of oil bodies; these droplets were unstable and coalesced rapidly. Addition of oil body PL or dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine, with or without charged stearylamine/stearic acid, or oleosins, to the medium before sonication provided limited stabilization effects to the TAG droplets. High stability was achieved only when the TAG were sonicated with both oil body PL (or dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine) and oleosins of proportions similar to or higher than those in the native oil bodies. These stabilized droplets were similar to the isolated oil bodies in chemical properties, and can be considered as reconstituted oil bodies. Reconstituted oil bodies were also produced from TAG of a 1:2 molar mixture of triolein and trilinolein, dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine, and oleosins from rice (Oryza sativa), wheat (Triticum aestivum), rapeseed (Brassica napus), soybean (Glycine max), or jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis). It is concluded that both oleosins and PL are required to stabilize the oil bodies and that oleosins prevent oil bodies from coalescing by providing steric hindrance. A structural model of an oil body is presented. The current findings on seed oil bodies could be extended to the intracellular storage lipid

  20. Irregular bilayer structure in vesicles prepared from Halobacterium cutirubrum lipids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Fluorescent probes were used to study the structure of the cell envelope of Halobacterium cutirubrum, and, in particular, to explore the effect of the heterogeneity of the lipids in this organism on the structure of the bilayers. The fluorescence polarization of perylene was followed in vesicles of unfractionated lipids and polar lipids as a function of temperature in 3.4 M solutions of NaCl, NaNO3, and KSCN, and it was found that vesicles of unfractionated lipids were more perturbed by chaotropic agents than polar lipids. The dependence of the relaxation times of perylene on temperature was studied in cell envelopes and in vesicles prepared from polar lipids, unfractionated lipids, and mixtures of polar and neutral lipids.

  1. Sphingolipid symmetry governs membrane lipid raft structure.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Lipid domain formation in membranes underlies the concept of rafts but their structure is controversial because the key role of cholesterol has been challenged. The configuration of glycosphingolipid receptors for agonists, bacterial toxins and enveloped viruses in plasma membrane rafts appears to be an important factor governing ligand binding and infectivity but the details are as yet unresolved. I have used X-ray diffraction methods to examine how cholesterol affects the distribution of glycosphingolipid in aqueous dispersions of an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and egg-sphingomyelin containing different proportions of glucosylceramide from human extracts. Three coexisting liquid-ordered bilayer structures are observed at 37°C in mixtures containing up to 20mol% glycosphingolipid. All the cholesterol was sequestered in one bilayer with the minimum amount of sphingomyelin (33mol%) to prevent formation of cholesterol crystals. The other two bilayers consisted of sphingomyelin and glucosylceramide. Asymmetric molecular species of glucosylceramide with N-acyl chains longer than 20 carbons form an equimolar complex with sphingomyelin in which the glycosidic residues are arranged in hexagonal array. Symmetric molecular species mix with sphingomyelin in proportions less than equimolar to form quasicrystalline bilayers. When the glycosphingolipid exceeds equimolar proportions with sphingomyelin cholesterol is incorporated into the structure and formation of a gel phase of glucosylceramide is prevented. The demonstration of particular structural features of ceramide molecular species combined with the diversity of sugar residues of glycosphingolipid classes paves the way for a rational approach to understanding the functional specificity of lipid rafts and how they are coupled across cell membranes.

  2. Effect of dietary Lunaria oil on chick growth and organ lipid content.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, A J; Fritz, J C; Rudolf, T S

    1980-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of feeding Lunaria oil to chicks. A deit containing Lunaria oil produced poorer growth and lower feed conversion than one containing corn oil. White Plymouth Rock chicks had apparent digestibility values of 89.9% and 55.8% for corn and Lunaria oil, respectively. Gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of heart, liver, and body cavity lipids (fat) showed that more erucic and nervonic acids accumulated in the fat of the birds fed Lunaria oil than in the fat of those fed corn oil.

  3. Nanoemulsion delivery systems for oil-soluble vitamins: Influence of carrier oil type on lipid digestion and vitamin D3 bioaccessibility.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-11-15

    The influence of carrier oil type on the bioaccessibility of vitamin D3 encapsulated within oil-in-water nanoemulsions prepared using a natural surfactant (quillaja saponin) was studied using a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) model: mouth; stomach; small intestine. The rate of free fatty acid release during lipid digestion decreased in the following order: medium chain triglycerides (MCT) > corn oil ≈ fish oil > orange oil > mineral oil. Conversely, the measured bioaccessibility of vitamin D3 decreased in the following order: corn oil ≈ fish oil > orange oil > mineral oil > MCT. These results show that carrier oil type has a considerable impact on lipid digestion and vitamin bioaccessibility, which was attributed to differences in the release of bioactives from lipid droplets, and their solubilization in mixed micelles. Nanoemulsions prepared using long chain triglycerides (corn or fish oil) were most effective at increasing vitamin bioaccessibility. PMID:25977056

  4. Nanoemulsion delivery systems for oil-soluble vitamins: Influence of carrier oil type on lipid digestion and vitamin D3 bioaccessibility.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-11-15

    The influence of carrier oil type on the bioaccessibility of vitamin D3 encapsulated within oil-in-water nanoemulsions prepared using a natural surfactant (quillaja saponin) was studied using a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) model: mouth; stomach; small intestine. The rate of free fatty acid release during lipid digestion decreased in the following order: medium chain triglycerides (MCT) > corn oil ≈ fish oil > orange oil > mineral oil. Conversely, the measured bioaccessibility of vitamin D3 decreased in the following order: corn oil ≈ fish oil > orange oil > mineral oil > MCT. These results show that carrier oil type has a considerable impact on lipid digestion and vitamin bioaccessibility, which was attributed to differences in the release of bioactives from lipid droplets, and their solubilization in mixed micelles. Nanoemulsions prepared using long chain triglycerides (corn or fish oil) were most effective at increasing vitamin bioaccessibility.

  5. Kdo2-lipid A: structural diversity and impact on immunopharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyuan; Quinn, Peter J; Yan, Aixin

    2015-01-01

    3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid-lipid A (Kdo2-lipid A) is the essential component of lipopolysaccharide in most Gram-negative bacteria and the minimal structural component to sustain bacterial viability. It serves as the active component of lipopolysaccharide to stimulate potent host immune responses through the complex of Toll-like-receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation protein 2. The entire biosynthetic pathway of Escherichia coli Kdo2-lipid A has been elucidated and the nine enzymes of the pathway are shared by most Gram-negative bacteria, indicating conserved Kdo2-lipid A structure across different species. Yet many bacteria can modify the structure of their Kdo2-lipid A which serves as a strategy to modulate bacterial virulence and adapt to different growth environments as well as to avoid recognition by the mammalian innate immune systems. Key enzymes and receptors involved in Kdo2-lipid A biosynthesis, structural modification and its interaction with the TLR4 pathway represent a clear opportunity for immunopharmacological exploitation. These include the development of novel antibiotics targeting key biosynthetic enzymes and utilization of structurally modified Kdo2-lipid A or correspondingly engineered live bacteria as vaccines and adjuvants. Kdo2-lipid A/TLR4 antagonists can also be applied in anti-inflammatory interventions. This review summarizes recent knowledge on both the fundamental processes of Kdo2-lipid A biosynthesis, structural modification and immune stimulation, and applied research on pharmacological exploitations of these processes for therapeutic development. PMID:24838025

  6. Lipid patches in membrane protein oligomers: crystal structure of the bacteriorhodopsin-lipid complex.

    PubMed

    Essen, L; Siegert, R; Lehmann, W D; Oesterhelt, D

    1998-09-29

    Heterogenous nucleation on small molecule crystals causes a monoclinic crystal form of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) in which trimers of this membrane protein pack differently than in native purple membranes. Analysis of single crystals by nano-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry demonstrated a preservation of the purple membrane lipid composition in these BR crystals. The 2.9-A x-ray structure shows a lipid-mediated stabilization of BR trimers where the glycolipid S-TGA-1 binds into the central compartment of BR trimers. The BR trimer/lipid complex provides an example of local membrane thinning as the lipid head-group boundary of the central lipid patch is shifted by 5 A toward the membrane center. Nonbiased electron density maps reveal structural differences to previously reported BR structures, especially for the cytosolic EF loop and the proton exit pathway. The terminal proton release complex now comprises an E194-E204 dyad as a diffuse proton buffer.

  7. Preparation and characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with frankincense and myrrh oil.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Yong-Tai; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) for the oral delivery of frankincense and myrrh essential oils (FMO). Aqueous dispersions of SLNs were successfully prepared by a high-pressure homogenization method using Compritol 888 ATO as the solid lipid and soybean lecithin and Tween 80 as the surfactants. The properties of the SLNs such as particle size, zeta potential (ZP), and drug encapsulation efficiency (EE) were investigated. The morphology of SLNs was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystallinity of the formulation was analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, drug evaporation release and antitumor activity were also studied. Round SLNs with a mean size of 113.3 ± 3.6 nm, a ZP of -16.8 ± 0.4 mV, and an EE of 80.60% ± 1.11% were obtained. DSC and XRD measurements revealed that less ordered structures were formed in the inner cores of the SLN particles. Evaporation loss of the active components in FMO could be reduced in the SLNs. Furthermore, the SLN formulation increased the antitumor efficacy of FMO in H22-bearing Kunming mice. Hence, the presented SLNs can be used as drug carriers for hydrophobic oil drugs extracted from traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:22619540

  8. Human tissue lipids: occurrence of fatty acid isomers from dietary hydrogenated oils.

    PubMed

    Ohlrogge, J B; Emken, E A; Gulley, R M

    1981-08-01

    Hydrogenation of vegetable oils produces fatty acids with unusual structures having trans double bonds and double bonds in new positions of the acyl chain. This study was designed to determine which of these fatty acid isomers are incorporated or accumulated in humans during long-term dietary consumption of hydrogenated fats. The double bond position and configuration of the octadecenoate fraction of total lipids extracted from human heart, brain, liver, aorta, and adipose tissue were determined. The level of trans octadecenoate in the tissues as determined by both direct gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) and by GLC after silver nitrate thin-layer chromatography ranged between 0.4 and 5.0%, with an average of 2.7%. Tissues were found to contain trans-octadecenoic isomers having double bonds between the 6 and 15 positions, whereas cis double bonds were found to occur between the 6 and 14 positions. The distribution of double bonds in adipose tissue correlated very closely with the composition of dietary hydrogenated fat. Thus, essentially all of the unusual octadecenoic fatty acid isomers that are produced during vegetable oil hydrogenation are incorporated into human tissue. However, in contrast to results of short-term (1-6 months) feeding studies of animals, our results suggest that long-term (20-60 years) consumption of hydrogenated fats by humans does not lead to substantial preferential accumulation of positional isomers in human tissue total lipids.

  9. Preparation and characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with frankincense and myrrh oil

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feng; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Yong-Tai; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) for the oral delivery of frankincense and myrrh essential oils (FMO). Aqueous dispersions of SLNs were successfully prepared by a high-pressure homogenization method using Compritol 888 ATO as the solid lipid and soybean lecithin and Tween 80 as the surfactants. The properties of the SLNs such as particle size, zeta potential (ZP), and drug encapsulation efficiency (EE) were investigated. The morphology of SLNs was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystallinity of the formulation was analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, drug evaporation release and antitumor activity were also studied. Round SLNs with a mean size of 113.3 ± 3.6 nm, a ZP of −16.8 ± 0.4 mV, and an EE of 80.60% ± 1.11% were obtained. DSC and XRD measurements revealed that less ordered structures were formed in the inner cores of the SLN particles. Evaporation loss of the active components in FMO could be reduced in the SLNs. Furthermore, the SLN formulation increased the antitumor efficacy of FMO in H22-bearing Kunming mice. Hence, the presented SLNs can be used as drug carriers for hydrophobic oil drugs extracted from traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:22619540

  10. Regulation of inflammatory and lipid metabolism genes by eicosapentaenoic acid-rich oil[S

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Peter J.; Bhatia, Sujata K.; Belcher, Leigh A; Hannon, Daniel B.; Thompson, Jerry T.; Vanden Heuvel, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Omega-3-PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are associated with prevention of various aspects of metabolic syndrome. In the present studies, the effects of oil rich in EPA on gene expression and activation of nuclear receptors was examined and compared with other ω3-PUFAs. The EPA-rich oil (EO) altered the expression of FA metabolism genes in THP-1 cells, including stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) and FA desaturase-1 and -2 (FASDS1 and -2). Other ω3-PUFAs resulted in a similar gene expression response for a subset of genes involved in lipid metabolism and inflammation. In reporter assays, EO activated human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPARβ/γ with minimal effects on PPARγ, liver X receptor, retinoid X receptor, farnesoid X receptor, and retinoid acid receptor γ (RARγ); these effects were similar to that observed for purified EPA. When serum from a 6 week clinical intervention with dietary supplements containing olive oil (control), DHA, or two levels of EPA were applied to THP-1 cells, the expression of SCD and FADS2 decreased in the cells treated with serum from the ω3-PUFA-supplemented individuals. Taken together, these studies indicate regulation of gene expression by EO that is consistent with treating aspects of dyslipidemia and inflammation. PMID:22556214

  11. Inhibition of lipid oxidation by formation of caseinate-oil-oat gum complexes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid oxidation, particularly oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids such as omega-3 fatty acids, has posed a serious challenge to the food industry trying to incorporate heart-healthy oil products into their lines of healthful foods and beverages. In this study, model plant oil was dispersed into so...

  12. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: Structure, Preparation and Application

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Neda; Valizadeh, Hadi; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) have attracted special interest during last few decades. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) are two major types of Lipid-based nanoparticles. SLNs were developed to overcome the limitations of other colloidal carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles because they have advantages like good release profile and targeted drug delivery with excellent physical stability. In the next generation of the lipid nanoparticle, NLCs are modified SLNs which improve the stability and capacity loading. Three structural models of NLCs have been proposed. These LNPs have potential applications in drug delivery field, research, cosmetics, clinical medicine, etc. This article focuses on features, structure and innovation of LNPs and presents a wide discussion about preparation methods, advantages, disadvantages and applications of LNPs by focusing on SLNs and NLCs. PMID:26504751

  13. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: Structure, Preparation and Application.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Neda; Valizadeh, Hadi; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2015-09-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) have attracted special interest during last few decades. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) are two major types of Lipid-based nanoparticles. SLNs were developed to overcome the limitations of other colloidal carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles because they have advantages like good release profile and targeted drug delivery with excellent physical stability. In the next generation of the lipid nanoparticle, NLCs are modified SLNs which improve the stability and capacity loading. Three structural models of NLCs have been proposed. These LNPs have potential applications in drug delivery field, research, cosmetics, clinical medicine, etc. This article focuses on features, structure and innovation of LNPs and presents a wide discussion about preparation methods, advantages, disadvantages and applications of LNPs by focusing on SLNs and NLCs. PMID:26504751

  14. Analysis of Lipoplex Structure and Lipid Phase Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana

    2012-07-18

    Efficient delivery of genetic material to cells is needed for tasks of utmost importance in the laboratory and clinic, such as gene transfection and gene silencing. Synthetic cationic lipids can be used as delivery vehicles for nucleic acids and are now considered the most promising nonviral gene carriers. They form complexes (lipoplexes) with the polyanionic nucleic acids. A critical obstacle for clinical application of the lipid-mediated DNA delivery (lipofection) is its unsatisfactory efficiency for many cell types. Understanding the mechanism of lipid-mediated DNA delivery is essential for their successful application, as well as for a rational design and synthesis of novel cationic lipoid compounds for enhanced gene delivery. A viewpoint now emerging is that the critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection is the structural evolution of lipoplexes within the cell, upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids. In particular, recent studies showed that the phase evolution of lipoplex lipids upon interaction and mixing with membrane lipids appears to be decisive for transfection success: specifically, lamellar lipoplex formulations, which were readily susceptible to undergoing lamellar-nonlamellar phase transition upon mixing with cellular lipids and were found rather consistently associated with superior transfection potency, presumably as a result of facilitated DNA release. Thus, understanding the lipoplex structure and the phase changes upon interacting with membrane lipids is important for the successful application of the cationic lipids as gene carriers.

  15. Counteracting foaming caused by lipids or proteins in biogas reactors using rapeseed oil or oleic acid as antifoaming agents.

    PubMed

    Kougias, P G; Boe, K; Einarsdottir, E S; Angelidaki, I

    2015-08-01

    Foaming is one of the major operational problems in biogas plants, and dealing with foaming incidents is still based on empirical practices. Various types of antifoams are used arbitrarily to combat foaming in biogas plants, but without any scientific support this action can lead to serious deterioration of the methanogenic process. Many commercial antifoams are derivatives of fatty acids or oils. However, it is well known that lipids can induce foaming in manure based biogas plants. This study aimed to elucidate the effect of rapeseed oil and oleic acid on foam reduction and process performance in biogas reactors fed with protein or lipid rich substrates. The results showed that both antifoams efficiently suppressed foaming. Moreover rapeseed oil resulted in stimulation of the biogas production. Finally, it was reckoned that the chemical structure of lipids, and more specifically their carboxylic ends, is responsible for their foam promoting or foam counteracting behaviour. Thus, it was concluded that the fatty acids and oils could suppress foaming, while salt of fatty acids could generate foam.

  16. Coconut oil predicts a beneficial lipid profile in pre-menopausal women in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Feranil, Alan B.; Duazo, Paulita L.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; Adair, Linda S.

    2011-01-01

    Coconut oil is a common edible oil in many countries, and there is mixed evidence for its effects on lipid profiles and cardiovascular disease risk. Here we examine the association between coconut oil consumption and lipid profiles in a cohort of 1,839 Filipino women (age 35–69 years) participating in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey, a community based study in Metropolitan Cebu City. Coconut oil intake was measured as individual coconut oil intake calculated using two 24-hour dietary recalls (9.54 ± 8.92 grams). Cholesterol profiles were measured in plasma samples collected after an overnight fast. Mean lipid values in this sample were total cholesterol (TC) (186.52 ± 38.86 mg/dL), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) (40.85 ± 10.30 mg/dL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) (119.42 ± 33.21 mg/dL), triglycerides (130.75 ± 85.29 mg/dL) and the TC/HDL ratio (4.80 ± 1.41). Linear regression models were used to estimate the association between coconut oil intake and each plasma lipid outcome after adjusting for total energy intake, age, body mass index (BMI), number of pregnancies, education, menopausal status, household assets and urban residency. Dietary coconut oil intake was positively associated with HDL-c levels. PMID:21669587

  17. Composite S-layer lipid structures

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2010-01-01

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state of the art survey how S-layer proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas for application of composite S-layer membrane systems concern sensor systems involving specific membrane functions. PMID:19303933

  18. Hypocholesterolemic effects of low calorie structured lipids on rats and rabbits fed on normal and atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Kanjilal, Sanjit; Kaki, Shiva Shanker; Rao, Bhamidipati V S K; Sugasini, Dhavamani; Rao, Yalagala Poornachandra; Prasad, Rachapudi B N; Lokesh, Belur R

    2013-01-01

    The hypocholesterolemic effects of two low calorie structured lipids (SL1 and SL2) containing essential fatty acids, prepared by lipase catalysed interesterification of ethyl behenate respectively with sunflower and soybean oils were studied in rats and rabbits. The feeding experiment conducted on rats as well as rabbits, fed on normal and atherogenic diet containing 10% of SL1 and SL2 (experimental) and sunflower oil (control) indicated no adverse effects on growth and food intake. However, the structured lipids beneficially lowered serum and liver lipids, particularly cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides and also maintains the essential fatty acid status in serum and liver. The lipid deposition observed in the arteries of rabbits fed on atherogenic diets was significantly reduced when structured lipids were included in the diet. These observations coincided with reduced levels of serum cholesterol particularly LDL cholesterol observed in experimental groups. Therefore the structured lipids, designed to have low calorific value also beneficially lower serum lipids and lipid deposition in animals fed on atherogenic diets. PMID:23017421

  19. The Effect of Camellia Seed Oil Intake on Lipid Metabolism in Mice.

    PubMed

    Satou, Tadaaki; Sato, Naoko; Kato, Haruyo; Kawamura, Mana; Watanabe, Sanae; Koike, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    Camellia seed oil has mainly been applied to the production of cosmetics, and research into its dietary effects is required. Alterations in lipid metabolism by the intake of camellia seed oil were investigated. Health parameters such as diet intake, weight gain, fat mass, and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels were measured in mice fed a high fat diet containing camellia seed oil; comparisons were made to a normal diet and a high fat diet containing either soybean oil or olive oil as controls. No significant differences in weight gain and diet intake were observed between the groups. However, the camellia seed oil diet suppressed epididymal fat weight similarly to the olive oil diet. In total cholesterol and HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol levels, the soybean oil, olive oil and camellia seed oil diet groups showed significant increases compared with the normal diet. However, increases in LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol levels were inhibited by the camellia seed oil diet similarly to the olive oil diet. As the high oleic acid content of camellia seed oil is similar to that of olive oil, it is proposed that its presence mitigated fat accumulation and plasma cholesterol levels. PMID:27396207

  20. Protective Effect of Pulp Oil Extracted from Canarium odontophyllum Miq. Fruit on Blood Lipids, Lipid Peroxidation, and Antioxidant Status in Healthy Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Shakirin, Faridah Hanim; Azlan, Azrina; Ismail, Amin; Amom, Zulkhairi; Cheng Yuon, Lau

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to compare the effects of pulp and kernel oils of Canarium odontophyllum Miq. (CO) on lipid profile, lipid peroxidation, and oxidative stress of healthy rabbits. The oils are rich in SFAs and MUFAs (mainly palmitic and oleic acids). The pulp oil is rich in polyphenols. Male New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits were fed for 4 weeks on a normal diet containing pulp (NP) or kernel oil (NK) of CO while corn oil was used as control (NC). Total cholesterol (TC), HDL-C, LDL-c and triglycerides (TG) levels were measured in this paper. Antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidise), thiobarbiturate reactive substances (TBARSs), and plasma total antioxidant status (TAS) were also evaluated. Supplementation of CO pulp oil resulted in favorable changes in blood lipid and lipid peroxidation (increased HDL-C, reduced LDL-C, TG, TBARS levels) with enhancement of SOD, GPx, and plasma TAS levels. Meanwhile, supplementation of kernel oil caused lowering of plasma TC and LDL-C as well as enhancement of SOD and TAS levels. These changes showed that oils of CO could be beneficial in improving lipid profile and antioxidant status as when using part of normal diet. The oils can be used as alternative to present vegetable oil. PMID:22685623

  1. Determination of lipid oxidation products in vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Bente Lise; Blomhoff, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Background There is convincing evidence that replacing dietary saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats (PUFA) decreases risk of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, PUFA rich foods such as vegetable oils, fatty fish, and marine omega-3 supplements are recommended. However, PUFA are easily oxidizable and there is concern about possible negative health effects from intake of oxidized lipids. Little is known about the degree of lipid oxidation in such products. Objective To assess the content of lipid oxidation products in a large selection of vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements available in Norway. Both fresh and heated vegetable oils were studied. Design A large selection of commercially available vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements was purchased from grocery stores, pharmacies, and health food stores in Norway. The content of lipid oxidation products were measured as peroxide value and alkenal concentration. Twelve different vegetable oils were heated for a temperature (225°C) and time (25 minutes) resembling conditions typically used during cooking. Results The peroxide values were in the range 1.04–10.38 meq/kg for omega-3 supplements and in the range 0.60–5.33 meq/kg for fresh vegetable oils. The concentration range of alkenals was 158.23–932.19 nmol/mL for omega-3 supplements and 33.24–119.04 nmol/mL for vegetable oils. After heating, a 2.9–11.2 fold increase in alkenal concentration was observed for vegetable oils. Conclusions The contents of hydroperoxides and alkenals in omega-3 supplements are higher than in vegetable oils. After heating vegetable oils, a large increase in alkenal concentration was observed. PMID:21691461

  2. Multiscale structures of lipids in foods as parameters affecting fatty acid bioavailability and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Michalski, M C; Genot, C; Gayet, C; Lopez, C; Fine, F; Joffre, F; Vendeuvre, J L; Bouvier, J; Chardigny, J M; Raynal-Ljutovac, K

    2013-10-01

    On a nutritional standpoint, lipids are now being studied beyond their energy content and fatty acid (FA) profiles. Dietary FA are building blocks of a huge diversity of more complex molecules such as triacylglycerols (TAG) and phospholipids (PL), themselves organised in supramolecular structures presenting different thermal behaviours. They are generally embedded in complex food matrixes. Recent reports have revealed that molecular and supramolecular structures of lipids and their liquid or solid state at the body temperature influence both the digestibility and metabolism of dietary FA. The aim of the present review is to highlight recent knowledge on the impact on FA digestion, absorption and metabolism of: (i) the intramolecular structure of TAG; (ii) the nature of the lipid molecules carrying FA; (iii) the supramolecular organization and physical state of lipids in native and formulated food products and (iv) the food matrix. Further work should be accomplished now to obtain a more reliable body of evidence and integrate these data in future dietary recommendations. Additionally, innovative lipid formulations in which the health beneficial effects of either native or recomposed structures of lipids will be taken into account can be foreseen.

  3. Structure of Cationic Liposome DNA Complexes Incorporating PEG Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Kathrin; Subramanian, G.; Safinya, C. R.

    1998-03-01

    DNA cationic liposome complexes with PEG lipids are promising candidates for efficient transfection of DNA in vivo. The presence of PEG confers (a) colloidal stability and (b) increased circulation time of the complexes in the blood stream leading to long term transfection activity. However, there has been no elucidation of the structure of these complexes which is crucial for correlating the structure and transfection efficiency. We have carried out a systematic structural investigation of complexes incorporating PEG lipids using X-ray scattering. We have studied the structure of complexes made from DOTAP (a cationic lipid), DOPC (a neutral lipid), PEG-DMPE and λ-DNA both as a function of the PEG-DMPE and neutral lipid concentrations. We have produced stable complexes which form a multilamellar structure with alternating lipid bilayers and DNA molecules. The DNA molecules are ordered in a 2-D smectic array whose spacing is controlled by the concentrations of PEG-DMPE and the neutral lipid. Supported by NSF-DMR-9624091, PRF-31352-AC7, and Los Alamos-STB/UC:96-108.

  4. Structure of a lipid-bound extended synaptotagmin indicates a role in lipid transfer.

    PubMed

    Schauder, Curtis M; Wu, Xudong; Saheki, Yasunori; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Torta, Federico; Wenk, Markus R; De Camilli, Pietro; Reinisch, Karin M

    2014-06-26

    Growing evidence suggests that close appositions between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and other membranes, including appositions with the plasma membrane (PM), mediate exchange of lipids between these bilayers. The mechanisms of such exchange, which allows lipid transfer independently of vesicular transport, remain poorly understood. The presence of a synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial-lipid-binding protein (SMP) domain, a proposed lipid-binding module, in several proteins localized at membrane contact sites has raised the possibility that such domains may be implicated in lipid transport. SMP-containing proteins include components of the ERMES complex, an ER–mitochondrial tether, and the extended synaptotagmins (known as tricalbins in yeast), which are ER–PM tethers. Here we present at 2.44 Å resolution the crystal structure of a fragment of human extended synaptotagmin 2 (E-SYT2), including an SMP domain and two adjacent C2 domains. The SMP domain has a β-barrel structure like protein modules in the tubular-lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily. It dimerizes to form an approximately 90-Å-long cylinder traversed by a channel lined entirely with hydrophobic residues, with the two C2A–C2B fragments forming arched structures flexibly linked to the SMP domain. Importantly, structural analysis complemented by mass spectrometry revealed the presence of glycerophospholipids in the E-SYT2 SMP channel, indicating a direct role for E-SYTs in lipid transport. These findings provide strong evidence for a role of SMP-domain-containing proteins in the control of lipid transfer at membrane contact sites and have broad implications beyond the field of ER-to-PM appositions. PMID:24847877

  5. [Effects of silkworm pupa oil on serum lipids level and platelet function in rats].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuefeng; Huang, Lianzhen; Hu, Jianping; Li, Tao

    2002-08-01

    To observe the effects of silkworm pupa oil on serum lipids level and platelet function in rats, according to serum TG, TC level, 40 male Wistar rats are divided into four groups (normal control group, high fat control group, silkworm pupa oil group and silkworm pupa oil + VE group). The rats are fed different diets and six weeks later, serum lipids level and platelet function are measured. The results show that (1) Compared with high fat control group, serum TC, TG, LDL-C level, AI value, Platelet aggregability, plasma TXB2 level and T/P ratio decrease significantly while HDL-C level and 6-k-PGF1 level increase in silkworm pupa oil group; (2) Serum TC, LDL-C level, T/P ratio and platelet aggregability are significantly lower in silkworm pupa oil + VE group than in silkworm pupa oil group. It is suggested that silkworm pupa oil rich in alpha-linolenic acid can reduce serum lipids level and inhibit platelet aggregation, which is more effective with the supplementation with VE.

  6. Characterization of mannosylerythritol lipids containing hexadecatetraenoic acid produced from cuttlefish oil by Pseudozyma churashimaensis OK96.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Kawamura, Daisuke; Morita, Naoki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kitamoto, Dai

    2013-01-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds produced by microorganisms. Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL) are promising biosurfactants produced by Ustilaginomycetes, and their physicochemical and biochemical properties differ depending on the chemical structure of their hydrophilic and/or hydrophobic moieties. To further develop MEL derivatives and expand their potential applications, we focused our attention on the use of cuttlefish oil, which contains polyunsaturated fatty acids (e.g., docosahexaenoic acid, C₂₂:₆, and eicosapentaenoic acid, C₂₀:₅, as the sole carbon source. Among the microorganisms capable of producing MEL, only nine strains were able to produce them from cuttlefish oil. On gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis, we observed that Pseudozyma churashimaensis OK96 was particularly suitable for the production of MEL-A, a MEL containing hexadecatetraenoic acid (C₁₆:₄) (23.6% of the total unsaturated fatty acids and 7.7% of the total fatty acids). The observed critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surface tension at CMC of the new MEL-A were 5.7×10⁻⁶ M and 29.5 mN/m, respectively, while those of MEL-A produced from soybean oil were 2.7×10⁻⁶ M and 27.7 mN/m, respectively. With polarized optical and confocal laser scanning microscopies, the self-assembling properties of MEL-A were found to be different from those of conventional MEL. Furthermore, based on the DPPH radical-scavenging assay, the anti-oxidative activity of MEL-A was found to be 2.1-fold higher than that of MEL-A produced from soybean oil. Thus, the newly identified MEL-A is attractive as a new functional material with excellent surface-active and antioxidative properties. PMID:23648407

  7. Saturating Light Induces Sustained Accumulation of Oil in Plastidal Lipid Droplets in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Goold, Hugh Douglas; Cuiné, Stéphan; Légeret, Bertrand; Liang, Yuanxue; Brugière, Sabine; Auroy, Pascaline; Javot, Hélène; Tardif, Marianne; Jones, Brian; Beisson, Fred; Peltier, Gilles; Li-Beisson, Yonghua

    2016-08-01

    Enriching algal biomass in energy density is an important goal in algal biotechnology. Nitrogen (N) starvation is considered the most potent trigger of oil accumulation in microalgae and has been thoroughly investigated. However, N starvation causes the slow down and eventually the arrest of biomass growth. In this study, we show that exposing a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii culture to saturating light (SL) under a nonlimiting CO2 concentration in turbidostatic photobioreactors induces a sustained accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs) without compromising growth, which results in much higher oil productivity than N starvation. We also show that the polar membrane lipid fraction of SL-induced LDs is rich in plastidial lipids (approximately 70%), in contrast to N starvation-induced LDs, which contain approximately 60% lipids of endoplasmic reticulum origin. Proteomic analysis of LDs isolated from SL-exposed cells identified more than 200 proteins, including known proteins of lipid metabolism, as well as 74 proteins uniquely present in SL-induced LDs. LDs induced by SL and N depletion thus differ in protein and lipid contents. Taken together, lipidomic and proteomic data thus show that a large part of the sustained oil accumulation occurring under SL is likely due to the formation of plastidial LDs. We discuss our data in relation to the different metabolic routes used by microalgae to accumulate oil reserves depending on cultivation conditions. Finally, we propose a model in which oil accumulation is governed by an imbalance between photosynthesis and growth, which can be achieved by impairing growth or by boosting photosynthetic carbon fixation, with the latter resulting in higher oil productivity. PMID:27297678

  8. Investigation of natural lipid-phenolic interactions on biological properties of virgin olive oil.

    PubMed

    Alu'datt, Muhammad H; Rababah, Taha; Ereifej, Khalil; Gammoh, Sana; Alhamad, Mohammad N; Mhaidat, Nizar; Kubow, Stan; Johargy, Ayman; Alnaiemi, Ola J

    2014-12-10

    There is limited knowledge regarding the impact of naturally occurring lipid-phenolic interactions on the biological properties of phenolics in virgin olive oil. Free and bound phenolics were isolated via sequential methanolic extraction at 30 and 60 °C, and were identified and quantified using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and gas chromatography. Decreased oleic acid concentrations and increased concentrations of palmitoleic acid, stearic, linoleic, and linolenic acids were observed in virgin olive oil after removal of free and bound lipid phenolic compounds. The presence of p-hydroxybenzoic acid and tyrosol bound to glycerides was determined via LC-MS/MS, which indicates natural lipid-phenolic interactions in virgin olive oil. Both free and lipid bound phenolic extracts exerted antiproliferative activities against the CRC1 and CRC5 colorectal cancer cell lines. The present work indicates that naturally occurring lipid-phenolic interactions can affect the biological properties of phenolics in virgin olive oil.

  9. Analysis of persistent halogenated hydrocarbons in fish feeds containing fish oil and other alternative lipid sources.

    PubMed

    You, Jing; Kelley, Rebecca A; Crouse, Curtis C; Trushenski, Jesse T; Lydy, Michael J

    2011-09-15

    A trade-off exists between beneficial n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated acids and toxic persistent halogenated hydrocarbons (PHHs), both of which primarily originate from fish oil commonly used in fish feeds. Alternative lipid sources are being investigated for use in fish feeds to reduce harmful contaminant accumulation, hence, research is needed to evaluate PHHs in fish feeds with various lipid compositions. An analytical method was developed for PHHs including nine organochlorine insecticides (OCPs), 26 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and seven polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in fish feeds with differing proportions of fish oils and alternative lipid sources by GC-ECD after accelerated solvent extraction, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and sulfuric acid cleanup. The GPC removed the majority of the neutral lipids and sulfuric acid treatment effectively destroyed the polar lipids. Thus, the combination of the two methods removed approximately 99.7% of the lipids in the extracts. The method detection limits were less than 5 ng/g dry weight (dw) for most PHHs, while recoveries were 75-118%, 67-105%, 69-92%, 63-100% and 94-144% with relative standard deviations of 0.2-39%, 0.3-20%, 0.5-12%, 1.5-18% and 1.5-15% for PHHs in five types of fish feeds made from different lipid sources. Although the source of lipid showed no impact on cleanup efficiency and the developed method worked well for all feeds, fish feeds with 100% fish oil contained background PHHs and more interference than feeds containing alternative lipids.

  10. Optimisation of oil red O staining permits combination with immunofluorescence and automated quantification of lipids.

    PubMed

    Koopman, R; Schaart, G; Hesselink, M K

    2001-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a stain permitting automated quantification of myocellular lipid depositions in skeletal muscle sections together with immunolocalisation of other myocellular constituents by fluorescence microscopy. Lipid droplets were detected in skeletal muscle by oil red O (ORO). Conventional ORO was modified to diminish background staining, prevent crystallisation of ORO and to optimise lipid retention in cryosections. These modifications resulted in a punctate staining of lipid droplets, rather than the somewhat diffuse staining by conventional ORO. Small cavities in muscle sections (like the lumen of small blood vessels) lack ORO when using the protocol presented here. In addition a staining protocol is presented combining ORO with immunofluorescence. This combination permits multiple staining studies in the same section. Thus, lipid droplets can be studied together with immunolabelling of proteins involved in lipid handling and metabolism. This will extend our knowledge on the subcellular localisation of lipid handling proteins (i.e. enzymes and fatty acid transporting proteins) in relation to the localisation of lipid depositions. In conclusion, the protocol presented here permits examination of ORO-stained lipid droplets in skeletal muscle sections together with multiple staining of other immunodetectable proteins present in skeletal muscle by quantitative fluorescence microscopy.

  11. Dietary lipids from an evolutionary perspective: sources, structures and functions.

    PubMed

    German, J Bruce

    2011-04-01

    Lipids are a complex group of biomolecules whose precise functions remain poorly understood. As a result of this poor understanding, it is difficult to make mechanistically based recommendations for appropriate dietary intakes. It is equally difficult to develop methods that are capable of diagnosing functional impairments because of insufficiencies or excesses in particular fatty acids. Lipids are abundant building blocks of cellular membranes, supply components for lipid particle assembly and substrates for metabolic fuel, and provide a precursor pool for an astonishingly diverse range of signalling molecules. In each of these broad functions, the functional consequences of different structures of fatty acids are not fully understood. According to research on membrane functions through early evolution, docosahexaenoic acid provides two biophysical properties to membranes - accelerating the lateral motion of lipids and proteins within the plane of the membrane and simultaneously slowing the rate of diffusion/leakage of charged species across the plane of the membrane. The range of fatty acid structures used as substrates for assembly of either lipoproteins or milk fat globules is broad, yet the functional consequences of differences are not known. Different lipids signal into a remarkable range of biological processes. Saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids are becoming recognized as signal molecules in their own right. The complex composition of human milk lipids implies that diets with a diversity of fatty acids in complex lipid forms and structures is more beneficial than a narrow range of any particular group of fatty acids. PMID:21366863

  12. [Effect of different processing conditions on content of myrisiticin, volatile oil and fatty lipid in semen Myristicae].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Tan, J

    1998-04-01

    The effect of different processing conditions on contents of myrisiticin, volatile oil and fatty lipid in Semen Myristicae was studied by orthogonal design. The result shows that these processing conditions could not influence the contents of myrisiticin, volatile oil and fatty lipid in the processed products of Semen Myristicae, suggesting that processing does not necessarily lower toxicity. PMID:11596247

  13. The effect of neutral helper lipids on the structure of cationic lipid monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Dabkowska, A. P.; Barlow, D. J.; Hughes, A. V.; Campbell, R. A.; Quinn, P. J.; Lawrence, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Successful drug delivery via lipid-based systems has often been aided by the incorporation of ‘helper lipids’. While these neutral lipids enhance the effectiveness of cationic lipid-based delivery formulations, many questions remain about the nature of their beneficial effects. The structure of monolayers of the cationic lipid dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DODAB) alone, and mixed with a neutral helper lipid, either diolelyphosphatidylethanolamine or cholesterol at a 1 : 1 molar ratio was investigated at the air–water interface using a combination of surface pressure–area isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and specular neutron reflectivity in combination with contrast variation. BAM studies showed that while pure DODAB and DODAB with cholesterol monolayers showed fairly homogeneous surfaces, except in the regions of phase transition, monolayers of DODAB with diolelyphosphatidylethanolamine were, in contrast, inhomogeneous exhibiting irregular bean-shaped domains throughout. Neutron reflectivity data showed that while the thickness of the DODAB monolayer increased from 17 to 24 Å as it was compressed from a surface pressure of 5–40 mN m−1, the thickness of the helper lipid-containing monolayers, over the same range of surface pressures, was relatively invariant at between 25 and 27 Å. In addition, the monolayers containing diolelyphosphatidylethanolamine were found to be more heavily hydrated than the monolayers of cationic lipid, alone or in combination with cholesterol, with hydration levels of 18 molecules of water per molecule of lipid being recorded for the diolelyphosphatidylethanolamine-containing monolayers at a surface pressure of 30 mN m−1 compared with only six and eight molecules of water per molecule of lipid for the pure DODAB monolayer and the cholesterol-containing DODAB monolayer, respectively. PMID:21831895

  14. Design, characterization, and clinical evaluation of argan oil nanostructured lipid carriers to improve skin hydration

    PubMed Central

    Tichota, Deise Michele; Silva, Ana Catarina; Sousa Lobo, José Manuel; Amaral, Maria Helena

    2014-01-01

    Given its advantages in skin application (eg, hydration, antiaging, and protection), argan oil could be used in both dermatological and cosmetic formulations. Therefore, the preparation of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) using argan oil as a liquid lipid is a promising technique, since the former constitute well-established systems for dermal delivery. The aim of this work was to develop a topical formulation of argan oil NLCs to improve skin hydration. Firstly an NLC dispersion was developed and characterized, and afterward an NLC-based hydrogel was prepared. The in vivo evaluation of the suitability of the prepared formulation for the proposed application was assessed in volunteers, by measuring different skin-surface parameters for 1 month. An argan oil NLC-based hydrogel formulation was successfully prepared and characterized. Moreover, the entrapment of the NLCs in the hydrogel net did not affect their colloidal sizes. Additionally, it was observed that this formulation precipitated an increase in skin hydration of healthy volunteers. Therefore, we concluded that the preparation of NLC systems using argan oil as the liquid lipid is a promising strategy, since a synergistic effect on the skin hydration was obtained (ie, NLC occlusion plus argan oil hydration). PMID:25143733

  15. Design, characterization, and clinical evaluation of argan oil nanostructured lipid carriers to improve skin hydration.

    PubMed

    Tichota, Deise Michele; Silva, Ana Catarina; Sousa Lobo, José Manuel; Amaral, Maria Helena

    2014-01-01

    Given its advantages in skin application (eg, hydration, antiaging, and protection), argan oil could be used in both dermatological and cosmetic formulations. Therefore, the preparation of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) using argan oil as a liquid lipid is a promising technique, since the former constitute well-established systems for dermal delivery. The aim of this work was to develop a topical formulation of argan oil NLCs to improve skin hydration. Firstly an NLC dispersion was developed and characterized, and afterward an NLC-based hydrogel was prepared. The in vivo evaluation of the suitability of the prepared formulation for the proposed application was assessed in volunteers, by measuring different skin-surface parameters for 1 month. An argan oil NLC-based hydrogel formulation was successfully prepared and characterized. Moreover, the entrapment of the NLCs in the hydrogel net did not affect their colloidal sizes. Additionally, it was observed that this formulation precipitated an increase in skin hydration of healthy volunteers. Therefore, we concluded that the preparation of NLC systems using argan oil as the liquid lipid is a promising strategy, since a synergistic effect on the skin hydration was obtained (ie, NLC occlusion plus argan oil hydration).

  16. Why Fish Oil Fails: A Comprehensive 21st Century Lipids-Based Physiologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peskin, B. S.

    2014-01-01

    The medical community suffered three significant fish oil failures/setbacks in 2013. Claims that fish oil's EPA/DHA would stop the progression of heart disease were crushed when The Risk and Prevention Study Collaborative Group (Italy) released a conclusive negative finding regarding fish oil for those patients with high risk factors but no previous myocardial infarction. Fish oil failed in all measures of CVD prevention—both primary and secondary. Another major 2013 setback occurred when fish oil's DHA was shown to significantly increase prostate cancer in men, in particular, high-grade prostate cancer, in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) analysis by Brasky et al. Another monumental failure occurred in 2013 whereby fish oil's EPA/DHA failed to improve macular degeneration. In 2010, fish oil's EPA/DHA failed to help Alzheimer's victims, even those with low DHA levels. These are by no means isolated failures. The promise of fish oil and its so-called active ingredients EPA / DHA fails time and time again in clinical trials. This lipids-based physiologic review will explain precisely why there should have never been expectation for success. This review will focus on underpublicized lipid science with a focus on physiology. PMID:24551453

  17. Effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage.

    PubMed

    Lu, F S H; Bruheim, I; Haugsgjerd, B O; Jacobsen, C

    2014-08-15

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage. Krill oil was incubated at two different temperatures (20 and 40 °C) for 28 or 42 days. The oxidative stability of krill oil was assessed by peroxide value and anisidine value, measurement of lipid derived volatiles, lipid classes and antioxidants. The non-enzymatic browning reactions were assessed through the measurement of pyrroles, free amino acids content and Strecker-derived volatiles. The increase of incubation temperature firstly increased the lipid oxidation in krill oil and subsequently the non-enzymatic browning reactions. The occurrence of these reactions was most likely due to the reaction between α-dicarbonyl or carbonyl compounds with amino acids or ammonia. In addition to tocopherol and astaxanthin esters, the formation of pyrroles might help to protect the krill oil against lipid oxidation. PMID:24679797

  18. Effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage.

    PubMed

    Lu, F S H; Bruheim, I; Haugsgjerd, B O; Jacobsen, C

    2014-08-15

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage. Krill oil was incubated at two different temperatures (20 and 40 °C) for 28 or 42 days. The oxidative stability of krill oil was assessed by peroxide value and anisidine value, measurement of lipid derived volatiles, lipid classes and antioxidants. The non-enzymatic browning reactions were assessed through the measurement of pyrroles, free amino acids content and Strecker-derived volatiles. The increase of incubation temperature firstly increased the lipid oxidation in krill oil and subsequently the non-enzymatic browning reactions. The occurrence of these reactions was most likely due to the reaction between α-dicarbonyl or carbonyl compounds with amino acids or ammonia. In addition to tocopherol and astaxanthin esters, the formation of pyrroles might help to protect the krill oil against lipid oxidation.

  19. Neutral lipid biosynthesis in engineered Escherichia coli: jojoba oil-like wax esters and fatty acid butyl esters.

    PubMed

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Stöveken, Tim; Luftmann, Heinrich; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2006-02-01

    Wax esters are esters of long-chain fatty acids and long-chain fatty alcohols which are of considerable commercial importance and are produced on a scale of 3 million tons per year. The oil from the jojoba plant (Simmondsia chinensis) is the main biological source of wax esters. Although it has a multitude of potential applications, the use of jojoba oil is restricted, due to its high price. In this study, we describe the establishment of heterologous wax ester biosynthesis in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain by coexpression of a fatty alcohol-producing bifunctional acyl-coenzyme A reductase from the jojoba plant and a bacterial wax ester synthase from Acinetobacter baylyi strain ADP1, catalyzing the esterification of fatty alcohols and coenzyme A thioesters of fatty acids. In the presence of oleate, jojoba oil-like wax esters such as palmityl oleate, palmityl palmitoleate, and oleyl oleate were produced, amounting to up to ca. 1% of the cellular dry weight. In addition to wax esters, fatty acid butyl esters were unexpectedly observed in the presence of oleate. The latter could be attributed to solvent residues of 1-butanol present in the medium component, Bacto tryptone. Neutral lipids produced in recombinant E. coli were accumulated as intracytoplasmic inclusions, demonstrating that the formation and structural integrity of bacterial lipid bodies do not require specific structural proteins. This is the first report on substantial biosynthesis and accumulation of neutral lipids in E. coli, which might open new perspectives for the biotechnological production of cheap jojoba oil equivalents from inexpensive resources employing recombinant microorganisms.

  20. Neutral Lipid Biosynthesis in Engineered Escherichia coli: Jojoba Oil-Like Wax Esters and Fatty Acid Butyl Esters

    PubMed Central

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Stöveken, Tim; Luftmann, Heinrich; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Wax esters are esters of long-chain fatty acids and long-chain fatty alcohols which are of considerable commercial importance and are produced on a scale of 3 million tons per year. The oil from the jojoba plant (Simmondsia chinensis) is the main biological source of wax esters. Although it has a multitude of potential applications, the use of jojoba oil is restricted, due to its high price. In this study, we describe the establishment of heterologous wax ester biosynthesis in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain by coexpression of a fatty alcohol-producing bifunctional acyl-coenzyme A reductase from the jojoba plant and a bacterial wax ester synthase from Acinetobacter baylyi strain ADP1, catalyzing the esterification of fatty alcohols and coenzyme A thioesters of fatty acids. In the presence of oleate, jojoba oil-like wax esters such as palmityl oleate, palmityl palmitoleate, and oleyl oleate were produced, amounting to up to ca. 1% of the cellular dry weight. In addition to wax esters, fatty acid butyl esters were unexpectedly observed in the presence of oleate. The latter could be attributed to solvent residues of 1-butanol present in the medium component, Bacto tryptone. Neutral lipids produced in recombinant E. coli were accumulated as intracytoplasmic inclusions, demonstrating that the formation and structural integrity of bacterial lipid bodies do not require specific structural proteins. This is the first report on substantial biosynthesis and accumulation of neutral lipids in E. coli, which might open new perspectives for the biotechnological production of cheap jojoba oil equivalents from inexpensive resources employing recombinant microorganisms. PMID:16461689

  1. Enzymatic Synthesis of Structured Lipids using a Novel Cold-Active Lipase from Pichia lynferdii NRRL Y-7723

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Structured lipids (SL) were synthesized by the acidolysis of borage oil with caprylic acid using lipases. Six commercial lipases from different sources and a novel lipase from Pichia lynferdii NRRL Y-7723 were screened for their acidolysis activities and Lipozyme RM IM and NRRL Y-7723 lipase were s...

  2. Lipid components of olive oil from Tunisian Cv. Sayali: characterization and authenticity.

    PubMed

    Sakouhi, Faouzi; Absalon, Christelle; Flamini, Guido; Cioni, Pier Luigi; Kallel, Habib; Boukhchina, Sadok

    2010-09-01

    The analysis of the total lipid fraction from the Sayali variety of olive oil was accomplished in the present investigation. Glyceridic, unsaponifiable and flavour fractions of the oil were isolated and identified using several analytical methods. Chromatographic techniques have proven to be suitable for these determinations, especially capillary gas chromatography. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was successfully used to identify sterols, triterpenes alcohols, 4-monomethylsterols, aliphatic alcohols and aroma compounds in our samples. Furthermore, solid phase microextraction was used to isolate volatiles from the total lipid fraction. Results from the quantitative characterization of Sayali olive oil showed that oleic acid (77.4%) and triolein (47.4%) were the dominant glyceridic components. However, the main compounds of the unsaponifiable fraction were beta-sitosterol (147.5mg/100g oil), 24-methylene cycloartenol (146.4mg/100g oil) and hexacosanol (49.3mg/100g oil). Moreover, results showed that the aldehydic compounds were the major flavours present in Sayali olive oil.

  3. The comparative reductions of the plasma lipids and lipoproteins by dietary polyunsaturated fats: salmon oil versus vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Harris, W S; Connor, W E; McMurry, M P

    1983-02-01

    The lower plasma lipid levels and lower incidence of atherosclerotic diseases in Greenland Eskimos suggested that the unusual fatty acids present in their diet of seal and fish may be anti-atherogenic. These fatty acids are eicosapentaenoic (C20:5) and docosahexaenoic (C22:6) acids and are of the omega-3 fatty acid family. We have compared a salmon oil diet containing high levels of these unique fatty acids to a control diet high in saturated fat and to a vegetable oil diet high in linoleic acid (C18:2). All diets contained 40% of the total calories as fat and 500 mg of cholesterol; they differed only in fatty acid composition. In 4 wk the salmon oil diet reduced plasma cholesterol levels from 188 to 162 mg/dl (p less than 0.001) and triglyceride levels from 77 to 48 mg/dl (p less than 0.005). LDL and VLDL cholesterol levels changed from 128 to 108 and 13 to 8 mg/dl (p less than 0.005), respectively. HDL cholesterol levels did not change. The vegetable oil diet caused similar decreases in cholesterol levels but did not lower triglyceride levels. The omega-3 fatty acids comprised up to 30% of the total fatty acids in each plasma lipid class after the salmon diet. Fish oils contain fatty acids which may be metabolically unique and potentially useful in the control of both hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia.

  4. Dietary canola oil alters hematological indices and blood lipids in neonatal piglets fed formula.

    PubMed

    Innis, S M; Dyer, R A

    1999-07-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of canola oil on platelet characteristics, blood lipids and growth in exclusively formula-fed piglets. Piglets were fed from birth to 10 or 18 d with formula containing 51% energy from fat, with 100% fat as canola or soybean oil; 26% soybean, 59% high oleic acid sunflower and 12% flax oil (canola mimic); or 26% canola (canola blend) or soybean (soybean blend) with high oleic acid sunflower, palm and coconut oil. The canola mimic provided similar carbon chain 16 and 18 fatty acids without the sterol or 20:1 and erucic acid (22:1) of canola oil. The oil blends provided formula resembling infant formulas but with higher 16:0 and lower unsaturated fatty acid levels than in canola or soybean oil. Body weight, weight gain and heart and liver weight were not different after 10 or 18 d feeding canola when compared to soybean oil alone or blended oil formulas. Piglets fed formulas with 100% canola oil had lower platelet counts than piglets fed formula soybean oil or the canola oil mimic. Platelet counts were lower, and platelet distribution width and volume were higher, when formulas with 100% canola or soybean rather than the blended oil formulas were fed. The results show that formula fat composition influences the developing hematological system and that canola oil suppresses the normal developmental increase in platelet count in piglets by a mechanism apparently unrelated to the formula 16:0, 18:1, 18:2(n-6) or 18:3(n-3), or plasma phospholipid 20:4(n-6) or 20:5(n-3).

  5. Gene expression of GST and CYP330A1 in lipid-rich and lipid-poor female Calanus finmarchicus (Copepoda: Crustacea) exposed to dispersed oil.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Nordtug, Trond; Altin, Dag; Booth, Andy; Hessen, Kristine Mordal; Olsen, Anders J

    2009-01-01

    The copepod Calanus finmarchicus is a marine ecological key species in the Northern Atlantic food web. This species was exposed to an artificially weathered North Sea oil dispersion (oil droplets and water-soluble fractions [WSF]) and a filtered dispersion (containing only WSF) in serial dilution. Female copepods were divided into lipid-rich and lipid-poor for each exposure followed by gene expression analyses of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and cytochrome P-450 330A1 (CYP330A1). Lipid-rich copepods exhibited elevated transcription of GST and reduced transcription of CYP330A1 after exposure to both dispersed oil and WSF. In contrast, lipid-poor copepods exhibited increased transcription of CYP330A1 following exposure to WSF but not the dispersion. Data suggested that small lipid storage promotes increased bioavailability of accumulated oil compounds. Variations in response in CYP330A1 gene expression indicate that oil constituents may exert different modes of toxic action in copepods depending on their reproductive stages. The contribution of oil droplets to the observed effects seemed to be low as GST gene expression was similar after exposure to both dispersed oil and WSF. However, feeding rate in copepods exposed to dispersed oil was reduced, and this may have decreased the uptake of oil constituents via the diet. Although quantitatively higher mortality was observed in copepods exposed to the highest dispersion levels, this may result from smothering of animals by oil droplets. Furthermore, increasing dilution of both the dispersions and the WSF altered their distributions and chemical composition, which may influence the bioavailability of spilled crude oil to pelagic marine organisms. PMID:19184728

  6. Impact of dietary oils and fats on lipid peroxidation in liver and blood of albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Haggag, Mohammad El-Sayed Yassin El-Sayed; Elsanhoty, Rafaat Mohamed; Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of different dietary fat and oils (differing in their degree of saturation and unsaturation) on lipid peroxidation in liver and blood of rats. Methods The study was conducted on 50 albino rats that were randomly divided into 5 groups of 10 animals. The groups were fed on dietary butter (Group I), margarine (Group II), olive oil (Group III), sunflower oil (Group IV) and corn oil (Group V) for 7 weeks. After 12 h of diet removal, livers were excised and blood was collected to measure malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the supernatant of liver homogenate and in blood. Blood superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione peroxidase activity (GPx), serum vitamin E and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels were also measured to determine the effects of fats and oils on lipid peroxidation. Results The results indicated that no significant differences were observed in SOD activity, vitamin E and TAC levels between the five groups. However, there was significant decrease of GPx activity in groups IV and V when compared with other groups. The results indicated that feeding corn oil caused significant increases in liver and blood MDA levels as compared with other oils and fats. There were positive correlations between SOD and GPx, vitamin E and TAC as well as between GPx and TAC (r: 0.743; P<0.001) and between blood MDA and liver MDA (r: 0.897; P<0.001). The results showed also negative correlations between blood MDA on one hand and SOD, GPx, vitamin E and TAC on the other hand. Conclusions The results demonstrated that feeding oils rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) increases lipid peroxidation significantly and may raise the susceptibility of tissues to free radical oxidative damage. PMID:24144131

  7. Forensic identification of seal oils using lipid profiles and statistical models.

    PubMed

    Broadwater, Margaret H; Seaborn, Gloria T; Schwacke, John H

    2013-03-01

    Seal blubber oils are used as a source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in Canada but prohibited in the United States and (FA) European Union. Thus, a reliable method is needed to identify oils originating from seals versus fish. Two lipid profiling methods, fatty acid analysis using gas chromatography and triacylglycerol (TAG) analysis using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, were applied with statistical models to discriminate commercial oils and blubber samples harvested from marine fish and seals. Significant differences were observed among FA profiles, and seal samples differed from each of the fish oils (p ≤ 0.001). FA and TAG profiles were used to discriminate sample groups using a random forest classifier; all samples were classified correctly as seals versus fish using both methods. We propose a two-step method for the accurate identification of seal oils, with preliminary identification based on FA profile analysis and confirmation with TAG profiles.

  8. Sea buckthorn seed oil protects against the oxidative stress produced by thermally oxidized lipids.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Alam; Ullah, Sana

    2015-11-01

    Thermally oxidized vegetable ghee was fed to the rabbits for 14 days with specific doses of sea buckthorn seed oil (SO). The ghee and SO were characterized for quality parameters and fatty acid composition using GC-MS. Rabbits serum lipid profile, hematology and histology were investigated. Major fatty acids were palmitic acid (44%) and oleic acid (46%) in ghee, while SO contains oleic acid (56.4%) and linoleic acid (18.7%). Results showed that oxidized vegetable ghee increases the serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterols, triglycerides and decrease the serum glucose. Oxidized ghee produced toxic effects in the liver and hematological parameters. Sea buckthorn oil supplementation significantly lowered the serum LDL-cholesterols, triglycerides and increased serum glucose and body weight of the animals. Sea buckthorn oil was found to reduce the toxic effects and degenerative changes in the liver and thus provides protection against the thermally oxidized lipids induced oxidative stress. PMID:25976784

  9. Sea buckthorn seed oil protects against the oxidative stress produced by thermally oxidized lipids.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Alam; Ullah, Sana

    2015-11-01

    Thermally oxidized vegetable ghee was fed to the rabbits for 14 days with specific doses of sea buckthorn seed oil (SO). The ghee and SO were characterized for quality parameters and fatty acid composition using GC-MS. Rabbits serum lipid profile, hematology and histology were investigated. Major fatty acids were palmitic acid (44%) and oleic acid (46%) in ghee, while SO contains oleic acid (56.4%) and linoleic acid (18.7%). Results showed that oxidized vegetable ghee increases the serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterols, triglycerides and decrease the serum glucose. Oxidized ghee produced toxic effects in the liver and hematological parameters. Sea buckthorn oil supplementation significantly lowered the serum LDL-cholesterols, triglycerides and increased serum glucose and body weight of the animals. Sea buckthorn oil was found to reduce the toxic effects and degenerative changes in the liver and thus provides protection against the thermally oxidized lipids induced oxidative stress.

  10. Characterization of lipid oxidation in plant oils by micro-calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Wafa; Toutain, Jean; Sommier, Alain; Essafi, Wafa; Gargouri, Mohamed; Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Cansell, Maud

    2016-04-15

    A new experimental device was developed, based on the measurement of the heat flux dissipated during chemical reactions. The technique was exploited for real time monitoring of lipid oxidation in plant oils. The thermopiles were used in adiabatic configuration in order to measure the entire heat flux and improve sensitivity. Measurements were operated with a resolution of few μW as required to follow low exothermic reactions like oxidation. The validation of the device was performed by correlating conjugated diene concentrations measured by spectrophotometry and the heat flux dissipated by oxidation reactions. Our experimental approach involved several plant oils analyzed in isothermal conditions. This novel technique provides a versatile, sensitive, solvent-free and yet low-cost method to assess lipid oxidation stability, particularly suitable for the fast screening of plant oils.

  11. Lipids for Health and Beauty: Enzymatic Modification of Vegetable Oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulic acid has been extensively investigated for its potential as a cosmetic and pharmaceutical agent. We have prepared lipophilic derivatives of ferulic acid by a simple, enzyme-catalyzed transesterification reaction of ethyl ferulate with vegetable oils. Immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B...

  12. The embryo and the endosperm contribute equally to argan seed oil yield but confer distinct lipid features to argan oil.

    PubMed

    Errouane, Kheira; Doulbeau, Sylvie; Vaissayre, Virginie; Leblanc, Olivier; Collin, Myriam; Kaid-Harche, Meriem; Dussert, Stéphane

    2015-08-15

    In the perspective of studying lipid biosynthesis in the argan seed, the anatomy, ploidy level and lipid composition of mature seed tissues were investigated using an experimental design including two locations in Algeria and four years of study. Using flow cytometry, we determined that mature argan seeds consist of two well-developed tissues, the embryo and the endosperm. The lipid content of the embryo was higher than that of the endosperm, but the dry weight of the endosperm was higher. Consequently, both tissues contribute equally to seed oil yield. Considerable differences in fatty acid composition were observed between the two tissues. In particular, the endosperm 18:2 percentage was twofold higher than that of the embryo. The tocopherol content of the endosperm was also markedly higher than that of the embryo. In contrast, the endosperm and the embryo had similar sterol and triterpene alcohol contents and compositions. PMID:25794750

  13. The embryo and the endosperm contribute equally to argan seed oil yield but confer distinct lipid features to argan oil.

    PubMed

    Errouane, Kheira; Doulbeau, Sylvie; Vaissayre, Virginie; Leblanc, Olivier; Collin, Myriam; Kaid-Harche, Meriem; Dussert, Stéphane

    2015-08-15

    In the perspective of studying lipid biosynthesis in the argan seed, the anatomy, ploidy level and lipid composition of mature seed tissues were investigated using an experimental design including two locations in Algeria and four years of study. Using flow cytometry, we determined that mature argan seeds consist of two well-developed tissues, the embryo and the endosperm. The lipid content of the embryo was higher than that of the endosperm, but the dry weight of the endosperm was higher. Consequently, both tissues contribute equally to seed oil yield. Considerable differences in fatty acid composition were observed between the two tissues. In particular, the endosperm 18:2 percentage was twofold higher than that of the embryo. The tocopherol content of the endosperm was also markedly higher than that of the embryo. In contrast, the endosperm and the embryo had similar sterol and triterpene alcohol contents and compositions.

  14. Lipid nanotechnologies for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Grushin, Kirill; Dalm, Daniela; Miller, Jaimy

    2014-11-01

    We present a methodology of lipid nanotubes (LNT) and nanodisks technologies optimized in our laboratory for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins at close to physiological conditions. The application of these lipid nanotechnologies for structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is fundamental for understanding and modulating their function. The LNTs in our studies are single bilayer galactosylceramide based nanotubes of ∼20 nm inner diameter and a few microns in length, that self-assemble in aqueous solutions. The lipid nanodisks (NDs) are self-assembled discoid lipid bilayers of ∼10 nm diameter, which are stabilized in aqueous solutions by a belt of amphipathic helical scaffold proteins. By combining LNT and ND technologies, we can examine structurally how the membrane curvature and lipid composition modulates the function of the membrane-associated proteins. As proof of principle, we have engineered these lipid nanotechnologies to mimic the activated platelet's phosphtaidylserine rich membrane and have successfully assembled functional membrane-bound coagulation factor VIII in vitro for structure determination by cryo-EM. The macromolecular organization of the proteins bound to ND and LNT are further defined by fitting the known atomic structures within the calculated three-dimensional maps. The combination of LNT and ND technologies offers a means to control the design and assembly of a wide range of functional membrane-associated proteins and complexes for structural studies by cryo-EM. The presented results confirm the suitability of the developed methodology for studying the functional structure of membrane-associated proteins, such as the coagulation factors, at a close to physiological environment.

  15. Skin lipid structure controls water permeability in snake molts.

    PubMed

    Torri, Cristian; Mangoni, Alfonso; Teta, Roberta; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Fermani, Simona; Bonacini, Irene; Gazzano, Massimo; Burghammer, Manfred; Fabbri, Daniele; Falini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The role of lipids in controlling water exchange is fundamentally a matter of molecular organization. In the present study we have observed that in snake molt the water permeability drastically varies among species living in different climates and habitats. The analysis of molts from four snake species: tiger snake, Notechis scutatus, gabon viper, Bitis gabonica, rattle snake, Crotalus atrox, and grass snake, Natrix natrix, revealed correlations between the molecular composition and the structural organization of the lipid-rich mesos layer with control in water exchange as a function of temperature. It was discovered, merging data from micro-diffraction and micro-spectroscopy with those from thermal, NMR and chromatographic analyses, that this control is generated from a sophisticated structural organization that changes size and phase distribution of crystalline domains of specific lipid molecules as a function of temperature. Thus, the results of this research on four snake species suggest that in snake skins different structured lipid layers have evolved and adapted to different climates. Moreover, these lipid structures can protect, "safety", the snakes from water lost even at temperatures higher than those of their usual habitat.

  16. Coconut oil is associated with a beneficial lipid profile in pre-menopausal women in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Feranil, Alan B; Duazo, Paulita L; Kuzawa, Christopher W; Adair, Linda S

    2011-01-01

    Coconut oil is a common edible oil in many countries, and there is mixed evidence for its effects on lipid profiles and cardiovascular disease risk. Here we examine the association between coconut oil consumption and lipid profiles in a cohort of 1,839 Filipino women (age 35-69 years) participating in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey, a community based study in Metropolitan Cebu. Coconut oil intake was estimated using the mean of two 24-hour dietary recalls (9.5±8.9 grams). Lipid profiles were measured in morning plasma samples collected after an overnight fast. Linear regression models were used to estimate the association between coconut oil intake and each plasma lipid outcome after adjusting for total energy intake, age, body mass index (BMI), number of pregnancies, education, menopausal status, household assets and urban residency. Dietary coconut oil intake was positively associated with high density lipoprotein cholesterol especially among pre-menopausal women, suggesting that coconut oil intake is associated with beneficial lipid profiles. Coconut oil consumption was not significantly associated with low density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglyceride values. The relationship of coconut oil to cholesterol profiles needs further study in populations in which coconut oil consumption is common.

  17. [STUDY OF LIPIDS SEED'S OIL OF VITEX AGNUS CASTUS GROWING IN GEORGIA].

    PubMed

    Kikalishvili, B; Zurabashvili, D; Sulakvelidze, Ts; Malania, M; Turabelidze, D

    2016-07-01

    There was established the lipid composition of the seeds of Vitex agnus castus L. by the qualitative and quantitative methods of analyses. There were received neutral lipids from the seeds by extraction with hexane in the yield 10%, counted on dry material. For the divide of neutral lipids there was used silica gel plates LS 5/40 in the systems of solvents: 1. petroleum ether-diethylether-acidum aceticum (85:14:1), 2. hexane-diethylether (1:1). After obtaining neutral lipids from the residual plant shrot pollar lipids was extracted with the mixture of chloroform-methanol (2:1) and was divided on silica gel plates LS 5/40, mobile phase: 1. chloroform-methanol-25% ammonium hydrate 2. chloroform-methanol icy acetic acid-water (170:25:25:6). In the sum of polar lipids qualitatively were established phospholipids: lisophosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinosit, phospatidylethanolamine and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine, in neutral lipids, hydrocarbons, triglycerids, free fatty acids and sterines. By the method of high performance liquid chromatography analyses there were identified following free fatty acids: lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, linolic, linolenic, arachidic and begenic, unsaturated oleic and polyunsaturated linolic and linolenic acids. obtained oil with unique composition from the seeds of Vitex agnus-castus indicates to its high biological activity and importance for usage in medicine. PMID:27661281

  18. [STUDY OF LIPIDS SEED'S OIL OF VITEX AGNUS CASTUS GROWING IN GEORGIA].

    PubMed

    Kikalishvili, B; Zurabashvili, D; Sulakvelidze, Ts; Malania, M; Turabelidze, D

    2016-07-01

    There was established the lipid composition of the seeds of Vitex agnus castus L. by the qualitative and quantitative methods of analyses. There were received neutral lipids from the seeds by extraction with hexane in the yield 10%, counted on dry material. For the divide of neutral lipids there was used silica gel plates LS 5/40 in the systems of solvents: 1. petroleum ether-diethylether-acidum aceticum (85:14:1), 2. hexane-diethylether (1:1). After obtaining neutral lipids from the residual plant shrot pollar lipids was extracted with the mixture of chloroform-methanol (2:1) and was divided on silica gel plates LS 5/40, mobile phase: 1. chloroform-methanol-25% ammonium hydrate 2. chloroform-methanol icy acetic acid-water (170:25:25:6). In the sum of polar lipids qualitatively were established phospholipids: lisophosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinosit, phospatidylethanolamine and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine, in neutral lipids, hydrocarbons, triglycerids, free fatty acids and sterines. By the method of high performance liquid chromatography analyses there were identified following free fatty acids: lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, linolic, linolenic, arachidic and begenic, unsaturated oleic and polyunsaturated linolic and linolenic acids. obtained oil with unique composition from the seeds of Vitex agnus-castus indicates to its high biological activity and importance for usage in medicine.

  19. Effect of chemical permeation enhancers on stratum corneum barrier lipid organizational structure and interferon alpha permeability.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Shadi H; Saliaj, Evi; Wettig, Shawn D; Dong, Chilbert; Ivanova, Marina V; Huzil, J Torin; Foldvari, Marianna

    2013-06-01

    The outermost layer of the skin, known as the stratum corneum (SC), is composed of dead corneocytes embedded in an intercellular lipid matrix consisting of ceramides, free fatty acids, and cholesterol. The high level of organization within this matrix protects the body by limiting the permeation of most compounds through the skin. While essential for its protective functions, the SC poses a significant barrier for the delivery of topically applied pharmaceutical agents. Chemical permeation enhancers (CPEs) can increase delivery of small drug compounds into the skin by interacting with the intercellular lipids through physical processes including extraction, fluidization, increased disorder, and phase separation. However, it is not clear whether these same mechanisms are involved in delivery of biotherapeutic macromolecules, such as proteins. Here we describe the effect of three categories of CPEs {solvents [ethanol, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (transcutol), oleic acid], terpenes [menthol, nerol, camphor, methyl salicylate], and surfactants [Tween 80, SDS, benzalkonium chloride, polyoxyl 40 hydrogenated castor oil (Cremophor RH40), didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), didecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB)]} on the lipid organizational structure of human SC as determined by X-ray scattering studies. Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering studies were conducted to correlate the degree of structural changes and hydrocarbon chain packing in SC lipids caused by these various classes of CPEs to the extent of permeation of interferon alpha-2b (IFNα), a 19 kDa protein drug, into human skin. With the exception of solvents, propylene glycol and ethanol, all classes of CPEs caused increased disordering of lamellar and lateral packing of lipids. We observed that the highest degree of SC lipid disordering was caused by surfactants (especially SDS, DDAB, and DTAB) followed by terpenes, such as nerol. Interestingly, in vitro skin permeation studies

  20. Non-lamellar lipid liquid crystalline structures at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chang, Debby P; Barauskas, Justas; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P; Wadsäter, Maria; Tiberg, Fredrik; Nylander, Tommy

    2015-08-01

    The self-assembly of lipids leads to the formation of a rich variety of nano-structures, not only restricted to lipid bilayers, but also encompassing non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures, such as cubic, hexagonal, and sponge phases. These non-lamellar phases have been increasingly recognized as important for living systems, both in terms of providing compartmentalization and as regulators of biological activity. Consequently, they are of great interest for their potential as delivery systems in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic applications. The compartmentalizing nature of these phases features mono- or bicontinuous networks of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. To utilize these non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures in biomedical devices for analyses and drug delivery, it is crucial to understand how they interact with and respond to different types of interfaces. Such non-lamellar interfacial layers can be used to entrap functional biomolecules that respond to lipid curvature as well as the confinement. It is also important to understand the structural changes of deposited lipid in relation to the corresponding bulk dispersions. They can be controlled by changing the lipid composition or by introducing components that can alter the curvature or by deposition on nano-structured surface, e.g. vertical nano-wire arrays. Progress in the area of liquid crystalline lipid based nanoparticles opens up new possibilities for the preparation of well-defined surface films with well-defined nano-structures. This review will focus on recent progress in the formation of non-lamellar dispersions and their interfacial properties at the solid/liquid and biologically relevant interfaces.

  1. Non-lamellar lipid liquid crystalline structures at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chang, Debby P; Barauskas, Justas; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P; Wadsäter, Maria; Tiberg, Fredrik; Nylander, Tommy

    2015-08-01

    The self-assembly of lipids leads to the formation of a rich variety of nano-structures, not only restricted to lipid bilayers, but also encompassing non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures, such as cubic, hexagonal, and sponge phases. These non-lamellar phases have been increasingly recognized as important for living systems, both in terms of providing compartmentalization and as regulators of biological activity. Consequently, they are of great interest for their potential as delivery systems in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic applications. The compartmentalizing nature of these phases features mono- or bicontinuous networks of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. To utilize these non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures in biomedical devices for analyses and drug delivery, it is crucial to understand how they interact with and respond to different types of interfaces. Such non-lamellar interfacial layers can be used to entrap functional biomolecules that respond to lipid curvature as well as the confinement. It is also important to understand the structural changes of deposited lipid in relation to the corresponding bulk dispersions. They can be controlled by changing the lipid composition or by introducing components that can alter the curvature or by deposition on nano-structured surface, e.g. vertical nano-wire arrays. Progress in the area of liquid crystalline lipid based nanoparticles opens up new possibilities for the preparation of well-defined surface films with well-defined nano-structures. This review will focus on recent progress in the formation of non-lamellar dispersions and their interfacial properties at the solid/liquid and biologically relevant interfaces. PMID:25435157

  2. Bioactive lipids, radical scavenging potential, and antimicrobial properties of cold pressed clove (Syzygium aromaticum) oil.

    PubMed

    Assiri, Adel Mohamad Ali; Hassanien, Mohamed F R

    2013-11-01

    Health promoting cold pressed oils may improve human health and prevent certain diseases. It is hard to find any research concerning the composition and functional properties of cold pressed clove (Syzygium aromaticum) oil (CO). Cold pressed CO was evaluated for its lipid classes, fatty acid profiles, and tocol contents. In addition, antiradical and antimicrobial properties of CO were evaluated. The amounts of neutral lipids in CO was the highest (∼94.7% of total lipids), followed by glycolipids and phospholipids. The main fatty acids in CO were linoleic and oleic, which comprise together ∼80% of total fatty acids. Stearic and palmitic acids were the main saturated fatty acids. α- and γ-tocopherols and δ-tocotrienol were the main detected tocols. CO had higher antiradical action against DPPH• and galvinoxyl radicals than virgin olive oil. The results of antimicrobial properties revealed that CO inhibited the growth of all tested microorganisms. CO had a drastic effect on the biosynthesis of proteins and lipids in cells of Bacillus subtilis. In consideration of potential utilization, detailed knowledge on the composition and functional properties of CO is of major importance. PMID:24180551

  3. Bioactive lipids, radical scavenging potential, and antimicrobial properties of cold pressed clove (Syzygium aromaticum) oil.

    PubMed

    Assiri, Adel Mohamad Ali; Hassanien, Mohamed F R

    2013-11-01

    Health promoting cold pressed oils may improve human health and prevent certain diseases. It is hard to find any research concerning the composition and functional properties of cold pressed clove (Syzygium aromaticum) oil (CO). Cold pressed CO was evaluated for its lipid classes, fatty acid profiles, and tocol contents. In addition, antiradical and antimicrobial properties of CO were evaluated. The amounts of neutral lipids in CO was the highest (∼94.7% of total lipids), followed by glycolipids and phospholipids. The main fatty acids in CO were linoleic and oleic, which comprise together ∼80% of total fatty acids. Stearic and palmitic acids were the main saturated fatty acids. α- and γ-tocopherols and δ-tocotrienol were the main detected tocols. CO had higher antiradical action against DPPH• and galvinoxyl radicals than virgin olive oil. The results of antimicrobial properties revealed that CO inhibited the growth of all tested microorganisms. CO had a drastic effect on the biosynthesis of proteins and lipids in cells of Bacillus subtilis. In consideration of potential utilization, detailed knowledge on the composition and functional properties of CO is of major importance.

  4. Effect of sesame oil on serum and liver lipid profiles in the rat.

    PubMed

    Satchithanandam, S; Chanderbhan, R; Kharroubi, A T; Calvert, R J; Klurfeld, D; Tepper, S A; Kritchevsky, D

    1996-01-01

    In our previous study (Satchithanandam, S., Reicks, M., Calvert, R.J., Cassidy, M.M. and Kritchevsky, D. (1993) J. Nutr. 123, 1852-1858), we found that the absorption of lymphatic cholesterol by rats fed diets containing 24% sesame oil was about 50% less than that by rats fed the control diet containing no sesame oil. The effect of sesame oil on serum cholesterol levels was not determined at that time. In the present study, three groups of male Wistar rats (75-100 g) were fed a control diet or a diet containing 12 or 24% sesame oil. To increase serum cholesterol levels, 1% cholesterol and 0.5% cholic acid were added to each diet. After rats were fed for 4 weeks, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were measured in the serum. Liver weight and cholesterol and triglyceride levels were determined. Liver cholesterol levels were significantly lower in rats fed the 24% sesame oil diet, and the liver lipid level was significantly higher in the 24% sesame oil-fed group, compared with levels in the group fed the control diet. Liver weights and esterified cholesterol and liver triglyceride levels were not significantly different among the groups. Levels of serum total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were significantly lower in rats fed the 24% sesame oil diet, compared with levels in the control group. Serum triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol levels did not differ significantly among the groups. The mechanism by which a diet containing 24% sesame oil reduces levels of serum and liver cholesterol, liver LDL cholesterol, and liver lipids is not known. However, the high degree of unsaturation (85%) of sesame oil and the presence of linoleic acid may be important factors. PMID:8979168

  5. Additive effect of linseed oil supplementation on the lipid profiles of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Avelino, Ana Paula A; Oliveira, Gláucia MM; Ferreira, Célia CD; Luiz, Ronir R; Rosa, Glorimar

    2015-01-01

    Background Linseed oil has been investigated as a rich source of n-3 series polyunsaturated fatty acids, which mainly produce a non-atherogenic lipid profile. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of linseed oil supplementation associated with nutritional guidelines on the lipid profiles of older adults, according to the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Methods We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with 110 older adults randomized in two groups: placebo and linseed oil. The linseed oil group received supplementation with 3 g of linseed oil. Both groups received nutritional guidance and were supplemented for 90 days with monthly blood collection for biochemical analysis. The dietary intake of saturated fat was subdivided into low (<7% SFA/day of the total energy value) and high consumption groups (>7% SFA/day of the total energy value). Results Low SFA (<7% SFA/day of total energy value) consumption was associated with lower total cholesterol concentrations. However, we observed that the linseed oil group, including older adults who consumed >7% SFA/day, had a greater reduction in total cholesterol than the placebo group (P=0.020). The same was observed for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P<0.050), suggesting an additive effect of linseed oil and diet. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations were increased significantly in only the linseed group, suggesting that the nutritional intervention alone did not improve HDL cholesterol. Conclusion The results suggest that the nutritional intervention was effective, but linseed oil showed notable effects by increasing the HDL cholesterol concentration. In addition, consumption of <7% SFA/day of the total energy value increased the effect of linseed oil, demonstrating the importance of reducing the consumption of saturated fat. PMID:26543357

  6. The effect of surfactant composition on the chemical and structural properties of nanostructured lipid carriers.

    PubMed

    Karn-Orachai, Kullavadee; Smith, Siwaporn Meejoo; Phunpee, Sarunya; Treethong, Alongkot; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Pratontep, Sirapat; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong

    2014-01-01

    Fine-tuning the nanoscale structure and morphology of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) is central to improving drug loading and stability of the particles. The role of surfactant charge on controlling the structure, the physicochemical properties and the stability of NLCs has been investigated using three surfactant types (cationic, anionic, non-ionic), and mixed surfactants. Either one, a mixture of two, or a mixture of three surfactants were used to coat the NLCs, with these classified as one, two and three surfactant systems, respectively. The mixed (two and three) surfactant systems produced smaller NLC particles and yielded NLCs with lower crystallinity than the one surfactant system. The combined effects of the ionic and the non-ionic surfactants may play a key role in assisting the lipid-oil mixing, as well as maintaining colloidal repulsion between NLC particles. In contrast, for the three surfactant system, the lipid-oil mixture in the NLCs appeared less homogenous. This was also reflected in the results of the stability study, which indicated that NLC particle sizes in two surfactant systems appeared to be retained over longer periods than for other surfactant systems. PMID:24861323

  7. Structural elucidation of olive pomace fed sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) polar lipids with cardioprotective activities.

    PubMed

    Nasopoulou, Constantina; Smith, Terry; Detopoulou, Maria; Tsikrika, Constantina; Papaharisis, Leonidas; Barkas, Dimitris; Zabetakis, Ioannis

    2014-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to structurally characterise the polar lipids of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), fed with an experimental diet containing olive pomace (OP), that exhibit cardioprotective activities. OP has been added to conventional fish oil (FO) feed at 4% and this was the OP diet, having been supplemented as finishing diet to fish. Sea bass was aquacultured using either FO or OP diet. At the end of the dietary experiment, lipids in both samples of fish muscle were quantified and HPLC fractionated. The in vitro cardioprotective properties of the polar lipid fractions, using washed rabbit's platelets, have been assessed and the two most biologically active fractions were further analysed by mass spectrometry. The gas-chromatrograpy-mass spectrometric data shows that these two fractions contain low levels of myristic (14:0), oleic (18:1 cis ω-9) and linoleic acids (18:2 ω-6), but high levels of palmitic (16:0) and stearic acids (18:0) as well as eicosadienoic acid (20:2 ω-6). The first fraction (MS1) also contained significant levels of arachidonic acid (20:4 ω-6) and the omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (22:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6). Electrospray-mass spectrometry elucidated that the lipid composition of the two fractions contained various diacyl-glycerophospholipids species, where the majority of them have either 18:0 or 18:1 fatty acids in the sn-1 position and either 22:6 or 20:2 fatty acids in the sn-2 position for MS1 and MS2, respectively. Our research focuses on the structure/function relationship of fish muscle polar lipids and cardiovascular diseases and structural data are given for polar lipid HPLC fractions with strong cardioprotective properties. PMID:24128590

  8. Structural elucidation of olive pomace fed sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) polar lipids with cardioprotective activities.

    PubMed

    Nasopoulou, Constantina; Smith, Terry; Detopoulou, Maria; Tsikrika, Constantina; Papaharisis, Leonidas; Barkas, Dimitris; Zabetakis, Ioannis

    2014-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to structurally characterise the polar lipids of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), fed with an experimental diet containing olive pomace (OP), that exhibit cardioprotective activities. OP has been added to conventional fish oil (FO) feed at 4% and this was the OP diet, having been supplemented as finishing diet to fish. Sea bass was aquacultured using either FO or OP diet. At the end of the dietary experiment, lipids in both samples of fish muscle were quantified and HPLC fractionated. The in vitro cardioprotective properties of the polar lipid fractions, using washed rabbit's platelets, have been assessed and the two most biologically active fractions were further analysed by mass spectrometry. The gas-chromatrograpy-mass spectrometric data shows that these two fractions contain low levels of myristic (14:0), oleic (18:1 cis ω-9) and linoleic acids (18:2 ω-6), but high levels of palmitic (16:0) and stearic acids (18:0) as well as eicosadienoic acid (20:2 ω-6). The first fraction (MS1) also contained significant levels of arachidonic acid (20:4 ω-6) and the omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (22:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6). Electrospray-mass spectrometry elucidated that the lipid composition of the two fractions contained various diacyl-glycerophospholipids species, where the majority of them have either 18:0 or 18:1 fatty acids in the sn-1 position and either 22:6 or 20:2 fatty acids in the sn-2 position for MS1 and MS2, respectively. Our research focuses on the structure/function relationship of fish muscle polar lipids and cardiovascular diseases and structural data are given for polar lipid HPLC fractions with strong cardioprotective properties.

  9. Postprandial effects on plasma lipids and satiety hormones from intake of liposomes made from fractionated oat oil: two randomized crossover studies

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, Lena; Rosenquist, Anna; Rehfeld, Jens F.; Härröd, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background The composition and surface structure of dietary lipids influence their intestinal degradation. Intake of liposomes made of fractionated oat oil (LOO) is suggested to affect the digestion process and postprandial lipemia and also induce satiety. Objective In the present study, the metabolic effects on plasma lipids and gut hormones related to satiety were investigated in healthy individuals after intake of LOO, with dairy lipids as placebo. Design Two blinded randomized studies with crossover design were performed. In the first study, 19 subjects consumed 35 g lipids from LOO or yoghurt in a breakfast meal. In a follow-up study, 15 women consumed 14 or 1.8 g lipids from LOO mixed in yoghurt. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma lipids, insulin, glucose, and intestinal hormones CCK, PYY, GLP-1, and GLP-2 before and four times after the meal. Subjective analysis of satiety was measured using a visual analog scale questionnaire. Participants recorded their food intake during the rest of the day. Results Intake of 35 and 14 g lipids from LOO significantly increased plasma concentrations of CCK, GLP-1, GLP-2, and PYY postprandially. This coincided with a prolonged elevation of triglycerides and large cholesterol-containing particles. Non-esterified fatty acids decreased after intake of 14 and 1.8 g lipids from LOO. The subjective sensation of satiety in women was increased 7 h after intake of 35 g lipids from LOO without any difference in food intake. Our results indicate that intake of 14 g lipids from LOO at breakfast substantially reduced energy intake during the rest of the day. Conclusions This study suggests that intake of LOO prolong lipid digestion, affect postprandial plasma lipids and have an effect on satiety. The effect of LOO on GLP-2 indicates that intake of LOO also improve gut health. PMID:25317122

  10. Investigating the Structure of Multicomponent Gel-Phase Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hartkamp, Remco; Moore, Timothy C; Iacovella, Christopher R; Thompson, Michael A; Bulsara, Pallav A; Moore, David J; McCabe, Clare

    2016-08-23

    Single- and multicomponent lipid bilayers of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DSPC), isostearyl isostearate, and heptadecanoyl heptadecanoate in the gel phase are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that the structural properties of multicomponent bilayers can deviate strongly from the structures of their single-component counterparts. Specifically, the lipid mixtures are shown to adopt a compact packing by offsetting the positioning depths at which different lipid species are located in the bilayer. This packing mechanism affects the area per lipid, the bilayer height, and the chain tilt angles and has important consequences for other bilayer properties, such as interfacial hydrogen bonding and bilayer permeability. In particular, the simulations suggest that bilayers containing isostearyl isostearate or heptadecanoyl heptadecanoate are less permeable than pure 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine or DSPC bilayers. Furthermore, hydrogen-bond analysis shows that the residence times of lipid-water hydrogen bonds depend strongly on the bilayer composition, with longer residence times for bilayers that have a higher DSPC content. The findings illustrate and explain the fundamental differences between the properties of single- and multicomponent bilayers. PMID:27558724

  11. Influence of aqueous phase emulsifiers on lipid oxidation in water-in-walnut oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jianhua; Zhu, Zhenbao; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2014-03-01

    Effects of selected aqueous phase emulsifiers on lipid oxidative stability of water-in-walnut oil (W/O) emulsions stabilized by polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) were evaluated. The formation of primary oxidation products (lipid hydroperoxides) and secondary oxidation products (headspace hexanal) increased with increasing dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) concentration (0.1-0.2 wt % of emulsions). In contrast, the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the aqueous phase reduced lipid hydroperoxide and hexanal formation. In addition, the presence of Tween 20 in the aqueous phase did not significantly influence lipid oxidation rates in W/O emulsions compared to the control (without Tween 20). Whey protein isolate (WPI) was observed to inhibit lipid oxidation in the W/O emulsions (0.05-0.2 wt % of emulsions). Aqueous phase pH had an important impact on the antioxidant capability of WPI, with higher pH improving its ability to inhibit lipid oxidation. The combination of WPI and DTAB in the aqueous phase suppressed the prooxidant effect of DTAB. The combination of WPI and SDS resulted in improved antioxidant activity, with inhibition being greater at pH 7.0 than at pH 3.0. These results suggest that the oxidative stability of W/O emulsions could be improved by the use of suitable emulsifiers in the aqueous phase.

  12. Bioactive Structure of Membrane Lipids and Natural Products Elucidated by a Chemistry-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Murata, Michio; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Matsumori, Nobuaki

    2015-08-01

    Determining the bioactive structure of membrane lipids is a new concept, which aims to examine the functions of lipids with respect to their three-dimensional structures. As lipids are dynamic by nature, their "structure" does not refer solely to a static picture but also to the local and global motions of the lipid molecules. We consider that interactions with lipids, which are completely defined by their structures, are controlled by the chemical, functional, and conformational matching between lipids and between lipid and protein. In this review, we describe recent advances in understanding the bioactive structures of membrane lipids bound to proteins and related molecules, including some of our recent results. By examining recent works on lipid-raft-related molecules, lipid-protein interactions, and membrane-active natural products, we discuss current perspectives on membrane structural biology.

  13. Studies on structures of lipid A-monophosphate clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faunce, Chester A.; Reichelt, Hendrik; Paradies, Henrich H.

    2011-03-01

    Single crystalline clusters of lipid A-monophosphate were grown from organic dispersions containing 5-15% (v/v) water at various volume fractions, ϕ, and temperatures. The morphology of the single lipid A-monophosphate crystals was either rhombohedral or hexagonal. The hexagonal crystals were needlelike or cylindrical in shape, with the long dimension parallel to the c axis of the unit cell. The crystalline clusters were studied using electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction. Employing molecular location methods following a Rietveld refinement and whole-pattern refinement revealed two monoclinic crystal structures in the space groups P21 and C2, both converged with RF = 0.179. The two monoclinic crystal structures were packing (hydrocarbon chains) and conformational (sugar) polymorphs. Neither of these two structures had been encountered previously. Only intramolecular hydrogen bonding was observed for the polymorphs, which were located between the amide and the carboxyl groups. Another crystalline structure was found in the volume-fraction range 2.00 × 10-3 ≤ ϕ ≤ 2.50 × 10-3, which displayed hexagonal symmetry. The hexagonal symmetry of the self-assembled lipid A-monophosphate crystalline phase might be reconciled with the monoclinic symmetry found at low-volume-fractions. Therefore, lowering the symmetry from cubic, i.e., Ia overline 3d, to rhombohedral R overline 3 m, and finally to the monoclinic space group C2 was acceptable if the lipid A-monophosphate anion was completely orientationally ordered.

  14. DNA/Fusogenic Lipid Nanocarrier Assembly: Millisecond Structural Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Angelov, Borislav; Angelova, Angelina; Filippov, Sergey K; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Drechsler, Markus; Štěpánek, Petr; Couvreur, Patrick; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2013-06-01

    Structural changes occurring on a millisecond time scale during uptake of DNA by cationic lipid nanocarriers are monitored by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) coupled to a rapid-mixing stopped-flow technique. Nanoparticles (NPs) of nanochannel organization are formed by PEGylation, hydration, and dispersion of a lipid film of the fusogenic lipid monoolein in a mixture with positively charged (DOMA) and PEGylated (DOPE-PEG2000) amphiphiles and are characterized by the inner cubic structure of very large nanochannels favorable for DNA upload. Ultrafast structural dynamics of complexation and assembly of these cubosome particles with neurotrophic plasmid DNA (pDNA) is revealed thanks to the high brightness of the employed synchrotron X-ray beam. The rate constant of the pDNA/lipid NP complexation is estimated from dynamic roentgenograms recorded at 4 ms time resolution. pDNA upload into the vastly hydrated channels of the cubosome carriers leads to a fast nanoparticle-nanoparticle structural transition and lipoplex formation involving tightly packed pDNA. PMID:26283134

  15. Sucrose Production Mediated by Lipid Metabolism Suppresses the Physical Interaction of Peroxisomes and Oil Bodies during Germination of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Cui, Songkui; Hayashi, Yasuko; Otomo, Masayoshi; Mano, Shoji; Oikawa, Kazusato; Hayashi, Makoto; Nishimura, Mikio

    2016-09-16

    Physical interaction between organelles is a flexible event and essential for cells to adapt rapidly to environmental stimuli. Germinating plants utilize oil bodies and peroxisomes to mobilize storage lipids for the generation of sucrose as the main energy source. Although membrane interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes has been widely observed, its underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here we present genetic evidence for control of the physical interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes. We identified alleles of the sdp1 mutant altered in oil body morphology. This mutant accumulates bigger and more oil body aggregates compared with the wild type and showed defects in lipid mobilization during germination. SUGAR DEPENDENT 1 (SDP1) encodes major triacylglycerol lipase in Arabidopsis Interestingly, sdp1 seedlings show enhanced physical interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes compared with the wild type, whereas exogenous sucrose supplementation greatly suppresses the interaction. The same phenomenon occurs in the peroxisomal defective 1 (ped1) mutant, defective in lipid mobilization because of impaired peroxisomal β-oxidation, indicating that sucrose production is a key factor for oil body-peroxisomal dissociation. Peroxisomal dissociation and subsequent release from oil bodies is dependent on actin filaments. We also show that a peroxisomal ATP binding cassette transporter, PED3, is the potential anchor protein to the membranes of these organelles. Our results provide novel components linking lipid metabolism and oil body-peroxisome interaction whereby sucrose may act as a negative signal for the interaction of oil bodies and peroxisomes to fine-tune lipolysis.

  16. Sucrose Production Mediated by Lipid Metabolism Suppresses the Physical Interaction of Peroxisomes and Oil Bodies during Germination of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Cui, Songkui; Hayashi, Yasuko; Otomo, Masayoshi; Mano, Shoji; Oikawa, Kazusato; Hayashi, Makoto; Nishimura, Mikio

    2016-09-16

    Physical interaction between organelles is a flexible event and essential for cells to adapt rapidly to environmental stimuli. Germinating plants utilize oil bodies and peroxisomes to mobilize storage lipids for the generation of sucrose as the main energy source. Although membrane interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes has been widely observed, its underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here we present genetic evidence for control of the physical interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes. We identified alleles of the sdp1 mutant altered in oil body morphology. This mutant accumulates bigger and more oil body aggregates compared with the wild type and showed defects in lipid mobilization during germination. SUGAR DEPENDENT 1 (SDP1) encodes major triacylglycerol lipase in Arabidopsis Interestingly, sdp1 seedlings show enhanced physical interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes compared with the wild type, whereas exogenous sucrose supplementation greatly suppresses the interaction. The same phenomenon occurs in the peroxisomal defective 1 (ped1) mutant, defective in lipid mobilization because of impaired peroxisomal β-oxidation, indicating that sucrose production is a key factor for oil body-peroxisomal dissociation. Peroxisomal dissociation and subsequent release from oil bodies is dependent on actin filaments. We also show that a peroxisomal ATP binding cassette transporter, PED3, is the potential anchor protein to the membranes of these organelles. Our results provide novel components linking lipid metabolism and oil body-peroxisome interaction whereby sucrose may act as a negative signal for the interaction of oil bodies and peroxisomes to fine-tune lipolysis. PMID:27466365

  17. Effect of seawater desalination and oil pollution on the lipid composition of blue mussels Mytilus edulis L. from the White Sea.

    PubMed

    Fokina, N N; Bakhmet, I N; Shklyarevich, G A; Nemova, N N

    2014-12-01

    A study on the effect oil pollution under normal and reduced salinity had on blue mussels Mytilus edulis L. from the White Sea in an aquarium-based experiment and in the natural habitat revealed a change in gill total lipids as a compensatory response. The cholesterol concentration and the cholesterol/phospholipids ratio in gills were found to reflect the impact of the environmental factors (oil pollution and desalination), and evidence adaptive changes in the cell membrane structure. An elevated content of storage lipids (chiefly triacylglycerols) in the mussels in the aquarium experiment indicates, first of all, the uptake and accumulation of oil products in gill cells under both normal and reduced seawater salinity, while high triacylglycerols level in gill littoral mussels from 'control' biotope in the Gulf of Kandalaksha is primarily associated with the mussel׳s pre-spawning period.

  18. Camphor Tree Seed Kernel Oil Reduces Body Fat Deposition and Improves Blood Lipids in Rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Wang, Baogui; Gong, Deming; Zeng, Cheng; Jiang, Yihao; Zeng, Zheling

    2015-08-01

    The total and positional fatty acid composition in camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora) seed kernel oil (CKO) were analyzed, and for the first time, the effect of CKO on body fat deposition and blood lipids in rats was studied. The major fatty acids in CKO were determined to be decanoic acid (C10:0, 51.49%) and dodecanoic acid (C12:0, 40.08%), and uniformly distributed at Sn-1, 3, and Sn-2 positions in triglyceride (TG). Rats were randomly divided into control, CKO, lard, and soybean oil groups. At the end of the experiment, levels of blood lipids and the fats of abdomen in the rats were measured. The main organ were weighted and used for the histological examination. The results showed that body weight and fat deposition in CKO group were significantly lower than the lard and soybean groups. Moderate consumption of CKO was found to improve the levels of blood TG and low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

  19. Data supporting beta-amyloid dimer structural transitions and protein–lipid interactions on asymmetric lipid bilayer surfaces using MD simulations on experimentally derived NMR protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Sara Y.; Chou, George; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark W.; Compton, Campbell; Cheng, Kwan H.

    2016-01-01

    This data article supports the research article entitled “Maximally Asymmetric Transbilayer Distribution of Anionic Lipids Alters the Structure and interaction with Lipids of an Amyloidogenic Protein Dimer Bound to the Membrane Surface” [1]. We describe supporting data on the binding kinetics, time evolution of secondary structure, and residue-contact maps of a surface-absorbed beta-amyloid dimer protein on different membrane surfaces. We further demonstrate the sorting of annular and non-annular regions of the protein/lipid bilayer simulation systems, and the correlation of lipid-number mismatch and surface area per lipid mismatch of asymmetric lipid membranes. PMID:27054174

  20. Data supporting beta-amyloid dimer structural transitions and protein-lipid interactions on asymmetric lipid bilayer surfaces using MD simulations on experimentally derived NMR protein structures.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sara Y; Chou, George; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark W; Compton, Campbell; Cheng, Kwan H

    2016-06-01

    This data article supports the research article entitled "Maximally Asymmetric Transbilayer Distribution of Anionic Lipids Alters the Structure and interaction with Lipids of an Amyloidogenic Protein Dimer Bound to the Membrane Surface" [1]. We describe supporting data on the binding kinetics, time evolution of secondary structure, and residue-contact maps of a surface-absorbed beta-amyloid dimer protein on different membrane surfaces. We further demonstrate the sorting of annular and non-annular regions of the protein/lipid bilayer simulation systems, and the correlation of lipid-number mismatch and surface area per lipid mismatch of asymmetric lipid membranes.

  1. Comparison of effects of soft margarine, blended, ghee, and unhydrogenated oil with hydrogenated oil on serum lipids: A randomized clinical trail

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadifard, Noushin; Hosseini, Mohsen; Sajjadi, Firoozeh; Maghroun, Maryam; Boshtam, Maryam; Nouri, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Trans fatty acids (TFAs) are known as the most harmful type of dietary fats. Therefore, this study was done to compare the effects of some different oils including unhydrogenated, blended, ghee, and soft magazine with hydrogenated oil on serum lipid profile of healthy adults. METHODS This study was a randomized clinical trial conducted on 206 healthy participants of 20 to 60 years of age. Subjects were randomly divided into 5 groups and each of them was treated with a diet containing unhydrogenated oil, ghee, blended oil, soft margarine, or hydrogenated oil for 40 days. Fasting serum lipids were measured before and after the study. RESULTS Compared to hydrogenated oil, total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) had a significant reduction in all groups, LDL-C declined in unhydrogenated oil and soft margarine groups, and apolipoprotein (Apo) B only in unhydrogenated oil group (all P < 0.05). However, there was a significant enhancement in ApoA of ghee oil (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Consuming unhydrogenated oil, ghee, soft margarine, and blended oil had some beneficial effects on serum lipids. PMID:24575140

  2. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Jakob; Köper, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties. PMID:27249006

  3. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jakob; Köper, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties. PMID:27249006

  4. Structure and Orientational Texture of Self-Organizing Lipid Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E. B.; Miller, C. E.; Majewski, J.; Mulder, D. J.; Kuhl, T. L.

    2009-06-12

    The structure of single supported dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayers prepared by vesicle fusion or Langmuir-Blodgett-Schaeffer (LBS) deposition techniques was characterized by x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction in bulk water. LBS bilayers display symmetric leaflets similar to monolayer structures, while vesicle fusion yields more inhomogeneous bilayers. Diffraction establishes that lipids are always coupled across the bilayer even when leaflets are deposited independently and suggests the existence of orientational texture.

  5. The Use of Fish Oil Lipid Emulsion in the Treatment of Intestinal Failure Associated Liver Disease (IFALD)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Melissa I.; Puder, Mark; Gura, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, fish oil based lipid emulsions have been used in the treatment of intestinal failure associated liver disease, with a noticeable impact on decreasing the incidence of morbidity and mortality of this often fatal condition. With this new therapy, however, different approaches have emerged as well as concerns about potential risks with using fish oil as a monotherapy. This review will discuss the experience to date with this lipid emulsion along with the rational for its use, controversies and concerns. PMID:23363993

  6. Structural Basis for Antibody Recognition of Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Haji-Ghassemi, Omid; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Rodriguez, Teresa; Brade, Lore; Kosma, Paul; Brade, Helmut; Evans, Stephen V.

    2015-01-01

    Septic shock is a leading cause of death, and it results from an inflammatory cascade triggered by the presence of microbial products in the blood. Certain LPS from Gram-negative bacteria are very potent inducers and are responsible for a high percentage of septic shock cases. Despite decades of research, mAbs specific for lipid A (the endotoxic principle of LPS) have not been successfully developed into a clinical treatment for sepsis. To understand the molecular basis for the observed inability to translate in vitro specificity for lipid A into clinical potential, the structures of antigen-binding fragments of mAbs S1–15 and A6 have been determined both in complex with lipid A carbohydrate backbone and in the unliganded form. The two antibodies have separate germ line origins that generate two markedly different combining-site pockets that are complementary both in shape and charge to the antigen. mAb A6 binds lipid A through both variable light and heavy chain residues, whereas S1–15 utilizes exclusively the variable heavy chain. Both antibodies bind lipid A such that the GlcN-O6 attachment point for the core oligosaccharide is buried in the combining site, which explains the lack of LPS recognition. Longstanding reports of polyspecificity of anti-lipid A antibodies toward single-stranded DNA combined with observed homology of S1–15 and A6 and the reports of several single-stranded DNA-specific mAbs prompted the determination of the structure of S1–15 in complex with single-stranded DNA fragments, which may provide clues about the genesis of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, thyroiditis, and rheumatic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26085093

  7. Structure and shear response of lipid monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1990-02-01

    Organic monolayers and multilayers are both scientifically fascinating and technologically promising; they are, however, both complex systems and relatively inaccessible to experimental probes. In this Progress Report, we describe our X-ray diffraction studies, which have given us substantial new information about the structures and phase transitions in monolayers on the surface of water; our use of these monolayers as a unique probe of the dynamics of wetting and spreading; and our studies of monolayer mechanical properties using a simple but effective technique available to anyone using the Wilhelmy method to measure surface tension.

  8. Wet and dry extraction of coconut oil: impact on lipid metabolic and antioxidant status in cholesterol coadministered rats.

    PubMed

    Nevin, K Govindan; Rajamohan, Thankappan

    2009-08-01

    Because coconut oil extracted by wet process (virgin coconut oil, VCO) is gaining popularity among consumers, this study was conducted to evaluate VCO compared with coconut oil extracted by dry process (copra oil, CO) for their influence on lipid parameters, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant status in rats coadministered with cholesterol. VCO, CO, and cholesterol were fed in a semi-synthetic diet to 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats for 45 days. After the experimental period, lipid and lipid peroxide levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were observed. Chemical composition and antioxidant properties of the polyphenolic fraction from VCO and CO were also analyzed. The results showed that lipid and lipid peroxide levels were lower in VCO-fed animals than in animals fed either CO or cholesterol alone. Antioxidant enzyme activities in VCO-fed animals were comparable with those in control animals. Although the fatty acid profiles of both oils were similar, a significantly higher level of unsaponifiable components was observed in VCO. Polyphenols from VCO also showed significant radical-scavenging activity compared with those from CO. This study clearly indicates the potential benefits of VCO over CO in maintaining lipid metabolism and antioxidant status. These effects may be attributed in part to the presence of biologically active minor unsaponifiable components.

  9. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with marine and botanical oils: influence on serum lipids.

    PubMed

    Olendzki, Barbara C; Leung, Katherine; Van Buskirk, Susan; Reed, George; Zurier, Robert B

    2011-01-01

    The gap in mortality between patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the general population (1.5-3.0 fold risk) is increasing. This disparity is attributable mainly to cardiovascular disease (CVD), as the CVD risk is comparable to patients with diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study is to determine whether borage seed oil rich in gamma-linolenic acid, fish oil rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or the combination of both oils are useful treatments for dyslipidemia in patients with RA. We randomized patients into a double blind, 18 month trial. Mixed effects models were used to compare trends over time in serum lipids. No significant differences were observed between the three groups: All three treatment groups exhibited similar meaningful improvement in the lipid profile at 9 and 18 months. When all groups were combined, these treatments significantly reduced total and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, increased HDL-cholesterol, and improved the atherogenic index. All improvements observed at 9 months persisted at 18 months (P < 0.001 verses baseline). Conclusion. Marine and botanical oils may be useful treatment for rheumatoid arthritis patients who are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease compared to the general population. PMID:22007257

  10. Structural interactions of a voltage sensor toxin with lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Milescu, Mirela; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J.; White, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Protein toxins from tarantula venom alter the activity of diverse ion channel proteins, including voltage, stretch, and ligand-activated cation channels. Although tarantula toxins have been shown to partition into membranes, and the membrane is thought to play an important role in their activity, the structural interactions between these toxins and lipid membranes are poorly understood. Here, we use solid-state NMR and neutron diffraction to investigate the interactions between a voltage sensor toxin (VSTx1) and lipid membranes, with the goal of localizing the toxin in the membrane and determining its influence on membrane structure. Our results demonstrate that VSTx1 localizes to the headgroup region of lipid membranes and produces a thinning of the bilayer. The toxin orients such that many basic residues are in the aqueous phase, all three Trp residues adopt interfacial positions, and several hydrophobic residues are within the membrane interior. One remarkable feature of this preferred orientation is that the surface of the toxin that mediates binding to voltage sensors is ideally positioned within the lipid bilayer to favor complex formation between the toxin and the voltage sensor. PMID:25453087

  11. Structural interactions of a voltage sensor toxin with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Milescu, Mirela; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J; White, Stephen

    2014-12-16

    Protein toxins from tarantula venom alter the activity of diverse ion channel proteins, including voltage, stretch, and ligand-activated cation channels. Although tarantula toxins have been shown to partition into membranes, and the membrane is thought to play an important role in their activity, the structural interactions between these toxins and lipid membranes are poorly understood. Here, we use solid-state NMR and neutron diffraction to investigate the interactions between a voltage sensor toxin (VSTx1) and lipid membranes, with the goal of localizing the toxin in the membrane and determining its influence on membrane structure. Our results demonstrate that VSTx1 localizes to the headgroup region of lipid membranes and produces a thinning of the bilayer. The toxin orients such that many basic residues are in the aqueous phase, all three Trp residues adopt interfacial positions, and several hydrophobic residues are within the membrane interior. One remarkable feature of this preferred orientation is that the surface of the toxin that mediates binding to voltage sensors is ideally positioned within the lipid bilayer to favor complex formation between the toxin and the voltage sensor. PMID:25453087

  12. [Fish oil containing lipid emulsions in critically ill patients: Critical analysis and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Manzanares, W; Langlois, P L

    2016-01-01

    Third-generation lipid emulsions (LE) are soybean oil sparing strategies with immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory effects. Current evidence supporting the use of intravenous (i.v) fish oil (FO) LE in critically ill patients requiring parenteral nutrition or receiving enteral nutrition (pharmaconutrient strategy) mainly derives from small phase ii clinical trials in heterogenous intensive care unit patient's population. Over the last three years, there have been published different systematic reviews and meta-analyses evaluating the effects of FO containing LE in the critically ill. Recently, it has been demonstrated that i.v FO based LE may be able to significantly reduce the incidence of infections as well as mechanical ventilation days and hospital length of stay. Nonetheless, more robust evidence is required before giving a definitive recommendation. Finally, we strongly believe that a dosing study is required before new phase iii clinical trials comparing i.v FO containing emulsions versus other soybean oil strategies can be conducted.

  13. Size and structure of spontaneously forming liposomes in lipid/PEG-lipid mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Rovira-Bru, Montse; Thompson, David H; Szleifer, Igal

    2002-01-01

    The optimal size and structure of spontaneous liposomes formed from lipid/polymer-lipid mixtures was calculated using a molecular mean-field theory. The equilibrium properties of the aggregate are obtained by expanding the free energy of a symmetric planar bilayer up to fourth order in curvature and composition of lipid and polymer. The expansion coefficients are obtained from a molecular theory that explicitly accounts for the conformational degrees of freedom of the hydrophobic tails of the lipid and of the polymer chains. The polar headgroup interactions are treated using the opposing forces model. The onset of stability of the symmetric planar film is obtained from the expansion up to quadratic order. For unstable planar films the equilibrium size and structure of the spherical aggregates is obtained from the second- and fourth-order terms in curvature and composition of lipid and polymer. The driving force for the formation of spontaneous vesicles is the asymmetric distribution of polymers between the inner and outer monolayer. The composition asymmetry between the two monolayers in the aggregates is much larger for the polymer component than for the lipid, and it depends upon the size of the aggregate. The smaller the aggregate, the more asymmetric the distribution of polymer and lipid. The tendency of the polymer chains to be tethered on the outer surface of the aggregate is very strong, and it limits the range of polymer loading for which spherical liposomes are stable. A very small excess of polymer loading causes small spherical micelles to be the optimal aggregates. In these cases spontaneous liposomes can form as metastable aggregates, showing as a local minima in the free energy. Even for metastable aggregates the asymmetric distribution of polymers is very large. The elastic constants of the asymmetric bilayer in the spherical aggregate are found to be the same as those that are calculated from the planar symmetric film. Therefore, the stable

  14. Comparison of Formulas Based on Lipid Emulsions of Olive Oil, Soybean Oil, or Several Oils for Parenteral Nutrition: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yu-Jie; Sun, Li-Li; Li, Meng-Ying; Ding, Cui-Ling; Su, Yu-Cheng; Sun, Li-Juan; Xue, Sen-Hai; Yan, Feng; Zhao, Chang-Hai; Wang, Wen

    2016-03-01

    Many studies have reported that olive oil-based lipid emulsion (LE) formulas of soybean oil, medium-chain triglycerides, olive oil, and fish oil (SMOF) may be a viable alternative for parenteral nutrition. However, some randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) have raised concerns regarding the nutritional benefits and safety of SMOFs. We searched principally the MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Scopus, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases from inception to March 2014 for the relevant literature and conducted a meta-analysis of 15 selected RCTs that 1) compared either olive oil- or SMOF-based LEs with soybean oil-based LEs and 2) reported plasma concentrations of α-tocopherol, oleic acid, and ω-6 (n-6) and ω-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and liver concentrations of total bilirubin and the enzymes alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, and γ-glutamyl transferase. The meta-analysis suggested that SMOF-based LEs were associated with higher plasma concentrations of plasma α-tocopherol, oleic acid, and the ω-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. Olive oil- and SMOF-based LEs correlated with lower plasma concentrations of long-chain ω-6 PUFAs and were similar to soybean oil-based LEs with regard to their effects on liver function indicators. In summary, olive oil- and SMOF-based LEs have nutritional advantages over soybean oil-based LEs and are similarly safe. However, their performance in clinical settings requires further investigation. PMID:26980811

  15. Comparison of Formulas Based on Lipid Emulsions of Olive Oil, Soybean Oil, or Several Oils for Parenteral Nutrition: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yu-Jie; Sun, Li-Li; Li, Meng-Ying; Ding, Cui-Ling; Su, Yu-Cheng; Sun, Li-Juan; Xue, Sen-Hai; Yan, Feng; Zhao, Chang-Hai; Wang, Wen

    2016-03-01

    Many studies have reported that olive oil-based lipid emulsion (LE) formulas of soybean oil, medium-chain triglycerides, olive oil, and fish oil (SMOF) may be a viable alternative for parenteral nutrition. However, some randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) have raised concerns regarding the nutritional benefits and safety of SMOFs. We searched principally the MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Scopus, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases from inception to March 2014 for the relevant literature and conducted a meta-analysis of 15 selected RCTs that 1) compared either olive oil- or SMOF-based LEs with soybean oil-based LEs and 2) reported plasma concentrations of α-tocopherol, oleic acid, and ω-6 (n-6) and ω-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and liver concentrations of total bilirubin and the enzymes alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, and γ-glutamyl transferase. The meta-analysis suggested that SMOF-based LEs were associated with higher plasma concentrations of plasma α-tocopherol, oleic acid, and the ω-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. Olive oil- and SMOF-based LEs correlated with lower plasma concentrations of long-chain ω-6 PUFAs and were similar to soybean oil-based LEs with regard to their effects on liver function indicators. In summary, olive oil- and SMOF-based LEs have nutritional advantages over soybean oil-based LEs and are similarly safe. However, their performance in clinical settings requires further investigation.

  16. A bicontinuous tetrahedral structure in a liquid-crystalline lipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longley, William; McIntosh, Thomas J.

    1983-06-01

    The structure of most lipid-water phases can be visualized as an ordered distribution of two liquid media, water and hydrocarbons, separated by a continuous surface covered by the polar groups of the lipid molecules1. In the cubic phases in particular, rod-like elements are linked into three-dimensional networks1,2. Two of these phases (space groups Ia3d and Pn3m) contain two such three-dimensional networks mutually inter-woven and unconnected. Under the constraints of energy minimization3, the interface between the components in certain of these `porous fluids' may well resemble one of the periodic minimal surface structures of the type described mathematically by Schwarz4,5. A structure of this sort has been proposed for the viscous isotropic (cubic) form of glycerol monooleate (GMO) by Larsson et al.6 who suggested that the X-ray diagrams of Lindblom et al.7 indicated a body-centred crystal structure in which lipid bilayers might be arranged as in Schwarz's octahedral surface4. We have now found that at high water contents, a primitive cubic lattice better fits the X-ray evidence with the material in the crystal arranged in a tetrahedral way. The lipid appears to form a single bilayer, continuous in three dimensions, separating two continuous interlinked networks of water. Each of the water networks has the symmetry of the diamond crystal structure and the bilayer lies in the space between them following a surface resembling Schwarz's tetrahedral surface4.

  17. Effect of Variable Solvents on Particle Size of Geranium Oil-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticle (Ge-SLN) For Mosquito Repellent Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asnawi, Syalwati; Aziz, Azila A.; Aziz, Ramlan A.

    2009-06-01

    A new delivery system for insect repellent is proposed by the incorporation of geranium oil into solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN). A variety of solvents which act as co-surfactants, were introduced to increase the particle size of GE-SLN. Ethanol, which has a high boiling point and a long chain alcohol produced larger particle than dichloromethane. The structure of SLN was not stable when methanol and acetone were used as co-solvents. Concentration of solvents can also influence the size of SLN. In vitro release experiments showed that SLN was able to reduce the rapid evaporation of geranium oil.

  18. Dietary hydrogenated soybean oil affects lipid and vitamin E metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Naziroglu, Mustafa; Brandsch, Corinna

    2006-04-01

    Fatty acids containing stearic acid, which are found in hydrogenated fat, may have a detrimental effect on the cholesterol and triacylglycerol (TAG) content of plasma lipoproteins, and on the absorption of fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins. The aim of our study was to examine the tissue concentration of lipids and vitamins A and E after feeding a hydrogenated soybean oil (HSO) diet to rats. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups, fed on coconut oil (control) and HSO, respectively in amounts corresponding to 15% of the total feed. Plasma total cholesterol, VLDL- and LDL-cholesterol, lipid peroxidation and daily excretion of the TAG and cholesterol in feces were higher in the HSO than in the control group. TAG values in plasma and liver, and HDL-cholesterol levels in plasma were lower in the HSO than in the control group. The same was true for phospholipids in plasma and for saturated fatty acids, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids levels in the liver and vitamin E in plasma, LDL and adipose tissue. The results of this study provide new evidence concerning the effect of dietary hydrogenated fat on lipid, TAG and vitamin E status, which are important for maintenance of good health. Consumption of dietary HSO may be associated with cardiovascular disease.

  19. Comparative study of tissue deposition of omega-3 fatty acids from polar-lipid rich oil of the microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata with krill oil in rats.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Michael L; Levy, Aharon; Leikin-Frenkel, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) exert health benefits which are dependent upon their incorporation into blood, cells and tissues. Plasma and tissue deposition of LC n-3 PUFA from oils extracted from the micro-algae Nannochloropsis oculata and from krill were compared in rats. The algal oil provides eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) partly conjugated (15%) to phospholipids and glycolipids but no docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), whereas krill oil provides both EPA and DHA conjugated in part (40%) to phospholipids. Rats fed a standard diet received either krill oil or polar-lipid rich algal oil by gavage daily for 7 days (5 ml oil per kg body weight each day). Fatty acid concentrations were analyzed in plasma, brain and liver, and two adipose depots since these represent transport, functional and storage pools of fatty acids, respectively. When measuring total LC n-3 PUFA (sum of EPA, docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and DHA), there was no statistically significant difference between the algal oil and krill oil for plasma, brain, liver and gonadal adipose tissue. Concentrations of LC n-3 PUFA were higher in the retroperitoneal adipose tissue from the algal oil group. Tissue uptake of LC n-3 PUFA from an algal oil containing 15% polar lipids (glycolipids and phospholipids) was found to be equivalent to krill oil containing 40% phospholipids. This may be due to glycolipids forming smaller micelles during ingestive hydrolysis than phospholipids. Ingestion of fatty acids with glycolipids may improve bioavailability, but this needs to be further explored.

  20. Phytosterol structured algae oil nanoemulsions and powders: improving antioxidant and flavor properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Wei; Chen, Ya-Jun; Wang, Jin-Mei; Guo, Jian; Yin, Shou-Wei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2016-09-14

    Algae oil, enriched with omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 LC-PUFA), is known for its health benefits. However, protection against lipid oxidation as well as masking of unpleasant fishy malodors in algae oil enriched foods is a big challenge to achieve. In this study, we firstly achieved a one-pot ultrasound emulsification strategy (alternative heating-homogenization) to prepare phytosterol structured thermosensitive algae oil-in-water nanoemulsion stabilized by quillaja saponin. After spray drying, the resulting algae oil powders from the structured nanoemulsion templates exhibit an excellent reconstructed behavior, even after 30 d of storage. Furthermore, an enhanced oxidative stability was obtained by reducing both the primary and secondary oxidation products through formulation with β-sitosterol and γ-oryzanol, which are natural antioxidants. Following the results of headspace volatiles using dynamic headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DHS-GC-MS), it was clear that the structured algae oil-loaded nanoemulsion and powder had lower levels of fishy off-flavour (e.g., (Z)-heptenal, decanal, ethanone, and hexadecenoic acid), whereas the control emulsion and oil powder without structure performed worse. This study demonstrated that the structure from phytosterols is an effective strategy to minimize the fishy off-flavour and maximize oxidative stability of both algae oil nanoemulsions and spray-dried powders, and opens up the possibility of formulation design in polyunsaturated oil encapsulates as novel delivery systems to apply in functional foods and beverages. PMID:27501908

  1. Phytosterol structured algae oil nanoemulsions and powders: improving antioxidant and flavor properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Wei; Chen, Ya-Jun; Wang, Jin-Mei; Guo, Jian; Yin, Shou-Wei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2016-09-14

    Algae oil, enriched with omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 LC-PUFA), is known for its health benefits. However, protection against lipid oxidation as well as masking of unpleasant fishy malodors in algae oil enriched foods is a big challenge to achieve. In this study, we firstly achieved a one-pot ultrasound emulsification strategy (alternative heating-homogenization) to prepare phytosterol structured thermosensitive algae oil-in-water nanoemulsion stabilized by quillaja saponin. After spray drying, the resulting algae oil powders from the structured nanoemulsion templates exhibit an excellent reconstructed behavior, even after 30 d of storage. Furthermore, an enhanced oxidative stability was obtained by reducing both the primary and secondary oxidation products through formulation with β-sitosterol and γ-oryzanol, which are natural antioxidants. Following the results of headspace volatiles using dynamic headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DHS-GC-MS), it was clear that the structured algae oil-loaded nanoemulsion and powder had lower levels of fishy off-flavour (e.g., (Z)-heptenal, decanal, ethanone, and hexadecenoic acid), whereas the control emulsion and oil powder without structure performed worse. This study demonstrated that the structure from phytosterols is an effective strategy to minimize the fishy off-flavour and maximize oxidative stability of both algae oil nanoemulsions and spray-dried powders, and opens up the possibility of formulation design in polyunsaturated oil encapsulates as novel delivery systems to apply in functional foods and beverages.

  2. Assessment of the antioxidant capacity and oxidative stability of esterified phenolic lipids in selected edible oils.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Sarya; Kermasha, Selim

    2014-04-01

    The research work was aimed at the determination of the antioxidant capacity (AOC) and the oxidative stability of phenolic lipids (PLs), obtained by lipase-catalyzed transesterification of phenolic acids (PAs) with selected edible oils (EOs), including flaxseed (FSO), fish liver (FO), and krill (KO) oils. The statistical analyses (Tukey's test at P < 0.05) revealed that the difference in AOC between that of the esterified FSO (EFSO) and the esterified krill oil (EKO) containing PLs and their control trials of EOs was significant (P < 0.05). To evaluate the storage stability, the EOs and their esterified products were subjected to 2 oxidation treatments. The experimental findings showed that the esterified EOs had higher oxidative stability when they were subjected to light, oxygen, and agitation at 50 °C as compared to that of the EOs; however, only the esterified fish oil (EFO) showed a significant difference in its peroxide value, when the esterified EOs were placed in the dark at 25 °C. Overall, the phenolic mono- and diacyglycerols present in the EOs have shown to be potential antioxidants in improving the oxidative stability of the oil and enhancing its AOC.

  3. Copper-catalyzed oxidation of a structured lipid-based emulsion containing alpha-tocopherol and citric acid: influence of pH and NaCl.

    PubMed

    Osborn-Barnes, Hannah T; Akoh, Casimir C

    2003-11-01

    The effects of salt and pH on copper-catalyzed lipid oxidation in structured lipid-based emulsions were evaluated. Ten percent oil-in-water emulsions were formulated with a canola oil/caprylic acid structured lipid and stabilized with 0.5% whey protein isolate. alpha-Tocopherol and citric acid were added to the emulsions to determine how changes in pH or the addition of NaCl affected their antioxidant activity. The peroxide values and anisidine values of emulsions stored at 50 degrees C were measured over an 8-day period. Increased lipid oxidation occurred in the pH 7.0 emulsions and when 0.5 M NaCl was added to the pH 3.0 samples. Adding alpha-tocopherol, citric acid, or a combination of the two compounds slowed the formation of hydroperoxides and their subsequent decomposition products in pH 3.0 emulsions.

  4. Structural changes of lipoprotein lipids by 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-Korpela, M.; Oja, J.; Lounila, J.; Jokisaari, J.; Savolainen, M. J.; Kesäniemi, Y. A.

    1995-08-01

    A new procedure for detecting structural changes of lipoprotein lipids is introduced and applied to study native low (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. The method involves lineshape fitting analyses of specific resonances in proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra together with numerical derivation of the obtained intensity curves with respect to temperature. In addition to the well-known phase transition of the LDL core cholesterol esters, a novel structural change was revealed in the phospholipid monolayer of both native LDL and HDL particles. The attributes of this phenomenon are discussed.

  5. Effects of 7-hydroxycalamenene isolated from Croton cajucara essential oil on growth, lipid content and ultrastructural aspects of Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Mariana M B; Almeida, Catia A; Chaves, Francisco C M; Campos-Takaki, Galba M; Rozental, Sonia; Bizzo, Humberto R; Alviano, Celuta S; Alviano, Daniela S

    2014-05-01

    The leaves and bark of Croton cajucara, a shrub from the Amazon region, have been used in folk medicine to treat diabetes, malaria, and gastrointestinal and liver disorders. The essential oil from the leaves, rich in linalool, presented antileishmanial and antimicrobial activities. A chemotype of this species was found with an essential oil rich in 7-hydroxycalamenene. During our studies of the C. cajucara essential oil, we isolated 7-hydroxycalamenene at > 98 % purity. The minimum inhibitory concentration of 7-hydroxycalamenene against Absidia cylindrospora, Cunninghamella elegans, Mucor circinelloides, Mucor circinelloides f. circinelloides, Mucor mucedo, Mucor plumbeus, Mucor ramosissimus, Rhizopus microsporus, Rhizopus oryzae, and Syncephalastrum racemosum ranged from 19.53 to 2500 µg/mL. The reference drug used, amphotericin B, presented a minimum inhibitory concentration ranging from 0.085 µg/mL to 43.87 µg/mL. 7-Hydroxycalamenene also altered spore differentiation and total lipid content. Ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy showed significant alterations in the cellular structure of R. oryzae.

  6. Lipid molarity affects liquid/liquid aroma partitioning and its dynamic release from oil/water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Swen; Krings, Ulrich; Zorn, Holger; Berger, Ralf G

    2003-10-01

    Initial dynamic flavor release from oil/water emulsions containing different TAG phases was studied using a computerized apparatus and thermodesorption GC. A significant influence of lipid molarity on liquid/liquid partitioning and release of some flavor compounds was found. The release of the least hydrophobic compounds was not affected by any type of lipid. Hydrophobic compounds showed a positive correlation between their release and decreasing molarity of the lipid phase, that is, with increasing number of lipid molecules; only the most hydrophobic compounds did not show such a correlation. A strong linear correlation between low-melting TAG/water partition coefficients and lipid phase molarity was validated by volatile partition data of C6, C11, and C16 alkane/water systems. Lipid phase transition from the liquid to solid state did not affect flavor partitioning and release. Neither experimental nor theoretical octanol/water partition coefficients agreed with experimental TAG/water and alkane/water partition coefficients.

  7. Argan Oil Exerts an Antiatherogenic Effect by Improving Lipids and Susceptibility of LDL to Oxidation in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ould Mohamedou, M. M.; Zouirech, K.; El Messal, M.; El Kebbaj, M. S.; Chraibi, A.; Adlouni, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of argan oil consumption on serum lipids, apolipoproteins (AI and B), CRP, and LDL susceptibility to oxidation in type 2 diabetic patients which are known to have a high level of cardiovascular risk due to lipid abnormalities and lipid peroxidation. For that, 86 type 2 diabetic patients with dyslipidemia were randomized to one group consuming 25 mL/day of argan oil during 3 weeks and control group consuming 20 g/day of butter in breakfast. After argan oil intervention, serum triglycerides decreased by 11.84%, (P = 0.001), total chol by 9.13%, (P = 0.01), and LDL-chol by 11.81%, (P = 0.02). However, HDL-chol and Apo AI increased (10.51%, P = 0.01 and 9.40%,  P = 0.045, resp.). Susceptibility of LDL to lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced by increasing of 20.95%, (P = 0.038) in lag phase after argan oil consumption. In conclusion, we show for the first time that consumption of argan oil may have an antiatherogenic effect by improving lipids, and the susceptibility of LDL to oxidation in type 2 diabetes patients with dyslipidemia, and can therefore be recommended in the nutritional management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:22114593

  8. Argan Oil Exerts an Antiatherogenic Effect by Improving Lipids and Susceptibility of LDL to Oxidation in Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Ould Mohamedou, M M; Zouirech, K; El Messal, M; El Kebbaj, M S; Chraibi, A; Adlouni, A

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of argan oil consumption on serum lipids, apolipoproteins (AI and B), CRP, and LDL susceptibility to oxidation in type 2 diabetic patients which are known to have a high level of cardiovascular risk due to lipid abnormalities and lipid peroxidation. For that, 86 type 2 diabetic patients with dyslipidemia were randomized to one group consuming 25 mL/day of argan oil during 3 weeks and control group consuming 20 g/day of butter in breakfast. After argan oil intervention, serum triglycerides decreased by 11.84%, (P = 0.001), total chol by 9.13%, (P = 0.01), and LDL-chol by 11.81%, (P = 0.02). However, HDL-chol and Apo AI increased (10.51%, P = 0.01 and 9.40%,  P = 0.045, resp.). Susceptibility of LDL to lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced by increasing of 20.95%, (P = 0.038) in lag phase after argan oil consumption. In conclusion, we show for the first time that consumption of argan oil may have an antiatherogenic effect by improving lipids, and the susceptibility of LDL to oxidation in type 2 diabetes patients with dyslipidemia, and can therefore be recommended in the nutritional management of type 2 diabetes.

  9. Serum lipid profile and inflammatory markers in the aorta of cholesterol-fed rats supplemented with extra virgin olive oil, sunflower oils and oil-products.

    PubMed

    Katsarou, Ageliki I; Kaliora, Andriana C; Papalois, Apostolos; Chiou, Antonia; Kalogeropoulos, Nick; Agrogiannis, George; Andrikopoulos, Nikolaos K

    2015-01-01

    Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) major and minor component anti-inflammatory effect on aorta was evaluated; Wistar rats were fed (9 weeks) on either a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) or a HCD supplemented with oils, i.e. EVOO, sunflower oil (SO), high-oleic sunflower oil (HOSO), or oil-products modified to their phenolic content, i.e. phenolics deprived-EVOO [EVOO(-)], SO enriched with the EVOO phenolics [SO(+)], HOSO enriched with the EVOO phenolics [HOSO(+)]. HCD induced dyslipidemia and resulted in higher aorta adhesion molecules levels at euthanasia. Groups receiving EVOO, EVOO(-), HOSO, HOSO(+) presented higher serum TC and LDL-c levels compared to cholesterol-fed rats; attenuation of aorta E-selectin levels was also observed. In EVOO/EVOO(-) groups, aorta vascular endothelial adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) was lower compared to HCD animals. SO/SO(+) diets had no effect on endothelial dysfunction amelioration. Overall, our results suggest that major and/or minor EVOO constituents improve aorta E-selectin and VCAM-1, while serum lipids do not benefit.

  10. [Effect of partially refined palm oil in lipid profile in rats].

    PubMed

    Salinas, Nancy; Márquez, Mercedes; Sutil, Rosalía; Pacheco, Emperatriz; Muñoz, Marielena; Gómez, Maria Esther

    2008-03-01

    Palm oil is rich in carotenoids, tocopherols and tocotrienols. This oil is refined for its human consumption bringing as a consequence an alteration of their properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the partially refined, bleached and deodorized palm oil (RBD red) on the lipid profile and levels of vitamin A (retinol) and E (alpha tocopherol) in 4 groups of rats: B (commercial food Protinal for laboratory animals: ST + 5% egg yolk powder); C (ST + 5% egg yolk powder + 14 RBD red) both groups with induced hyperlipidemia; and D (ST + 14% RBD red), as compared with a control A (ST) during 35 days. The results were: the RBD red induced significative decreases of TC (total cholesterol) in groups C and D (81 +/- 11 mg/dL and 77 + 7 mg/dL), respectively, when compared with the control group (99 +/- 11 mg/dL) for 35 days experimentation. Additionally, an increment of the HDL-C (53 +/- 4 mg/dL) in the C group and in the D group (53 +/- 5 mg/dL) were observed when compared with group B (44 +/- 3 mg/dL), resulting in a lower ratio of TC/HDL-C (1.5 +/- 0.1). In the groups C and D, there were significant increases (p < 0.05) in the serum concentrations of retinol (26 +/- 5 microg/dL and 58 +/- 18 microg/dL) and a tocopherol (165 +/- 58 microg/dL) and 445 +/- 65 microg/dL). These results allow to conclude that the supplementation with RBD red diminishes the TC, improving the ratio TC/HDL-C. The presence of a monosaturated fatty acid (oleic acid) and the high concentrations of micronutrients (a tocopherol and retinol) in RBD red palm oil, influence favorably the lipid profile of rats with induced hyperlipidemia.

  11. Protein-lipid interactions and non-lamellar lipidic structures in membrane pore formation and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert J C

    2016-03-01

    Pore-forming proteins and peptides act on their targeted lipid bilayer membranes to increase permeability. This approach to the modulation of biological function is relevant to a great number of living processes, including; infection, parasitism, immunity, apoptosis, development and neurodegeneration. While some pore-forming proteins/peptides assemble into rings of subunits to generate discrete, well-defined pore-forming structures, an increasing number is recognised to form pores via mechanisms which co-opt membrane lipids themselves. Among these, membrane attack complex-perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) family proteins, Bax/colicin family proteins and actinoporins are especially prominent and among the mechanisms believed to apply are the formation of non-lamellar (semi-toroidal or toroidal) lipidic structures. In this review I focus on the ways in which lipids contribute to pore formation and contrast this with the ways in which lipids are co-opted also in membrane fusion and fission events. A variety of mechanisms for pore formation that involve lipids exists, but they consistently result in stable hybrid proteolipidic structures. These structures are stabilised by mechanisms in which pore-forming proteins modify the innate capacity of lipid membranes to respond to their environment, changing shape and/or phase and binding individual lipid molecules directly. In contrast, and despite the diversity in fusion protein types, mechanisms for membrane fusion are rather similar to each other, mapping out a pathway from pairs of separated compartments to fully confluent fused membranes. Fusion proteins generate metastable structures along the way which, like long-lived proteolipidic pore-forming complexes, rely on the basic physical properties of lipid bilayers. Membrane fission involves similar intermediates, in the reverse order. I conclude by considering the possibility that at least some pore-forming and fusion proteins are evolutionarily related

  12. Development and characterization of structured lipids containing capric and conjugated linoleic acids as functional dietary lipid molecules.

    PubMed

    Vu, Phuong-Lan; Shin, Jung-Ah; Lee, Yun-Jeung; Nam, Ha-Young; Lee, Jeung-Hee; Akoh, Casimir C; Lee, Ki-Teak

    2008-03-01

    Recently, dietary oil with high diacylglycerol (DAG) contents, so called DAG-oil, was introduced in Japan and the USA. It was claimed that the oil mostly composed of DAG is metabolized differently from conventional triacylglycerol oil, reducing body weight and fat mass because DAG tends to be oxidized to provide energy rather than stored as fat in the body. Monoacylglcyerol and DAG could be prepared by lipase-catalyzed reactions including hydrolysis, esterification, and glycerolysis. In this study, modified lipid containing some DAG esterified with the health-beneficial medium-chain fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid was produced by lipase-catalyzed reactions. Many health benefits of medium-chain fatty acids (C6:0-C12:0) and conjugated linoleic acid isomers have been reported, including anticarcinogenic and antiatherogenic activities, and being rapid energy sources for humans with little or no deposition as body fat. The produced lipid molecules in this study have potential applications as functional healthy dietary fats and oils.

  13. Fatty Acid Composition and Lipid Profile of Diospyros mespiliformis, Albizia lebbeck, and Caesalpinia pulcherrima Seed Oils from Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oderinde, Rotimi Ayodele

    2014-01-01

    The screening of lesser-known underutilized seeds as source of food has been a way of finding solution to food insecurity in developing nations. In this regard, oil as a class of food was extracted from the seeds of Diospyros mespiliformis  (4.72 ± 0.2%), Albizia lebbeck  (6.40 ± 0.60%), and Caesalpinia pulcherrima  (7.2 ± 0.30%). The oils were finally analyzed for their fatty acid composition, lipid classes, fatty acid distribution in the lipid fractions, and molecular speciation of the triacylglycerols, glycolipids, and phospholipids. The fatty acid composition of the oils varied with C18:2 fatty acid being the most dominant in the oils. Neutral lipids were the most abundant lipid class found in the oils while molecular species of the triacylglycerol with equivalent carbon chain number C40 was majorly present in the oils of Diospyros mespiliformis and Caesalpinia pulcherrima. The present study presents lesser-known underutilized seeds as possible sources of food. PMID:26904625

  14. Surface-active solid lipid nanoparticles as Pickering stabilizers for oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Renuka; Rousseau, Dérick

    2012-03-01

    Oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions solely stabilized by surface-active solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were developed. The SLNs were generated by quench-cooling hot O/W nanoemulsions consisting of 7.5% glyceryl stearyl citrate (GSC) dispersed in water. Their initial volume-weighted mean particle diameter (∼152 nm) and zeta potential (ca.-49 mV) remained unchanged for 24 weeks. O/W emulsions (oil phase volume fraction: 0.2) containing 7.5% (w/w) GSC SLNs in the aqueous phase were kinetically-stable for 12 weeks and did not visually phase-separate over 24 weeks. The O/W emulsions generated with solid-state GSC SLNs had a volume-weighted mean oil droplet diameter of ∼459 nm and a zeta potential of ca.-43 mV. Emulsion microstructure evaluated with TEM revealed dispersed oil droplets sparsely covered with adsorbed Pickering-type SLNs as well aggregated SLNs present in the continuous phase. Gradual emulsion destabilization resulted from GSC SLN dissolution during the experimental timeframe. Overall, surface-active SLNs developed via nanoemulsions effectively kinetically stabilized O/W emulsions.

  15. The dependence of lipid asymmetry upon phosphatidylcholine acyl chain structure[S

    PubMed Central

    Son, Mijin; London, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Lipid asymmetry, the difference in inner and outer leaflet lipid composition, is an important feature of biomembranes. By utilizing our recently developed MβCD-catalyzed exchange method, the effect of lipid acyl chain structure upon the ability to form asymmetric membranes was investigated. Using this approach, SM was efficiently introduced into the outer leaflet of vesicles containing various phosphatidylcholines (PC), but whether the resulting vesicles were asymmetric (SM outside/PC inside) depended upon PC acyl chain structure. Vesicles exhibited asymmetry using PC with two monounsaturated chains of >14 carbons; PC with one saturated and one unsaturated chain; and PC with phytanoyl chains. Vesicles were most weakly asymmetric using PC with two 14 carbon monounsaturated chains or with two polyunsaturated chains. To define the origin of this behavior, transverse diffusion (flip-flop) of lipids in vesicles containing various PCs was compared. A correlation between asymmetry and transverse diffusion was observed, with slower transverse diffusion in vesicles containing PCs that supported lipid asymmetry. Thus, asymmetric vesicles can be prepared using a wide range of acyl chain structures, but fast transverse diffusion destroys lipid asymmetry. These properties may constrain acyl chain structure in asymmetric natural membranes to avoid short or overly polyunsaturated acyl chains. PMID:23093551

  16. Lipid digestibility and energy content of distillers' corn oil in swine and poultry.

    PubMed

    Kerr, B J; Dozier, W A; Shurson, G C

    2016-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the DE and ME and apparent total tract digestibility of ether extract of 3 distillers' corn oil (DCO; 4.9, 12.8, or 13.9% free fatty acids [FFA]) samplescompared with a sample of refined corn oil (CO; 0.04% FFA) and an industrially hydrolyzed high-FFA DCO (93.8% FFA) in young pigs and growing broilers. In Exp. 1, 54 barrows (initial age = 28 d) were fed a common diet for 7 d and then fed their allotted dietary treatment (either 100% basal diet or 1 of 5 test diets consisting of 90% basal diet plus 10% test lipid) for the next 7 d in group pens (9 pigs/pen). For the next 10 d, pigs were moved to individual metabolism crates for continued diet and crate adaptation and to a twice-daily feeding regimen. Pigs remained on their respective diets for a 4-d total fecal and urine collection period. For Exp. 2, 567 male broilers were obtained from a commercial hatchery (1 d of age) and reared in grower battery cages that contained 9 chicks per cage. Broilers were fed a common corn-soybean meal starter diet from placement until the beginning of the trial (19 d of age). Birds were then randomly assigned to 1 of 6 dietary treatments (94% basal diet plus 6% dextrose or 94% basal diet plus 6% test lipid substituted for dextrose) on d 19 and were allowed an 8-d dietary acclimation period followed by a 48-h energy balance assay. In Exp. 1, the DCO sample with 12.8% FFA contained the lowest ( < 0.05) DE (8,036 kcal/kg) content compared with the 0.04% refined CO sample and the 4.9 or 93.8% FFA DCO samples (8,814, 8,828, and 8,921 kcal/kg, respectively), with the DCO source containing 13.9% FFA having intermediate DE (8,465 kcal/kg) content. The ME content of these lipid sources also differed among treatments ( < 0.01), following trends similar to their DE values, with no differences noted for ME as a percentage of DE ( > 0.35) content among the lipids evaluated. In Exp. 2, lipids containing 0.04, 4.9, 12.8, and 13.9% FFA had similar nitrogen

  17. Cold fluorescent light as major inducer of lipid oxidation in soybean oil stored at household conditions for eight weeks.

    PubMed

    Pignitter, Marc; Stolze, Klaus; Gartner, Stephanie; Dumhart, Bettina; Stoll, Christiane; Steiger, Georg; Kraemer, Klaus; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-03-12

    Light, temperature, and oxygen availability has been shown to promote rancidity in vegetable oils. However, the contribution of each of these environmental factors to lipid oxidation in oil stored under household conditions is not known. We aimed to identify the major inducer of oxidative deterioration of soybean oil stored at constant (67.0 mL) or increasing (67.0-283 mL) headspace volume, 22 or 32 °C, with or without illumination by cold fluorescent light for 56 days by means of fatty acid composition, peroxide value, formation of conjugated dienes, lipid radicals, hexanal, and the decrease in the contents of tocopherols. Soybean oil stored in the dark for 56 days showed an increase of the peroxide value by 124 ± 0.62% (p = 0.006), whereas exposure of the oil to light in a cycle of 12 h light alternating with 12 h darkness for 56 days led to a rise of the peroxide value by 1473 ± 1.79% (p ≤ 0.001). Little effects on the oxidative status of the oil were observed after elevating the temperature from 22 to 32 °C and the headspace volume from 67.0 to 283 mL during 56 days of storage. We conclude that storing soybean oil in transparent bottles under household conditions might pose an increased risk for accelerated lipid oxidation induced by exposure to cold fluorescent light. PMID:24548005

  18. Thermal Oxidation Induces Lipid Peroxidation and Changes in the Physicochemical Properties and β -Carotene Content of Arachis Oil.

    PubMed

    Falade, Ayodeji Osmund; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the effect of thermal oxidation on the physicochemical properties, malondialdehyde, and β-carotene content of arachis oil. Pure arachis oil was heated for 20 mins with a corresponding temperature of 220°C. Thereafter, changes in the physicochemical properties (acid, iodine, and peroxide values) of the oil samples were determined. Subsequently, the level of lipid peroxidation was determined using change in malondialdehyde content. Then, the total carotenoid and β-carotene contents were evaluated using spectrophotometric method and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The results of the study revealed a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the acid and peroxide values and malondialdehyde concentration of the heated oil when compared with the fresh arachis oil. In contrast, a significant decrease (P < 0.05) was observed in the iodine value, total carotenoid, 13-cis-, 15-cis-, trans-, and 9-cis-β-carotene, and total β-carotene content of the heated oil. Hence, thermal oxidation induced lipid peroxidation and caused changes in the physicochemical properties and carotenoid contents of arachis oil, thereby reducing its nutritive value and health benefit. Therefore, cooking and frying with arachis oil for a long period might not be appropriate as this might lead to a loss of significant amount of the insignificant β-carotene in arachis oil. PMID:26904665

  19. Thermal Oxidation Induces Lipid Peroxidation and Changes in the Physicochemical Properties and β-Carotene Content of Arachis Oil

    PubMed Central

    Falade, Ayodeji Osmund

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the effect of thermal oxidation on the physicochemical properties, malondialdehyde, and β-carotene content of arachis oil. Pure arachis oil was heated for 20 mins with a corresponding temperature of 220°C. Thereafter, changes in the physicochemical properties (acid, iodine, and peroxide values) of the oil samples were determined. Subsequently, the level of lipid peroxidation was determined using change in malondialdehyde content. Then, the total carotenoid and β-carotene contents were evaluated using spectrophotometric method and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The results of the study revealed a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the acid and peroxide values and malondialdehyde concentration of the heated oil when compared with the fresh arachis oil. In contrast, a significant decrease (P < 0.05) was observed in the iodine value, total carotenoid, 13-cis-, 15-cis-, trans-, and 9-cis-β-carotene, and total β-carotene content of the heated oil. Hence, thermal oxidation induced lipid peroxidation and caused changes in the physicochemical properties and carotenoid contents of arachis oil, thereby reducing its nutritive value and health benefit. Therefore, cooking and frying with arachis oil for a long period might not be appropriate as this might lead to a loss of significant amount of the insignificant β-carotene in arachis oil. PMID:26904665

  20. Lipid-derived Thermoplastic Poly(ester urethane)s: Effect of Structure on Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetranjiwalla, Shegufta

    Thermoplastic poly(ester urethane)s (TPEU)s derived from vegetable oils possess inferior physical properties compared to their entirely petroleum-based counterparts due to the structural limitations and lower reactivity of the precursor lipid-derived monomers. The present work shows that high molecular weight of TPEUs with enhanced performance can be obtained from lipid-derived monomers via (i) the synthesis of polyester diols with controlled molecular weights, (ii) the tuning of the functional group stoichiometry of the polyester diols and the diisocyanate during polymerization, (iii) the degree of polymerization (iv) the control of the hard segment hydrogen bond density and distribution via the use of a chain extender and (v) different polymerization protocols. Solvent-resistant TPEUs with high molecular weight displaying polyethylene-like behavior and controlled polyester and urethane segment phase separation were obtained. Structure-property investigations revealed that the thermal transition temperatures and tensile properties increased and eventually plateaued with increasing molecular weight. Novel segmented TPEUs possessed high phase separation and showed elastomeric properties such as low modulus and high elongation analogous to rubber. The response of the structurally optimized TPEUs to environmental degradation was also established by subjecting the TPEUs to hydrothermal ageing. TPEUs exhibited thermal and mechanical properties that were comparable to commercially available entirely petroleum-based counterparts, and that could be tuned in order to achieve enhanced physical properties and controlled degradability.

  1. Exposure to Anacardiaceae volatile oils and their constituents induces lipid peroxidation within food-borne bacteria cells.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Ricardo M; Barbosa, Luiz C A; Demuner, Antonio J; Silva, Cleber J; Andrade, Nelio J; Ismail, Fyaz M D; Barbosa, Maria C A

    2012-08-14

    The chemical composition of the volatile oils from five Anacardiaceae species and their activities against Gram positive and negative bacteria were assessed. The peroxidative damage within bacterial cell membranes was determined through the breakdown product malondialdehyde (MDA). The major constituents in Anacardium humile leaves oil were (E)-caryophyllene (31.0%) and α-pinene (22.0%), and in Anacardium occidentale oil they were (E)-caryophyllene (15.4%) and germacrene-D (11.5%). Volatile oil from Astronium fraxinifolium leaves were dominated by (E)-β-ocimene (44.1%) and α-terpinolene (15.2%), whilst the oil from Myracrodruon urundeuva contained an abundance of δ-3-carene (78.8%). However, Schinus terebinthifolius leaves oil collected in March and July presented different chemical compositions. The oils from all species, except the one from A. occidentale, exhibited varying levels of antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. Oil extracted in July from S. terebinthifolius was more active against all bacterial strains than the corresponding oil extracted in March. The high antibacterial activity of the M. urundeuva oil could be ascribed to its high δ-3-carene content. The amounts of MDA generated within bacterial cells indicate that the volatile oils induce lipid peroxidation. The results suggest that one putative mechanism of antibacterial action of these volatile oils is pro-oxidant damage within bacterial cell membrane explaining in part their preservative properties.

  2. Bead milling for lipid recovery from thraustochytrid cells and selective hydrolysis of Schizochytrium DT3 oil using lipase.

    PubMed

    Byreddy, Avinesh R; Barrow, Colin J; Puri, Munish

    2016-01-01

    Marine microalgae present a renewable alternative source for sustainable production of omega-3 fatty acids, as compared to conventional sources such as krill oil and fish oil. In this study, we optimised a method for lipid extraction from marine thraustochytrids using a bead mill and enzymatic concentration of omega-3 fatty acids from the thraustochytrid oil. The optimised lipid extraction conditions were, bead size 0.4-0.6μm, 4500rpm, 4min of processing time at 5g biomass concentration. The maximum lipid yield (% dry weight basis) achieved at optimum conditions were 40.5% for Schizochytrium sp. S31 (ATCC) and 49.4% for Schizochytrium sp. DT3 (in-house isolate). DT3 oil contained 39.8% docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a percentage of lipid, a higher DHA percentage than S31. Partial hydrolysis of DT3 oil using Candida rugosa lipase was performed to enrich omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the glyceride portion. Total omega-3 fatty acid content was increased to 88.7%. PMID:26519698

  3. Embryo-specific expression of soybean oleosin altered oil body morphogenesis and increased lipid content in transgenic rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen Xian; Liu, Hua Liang; Qu, Le Qing

    2013-09-01

    Oleosin is the most abundant protein in the oil bodies of plant seeds, playing an important role in regulating oil body formation and lipid accumulation. To investigate whether lipid accumulation in transgenic rice seeds depends on the expression level of oleosin, we introduced two soybean oleosin genes encoding 24 kDa proteins into rice under the control of an embryo-specific rice promoter REG-2. Overexpression of soybean oleosin in transgenic rice leads to an increase of seed lipid content up to 36.93 and 46.06 % higher than that of the non-transgenic control, respectively, while the overall fatty acid profiles of triacylglycerols remained unchanged. The overexpression of soybean oleosin in transgenic rice seeds resulted in more numerous and smaller oil bodies compared with wild type, suggesting that an inverse relationship exists between oil body size and the total oleosin level. The increase in lipid content is accompanied by a reduction in the accumulation of total seed protein. Our results suggest that it is possible to increase rice seed oil content for food use and for use as a low-cost feedstock for biodiesel by overexpressing oleosin in rice seeds.

  4. Structural basis for the transcriptional regulation of membrane lipid homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Darcie J.; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Subramanian, Chitra; Rock, Charles O.; White, Stephen W.

    2010-11-09

    DesT is a transcriptional repressor that regulates the genes that control the unsaturated:saturated fatty acid ratio available for membrane lipid synthesis. DesT bound to unsaturated acyl-CoA has a high affinity for its cognate palindromic DNA-binding site, whereas DesT bound to saturated acyl-CoA does not bind this site. Structural analyses of the DesT-oleoyl-CoA-DNA and DesT-palmitoyl-CoA complexes reveal that acyl chain shape directly influences the packing of hydrophobic core residues within the DesT ligand-binding domain. These changes are propagated to the paired DNA-binding domains via conformational changes to modulate DNA binding. These structural interpretations are supported by the in vitro and in vivo characterization of site-directed mutants. The regulation of DesT by the unsaturated:saturated ratio of acyl chains rather than the concentration of a single ligand is a paradigm for understanding transcriptional regulation of membrane lipid homeostasis.

  5. Oligomeric Structure of Colicin Ia Channel in Lipid Bilayer Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Sarah L.; Radjainia, Mazdak; Mitra, Alok K.

    2009-01-01

    Colicin Ia is a soluble, harpoon-shaped bacteriocin which translocates across the periplasmic space of sensitive Escherichia coli cell by parasitizing an outer membrane receptor and forms voltage-gated ion channels in the inner membrane. This process leads to cell death, which has been thought to be caused by a single colicin Ia molecule. To directly visualize the three-dimensional structure of the channel, we generated two-dimensional crystals of colicin Ia inserted in lipid-bilayer membranes and determined a ∼17 three-dimensional model by electron crystallography. Supported by velocity sedimentation, chemical cross-linking and single-particle image analysis, the three-dimensional structure is a crown-shaped oligomer enclosing a ∼35 Å-wide extrabilayer vestibule. Our study suggests that lipid insertion instigates a global conformational change in colicin Ia and that more than one molecule participates in the channel architecture with the vestibule, possibly facilitating the known large scale peptide translocation upon channel opening. PMID:19357078

  6. Lipid profiles of oil from trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) heads, spines and viscera: trout by-products as a possible source of omega-3 lipids?

    PubMed

    Fiori, L; Solana, M; Tosi, P; Manfrini, M; Strim, C; Guella, G

    2012-09-15

    Lipid profiles of fish oil extracted from trout heads, spines and viscera using supercritical carbon dioxide and Randall extraction with hexane were measured. The amount of unsaturated fatty acids (as a percentage of total fatty acids) was within the range of 72.6-75.3% in all the substrates. A significant presence of the most important omega-3 fatty acids was detected. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) content in oil from spines, heads and viscera resulted to be 8.7% and 7.3%, 7.9% and 6.3%, and 6.4% and 6.0%, respectively. A low (≈3%), but worth noting, presence of lipids with omega-1 polyunsaturated fatty chains was observed in all the oils. Finally, significant differences were noticed in the relative amounts of triacylglycerides (TAG), diacylglycerides (DAG) and free fatty acids (FFA). Whereas oil from heads and spines was essentially composed of TAG (≈98%), in viscera oil the molar distribution ratio became TAG:DAG:FFA=87:8:5.

  7. Structural elucidation of oxygenated storage lipids in cucumber cotyledons. Implication of lipid body lipoxygenase in lipid mobilization during germination.

    PubMed

    Feussner, I; Balkenhohl, T J; Porzel, A; Kühn, H; Wasternack, C

    1997-08-22

    At early stages of germination, a special lipoxygenase is expressed in cotyledons of cucumber and several other plants. This enzyme is localized at the lipid storage organelles and oxygenates their storage triacylglycerols. We have isolated this lipid body lipoxygenase from cucumber seedlings and found that it is capable of oxygenating in vitro di- and trilinolein to the corresponding mono-, di-, and trihydroperoxy derivatives. To investigate the in vivo activity of this enzyme during germination, lipid bodies were isolated from cucumber seedlings at different stages of germination, and the triacylglycerols were analyzed for oxygenated derivatives by a combination of high pressure liquid chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We identified as major oxygenation products triacylglycerols that contained one, two, or three 13S-hydroperoxy-9(Z),11(E)-octadecadienoic acid residues. During germination, the amount of oxygenated lipids increased strongly, reaching a maximum after 72 h and declining afterward. The highly specific pattern of hydroperoxy lipids formed suggested the involvement of the lipid body lipoxygenase in their biosynthesis. These data suggest that this lipoxygenase may play an important role during the germination process of cucumber and other plants and support our previous hypothesis that the specific oxygenation of the storage lipids may initiate their mobilization as a carbon and energy source for the growing seedling. PMID:9261186

  8. Lipid formation and γ-linolenic acid production by Mucor circinelloides and Rhizopus sp., grown on vegetable oil

    PubMed Central

    Tauk-Tornisielo, Sâmia M.; Arasato, Luciana S.; de Almeida, Alex F.; Govone, José S.; Malagutti, Eleni N.

    2009-01-01

    The fungi strains were tested in Bioscreen automated system to select the best nutritional source. Following, shaking submserse cultures were studied in media containing sole carbon or nitrogen source. The growth of these strains improved in media containing vegetable oil, with high concentration of lipids. The high concentration of γ-linolenic acid was obtained with M. circinelloides in culture containing sesame oil. PMID:24031370

  9. Structural studies of polymer-cushioned lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Majewski, J; Wong, J Y; Park, C K; Seitz, M; Israelachvili, J N; Smith, G S

    1998-11-01

    The structure of softly supported polymer-cushioned lipid bilayers, prepared in two different ways at the quartz-solution interface, were determined using neutron reflectometry. The polymer cushion consisted of a thin layer of branched, cationic polyethyleneimine (PEI), and the bilayers were formed by adsorption of small unilamellar dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) vesicles. When vesicles were first allowed to adsorb to a bare quartz substrate, an almost perfect bilayer formed. When the polymer was then added to the aqueous solution, it appeared to diffuse beneath this bilayer, effectively lifting it from the substrate. In contrast, if the polymer layer is adsorbed first to the bare quartz substrate followed by addition of vesicles to the solution, there is very little interaction of the vesicles with the polymer layer, and the result is a complex structure most likely consisting of patchy multilayers or adsorbed vesicles.

  10. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, G. H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic potential within phospholipid membranes imply an enormous electric field of 108-109 V m-1, which is likely to have great significance in controlling the conformation of translocating membrane proteins and in the transfer of ions and molecules across the membrane. We have calculated the membrane potential for DMPG bilayers and found ˜1 V (˜2 ṡ 108 V m-1) when in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and ˜1.4 V (˜2.8 ṡ 108 V m-1) when in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The number of water molecules for a fully hydrated DMPG membrane has been estimated to be 9.7 molecules per lipid in the gel phase and 17.5 molecules in the fluid phase, considerably smaller than inferred experimentally for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (DMPC

  11. Structural Oil Pan With Integrated Oil Filtration And Cooling System

    DOEpatents

    Freese, V, Charles Edwin

    2000-05-09

    An oil pan for an internal combustion engine includes a body defining a reservoir for collecting engine coolant. The reservoir has a bottom and side walls extending upwardly from the bottom to present a flanged lip through which the oil pan may be mounted to the engine. An oil cooler assembly is housed within the body of the oil pan for cooling lubricant received from the engine. The body includes an oil inlet passage formed integrally therewith for receiving lubricant from the engine and delivering lubricant to the oil cooler. In addition, the body also includes an oil pick up passage formed integrally therewith for providing fluid communication between the reservoir and the engine through the flanged lip.

  12. Mobilization of lipid reserves during germination of oat (Avena sativa L.), a cereal rich in endosperm oil.

    PubMed

    Leonova, Svetlana; Grimberg, Asa; Marttila, Salla; Stymne, Sten; Carlsson, Anders S

    2010-06-01

    Since the cereal endosperm is a dead tissue in the mature grain, beta-oxidation is not possible there. This raises the question about the use of the endosperm oil in cereal grains during germination. In this study, mobilization of lipids in different tissues of germinating oat grains was analysed using thin-layer and gas chromatography. The data imply that the oat endosperm oil [triacylglycerol (TAG)] is not a dead-end product as it was absorbed by the scutellum, either as free fatty acids (FFAs) released from TAG or as intact TAG immediately degraded to FFAs. These data were supported by light and transmission electron microscopy (LM and TEM) studies where close contact between endosperm lipid droplets and the scutellum was observed. The appearance of the fused oil in the oat endosperm changed into oil droplets during germination in areas close to the aleurone and the scutellar epithelium. However, according to the data obtained by TEM these oil droplets are unlikely to be oil bodies surrounded by oleosins. Accumulation of FFA pools in the embryo suggested further transport of FFAs from the scutellum. Noticeably high levels of TAG were also accumulated in the embryo but were not synthesized by re-esterification from imported FFAs. Comparison between two oat cultivars with different amounts of oil and starch in the endosperm suggests that an increased oil to starch ratio in oat grains does not significantly impact the germination process.

  13. Effect of Sesame Oil on Diuretics or ß-blockers in the Modulation of Blood Pressure, Anthropometry, Lipid Profile, and Redox Status

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, D.; Rao, M. Ramakrishna; Sambandam, G.; Pugalendi, K.V.

    2007-01-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate the effect of sesame oil in hypertensive patients who were on antihypertensive therapy either with diuretics (hydrochlorothiazide) or ß-blockers (atenolol). Thirty-two male and 18 female patients aged 35 to 60 years old were supplied sesame oil (Idhayam gingelly oil) and instructed to use it as the only edible oil for 45 days. Blood pressure, anthropometry, lipid profile, lipid peroxidation, and enzymic and non-enzymic antioxidants were measured at baseline and after 45 days of sesame oil substitution. Substitution of sesame oil brought down systolic and diastolic blood pressure to normal. The same patients were asked to withdraw sesame oil consumption for another 45 days, and the measurements were repeated at the end of withdrawal period. Withdrawal of sesame oil substitution brought back the initial blood pressure values. A significant reduction was noted in body weight and body mass index (BMI) upon sesame oil substitution. No significant alterations were observed in lipid profile except triglycerides. Plasma levels of sodium reduced while potassium elevated upon the substitution of sesame oil. Lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances [TBARS]) decreased while the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and the levels of vitamin C, vitamin E, ß-carotene, and reduced glutathione (GSH) were increased. The results suggested that sesame oil as edible oil lowered blood pressure, decreased lipid peroxidation, and increased antioxidant status in hypertensive patients. PMID:17876372

  14. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure

    PubMed Central

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M.; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G.; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A.; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A.

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern. PMID:26578797

  15. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-17

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern.

  16. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-17

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern. PMID:26578797

  17. Palm oil and cardiovascular disease: a randomized trial of the effects of hybrid palm oil supplementation on human plasma lipid patterns.

    PubMed

    Lucci, P; Borrero, M; Ruiz, A; Pacetti, D; Frega, N G; Diez, O; Ojeda, M; Gagliardi, R; Parra, L; Angel, M

    2016-01-01

    This study examines, for the first time, the effect of hybrid Elaeis oleifera × E. guineensis palm oil supplementation on human plasma lipids related to CVD risk factors. One hundred sixty eligible participants were randomized and assigned to one of the two treatments: 25 mL hybrid palm oil (HPO group) or 25 mL extra virgin olive oil (EVOO group) daily for 3 months. Fasting venous samples were obtained at baseline and after 1, 2 and 3 months for measurement of plasma lipids (TC, LDL-C, HDL-C and TAGs). Changes in body mass index and waist circumference were also assessed. Although there was an overall reduction in TC (7.4%, p < 0.001) and in LDL-C (15.6%, p < 0.001), no significant differences were found between the treatment groups in a repeated measures analysis of variance for TC (p = 0.0525), LDL-C (p = 0.2356), HDL-C (p = 0.8293) or TAGs (p = 0.3749). Furthermore, HPO consumption had similar effects on plasma lipids to EVOO, thus providing additional support for the concept that hybrid Elaeis oleifera × E. guineensis palm oil can be seen as a "tropical equivalent of olive oil".

  18. Optimized Rapeseed Oils Rich in Endogenous Micronutrients Protect High Fat Diet Fed Rats from Hepatic Lipid Accumulation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiqu; Liu, Xiaoli; Gao, Hui; Chen, Chang; Deng, Qianchun; Huang, Qingde; Ma, Zhonghua; Huang, Fenghong

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients in rapeseed exert a potential benefit to hepatoprotection, but most of them are lost during the conventional refining processing. Thus some processing technologies have been optimized to improve micronutrient retention in oil. The aim of this study is to assess whether optimized rapeseed oils (OROs) have positive effects on hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress induced by a high-fat diet. Methods: Rats received experiment diets containing 20% fat and refined rapeseed oil or OROs obtained with various processing technologies as lipid source. After 10 weeks of treatment, liver was assayed for lipid accumulation and oxidative stress. Results: All OROs reduced hepatic triglyceride contents. Microwave pretreatment-cold pressing oil (MPCPO) which had the highest micronutrients contents also reduced hepatic cholesterol level. MPCPO significantly decreased hepatic sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1 (SREBP1) but increased peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) expressions, and as a result, MPCPO significantly suppressed acetyl CoA carboxylase and induced carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 and acyl CoA oxidase expression. Hepatic catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities as well as reduced glutathione (GSH) contents remarkably increased and lipid peroxidation levels decreased in parallel with the increase of micronutrients. Conclusion: OROs had the ability to reduce excessive hepatic fat accumulation and oxidative stress, which indicated that OROs might contribute to ameliorating nonalcoholic fatty liver induced by high-fat diet. PMID:26473919

  19. Acute toxicity of dispersed crude oil on the cold-water copepod Calanus finmarchicus: Elusive implications of lipid content.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Jager, Tjalling; Altin, Dag; Øverjordet, Ida B; Olsen, Anders J; Salaberria, Iurgi; Nordtug, Trond

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, acute toxicity data were used from two previously reported studies where cold-water copepods were exposed to mechanically dispersed (MD) and chemically (CD) dispersed oil. In one of these studies, concentration-dependent mortality was observed, whereas no apparent relationship between exposure concentration and mortality was found in the other. The only marked difference between the studies is that copepods in the first experiment displayed a lower lipid sac volume (on average) than in the second one. In this study additional biometric data on lipid content were utilized and observed effects and toxicokinetics modeling applied in order to investigate whether differences in sensitivity between copepod cohorts might be explained by differences in lipid content. Results suggest that although a considerable lipid sac might retard toxicokinetics, the observed differences in lipid volume are not sufficient to explain differences in toxicity. Further, there are no apparent indications that acute toxic stress leads to lipid depletion, or that acute increased mortality rate selectively affects lipid-poor individuals. It is conceivable that other potential explanations exist, but the causal relationship between lipid content and increased mortality frequency remains elusive. PMID:27484137

  20. Acute toxicity of dispersed crude oil on the cold-water copepod Calanus finmarchicus: Elusive implications of lipid content.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Jager, Tjalling; Altin, Dag; Øverjordet, Ida B; Olsen, Anders J; Salaberria, Iurgi; Nordtug, Trond

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, acute toxicity data were used from two previously reported studies where cold-water copepods were exposed to mechanically dispersed (MD) and chemically (CD) dispersed oil. In one of these studies, concentration-dependent mortality was observed, whereas no apparent relationship between exposure concentration and mortality was found in the other. The only marked difference between the studies is that copepods in the first experiment displayed a lower lipid sac volume (on average) than in the second one. In this study additional biometric data on lipid content were utilized and observed effects and toxicokinetics modeling applied in order to investigate whether differences in sensitivity between copepod cohorts might be explained by differences in lipid content. Results suggest that although a considerable lipid sac might retard toxicokinetics, the observed differences in lipid volume are not sufficient to explain differences in toxicity. Further, there are no apparent indications that acute toxic stress leads to lipid depletion, or that acute increased mortality rate selectively affects lipid-poor individuals. It is conceivable that other potential explanations exist, but the causal relationship between lipid content and increased mortality frequency remains elusive.

  1. [Effect of Silybum marianum oil and legalon on lipid peroxidation and liver antioxidant systems in rats intoxicated with carbon tetrachloride].

    PubMed

    Batakov, E A

    2001-01-01

    An oil obtained from the seeds of Saint-Mary thistle (Silybum marianum) and the drug legalon (silybinin) prepared from this plant produce an antioxidant effect on liver tissues of rats poisoned with carbon tetrachloride. Legalon (25 mg/kg) and the oil (2000 mg) reduced the level of lipid peroxidation, increased the catalase activity, but did not reduce the concentration of selenium in liver (which decreased as a result of CCl4 intoxication). Legalon significantly increased the activity of superoxide dismutase in liver tissues, while the Saint-Mary thistle oil did not produce such effect.

  2. Comparison of ruminal lipid metabolism in dairy cows and goats fed diets supplemented with starch, plant oil, or fish oil.

    PubMed

    Toral, P G; Bernard, L; Belenguer, A; Rouel, J; Hervás, G; Chilliard, Y; Frutos, P

    2016-01-01

    Direct comparison of cow and goat performance and milk fatty acid responses to diets known to induce milk fat depression (MFD) in the bovine reveals relevant species-by-diet interactions in ruminal lipid metabolism. Thus, this study was conducted to infer potential mechanisms responsible for differences in the rumen microbial biohydrogenation (BH) due to diet and ruminant species. To meet this objective, 12 cows and 15 goats were fed a basal diet (control), a similar diet supplemented with 2.2% fish oil (FO), or a diet containing 5.3% sunflower oil and additional starch (+38%; SOS) according to a 3 × 3 Latin square design with 25-d experimental periods. On the last day of each period, fatty acid composition (by gas chromatography) and bacterial community (by terminal-RFLP), as well as fermentation characteristics, were measured in rumen fluid samples. Results showed significant differences in the response of cows and goats to dietary treatments, although variations in some fermentation parameters (e.g., decreases in the acetate-to-propionate ratio due to FO or SOS) were similar in both species. Main alterations in ruminal BH pathways potentially responsible for MFD on the SOS diet (i.e., the shift from trans-11 to trans-10 18:1 and related increases in trans-10,cis-12 18:2) tended to be more pronounced in cows, which is consistent with an associated MFD only in this species. However, changes linked to FO-induced MFD (e.g., decreases in 18:0 and increases in total trans-18:1) were stronger in caprine rumen fluid, which may explain their unexpected susceptibility (although less marked than in bovine) to the negative effect of FO on milk fat content. Altogether, these results suggest that distinct ruminal mechanisms lead to each type of diet-induced MFD and confirm a pronounced interaction with species. With regard to microbiota, differences between cows and goats in the composition of the rumen bacterial community might be behind the disparity in the microorganisms

  3. Comparison of ruminal lipid metabolism in dairy cows and goats fed diets supplemented with starch, plant oil, or fish oil.

    PubMed

    Toral, P G; Bernard, L; Belenguer, A; Rouel, J; Hervás, G; Chilliard, Y; Frutos, P

    2016-01-01

    Direct comparison of cow and goat performance and milk fatty acid responses to diets known to induce milk fat depression (MFD) in the bovine reveals relevant species-by-diet interactions in ruminal lipid metabolism. Thus, this study was conducted to infer potential mechanisms responsible for differences in the rumen microbial biohydrogenation (BH) due to diet and ruminant species. To meet this objective, 12 cows and 15 goats were fed a basal diet (control), a similar diet supplemented with 2.2% fish oil (FO), or a diet containing 5.3% sunflower oil and additional starch (+38%; SOS) according to a 3 × 3 Latin square design with 25-d experimental periods. On the last day of each period, fatty acid composition (by gas chromatography) and bacterial community (by terminal-RFLP), as well as fermentation characteristics, were measured in rumen fluid samples. Results showed significant differences in the response of cows and goats to dietary treatments, although variations in some fermentation parameters (e.g., decreases in the acetate-to-propionate ratio due to FO or SOS) were similar in both species. Main alterations in ruminal BH pathways potentially responsible for MFD on the SOS diet (i.e., the shift from trans-11 to trans-10 18:1 and related increases in trans-10,cis-12 18:2) tended to be more pronounced in cows, which is consistent with an associated MFD only in this species. However, changes linked to FO-induced MFD (e.g., decreases in 18:0 and increases in total trans-18:1) were stronger in caprine rumen fluid, which may explain their unexpected susceptibility (although less marked than in bovine) to the negative effect of FO on milk fat content. Altogether, these results suggest that distinct ruminal mechanisms lead to each type of diet-induced MFD and confirm a pronounced interaction with species. With regard to microbiota, differences between cows and goats in the composition of the rumen bacterial community might be behind the disparity in the microorganisms

  4. Loss of lipid material during the dehulling of oilseeds with different structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, A K; Rodríguez, L M; Fernández, M; Riccobene, I C; Nolasco, S M

    2015-12-01

    The loss of lipid material by migration to the hull during the dehulling of oilseeds with different structural characteristics was evaluated. The samples selected -three sunflower hybrids and a safflower cultivar- were processed under optimal dehulling operating conditions and with two passes through a dehuller. From the SEM micrographs of the samples it was possible to observe structural differences which affect the mechanical properties of the pericarps and, consequently, the dehulling process. The black-hull sunflower hybrid exhibited residual hull percentages lightly above those recommended by the industry after one pass through the dehuller, therefore, this hybrid should not be further processed to avoid oil losses due to migration to the hull. On the other hand, the safflower cultivar and the high stearic high oleic sunflower hybrid and the traditional striped-hull sunflower require two passes through the dehuller, but this resulted in an oil loss due to migration to the hull of over 0.9 % per gram of grains processed. These results suggest the need to reach 'compromise' decisions based on economic impact studies in the face of the variables that originate simultaneously both positive and negative effects. PMID:26604365

  5. Loss of lipid material during the dehulling of oilseeds with different structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, A K; Rodríguez, L M; Fernández, M; Riccobene, I C; Nolasco, S M

    2015-12-01

    The loss of lipid material by migration to the hull during the dehulling of oilseeds with different structural characteristics was evaluated. The samples selected -three sunflower hybrids and a safflower cultivar- were processed under optimal dehulling operating conditions and with two passes through a dehuller. From the SEM micrographs of the samples it was possible to observe structural differences which affect the mechanical properties of the pericarps and, consequently, the dehulling process. The black-hull sunflower hybrid exhibited residual hull percentages lightly above those recommended by the industry after one pass through the dehuller, therefore, this hybrid should not be further processed to avoid oil losses due to migration to the hull. On the other hand, the safflower cultivar and the high stearic high oleic sunflower hybrid and the traditional striped-hull sunflower require two passes through the dehuller, but this resulted in an oil loss due to migration to the hull of over 0.9 % per gram of grains processed. These results suggest the need to reach 'compromise' decisions based on economic impact studies in the face of the variables that originate simultaneously both positive and negative effects.

  6. The effect of zinc deficiency on erythrocyte membrane lipids of force-fed rats receiving a diet containing coconut oil or fish oil.

    PubMed

    Eder, K; Kirchgessner, M

    1994-06-01

    In the present study, the effect of zinc deficiency on erythrocyte membrane lipids of force-fed rats that received either a diet with coconut oil and safflower oil (86:14, w/w) or a diet with fish oil and safflower oil (91:9, w/w) was investigated. Zinc deficiency caused in the rats fed both types of dietary fat an increase in the amounts of total phospholipids and individual phospholipid classes in erythrocyte membranes. In the rats fed the coconut oil diet, zinc deficiency caused an increase in the proportion of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6) in phosphatidylcholine (PC), diacyl phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine (PS), and in total erythrocyte membrane fatty acids. In contrast, in the rats fed the fish oil diet, zinc deficiency caused an increase in the proportion of docosahexaenoic acid only in PC, but not in the other phospholipids. However, in these rats, changes in the ratio between eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5) and the n-3 fatty acids with 20 and 22 carbon atoms were observed in PC, diacyl PE and plasmalogen PE. The most pronounced changes in fatty acid composition due to zinc deficiency in the rats fed both types of fat occurred in PC. There was a relationship between the changes in the composition of plasma total fatty acids and the changes in fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membrane PC caused by zinc deficiency in the rats fed both types of dietary fat. The amount of cholesterol was similar in all treatment groups. However, zinc-deficient rats fed the coconut oil diet-but not those fed the fish oil diet-had an increased ratio between total phospholipids and cholesterol. Thus, the study shows that the effect of zinc deficiency on erythrocyte membrane lipids is to some degree similar for rats fed a coconut oil diet and rats fed a fish oil diet, and to some degree different.

  7. Oil crop biomass residue-based media for enhanced algal lipid production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Ma, Xiaochen; Zhou, Wenguang; Min, Min; Cheng, Yanling; Chen, Paul; Shi, Jian; Wang, Qin; Liu, Yuhuan; Ruan, Roger

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of hydrolysates from acid hydrolysis of four different oil crop biomass residues (OCBR) as low cost culture media for algae growth. The one-factor-at-a-time method was used to design a series of experiments to optimize the acid hydrolysis conditions through examining the total nitrogen, total phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand, and ammonia nitrogen in the hydrolysates. The optimal conditions were found to be using 3% sulfuric acid and hydrolyzing residues at 90 °C for 20 h. The hydrolysates (OCBR media) produced under the optimal conditions were used to cultivate the two algae strains, namely UM258 and UM268. The results from 5 days of cultivation showed that the OCBR media supported faster algae growth with maximal algal biomass yield of 2.7 and 3 g/L, respectively. Moreover, the total lipids for UM258 and UM268 were 54 and 35%, respectively, after 5 days of cultivation, which suggested that the OCBR media allowed the algae strains to accumulate higher lipids probably due to high C/N ratio. Furthermore, over 3% of omega-3 fatty acid (EPA) was produced for the two algae strains. In conclusion, OCBR media are excellent alternative for algae growth and have a great potential for large-scale production of algae-based ingredients for biodiesel as well as high-value food and pharmaceutical products.

  8. Molecular interactions of plant oil components with stratum corneum lipids correlate with clinical measures of skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Mack Correa, Mary Catherine; Mao, Guangru; Saad, Peter; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Walters, Russel M

    2014-01-01

    Plant-derived oils consisting of triglycerides and small amounts of free fatty acids (FFAs) are commonly used in skincare regimens. FFAs are known to disrupt skin barrier function. The objective of this study was to mechanistically study the effects of FFAs, triglycerides and their mixtures on skin barrier function. The effects of oleic acid (OA), glyceryl trioleate (GT) and OA/GT mixtures on skin barrier were assessed in vivo through measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and fluorescein dye penetration before and after a single application. OA's effects on stratum corneum (SC) lipid order in vivo were measured with infrared spectroscopy through application of perdeuterated OA (OA-d34 ). Studies of the interaction of OA and GT with skin lipids included imaging the distribution of OA-d34 and GT ex vivo with IR microspectroscopy and thermodynamic analysis of mixtures in aqueous monolayers. The oil mixtures increased both TEWL and fluorescein penetration 24 h after a single application in an OA dose-dependent manner, with the highest increase from treatment with pure OA. OA-d34 penetrated into skin and disordered SC lipids. Furthermore, the ex vivo IR imaging studies showed that OA-d34 permeated to the dermal/epidermal junction while GT remained in the SC. The monolayer experiments showed preferential interspecies interactions between OA and SC lipids, while the mixing between GT and SC lipids was not thermodynamically preferred. The FFA component of plant oils may disrupt skin barrier function. The affinity between plant oil components and SC lipids likely determines the extent of their penetration and clinically measurable effects on skin barrier functions.

  9. Molecular interactions of plant oil components with stratum corneum lipids correlate with clinical measures of skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Mack Correa, Mary Catherine; Mao, Guangru; Saad, Peter; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Walters, Russel M

    2014-01-01

    Plant-derived oils consisting of triglycerides and small amounts of free fatty acids (FFAs) are commonly used in skincare regimens. FFAs are known to disrupt skin barrier function. The objective of this study was to mechanistically study the effects of FFAs, triglycerides and their mixtures on skin barrier function. The effects of oleic acid (OA), glyceryl trioleate (GT) and OA/GT mixtures on skin barrier were assessed in vivo through measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and fluorescein dye penetration before and after a single application. OA's effects on stratum corneum (SC) lipid order in vivo were measured with infrared spectroscopy through application of perdeuterated OA (OA-d34 ). Studies of the interaction of OA and GT with skin lipids included imaging the distribution of OA-d34 and GT ex vivo with IR microspectroscopy and thermodynamic analysis of mixtures in aqueous monolayers. The oil mixtures increased both TEWL and fluorescein penetration 24 h after a single application in an OA dose-dependent manner, with the highest increase from treatment with pure OA. OA-d34 penetrated into skin and disordered SC lipids. Furthermore, the ex vivo IR imaging studies showed that OA-d34 permeated to the dermal/epidermal junction while GT remained in the SC. The monolayer experiments showed preferential interspecies interactions between OA and SC lipids, while the mixing between GT and SC lipids was not thermodynamically preferred. The FFA component of plant oils may disrupt skin barrier function. The affinity between plant oil components and SC lipids likely determines the extent of their penetration and clinically measurable effects on skin barrier functions. PMID:24372651

  10. Molecular interactions of plant oil components with stratum corneum lipids correlate with clinical measures of skin barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Mack Correa, Mary Catherine; Mao, Guangru; Saad, Peter; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Walters, Russel M

    2014-01-01

    Plant-derived oils consisting of triglycerides and small amounts of free fatty acids (FFAs) are commonly used in skincare regimens. FFAs are known to disrupt skin barrier function. The objective of this study was to mechanistically study the effects of FFAs, triglycerides and their mixtures on skin barrier function. The effects of oleic acid (OA), glyceryl trioleate (GT) and OA/GT mixtures on skin barrier were assessed in vivo through measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and fluorescein dye penetration before and after a single application. OA's effects on stratum corneum (SC) lipid order in vivo were measured with infrared spectroscopy through application of perdeuterated OA (OA-d34). Studies of the interaction of OA and GT with skin lipids included imaging the distribution of OA-d34 and GT ex vivo with IR microspectroscopy and thermodynamic analysis of mixtures in aqueous monolayers. The oil mixtures increased both TEWL and fluorescein penetration 24 h after a single application in an OA dose-dependent manner, with the highest increase from treatment with pure OA. OA-d34 penetrated into skin and disordered SC lipids. Furthermore, the ex vivo IR imaging studies showed that OA-d34 permeated to the dermal/epidermal junction while GT remained in the SC. The monolayer experiments showed preferential interspecies interactions between OA and SC lipids, while the mixing between GT and SC lipids was not thermodynamically preferred. The FFA component of plant oils may disrupt skin barrier function. The affinity between plant oil components and SC lipids likely determines the extent of their penetration and clinically measurable effects on skin barrier functions. PMID:24372651

  11. Structures of aminoarabinose transferase ArnT suggest a molecular basis for lipid A glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Vasileios I; Herrera, Carmen M; Schultz, Kathryn M; Clarke, Oliver B; Vendome, Jérémie; Tomasek, David; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Belcher Dufrisne, Meagan; Kloss, Brian; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Klug, Candice S; Trent, M Stephen; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mancia, Filippo

    2016-02-01

    Polymyxins are antibiotics used in the last line of defense to combat multidrug-resistant infections by Gram-negative bacteria. Polymyxin resistance arises through charge modification of the bacterial outer membrane with the attachment of the cationic sugar 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose to lipid A, a reaction catalyzed by the integral membrane lipid-to-lipid glycosyltransferase 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose transferase (ArnT). Here, we report crystal structures of ArnT from Cupriavidus metallidurans, alone and in complex with the lipid carrier undecaprenyl phosphate, at 2.8 and 3.2 angstrom resolution, respectively. The structures show cavities for both lipidic substrates, which converge at the active site. A structural rearrangement occurs on undecaprenyl phosphate binding, which stabilizes the active site and likely allows lipid A binding. Functional mutagenesis experiments based on these structures suggest a mechanistic model for ArnT family enzymes.

  12. Intestinal failure-associated liver disease and the use of fish oil-based lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Olivier J

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) is caused by the critical reduction of functional gut mass below the minimal amount necessary for adequate digestion and absorption to satisfy body nutrient and fluid requirements for maintenance in adults and growth in children. The advent of parenteral nutrition (PN) resulted in a dramatic improvement in life expectancy of patients suffering IF, but it has its own complications, such as catheter related sepsis. In pediatric patients suffering IF, intraluminal intestinal bacterial overgrowth may cause bacterial translocation and subsequent cholestasis and liver fibrosis. With our current understanding of the genesis of intestinal failure associated liver disease (IFALD), it should be prevented or at least early recognized and treated especially in patients experiencing prematurity and/or sepsis. Targeting harmful cytokine responses can be expected to reduce the severity and frequency of IFALD. In that view, prevention of sepsis, appropriate management of enteral feeding, prevention and treatment of intestinal bacterial overgrowth and the effects of fish oil, as providing omega-3 fatty with anti-inflammatory effects, are promising in avoiding or reversing cholestasis. This chapter aims to review both IF and PN related factors of liver disease with special emphasize on inflammation as cause of liver injury and on the use of fish oil based lipid emulsions as a provision of both alpha-tocopherol (200 g/l of 20% emulsion), as anti-oxidant agent and long-chain PUFAs. PMID:25471806

  13. Inhibition of Lipid Oxidation in Oil-in-Water Emulsions by Interface-Adsorbed Myofibrillar Protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiayi; Xiong, Youling L

    2015-10-14

    This study investigated the role of interfacial myofibrillar protein (MFP) in the oxidative stabilization of meat emulsions. Emulsions with 10% oil were prepared using either 2% (w/v) Tween 20 or 0.25, 0.5, and 1% (w/v) MFP and then subjected to hydroxyl radical oxidation at 4 °C for 0, 2, and 24 h. MFP was more readily oxidized (intrinsic fluorescence quenching, sulfur losses, and carbonyl formation) than oil [conjugated dienes and 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS)]. However, oxidized MFP in the continuous phase stimulated lipid oxidation after 24 h, sharply contrasting with interface-adsorbed MFP that inhibited TBARS formation nearly 90% (p < 0.05). Interfacial MFP from 2 h oxidized samples exhibited greater losses of fluorescence and more extensive polymerization of myosin (detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) than MFP present in the continuous phase. Results indicated that, due to the physical localization, interface-adsorbed MFP in general and myosin in particular provided accentuated protection of emulsions against oxidation. PMID:26414649

  14. Biobased oil structure on amphiphilic and tribological properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biobased oils are those derived from farm-based renewable raw materials. Most are vegetable oils (such as soybean, canola, corn, etc.) or chemical modifications of vegetable oils. They have a number of interesting structural features that impact their amphiphilic and lubrication properties. The basi...

  15. Formation and finite element analysis of tethered bilayer lipid structures.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kwang Joo; Valincius, Gintaras; Liao, Wei-Ching; Hu, Xin; Wen, Xuejin; Lee, Andrew; Yu, Bo; Vanderah, David J; Lu, Wu; Lee, L James

    2010-12-01

    Rapid solvent exchange of an ethanolic solution of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhyPC) in the presence of a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) [thiolipid/β-mercaptoethanol (βME) (3/7 mol/mol) on Au] shows a transition from densely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(dp)tBLMs], to loosely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(lp)tBLMs], and tethered bilayer liposome nanoparticles (tBLNs) with decreasing DPhyPC concentration. The tethered lipidic constructs in the aqueous medium were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Finite element analysis (FEA) was applied to interpret spectral EIS features without referring to equivalent circuit modeling. Using structural data obtained earlier from neutron reflectometry and dielectric constants of lipid bilayers, we reproduced experimentally observed features of the electrochemical impedance (EI) spectra of complex surface constructs involving small pinhole defects, large membrane-free patches, and bound liposomes. We demonstrated by FEA that highly insulating (dp)tBLMs with low-defect density exhibit EI spectra in the shape of a perfect semicircle with or without low-frequency upward "tails" in the Cole-Cole representation. Such EI spectra were observed at DPhyPC concentrations of >5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). While AFM was not able to visualize very small lateral defects in such films, EI spectra unambiguously signaled their presence by increased low frequency "tails". Using FEA we demonstrate that films with large diameter visible defects (>25 nm by AFM) produce EI spectral features consisting of two semicircles of comparable size. Such films were typically obtained at DPhyPC concentrations of <5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). At DPhyPC concentrations of <1.0 × 10(-3) mol L(-1) the planar bilayer structures were replaced by ellipsoidal liposomes with diameters ranging from 50 to 500 nm as observed in AFM images. Despite the distinct surface morphology change, the EI

  16. Formation and finite element analysis of tethered bilayer lipid structures.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kwang Joo; Valincius, Gintaras; Liao, Wei-Ching; Hu, Xin; Wen, Xuejin; Lee, Andrew; Yu, Bo; Vanderah, David J; Lu, Wu; Lee, L James

    2010-12-01

    Rapid solvent exchange of an ethanolic solution of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhyPC) in the presence of a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) [thiolipid/β-mercaptoethanol (βME) (3/7 mol/mol) on Au] shows a transition from densely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(dp)tBLMs], to loosely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(lp)tBLMs], and tethered bilayer liposome nanoparticles (tBLNs) with decreasing DPhyPC concentration. The tethered lipidic constructs in the aqueous medium were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Finite element analysis (FEA) was applied to interpret spectral EIS features without referring to equivalent circuit modeling. Using structural data obtained earlier from neutron reflectometry and dielectric constants of lipid bilayers, we reproduced experimentally observed features of the electrochemical impedance (EI) spectra of complex surface constructs involving small pinhole defects, large membrane-free patches, and bound liposomes. We demonstrated by FEA that highly insulating (dp)tBLMs with low-defect density exhibit EI spectra in the shape of a perfect semicircle with or without low-frequency upward "tails" in the Cole-Cole representation. Such EI spectra were observed at DPhyPC concentrations of >5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). While AFM was not able to visualize very small lateral defects in such films, EI spectra unambiguously signaled their presence by increased low frequency "tails". Using FEA we demonstrate that films with large diameter visible defects (>25 nm by AFM) produce EI spectral features consisting of two semicircles of comparable size. Such films were typically obtained at DPhyPC concentrations of <5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). At DPhyPC concentrations of <1.0 × 10(-3) mol L(-1) the planar bilayer structures were replaced by ellipsoidal liposomes with diameters ranging from 50 to 500 nm as observed in AFM images. Despite the distinct surface morphology change, the EI

  17. Water Structure at the Lipid Multibilayer Surface: Anionic Versus Cationic Head Group Effects.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Achintya; Kwak, Kyungwon; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-06-01

    Membrane water interface is a potential reaction site for many biochemical reactions. Therefore, a molecular level understanding of water structure and dynamics that strongly depend on the chemical structure of lipid is prerequisite for elucidating the role of water in biological reactions on membrane surface. Recently, we carried out femtosecond infrared pump-probe studies of water structure and dynamics at multibilayer surfaces of zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine-analogue lipid ( J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2016 , 7 , 741 ). Here, to further elucidate the anionic and cationic headgroup effects on water, we study vibrational dynamics of water on lipid multibilayers formed by anionic phospho-glycerol lipid molecules as well as by cationic choline-derivatized lipid molecules. We observed two significantly different vibrational lifetime components (very fast 0.5 ps and slow 1.9 ps) of the OD stretch mode of HOD molecules at the negatively charged phospho-lipid multibilayer whereas only one vibrational lifetime component (1.6 ps) was observed at the positively charged choline-derivatized lipid multibilayer. From the detailed analyses about the vibrational energy and rotational relaxations of HOD molecules in lipid multibilayers composed of anionic lipid with phosphate and cationic lipid without phosphate, the role of phosphate group in structuring water molecules at phospholipid membrane interface is revealed. PMID:27171689

  18. 2009 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function Gordon Research Conference - February 1- 6 ,2009

    SciTech Connect

    Kent D. Chapman

    2009-02-06

    The Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism and Function' has been instituted to accelerate research productivity in the field of plant lipids. This conference will facilitate wide dissemination of research breakthroughs, support recruitment of young scientists to the field of plant lipid metabolism and encourage broad participation of the plant lipid community in guiding future directions for research in plant lipids. This conference will build upon the strengths of the successful, previous biannual meetings of the National Plant Lipid Cooperative (www.plantlipids.org) that began in 1993, but will reflect a broader scope of topics to include the biochemistry, cell biology, metabolic regulation, and signaling functions of plant acyl lipids. Most importantly, this conference also will serve as a physical focal point for the interaction of the plant lipid research community. Applications to attend this conference will be open to all researchers interested in plant lipids and will provide a venue for the presentation of the latest research results, networking opportunities for young scientists, and a forum for the development and exchange of useful lipid resources and new ideas. By bringing together senior- and junior-level scientists involved in plant lipid metabolism, a broad range of insights will be shared and the community of plant lipid researchers will function more as a network of vested partners. This is important for the vitality of the research community and for the perceived value that will encourage conference attendance into the future.

  19. Production of a novel mannosylerythritol lipid containing a hydroxy fatty acid from castor oil by Pseudozyma tsukubaensis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Morita, Tomotake; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitagawa, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are glycolipid biosurfactants produced by various yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma, which exhibit excellent surface activities as well as versatile biochemical activities. A study on P. tsukubaensis NBRC1940 as a mono-acetylated MEL (MEL-B) producer revealed that the yeast accumulated a novel glycolipid from castor oil at a yield of 22 g/L. Its main chemical structure was identified as 1-O-β-(2'-O-alka(e)noyl-3'-O-hydroxyalka(e)noyl-6'-O-acetyl-D-mannopyranosyl)-D-erythritol designated as "new MEL-B." The new MEL-B, comprising a hydroxy fatty acid had a reduced surface tension of 28.5 mN/m at a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 2.2×10⁻⁵ M in water. The observed CMC was 5-fold higher than that of conventional MEL-B. When conventional MEL-B was dispersed in water, it self-assembled to form the lamellar (L(α)) phase at a wide range of concentrations. In contrast, new MEL-B formed spherical oily droplets similar to the sponge (L₃) phase, which is observed in aqueous solutions of di-acetylated MEL (MEL-A). The data suggest that the newly identified MEL-B is likely to have a different structure and interfacial properties compared to the conventional MELs, and could facilitate an increase in the application of glycolipid biosurfactants.

  20. Production of a novel mannosylerythritol lipid containing a hydroxy fatty acid from castor oil by Pseudozyma tsukubaensis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Morita, Tomotake; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitagawa, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are glycolipid biosurfactants produced by various yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma, which exhibit excellent surface activities as well as versatile biochemical activities. A study on P. tsukubaensis NBRC1940 as a mono-acetylated MEL (MEL-B) producer revealed that the yeast accumulated a novel glycolipid from castor oil at a yield of 22 g/L. Its main chemical structure was identified as 1-O-β-(2'-O-alka(e)noyl-3'-O-hydroxyalka(e)noyl-6'-O-acetyl-D-mannopyranosyl)-D-erythritol designated as "new MEL-B." The new MEL-B, comprising a hydroxy fatty acid had a reduced surface tension of 28.5 mN/m at a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 2.2×10⁻⁵ M in water. The observed CMC was 5-fold higher than that of conventional MEL-B. When conventional MEL-B was dispersed in water, it self-assembled to form the lamellar (L(α)) phase at a wide range of concentrations. In contrast, new MEL-B formed spherical oily droplets similar to the sponge (L₃) phase, which is observed in aqueous solutions of di-acetylated MEL (MEL-A). The data suggest that the newly identified MEL-B is likely to have a different structure and interfacial properties compared to the conventional MELs, and could facilitate an increase in the application of glycolipid biosurfactants. PMID:23728329

  1. TRPV1 structures in nanodiscs reveal mechanisms of ligand and lipid action.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Cao, Erhu; Julius, David; Cheng, Yifan

    2016-06-16

    When integral membrane proteins are visualized in detergents or other artificial systems, an important layer of information is lost regarding lipid interactions and their effects on protein structure. This is especially relevant to proteins for which lipids have both structural and regulatory roles. Here we demonstrate the power of combining electron cryo-microscopy with lipid nanodisc technology to ascertain the structure of the rat TRPV1 ion channel in a native bilayer environment. Using this approach, we determined the locations of annular and regulatory lipids and showed that specific phospholipid interactions enhance binding of a spider toxin to TRPV1 through formation of a tripartite complex. Furthermore, phosphatidylinositol lipids occupy the binding site for capsaicin and other vanilloid ligands, suggesting a mechanism whereby chemical or thermal stimuli elicit channel activation by promoting the release of bioactive lipids from a critical allosteric regulatory site. PMID:27281200

  2. Micronutrients-fortified rapeseed oil improves hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in rats fed a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intake of high-fat diet is associated with increased fatty livers. Hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress are key pathophysiological mechanisms in this disease. Micronutrients polyphenols, tocopherols and phytosterols in rapeseed exert potential benefit to hepatoprotection, but most of these micronutrients are removed by the traditional refining process. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether rapeseed oil fortified with these micronutrients can decrease hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress induced by high-fat diet. Sprague–Dawley rats received rodent diet contained 20% fat whose source was refined rapeseed oil (RRO) or fortified RRO with low, middle and high quantities of these micronutrients for 10 weeks. Intake of RRO caused a remarkable hepatic steatosis. Micronutrients supplementation was effective in reducing steatosis as well as total triglyceride and total cholesterol contents in liver. These micronutrients also significantly increased hepatic antioxidant defense capacities, as evaluated by the significant elevation in the activities of SOD and GPx as well as the level of GSH, and the significant decline in lipid peroxidation. These findings suggest that rapeseed oil fortified with micronutrients polyphenols, tocopherols and phytosterols may contribute to prevent fatty livers such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by ameliorating hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress. PMID:23510587

  3. Lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils with high activity against oxygen free radicals and tumor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lacatusu, I; Badea, N; Badea, G; Oprea, O; Mihaila, M A; Kaya, D A; Stan, R; Meghea, A

    2015-11-01

    The development of nano-dosage forms of phytochemicals represents a significant progress of the scientific approach in the biomedical research. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils (grape seed oil, fish oil and laurel leaf oil) in counteracting free radicals and combating certain tumor cells. No drug was encapsulated in the nanocarriers. The cytotoxic effect exerted by bioactive nanocarriers against two tumor cells, MDA-MB 231 and HeLa cell lines, and two normal cells, L929 and B16 cell lines, was measured using the MTT assay, while oxidative damage was assessed by measuring the total antioxidant activity using chemiluminescence analysis. The best performance was obtained for nanocarriers based on an association of grape seed and laurel leaf oils, with a capacity to scavenge about 98% oxygen free radicals. A dose of nanocarriers of 5mg·mL(-1) has led to a drastic decrease in tumor cell proliferation even in the absence of an antitumor drug (e.g. about 50% viability for MDA-MB 231 cell line and 60% viability for HeLa cell line). A comparative survival profile of normal and tumor cells, which were exposed to an effective dose of 2.5mg·mL(-1) lipid nanocarriers, has revealed a death rate of 20% for normal B16 cells and of 40% death rate for MDA-MB 231 and HeLa tumor cells. The results in this study imply that lipid nanocarriers based on grape seed oil in association with laurel leaf oil could be a candidate to reduce the delivery system toxicity and may significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy of antitumor drugs in clinical applications.

  4. Comparison of the radical scavenging potential of polar and lipidic fractions of olive oil and other vegetable oils under normal conditions and after thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Nisiotou, Christala; Papageorgiou, Yiannis; Kremli, Ioulia; Satravelas, Nikolaos; Zinieris, Nikolaos; Zygalaki, Helen

    2004-04-21

    The antioxidant activity (IC(50)) of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), commercial olive oil, and other vegetable oils (soybean, sunflower, and corn oil) was determined by UV-vis and by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the stable radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Also, we studied the antioxidant activity of the methanol soluble phase (methanolic, MF) and the nonsoluble phase (lipidic, LF) of oils by the same methods. Similarly, we studied the effect of heating on the antioxidant activity at 160 and 190 degrees C. Also, the MF, containing the polyphenolic substances, was used for measurements of the radical scavenging capacity toward the most important oxygen free radicals, superoxide anion (O(2)(*)(-)) and hydroxyl (HO(*)) radicals. Results showed that soybean oil and EVOO had the highest antioxidant potential and thermal stability. In the case of soybean oil, the antioxidant capacity is the result of its high content of gamma- and delta-tocopherols (with the highest antioxidant capacity and thermostabilities), whereas in EVOO, the antioxidant potential is the result of the combination of specific antioxidant polyphenols, which are acting additionally as effective stabilizers of alpha-tocopherol. The high content of EVOO in tyrosol, hydrotyrosol, and oleuropein and other polyphenolics with radical scavenging abilities toward superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical suggests that olive oil possesses biological properties that could partially account for the observed beneficial health effects of the Mediterranean diet.

  5. Conversion efficiency and oil quality of low-lipid high-protein and high-lipid low-protein microalgae via hydrothermal liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Liu, Zhidan; Zhang, Yuanhui; Li, Baoming; Lu, Haifeng; Duan, Na; Liu, Minsheng; Zhu, Zhangbing; Si, Buchun

    2014-02-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is a promising technology for converting algae into biocrude oil. Here, HTL of a low-lipid high-protein microalgae (Nannochloropsis sp.) and a high-lipid low-protein microalgae (Chlorella sp.) was studied. An orthogonal design was applied to investigate the effects of reaction temperature (220-300°C), retention time (30-90 min), and total solid content (TS, 15-25%wt) of the feedstock. The highest biocrude yield for Nannochloropsis sp. was 55% at 260°C, 60 min and 25%wt, and for Chlorella sp. was 82.9% at 220°C, 90 min and 25%wt. The maximum higher heating values (HHV) of biocrude oil from both algae were ∼ 37 MJ/kg. GC-MS revealed a various distribution of chemical compounds in biocrude. In particular, the highest hydrocarbons content was 29.8% and 17.9% for Nannochloropsis and Chlorella sp., respectively. This study suggests that algae composition greatly influences oil yield and quality, but may not be in similar effects.

  6. Supercritical fluid precipitation of ketoprofen in novel structured lipid carriers for enhanced mucosal delivery--a comparison with solid lipid particles.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, V S S; Matias, A A; Rodríguez-Rojo, S; Nogueira, I D; Duarte, C M M

    2015-11-10

    Structured lipid carriers based on mixture of solid lipids with liquid lipids are the second generation of solid lipid particles, offering the advantage of improved drug loading capacity and higher storage stability. In this study, structured lipid carriers were successfully prepared for the first time by precipitation from gas saturated solutions. Glyceryl monooleate (GMO), a liquid glycerolipid, was selected in this work to be incorporated into three solid glycerolipids with hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) ranging from 1 to 13, namely Gelucire 43/01™, Geleol™ and Gelucire 50/13™. In general, microparticles with a irregular porous morphology and a wide particle size distribution were obtained. The HLB of the individual glycerolipids might be a relevant parameter to take into account during the processing of solid:liquid lipid blends. As expected, the addition of a liquid lipid into a solid lipid matrix led to increased stability of the lipid carriers, with no significant modifications in their melting enthalpy after 6 months of storage. Additionally, Gelucire 43/01™:GMO particles were produced with different mass ratios and loaded with ketoprofen. The drug loading capacity of the structured lipid carriers increased as the GMO content in the particles increased, achieving a maximum encapsulation efficiency of 97% for the 3:1 mass ratio. Moreover, structured lipid carriers presented an immediate release of ketoprofen from its matrix with higher permeation through a mucous-membrane model, while solid lipid particles present a controlled release of the drug with less permeation capacity.

  7. Lipid oxidation and volatile production in irradiated raw pork batters prepared with commercial soybean oil containing vitamin E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Cheorun; Ahn, Dong Uk; Byun, Myung Woo

    2001-04-01

    An emulsion-type raw pork batter was prepared using 10% (meat weight) of backfat or commercial soybean oil enriched with vitamin E to determine the effect of irradiation on lipid oxidation and volatile production during storage. Batters (approximately 100 g) were vacuum- or aerobically packaged and irradiated at 0, 2.5 or 4.5 kGy. Irradiation increased lipid oxidation of aerobically packaged raw pork batters prepared with both backfat and soybean oil. Lipid oxidation of vacuum-packaged pork batters was not influenced by irradiation except for the batter prepared with backfat at day 0. Aerobically packaged batters prepared with soybean oil had lower ( P<0.05) TBARS than that with backfat, but vacuum-packaged ones were not different. The sum of volatile compounds with short retention time (<1.80) increased by irradiation, and with storage time except for aerobic packaging at day 7. The amount of total volatile compounds had an increasing trend until day 3, but not at day 7. Irradiation increased the production of total volatile compounds in the batters prepared with soybean oil and vacuum packaged, but irradiation effect on volatile production was not consistent with other treatments.

  8. Konjac-based oil bulking system for development of improved-lipid pork patties: technological, microbiological and sensory assessment.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Sandoval, Lorena; Cofrades, Susana; Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Carballo, José; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    Improved-lipid pork patties were manufactured following two different reformulation strategies: fat reduction by replacement of pork backfat with konjac gel (KG), and fat reduction/lipid improvement by replacement of pork backfat with an improved oil combination (olive, linseed and fish oils) bulking system based on konjac gel (O-KG). Technological, microbiological and sensory properties were analyzed as affected by the type of formulation and by chilled storage (9days, 2°C). Fat was reduced by between 30 and 86%. In the cases where O-KG was incorporated, 12 and 41% of total fat in patties came from the oil combination. There was no observable effect on color parameters in samples with O-K. Higher KG levels produced harder cooked patties. Animal fat replacement in patties promoted an increase in lipid oxidation, which was more pronounced in samples with an oil combination. In general, during chilled storage no major changes were observed in the studied properties as a result of the different treatments. PMID:25485511

  9. On ripples and rafts: Curvature induced nanoscale structures in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Friederike; Dolezel, Stefan; Lenz, Olaf; Meinhardt, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    We develop an elastic theory that predicts the spontaneous formation of nanoscale structures in lipid bilayers which locally phase separate between two phases with different spontaneous monolayer curvature. The theory rationalizes in a unified manner the observation of a variety of nanoscale structures in lipid membranes: Rippled states in one-component membranes, lipid rafts in multicomponent membranes. Furthermore, we report on recent observations of rippled states and rafts in simulations of a simple coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers, which are compatible with experimental observations and with our elastic model.

  10. Enhanced level of n-3 fatty acid in membrane phospholipids induces lipid peroxidation in rats fed dietary docosahexaenoic acid oil.

    PubMed

    Song, J H; Miyazawa, T

    2001-03-01

    The effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) oil with different lipid types on lipid peroxidation was studied in rats. Each group of male Sprague-Dawley rats was pair fed 15% (w/w) of either DHA-triglycerides (DHA-TG), DHA-ethyl esters (DHA-EE) or DHA-phospholipids (DHA-PL) for up to 3 weeks. The palm oil (supplemented with 20% soybean oil) diet without DHA was fed as the control. Dietary DHA oils lowered plasma triglyceride concentrations in rats fed DHA-TG (by 30%), DHA-EE (by 45%) and DHA-PL (by 27%), compared to control. The incorporation of dietary DHA into plasma and liver phospholipids was more pronounced in the DHA-TG and DHA-EE group than in the DHA-PL group. However, DHA oil intake negatively influenced lipid peroxidation in both plasma and liver. Phospholipid peroxidation in plasma and liver was significantly higher than control in rats fed DHA-TG or DHA-EE, but not DHA-PL. These results are consistent with increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and decreased alpha-tocopherol levels in plasma and liver. In addition, liver microsomes from rats of each group were exposed to a mixture of chelated iron (Fe(3+)/ADP) and NADPH to determine the rate of peroxidative damage. During NADPH-dependent peroxidation of microsomes, the accumulation of phospholipid hydroperoxides, as well as TBARS, were elevated and alpha-tocopherol levels were significantly exhausted in DHA-TG and DHA-EE groups. During microsomal lipid peroxidation, there was a greater loss of n-3 fatty acids (mainly DHA) than of n-6 fatty acids, including arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). These results indicate that polyunsaturation of n-3 fatty acids is the most important target for lipid peroxidation. This suggests that the ingestion of large amounts of DHA oil enhances lipid peroxidation in the target membranes where greater amounts of n-3 fatty acids are incorporated, thereby increasing the peroxidizability and possibly accelerating the atherosclerotic process.

  11. Quantitative modelling of crude oil toxicity using the approach of cybernetics and structured mechanisms of microbial processes.

    PubMed

    Onwurah, Ikechukwu N E

    2002-06-01

    Cybernetics and structured approach to biochemical processes in microbial cells offer the status of using various cell components of Azotobacter as molecular markers in toxicity assay of environmental toxicants. The intra-linked dynamic physicochemical reactions of the basic macromolecules--DNA, protein and membrane lipids--with respect to the crude oil in the growth environment, results in an 'impulse transfer function'. The structured effects are reduction in both DNA and protein levels, and an elevated level of lipid peroxidation products. Toxicity index (Ti) of the crude oil, at a given concentration, is the percent ratio of the summation of the products of these effect parameters' and their respective weightings, relative to control. The EC50 is the effective percent (w/v) concentration of the crude oil at which a toxicity index of 50% was recorded, and this corresponded with about 44% loss in nitrogen fixation of the diazotrophic bacterium.

  12. Wheat germ oil and α-lipoic acid predominantly improve the lipid profile of broiler meat.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Muhammad Sajid; Anjum, Faqir Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Issa; Shahid, Muhammad

    2013-11-20

    In response to recent assertions that synthetic antioxidants may have the potential to cause toxic effects and to consumers' increased attention to consuming natural products, the poultry industry has been seeking sources of natural antioxidants, alone or in combination with synthetic antioxidants that are currently being used by the industry. The present study was conducted to determine the effect of α-lipoic acid, α-tocopherol, and wheat germ oil on the status of antioxidant enzymes, fatty acid profile, and serum biochemical profile of broiler blood. One-day-old (180) broiler birds were fed six different feeds varying in their antioxidant content: no addition (T1), natural α-tocopherol (wheat germ oil, T2), synthetic α-tocopherol (T3), α-lipoic acid (T4), α-lipoic acid together with natural α-tocopherol (T5), and α-lipoic acid together with synthetic α-tocopherol (T6). The composition of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in the breast and leg meat was positively influenced by the different dietary supplements. The content of fatty acid was significantly greater in broilers receiving T2 both in breast (23.92%) and in leg (25.82%) meat, whereas lower fatty acid levels was found in broilers receiving diets containing T6 in the breast (19.57%) and leg (21.30%) meat. Serum total cholesterol (113.42 mg/dL) and triglycerides (52.29 mg/dL) were lowest in the group given natural α-tocopherol and α-lipoic acid. Wheat germ oil containing natural α-tocopherol alone or with α-lipoic acid was more effective than synthetic α-tocopherol in raising levels of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione reductase while lowering plasma total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides and raising high-density lipoprotein and plasma protein significantly. It was concluded that the combination of wheat germ oil and α-lipoic acid is helpful in improving the lipid profile of broilers. PMID:24191686

  13. Membrane Protein Crystallization in Lipidic Mesophases. Hosting Lipid Effects on the Crystallization and Structure of a Transmembrane Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Hfer, Nicole; Aragao, David; Lyons, Joseph A.; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-09-28

    Gramicidin is an apolar pentadecapeptide antibiotic consisting of alternating d- and l-amino acids. It functions, in part, by creating pores in membranes of susceptible cells rendering them leaky to monovalent cations. The peptide should be able to traverse the host membrane either as a double-stranded, intertwined double helix (DSDH) or as a head-to-head single-stranded helix (HHSH). Current structure models are based on macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the HHSH form has only been observed by NMR. The shape and size of the different gramicidin conformations differ. We speculated therefore that reconstituting it into a lipidic mesophase with bilayers of different microstructures would preferentially stabilize one form over the other. By using such mesophases for in meso crystallogenesis, the expectation was that at least one would generate crystals of gramicidin in the HHSH form for structure determination by MX. This was tested using commercial and in-house synthesized lipids that support in meso crystallogenesis. Lipid acyl chain lengths were varied from 14 to 18 carbons to provide mesophases with a range of bilayer thicknesses. Unexpectedly, all lipids produced high-quality, structure-grade crystals with gramicidin only in the DSDH conformation.

  14. Dietary olive oil and menhaden oil mitigate induction of lipogenesis in hyperinsulinemic corpulent JCR:LA-cp rats: microarray analysis of lipid-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiong; Elam, Marshall B; Wilcox, Henry G; Cagen, Lauren M; Park, Edwards A; Raghow, Rajendra; Patel, Divyen; Kumar, Poonam; Sheybani, Ali; Russell, James C

    2004-12-01

    In the corpulent James C. Russell corpulent (JCR:LA-cp) rat, hyperinsulinemia leads to induction of lipogenic enzymes via enhanced expression of sterol-regulatory-binding protein (SREBP)-1c. This results in increased hepatic lipid production and hypertriglyceridemia. Information regarding down-regulation of SREBP-1c and lipogenic enzymes by dietary fatty acids in this model is limited. We therefore assessed de novo hepatic lipogenesis and hepatic and plasma lipids in corpulent JCR rats fed diets enriched in olive oil or menhaden oil. Using microarray and Northern analysis, we determined the effect of these diets on expression of mRNA for lipogenic enzymes and other proteins related to lipid metabolism. In corpulent JCR:LA-cp rats, both the olive oil and menhaden oil diets reduced expression of SREBP-1c, with concomitant reductions in hepatic triglyceride content, lipogenesis, and expression of enzymes related to lipid synthesis. Unexpectedly, expression of many peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-dependent enzymes mediating fatty acid oxidation was increased in livers of corpulent JCR rats. The menhaden oil diet further increased expression of these enzymes. Induction of SREBP-1c by insulin is dependent on liver x receptor (LXR)alpha. Although hepatic expression of mRNA for LXR itself was not increased in corpulent rats, expression of Cyp7a1, an LXR-responsive gene, was increased, suggesting increased LXR activity. Expression of mRNA encoding fatty acid translocase and ATP-binding cassette subfamily DALD member 3 was also increased in livers of corpulent JCR rats, indicating a potential role for these fatty acid transporters in the pathogenesis of disordered lipid metabolism in obesity. This study clearly demonstrates that substitution of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid for carbohydrate in the corpulent JCR:LA-cp rat reduces de novo lipogenesis, at least in part, by reducing hepatic expression of SREBP-1c and that strategies directed toward reducing

  15. Investigating structural details of lipid-cholesterol-A β interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Durgesh; Anunciado, Divina; Heller, William; O'Neill, Hugh; Urban, Volker; Qian, Shuo

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and is predicted to affect 1 in 85 people around the world by 2050. Amyloid beta (A β) -peptide, a peptide composed of 40- 42 amino acids that is the product of cleavage from the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is regarded to play a major role in the development of AD. In addition, accumulating evidence points to a positive association between cholesterol and AD. Here, we present results from our studies about A β-peptide and cholesterol in bilayer by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) using a combination of dimyristoyl, phosphocholine (DMPC) and partially deuterated cholesterol (cholesterol-d7) with and without A β. We compare the results using grazing incidence and transmission SANS on lipid bilayer films and unilamellar vesicles respectively. The structural details on vesicles and bilayers work in conjunction with the circular dichroism on peptide in solution and oriented circular dichroism in bilayer films. The studies confirm a positive association of A β with the membrane layers. The results from different studies will be compared and contrasted in presentation.

  16. Structure and orientation of sarcolipin in lipid environments.

    PubMed

    Mascioni, Alessandro; Karim, Christine; Barany, George; Thomas, David D; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2002-01-15

    Sarcolipin (SLN) is a 31 amino acid integral membrane protein that regulates Ca-ATPase activity in skeletal muscle. Here, we report the three-dimensional structure and topology of synthetic SLN in lipid environments, as determined by solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. 2D solution NMR experiments were performed on SLN solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. We found that SLN adopts a highly defined alpha-helical conformation from F9 through R27, with a backbone RMSD of 0.65 A and a side chain RMSD of 1.66 A. The N-terminus (M1 through L8) and the C-terminus (S28 through Y31) are mostly unstructured. The orientation of the SLN was determined using one-dimensional (15)N NMR solid-state spectroscopy. The protein was incorporated into phospholipid bilayers prepared from a mixture of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine. The (15)N chemical shift solid-state spectra from selectively labeled SLN samples indicate that SLN orients perpendicularly to the plane of the membrane bilayers. These results support the proposed mechanism of Ca-ATPase regulation of SLN via protein-protein intramembranous interactions between the highly conserved transmembrane domains of the Ca-ATPase and the conserved transmembrane domain of SLN.

  17. MemProtMD: Automated Insertion of Membrane Protein Structures into Explicit Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Goose, Joseph E.; Caffrey, Martin; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Parker, Joanne L.; Newstead, Simon; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There has been exponential growth in the number of membrane protein structures determined. Nevertheless, these structures are usually resolved in the absence of their lipid environment. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations enable insertion of membrane proteins into explicit models of lipid bilayers. We have automated the CGMD methodology, enabling membrane protein structures to be identified upon their release into the PDB and embedded into a membrane. The simulations are analyzed for protein-lipid interactions, identifying lipid binding sites, and revealing local bilayer deformations plus molecular access pathways within the membrane. The coarse-grained models of membrane protein/bilayer complexes are transformed to atomistic resolution for further analysis and simulation. Using this automated simulation pipeline, we have analyzed a number of recently determined membrane protein structures to predict their locations within a membrane, their lipid/protein interactions, and the functional implications of an enhanced understanding of the local membrane environment of each protein. PMID:26073602

  18. Dynamical clustering and a mechanism for raft-like structures in a model lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Starr, Francis W; Hartmann, Benedikt; Douglas, Jack F

    2014-05-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the dynamical heterogeneity of a model single-component lipid membrane using a coarse-grained representation of lipid molecules. This model qualitatively reproduces the known phase transitions between disordered, ordered, and gel membrane phases, and the phase transitions are accompanied by significant changes in the nature of the lipid dynamics. In particular, lipid diffusion in the liquid-ordered phase is hindered by the transient trapping of molecules by their neighbors, similar to the dynamics of a liquid approaching its glass transition. This transient molecular caging gives rise to two distinct mobility groups within a single-component membrane: lipids that are transiently trapped, and lipids with displacements on the scale of the intermolecular spacing. Most significantly, lipids within these distinct mobility states spatially segregate, creating transient "islands" of enhanced mobility having a size and time scale compatible with lipid "rafts," dynamical structures thought to be important for cell membrane function. Although the dynamic lipid clusters that we observe do not themselves correspond to rafts (which are more complex, multicomponent structures), we hypothesize that such rafts may develop from the same universal mechanism, explaining why raft-like regions should arise, regardless of lipid structural or compositional details. These clusters are strikingly similar to the dynamical clusters found in glass-forming fluids, and distinct from phase-separation clusters. We also show that mobile lipid clusters can be dissected into smaller clusters of cooperatively rearranging molecules. The geometry of these clusters can be understood in the context of branched equilibrium polymers, related to percolation theory. We discuss how these dynamical structures relate to a range observations on the dynamics of lipid membranes.

  19. The effect of hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of Heracleum persicum on lipid profile in cholesterol-fed rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Dashti, Gholamreza; Saberi, Salabali; Malekjamshidi, Parvin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effect of hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of Heracleum persicum (Apiaceae) on lipid profile of male hyperlipidemic rabbits. Materials and Methods: Thirty rabbits were randomly divided into six groups of five each. One group received normal diet and the other groups fed with a high cholesterol (2% W/W) diet for 7 weeks. Vehicle, hydroalcoholic extract (500 and 1000 mg/kg), essential oil (200  l/kg), and lovastatin (5 mg/kg) were administered orally to animals and their effects on lipid profile were evaluated. Results: Essential oil of H. perscum significantly (p<0.05) lowered serum triglyceride level and increased HDL-cholesterol concentration. Moreover, hydroalcoholic extract (1000 mg/kg), essential oil (200  l/kg), and lovastatin significantly (p<0.01) reduced serum concentration of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol. Conclusion: These findings suggest that essential oil of the plant fruits may have some benefits in reducing cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:25050312

  20. [Effect of sacha inchi oil (plukenetia volúbilis l) on the lipid profile of patients with hyperlipoproteinemia].

    PubMed

    Garmendia, Fausto; Pando, Rosa; Ronceros, Gerardo

    2011-12-01

    We performed a pilot, experimental, open study in order to know the effect, effective dosage and secondary effects of sacha inchi´s (Plukenetia Huallabamba) [corrected] oil on the lipid profiles of patients with hypercholesterolemia. We included 24 patients of ages 35 to 75, to whom we measured total cholesterol (TC), HDL, triglycerides (Tg), glucose (G), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and insulin (I) levels in blood, then we randomized them to receive sacha inchi oil orally 5 ml or 10 ml of a suspension of sacha inchi oil (2gr/5ml) for four months. The oil intake produced a decrease in the mean values of TC, and NEFA, and a rise in HDL in both subgroups. The subgroup receiving 10 ml was associated to an increase in the insulin levels. Sacha inchi oil appears to have beneficial effects on the lipid profile of patients with dyslipidemia, but their efficacy and security should be evaluated in randomized clinical trials. PMID:22241259

  1. Lipid Microdomains: Structural Correlations, Fluctuations, and Formation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jun; Sammalkorpi, Maria; Haataja, Mikko

    2010-03-01

    Compositional lipid microdomains (“lipid rafts”) in mammalian plasma membranes are believed to facilitate many important cellular processes. While several physically distinct scenarios predicting the presence of finite-sized microdomains in vivo have been proposed in the past, direct experimental verification or falsification of model predictions has remained elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that the combination of the spatial correlation and temporal fluctuation spectra of the lipid domains can be employed to unambiguously differentiate between the existing theoretical scenarios. Furthermore, the differentiation of the raft formation mechanisms using this methodology can be achieved by collecting data at physiologically relevant conditions without the need to tune control parameters.

  2. The development of flow-through bio-catalyst microreactors from silica micro structured fibers for lipid transformations.

    PubMed

    Anuar, Sabiqah Tuan; Villegas, Carla; Mugo, Samuel M; Curtis, Jonathan M

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates the utility of a flow-through enzyme immobilized silica microreactor for lipid transformations. A silica micro structured fiber (MSF) consisting of 168 channels of internal diameter 4-5 μm provided a large surface area for the covalent immobilization of Candida antartica lipase. The specific activity of the immobilized lipase was determined by hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate and calculated to be 0.81 U/mg. The catalytic performance of the lipase microreactor was demonstrated by the efficient ethanolysis of canola oil. The parameters affecting the performance of the MSF microreactor, including temperature and reaction flow rate, were investigated. Characterization of the lipid products exiting the microreactor was performed by non-aqueous reversed-phased liquid chromatography (NARP-LC) with evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) and by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC). Under optimized conditions of 1 μL/min flow rate of 5 mg/mL trioleoylglycerol (TO) in ethanol and 50 °C reaction temperature, 2-monooleoylglycerol was the main product at > 90% reaction yield. The regioselectivity of the Candida antartica lipase immobilized MSF microreactor in the presence of ethanol was found to be comparable to that obtained under conventional conditions. The ability of these reusable flow-through microreactors to regioselectively form monoacylglycerides in high yield from triacylglycerides demonstrate their potential use in small-scale lipid transformations or analytical lipids profiling. PMID:21318469

  3. The development of flow-through bio-catalyst microreactors from silica micro structured fibers for lipid transformations.

    PubMed

    Anuar, Sabiqah Tuan; Villegas, Carla; Mugo, Samuel M; Curtis, Jonathan M

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates the utility of a flow-through enzyme immobilized silica microreactor for lipid transformations. A silica micro structured fiber (MSF) consisting of 168 channels of internal diameter 4-5 μm provided a large surface area for the covalent immobilization of Candida antartica lipase. The specific activity of the immobilized lipase was determined by hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate and calculated to be 0.81 U/mg. The catalytic performance of the lipase microreactor was demonstrated by the efficient ethanolysis of canola oil. The parameters affecting the performance of the MSF microreactor, including temperature and reaction flow rate, were investigated. Characterization of the lipid products exiting the microreactor was performed by non-aqueous reversed-phased liquid chromatography (NARP-LC) with evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) and by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC). Under optimized conditions of 1 μL/min flow rate of 5 mg/mL trioleoylglycerol (TO) in ethanol and 50 °C reaction temperature, 2-monooleoylglycerol was the main product at > 90% reaction yield. The regioselectivity of the Candida antartica lipase immobilized MSF microreactor in the presence of ethanol was found to be comparable to that obtained under conventional conditions. The ability of these reusable flow-through microreactors to regioselectively form monoacylglycerides in high yield from triacylglycerides demonstrate their potential use in small-scale lipid transformations or analytical lipids profiling.

  4. Characterization of new types of mannosylerythritol lipids as biosurfactants produced from soybean oil by a basidiomycetous yeast, Pseudozyma shanxiensis.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Morita, Tomotake; Konishi, Masaaki; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2007-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are glycolipid biosurfactants produced by the yeast strains of the genus Pseudozyma. These show not only the excellent surface-active properties but also versatile biochemical actions. In course of MEL production from soybean oil by P. shanxiensis, new extracellular glycolipids (more hydrophilic than the previously reported MELs) were found in the culture medium. As a result of the structural characterization, the glycolipids were identified as a mixture of 4-O-[(2', 4'-di-O-acetyl-3'-O-alka(e)noyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-D-erythritol and 4-O-[(4'-O-acetyl-3'-O-alka(e)noyl-2'-O-butanoyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-D-erythritol. Interestingly, the new MELs possessed a much shorter chain (C(2) or C(4)) at the C-2' position of the mannose moiety compared to the MELs hitherto reported, which mainly possess a medium-chain acid (C(10)) at the position. They would thus show higher hydrophilicity and/or water-solubility, and expand the development of the environmentally advanced yeast biosurfactants. PMID:17898510

  5. [Structure, function and reconstruction of skin surface lipid film].

    PubMed

    Lu, Benrong; Liu, Yi; Li, Shilong; Wang, Gang

    2016-02-01

    After healing of burn wound, skin of scar, transplanted skin grafts, and healed donor site wound suffer from temporary or permanent loss of function of sebaceous glands and dysfunction of skin surface lipid film formation, resulting in desiccation, desquamation, and sensitiveness of the skin, making areas of newly formed skin unsatisfactory. Therefore a good rehabilitation may fail. In this paper, the composition, physiochemical properties, and reconstruction of skin surface lipid film are discussed.

  6. Preservative system development for argan oil-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers.

    PubMed

    Hommoss, A

    2011-03-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) are used in many dermal cosmetic formulations. To prevent microbiological spoilage of NLC suspensions preservative systems must be used. Preservatives can impair the physical stability of NLC suspensions. Therefore, a systematic screening of preservative systems should be performed and the compatibility of these preservative systems with each NLC formulation has to be investigated. In this study three Argan oil-loaded NLC formulations were developed. Ethanol, propylene glycol and pentylene glycol were admixed to these formulations as preservative systems. The physical stability of the non-preserved and preserved formulations has been investigated. Upon admixing 20% w/w ethanol to the selected formulations, immediate particle aggregation could be detected using laser diffractometry and after 24 hours gelling occurred. This was accompanied with a lowering of Zeta potential value. Samples preserved with 10% w/w propylene glycol did not show any change in particle size or in Zeta potential, in comparison to the non-preserved formulation, when measured after one day and 120 days. Samples preserved with 5% pentylene glycol proved also to be stable after 120 days and did not show any change in particle size or Zeta potential.

  7. Influence of plasma-treatments on the structure, superstructure, and function of membrane lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Malte U.; Forbrig, Enrico; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    Every cell, eu- or prokaryotic, has a membrane as an interface to the environment. Every substance that is applied from outside the cell has to interact with it. This includes plasma-generated reactive species in the liquid cell environment created by plasma-treatment. By the Singer and Nicolson model, proteins are embedded in a lipid bilayer. Proteins are the functional elements, lipids are the structural elements. Due to the amphiphilic nature of the lipids, they form (super-) structures in an aqueous environment. The exact superstructure is determined by a structural parameter of the lipid, its shape. Here, we show experiments on lipids by fluorophore-based liposome assays and raman spectroscopy. The results show a membrane-activity of plasma-born reactive species against lipids and lipid structures. Based on this results and literature, we propose a model for a lesion-forming mechanism in membranes of some reactive species created by plasma-treatment. It is based on a hydrophobic-hydrophilic mismatch due to lipid peroxidization induced by reactive species generated in liquids by plasma-treatment.

  8. Structure of phospholipid monolayers containing poly(ethylene glycol) lipids at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, J.; Smith, G.S.; Kuhl, T.L.; Israelachvili, J.N.; Gerstenberg, M.C.

    1997-04-17

    The density distribution of a lipid monolayer at the air-water interface mixed with varying amounts of lipid with poly(ethylene glycol)polymer headgroups (polymer-lipid or PEG-lipid) was measured using neutron reflectometry. The structure of the monolayer at the interface was greatly perturbed by the presence of the bulky polymer-lipid headgroups resulting in a large increase in the thickness of the headgroup region normal to the interface and a systematic roughening of the interface with increasing polymer-lipid content. These results show how bulky hydrophilic moieties cause significant deformations and out-of-place protrusions of phospholipid monolayers and presumably bilayers, vesicles and biological membranes. In terms of polymer physics, very short polymer chains tethered to the air-water interface follow scaling behavior with a mushroom to brush transition with increasing polymer grafting density. 34 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A plural role for lipids in motor neuron diseases: energy, signaling and structure

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Florent; Hussain, Ghulam; Dupuis, Luc; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Henriques, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are characterized by selective death of motor neurons and include mainly adult-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Neurodegeneration is not the single pathogenic event occurring during disease progression. There are multiple lines of evidence for the existence of defects in lipid metabolism at peripheral level. For instance, hypermetabolism is well characterized in ALS, and dyslipidemia correlates with better prognosis in patients. Lipid metabolism plays also a role in other MNDs. In SMA, misuse of lipids as energetic nutrients is described in patients and in related animal models. The composition of structural lipids in the central nervous system is modified, with repercussion on membrane fluidity and on cell signaling mediated by bioactive lipids. Here, we review the main epidemiologic and mechanistic findings that link alterations of lipid metabolism and motor neuron degeneration, and we discuss the rationale of targeting these modifications for therapeutic management of MNDs. PMID:24600344

  10. Mugil cephalus roe oil obtained by supercritical fluid extraction affects the lipid profile and viability in cancer HeLa and B16F10 cells.

    PubMed

    Rosa, A; Piras, A; Nieddu, M; Putzu, D; Cesare Marincola, F; Falchi, A M

    2016-09-14

    We explored the changes in viability and lipid profile occurring in cancer cells, murine melanoma cells (B16F10 cells) and human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells), when exposed to 24 h-treatments with an n-3 PUFA-rich oil obtained by supercritical extraction with CO2 from Mugil cephalus processed roe (bottarga). The composition of the major lipid classes of bottarga oil was determined by the (13)C NMR technique. Reversed-phase HPLC with DAD/ELSD detection was performed to analyze cells' total fatty acid profile and the levels of phospholipids, total/free cholesterol, triacylglycerols, and cholesteryl esters. Cell-based fluorescent measurements of intracellular membranes and lipid droplets were performed on bottarga oil-treated cells using the Nile red staining technique. The treatments of cancer cells with bottarga oil reduced the viability and affected the fatty acid profile, with a significant n-3 PUFA increase in treated cells. Mullet roe oil uptake modulated the cancer cell lipid composition, inducing a remarkable incorporation of health beneficial n-3 PUFA in the polar and neutral lipid fractions. Bottarga oil treatment influenced the synthesis of intracellular membranes and accumulation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets in cancer cells. PMID:27603212

  11. Mugil cephalus roe oil obtained by supercritical fluid extraction affects the lipid profile and viability in cancer HeLa and B16F10 cells.

    PubMed

    Rosa, A; Piras, A; Nieddu, M; Putzu, D; Cesare Marincola, F; Falchi, A M

    2016-09-14

    We explored the changes in viability and lipid profile occurring in cancer cells, murine melanoma cells (B16F10 cells) and human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells), when exposed to 24 h-treatments with an n-3 PUFA-rich oil obtained by supercritical extraction with CO2 from Mugil cephalus processed roe (bottarga). The composition of the major lipid classes of bottarga oil was determined by the (13)C NMR technique. Reversed-phase HPLC with DAD/ELSD detection was performed to analyze cells' total fatty acid profile and the levels of phospholipids, total/free cholesterol, triacylglycerols, and cholesteryl esters. Cell-based fluorescent measurements of intracellular membranes and lipid droplets were performed on bottarga oil-treated cells using the Nile red staining technique. The treatments of cancer cells with bottarga oil reduced the viability and affected the fatty acid profile, with a significant n-3 PUFA increase in treated cells. Mullet roe oil uptake modulated the cancer cell lipid composition, inducing a remarkable incorporation of health beneficial n-3 PUFA in the polar and neutral lipid fractions. Bottarga oil treatment influenced the synthesis of intracellular membranes and accumulation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets in cancer cells.

  12. The Structure of the Mouse Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor in Lipid Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kudryashev, Mikhail; Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Deluz, Cédric; Hassaine, Gherici; Grasso, Luigino; Graf-Meyer, Alexandra; Vogel, Horst; Stahlberg, Henning

    2016-01-01

    The function of membrane proteins is best understood if their structure in the lipid membrane is known. Here, we determined the structure of the mouse serotonin 5-HT3 receptor inserted in lipid bilayers to a resolution of 12 Å without stabilizing antibodies by cryo electron tomography and subtomogram averaging. The reconstruction reveals protein secondary structure elements in the transmembrane region, the extracellular pore, and the transmembrane channel pathway, showing an overall similarity to the available X-ray model of the truncated 5-HT3 receptor determined in the presence of a stabilizing nanobody. Structural analysis of the 5-HT3 receptor embedded in a lipid bilayer allowed the position of the membrane to be determined. Interactions between the densely packed receptors in lipids were visualized, revealing that the interactions were maintained by the short horizontal helices. In combination with methodological improvements, our approach enables the structural analysis of membrane proteins in response to voltage and ligand gating.

  13. Structural interactions between lipids, water and S1-S4 voltage-sensing domains.

    PubMed

    Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J

    2012-11-01

    Membrane proteins serve crucial signaling and transport functions, yet relatively little is known about their structures in membrane environments or how lipids interact with these proteins. For voltage-activated ion channels, X-ray structures suggest that the mobile voltage-sensing S4 helix would be exposed to the membrane, and functional studies reveal that lipid modification can profoundly alter channel activity. Here, we use solid-state NMR to investigate structural interactions of lipids and water with S1-S4 voltage-sensing domains and to explore whether lipids influence the structure of the protein. Our results demonstrate that S1-S4 domains exhibit extensive interactions with lipids and that these domains are heavily hydrated when embedded in a membrane. We also find evidence for preferential interactions of anionic lipids with S1-S4 domains and that these interactions have lifetimes on the timescale of ≤ 10(-3)s. Arg residues within S1-S4 domains are well hydrated and are positioned in close proximity to lipids, exhibiting local interactions with both lipid headgroups and acyl chains. Comparative studies with a positively charged lipid lacking a phosphodiester group reveal that this lipid modification has only modest effects on the structure and hydration of S1-S4 domains. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Arg residues in S1-S4 voltage-sensing domains reside in close proximity to the hydrophobic interior of the membrane yet are well hydrated, a requirement for carrying charge and driving protein motions in response to changes in membrane voltage.

  14. Association of Borage Oil and Betamethasone Dipropionate in Lipid-Core Nanocapsules: Characterization, Photostability and In Vitro Irritation Test.

    PubMed

    Weber, Julia; Funk, Nadine L; Motta, Mariana H; Guedes, Alessandra M; Visintainer, Ana Paula C; Tedesco, Solange B; Da Silva, Cristiane de B

    2016-02-01

    The association of vegetable products to nanostructured systems has attracted the attention of researchers due to several advantages, such as drug photoprotection, as well as the improvement of the pharmacological and therapeutic activities because of synergistic action, which can provide their topical application. In this work, lipid-core nanocapsules containing borage oil as oil core and betamethasone dipropionate were developed, and nanocapsules without the drug were prepared for comparison. The suspensions were characterized in relation to mean particle size, zeta potential, pH, drug content, and encapsulation efficiency. A photodegradation study was carried out and the in vitro release profile as well as the irritation potential of the drug after nanoencapsulation were also evaluated. In addition, the antiproliferative activity of the free borage oil as well as loaded in nanocapsules was studied. Lipid-core nanocapsules showed nanometric mean size (185-210 nm); polydispersity index below 0.10; negative zeta potential and pH slightly acid (6.0-6.2). Moreover, the drug content was close to theoretical concentration (0.50 +/- 0.03 mg/ml of betamethasone), and the encapsulation efficiency was approximately 100%. The study of the antiproliferative activity of borage oil showed ability to reduce cell growth of Allium cepa. The nanoencapsulation of betamethasone dipropionate provided greater protection against UVC light and decreased the irritation potential of the drug. The release profile of betamethasone dipropionate from nanocapsules followed monoexponential model. PMID:27433586

  15. Association of Borage Oil and Betamethasone Dipropionate in Lipid-Core Nanocapsules: Characterization, Photostability and In Vitro Irritation Test.

    PubMed

    Weber, Julia; Funk, Nadine L; Motta, Mariana H; Guedes, Alessandra M; Visintainer, Ana Paula C; Tedesco, Solange B; Da Silva, Cristiane de B

    2016-02-01

    The association of vegetable products to nanostructured systems has attracted the attention of researchers due to several advantages, such as drug photoprotection, as well as the improvement of the pharmacological and therapeutic activities because of synergistic action, which can provide their topical application. In this work, lipid-core nanocapsules containing borage oil as oil core and betamethasone dipropionate were developed, and nanocapsules without the drug were prepared for comparison. The suspensions were characterized in relation to mean particle size, zeta potential, pH, drug content, and encapsulation efficiency. A photodegradation study was carried out and the in vitro release profile as well as the irritation potential of the drug after nanoencapsulation were also evaluated. In addition, the antiproliferative activity of the free borage oil as well as loaded in nanocapsules was studied. Lipid-core nanocapsules showed nanometric mean size (185-210 nm); polydispersity index below 0.10; negative zeta potential and pH slightly acid (6.0-6.2). Moreover, the drug content was close to theoretical concentration (0.50 +/- 0.03 mg/ml of betamethasone), and the encapsulation efficiency was approximately 100%. The study of the antiproliferative activity of borage oil showed ability to reduce cell growth of Allium cepa. The nanoencapsulation of betamethasone dipropionate provided greater protection against UVC light and decreased the irritation potential of the drug. The release profile of betamethasone dipropionate from nanocapsules followed monoexponential model.

  16. The effects of coconut oil supplementation on the body composition and lipid profile of rats submitted to physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Resende, Nathália M; Félix, Henrique R; Soré, Murillo R; M M, Aníbal; Campos, Kleber E; Volpato, Gustavo T

    2016-05-13

    This study aims to verify the effects of coconut oil supplementation (COS) in the body composition and lipid profile of rats submitted to physical exercise. The animals (n=6 per group) were randomly assigned to: G1=Sedentary and Non-supplemented (Control Group), G2=Sedentary and Supplemented, G3=Exercised and Non-supplemented and G4=Exercised and Supplemented. The COS protocol used was 3 mL/Kg of body mass by gavage for 28 days. The physical exercise was the vertical jumping training for 28 days. It was determined the body mass parameters, Lee Index, blood glucose and lipid profile. The COS did not interfere with body mass, but the lean body mass was lower in G3 compared to G2. The final Lee Index classified G1 and G2 as obese (>30g/cm). The lipid profile showed total cholesterol was decreased in G3, LDL-c concentration was decreased in G2, triglycerides, VLDL-c and HDL-c concentrations were increased in G2 and G4 in relation to G1 and G3. The COS decreased LDL-c/HDL-c ratio. In conclusion, the COS associated or not to physical exercise worsen others lipid parameters, like triglycerides and VLDL-c level, showing the care with the use of lipid supplements.

  17. The effects of coconut oil supplementation on the body composition and lipid profile of rats submitted to physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Resende, Nathália M; Félix, Henrique R; Soré, Murillo R; M M, Aníbal; Campos, Kleber E; Volpato, Gustavo T

    2016-05-13

    This study aims to verify the effects of coconut oil supplementation (COS) in the body composition and lipid profile of rats submitted to physical exercise. The animals (n=6 per group) were randomly assigned to: G1=Sedentary and Non-supplemented (Control Group), G2=Sedentary and Supplemented, G3=Exercised and Non-supplemented and G4=Exercised and Supplemented. The COS protocol used was 3 mL/Kg of body mass by gavage for 28 days. The physical exercise was the vertical jumping training for 28 days. It was determined the body mass parameters, Lee Index, blood glucose and lipid profile. The COS did not interfere with body mass, but the lean body mass was lower in G3 compared to G2. The final Lee Index classified G1 and G2 as obese (>30g/cm). The lipid profile showed total cholesterol was decreased in G3, LDL-c concentration was decreased in G2, triglycerides, VLDL-c and HDL-c concentrations were increased in G2 and G4 in relation to G1 and G3. The COS decreased LDL-c/HDL-c ratio. In conclusion, the COS associated or not to physical exercise worsen others lipid parameters, like triglycerides and VLDL-c level, showing the care with the use of lipid supplements. PMID:27192196

  18. Structural analysis of the lipid A isolated from Hafnia alvei 32 and PCM 1192 lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Lukasiewicz, Jolanta; Jachymek, Wojciech; Niedziela, Tomasz; Kenne, Lennart; Lugowski, Czeslaw

    2010-03-01

    Hafnia alvei, a Gram-negative bacterium, is an opportunistic pathogen associated with mixed hospital infections, bacteremia, septicemia, and respiratory diseases. The majority of clinical symptoms of diseases caused by this bacterium have a lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin)-related origin. The lipid A structure affects the biological activity of endotoxins predominantly. Thus, the structure of H. alvei lipid A was analyzed for the first time. The major form, asymmetrically hexa-acylated lipid A built of beta-D-GlcpN4P-(1-->6)-alpha-D-GlcpN1P substituted with (R)-14:0(3-OH) at N-2 and O-3, 14:0(3-(R)-O-12:0) at N-2', and 14:0(3-(R)-O-14:0) at O-3', was identified by ESI-MS(n) and MALDI-time-of-flight (TOF) MS. Comparative analysis performed by MS suggested that LPSs of H. alvei 32, PCM 1192, PCM 1206, and PCM 1207 share the identified structure of lipid A. LPSs of H. alvei are yet another example of enterobacterial endotoxins having the Escherichia coli-type structure of lipid A. The presence of hepta-acylated forms of H. alvei lipid A resulted from the addition of palmitate (16:0) substituting 14:0(3-OH) at N-2 of the alpha-GlcpN residue. All the studied strains of H. alvei have an ability to modify their lipid A structure by palmitoylation. PMID:19706748

  19. Synthesis and estimation of calorific value of a structured lipid-potential reduced calorie fat.

    PubMed

    Kanjilal, S; Prasad, R B; Kaimal, T N; Ghafoorunissa; Rao, S H

    1999-10-01

    The majority of reduced calorie fats and fat substitutes available today, though similar in texture and flavor to natural fats, contain fatty acids that are not usually present in edible oils and fats and thus do not fully match the chemistry and functions of natural fats. For example, such products do not provide nutritionally important essential fatty acids (EFA). In this investigation, we prepared and evaluated a reduced calorie fat, prepared entirely from natural fats, taking advantage of the fact that long-chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFA), such as behenic acid (22:0), are poorly absorbed. Mustard oil (MO) and sunflower oil (SO) were used as substrates to yield a structured lipid (SL). The product, being derived from a natural vegetable oil, would thus provide EFA, as would a native fat, a feature not provided by the low-calorie fats available in the market. Erucic acid (22:1) was isolated from MO by a lipase (EC 3.1.1.3)-catalyzed reaction. It was then hydrogenated to behenic acid, the ethyl ester of which was subsequently enzymatically transesterified with SO to yield a plastic fat containing about 30-35% behenic acid. Absorption of this fat was studied in Wistar rats. In a preliminary single oral dose experiment, rats were fed equal amounts (2 mL) of SO and the SL. Plasma triacylglycerol (TAG) levels were estimated after 1, 2, and 3 h of feeding. The significantly lower concentration of plasma TAG in the 2-h sample, observed in the SL-fed group compared to the SO-fed group (P<0.001), indicated poor absorption of the SL. In order to estimate the calorific value of the SL, we conducted a restricted diet growth experiment over 21 d on weanling Wistar male rats with SO as caloric control. Diets for the test groups were modified by adding 5, 10, and 15% SO for the control groups, and 5 and 10% SL for the experimental groups. Food consumption of the test groups was restricted to 50% of the feed containing 5% SO that had been consumed by the ad libitum group the

  20. Flaxseed oil and alpha-lipoic acid combination ameliorates hepatic oxidative stress and lipid accumulation in comparison to lard

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intake of high-fat diet is associated with increased non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress are key pathophysiological mechanisms in NAFLD. Both flaxseed oil (FO) and α-lipoic acid (LA) exert potential benefit to NAFLD. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the combination of FO and LA on hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in rats induced by high-fat diet. Methods LA was dissolved in flaxseed oil to a final concentration of 8 g/kg (FO + LA). The rodent diet contained 20% fat. One-fifth of the fat was soybean oil and the others were lard (control group), or 75% lard and 25% FO + LA (L-FO + LA group), or 50% lard and 50% FO + LA (M-FO + LA group), or FO + LA (H-FO + LA group). Male Sprague–Dawley rats were fed for 10 weeks and then killed for liver collection. Results Intake of high-fat lard caused a significant hepatic steatosis. Replacement with FO + LA was effective in reducing steatosis as well as total triglyceride and total cholesterol contents in liver. The combination of FO and LA also significantly elevated hepatic antioxidant defense capacities, as evaluated by the remarkable increase in the activities of SOD, CAT and GPx as well as the level of GSH, and the significant decline in lipid peroxidation. Conclusion The combination of FO and LA may contribute to prevent fatty livers such as NAFLD by ameliorating hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress. PMID:23634883

  1. Antitumor Lipids--Structure, Functions, and Medical Applications.

    PubMed

    Kostadinova, Aneliya; Topouzova-Hristova, Tanya; Momchilova, Albena; Tzoneva, Rumiana; Berger, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Cell proliferation and metastasis are considered hallmarks of tumor progression. Therefore, efforts have been made to develop novel anticancer drugs that inhibit both the proliferation and the motility of tumor cells. Synthetic antitumor lipids (ATLs), which are chemically divided into two main classes, comprise (i) alkylphospholipids (APLs) and (ii) alkylphosphocholines (APCs). They represent a new entity of drugs with distinct antiproliferative properties in tumor cells. These compounds do not interfere with the DNA or mitotic spindle apparatus of the cell, instead, they incorporate into cell membranes, where they accumulate and interfere with lipid metabolism and lipid-dependent signaling pathways. Recently, it has been shown that the most commonly studied APLs inhibit proliferation by inducing apoptosis in malignant cells while leaving normal cells unaffected and are potent sensitizers of conventional chemo- and radiotherapy, as well as of electrical field therapy. APLs resist catabolic degradation to a large extent, therefore accumulate in the cell and interfere with lipid-dependent survival signaling pathways, notably PI3K-Akt and Raf-Erk1/2, and de novo phospholipid biosynthesis. They are internalized in the cell membrane via raft domains and cause downstream reactions as inhibition of cell growth and migration, cell cycle arrest, actin stress fibers collapse, and apoptosis. This review summarizes the in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials of most common ATLs and their mode of action at molecular and biochemical levels.

  2. Addition of lipid to the photosynthetic membrane: effects on membrane structure and energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    We have carried out a series of experiments in which the lipid composition of the photosynthetic membrane has been altered by the addition of lipid from a defined source under experimental conditions. Liposomes prepared by sonication are mixed with purified photosynthetic membranes obtained from spinach chloroplasts and are taken through cycles of freezing and thawing. Several lines of evidence, including gel electrophoresis and freeze-fracture electron microscopy, indicate that an actual addition of lipid has taken place. Structural analysis by freeze-fracture shows that intramembrane particles are widely separated after the addition of large amounts of lipid, with one exception: large hexagonal lattices of particles appear in some regions of the membrane. These lattices are identical in appearance with lattices formed from a single purified component of the membrane known as chlorophyll-protein complex II. The suggestion that the presence of such lattices in lipid-enriched membranes reflects a profound rearrangement of photosynthetic structures has been confirmed by analysis of the fluorescence emission spectra of natural and lipid- enriched membranes. Specifically, lipid addition in each of the cases we have studied results in the apparent detachment of chlorophyll- protein complex II from photosynthetic reaction centers. It is concluded that specific arrangements of components in the photosynthetic membrane, necessary for the normal functioning of the membrane in the light reaction of photosynthesis, can be regulated to a large extent by the lipid content of the membrane. PMID:7298712

  3. Effects of microalgal polyunsaturated fatty acid oil on body weight and lipid accumulation in the liver of C57BL/6 mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Go, Ryeo-Eun; Hwang, Kyung-A; Park, Geon-Tae; Lee, Hae-Miru; Lee, Geum-A; Kim, Cho-Won; Jeon, So-Ye; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Hong, Won-Kyung; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-05-01

    Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which are abundant in marine fish oils, have recently received global attention for their prominent anti-obesogenic effects. Among PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), which are n-3 long-chain PUFAs widely referred to as omega-3 oils, were reported to prevent the development of obesity in rodents and humans. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-obesity effects of microalgal oil on high-fat induced obese C57BL/6 mice, compared with commercial omega-3 fish oil and vegetable corn oil. Microalgal oil is an inherent mixture of several PUFAs, including EPA, DHA and other fatty acids produced from a marine microalgal strain of Thraustochytriidae sp. derived mutant. It was found to contain more PUFAs (>80%) and more omega-3 oils than commercial omega-3 fish oil (PUFAs >31%) and corn oil (PUFAs 59%). All three types of oils induced weight loss in high-fat-induced obese mice, with the loss induced by microalgal oil being most significant at 9 weeks (10% reduction). However, the oils tested did not improve blood lipid levels, although microalgal oil showed an apparent inhibitory effect on lipid accumulation in the liver. These findings may be attributed to the higher PUFA content, including omega-3 oils of microalgal oil than other oils. Collectively, these findings suggest that microalgal oil, derived from Thraustochytriidae sp. derived mutant, is a prominent candidate for replacement of omega-3 fish oils based on its apparent anti-obesity effect in vivo.

  4. Effects of microalgal polyunsaturated fatty acid oil on body weight and lipid accumulation in the liver of C57BL/6 mice fed a high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Go, Ryeo-Eun; Hwang, Kyung-A; Park, Geon-Tae; Lee, Hae-Miru; Lee, Geum-A; Kim, Cho-Won; Jeon, So-Ye; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Hong, Won-Kyung; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which are abundant in marine fish oils, have recently received global attention for their prominent anti-obesogenic effects. Among PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), which are n-3 long-chain PUFAs widely referred to as omega-3 oils, were reported to prevent the development of obesity in rodents and humans. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-obesity effects of microalgal oil on high-fat induced obese C57BL/6 mice, compared with commercial omega-3 fish oil and vegetable corn oil. Microalgal oil is an inherent mixture of several PUFAs, including EPA, DHA and other fatty acids produced from a marine microalgal strain of Thraustochytriidae sp. derived mutant. It was found to contain more PUFAs (>80%) and more omega-3 oils than commercial omega-3 fish oil (PUFAs >31%) and corn oil (PUFAs 59%). All three types of oils induced weight loss in high-fat-induced obese mice, with the loss induced by microalgal oil being most significant at 9 weeks (10% reduction). However, the oils tested did not improve blood lipid levels, although microalgal oil showed an apparent inhibitory effect on lipid accumulation in the liver. These findings may be attributed to the higher PUFA content, including omega-3 oils of microalgal oil than other oils. Collectively, these findings suggest that microalgal oil, derived from Thraustochytriidae sp. derived mutant, is a prominent candidate for replacement of omega-3 fish oils based on its apparent anti-obesity effect in vivo. PMID:27533934

  5. Effects of microalgal polyunsaturated fatty acid oil on body weight and lipid accumulation in the liver of C57BL/6 mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Go, Ryeo-Eun; Hwang, Kyung-A; Park, Geon-Tae; Lee, Hae-Miru; Lee, Geum-A; Kim, Cho-Won; Jeon, So-Ye; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Hong, Won-Kyung; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-05-01

    Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which are abundant in marine fish oils, have recently received global attention for their prominent anti-obesogenic effects. Among PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), which are n-3 long-chain PUFAs widely referred to as omega-3 oils, were reported to prevent the development of obesity in rodents and humans. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-obesity effects of microalgal oil on high-fat induced obese C57BL/6 mice, compared with commercial omega-3 fish oil and vegetable corn oil. Microalgal oil is an inherent mixture of several PUFAs, including EPA, DHA and other fatty acids produced from a marine microalgal strain of Thraustochytriidae sp. derived mutant. It was found to contain more PUFAs (>80%) and more omega-3 oils than commercial omega-3 fish oil (PUFAs >31%) and corn oil (PUFAs 59%). All three types of oils induced weight loss in high-fat-induced obese mice, with the loss induced by microalgal oil being most significant at 9 weeks (10% reduction). However, the oils tested did not improve blood lipid levels, although microalgal oil showed an apparent inhibitory effect on lipid accumulation in the liver. These findings may be attributed to the higher PUFA content, including omega-3 oils of microalgal oil than other oils. Collectively, these findings suggest that microalgal oil, derived from Thraustochytriidae sp. derived mutant, is a prominent candidate for replacement of omega-3 fish oils based on its apparent anti-obesity effect in vivo. PMID:27533934

  6. Dietary lipid varying in corn and coconut oil influences protein kinase C in phorbol ester-treated mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Mouat, M F; Locniskar, M F

    1998-01-01

    An earlier study indicated that increased levels of corn oil in the diet resulted in decreased tumor yield after promotion by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in Sencar mouse epidermis (J Leyton, ML Lee, M Locniskar, MA Belury, TJ Slaga, et al. Cancer Res 51, 907-915, 1991). In the present study we investigated whether corn oil diets could alter the subcellular distribution and activity of protein kinase C (PKC), which is part of an important signaling pathway in carcinogenesis. We used three 15% (wt/wt) fat semipurified diets containing three ratios of corn oil to coconut oil: 1.0%:14.0% (Diet L), 7.9%:7.1% (Diet M), and 15.0%:0.0% (Diet H). The translocation to the membrane fraction of epidermal PKC by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate was decreased as the corn oil content of the diet was increased, and this correlates with the decrease in tumor yield. The translocation to the membrane fraction of specific isoforms of PKC was affected by increased dietary corn oil: the largest decreases were in cytosolic PKC-alpha and -beta, and the smallest change was in PKC-epsilon. The other isoforms, PKC-delta and -zeta, were unaffected. The major constituent of corn oil is linoleic acid, which did not affect the binding of phorbol ester to PKC, which suggests that inhibition of such binding was not responsible for the effects of increased dietary corn oil. Products of linoleic acid metabolism, i.e., arachidonic acid and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, also did not affect the binding of phorbol ester to PKC. Thus the results of these studies suggest that the subcellular distributions of PKC and its isoforms can be modulated by dietary lipids.

  7. Automated Lipid A Structure Assignment from Hierarchical Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Ying S.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Jones, Jace W.; Ng, Wailap V.; Ernst, Robert K.; Goodlett, David R.

    2011-05-01

    Infusion-based electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled to multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry (MS n ) is a standard methodology for investigating lipid A structural diversity (Shaffer et al. J. Am. Soc. Mass. Spectrom. 18(6), 1080-1092, 2007). Annotation of these MS n spectra, however, has remained a manual, expert-driven process. In order to keep up with the data acquisition rates of modern instruments, we devised a computational method to annotate lipid A MS n spectra rapidly and automatically, which we refer to as hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. As a first-pass tool, HiTMS aids expert interpretation of lipid A MS n data by providing the analyst with a set of candidate structures that may then be confirmed or rejected. HiTMS deciphers the signature ions (e.g., A-, Y-, and Z-type ions) and neutral losses of MS n spectra using a species-specific library based on general prior structural knowledge of the given lipid A species under investigation. Candidates are selected by calculating the correlation between theoretical and acquired MS n spectra. At a false discovery rate of less than 0.01, HiTMS correctly assigned 85% of the structures in a library of 133 manually annotated Francisella tularensis subspecies novicida lipid A structures. Additionally, HiTMS correctly assigned 85% of the structures in a smaller library of lipid A species from Yersinia pestis demonstrating that it may be used across species.

  8. Effect of dietary palm oil and its fractions on rat plasma and high density lipoprotein lipids.

    PubMed

    Sundram, K; Khor, H T; Ong, A S

    1990-04-01

    Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed semipurified diets containing 20% fat for 15 weeks. The dietary fats were corn oil, soybean oil, palm oil, palm olein and palm stearin. No differences in the body and organ weights of rats fed the various diets were evident. Plasma cholesterol levels of rats fed soybean oil were significantly lower than those of rats fed corn oil, palm oil, palm olein or palm stearin. Significant differences between the plasma cholesterol content of rats fed corn oil and rats fed the three palm oils were not evident. HDL cholesterol was raised in rats fed the three palm oil diets compared to the rats fed either corn oil or soybean oil. The cholesterol-phospholipid molar ratio of rat platelets was not influenced by the dietary fat type. The formation of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha was significantly enhanced in palm oil-fed rats compared to all other dietary treatments. Fatty acid compositional changes in the plasma cholesterol esters and plasma triglycerides were diet regulated with significant differences between rats fed the polyunsaturated corn and soybean oil compared to the three palm oils.

  9. The effect of oil components on the physicochemical properties and drug delivery of emulsions: tocol emulsion versus lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chi-Feng; Fang, Chia-Lang; Liao, Mei-Hui; Fang, Jia-You

    2007-04-20

    An emulsion system composed of vitamin E, coconut oil, soybean phosphatidylcholine, non-ionic surfactants, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives (referred to as the tocol emulsion) was characterized in terms of its physicochemical properties, drug release, in vivo efficacy, toxicity, and stability. Systems without vitamin E (referred to as the lipid emulsion) and without any oils (referred to as the aqueous micelle system) were prepared for comparison. A lipophilic antioxidant, resveratrol, was used as the model drug for emulsion loading. The incorporation of Brij 35 and PEG derivatives reduced the vesicle diameter to <100nm. The inclusion of resveratrol into the emulsions and aqueous micelles retarded the drug release. The in vitro release rate showed a decrease in the order of aqueous micelle system>tocol emulsion>lipid emulsion. Treatment of resveratrol dramatically reduced the intimal hyperplasia of the injured vascular wall in rats. There was no significant difference in this reduction when resveratrol was delivered by either emulsion or the aqueous micelle system. The percentages of erythrocyte hemolysis by the emulsions and aqueous micelle system were approximately 0 and approximately 10%, respectively. Vitamin E prevented the aggregation of emulsion vesicles. The mean vesicle size of the tocol emulsion remained unchanged during 30 days at 37 degrees C. The lipid emulsion and aqueous micelle system, respectively, showed 11- and 16-fold increases in vesicle size after 30 days of storage.

  10. Effect of thioacetamide and dexamethasone on serum lipids in rats fed on high-fat sunflower or olive oil diets.

    PubMed

    Esteban, F J; Sánchez-López, A M; Del Moral, M L; Camacho, M V; Hernández, R; Jiménez, A; Pedrosa, J A; Peinado, M A

    1999-04-01

    We have previously reported that high-fat diets develop hepatic steatosis and, depending on the fat quality, affect serum lipid levels differently (J Nutr Sci Vitaminol, 1997, 43, 155-160). The aim of this work is to study the influence of high-fat diets (14% sunflower or olive oils) on serum lipids in a model of hepatic acute damage induced by thioacetamide, and their influence when dexamethasone is administered before thioacetamide injection. Serum lipids and hepatic collagen have been evaluated using biochemical methods, and the steatotic process by histological staining. The results showed that hepatic steatosis and fibrosis are developed either by high-fat diets or thioacetamide injection. Pretreatment with dexamethasone did not decrease the hepatic collagen content. Thioacetamide injection alone or pretreatment with dexamethasone produced increase in serum tryglicerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-C in both high-fat diet groups, and a HDL-C increase in the olive-oil group, even though the atherogenic indices (HDL/TC and HDL/TG) were different depending on the enriched diet. The administration of high-fat diets to study the influence of the fat quality on health and disease should be interpreted carefully due to the ability of the diets themselves to cause hepatic damage. PMID:10450564

  11. Effects of a synthetic oil on zooplankton community structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of a coal-derived oil on the structure of zooplankton communities of laboratory pond microcosms and outdoor experimental ponds. Several measures of community structure and multivariate statistical techniques were used to reveal changes in the patterns of zooplankton community structure caused by the perturbation. From these results the basic ecological mechanisms responsible for maintenance of zooplankton community structure were inferred. The comparison of the field, laboratory microcosm, and laboratory bioassay results for the effects of oil provided an empirical basis for predicting pollutant effects on aquatic ecosystems. The responses of the microcosm and pond zooplankton communities to oil treatment were quite similar. Changes in cladoceran densities were the most sensitive indicators of stress in the zooplankton communities. Copepods were slightly less sensitive, and rotifers were least sensitive to oil treatment.

  12. Lipid Peroxidation in a Stomach Medium Is Affected by Dietary Oils (Olive/Fish) and Antioxidants: The Mediterranean versus Western Diet.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Oren; Shpaizer, Adi; Kanner, Joseph

    2015-08-12

    Red meat is an integral part of the Western diet, and high consumption is associated with an increased risk of chronic diseases. Using a system that simulated the human stomach, red meat was interacted with different oils (olive/fish) and lipid peroxidation was determined by measuring accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) and lipid peroxides (LOOH). Olive oil decreased meat lipid peroxidation from 121.7 ± 3.1 to 48.2 ± 1.3 μM and from 327.1 ± 9.5 to 77.3 ± 6.0 μM as assessed by MDA and ROOH, respectively. The inhibitory effect of olive oil was attributed to oleic acid rather than its polyphenol content. In contrast, fish oils from tuna or an ω-3 supplement dramatically increased meat lipid peroxidation from 96.2 ± 3.6 to 514.2 ± 6.7 μM MDA. Vitamin E inhibited meat lipid peroxidation in the presence of olive oil but paradoxically increased peroxidation in the presence of fish oil. The inhibitory properties of oleic acid may play a key role in the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet.

  13. Heat flow anomalies in oil- and gas-bearing structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sergiyenko, S.I.

    1988-02-01

    The main features of the distribution of heat flow values in oil, gas and gas-condensate fields on the continents have been discussed by Makarenko and Sergiyenko. The method of analysis used made it possible to establish that the presence of hydrocarbons in formations leads to high heat-flow, regardless of the age of folding of the potentially oil- and gas-bearing zones. Only in regions adjacent to marginal Cenozoic folded mountain structures and in zones of Cenozoic volcanism is the world average higher, by 2.5 to 10%, than in the oil- and gas-bearing structures in those regions. The earlier analysis of the distribution of heat flow values in oil and gas structures was based on 403 measurements. The author now has nearly doubled the sample population, enabling him substantially to revise the ideas on the distribution of heat flow values and the development of the thermal regime of local oil and gas structures. He notes that the method previously used, comparing heat flow values on young continental platforms with values in local oil and gas structures, makes it possible to estimate the thermal effect of the presence of oil and gas. This conclusion stems from the fact that the overwhelming majority of heat flow measurements were made on various kinds of positive structural forms, and distortions of the thermal field caused by thermal anisotropy phenomena are equally characteristic of both productive and nonproductive structures. As a result, for the first time a continuous time series of heat flow measurements over oil and gas structures in various tectonic regions, with ages of consolidation ranging from the Precambrian to the Cenozoic, was established. 26 references.

  14. Biophysical investigations of the structure and function of the tear fluid lipid layers and the effect of ectoine. Part B: artificial lipid films.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Mridula; Brinkkötter, Marc; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-01

    The tear fluid lipid layer is present at the outermost part of the tear film which lines the ocular surface and functions to maintain the corneal surface moist by retarding evaporation. Instability in the structure of the tear fluid lipid layer can cause an increased rate of evaporation and thus dry eye syndrome. Ectoine has been previously shown to fluidize lipid monolayers and alter the phase behavior. In the current study we have investigated the effect of ectoine on the artificial tear fluid lipid layer composed of binary and ternary lipid mixtures of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesteryl esters and tri-acyl-glycerols. The focus of our study was mainly the structural and the biophysical aspects of the artificial tear fluid lipid layer using surface activity studies and topology analysis. The presence of ectoine consistently causes an expansion of the pressure-area isotherm indicating increased intermolecular spacing. The topology studies showed the formation of droplet-like structures due to the addition of ectoine only when tri-acyl-glycerol is present in the mixture of DPPC and chol-palmitate, similar to the natural meibomian lipids. Consequently, the hypothesis of an exclusion of tri/di-acyl-glycerol from the meibomian lipid film in the presence of ectoine in the subphase is confirmed. A model describing the effect of ectoine on meibomian lipid films is further presented which may have an application for the use of ectoines in eye drops as a treatment for the dry eye syndrome.

  15. Directed self-assembly of lipid nanotubes from inverted hexagonal structures.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Kaori; Chami, Mohamed; Derényi, Imre; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2012-08-28

    Conventional lipid-tube formation is based on either a tube phase of certain lipids or the shape transformation of lamellar structures by applying a point load. In the present study, lipid blocks in inverted hexagonal phase made of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) were shown to protrude lipid nanotubes upon a fluid-dynamic flow on polyelectrolyte-functionalized surfaces in physiological buffer solution. The outer diameter of the tubes is 19.1 ± 4.5 nm and their lengths are up to several hundred micrometers. The method described enables the alignment and patterning of lipid nanotubes into various (including curvy) shapes with a microfluidic system.

  16. The effect of interesterification on the bioavailability of fatty acids in structured lipids.

    PubMed

    Farfán, M; Villalón, M J; Ortíz, M E; Nieto, S; Bouchon, P

    2013-08-15

    Fatty acid (FA) profile is a critical factor in the nutritional properties of fats, but, stereochemistry may also play a fundamental role in the rate and extent to which FAs are absorbed and become available. To better understand this phenomenon, we evaluated the bioavailability of FAs in linseed-oil and palm-stearin blends compared to their interesterified mix, using a sn-1,3 stereospecific lipase, to determine if there was any difference in terms of FA availability when using this technology. Test meals were fed through an intragastric feeding tube on Sprague-Dawley male rats after 18 h fasting. Postprandial blood samples were collected after meal or physiological serum (control) administration and the FA profile of plasma lipids was determined. Results showed that modification of the melting profile through interesterification, without altering the bioavailability determined by sn-2 stereochemistry, could delay lipid absorption at the beginning, but had no effect on total lipid absorption.

  17. High-oleic rapeseed (canola) and flaxseed oils modulate serum lipids and inflammatory biomarkers in hypercholesterolaemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Gillingham, Leah G; Gustafson, Jennifer A; Han, Song-Yee; Jassal, Davinder S; Jones, Peter J H

    2011-02-01

    Recently, novel dietary oils with modified fatty acid profiles have been manufactured to improve fatty acid intakes and reduce CVD risk. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of novel high-oleic rapeseed (canola) oil (HOCO), alone or blended with flaxseed oil (FXCO), on circulating lipids and inflammatory biomarkers v. a typical Western diet (WD). Using a randomised, controlled, crossover trial, thirty-six hypercholesterolaemic subjects consumed three isoenergetic diets for 28 d each containing approximately 36% energy from fat, of which 70% was provided by HOCO, FXCO or WD. Dietary fat content of SFA, MUFA, PUFA n-6 and n-3 was 6, 23, 5, 1% energy for HOCO; 6, 16, 5, 7·5% energy for FXCO; 11·5, 16, 6, 0·5% energy for WD. After 28 d, compared with WD, LDL-cholesterol was reduced 15·1% (P < 0·001) with FXCO and 7·4% (P < 0·001) with HOCO. Total cholesterol (TC) was reduced 11% (P < 0·001) with FXCO and 3·5% (P = 0·002) with HOCO compared with WD. Endpoint TC differed between FXCO and HOCO (P < 0·05). FXCO consumption reduced HDL-cholesterol by 8·5% (P < 0·001) and LDL:HDL ratio by 7·5% (P = 0·008) v. WD. FXCO significantly decreased E-selectin concentration compared with WD (P = 0·02). No differences were observed in inflammatory markers after the consumption of HOCO compared with WD. In conclusion, consumption of novel HOCO alone or when blended with flaxseed oil is cardioprotective through lipid-lowering effects. The incorporation of flaxseed oil may also target inflammation by reducing plasma E-selectin.

  18. Accelerated separation of GC-amenable lipid classes in plant oils by countercurrent chromatography in the co-current mode.

    PubMed

    Hammann, Simon; Englert, Michael; Müller, Marco; Vetter, Walter

    2015-12-01

    Triacylglycerols represent the major part (>90%) in most plant oils and have to be eliminated, when the minor compounds such as phytosterols or tocopherols should be analyzed. Here, we used an all liquid-liquid chromatographic technique, countercurrent chromatography (CCC), to fractionate the minor lipids before gas chromatography (GC) analysis. To cover the wide range of polarity of the minor compounds, we used the co-current mode, in which both mobile and stationary phase are pumped through the system. This allowed to elute substances which partitioned almost exclusively in the stationary phase within 90 min. After testing with standard compounds, the method was applied to the separation of sesame oil and sunflower oil samples. The abundant triacylglycerols could be effectively separated from tocopherols, phytosterols, diacylglycerols, and free fatty acids in the samples, and these compounds could be analyzed (after trimethylsilylation) by GC coupled with mass spectrometry. After the enrichment caused by the CCC fractionation, we were also able to identify the tocopherol derivative α-tocomonoenol, which had not been described in sunflower oil before. Also, separation of sesame oil yielded a mixture of the polar compounds sesamin and sesamolin without further impurities.

  19. Echium oil reduces plasma lipids and hepatic lipogenic gene expression in apoB100-only LDL receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Boudyguina, Elena; Wilson, Martha D; Gebre, Abraham K; Parks, John S

    2008-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with echium oil (EO), which is enriched in stearidonic acid (SDA; 18:4 n-3), the product of Delta-6 desaturation of 18:3 n-3, will decrease plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations and result in conversion of SDA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in the liver. Mildly hypertriglyceridemic mice (apoB100-only LDLrKO) were fed a basal diet containing 10% calories as palm oil (PO) and 0.2% cholesterol for 4 weeks, after which they were randomly assigned to experimental diets consisting of the basal diet plus supplementation of 10% of calories as PO, EO or fish oil (FO) for 8 weeks. The EO and FO experimental diets decreased plasma TG and VLDL lipid concentration, and hepatic TG content compared to PO, and there was a significant correlation between hepatic TG content and plasma TG concentration among diet groups. EO fed mice had plasma and liver lipid EPA enrichment that was greater than PO-fed mice but less than FO-fed mice. Down-regulation of several genes involved in hepatic TG biosynthesis was similar for mice fed EO and FO and significantly lower compared to those fed PO. In conclusion, EO may provide a botanical alternative to FO for reduction of plasma TG concentrations.

  20. A structural role for lipids in organelle shaping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Alan S; Kundu, Aupola; Fong, Burr; Fitzgerald, Julie; Larijani, Banafshé; Poccia, Dominic

    2013-08-01

    The importance of proteins in shaping the membranes that define the perimeters of organelles is well documented. By forming cross-links, motors, or scaffolds or by inserting into membranes, proteins can harness energy to deform membranes, particularly when high degrees of curvature are necessitated-as in small membrane vesicles, tubules of the endoplasmic reticulum, the edges of endoplasmic reticulum sheets or Golgi apparatus cisternae, and membrane fusion intermediates (stalks). Here we propose that membrane lipids displaying negative curvature act in concert with membrane proteins to contribute to the alteration and maintenance of bending in biological membranes. We emphasize recent data from studies of sea urchin eggs and embryos and suggest how novel approaches can lead to future directions for investigating the roles of such lipids in vivo. PMID:23995745

  1. Time to face the fats: what can mass spectrometry reveal about the structure of lipids and their interactions with proteins?

    PubMed

    Brown, Simon H J; Mitchell, Todd W; Oakley, Aaron J; Pham, Huong T; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2012-09-01

    Since the 1950s, X-ray crystallography has been the mainstay of structural biology, providing detailed atomic-level structures that continue to revolutionize our understanding of protein function. From recent advances in this discipline, a picture has emerged of intimate and specific interactions between lipids and proteins that has driven renewed interest in the structure of lipids themselves and raised intriguing questions as to the specificity and stoichiometry in lipid-protein complexes. Herein we demonstrate some of the limitations of crystallography in resolving critical structural features of ligated lipids and thus determining how these motifs impact protein binding. As a consequence, mass spectrometry must play an important and complementary role in unraveling the complexities of lipid-protein interactions. We evaluate recent advances and highlight ongoing challenges towards the twin goals of (1) complete structure elucidation of low, abundant, and structurally diverse lipids by mass spectrometry alone, and (2) assignment of stoichiometry and specificity of lipid interactions within protein complexes.

  2. Time to Face the Fats: What Can Mass Spectrometry Reveal about the Structure of Lipids and Their Interactions with Proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Simon H. J.; Mitchell, Todd W.; Oakley, Aaron J.; Pham, Huong T.; Blanksby, Stephen J.

    2012-09-01

    Since the 1950s, X-ray crystallography has been the mainstay of structural biology, providing detailed atomic-level structures that continue to revolutionize our understanding of protein function. From recent advances in this discipline, a picture has emerged of intimate and specific interactions between lipids and proteins that has driven renewed interest in the structure of lipids themselves and raised intriguing questions as to the specificity and stoichiometry in lipid-protein complexes. Herein we demonstrate some of the limitations of crystallography in resolving critical structural features of ligated lipids and thus determining how these motifs impact protein binding. As a consequence, mass spectrometry must play an important and complementary role in unraveling the complexities of lipid-protein interactions. We evaluate recent advances and highlight ongoing challenges towards the twin goals of (1) complete structure elucidation of low, abundant, and structurally diverse lipids by mass spectrometry alone, and (2) assignment of stoichiometry and specificity of lipid interactions within protein complexes.

  3. Dynamical Clustering and the Origin of Raft-like Structures in a Model Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Francis

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the dynamical heterogeneity of a model single-component lipid membrane using simulations of a coarse-grained representation of lipid molecules. In the liquid-ordered (LO) phase, lipid diffusion is hindered by the transient trapping of molecules by their neighbors, giving rise to two distinct mobility groups: low-mobility lipids which are temporarily ``caged'', and lipids with displacements on the scale of the intermolecular spacing. The lipid molecules within these distinct mobility states cluster, giving rise to transient ``islands'' of enhanced mobility having the size and time scale expected for lipid ``rafts''. These clusters are strikingly similar to the dynamical clusters found in glass-forming fluids, and distinct from phase-separation clusters. Such dynamic heterogeneity is ubiquitous in disordered condensed-phase systems. Thus, we hypothesize that rafts may originate from this universal mechanism, explaining why raft-like regions should arise, regardless of lipid structural or compositional details. This perspective provides a new approach to understand membrane transport.

  4. Lipid-Encapsulated Echium Oil (Echium plantagineum) Increases the Content of Stearidonic Acid in Plasma Lipid Fractions and Milk Fat of Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Melissa L; Lock, Adam L; Kraft, Jana

    2015-05-20

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of feeding lipid-encapsulated echium oil (EEO) on animal performance and milk fatty acid profile. Twelve Holstein dairy cows were used in a 3 × 3 Latin Square design with 14 day periods. Treatments were a control diet (no supplemental fat), 1.5% dry matter (DM) as EEO and 3.0% DM as EEO. Treatments had no negative effect on animal performance (dry matter intake, milk yield, and fat yield). The milk fat content of total n-3 fatty acids and stearidonic acid (SDA) increased with EEO supplementation (P < 0.001). The proportion of SDA increased in all plasma lipid fractions with EEO supplementation (P < 0.001). Transfer of SDA from EEO into milk fat was 3.4 and 3.2% for the 1.5 and 3% EEO treatments, respectively. In conclusion, EEO increases the content of n-3 fatty acids in milk fat; however, the apparent transfer efficiency was low.

  5. Reduction of lipid oxidation by formation of caseinate-oil-oat gum emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentration of oat gum, though important for formation of stable emulsion, has no effect on oxidation of Omega 3 oil; this is most prominent in fish-oil based Omega 3 oil. The optimal concentration of oat gum is about 0.2% wt for emulsion stability and visual appearance. We found that concentr...

  6. Carbohydrate conformation and lipid condensation in monolayers containing glycosphingolipid Gb3: influence of acyl chain structure.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Erik B; Gao, Haifei; Dennison, Andrew J C; Chopin, Nathalie; Struth, Bernd; Arnold, Thomas; Florent, Jean-Claude; Johannes, Ludger

    2014-09-01

    Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), a glycosphingolipid found in the plasma membrane of animal cells, is the endocytic receptor of the bacterial Shiga toxin. Using x-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), lipid monolayers containing Gb3 were investigated at the air-water interface. XR probed Gb3 carbohydrate conformation normal to the interface, whereas GIXD precisely characterized Gb3's influence on acyl chain in-plane packing and area per molecule (APM). Two phospholipids, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE), were used to study Gb3 packing in different lipid environments. Furthermore, the impact on monolayer structure of a naturally extracted Gb3 mixture was compared to synthetic Gb3 species with uniquely defined acyl chain structures. XR results showed that lipid environment and Gb3 acyl chain structure impact carbohydrate conformation with greater solvent accessibility observed for smaller phospholipid headgroups and long Gb3 acyl chains. In general, GIXD showed that Gb3 condensed phospholipid packing resulting in smaller APM than predicted by ideal mixing. Gb3's capacity to condense APM was larger for DSPC monolayers and exhibited different dependencies on acyl chain structure depending on the lipid environment. The interplay between Gb3-induced changes in lipid packing and the lipid environment's impact on carbohydrate conformation has broad implications for glycosphingolipid macromolecule recognition and ligand binding.

  7. Carbohydrate Conformation and Lipid Condensation in Monolayers Containing Glycosphingolipid Gb3: Influence of Acyl Chain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Erik B.; Gao, Haifei; Dennison, Andrew J.C.; Chopin, Nathalie; Struth, Bernd; Arnold, Thomas; Florent, Jean-Claude; Johannes, Ludger

    2014-01-01

    Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), a glycosphingolipid found in the plasma membrane of animal cells, is the endocytic receptor of the bacterial Shiga toxin. Using x-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), lipid monolayers containing Gb3 were investigated at the air-water interface. XR probed Gb3 carbohydrate conformation normal to the interface, whereas GIXD precisely characterized Gb3’s influence on acyl chain in-plane packing and area per molecule (APM). Two phospholipids, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE), were used to study Gb3 packing in different lipid environments. Furthermore, the impact on monolayer structure of a naturally extracted Gb3 mixture was compared to synthetic Gb3 species with uniquely defined acyl chain structures. XR results showed that lipid environment and Gb3 acyl chain structure impact carbohydrate conformation with greater solvent accessibility observed for smaller phospholipid headgroups and long Gb3 acyl chains. In general, GIXD showed that Gb3 condensed phospholipid packing resulting in smaller APM than predicted by ideal mixing. Gb3’s capacity to condense APM was larger for DSPC monolayers and exhibited different dependencies on acyl chain structure depending on the lipid environment. The interplay between Gb3-induced changes in lipid packing and the lipid environment’s impact on carbohydrate conformation has broad implications for glycosphingolipid macromolecule recognition and ligand binding. PMID:25185550

  8. Evaluation of effect of dietary supplementation with Dacryodes edulis G.Don pulp oil on serum lipid parameters in Wistar albino rats.

    PubMed

    Ezekwesili, C N; Eneh, F U

    2014-07-01

    The pulp of Dacryodes edulis G.Don which is rich in oils is commonly consumed in Nigeria when in season. The effect of diet supplementation with edulis fruit pulp oil on body lipid parameters was evaluated in male Wistar albino rats. D. edulis oil was extracted in n-hexane. The test diet was.compounded using the oil extract (10%), whereas the control animals were kept on control diet formulated with groundnut oil (10%). After six weeks, the animals were anaesthetized with chloroform and blood samples collected through cardiac puncture for the determination of serum lipid profile. Results revealed that D. edulis fruit pulp oil did not cause any significant (p > 0.05) alterations in serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triacylglycerol. The total amount of lipids present in the serum was increased by 33.3%, whereas the quantity of liver lipids decreased by the same factor (33.3%). Insignificant (p > 0.05) increases in the weights (g 100 g(-1) BW) of the liver (2.91 ± 0.17 to 3.38 ± 0.25), kidney (0.36 ± 0.06 to 0.40 ± 0.02) and heart (0.32 ± 0.02 to 0.33 ± 0.04) were observed in the test group. No significant change (p > 0.05) in the average body weight of the test animals was recorded. HPLC analysis of D. edulis oil showed that it contained palmitic acid (48.7%), linoleic acid (28.6%),oleic acid (12.9%), stearic acid (5.0%), lauric acid (2.2%), linolenic acid (1.7%) and myristic acid (0.9%). The peroxide value of the oil was 0.00. Prolonged intake of D. edulis fruit pulp oil may induce adverse effects on the body organs, even though the body lipid profile remains unaltered. PMID:26035940

  9. Structural studies of the lipid membranes at the Siberia-2 synchrotron radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, M. A.; Ermakova, E. V.; Ryabova, N. Yu.; Nayda, O. V.; Zabelin, A. V.; Pogorely, D. K.; Korneev, V. N.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    Lipid membranes are a subject of contemporary interdisciplinary studies at the junction of biology, biophysics, pharmacology, and bionanotechnology. The results of the structural studies of several types of lipid membranes by the lamellar and lateral diffraction of X-ray synchrotron radiation are presented. The experiments were performed at the Mediana and DICSI stations of the Siberia-2 synchrotron radiation source at the Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute. The data obtained are compared with the results of studying lipid membranes at the small-angle scattering beamlines D22 and D24 at LURE (France) and at the A2 beamline at DESY (Germany). The parameters of the DICSI station are shown to meet the basic requirements for the structural study of lipid systems, which are of fundamental and applied interest.

  10. Development of a fish cell culture model to investigate the impact of fish oil replacement on lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Melissa K; King, Hamish W; Bain, Peter A; Gibson, Robert A; Tocher, Douglas R; Schuller, Kathryn A

    2011-08-01

    Fish oils are rich in omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA), predominantly 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3, whereas vegetable oils contain abundant C(18)-PUFA, predominantly 18:3n-3 or 18:2n-6. We hypothesized that replacement of fish oils with vegetable oils would increase the oxidative stability of fish lipids. Here we have used the long established and easily cultivated FHM cell line derived from the freshwater fish species fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to test this hypothesis. The FHM cells were readily able to synthesize 20:5n-3 and 24:6n-3 from 18:3n-3 but 22:6n-3 synthesis was negligible. Also, they were readily able to synthesize 20:3n-6 from 18:2n-6 but 20:4n-6 synthesis was negligible. Mitochondrial β-oxidation was greatest for 18:3n-3 and 20:5n-3 and the rates for 16:0, 18:2n-6, 22:6n-3 and 18:1n-9 were significantly lower. Fatty acid incorporation was predominantly into phospholipids (79-97%) with very little incorporation into neutral lipids. Increasing the fatty acid concentration in the growth medium substantially increased the concentrations of 18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6 in the cell phospholipids but this was not the case for 20:5n-3 or 22:6n-3. When they were subjected to oxidative stress, the FHM cells supplemented with either 20:5n-3 or 22:6n-3 (as compared with 18:3n-3 or saturated fatty acids) exhibited significantly higher levels of thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) indicating higher levels of lipid peroxidation. The results are discussed in relation to the effects of fatty acid unsaturation on the oxidative stability of cellular lipids and the implications for sustainable aquaculture.

  11. High-throughput analysis of lipid hydroperoxides in edible oils and fats using the fluorescent reagent diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine.

    PubMed

    Santas, Jonathan; Guzmán, Yeimmy J; Guardiola, Francesc; Rafecas, Magdalena; Bou, Ricard

    2014-11-01

    A fluorometric method for the determination of hydroperoxides (HP) in edible oils and fats using the reagent diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP) was developed and validated. Two solvent media containing 100% butanol or a mixture of chloroform/methanol (2:1, v/v) can be used to solubilise lipid samples. Regardless of the solvent used to solubilise the sample, the DPPP method was precise, accurate, sensitive and easy to perform. The HP content of 43 oil and fat samples was determined and the results were compared with those obtained by means of the AOCS Official Method for the determination of peroxide value (PV) and the ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) method. The proposed method not only correlates well with the PV and FOX methods, but also presents some advantages such as requiring low sample and solvent amounts and being suitable for high-throughput sample analysis.

  12. Olive oil- and fish oil-enriched diets modify plasma lipids and susceptibility of LDL to oxidative modification in free-living male patients with peripheral vascular disease: the Spanish Nutrition Study.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Tortosa, C; López-Pedrosa, J M; Suarez, A; Ros, E; Mataix, J; Gil, A

    1999-07-01

    The present study describes a clinical trial in which Spanish patients suffering from peripheral vascular disease (Fontaine stage II) were given specific lipid supplements. Designed as a longitudinal intervention study, patients were provided with olive oil for 3 months, followed by a 3 month wash-out period, then supplemented with a combination of fish oil and olive oil for the final 3 months. Changes in plasma and lipoprotein fatty acid composition and susceptibility of LDL to in vitro oxidation were examined. Furthermore, lipid-supplement-induced changes in LDL properties were measured as relative electrophoretic mobility and macrophage uptake. In addition, thirteen patients not provided with olive oil and fish oil were included as a control group and twenty healthy age-matched individuals were used as a reference group. A complete clinical study and a nutritional survey concerning food habits and lifestyle were performed every 3 months. Yao indices and claudicometry did not change significantly with dietary intervention although changes in plasma lipid composition suggested an improvement in the condition of the patients. The intake of the fish-oil supplement resulted in significantly increased plasma levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3) in comparison with baseline concentrations, olive-oil and control groups. Fish-oil consumption significantly decreased plasma triacylglycerol levels compared with the olive-oil period, control and reference groups. The susceptibility of LDL to Cu-mediated oxidation was lower in the patients consuming olive oil and the fish-oil supplement than in the control group, and the uptake of LDL by macrophages was significantly lower in the group supplemented with fish oil. In conclusion, consumption of olive oil together with a dietary supplement of fish oil may be useful in the nutritional management of patients suffering from peripheral vascular disease in terms of increasing plasma n-3 long

  13. Impact of Lipid and Protein Co-oxidation on Digestibility of Dairy Proteins in Oil-in-Water (O/W) Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Obando, Mónica; Papastergiadis, Antonios; Li, Shanshan; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2015-11-11

    Enrichment of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is a growing trend in the food industry. However, PUFAs are known to be susceptible to lipid oxidation. It has been shown that oxidizing lipids react with proteins present in the food and that as a result polymeric protein complexes are produced. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the impact of lipid and protein co-oxidation on protein digestibility. Casein and whey protein (6 mg/mL) based emulsions with 1% oil with different levels of PUFAs were subjected to respectively autoxidation and photo-oxidation. Upon autoxidation at 70 °C, protein digestibility of whey protein based emulsions containing fish oil decreased to 47.7 ± 0.8% after 48 h, whereas in the controls without oil 67.8 ± 0.7% was observed. Upon photo-oxidation at 4 °C during 30 days, mainly casein-based emulsions containing fish oil were affected: the digestibility amounted to 43.9 ± 1.2%, whereas in the control casein solutions without oil, 72.6 ± 0.2% of the proteins were digestible. Emulsions containing oils with high PUFA levels were more prone to lipid oxidation and thus upon progressive oxidation showed a higher impact on protein digestibility.

  14. Impact of Lipid and Protein Co-oxidation on Digestibility of Dairy Proteins in Oil-in-Water (O/W) Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Obando, Mónica; Papastergiadis, Antonios; Li, Shanshan; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2015-11-11

    Enrichment of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is a growing trend in the food industry. However, PUFAs are known to be susceptible to lipid oxidation. It has been shown that oxidizing lipids react with proteins present in the food and that as a result polymeric protein complexes are produced. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the impact of lipid and protein co-oxidation on protein digestibility. Casein and whey protein (6 mg/mL) based emulsions with 1% oil with different levels of PUFAs were subjected to respectively autoxidation and photo-oxidation. Upon autoxidation at 70 °C, protein digestibility of whey protein based emulsions containing fish oil decreased to 47.7 ± 0.8% after 48 h, whereas in the controls without oil 67.8 ± 0.7% was observed. Upon photo-oxidation at 4 °C during 30 days, mainly casein-based emulsions containing fish oil were affected: the digestibility amounted to 43.9 ± 1.2%, whereas in the control casein solutions without oil, 72.6 ± 0.2% of the proteins were digestible. Emulsions containing oils with high PUFA levels were more prone to lipid oxidation and thus upon progressive oxidation showed a higher impact on protein digestibility. PMID:26466987

  15. Isolation and lipid degradation profile of Raoultella planticola strain 232-2 capable of efficiently catabolizing edible oils under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, Daisuke; Watanabe, Mika; Utsue, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    The lipids (fats and oils) degradation capabilities of soil microorganisms were investigated for possible application in treatment of lipids-contaminated wastewater. We isolated a strain of the bacterium Raoultella planticola strain 232-2 that is capable of efficiently catabolizing lipids under acidic conditions such as in grease traps in restaurants and food processing plants. The strain 232-2 efficiently catabolized a mixture (mixed lipids) of commercial vegetable oil, lard, and beef tallow (1:1:1, w/w/w) at 20-35 °C, pH 3-9, and 1,000-5,000 ppm lipid content. Highly effective degradation rate was observed at 35 °C and pH 4.0, and the 24-h degradation rate was 62.5 ± 10.5 % for 3,000 ppm mixed lipids. The 24-h degradation rate for 3,000 ppm commercial vegetable oil, lard, beef tallow, mixed lipids, and oleic acid was 71.8 %, 58.7 %, 56.1 %, 55.3 ± 8.5 %, and 91.9 % at pH 4 and 30 °C, respectively. R. planticola NBRC14939 (type strain) was also able to efficiently catabolize the lipids after repeated subculturing. The composition of the culture medium strongly influenced the degradation efficiency, with yeast extract supporting more complete dissimilation than BactoPeptone or beef extract. The acid tolerance of strain 232-2 is proposed to result from neutralization of the culture medium by urease-mediated decomposition of urea to NH(3). The rate of lipids degradation increased with the rates of neutralization and cell growth. Efficient lipids degradation using strain 232-2 has been achieved in the batch treatment of a restaurant wastewater.

  16. Isolation and lipid degradation profile of Raoultella planticola strain 232-2 capable of efficiently catabolizing edible oils under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, Daisuke; Watanabe, Mika; Utsue, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    The lipids (fats and oils) degradation capabilities of soil microorganisms were investigated for possible application in treatment of lipids-contaminated wastewater. We isolated a strain of the bacterium Raoultella planticola strain 232-2 that is capable of efficiently catabolizing lipids under acidic conditions such as in grease traps in restaurants and food processing plants. The strain 232-2 efficiently catabolized a mixture (mixed lipids) of commercial vegetable oil, lard, and beef tallow (1:1:1, w/w/w) at 20-35 °C, pH 3-9, and 1,000-5,000 ppm lipid content. Highly effective degradation rate was observed at 35 °C and pH 4.0, and the 24-h degradation rate was 62.5 ± 10.5 % for 3,000 ppm mixed lipids. The 24-h degradation rate for 3,000 ppm commercial vegetable oil, lard, beef tallow, mixed lipids, and oleic acid was 71.8 %, 58.7 %, 56.1 %, 55.3 ± 8.5 %, and 91.9 % at pH 4 and 30 °C, respectively. R. planticola NBRC14939 (type strain) was also able to efficiently catabolize the lipids after repeated subculturing. The composition of the culture medium strongly influenced the degradation efficiency, with yeast extract supporting more complete dissimilation than BactoPeptone or beef extract. The acid tolerance of strain 232-2 is proposed to result from neutralization of the culture medium by urease-mediated decomposition of urea to NH(3). The rate of lipids degradation increased with the rates of neutralization and cell growth. Efficient lipids degradation using strain 232-2 has been achieved in the batch treatment of a restaurant wastewater. PMID:22395910

  17. Synergistic interactions between doxycycline and terpenic components of essential oils encapsulated within lipid nanocapsules against gram negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Valcourt, C; Saulnier, P; Umerska, A; Zanelli, M P; Montagu, A; Rossines, E; Joly-Guillou, M L

    2016-02-10

    The combination of essential oils (EOs) with antibiotics provides a promising strategy towards combating resistant bacteria. We have selected a mixture of 3 major components extracted from EOs: carvacrol (oregano oil), eugenol (clove oil) and cinnamaldehyde (cinnamon oil). These compounds were successfully encapsulated within lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). The EOs-loaded LNCs were characterised by a noticeably high drug loading of 20% and a very small particle diameter of 114nm. The in vitro interactions between EOs-loaded LNCs and doxycycline were examined via checkerboard titration and time-kill assay against 5 Gram-negative strains: Acinetobacter baumannii SAN, A. baumannii RCH, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. No growth inhibition interactions were found between EOs-loaded LNCs and doxycycline (FIC index between 0.7 and 1.30). However, when bactericidal effects were considered, a synergistic interaction was observed (FBC index equal to 0.5) against all tested strains. A synergistic effect was also observed in time-kill assay (a difference of at least 3 log between the combination and the most active agent alone). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to visualise the changes in the bacterial membrane. The holes in bacterial envelope and leakage of cellular contents were observed in SE micrographs after exposure to the EOs-LNCs and the doxycycline combination. PMID:26631640

  18. Plasma lipid effects of three common vegetable oils in reduced-fat diets of free-living adults.

    PubMed

    Insull, W; Silvers, A; Hicks, L; Probstfield, J L

    1994-08-01

    We compared plasma lipid changes due to the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in partially hydrogenated soybean oil, corn oil, and sunflower oil fed in reduced-fat diets (22-26% of total energy). Each oil was the dominant fat in isoenergetic diets of centrally prepared foods consumed by 26 male and 35 female normolipidemic, free-living individuals. Test diets were consumed double-blind, alternating with self-selected diets for 5 wk each. The ranges of proportions of total fat were: 4.7-9.7% polyunsaturated fat, 8.9-14.2% monounsaturated fat and 5.4-7.4% saturated fat. All three diets lowered (P < 0.0001) total cholesterol (11%), LDL cholesterol (13%), and HDL cholesterol (10%), without triglyceride changes. We conclude that PUFAs at approximately 6% of total energy result in clinically relevant plasma cholesterol-lowering and that the proportion of polyunsaturated fat must be an important consideration when planning reduced-fat, reduced-saturated-fat diets.

  19. Synergistic interactions between doxycycline and terpenic components of essential oils encapsulated within lipid nanocapsules against gram negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Valcourt, C; Saulnier, P; Umerska, A; Zanelli, M P; Montagu, A; Rossines, E; Joly-Guillou, M L

    2016-02-10

    The combination of essential oils (EOs) with antibiotics provides a promising strategy towards combating resistant bacteria. We have selected a mixture of 3 major components extracted from EOs: carvacrol (oregano oil), eugenol (clove oil) and cinnamaldehyde (cinnamon oil). These compounds were successfully encapsulated within lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). The EOs-loaded LNCs were characterised by a noticeably high drug loading of 20% and a very small particle diameter of 114nm. The in vitro interactions between EOs-loaded LNCs and doxycycline were examined via checkerboard titration and time-kill assay against 5 Gram-negative strains: Acinetobacter baumannii SAN, A. baumannii RCH, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. No growth inhibition interactions were found between EOs-loaded LNCs and doxycycline (FIC index between 0.7 and 1.30). However, when bactericidal effects were considered, a synergistic interaction was observed (FBC index equal to 0.5) against all tested strains. A synergistic effect was also observed in time-kill assay (a difference of at least 3 log between the combination and the most active agent alone). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to visualise the changes in the bacterial membrane. The holes in bacterial envelope and leakage of cellular contents were observed in SE micrographs after exposure to the EOs-LNCs and the doxycycline combination.

  20. Low fish oil intake improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and muscle metabolism on insulin resistant MSG-obese rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is commonly associated with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a lower dose of fish oil supplementation on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and muscle metabolism in obese rats. Methods Monosodium glutamate (MSG) (4 mg/g body weight) was injected in neonatal Wistar male rats. Three-month-old rats were divided in normal-weight control group (C), coconut fat-treated normal weight group (CO), fish oil-treated normal weight group (FO), obese control group (Ob), coconut fat-treated obese group (ObCO) and fish oil-treated obese group (ObFO). Obese insulin-resistant rats were supplemented with fish oil or coconut fat (1 g/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, fasting blood biochemicals parameters, and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism were analyzed. Results Obese animals (Ob) presented higher Index Lee and 2.5 fold epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue than C. Insulin sensitivity test (Kitt) showed that fish oil supplementation was able to maintain insulin sensitivity of obese rats (ObFO) similar to C. There were no changes in glucose and HDL-cholesterol levels amongst groups. Yet, ObFO revealed lower levels of total cholesterol (TC; 30%) and triacylglycerol (TG; 33%) compared to Ob. Finally, since exposed to insulin, ObFO skeletal muscle revealed an increase of 10% in lactate production, 38% in glycogen synthesis and 39% in oxidation of glucose compared to Ob. Conclusions Low dose of fish oil supplementation (1 g/kg/day) was able to reduce TC and TG levels, in addition to improved systemic and muscle insulin sensitivity. These results lend credence to the benefits of n-3 fatty acids upon the deleterious effects of insulin resistance mechanisms. PMID:21526994

  1. Structural characterization of the lipid A component of pathogenic Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed Central

    Kulshin, V A; Zähringer, U; Lindner, B; Frasch, C E; Tsai, C M; Dmitriev, B A; Rietschel, E T

    1992-01-01

    The lipid A component of meningococcal lipopolysaccharide was structurally characterized by using chemical modification methods, methylation analysis, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance, and laser desorption mass spectroscopy. It was shown that Neisseria meningitidis lipid A consists of a 1,4'-bisphosphorylated beta(1'----6)-linked D-glucosamine disaccharide (lipid A backbone), both phosphate groups being largely replaced by O-phosphorylethanolamine. This disaccharide harbors two nonsubstituted hydroxyl groups at positions 4 and 6', the latter representing the attachment site of the oligosaccharide portion in lipopolysaccharide. In addition, it is substituted by up to six fatty acid residues. In the major lipid A component, representing a hexaacyl species, the hydroxyl groups at positions 3 and 3' carry (R)-3-hydroxydodecanoic acid [12:0(3-OH)], whereas the amino groups at positions 2 and 2' are substituted by (R)-3-(dodecanoyloxy)tetradecanoic acid [3-O(12:0)-14:0]. A minor portion was present as a tetraacyl lipid A component lacking either dodecanoic acid (12:0) or 12:0 and 12:0(3-OH). N. meningitidis lipid A, therefore, significantly differs from Escherichia coli lipid A by the nature and locations of fatty acids and the substitution of O-phosphorylethanolamine for the nonglycosyl (4'-P) and glycosyl phosphate. PMID:1548229

  2. Influence of membrane phospholipid composition and structural organization on spontaneous lipid transfer between membranes.

    PubMed

    Pankov, R; Markovska, T; Antonov, P; Ivanova, L; Momchilova, A

    2006-09-01

    Investigations were carried out on the influence of phospholipid composition of model membranes on the processes of spontaneous lipid transfer between membranes. Acceptor vesicles were prepared from phospholipids extracted from plasma membranes of control and ras-transformed fibroblasts. Acceptor model membranes with manipulated levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), sphingomyelin and phosphatidic acid were also used in the studies. Donor vesicles were prepared of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and contained two fluorescent lipid analogues, NBD-PC and N-Rh-PE, at a self-quenching concentration. Lipid transfer rate was assessed by measuring the increase of fluorescence in acceptor membranes due to transfer of fluorescent lipid analogues from quenched donor to unquenched acceptor vesicles. The results showed that spontaneous NBD-PC transfer increased upon fluidization of acceptor vesicles. In addition, elevation of PE concentration in model membranes was also accompanied by an increase of lipid transfer to all series of acceptor vesicles. The results are discussed with respect to the role of lipid composition and structural order of cellular plasma membranes in the processes of spontaneous lipid exchange between membrane bilayers. PMID:17197729

  3. The influence of dietary palm olein, fish oil and lard on the egg yolk and plasma lipid composition, and performances of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Hodzic, A; Hamamdzic, M; Gagic, A; Mihaljevic, M; Vegara, M; Krnic, J; Pasic Juhas, E

    2008-01-01

    The influence of dietary palm olein, in comparison to fish oil and lard, on lipid levels in egg yolk and blood plasma, the fatty acid composition of egg yolk, and various production parameters were studied. Brown Lohman laying hens (n=45) were randomly assigned into three groups of 15 birds, and treated with experimental diets with either 3% palm olein (PO), fish oil (FO) or lard (L) for 6 weeks. At the end of the experiment, feed consumption was significantly lower for hens fed the PO diet, except week 6 of the experiment. The concentration of plasma triglycerides was increased by all experimental diets, whereas there were no significant increases of plasma total lipid and total cholesterol concentrations only in the PO group. For yolk lipids a decrease in triglycerides in the FO and L groups was observed, while total cholesterol and total lipid were significantly decreased in the PO group. Feeding with the PO diet resulted in the lowest concentrations of palmitic, stearic and linoleic acid, as well as in the highest concentration of monounsaturated oleic acid in the yolk total lipid. It was concluded that the composition of yolk lipids did not closely match the concentrations of lipids observed in experimental diets or plasma. Based on the current work it seems that the PO diet modulates egg yolk lipid content best. PMID:18540201

  4. Edible oil structuring: an overview and recent updates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashok R; Dewettinck, Koen

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, research dealing with edible oil structuring has received considerable interest from scientific community working in the area of food formulation. Much of this interest is linked to the possibility of using structured oil in development of newer product formats with improved nutritional profile (trans fat-free, low in saturated fats and high in mono and/or poly unsaturated fatty acids). In addition to the obvious industrial need of finding the alternative formulation approach, the interesting properties of structured systems (particularly, oleogels) also makes them a fascinating subject for fundamental studies. In this paper, we attempt to give a comprehensive and concise overview of the field of oil structuring with special emphasis on the updates from recent years. Specifically, several categories of food-grade oleogelators and their potential food applications are summarized with typical examples along with a discussion on the general principles and unresolved challenges related to this emerging area.

  5. Structural determinants of protein partitioning into ordered membrane domains and lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Lorent, Joseph Helmuth; Levental, Ilya

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the existence of lateral nanoscopic lipid domains in plasma membranes, known as lipid rafts. These domains preferentially recruit membrane proteins and lipids to facilitate their interactions and thereby regulate transmembrane signaling and cellular homeostasis. The functionality of raft domains is intrinsically dependent on their selectivity for specific membrane components; however, while the physicochemical determinants of raft association for lipids are known, very few systematic studies have focused on the structural aspects that guide raft partitioning of proteins. In this review, we describe biophysical and thermodynamic aspects of raft-mimetic liquid ordered phases, focusing on those most relevant for protein partitioning. Further, we detail the variety of experimental models used to study protein-raft interactions. Finally, we review the existing literature on mechanisms for raft targeting, including lipid post-translational modifications, lipid binding, and transmembrane domain features. We conclude that while protein palmitoylation is a clear raft-targeting signal, few other general structural determinants for raft partitioning have been revealed, suggesting that many discoveries lie ahead in this burgeoning field.

  6. Three-dimensional structure of the anthrax toxin pore inserted into lipid nanodiscs and lipid vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, H.; Wang, J.; Tama, F.; Chollet, L.; Gogol, E. P.; Collier, R. J.; Fisher, M. T.

    2010-01-01

    A major goal in understanding the pathogenesis of the anthrax bacillus is to determine how the protective antigen (PA) pore mediates translocation of the enzymatic components of anthrax toxin across membranes. To obtain structural insights into this mechanism, we constructed PA-pore membrane complexes and visualized them by using negative-stain electron microscopy. Two populations of PA pores were visualized in membranes, vesicle-inserted and nanodisc-inserted, allowing us to reconstruct two virtually identical PA-pore structures at 22-Å resolution. Reconstruction of a domain 4-truncated PA pore inserted into nanodiscs showed that this domain does not significantly influence pore structure. Normal mode flexible fitting of the x-ray crystallographic coordinates of the PA prepore indicated that a prominent flange observed within the pore lumen is formed by the convergence of mobile loops carrying Phe427, a residue known to catalyze protein translocation. Our results have identified the location of a crucial functional element of the PA pore and documented the value of combining nanodisc technology with electron microscopy to examine the structures of membrane-interactive proteins. PMID:20142512

  7. Effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Deng, Binbin; Giancola, JoLynn B.; McComb, David W.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-like nanoparticles (LLNs) have shown great potential for RNA delivery. Lipid-like compounds are key components in LLNs. In this study, we investigated the effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA. Our results showed that position change of functional groups on lipid-like compounds can dramatically improve delivery efficiency. We then optimized formulation ratios of TNT-b10 LLNs, a lead material, increasing delivery efficiency over 2-fold. More importantly, pegylated TNT-b10 LLNs is stable for over four weeks and is over 10-fold more efficient than that of its counterpart TNT-a10 LLNs. Additionally, the optimal formulation O-TNT-b10 LLNs is capable of delivering mRNA encoding luciferase in vivo. These results provide useful insights into the design of next generation LLNs for mRNA delivery. PMID:26916931

  8. Effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Deng, Binbin; Giancola, Jolynn B.; McComb, David W.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-02-01

    Lipid-like nanoparticles (LLNs) have shown great potential for RNA delivery. Lipid-like compounds are key components in LLNs. In this study, we investigated the effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA. Our results showed that position change of functional groups on lipid-like compounds can dramatically improve delivery efficiency. We then optimized formulation ratios of TNT-b10 LLNs, a lead material, increasing delivery efficiency over 2-fold. More importantly, pegylated TNT-b10 LLNs is stable for over four weeks and is over 10-fold more efficient than that of its counterpart TNT-a10 LLNs. Additionally, the optimal formulation O-TNT-b10 LLNs is capable of delivering mRNA encoding luciferase in vivo. These results provide useful insights into the design of next generation LLNs for mRNA delivery.

  9. Structure of lipid multilayers via drop casting of aqueous liposome dispersions.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Beatrice; Snow, Tim; Redeker, Christian; Slastanova, Anna; Bikondoa, Oier; Arnold, Thomas; Klein, Jacob; Briscoe, Wuge H

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the structure of solid supported lipid multilayers is crucial to their application as a platform for novel materials. Conventionally, they are prepared from drop casting or spin coating of lipids dissolved in organic solvents, and lipid multilayers prepared from aqueous media and their structural characterisation have not been reported previously, due to their extremely low lipid solubility (i.e.∼10(-9) M) in water. Herein, using X-ray reflectivity (XRR) facilitated by a "bending mica" method, we have studied the structural characteristics of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) multilayers prepared via drop casting aqueous small unilamellar and multilamellar vesicle or liposome (i.e. SUV and MLV) dispersions on different surfaces, including mica, positively charged polyethylenimine (PEI) coated mica, and stearic trimethylammonium iodide (STAI) coated mica which exposes a monolayer of hydrocarbon tails. We suggest that DOPC liposomes served both as a delivery matrix where an appreciable lipid concentration in water (∼25 mg mL(-1) or 14 mM) was feasible, and as a structural precursor where the lamellar structure was readily retained on the rupture of the vesicles at the solid surface upon solvent evaporation to facilitate rapid multilayer formation. We find that multilayers on mica from MLVs exhibited polymorphism, whereas the SUV multilayers were well ordered and showed stronger stability against water. The influence of substrate chemistry (i.e. polymer coating, charge and hydrophobicity) on the multilayer structure is discussed in terms of lipid-substrate molecular interactions determining the bilayer packing proximal to the solid-liquid interface, which then had a templating effect on the structure of the bilayers distal from the interface, resulting in the overall different multilayer structural characteristics on different substrates. Such a fundamental understanding of the correlation between the physical parameters that characterise liposomes

  10. Evidence Suggesting That Francisella tularensis O-Antigen Capsule Contains a Lipid A-Like Molecule That Is Structurally Distinct from the More Abundant Free Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jason H.; Kaufman, Justin W.; Apicella, Michael A.; Weiss, Jerrold P.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the Gram-negative bacterium that causes tularemia, produces a high molecular weight capsule that is immunologically distinct from Francisella lipopolysaccharide but contains the same O-antigen tetrasaccharide. To pursue the possibility that the capsule of Francisella live vaccine strain (LVS) has a structurally unique lipid anchor, we have metabolically labeled Francisella with [14C]acetate to facilitate highly sensitive compositional analysis of capsule-associated lipids. Capsule was purified by two independent methods and yielded similar results. Autoradiographic and immunologic analysis confirmed that this purified material was largely devoid of low molecular weight LPS and of the copious amounts of free lipid A that the Francisellae accumulate. Chemical hydrolysis yielded [14C]-labeled free fatty acids characteristic of Francisella lipid A but with a different molar ratio of 3-OH C18:0 to 3-OH C16:0 and different composition of non-hydroxylated fatty acids (mainly C14:0 rather than C16:0) than that of free Francisella lipid A. Mild acid hydrolysis to induce selective cleavage of KDO-lipid A linkage yielded a [14C]-labeled product that partitioned during Bligh/Dyer extraction and migrated during thin-layer chromatography like lipid A. These findings suggest that the O-antigen capsule of Francisella contains a covalently linked and structurally distinct lipid A species. The presence of a discrete lipid A-like molecule associated with capsule raises the possibility that Francisella selectively exploits lipid A structural heterogeneity to regulate synthesis, transport, and stable bacterial surface association of the O-antigen capsular layer. PMID:27326857

  11. Polyunsaturated (n-3) fatty acids susceptible to peroxidation are increased in plasma and tissue lipids of rats fed docosahexaenoic acid-containing oils.

    PubMed

    Song, J H; Fujimoto, K; Miyazawa, T

    2000-12-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid [DHA, 22:6(n-3)], a major component of membrane phospholipids in brain and retina, is profoundly susceptible to oxidative stress in vitro. The extent of this peroxidation in organs when DHA is ingested in mammals, however, is not well elucidated. We investigated the effect of dietary DHA-containing oils (DHA 7.0-7.1 mol/100 mol total fatty acids), in the form of triacylglycerols (TG), ethyl esters (EE) and phospholipids (PL), on tissue lipid metabolism and lipid peroxidation in rats. Groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were fed semipurified diets containing 15 g/100 g test oils and were compared with those fed 80% palm oil and 20% soybean oil as the control (unsupplemented group) for 3 wk. The DHA oil diets markedly increased (P: < 0.05) the levels of DHA in the plasma, liver and kidney, 1.5-1.9, 2.5-3.8 and 2.2-2.5 times the control values, respectively, whereas there was a concomitant reduction (P: < 0.05) in arachidonic acid. All forms of DHA oil caused lower TG concentrations in plasma (P: < 0.05) and liver (P: < 0.05), but had no effect in kidney. The DHA oil-fed rats had greater phospholipid hydroperoxide accumulations in plasma (191-192% of control rats), liver (170-230%) and kidney (250-340%), whereas the alpha-tocopherol level was reduced concomitantly (21-73% of control rats). Consistent with these results, rats fed DHA-containing oils had more thiobarbituric reactive substances in these organs than the controls. Thus, high incorporation of (n-3) fatty acids (mainly DHA) into plasma and tissue lipids due to DHA-containing oil ingestion may undesirably affect tissues by enhancing susceptibility of membranes to lipid peroxidation and by disrupting the antioxidant system.

  12. Antioxidant role of oils isolated from garlic (Allium sativum Linn) and onion (Allium cepa Linn) on nicotine-induced lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Helen, A; Rajasree, C R; Krishnakumar, K; Augusti, K T; Vijayammal, P L

    1999-10-01

    Nicotine, a major component of tobacco, is partly responsible for the development of atherosclerosis. It has been suggested that antioxidant nutrients are protective against degenerative diseases. So we have studied the antioxidant effect of oils isolated from onion and garlic on nicotine-induced lipid peroxidation in rat tissues. The lipid peroxidation products and scavenging enzymes were assessed in liver, lungs, heart and kidney. The rats were treated with 0.6 mg nicotine/kg bw and simultaneously given 100 mg garlic or onion oils/kg bw for 21 d. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, conjugated dienes and hydroperoxides concentrations were significantly increased in the tissues of nicotine-treated rats. Both the garlic oil and onion oil supplementation to nicotine-treated rats increased resistance to lipid peroxidation. The activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase decreased in nicotine-treated rats, but there was a trend to increased glutathione content. With garlic oil or onion oil supplementation, nicotine-treated rats had increased activities of antioxidant enzymes and increased concentrations of glutathione. These results indicate that oils of garlic and onion are effective antioxidants against the oxidative damage caused by nicotine. PMID:10509436

  13. One-dimensional lipid bilayers on carbon nanotubes: Structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukhin, Alexander Borisovich

    In this work we report design, assembly, and properties of one-dimensional lipid bilayers wrapped around polymer-coated carbon nanotubes. We propose to use this platform as a tool for interfacing nanomaterials with biological systems. We start by presenting a new general procedure for noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes based on polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer assembly. We confirm formation of multilayer polymer structures around individual carbon nanotubes by transmission electron microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy, and demonstrate that sign of the outmost polymer layer controls surface properties of the multilayer assembly. We study how rigidity of a polymer chain influences its ability to adsorb onto high curvature substrates, such as carbon nanotubes. We then build the one-dimensional lipid bilayer structure by spontaneous assembly of lipid molecules in a continuous nanoshell around a template of a carbon nanotube wrapped with hydrophilic polymer cushion layers. We demonstrate that such one-dimensional lipid membranes are fluid and can heal defects, even over repeated damage-recovery cycles. Measured diffusion coefficients of lipid molecules in our polymer-supported bilayers are about 3 orders of magnitude lower than typical values for fluid lipid membranes, which we attribute to strong electrostatic polyelectrolyte-lipid interactions. To explore the potential for device integration of one-dimensional bilayers we investigate effect of polyelectrolyte multilayers on electrical properties of carbon nanotube transistors. We demonstrate that complex interaction of adsorbed species with the device substrate can produce significant and sometimes unexpected side effects on device characteristics. Finally, we fabricate transistors with suspended carbon nanotube channels and devise a method to transfer them in liquid. It allows us to assemble one-dimensional lipid membranes on carbon nanotube devices, characterize their electrical properties, and

  14. [Palm oil derivatives with different concentration of palmitic acid and antioxidants. Effects upon plasmatic lipids and platelet aggregation].

    PubMed

    Scorza, T; Martucci, A; Torrealba de Ron, A T

    1999-03-01

    It was evaluated the effect of diet rich with cholesterol (0.1%) and different concentration of palmitic acid (16:0) and antioxidants (vitamin C, alpha tocopherol and retinol) upon plasmatic lipids and platelet aggregability in rabbits. The animals were distributed in three groups: I. Standard chow meal (Rp Conejarina) + cholesterol (chol) 0.1%; II. Standard chow meal + chol 0.1% + semipurified palm oil 10% (16:0 = 39.8%, oleic acid 48.7%, linoleic acid 11.4%, retinol 7.3 ug/dL, alpha tocopherol 157.6 ug/dL; III. Standard chow meal + chol 0.1% + crude palm oil 10% (16:0 = 45.3%, oleic acid 46.3%, linoleic acid 7.9%, retinol 96.4 ug/dL, alpha tocopherol 322.8 ug/dL). Monthly determination of plasmatic lipids were done (Enzymatic methods) and at ten months platelet aggregability with ADP, plasmatic vitamin C, retinol and, alpha tocopherol determination were done. Total plasmatic cholesterol (TC) and LDLc increased significantly in the three groups of animals. Significant differences between groups were not found. Platelet aggregability was lower in the animals fed with palmitic acid rich diet (groups II and III) (P = 0.002 and 0.001). Retinol, alpha tocopherol plasmatic concentrations revealed no significant differences. Vitamin C in the groups I was lower than groups II and III (P < 0.05 < 0.02). In this study hypercholesterolemic rabbits fed with rich diets (crude and semipurified) had lower platelet aggregability without changes in plasmatic lipids concentrations.

  15. Lipid digestibility and energy content of distillers corn oil in swine and poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the DE and ME, and apparent total tract digestibility of ether extract of 3 distillers corn oil (DCO; 4.9, 12.8, or 13.9% FFA), compared with a sample of refined corn oil (CO, 0.04% FFA), and an industrially-hydrolyzed high FFA DCO (93.8% FFA) in young pig...

  16. Effect of ionizing radiation on the protein and lipid quality characteristics of mutton kheema treated with rice bran oil and sunflower oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalarama Reddy, K.; Jayathilakan, K.; Pandey, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Effect of rice bran oil (RBO) and irradiation (0, 1, 2 and 3 kGy) on lipid and protein quality of ready-to-eat mutton kheema were established during refrigerated storage (4±1 °C). Total carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), non-heme iron and total volatiles in irradiated RBO samples were significantly lower (p<0.05) from the corresponding sunflower oil (SFO) treated samples initially and during storage. Product with RBO and Flaxseed oil (FSO) at the optimized level yielded a designer meat product having an SFA:MUFA:PUFA and n-6/n-3 ratio of 1:1.3:1.3 and 3.6:1 respectively. Degradation in PUFA levels in SFO samples were significantly higher (p<0.05) and an increase of 31% in metmyoglobin after 50 days was noticed in comparison with RBO samples. Non-linear correlation analysis of chemical markers established polynomial fit equations. 2 kGy radiation processing with RBO yielded a product having 50 days of shelf stability in terms of its chemical characteristics.

  17. Impact of Oil on Bacterial Community Structure in Bioturbated Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Stauffert, Magalie; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Jézéquel, Ronan; Barantal, Sandra; Cuny, Philippe; Gilbert, Franck; Cagnon, Christine; Militon, Cécile; Amouroux, David; Mahdaoui, Fatima; Bouyssiere, Brice; Stora, Georges; Merlin, François-Xavier; Duran, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Oil spills threaten coastlines where biological processes supply essential ecosystem services. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how oil influences the microbial communities in sediments that play key roles in ecosystem functioning. Ecosystems such as sediments are characterized by intensive bioturbation due to burrowing macrofauna that may modify the microbial metabolisms. It is thus essential to consider the bioturbation when determining the impact of oil on microbial communities. In this study, an experimental laboratory device maintaining pristine collected mudflat sediments in microcosms closer to true environmental conditions – with tidal cycles and natural seawater – was used to simulate an oil spill under bioturbation conditions. Different conditions were applied to the microcosms including an addition of: standardized oil (Blend Arabian Light crude oil, 25.6 mg.g−1 wet sediment), the common burrowing organism Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor and both the oil and H. diversicolor. The addition of H. diversicolor and its associated bioturbation did not affect the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons. After 270 days, 60% of hydrocarbons had been removed in all microcosms irrespective of the H. diversicolor addition. However, 16S-rRNA gene and 16S-cDNA T-RFLP and RT-PCR-amplicon libraries analysis showed an effect of the condition on the bacterial community structure, composition, and dynamics, supported by PerMANOVA analysis. The 16S-cDNA libraries from microcosms where H. diversicolor was added (oiled and un-oiled) showed a marked dominance of sequences related to Gammaproteobacteria. However, in the oiled-library sequences associated to Deltaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were also highly represented. The 16S-cDNA libraries from oiled-microcosms (with and without H. diversicolor addition) revealed two distinct microbial communities characterized by different phylotypes associated to known hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria and dominated by

  18. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M.

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k{sub c} and k{sup ¯} and the preferred monolayer curvature J{sub 0}{sup m}, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k{sub c} and the area compression modulus k{sub A} are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k{sup ¯}<0, membranes can form stable cubic phases when the Gaussian bending modulus becomes positive, which occurs with membranes composed of PC lipids with long tails. Similarly, negative monolayer curvatures appear when a small head group such as PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J{sub 0}{sup m}≫0, especially at low ionic

  19. DHA-enriched fish oil targets B cell lipid microdomains and enhances ex vivo and in vivo B cell function

    PubMed Central

    Gurzell, Eric A.; Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Clinthorne, Jonathan; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Fenton, Jenifer I.

    2013-01-01

    DHA is a n-3 LCPUFA in fish oil that generally suppresses T lymphocyte function. However, the effect of fish oil on B cell function remains relatively understudied. Given the important role of B cells in gut immunity and increasing human fish oil supplementation, we sought to determine whether DFO leads to enhanced B cell activation in the SMAD−/− colitis-prone mouse model, similar to that observed with C57BL/6 mice. This study tested the hypothesis that DHA from fish oil is incorporated into the B cell membrane to alter lipid microdomain clustering and enhance B cell function. Purified, splenic B cells from DFO-fed mice displayed increased DHA levels and diminished GM1 microdomain clustering. DFO enhanced LPS-induced B cell secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α and increased CD40 expression ex vivo compared with CON. Despite increased MHCII expression in the unstimulated ex vivo B cells from DFO-fed mice, we observed no difference in ex vivo OVA-FITC uptake in B cells from DFO or CON mice. In vivo, DFO increased lymphoid tissue B cell populations and surface markers of activation compared with CON. Finally, we investigated whether these ex vivo and in vivo observations were consistent with systemic changes. Indeed, DFO-fed mice had significantly higher plasma IL-5, IL-13, and IL-9 (Th2-biasing cytokines) and cecal IgA compared with CON. These results support the hypothesis and an emerging concept that fish oil enhances B cell function in vivo. PMID:23180828

  20. Effects of Aster scaber Seed Oil Containing trans-Δ3 Fatty Acids on Lipid Profiles of Hamsters and Rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong-Soon; Lee, Koung-Hee; Jeong, Yeon-Ho; Koba, Kazunori; Sugano, Michihiro

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Aster scaber seed oil (ASO) on lipid profiles were studied in rats and hamsters. ASO contained considerable amounts of Δ3t-16:1 (11.4%), Δ3t, 9c-18:2 (4.6%), and Δ3t, 9c, 12c-18:3 (11.3%). Young rats and hamsters were fed diets containing ASO, soybean oil (SBO), or olive oil (OLO) as fat sources for 4 weeks in separate experiments with or without cholesterol. In the rat study, there were no significant differences in the concentrations of serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, and triacylglycerol among the groups. The serum but not liver malondialdehyde (MDA) level was significantly lower in the ASO-fed group than it was in the other groups. The biochemical and growth parameters revealed no significant biological damages in the ASO-fed animals. In the hamster study, dietary cholesterol-dependent effects were evident in the serum lipids profiles, whereas the fat-induced effect was only observed in the ratio of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-/HDL-cholesterol. Furthermore, fat- and cholesterol-induced effects were evident in the ratio of serum LDL-/HDL-cholesterol. Significant interactions between dietary fat and cholesterol were observed as evident from the concentration of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol, as well as the activity of serum cholesterol ester transfer protein. These results suggest that dietary ASO containing trans-Δ3 fatty acids appeared to improve the serum LDL-/HDL-cholesterol ratio more than the SBO did, especially when hamsters were simultaneously fed cholesterol-supplemented diet.

  1. Biophysical investigations of the structure and function of the tear fluid lipid layer and the effect of ectoine. Part A: natural meibomian lipid films.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Mridula; Backers, Hannes; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-01

    The tear fluid lipid layer is the outermost part of the tear film on the ocular surface which protects the eye from inflammations and injuries. We investigated the influence of ectoine on the structural organization of natural meibomian lipid films using surface activity analysis and topographical studies. These films exhibit a continuous pressure-area isotherm without any phase transition. With the addition of ectoine, the isotherm is expanded towards higher area per molecule values suggesting an increased area occupied by the interfacial lipid molecules. The AFM topology scans of natural meibomian lipid films reveal a presence of fiber-like structures. The addition of ectoine causes an appearance of droplet-like structures which are hypothesized to be tri-acyl-glycerols and other hydrophobic components excluded from the lipid film. Further the material properties of the droplet-like structure with respect to the surrounding were determined by using the quantitative imaging mode of the AFM technique. The droplet-like structures were found to be comparatively softer than the surrounding. Based on the observations a preliminary hypothesis is proposed explaining the mechanism of action of ectoine leading to the fluidization of meibomian lipid films. This suggests the possibility of ectoine as a treatment for the dry eye syndrome.

  2. How relevant are assembled equilibrium samples in understanding structure formation during lipid digestion?

    PubMed

    Phan, Stephanie; Salentinig, Stefan; Hawley, Adrian; Boyd, Ben J

    2015-10-01

    Lipid-based formulations are gaining interest for use as drug delivery systems for poorly water-soluble drug compounds. During digestion, the lipolysis products self-assemble with endogenous surfactants in the gastrointestinal tract to form colloidal structures, enabling enhanced drug solubilisation. Although earlier studies in the literature focus on assembled equilibrium systems, little is known about structure formation under dynamic lipolysis conditions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the likely colloidal structure formation in the small intestine after the ingestion of lipids, under equilibrium and dynamic conditions. The structural aspects were studied using small angle X-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering, and were found to depend on lipid composition, lipid chain length, prandial state and emulsification. Incorporation of phospholipids and lipolysis products into bile salt micelles resulted in swelling of the structure. At insufficient bile salt concentrations, a co-existing lamellar phase was observed, due to a reduction in the solubilisation capacity for lipolysis products. Emulsification accelerated the rate of lipolysis and structure formation.

  3. Lipid-free Apolipoprotein A-I Structure: Insights into HDL Formation and Atherosclerosis Development.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xiaohu; Atkinson, David

    2015-07-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I is the major protein in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and plays an important role during the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Knowledge of the high-resolution structure of full-length apoA-I is vital for a molecular understanding of the function of HDL at the various steps of the RCT pathway. Due to the flexible nature of apoA-I and aggregation properties, the structure of full-length lipid-free apoA-I has evaded description for over three decades. Sequence analysis of apoA-I suggested that the amphipathic α-helix is the structural motif of exchangeable apolipoprotein, and NMR, X-ray and MD simulation studies have confirmed this. Different laboratories have used different methods to probe the secondary structure distribution and organization of both the lipid-free and lipid-bound apoA-I structure. Mutation analysis, synthetic peptide models, surface chemistry and crystal structures have converged on the lipid-free apoA-I domain structure and function: the N-terminal domain [1-184] forms a helix bundle while the C-terminal domain [185-243] mostly lacks defined structure and is responsible for initiating lipid-binding, aggregation and is also involved in cholesterol efflux. The first 43 residues of apoA-I are essential to stabilize the lipid-free structure. In addition, the crystal structure of C-terminally truncated apoA-I suggests a monomer-dimer conversation mechanism mediated through helix 5 reorganization and dimerization during the formation of HDL. Based on previous research, we have proposed a structural model for full-length monomeric apoA-I in solution and updated the HDL formation mechanism through three states. Mapping the known natural mutations on the full-length monomeric apoA-I model provides insight into atherosclerosis development through disruption of the N-terminal helix bundle or deletion of the C-terminal lipid-binding domain.

  4. Dissipative structure formation in lipid/lipopolymer monolayers.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Peter C; Reif, Michael; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Jordan, Rainer; Tanaka, Motomu

    2011-03-17

    We study the formation of dissipative microstructures in monomolecular films of surfactant mixtures, which occur near the three-phase contact line during Langmuir-Blodgett transfer onto a solid substrate. Continuous stripes parallel to the transfer direction are generated over several centimeters, indicating the phase separation of phospholipids and lipids with polymer head groups (lipopolymers). The systematic variation of transfer conditions revealed that transfer speed and subphase viscosity determine the stripe-to-stripe distance from several micrometers to submicrometers. To account for the physical mechanism of such pattern formation, we characterize the local film thickness and the membrane composition in the vicinity of the three-phase contact line using imaging ellipsometry and fluorescence microscopy. At relatively slow rates of substrate lifting, the power law exponent that we found between the interstripe distance and the transfer speed suggests that the stripe formation is due to spinodal decomposition, which can be accounted under the framework of the Cahn-Hilliard equation, whereas at relatively high rates, the distance is found to be proportional to the substrate speed, suggesting a dominant effect of the shear force on the stripe formation.

  5. Dissipative structure formation in lipid/lipopolymer monolayers.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Peter C; Reif, Michael; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Jordan, Rainer; Tanaka, Motomu

    2011-03-17

    We study the formation of dissipative microstructures in monomolecular films of surfactant mixtures, which occur near the three-phase contact line during Langmuir-Blodgett transfer onto a solid substrate. Continuous stripes parallel to the transfer direction are generated over several centimeters, indicating the phase separation of phospholipids and lipids with polymer head groups (lipopolymers). The systematic variation of transfer conditions revealed that transfer speed and subphase viscosity determine the stripe-to-stripe distance from several micrometers to submicrometers. To account for the physical mechanism of such pattern formation, we characterize the local film thickness and the membrane composition in the vicinity of the three-phase contact line using imaging ellipsometry and fluorescence microscopy. At relatively slow rates of substrate lifting, the power law exponent that we found between the interstripe distance and the transfer speed suggests that the stripe formation is due to spinodal decomposition, which can be accounted under the framework of the Cahn-Hilliard equation, whereas at relatively high rates, the distance is found to be proportional to the substrate speed, suggesting a dominant effect of the shear force on the stripe formation. PMID:21338143

  6. Biotechnology of oil palm: strategies towards manipulation of lipid content and composition.

    PubMed

    Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad; Rasid, Omar Abdul; Masani, Mat Yunus Abdul; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi

    2015-04-01

    Oil palm is a major economic crop for Malaysia. The major challenges faced by the industry are labor shortage, availability of arable land and unstable commodity price. This has caused the industry to diversify its applications into higher value products besides increasing its yield. While conventional breeding has its limitations, biotechnology was identified as one of the tools for overcoming the above challenges. Research on biotechnology of oil palm began more than two decades ago leveraging a multidisciplinary approach involving biochemical studies, gene and promoter isolation, transformation vector construction and finally genetic transformation to produce the targeted products. The main target of oil palm biotechnology research is to increase oleic acid in the mesocarp. Other targets are stearic acid, palmitoleic acid, ricinoleic acid, lycopene (carotenoid) and biodegradable plastics. Significant achievements were reported for the biochemical studies, isolation of useful oil palm genes and characterization of important promoters. A large number of transformation constructs for various targeted products were successfully produced using the isolated oil palm genes and promoters. Finally transformation of these constructs into oil palm embryogenic calli was carried out while the regeneration of transgenic oil palm harboring the useful genes is in progress.

  7. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris

    SciTech Connect

    Gizatullina, Albina K.; Finkina, Ekaterina I.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Melnikova, Daria N.; Bogdanov, Ivan V.; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V.

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Lipid transfer protein from lentil seeds (Lc-LTP2) was overexpressed in E. coli. •Antimicrobial activity and spatial structure of the recombinant Lc-LTP2 were examined. •Internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity occupies ∼7% of the total Lc-LTP2 volume. •Binding of DMPG lipid induces moderate rearrangements in the Lc-LTP2 structure. •Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex has limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours. -- Abstract: Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7 Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600 Å{sup 3}). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours.

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of the Oil-Rich Tea Plant, Camellia oleifera, Reveals Candidate Genes Related to Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui; Zhang, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hai-Bin; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapidly driven by the need for developing sustainable sources of nutritionally important fatty acids and the rising concerns about environmental impacts after using fossil oil, oil-plants have received increasing awareness nowadays. As an important oil-rich plant in China, Camellia oleifera has played a vital role in providing nutritional applications, biofuel productions and chemical feedstocks. However, the lack of C. oleifera genome sequences and little genetic information have largely hampered the urgent needs for efficient utilization of the abundant germplasms towards modern breeding efforts of this woody oil-plant. Results Here, using the 454 GS-FLX sequencing platform, we generated approximately 600,000 RNA-Seq reads from four tissues of C. oleifera. These reads were trimmed and assembled into 104,842 non-redundant putative transcripts with a total length of ∼38.9 Mb, representing more than 218-fold of all the C. oleifera sequences currently deposited in the GenBank (as of March 2014). Based on the BLAST similarity searches, nearly 42.6% transcripts could be annotated with known genes, conserved domains, or Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Comparisons with the cultivated tea tree, C. sinensis, identified 3,022 pairs of orthologs, of which 211 exhibited the evidence under positive selection. Pathway analysis detected the majority of genes potentially related to lipid metabolism. Evolutionary analysis of omega-6 fatty acid desaturase (FAD2) genes among 20 oil-plants unexpectedly suggests that a parallel evolution may occur between C. oleifera and Olea oleifera. Additionally, more than 2,300 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 20,200 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in the C. oleifera transcriptome. Conclusions The generated transcriptome represents a considerable increase in the number of sequences deposited in the public databases, providing an unprecedented opportunity to discover all related-genes associated with lipid metabolic

  9. Keratin-lipid structural organization in the corneous layer of snake.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Alberto; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Falini, Giuseppe; Fermani, Simona; Gazzano, Massimo

    2009-12-01

    The shed epidermis (molt) of snakes comprises four distinct layers. The upper two layers, here considered as beta-layer, contain essentially beta-keratin. The following layer, known as mesos-layer, is similar to the human stratum corneum, and is formed by thin cells surrounded by intercellular lipids. The latter layer mainly contains alpha-keratin. In this study, the molecular assemblies of proteins and lipids contained in these layers have been analyzed in the scale of two species of snakes, the elapid Tiger snake (TS, Notechis scutatus) and the viperid Gabon viper (GV, Bitis gabonica). Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction, FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, thermal analysis, and scanning electron microscopy experiments confirm the presence of the three layers in the GV skin scale. Conversely, in the TS molt a typical alpha-keratin layer appears to be absent. In the latter, experimental data suggest the presence of two domains similar to those found in the lipid intercellular matrix of stratum corneum. X-ray diffraction data also allow to determine the relative orientation of keratins and lipids. The keratin fibrils are randomly oriented inside the layers parallel to the surface of scales while the lipids are organized in lamellar structures having aliphatic chains normal to the scale surface. The high ordered lipid organization in the mature mesos layer probably increases its effectiveness in limiting water-loss. PMID:19280640

  10. Fungal lipid accumulation and development of mycelial structures by two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    van Aarle, Ingrid M; Olsson, Pål Axel

    2003-11-01

    We monitored the development of intraradical and extraradical mycelia of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Scutellospora calospora and Glomus intraradices when colonizing Plantago lanceolata. The occurrence of arbuscules (branched hyphal structures) and vesicles (lipid storage organs) was compared with the amounts of signature fatty acids. The fatty acid 16:1omega5 was used as a signature for both AM fungal phospholipids (membrane constituents) and neutral lipids (energy storage) in roots (intraradical mycelium) and in soil (extraradical mycelium). The formation of arbuscules and the accumulation of AM fungal phospholipids in intraradical mycelium followed each other closely in both fungal species. In contrast, the neutral lipids of G. intraradices increased continuously in the intraradical mycelium, while vesicle occurrence decreased after initial rapid root colonization by the fungus. S. calospora does not form vesicles and accumulated more neutral lipids in extraradical than in intraradical mycelium, while the opposite pattern was found for G. intraradices. G. intraradices allocated more of its lipids to storage than did S. calospora. Thus, within a species, the fatty acid 16:1omega5 is a good indicator for AM fungal development. The phospholipid fatty acid 16:1omega5 is especially suitable for indicating the frequency of arbuscules in the symbiosis. We propose that the ratio of neutral lipids to phospholipids is more important than is the presence of vesicles in determining the storage status of AM fungi.

  11. Dietary rapeseed oil affects the expression of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Jordal, Ann-Elise O; Torstensen, Bente E; Tsoi, Stephen; Tocher, Douglas R; Lall, Santosh P; Douglas, Susan E

    2005-10-01

    Supplies of marine fish oils (FO) are limited, and sustainable production in aquaculture dictates that alternatives that do not compromise fish health and product quality, such as vegetable oils, must be found. Nutrigenomics will increase our understanding of how nutrition influences metabolic pathways and homeostatic control, and may be used to measure and validate subtle changes in organ-specific, metabolic gene expression signatures. We compared 2 groups of Atlantic salmon fed diets containing 100% FO or 75% rapeseed oil (RO) for 42 wk. A small-scale cDNA microarray was constructed to screen for changes in the expression of lipid metabolism genes in the liver resulting from this partial substitution of RO for FO. Delta5 fatty acid desaturase gene expression was significantly greater in fish fed 75% RO than in fish fed the control diet; this was confirmed by quantitative real time PCR analysis. In addition, several genes, among these mitochondrial proteins, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, as well as other transcription factors, coactivators, and signal transducers, showed significant differential regulation. This partially validated microarray may be used for further gene expression profiling using other dietary comparisons, and for further characterization of selected genes.

  12. Impact of nitrogen flushing and oil choice on the progression of lipid oxidation in unwashed fried sliced potato crisps.

    PubMed

    Marasca, E; Greetham, D; Herring, S D; Fisk, I D

    2016-05-15

    Unwashed, sliced, batch-fried potato crisps have a unique texture and are growing in popularity in the UK/EU premium snack food market. In this study, the storage stability of unwashed sliced (high surface starch) potatoes (crisps) fried in regular sunflower oil (SO) or in high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO) was compared over accelerated shelf life testing (45°C, 6 weeks); with and without nitrogen gas flushing. Primary oxidation products (lipid hydroperoxides) were measured with a ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay and volatile secondary oxidation products (hexanal) were quantified by using solid phase micro-extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). Results revealed that crisps fried in SO were the least stable. Flushing the stored crisps with nitrogen gas proved to be effective in slowing down the oxidation rate after frying with sunflower oil, significantly stabilizing the crisps. However, crisps fried in HOSO were the most stable, with the lowest rate of development of oxidation markers, and this has previously not been shown for crisps with a high free starch content.

  13. Impact of nitrogen flushing and oil choice on the progression of lipid oxidation in unwashed fried sliced potato crisps.

    PubMed

    Marasca, E; Greetham, D; Herring, S D; Fisk, I D

    2016-05-15

    Unwashed, sliced, batch-fried potato crisps have a unique texture and are growing in popularity in the UK/EU premium snack food market. In this study, the storage stability of unwashed sliced (high surface starch) potatoes (crisps) fried in regular sunflower oil (SO) or in high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO) was compared over accelerated shelf life testing (45°C, 6 weeks); with and without nitrogen gas flushing. Primary oxidation products (lipid hydroperoxides) were measured with a ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay and volatile secondary oxidation products (hexanal) were quantified by using solid phase micro-extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). Results revealed that crisps fried in SO were the least stable. Flushing the stored crisps with nitrogen gas proved to be effective in slowing down the oxidation rate after frying with sunflower oil, significantly stabilizing the crisps. However, crisps fried in HOSO were the most stable, with the lowest rate of development of oxidation markers, and this has previously not been shown for crisps with a high free starch content. PMID:26775947

  14. Impact of nitrogen flushing and oil choice on the progression of lipid oxidation in unwashed fried sliced potato crisps

    PubMed Central

    Marasca, E.; Greetham, D.; Herring, S.D.; Fisk, I.D.

    2016-01-01

    Unwashed, sliced, batch-fried potato crisps have a unique texture and are growing in popularity in the UK/EU premium snack food market. In this study, the storage stability of unwashed sliced (high surface starch) potatoes (crisps) fried in regular sunflower oil (SO) or in high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO) was compared over accelerated shelf life testing (45 °C, 6 weeks); with and without nitrogen gas flushing. Primary oxidation products (lipid hydroperoxides) were measured with a ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay and volatile secondary oxidation products (hexanal) were quantified by using solid phase micro-extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). Results revealed that crisps fried in SO were the least stable. Flushing the stored crisps with nitrogen gas proved to be effective in slowing down the oxidation rate after frying with sunflower oil, significantly stabilizing the crisps. However, crisps fried in HOSO were the most stable, with the lowest rate of development of oxidation markers, and this has previously not been shown for crisps with a high free starch content. PMID:26775947

  15. Structure And Gene Silencing Activities of Monovalent And Pentavalent Cationic Lipid Vectors Complexed With Sirna

    SciTech Connect

    Bouxsein, N.F.; McAllister, C.S.; Ewert, K.K.; Samuel, C.E.; Safinya, C.R.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-07-03

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of 19-25 bp mediate the cleavage of complementary mRNA, leading to post-transcriptional gene silencing. We examined cationic lipid (CL)-mediated delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells and made comparisons to CL-based DNA delivery. The effect of lipid composition and headgroup charge on the biophysical and biological properties of CL-siRNA vectors was determined. X-ray diffraction revealed that CL-siRNA complexes exhibited lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases, qualitatively similar to CL-DNA complexes, but also formed other nonlamellar structures. Surprisingly, optimally formulated inverted hexagonal 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP)/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) CL-siRNA complexes exhibited high toxicity and much lower target-specific gene silencing than lamellar CL-siRNA complexes even though optimally formulated, inverted hexagonal CL-DNA complexes show high transfection efficiency in cell culture. We further found that efficient silencing required cationic lipid/nucleic acid molar charge ratios (chg) nearly an order of magnitude larger than those yielding efficiently transfecting CL-DNA complexes. This second unexpected finding has implications for cell toxicity. Multivalent lipids (MVLs) require a smaller number of cationic lipids at a given chg of the complex. Consistent with this observation, the pentavalent lipid MVL5 exhibited lower toxicity and superior silencing efficiency over a large range in both the lipid composition and chg when compared to monovalent DOTAP. Most importantly, MVL5 achieved much higher total knockdown of the target gene in CL-siRNA complex regimes where toxicity was low. This property of CL-siRNA complexes contrasts to CL-DNA complexes, where the optimized transfection efficiencies of multivalent and monovalent lipids are comparable.

  16. Structural characterization of the lipid A component of Helicobacter pylori rough- and smooth-form lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, A P; Lindner, B; Walsh, E J

    1997-01-01

    The chemical structure of free lipid A isolated from rough- and smooth-form lipopolysaccharides (R-LPS and S-LPS, respectively) of the human gastroduodenal pathogen Helicobacter pylori was elucidated by compositional and degradative analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The predominant molecular species in both lipid A components are identical and tetraacylated, but a second molecular species which is hexaacylated is also present in lipid A from S-LPS. Despite differences in substitution by acyl chains, the hydrophilic backbone of the molecules consisted of beta(1,6)-linked D-glucosamine (GlcN) disaccharide 1-phosphate. Because of microheterogeneity, nonstoichiometric amounts of ethanolamine-phosphate were also linked to the glycosidic hydroxyl group. In S-LPS, but not in R-LPS, the hydroxyl group at position 4' was partially substituted by another phosphate group. Considerable variation in the distribution of fatty acids on the lipid A backbone was revealed by laser desorption mass spectrometry. In tetraacyl lipid A, the amino group of the reducing GlcN carried (R)-3-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid (position 2), that of the nonreducing GlcN carried (R)-3-(octadecanoyloxy)octadecanoic acid (position 2'), and ester-bound (R)-3-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid was attached at position 3. Hexaacyl lipid A had a similar substitution by fatty acids, but in addition, ester-bound (R)-3-(dodecanoyloxy)hexadecanoic acid or (R)-3(tetradecanoyloxy)hexadecanoic acid was attached at position 3'. The predominant absence of ester-bound 4'-phosphate and the presence of tetraacyl lipid A with fatty acids of 16 to 18 carbons in length differentiate H. pylori lipid A from that of other bacterial species and help explain the low endotoxic and biological activities of H. pylori LPS. PMID:9335296

  17. Ether lipid generating enzyme AGPS alters the balance of structural and signaling lipids to fuel cancer pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Daniel I; Cozzo, Alyssa; Ji, Xiaodan; Roberts, Lindsay S; Louie, Sharon M; Mulvihill, Melinda M; Luo, Kunxin; Nomura, Daniel K

    2013-09-10

    Aberrant lipid metabolism is an established hallmark of cancer cells. In particular, ether lipid levels have been shown to be elevated in tumors, but their specific function in cancer remains elusive. We show here that the metabolic enzyme alkylglyceronephosphate synthase (AGPS), a critical step in the synthesis of ether lipids, is up-regulated across multiple types of aggressive human cancer cells and primary tumors. We demonstrate that ablation of AGPS in cancer cells results in reduced cell survival, cancer aggressiveness, and tumor growth through altering the balance of ether lipid, fatty acid, eicosanoid, and fatty acid-derived glycerophospholipid metabolism, resulting in an overall reduction in the levels of several oncogenic signaling lipids. Taken together, our results reveal that AGPS, in addition to maintaining ether lipids, also controls cellular utilization of fatty acids, favoring the generation of signaling lipids necessary for promoting the aggressive features of cancer. PMID:23980144

  18. Response and sensitivity of lipid related molecular structure to wet and dry heating in canola tissue.

    PubMed

    Abeysekara, Saman; Samadi; Yu, Peiqiang

    2012-05-01

    Heat treatments are used to manipulate nutrient utilization, availability and functional properties. The objective of this study was to characterize any molecular level changes of the functional groups associated with lipid structure in canola (Brassica) seed, as affected during the wet and dry heat treatment processes using molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included lipid CH(3) asymmetric (ca. 2970-2946 cm(-1)), CH(2) asymmetric (ca. 2945-2880 cm(-1)), CH(3) symmetric (ca. 2881-2864 cm(-1)) and CH(2) symmetric (ca. 2864-2770 cm(-1)) functional groups, lipid carbonyl CO ester group (ca. 1774-1711 cm(-1)), lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C-C) (ca. 3007 cm(-1)) as well as their ratios. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were conducted to identify molecular spectral differences. Raw canola seeds were used for the control or autoclaved at 120°C for 1h (HT-1: wet heating) or dry roasted at 120°C for 1h (HT-2: dry heating). Molecular spectral analysis of lipid functional group ratios were not significantly changed (P>0.05) in the CH(2) asymmetric to CH(3) asymmetric stretching band peak intensity ratios for canola seed. Both wet (HT-1) and dry heating method (HT-2) had no significant effect (P>0.05) on lipid carbonyl CO ester group and lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to CC). Multivariate molecular spectral analyses, CLA and PCA, were unable to make distinctions between the different treatment original spectra at the CH(3) and CH(2) asymmetric and symmetric region (ca. 2992-2770 cm(-1)), unsaturated lipids band region (ca. 3025-2993 cm(-1)) and lipid carbonyl CO ester band region (ca. 1774-1711 cm(-1)). The results indicated that both dry and wet heating of given intense had no impact to the molecular spectrum in lipid related functional groups of canola seed, and was not strong enough to elicit heat-induced changes in lipid conformation.

  19. Response and sensitivity of lipid related molecular structure to wet and dry heating in Canola tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekara, Saman; Samadi; Yu, Peiqiang

    2012-05-01

    Heat treatments are used to manipulate nutrient utilization, availability and functional properties. The objective of this study was to characterize any molecular level changes of the functional groups associated with lipid structure in canola (Brassica) seed, as affected during the wet and dry heat treatment processes using molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included lipid CH3 asymmetric (ca. 2970-2946 cm-1), CH2 asymmetric (ca. 2945-2880 cm-1), CH3 symmetric (ca. 2881-2864 cm-1) and CH2 symmetric (ca. 2864-2770 cm-1) functional groups, lipid carbonyl Cdbnd O ester group (ca. 1774-1711 cm-1), lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C-C) (ca. 3007 cm-1) as well as their ratios. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were conducted to identify molecular spectral differences. Raw canola seeds were used for the control or autoclaved at 120 °C for 1 h (HT-1: wet heating) or dry roasted at 120 °C for 1 h (HT-2: dry heating). Molecular spectral analysis of lipid functional group ratios were not significantly changed (P > 0.05) in the CH2 asymmetric to CH3 asymmetric stretching band peak intensity ratios for canola seed. Both wet (HT-1) and dry heating method (HT-2) had no significant effect (P > 0.05) on lipid carbonyl Cdbnd O ester group and lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to Cdbnd C). Multivariate molecular spectral analyses, CLA and PCA, were unable to make distinctions between the different treatment original spectra at the CH3 and CH2 asymmetric and symmetric region (ca. 2992-2770 cm-1), unsaturated lipids band region (ca. 3025-2993 cm-1) and lipid carbonyl Cdbnd O ester band region (ca. 1774-1711 cm-1). The results indicated that both dry and wet heating of given intense had no impact to the molecular spectrum in lipid related functional groups of canola seed, and was not strong enough to elicit heat-induced changes in lipid conformation.

  20. Effects of Dietary Coconut Oil as a Medium-chain Fatty Acid Source on Performance, Carcass Composition and Serum Lipids in Male Broilers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhong; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Juntao; Chen, Yiqiang; Yang, Wenjun; Zhang, Liying

    2015-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary coconut oil as a medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) source on performance, carcass composition and serum lipids in male broilers. A total of 540, one-day-old, male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly allotted to 1 of 5 treatments with each treatment being applied to 6 replicates of 18 chicks. The basal diet (i.e., R0) was based on corn and soybean meal and was supplemented with 1.5% soybean oil during the starter phase (d 0 to 21) and 3.0% soybean oil during the grower phase (d 22 to 42). Four experimental diets were formulated by replacing 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% of the soybean oil with coconut oil (i.e., R25, R50, R75, and R100). Soybean oil and coconut oil were used as sources of long-chain fatty acid and MCFA, respectively. The feeding trial showed that dietary coconut oil had no effect on weight gain, feed intake or feed conversion. On d 42, serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were linearly decreased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01). Lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and total lipase activities were linearly increased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01). Abdominal fat weight/eviscerated weight (p = 0.05), intermuscular fat width (p<0.01) and subcutaneous fat thickness (p<0.01) showed a significant quadratic relationship, with the lowest value at R75. These results indicated that replacement of 75% of the soybean oil in diets with coconut oil is the optimum level to reduce fat deposition and favorably affect lipid profiles without impairing performance in broilers.

  1. Effects of Dietary Coconut Oil as a Medium-chain Fatty Acid Source on Performance, Carcass Composition and Serum Lipids in Male Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianhong; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Juntao; Chen, Yiqiang; Yang, Wenjun; Zhang, Liying

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary coconut oil as a medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) source on performance, carcass composition and serum lipids in male broilers. A total of 540, one-day-old, male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly allotted to 1 of 5 treatments with each treatment being applied to 6 replicates of 18 chicks. The basal diet (i.e., R0) was based on corn and soybean meal and was supplemented with 1.5% soybean oil during the starter phase (d 0 to 21) and 3.0% soybean oil during the grower phase (d 22 to 42). Four experimental diets were formulated by replacing 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% of the soybean oil with coconut oil (i.e., R25, R50, R75, and R100). Soybean oil and coconut oil were used as sources of long-chain fatty acid and MCFA, respectively. The feeding trial showed that dietary coconut oil had no effect on weight gain, feed intake or feed conversion. On d 42, serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were linearly decreased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01). Lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and total lipase activities were linearly increased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01). Abdominal fat weight/eviscerated weight (p = 0.05), intermuscular fat width (p<0.01) and subcutaneous fat thickness (p<0.01) showed a significant quadratic relationship, with the lowest value at R75. These results indicated that replacement of 75% of the soybean oil in diets with coconut oil is the optimum level to reduce fat deposition and favorably affect lipid profiles without impairing performance in broilers. PMID:25557818

  2. Approaches of Russian oil companies to optimal capital structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishuk, T.; Ulyanova, O.; Savchitz, V.

    2015-11-01

    Oil companies play a vital role in Russian economy. Demand for hydrocarbon products will be increasing for the nearest decades simultaneously with the population growth and social needs. Change of raw-material orientation of Russian economy and the transition to the innovative way of the development do not exclude the development of oil industry in future. Moreover, society believes that this sector must bring the Russian economy on to the road of innovative development due to neo-industrialization. To achieve this, the government power as well as capital management of companies are required. To make their optimal capital structure, it is necessary to minimize the capital cost, decrease definite risks under existing limits, and maximize profitability. The capital structure analysis of Russian and foreign oil companies shows different approaches, reasons, as well as conditions and, consequently, equity capital and debt capital relationship and their cost, which demands the effective capital management strategy.

  3. Structural characteristics of oil-poor dilutable fish oil omega-3 microemulsions for ophthalmic applications.

    PubMed

    Lidich, Nina; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2016-02-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) promotes synthesis of anti-inflammatory prostaglandins and relief of dry eye symptoms. However, topical ophthalmic application of DHA is difficult because of its lipophilic property. Therefore, it is important to develop aqueous-based formulation with enhanced capabilities. Novel, unique water-dilutable microemulsions (MEs) were constructed to allow loading of naturally occurring rigid long-chain triglyceride of DHA (TG-DHA). The TG-DHA serves as solubilizate and as the oil phase, therefore preparation is poor in oil. The structural transformations of MEs upon water dilution were studied by SAXS, viscosity, electrical conductivity, self-diffusion NMR, DSC, cryo-TEM, and DLS techniques. At low water content a new type of water-in-oil (W/O) structure is formed. The glycerol/water phase hydrates the headgroups of surfactants, and the oil solvates their tails, forming "ill-defined bicontinuous domains". Upon further water dilution more structured bicontinuous domains of high viscosity are formed. After additional dilution, the mesophases invert to oil-in-water (O/W) droplets of ∼8nm. In the structures composed of up to 25wt% water, the TG-DHA spaces and de-entangles the surfactant tails. Once the bicontinuous structures are formed, the surfactants and TG-DHA content decrease and their interfacial layer shrinks, leading to entanglement and buildup of viscous non-Newtonian mesophase. Above 70wt% water TG-DHA is embedded in the core of the O/W droplets, and its effect on the droplets' structure is minimal. This new dilutable ill-defined microemulsion can be a potential delivery vehicle for ophthalmic TG-DHA transport. PMID:26520814

  4. Comparative evaluation of structured oil systems: Shellac oleogel, HPMC oleogel, and HIPE gel

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashok R; Dewettinck, Koen

    2015-01-01

    In lipid-based food products, fat crystals are used as building blocks for creating a crystalline network that can trap liquid oil into a 3D gel-like structure which in turn is responsible for the desirable mouth feel and texture properties of the food products. However, the recent ban on the use of trans-fat in the US, coupled with the increasing concerns about the negative health effects of saturated fat consumption, has resulted in an increased interest in the area of identifying alternative ways of structuring edible oils using non-fat-based building blocks. In this paper, we give a brief account of three alternative approaches where oil structuring was carried out using wax crystals (shellac), polymer strands (hydrophilic cellulose derivative), and emulsion droplets as structurants. These building blocks resulted in three different types of oleogels that showed distinct rheological properties and temperature functionalities. The three approaches are compared in terms of the preparation process (ease of processing), properties of the formed systems (microstructure, rheological gel strength, temperature response, effect of water incorporation, and thixotropic recovery), functionality, and associated limitations of the structured systems. The comparative evaluation is made such that the new researchers starting their work in the area of oil structuring can use this discussion as a general guideline. Practical applications Various aspects of oil binding for three different building blocks were studied in this work. The practical significance of this study includes (i) information on the preparation process and the concentrations of structuring agents required for efficient gelation and (ii) information on the behavior of oleogels to temperature, applied shear, and presence of water. This information can be very useful for selecting the type of structuring agents keeping the final applications in mind. For detailed information on the actual edible applications

  5. Structure and function studies of cationic lipid non-viral gene delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Nelle Lynn

    Gene and drug delivery systems incorporating lipids mimic the biological environment and thus offer many advantages. In order to design successful gene or drug delivery vehicles based on lipid molecules an understanding of the affects of biopolymers on lipid membranes is necessary. We have examined the structures and interactions involved in two systems based on model biomembrane/biopolymer mixtures that are relevant for gene and drug delivery research. Liposomes incorporating PEG-lipids have shown great promise as drug carriers since they have proven to increase blood circulation times by evading the immune system. Previously, it was found that the addition of single-end-anchored (SEA)-PEG-surfactants to fluid lamellar membrane systems induces a novel hydrogel. As an extension of this work, we examine the affects of adding double-end-anchored (DEA)-PEG-surfactants to fluid membrane systems. The DEA-PEG-surfactants can adopt either a looping or bridging configuration which could deeply alter the microstructure of lamellar phases. We show that the DEA-PEG-surfactants induce gelation of fluid Lalpha phases in a way similar to that previously reported for SEA-PEG-surfactants. We also show, via x-ray diffraction, two striking differences between the SEA-and DEA-PEG-surfactant systems which demonstrate the existence of a large concentration of bridging polymers in the DEA system. The use of cationic liposomes (formed by mixtures of cationic and neutral lipids) as carriers of DNA for delivery in cells is a promising alternative to viral carriers for gene therapy. Using x-ray diffraction and biological assays, we show key parameters for optimizing gene transfer with these systems that are mediated by properties of the lipid. We have found cationic liposomes complexed with supercoiled plasmid DNA in solution self-assemble into a lamellar or an inverted hexagonal structure depending on lipid composition. Transfection efficiencies, determined by X-Gal and Luciferase assays

  6. Structural elucidation of the interaction between neurodegenerative disease-related tau protein with model lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Emmalee M.

    A protein's sequence of amino acids determines how it folds. That folded structure is linked to protein function, and misfolding to dysfunction. Protein misfolding and aggregation into beta-sheet rich fibrillar aggregates is connected with over 20 neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized in part by misfolding, aggregation and deposition of the microtubule associated tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). However, two questions remain: What is tau's fibrillization mechanism, and what is tau's cytotoxicity mechanism? Tau is prone to heterogeneous interactions, including with lipid membranes. Lipids have been found in NFTs, anionic lipid vesicles induced aggregation of the microtubule binding domain of tau, and other protein aggregates induced ion permeability in cells. This evidence prompted our investigation of tau's interaction with model lipid membranes to elucidate the structural perturbations those interactions induced in tau protein and in the membrane. We show that although tau is highly charged and soluble, it is highly surface active and preferentially interacts with anionic membranes. To resolve molecular-scale structural details of tau and model membranes, we utilized X-ray and neutron scattering techniques. X-ray reflectivity indicated tau aggregated at air/water and anionic lipid membrane interfaces and penetrated into membranes. More significantly, membrane interfaces induced tau protein to partially adopt a more compact conformation with density similar to folded protein and ordered structure characteristic of beta-sheet formation. This suggests possible membrane-based mechanisms of tau aggregation. Membrane morphological changes were seen using fluorescence microscopy, and X-ray scattering techniques showed tau completely disrupts anionic membranes, suggesting an aggregate-based cytotoxicity mechanism. Further investigation of protein constructs and a "hyperphosphorylation" disease mimic helped

  7. Structure to Function Correlations of Cationic Lipid Carriers for Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Nelle L.; Lin, Alison J.; George, Cyril X.; Ahmad, Ayesha; Samuel, Charles E.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    1998-03-01

    The use of cationic lipids as carriers of genes (stretches of DNA) for delivery in cells is a promising alternative to viral-carriers for gene therapy. However, there exists a lack of knowledge regarding interactions and structures of cationic lipid:DNA (CL:DNA) complexes which is essential for the development of the optimal cationic lipid carrier. We are using x-ray diffraction and biological assays to elucidate the solution structures of CL:DNA complexes and how these structures affect transfection efficiencies. We determine transfection efficiencies by X-Gal assays which measure protein synthesized as a result of reporter gene expression. We have found that cationic liposomes complexed with supercoiled plasmid DNA in solution self-assemble into a lamellar( J. Raedler, I. Koltover, T. Salditt, C. R. Safinya, Science 275, 810 (1997).) or hexagonal phase depending on the composition of the cationic and neutral lipid. We present correlation data between solution structures and transfection efficiencies based on x-ray and X-Gal results. Supported by NSF-DMR-9624091, PRF-31352-AC7, and Los Alamos-STB/UC: 96-108.

  8. Structural Significance of Lipid Diversity as Studied by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kučerka, Norbert; Heberle, Frederick A.; Pan, Jianjun; Katsaras, John

    2015-01-01

    We review recent developments in the rapidly growing field of membrane biophysics, with a focus on the structural properties of single lipid bilayers determined by different scattering techniques, namely neutron and X-ray scattering. The need for accurate lipid structural properties is emphasized by the sometimes conflicting results found in the literature, even in the case of the most studied lipid bilayers. Increasingly, accurate and detailed structural models require more experimental data, such as those from contrast varied neutron scattering and X-ray scattering experiments that are jointly refined with molecular dynamics simulations. This experimental and computational approach produces robust bilayer structural parameters that enable insights, for example, into the interplay between collective membrane properties and its components (e.g., hydrocarbon chain length and unsaturation, and lipid headgroup composition). From model studies such as these, one is better able to appreciate how a real biological membrane can be tuned by balancing the contributions from the lipid’s different moieties (e.g., acyl chains, headgroups, backbones, etc.). PMID:26402708

  9. Structural Significance of Lipid Diversity as Studied by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kučerka, Norbert; Heberle, Frederick A.; Pan, Jianjun; Katsaras, John

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, we review recent developments in the rapidly growing field of membrane biophysics, with a focus on the structural properties of single lipid bilayers determined by different scattering techniques, namely neutron and X-ray scattering. The need for accurate lipid structural properties is emphasized by the sometimes conflicting results found in the literature, even in the case of the most studied lipid bilayers. Increasingly, accurate and detailed structural models require more experimental data, such as those from contrast varied neutron scattering and X-ray scattering experiments that are jointly refined with molecular dynamics simulations. This experimental and computational approach producesmore » robust bilayer structural parameters that enable insights, for example, into the interplay between collective membrane properties and its components (e.g., hydrocarbon chain length and unsaturation, and lipid headgroup composition). Finally, from model studies such as these, one is better able to appreciate how a real biological membrane can be tuned by balancing the contributions from the lipid’s different moieties (e.g., acyl chains, headgroups, backbones, etc.).« less

  10. Structural Analysis of Nanoscale Self-Assembled Discoidal Lipid Bilayers by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Kijac, Aleksandra Z.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2006-01-01

    Nanodiscs are an example of discoidal nanoscale self-assembled lipid/protein particles similar to nascent high-density lipoproteins, which reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. The major protein component of high-density lipoproteins is human apolipoprotein A-I, and the corresponding protein component of Nanodiscs is membrane scaffold protein 1 (MSP1), a 200-residue lipid-binding domain of human apolipoprotein A-I. Here we present magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR studies of uniformly 13C,15N-labeled MSP1 in polyethylene glycol precipitated Nanodiscs. Two-dimensional MAS 13C-13C correlation spectra show excellent microscopic order of MSP1 in precipitated Nanodiscs. Secondary isotropic chemical shifts throughout the protein are consistent with a predominantly helical structure. Moreover, the backbone conformations of prolines derived from their 13C chemical shifts are consistent with the molecular belt model but not the picket fence model of lipid-bound MSP1. Overall comparison of experimental spectra and 13C chemical shifts predicted from several structural models also favors the belt model. Our study thus supports the belt model of Nanodisc structure and demonstrates the utility of MAS NMR to study the structure of high molecular weight lipid-protein complexes. PMID:16905610

  11. Structural Significance of Lipid Diversity as Studied by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kučerka, Norbert; Heberle, Frederick A.; Pan, Jianjun; Katsaras, John

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, we review recent developments in the rapidly growing field of membrane biophysics, with a focus on the structural properties of single lipid bilayers determined by different scattering techniques, namely neutron and X-ray scattering. The need for accurate lipid structural properties is emphasized by the sometimes conflicting results found in the literature, even in the case of the most studied lipid bilayers. Increasingly, accurate and detailed structural models require more experimental data, such as those from contrast varied neutron scattering and X-ray scattering experiments that are jointly refined with molecular dynamics simulations. This experimental and computational approach produces robust bilayer structural parameters that enable insights, for example, into the interplay between collective membrane properties and its components (e.g., hydrocarbon chain length and unsaturation, and lipid headgroup composition). Finally, from model studies such as these, one is better able to appreciate how a real biological membrane can be tuned by balancing the contributions from the lipid’s different moieties (e.g., acyl chains, headgroups, backbones, etc.).

  12. Oil exports, structural change, and economic development in Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Emami-Khoi, A.

    1981-01-01

    Within the broad Chenery-Kuznets framework, using structural change as a major indicator of economic development, this study investigates the direction and magnitude and broad features of structural change in Iran, and the role of oil production and exports in that change. Although the study covers a larger horizon, the analysis is focused on the period 1955 through 1977. A similar but less-detailed investigation is conducted for Algeria, Indonesia, and Venezuela also, and a cross-country, comparative perspective is generated. The study shows that, in general, the structural changes in Iran have either been weak (for example, in production and employment), or they are contrary to what the model would predict (for instance in trade). The pattern of structural change observed in Iran, therefore, does not indicate any significant economic development even though per capita income increased five-fold over the period 1955 through 1977. In short, oil does not appear to have been an engine of economic development in Iran. The situation appears broadly similar for the other three countries. Based on these findings, the study offers some suggestions concerning the future economic strategies that should enhance very considerably the contribution that oil industry can make toward Iran's economic development, and should thus accelerate the pace of economic development. These suggestions may be useful to other oil-exporting countries as well.

  13. Crystal Structure of a Lipid G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Michael A; Roth, Christopher B; Jo, Euijung; Griffith, Mark T; Scott, Fiona L; Reinhart, Greg; Desale, Hans; Clemons, Bryan; Cahalan, Stuart M; Schuerer, Stephan C; Sanna, M Germana; Han, Gye Won; Kuhn, Peter; Rosen, Hugh; Stevens, Raymond C

    2012-03-01

    The lyso-phospholipid sphingosine 1-phosphate modulates lymphocyte trafficking, endothelial development and integrity, heart rate, and vascular tone and maturation by activating G protein-coupled sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. Here, we present the crystal structure of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 fused to T4-lysozyme (S1P1-T4L) in complex with an antagonist sphingolipid mimic. Extracellular access to the binding pocket is occluded by the amino terminus and extracellular loops of the receptor. Access is gained by ligands entering laterally between helices I and VII within the transmembrane region of the receptor. This structure, along with mutagenesis, agonist structure-activity relationship data, and modeling, provides a detailed view of the molecular recognition and requirement for hydrophobic volume that activates S1P1, resulting in the modulation of immune and stromal cell responses.

  14. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-01-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect. PMID:26926570

  15. High rates of resolution of cholestasis in parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease with fish oil-based lipid emulsion monotherapy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our research was conducted to determine factors leading to resolution of cholestasis in patients with parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease treated with fish-oil-based lipid emulsion (FOLE). We used a prospective observational study of 57 infants <6 months of age with parenteral nutrition-as...

  16. The structural role of cholesterol in cell membranes: from condensed bilayers to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin R; Regen, Steven L

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Defining the two-dimensional structure of cell membranes represents one of the most daunting challenges currently facing chemists, biochemists, and biophysicists. In particular, the time-averaged lateral organization of the lipids and proteins that make up these natural enclosures has yet to be established. As the classic Singer-Nicolson model of cell membranes has evolved over the past 40 years, special attention has focused on the structural role played by cholesterol, a key component that represents ca. 30% of the total lipids that are present. Despite extensive studies with model membranes, two fundamental issues have remained a mystery: (i) the mechanism by which cholesterol condenses low-melting lipids by uncoiling their acyl chains and (ii) the thermodynamics of the interaction between cholesterol and high- and low-melting lipids. The latter bears directly on one of the most popular notions in modern cell biology, that is, the lipid raft hypothesis, whereby cholesterol is thought to combine with high-melting lipids to form "lipid rafts" that float in a "sea" of low-melting lipids. In this Account, we first describe a chemical approach that we have developed in our laboratories that has allowed us to quantify the interactions between exchangeable mimics of cholesterol and low- and high-melting lipids in model membranes. In essence, this "nearest-neighbor recognition" (NNR) method involves the synthesis of dimeric forms of these lipids that contain a disulfide moiety as a linker. By means of thiolate-disulfide interchange reactions, equilibrium mixtures of dimers are then formed. These exchange reactions are initiated either by adding dithiothreitol to a liposomal dispersion to generate a small amount of thiol monomer or by including a small amount of thiol monomer in the liposomes at pH 5.0 and then raising the pH to 7.4. We then show how such NNR measurements have allowed us to distinguish between two very different mechanisms that have been

  17. The effect of Amaranth oil on monolayers of artificial lipids and hepatocyte plasma membranes with adrenalin-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Yelisyeyeva, O P; Semen, K O; Ostrovska, G V; Kaminskyy, D V; Sirota, T V; Zarkovic, N; Mazur, D; Lutsyk, O D; Rybalchenko, K; Bast, A

    2014-03-15

    In this paper the oil from seeds of Amaranthus cruentus L. (AmO) was shown to be an efficient modulator of the physical chemical properties of artificial lipid and rat hepatocyte plasma membranes. AmO improved the membrane stability, their stress resistance and the adsorption of neurotensin to plasma membranes with the distinct biphasic interactions being observed even after adrenalin stress exposure. The analysis of pro-/antioxidant balance in rat blood revealed a mild prooxidant activity after AmO intake, which was accompanied by accumulation of oxidative destruction products in plasma membranes. This prooxidant action of AmO was corroborated in vitro in an adrenalin autooxidation model. On the other hand, the observed improved resistance to adrenalin stress in AmO supplemented rats was associated with an antioxidant response in blood and plasma membrane studies. The AmO effects can be attributed to the modulation of the metabolic pathways involved into oxygen and free radical homeostasis.

  18. Growth of lipid vesicle structures: from surface fractals to mass fractals.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo; Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Estelrich, Joan; Callejas-Fernández, José

    2008-07-01

    We study fractal vesicle aggregates whose morphology is conditioned by the interaction between the lipid vesicle membranes and calcium and magnesium ions. These morphologies are probed by means of static light scattering using a cross-correlation scheme that avoids the multiple intracluster scattering. In contrast to the branched structures induced by calcium, we report a singular surface- to mass-fractal transition controlled by the magnesium concentration. From infrared spectroscopy data we conclude that the specific dehydration of the lipid membranes due to these cations plays an essential role in short-range intervesicle interactions. PMID:18763912

  19. Growth of lipid vesicle structures: From surface fractals to mass fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo; Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Estelrich, Joan; Callejas-Fernández, José

    2008-07-01

    We study fractal vesicle aggregates whose morphology is conditioned by the interaction between the lipid vesicle membranes and calcium and magnesium ions. These morphologies are probed by means of static light scattering using a cross-correlation scheme that avoids the multiple intracluster scattering. In contrast to the branched structures induced by calcium, we report a singular surface- to mass-fractal transition controlled by the magnesium concentration. From infrared spectroscopy data we conclude that the specific dehydration of the lipid membranes due to these cations plays an essential role in short-range intervesicle interactions.

  20. Reversal of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease with a fish oil-based lipid emulsion (Omegaven) in an adult dependent on home parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Burns, David L; Gill, Brian M

    2013-03-01

    Patients with intestinal failure and short bowel syndrome usually require chronic parenteral nutrition (PN). PN is associated with risks, including infections, vascular thrombosis, and liver disease. PN-associated liver disease (PNALD) can progress from steatosis to chronic hepatitis and ultimately to cirrhosis. The etiology of PNALD is not completely understood. Therapies for PNALD include carbohydrate or lipid calorie reduction, antibiotics, or the use of ursodeoxycholic acid. When these efforts fail, therapeutic options are limited and liver transplantation may be required. The transition from a soybean- to a fish oil-based lipid formulation, such as the ω-3 parenteral lipid formulation (Omegaven), has shown a dramatic reversal of PNALD within the pediatric population. This is the first report of a PN-dependent adult in the United States complicated by PNALD and hepatic failure who had improvement of liver disease with an ω-3 fish oil-based parenteral formulation.

  1. Extracellular cellobiose lipid from yeast and their analogues: structures and fungicidal activities.

    PubMed

    Kulakovskaya, Tatyana; Shashkov, Alexander; Kulakovskaya, Ekaterina; Golubev, Wladyslav; Zinin, Alexander; Tsvetkov, Yury; Grachev, Alexey; Nifantiev, Nikolay

    2009-01-01

    Basidiomycetous yeasts Cryptococcus humicola and Pseudozyma fusiformata secrete cellobiose lipids into the culture broth. In the case of Cr. humicola, 16-(tetra-O-acetyl-beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid was defined as major product and 16-(tetra-O-acetyl-beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydrohexadecanoic acid was defined as minor product, while Ps. fusiformata secreted mainly 16-[6-O-acetyl-2'-O-(3-hydroxyhexanoyl)-beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid. These compounds exhibit similar fungicidal activities against different yeasts including pathogenic Cryptococcus and Candida species. The cells of Filobasidiella neoformans causing systemic cryptococcosis completely died after 30-min incubation with 0.02 mg mL(-1) of cellobiose lipids. The same effect on ascomycetous yeast, including pathogenic Candida species, is achieved at 0.1-0.3 mg mL(-1) of cellobiose lipids depending on the test culture used. Cellobiose lipid of Ps. fusiformata inhibits the growth of phytopathogenic fungi Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Phomopsis helianthi more efficiently than cellobiose lipids from Cr. humicola. Fully O-deacylated analogue, namely 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid, and totally synthetic compound, 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-hexadecanoic acid, do not inhibit the growth of F. neoformans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid inhibits the growth of both test cultures but at higher concentrations than cellobiose lipids of Cr. humicola and Ps. fusiformata. The amide of 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid possessed no fungicide activity. Thus, the structures of both the carbohydrate part and fatty acid aglycon moiety are important for the fungicidal activity of cellobiose lipids. PMID:19202311

  2. Influence of fish oil on skeletal muscle mitochondrial energetics and lipid metabolites during high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Johnson, Matthew L.; Schimke, Jill M.; Jakaitis, Daniel R.; Lebrasseur, Nathan K.; Jensen, Michael D.; Sreekumaran Nair, K.; Zabielski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) enhance insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis in rodent models of insulin resistance. These beneficial effects have been linked with anti-inflammatory properties, but emerging data suggest that the mechanisms may also converge on mitochondria. We evaluated the influence of dietary n-3 PUFAs on mitochondrial physiology and muscle lipid metabolites in the context of high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. Mice were fed control diets (10% fat), HFD (60% fat), or HFD with fish oil (HFD+FO, 3.4% kcal from n-3 PUFAs) for 10 wk. Body mass and fat mass increased similarly in HFD and HFD+FO, but n-3 PUFAs attenuated the glucose intolerance that developed with HFD and increased expression of genes that regulate glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. Despite similar muscle triglyceride levels in HFD and HFD+FO, long-chain acyl-CoAs and ceramides were lower in the presence of fish oil. Mitochondrial abundance and oxidative capacity were similarly increased in HFD and HFD+FO compared with controls. Hydrogen peroxide production was similarly elevated in HFD and HFD+FO in isolated mitochondria but not in permeabilized muscle fibers, likely due to increased activity and expression of catalase. These results support a hypothesis that n-3 PUFAs protect glucose tolerance, in part by preventing the accumulation of bioactive lipid mediators that interfere with insulin action. Furthermore, the respiratory function of skeletal muscle mitochondria does not appear to be a major factor in sphingolipid accumulation, glucose intolerance, or the protective effects of n-3 PUFAs. PMID:23632634

  3. Heat-induced changes to lipid molecular structure in Vimy flaxseed: Spectral intensity and molecular clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peiqiang; Damiran, Daalkhaijav

    2011-06-01

    Autoclaving was used to manipulate nutrient utilization and availability. The objectives of this study were to characterize any changes of the functional groups mainly associated with lipid structure in flaxseed ( Linum usitatissimum, cv. Vimy), that occurred on a molecular level during the treatment process using infrared Fourier transform molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included lipid CH 3 asymmetric (ca. 2959 cm -1), CH 2 asymmetric (ca. 2928 cm -1), CH 3 symmetric (ca. 2871 cm -1) and CH 2 symmetric (ca. 2954 cm -1) functional groups, lipid carbonyl C dbnd O ester group (ca. 1745 cm -1), lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C dbnd C) (ca. 3010 cm -1) as well as their ratios. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were conducted to identify molecular spectral differences. Flaxseed samples were kept raw for the control or autoclaved in batches at 120 °C for 20, 40 or 60 min for treatments 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Molecular spectral analysis of lipid functional group ratios showed a significant decrease ( P < 0.05) in the CH 2 asymmetric to CH 3 asymmetric stretching band peak intensity ratios for the flaxseed. There were linear and quadratic effects ( P < 0.05) of the treatment time from 0, 20, 40 and 60 min on the ratios of the CH 2 asymmetric to CH 3 asymmetric stretching vibration intensity. Autoclaving had no significant effect ( P > 0.05) on lipid carbonyl C dbnd O ester group and lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C dbnd C) (with average spectral peak area intensities of 138.3 and 68.8 IR intensity units, respectively). Multivariate molecular spectral analyses, CLA and PCA, were unable to make distinctions between the different treatment original spectra at the CH 3 and CH 2 asymmetric and symmetric region (ca. 2988-2790 cm -1). The results indicated that autoclaving had an impact to the mid-infrared molecular spectrum of flaxseed to identify heat-induced changes in lipid conformation. A future study

  4. Molecular and crystal structure of a self-assembling pyridinium cationic lipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaban, Alexandru T.; Ilies, Marc A.; Eichhöfer, Andreas; Balaban, Teodor Silviu

    2010-12-01

    Molecular insights into cationic lipid assemblies are relatively hard to reveal due to intrinsic mobility of the structural elements, hydration of the polar head and counterion, etc. Using X-ray diffraction of 4,6-dimethyl-2-tetradecyl-1-(2-tetradecanoyloxyethyl)pyridinium hexafluorophosphate ( 1) single crystals we succeeded in visualizing the molecular assembly of this amphiphile, in particular its U-shape structure and the impact of various structural parameters, including the counterion. The two alkyl chains lie parallel in orthogonal planes, and that the pyridinium cationic rings appear closely to the hexafluorophosphate anions. The whole assembly has therefore nonpolar zones alternating with polar cationic-anionic channel-zones. The relevance of this molecular and crystal structure to the gene transfection ability of this cationic lipid is also discussed.

  5. [Influence of heated linseed oil on reproduction in the female rat and on the composition of hepatic lipids in young rats].

    PubMed

    Potteau, B

    1976-01-01

    During gestation and lactation, six month old female Wistar rats were fed diets containing 10 p. 100 by weight of various vegetable oils; thermopolymerized linseed oil at 275 degrees C for 12 hours under nitrogen atmosphere (group T), oxidized linseed oil at 200 degrees C for 100 hours under air atmosphere (group O). The two oils contain respectively 11,5 and 1,1 p. 100 of cyclic monomers (18 C). Control groups were fed either fresh linseed oil or fresh peanut oil under the same conditions. In group T, most of the newborn rats die at birth or during the first three days of life; none of them survive 13 days after birth. In group O, mortality of youngs is not so high but is still significantly higher than in control groups. Moreover, dead young rats of group T have heavier livers and higher lipid content in the organ. Cyclic monomers were detected in liver fatty acids. In surviving young rats of group O,the body growth during lactation is significantly slower than in control animals. Young rats of group O were sacrificed at the age of 14 days. Liver weight and lipid content of the organ are increased and cyclic monomers were detected. The effects are however less pronounced than in group T. One can assume that among abnormal compounds formed during heating of linseed oil, cyclic monomers are responsible for the toxic effects observed in the present experiment since they have been transmitted to the litters either during gestation or lactation.

  6. Ginger Essential Oil Ameliorates Hepatic Injury and Lipid Accumulation in High Fat Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Syuan; Lee, Wan-Ching; Lin, Yu-En; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Shih-Hang; Panyod, Suraphan; Chu, Yung-Lin; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-03-16

    The objective of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective efficacy and mechanism of action of ginger essential oil (GEO) against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Mice were maintained on either a control diet or high-fat diet (HFD) supplemented with GEO (12.5, 62.5, and 125 mg/kg) or citral (2.5 and 25 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. We demonstrated that GEO and its major component (citral) lowered HFD-induced obesity in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by anti-hyperlipidemic effects by reducing serum free fatty acid, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels. Moreover, liver histological results showed that administration of 62.5 and 125 mg/kg GEO and 25 mg/kg citral significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation. Further assessment by Western blotting and investigation of the lipid metabolism revealed that hepatic protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) were down-regulated by GEO and citral, indicating that GEO and citral suppressed HFD-stimulated lipid biosynthesis and oxidative stress. Furthermore, GEO and citral effectively enhanced the antioxidant capacities and reduced inflammatory response in mouse liver, which exerted protective effects against steatohepatitis. Collectively, GEO and citral exhibited potent hepatoprotective effects against NAFLD induced by HFD in obese mice. Thus, GEO might be an effective dietary supplement to ameliorate NAFLD-related metabolic diseases, and citral could play a vital role in its management.

  7. Ginger Essential Oil Ameliorates Hepatic Injury and Lipid Accumulation in High Fat Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Syuan; Lee, Wan-Ching; Lin, Yu-En; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Shih-Hang; Panyod, Suraphan; Chu, Yung-Lin; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-03-16

    The objective of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective efficacy and mechanism of action of ginger essential oil (GEO) against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Mice were maintained on either a control diet or high-fat diet (HFD) supplemented with GEO (12.5, 62.5, and 125 mg/kg) or citral (2.5 and 25 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. We demonstrated that GEO and its major component (citral) lowered HFD-induced obesity in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by anti-hyperlipidemic effects by reducing serum free fatty acid, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels. Moreover, liver histological results showed that administration of 62.5 and 125 mg/kg GEO and 25 mg/kg citral significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation. Further assessment by Western blotting and investigation of the lipid metabolism revealed that hepatic protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) were down-regulated by GEO and citral, indicating that GEO and citral suppressed HFD-stimulated lipid biosynthesis and oxidative stress. Furthermore, GEO and citral effectively enhanced the antioxidant capacities and reduced inflammatory response in mouse liver, which exerted protective effects against steatohepatitis. Collectively, GEO and citral exhibited potent hepatoprotective effects against NAFLD induced by HFD in obese mice. Thus, GEO might be an effective dietary supplement to ameliorate NAFLD-related metabolic diseases, and citral could play a vital role in its management. PMID:26900108

  8. Structure formation in binary mixtures of lipids and detergents: Self-assembly and vesicle division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly dynamics in binary surfactant mixtures and structure changes of lipid vesicles induced by detergent solution are studied using coarse-grained molecular simulations. Disk-shaped micelles, the bicelles, are stabilized by detergents surrounding the rim of a bilayer disk of lipids. The self-assembled bicelles are considerably smaller than bicelles formed from vesicle rupture, and their size is determined by the concentrations of lipids and detergents and the interactions between the two species. The detergent-adsorption induces spontaneous curvature of the vesicle bilayer and results in vesicle division into two vesicles or vesicle rupture into worm-like micelles. The division occurs mainly via the inverse pathway of the modified stalk model. For large spontaneous curvature of the monolayers of the detergents, a pore is often opened, thereby leading to vesicle division or worm-like micelle formation.

  9. Lipid Transfer Proteins As Components of the Plant Innate Immune System: Structure, Functions, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Finkina, E. I.; Melnikova, D. N.; Bogdanov, I. V.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of molecular factors of the plant innate immune system, small proteins that transfer lipids and exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities are of particular interest. These are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are interesting to researchers for three main features. The first feature is the ability of plant LTPs to bind and transfer lipids, whereby these proteins got their name and were combined into one class. The second feature is that LTPs are defense proteins that are components of plant innate immunity. The third feature is that LTPs constitute one of the most clinically important classes of plant allergens. In this review, we summarize the available data on the plant LTP structure, biological properties, diversity of functions, mechanisms of action, and practical applications, emphasizing their role in plant physiology and their significance in human life. PMID:27437139

  10. Structural basis for self-assembly of a cytolytic pore lined by protein and lipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Koji; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Morante, Koldo; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-02-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFT) are water-soluble proteins that possess the remarkable ability to self-assemble on the membrane of target cells, where they form pores causing cell damage. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of action of the haemolytic protein fragaceatoxin C (FraC), a α-barrel PFT, by determining the crystal structures of FraC at four different stages of the lytic mechanism, namely the water-soluble state, the monomeric lipid-bound form, an assembly intermediate and the fully assembled transmembrane pore. The structure of the transmembrane pore exhibits a unique architecture composed of both protein and lipids, with some of the lipids lining the pore wall, acting as assembly cofactors. The pore also exhibits lateral fenestrations that expose the hydrophobic core of the membrane to the aqueous environment. The incorporation of lipids from the target membrane within the structure of the pore provides a membrane-specific trigger for the activation of a haemolytic toxin.

  11. Effect of Erythrodiol, A Natural Pentacyclic Triterpene from Olive Oil, on the Lipid Membrane Properties.

    PubMed

    Habib, Lamice; Jraij, Alia; Khreich, Nathalie; Charcosset, Catherine; Greige-Gerges, Hélène

    2015-12-01

    The effect of erythrodiol, a natural pentacyclic triterpene to which humans are exposed through nutrients, on the lipid membranes is studied using liposomes as a membrane model. Empty and erythrodiol-loaded liposomes were prepared by the reverse phase evaporation method followed by the extrusion and by the thin film hydration method. Liposomes were characterized in terms of size and zeta potential and were imaged by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effect of erythrodiol on thermotropic behavior of DPPC bilayers is also examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC thermograms suggested that erythrodiol interacted with the polar head groups of phospholipids and may produce a disruption of the ordering of the alkyl chains. The diffraction light scattering analysis showed that erythrodiol-loaded liposomes presented a decrease in the vesicle size when compared to blank liposomes. Images obtained by TEM confirmed the formation of unilamellar and spherical liposomes. AFM images showed spherical vesicles and single lipid bilayers. The latter were more abundant in the preparations containing erythrodiol than in the blank ones. Moreover, erythrodiol-loaded liposomes tended to rupture into single lipid bilayers during scanning. The study may provide a better understanding of pentacyclic triterpenes-membrane interaction. PMID:26141679

  12. Solution Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Reveals Structural Details of Lipid Domains in Ternary Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, J.; Kiss, A; Pramudya, Y; Nguyen, L; Hirst, L

    2009-01-01

    The influence of cholesterol on lipid bilayer structure is significant and the effect of cholesterol on lipid sorting and phase separation in lipid-raft-forming model membrane systems has been well investigated by microscopy methods on giant vesicles. An important consideration however is the influence of fluorescence illumination on the phase state of these lipids and this effect must be carefully minimized. In this paper, we show that synchrotron x-ray scattering on solution lipid mixtures is an effective alternative technique for the identification and characterization of the l o (liquid ordered) and l d (liquid disordered) phases. The high intensity of synchrotron x rays allows the observation of up to 5 orders of diffraction from the l o phase, whereas only two are clearly visible when the l d phase alone is present. This data can be collected in approximately 1 min/sample, allowing rapid generation of phase data. In this paper, we measure the lamellar spacing in both the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases simultaneously, as a function of cholesterol concentration in two different ternary mixtures. We also observe evidence of a third gel-phaselike population at 10-12 mol % cholesterol and determine the thickness of the bilayer for this phase. Importantly we are able to look at phase coexistence in the membrane independent of photoeffects.

  13. Lipid membrane structure and dynamics in the presence of tamoxifen and antimicrobial peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebenstreit, Samuel; Khadka, Nawal; Pan, Jianjun

    2015-03-01

    Lipids are organic molecules composed of hydrophobic fatty acid tails and hydrophilic head groups that can form a multitude of structures, including lipid vesicles which provides an excellent model representing cell membranes. In this study, we examine the effects of antimicrobial peptides and drugs on lipid vesicles. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements are performed with and without the antimicrobial peptide. A change in absorbance corresponding to the wavenumber regimes associated with the stretching of the carbonyl and phosphate groups is observed. Also, a dye leakage assay is performed with vesicles composed of neutral and charged lipids. Calcein dye is enclosed within these vesicles in solution. Different concentrations of the active and inactive antimicrobial peptides, and tamoxifen are incubated with the vesicles. Concentration dependent dye leakage is determined by measuring fluorescence intensity before and after the addition of the peptides and tamoxifen. Different leakage behavior is observed for the active and inactive peptides, and the lipid composition of the vesicle is found to have a large effect. Supported by an NSF grant.

  14. Lipid membrane: inelastic deformation of surface structure by an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Sun, Run-Guang

    2002-08-01

    The stability of the 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-[phospho-rac-1-Glycerol-Na] liposome in the liquid crystalline state have been investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). We have observed the inelastic deformation of the sample surface. The AFM tip causes persistent deformation of the surface of the lipid membrane, in which some of the lipid molecules are eventually pushed or dragged by the AFM tip. The experiment shows how the surface structure of the lipid membrane can be created by the interaction between the AFM tip and lipid membrane. When the operating force exceeds 10-8 N, it leads to large deformations of the surface. A square region of about 1×1µm2 is created by the scanning probe on the surface. When the operating force is between 10-11N and 10-8N, it can image the topography of the surface of the lipid membrane. The stability of the sample is related to the concentration of the medium in which the sample is prepared.

  15. Solution synchrotron x-ray diffraction reveals structural details of lipid domains in ternary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing; Kiss, Alexander; Pramudya, Yohanes H.; Nguyen, Lam T.; Hirst, Linda S.

    2009-03-01

    The influence of cholesterol on lipid bilayer structure is significant and the effect of cholesterol on lipid sorting and phase separation in lipid-raft-forming model membrane systems has been well investigated by microscopy methods on giant vesicles. An important consideration however is the influence of fluorescence illumination on the phase state of these lipids and this effect must be carefully minimized. In this paper, we show that synchrotron x-ray scattering on solution lipid mixtures is an effective alternative technique for the identification and characterization of the lo (liquid ordered) and ld (liquid disordered) phases. The high intensity of synchrotron x rays allows the observation of up to 5 orders of diffraction from the lo phase, whereas only two are clearly visible when the ld phase alone is present. This data can be collected in ˜1min/sample , allowing rapid generation of phase data. In this paper, we measure the lamellar spacing in both the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases simultaneously, as a function of cholesterol concentration in two different ternary mixtures. We also observe evidence of a third gel-phaselike population at 10-12mol% cholesterol and determine the thickness of the bilayer for this phase. Importantly we are able to look at phase coexistence in the membrane independent of photoeffects.

  16. Hypoxia reduces the efficiency of elisidepsin by inhibiting hydroxylation and altering the structure of lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Király, Anna; Váradi, Tímea; Hajdu, Tímea; Rühl, Ralph; Galmarini, Carlos M; Szöllősi, János; Nagy, Peter

    2013-12-02

    The mechanism of action of elisidepsin (PM02734, Irvalec®) is assumed to involve membrane permeabilization via attacking lipid rafts and hydroxylated lipids. Here we investigate the role of hypoxia in the mechanism of action of elisidepsin. Culturing under hypoxic conditions increased the half-maximal inhibitory concentration and decreased the drug's binding to almost all cell lines which was reversed by incubation of cells with 2-hydroxy palmitic acid. The expression of fatty acid 2-hydroxylase was strongly correlated with the efficiency of the drug and inversely correlated with the effect of hypoxia. Number and brightness analysis and fluorescence anisotropy experiments showed that hypoxia decreased the clustering of lipid rafts and altered the structure of the plasma membrane. Although the binding of elisidepsin to the membrane is non-cooperative, its membrane permeabilizing effect is characterized by a Hill coefficient of ~3.3. The latter finding is in agreement with elisidepsin-induced clusters of lipid raft-anchored GFP visualized by confocal microscopy. We propose that the concentration of elisidepsin needs to reach a critical level in the membrane above which elisidepsin induces the disruption of the cell membrane. Testing for tumor hypoxia or the density of hydroxylated lipids could be an interesting strategy to increase the efficiency of elisidepsin.

  17. Influence of surfactant composition on physical and oxidative stability of Quillaja saponin-stabilized lipid particles with encapsulated ω-3 fish oil.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Hanna; Aulbach, Susanne; Leuenberger, Bruno H; Tedeschi, Concetta; Weiss, Jochen

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a saponin-rich extract of Quillaja saponaria to replace bile salts in the surfactant formulations for stabilization of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC). The influence of Quillaja extract and/or high-melting lecithin at different concentrations on physical and oxidative stability was evaluated in (i) NLC containing tristearin and ω-3 fish oil, (ii) ω-3 fish oil-in-water emulsion, and (iii) solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) containing tristearin. Best physical, polymorphic and oxidative stability of NLC were achieved with a surfactant combination of 2.4% (w/w) Quillaja extract and 0.6% (w/w) high-melting lecithin. The results showed that encapsulation of ω-3 fish oil into NLC inhibited the formation of lipid hydroperoxides, propanal and hexanal by 72, 53 and 57%, respectively, compared to the fish oil-in-water emulsion prepared with the same surfactants. This indicated that the low oxidation observed in NLC cannot be due to potential antioxidative effects of the surfactant combination itself. Evidence is accumulating that tristearin is able to form a protective shell around the ω-3 fish oil, when crystallization is induced via high-melting phospholipids in the solidified interfacial layer. PMID:25016544

  18. Theory of periodic structures in lipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Falkovitz, Meira S.; Seul, Michael; Frisch, Harry L.; McConnell, Harden M.

    1982-01-01

    An approximate, new model for the structure of the periodic, undulated Pβ′, phase of phosphatidylcholine bilayers is proposed. The properties of this phase are deduced by minimizing a Landau-de Gennes expression for the bilayer free energy when this free energy contains a term favoring a spontaneous curvature of the membrane. The theoretical calculation leads to a model for the Pβ′ phase of phosphatidylcholine bilayers having a number of novel physical properties, including periodic variations in membrane “fluidity.” PMID:16593202

  19. Food web structure in oil sands reclaimed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, K E; Ciborowski, J J H; Daly, C; Dixon, D G; Farwell, A J; Foote, A L; Frederick, K R; Costa, J M Gardner; Kennedy, K; Liber, K; Roy, M C; Slama, C A; Smits, J E G

    2013-07-01

    Boreal wetlands play an important role in global carbon balance. However, their ecosystem function is threatened by direct anthropogenic disturbance and climate change. Oil sands surface mining in the boreal regions of Western Canada denudes tracts of land of organic materials, leaves large areas in need of reclamation, and generates considerable quantities of extraction process-affected materials. Knowledge and validation of reclamation techniques that lead to self-sustaining wetlands has lagged behind development of protocols for reclaiming terrestrial systems. It is important to know whether wetlands reclaimed with oil sands process materials can be restored to levels equivalent to their original ecosystem function. We approached this question by assessing carbon flows and food web structure in naturally formed and oil sands-affected wetlands constructed in 1970-2004 in the postmining landscape. We evaluated whether a prescribed reclamation strategy, involving organic matter amendment, accelerated reclaimed wetland development, leading to wetlands that were more similar to their natural marsh counterparts than wetlands that were not supplemented with organic matter. We measured compartment standing stocks for bacterioplankton, microbial biofilm, macrophytes, detritus, and zoobenthos; concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and residual naphthenic acids; and microbial production, gas fluxes, and aquatic-terrestrial exports (i.e., aquatic insect emergence). The total biomass of several biotic compartments differed significantly between oil sands and reference wetlands. Submerged macrophyte biomass, macroinvertebrate trophic diversity, and predator biomass and richness were lower in oil sands-affected wetlands than in reference wetlands. There was insufficient evidence to conclude that wetland age and wetland amendment with peat-mineral mix mitigate effects of oil sands waste materials on the fully aquatic biota. Although high variability was observed within

  20. Food web structure in oil sands reclaimed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, K E; Ciborowski, J J H; Daly, C; Dixon, D G; Farwell, A J; Foote, A L; Frederick, K R; Costa, J M Gardner; Kennedy, K; Liber, K; Roy, M C; Slama, C A; Smits, J E G

    2013-07-01

    Boreal wetlands play an important role in global carbon balance. However, their ecosystem function is threatened by direct anthropogenic disturbance and climate change. Oil sands surface mining in the boreal regions of Western Canada denudes tracts of land of organic materials, leaves large areas in need of reclamation, and generates considerable quantities of extraction process-affected materials. Knowledge and validation of reclamation techniques that lead to self-sustaining wetlands has lagged behind development of protocols for reclaiming terrestrial systems. It is important to know whether wetlands reclaimed with oil sands process materials can be restored to levels equivalent to their original ecosystem function. We approached this question by assessing carbon flows and food web structure in naturally formed and oil sands-affected wetlands constructed in 1970-2004 in the postmining landscape. We evaluated whether a prescribed reclamation strategy, involving organic matter amendment, accelerated reclaimed wetland development, leading to wetlands that were more similar to their natural marsh counterparts than wetlands that were not supplemented with organic matter. We measured compartment standing stocks for bacterioplankton, microbial biofilm, macrophytes, detritus, and zoobenthos; concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and residual naphthenic acids; and microbial production, gas fluxes, and aquatic-terrestrial exports (i.e., aquatic insect emergence). The total biomass of several biotic compartments differed significantly between oil sands and reference wetlands. Submerged macrophyte biomass, macroinvertebrate trophic diversity, and predator biomass and richness were lower in oil sands-affected wetlands than in reference wetlands. There was insufficient evidence to conclude that wetland age and wetland amendment with peat-mineral mix mitigate effects of oil sands waste materials on the fully aquatic biota. Although high variability was observed within

  1. Comparison of plasma lipids and vitamin E in young and middle-aged subjects on potato crisps fried in palmolein and highly oleic sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, N; Truswell, A S; McNeil, Y

    1997-01-01

    We previously found no difference in healthy young adults' plasma cholesterols between palmolein and olive oil as the major dietary lipid, although the former is high in palmitic acid (16:0) but the latter in oleic acid (18:1 cis). In the experiment reported here we compared the effects of palmolein against another monounsaturated oil, highly oleic sunflower oil (HOSO), on plasma cholesterol in both young and middle-aged healthy adults. The test oils were provided as frying oil of potato crisps (150 g/day in men; 100 g/day in women) against low-fat background diets in free-living motivated volunteers. The design was a randomised double-blind 4-week/3-week crossover trial. Compliance was monitored with continuous dietary diaries and by measuring (fasting) plasma lipid fatty-acid pattern. Plasma lipids and vitamin-E compounds were measured at the start and twice at the end of each test period. In combined young plus older subjects (n = 42) mean plasma total and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) values were both 7% (significantly) lower on HOSO than on palmolein, but because high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) was also 5% lower, the LDL-c/HDL-c ratio was only 3% lower on HOSO than on palmolein. The difference between the present results with HOSO and previous results with olive oil both compared against palmolein suggest that olive oil is associated with higher plasma cholesterols than other monounsaturated oils. In both the young and older subgroup, LDL-c was lower on HOSO but because HDL-c moved down too in the young subgroup, the LDL-c/HDL-c ratio was lower on HOSO only in the older subjects. Palmolein has an unusual pattern of E vitamins, with a high content of tocotrienols, notably the gamma-isomer. Unlike alpha-tocopherol however, there was no sign of these tocotrienols in subjects' plasmas. PMID:9286464

  2. Membrane attachment and structure models of lipid storage droplet protein 1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Penghui; Chen, Xiao; Moktan, Hem; Arrese, Estela L; Duan, Lian; Wang, Liying; Soulages, Jose L; Zhou, Donghua H

    2014-03-01

    Neutral lipid triglycerides, a main reserve for fat and energy, are stored in organelles called lipid droplets. The storage and release of triglycerides are actively regulated by several proteins specific to the droplet surface, one of which in insects is PLIN1. PLIN1 plays a key role in the activation of triglyceride hydrolysis upon phosphorylation. However, the structure of PLIN1 and its relation to functions remain elusive due to its insolubility and crystallization difficulty. Here we report the first solid-state NMR study on the Drosophila melanogaster PLIN1 in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to show the structural basis for its lipid droplet attachment. NMR spin diffusion experiments were consistent with the predicted membrane attachment motif of PLIN1. The data indicated that PLIN1 has close contact with the terminal methyl groups of the phospholipid acyl chains. Structure models for the membrane attachment motif were generated based on hydrophobicity analysis and NMR membrane insertion depth information. Simulated NMR spectra from a trans-model agreed with experimental spectra. In this model, lipids from the bottom leaflet were very close to the surface in the region enclosed by membrane attachment motif. This may imply that in real lipid droplet, triglyceride molecules might be brought close to the surface by the same mechanism, ready to leave the droplet in the event of lipolysis. Juxtaposition of triglyceride lipase structure to the trans-model suggested a possible interaction of a conserved segment with the lipase by electrostatic interactions, opening the lipase lid to expose the catalytic center. PMID:24333382

  3. Membrane attachment and structure models of lipid storage droplet protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Penghui; Chen, Xiao; Moktan, Hem; Arrese, Estela L.; Duan, Lian; Wang, Liying; Soulages, Jose L.; Zhou, Donghua H.

    2014-01-01

    Neutral lipid triglycerides, a main reserve for fat and energy, are stored in organelles called lipid droplets. The storage and release of triglycerides are actively regulated by several proteins specific to the droplet surface, one of which in insects is PLIN1. PLIN1 plays a key role in the activation of triglyceride hydrolysis upon phosphorylation. However, the structure of PLIN1 and its relation to functions remain elusive due to its insolubility and crystallization difficulty. Here we report the first solid-state NMR study on the Drosophila melanogaster PLIN1 in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to show the structural basis for its lipid droplet attachment. NMR spin diffusion experiments were consistent with the predicted membrane attachment motif of PLIN1. The data indicated that PLIN1 has close contact with the terminal methyl groups of the phospholipid acyl chains. Structure models for the membrane attachment motif were generated based on hydrophobicity analysis and NMR membrane insertion depth information. Simulated NMR spectra from a trans-model agreed with experimental spectra. In this model, lipids from the bottom leaflet were very close to the surface in the region enclosed by membrane attachment motif. This may imply that in real lipid droplet, triglyceride molecules might be brought close to the surface by the same mechanism, ready to leave the droplet in the event of lipolysis. Juxtaposition of triglyceride lipase structure to the trans-model suggested a possible interaction of a conserved segment with the lipase by electrostatic interactions, opening the lipase lid to expose the catalytic center. PMID:24333382

  4. Lipid oxidation in algae oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by bovine and caprine caseins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caseins (alpha S1-, alpha S2-, and beta-casein) are phosphoproteins that are capable of binding transition metals and scavenging free radicals, these properties make them good candidates to be used as natural antioxidants in oil-in-water emulsions. Caprine casein exhibits variability in aS1-casein c...

  5. Spruce galactoglucomannans inhibit the lipid oxidation in rapeseed oil-in-water emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oil-in-water emulsions are functional and industrially valuable systems, whose large interfacial area makes them prone to deterioration, due in part to as the oxidation and oligomerization of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Spruce galactoglucomannans (GGM), wood biomacromolecules abundantly available f...

  6. Lipid profile of in vitro oil produced through cell culture of Jatropha curcas.

    PubMed

    Correa, Sandra M; Atehortúa, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Recent increases in energy demands as a consequence of population growth and industrialization, and pollution caused during the extraction and combustion of fossil fuel sources have driven the development of new energy sources that do not cause pollution and are inexpensive and renewable. Consequently, it is necessary to develop alternative ways of generating biofuels that put less pressure on agricultural lands and water supplies, and ensure ecosystems conservation. In order to achieve the proposed goals related to energetic coverage and independence, several approaches have been developed, including biodiesel production using vegetal oils as feedstock. The aim of the current research project was to apply a nonconventional bioprocess for in vitro biomass and oil production of Jatropha curcas, for assessing different J. curcas varieties, where seed tissue was isolated and used for callus induction. Once friable callus was obtained, cell suspension cultures were established. The cell viability, fatty acid content, and characteristics were used to select the most promising cell line according to its fatty acid profile and ability to grow and develop under in vitro conditions. Oil produced by cell suspension culture of the Jatropha varieties studied was extracted and characterized by GC/MS. Differences encountered among Jatropha varieties were related to their fatty acid profiles, oil content (% on dry basis), and cell viability measurements (%). PMID:22970586

  7. How the multiple antioxidant properties of ascorbic acid affect lipid oxidation in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Uluata, Sibel; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2015-02-18

    Lipid oxidation is a serious problem for oil-containing food products because it negatively affects shelf life and nutritional composition. An antioxidant strategy commonly employed to prevent or delay oxidation in foods is to remove oxygen from the closed food-packaging system. An alternative technique is use of an edible oxygen scavenger to remove oxygen within the food. Ascorbic acid (AA) is a particularly promising antioxidant because of its natural label and multiple antioxidative functions. In this study, AA was tested as an oxygen scavenger in buffer and an oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion. The effects of transition metals on the ability of AA to scavenge oxygen were determined. Headspace oxygen decrease less than 1% in the medium-chain triacylglycerol (MCT) O/W emulsion system (pH 3 and 7). AA was able to almost completely remove dissolved oxygen (DO) in a buffered solution. Transition metals (Fe(2+) and Cu(+)) significantly accelerated the degradation of AA; however, iron and copper only increased DO depletion rates, by 10.6-16.4% from day 1 to 7, compared to the control. AA (2.5-20 mM) decreased DO in a 1% O/W emulsion system 32.0-64.0% and delayed the formation of headspace hexanal in the emulsion from 7 to over 20 days. This research shows that, when AA is used in an O/W emulsion system, oxidation of the emulsion system can be delay by multiple mechanisms. PMID:25650525

  8. An engineered lipid remodeling system using a galactolipid synthase promoter during phosphate starvation enhances oil accumulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Mie; Madoka, Yuka; Fujiwara, Ryota; Murakawa, Masato; Yoshitake, Yushi; Ikeda, Keiko; Koizumi, Ryota; Endo, Keiji; Ozaki, Katsuya; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) depletion is a serious problem for plant growth. Membrane lipid remodeling is a defense mechanism that plants use to survive Pi-depleted conditions. During Pi starvation, phospholipids are degraded to supply Pi for other essential biological processes, whereas galactolipid synthesis in plastids is up-regulated via the transcriptional activation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol synthase 3 (MGD3). Thus, the produced galactolipids are transferred to extraplastidial membranes to substitute for phospholipids. We found that, Pi starvation induced oil accumulation in the vegetative tissues of various seed plants without activating the transcription of enzymes involved in the later steps of triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis. Moreover, the Arabidopsis starchless phosphoglucomutase mutant, pgm-1, accumulated higher TAG levels than did wild-type plants under Pi-depleted conditions. We generated transgenic plants that expressed a key gene involved in TAG synthesis using the Pi deficiency-responsive MGD3 promoter in wild-type and pgm-1 backgrounds. During Pi starvation, the transgenic plants accumulated higher TAG amounts compared with the non-transgenic plants, suggesting that the Pi deficiency-responsive promoter of galactolipid synthase in plastids may be useful for producing transgenic plants that accumulate more oil under Pi-depleted conditions.

  9. Dietary strawberry seed oil affects metabolite formation in the distal intestine and ameliorates lipid metabolism in rats fed an obesogenic diet

    PubMed Central

    Jurgoński, Adam; Fotschki, Bartosz; Juśkiewicz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To answer the question whether dietary strawberry seed oil rich in α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid (29.3 and 47.2% of total fatty acids, respectively) can beneficially affect disorders induced by the consumption of an obesogenic diet. Design Thirty-two male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups of eight animals each and fed with a basal or obesogenic (high in fat and low in fiber) diet that contained either strawberry seed oil or an edible rapeseed oil. A two-way analysis of variance was then applied to assess the effects of diet and oil and the interaction between them. Results After 8 weeks of feeding, the obesogenic diet increased the body weight and the liver mass and fat content, whereas decreased the cecal acetate and butyrate concentration. This diet also altered the plasma lipid profile and decreased the liver sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) content. However, the lowest liver SREBP-1c content was observed in rats fed an obesogenic diet containing strawberry seed oil. Moreover, dietary strawberry seed oil decreased the cecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) regardless of the diet type, whereas the cecal β-glucuronidase activity was considerably increased only in rats fed an obesogenic diet containing strawberry seed oil. Dietary strawberry seed oil also lowered the liver fat content, the plasma triglyceride level and the atherogenic index of plasma. Conclusions Strawberry seed oil has a potent lipid-lowering activity but can unfavorably affect microbial metabolism in the distal intestine. The observed effects are partly due to the synergistic action of the oil and the obesogenic diet. PMID:25636326

  10. Structural characterization of the lipid A from the LPS of the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Halomonas pantelleriensis.

    PubMed

    Carillo, Sara; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Casillo, Angela; Lindner, Buko; Romano, Ida; Nicolaus, Barbara; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Giuliano, Mariateresa; Cammarota, Marcella; Lanzetta, Rosa; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2016-09-01

    Halomonas pantelleriensis DSM9661(Τ) is a Gram-negative haloalkaliphilic bacterium isolated from the sand of the volcanic Venus mirror lake, closed to seashore in the Pantelleria Island in the south of Italy. It is able to optimally grow in media containing 3-15 % (w/v) total salt and at pH between 9 and 10. To survive in these harsh conditions, the bacterium has developed several strategies that probably concern the bacteria outer membrane, a barrier regulating the exchange with the environment. In such a context, the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), which are among the major constituent of the Gram-negative outer membrane, are thought to contribute to the restrictive membrane permeability properties. The structure of the lipid A family derived from the LPS of Halomonas pantelleriensis DSM 9661(T) is reported herein. The lipid A was obtained from the purified LPS by mild acid hydrolysis. The lipid A, which contains different numbers of fatty acids residues, and its partially deacylated derivatives were completely characterized by means of ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry and chemical analysis. Preliminary immunological assays were performed, and a comparison with the lipid A structure of the phylogenetic proximal Halomonas magadiensis is also reported.

  11. Structural characterization of the lipid A from the LPS of the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Halomonas pantelleriensis.

    PubMed

    Carillo, Sara; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Casillo, Angela; Lindner, Buko; Romano, Ida; Nicolaus, Barbara; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Giuliano, Mariateresa; Cammarota, Marcella; Lanzetta, Rosa; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2016-09-01

    Halomonas pantelleriensis DSM9661(Τ) is a Gram-negative haloalkaliphilic bacterium isolated from the sand of the volcanic Venus mirror lake, closed to seashore in the Pantelleria Island in the south of Italy. It is able to optimally grow in media containing 3-15 % (w/v) total salt and at pH between 9 and 10. To survive in these harsh conditions, the bacterium has developed several strategies that probably concern the bacteria outer membrane, a barrier regulating the exchange with the environment. In such a context, the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), which are among the major constituent of the Gram-negative outer membrane, are thought to contribute to the restrictive membrane permeability properties. The structure of the lipid A family derived from the LPS of Halomonas pantelleriensis DSM 9661(T) is reported herein. The lipid A was obtained from the purified LPS by mild acid hydrolysis. The lipid A, which contains different numbers of fatty acids residues, and its partially deacylated derivatives were completely characterized by means of ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry and chemical analysis. Preliminary immunological assays were performed, and a comparison with the lipid A structure of the phylogenetic proximal Halomonas magadiensis is also reported. PMID:27329160

  12. Lipid-Modulated Assembly of Magnetized Iron-Filled Carbon Nanotubes in Millimeter-Scale Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, Nashville C.; de Planque, Maurits R. R.; Antoranz Contera, Sonia; Grobert, Nicole; Ryan, John F.

    2007-04-01

    Biomolecule-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combine the molecular recognition properties of biomaterials with the electrical properties of nanoscale solid state transducers. Application of this hybrid material in bioelectronic devices requires the development of methods for the reproducible self-assembly of CNTs into higher-order structures in an aqueous environment. To this end, we have studied pattern formation of lipid-coated Fe-filled CNTs, with lengths in the 1-5 μm range, by controlled evaporation of aqueous CNT-lipid suspensions. Novel diffusion limited aggregation structures composed of end-to-end oriented nanotubes were observed by optical and atomic force microscopy. Significantly, the lateral dimension of assemblies of magnetized Fe-filled CNTs was in the millimeter range. Control experiments in the absence of lipids and without magnetization indicated that the formation of these long linear nanotube patterns is driven by a subtle interplay between radial flow forces in the evaporating droplet, lipid-modulated van der Waals forces, and magnetic dipole-dipole interactions.

  13. Structural and Functional Dynamics of an Integral Membrane Protein Complex Modulated by Lipid Headgroup Charge

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji; James, Zachary M.; Dong, Xiaoqiong; Karim, Christine B.; Thomas, David D.

    2012-01-01

    We have used membrane surface charge to modulate the structural dynamics of an integral membrane protein, phospholamban (PLB), and thereby its functional inhibition of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA). It was previously shown by EPR, in vesicles of neutral lipids, that the PLB cytoplasmic domain is in equilibrium between an ordered T state and a dynamically disordered R state, and that phosphorylation of PLB increases the R state and relieves SERCA inhibition, suggesting that R is less inhibitory. Here we sought to control the T/R equilibrium by an alternative means – varying the lipid headgroup charge, thus perturbing the electrostatic interaction of PLB’s cationic cytoplasmic domain with the membrane surface. We resolved the T and R states not only by EPR in the absence of SERCA, but also by time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) from SERCA to PLB, thus probing directly the SERCA-PLB complex. Compared to neutral lipids, anionic lipids increased both the T population and SERCA inhibition, while cationic lipids had the opposite effects. In contrast to conventional models, decreased inhibition was not accompanied by decreased binding. We conclude that PLB binds to SERCA in two distinct structural states of the cytoplasmic domain, an inhibitory T state that interacts strongly with the membrane surface, and a less inhibitory R state that interacts more strongly with the anionic SERCA cytoplasmic domain. Modulating membrane surface charge provides an effective way of investigating the correlation between structural dynamics and function of integral membrane proteins. PMID:22381409

  14. A substrate-based approach for the selection of oil-bearing heterotrophs from nitrogen-deficient soil for lipid production.

    PubMed

    Kuttiraja, M; Krishna, Shyam; Dhouha, Ayed; Tyagi, Rajeshwar Dayal

    2015-02-01

    In this study, nine heterotrophic yeast isolates were tested for their ability to assimilate crude glycerol and consecutive conversion to triacylglycerides (TGAs). All the organisms were initially screened on crude glycerol-based selection media, and those producing lipid globules were further evaluated for lipid production. Sudan Black B staining of eight isolates showed lipid globules. These strains were further studied at different C/N ratio. The molecular identification revealed that the isolates belonged to the genera of Yarrowia and Candida. Among these isolates, SKY7 (Yarrowia lipolytica) produced up to 42.04 ± 0.11 % of lipid w/w) with a C/N ratio of 100 and fermentation time of 72 h. The other strains produced 5.82 ± 0.4 to 34.57 ± 0.44 % lipid (w/w). The GC-flame ionization detector (FID) lipid profile showed that the lipid produced by the strains had close resemblance with vegetable oil and could serve as a feedstock for biodiesel production. Biolog test of the isolates revealed a wide spectrum of carbon utilization. PMID:25432337

  15. Dietary α-linolenic acid-rich flaxseed oil prevents against alcoholic hepatic steatosis via ameliorating lipid homeostasis at adipose tissue-liver axis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Feng, Kun; He, Chengwei; Li, Peng; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Low levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in serum and liver tissue biopsies are the common characteristics in patients with alcoholic liver disease. The α-linolenic acid (ALA) is a plant-derived n-3 PUFA and is rich in flaxseed oil. However, the impact of ALA on alcoholic fatty liver is largely unknown. In this study, we assessed the potential protective effects of ALA-rich flaxseed oil (FO) on ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and observed that dietary FO supplementation effectively attenuated the ethanol-induced hepatic lipid accumulation in mice. Ethanol exposure stimulated adipose lipolysis but reduced fatty acid/lipid uptake, which were normalized by FO. Our investigations into the corresponding mechanisms demonstrated that the ameliorating effect of FO might be associated with the lower endoplasmic reticulum stress and normalized lipid metabolism in adipose tissue. In the liver, alcohol exposure stimulated hepatic fatty acid uptake and triglyceride synthesis, which were attenuated by FO. Additionally, dietary FO upregulated plasma adiponectin concentration, hepatic adiponectin receptor 2 expression, and the activation of hepatic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. Collectively, dietary FO protects against alcoholic hepatic steatosis by improving lipid homeostasis at the adipose tissue-liver axis, suggesting that dietary ALA-rich flaxseed oil might be a promising approach for prevention of alcoholic fatty liver. PMID:27220557

  16. Structural Studies of a Lipid-Binding Peptide from Tunicate Hemocytes with Anti-Biofilm Activity

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Osmar N.; Alves, Eliane S. F.; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Ribeiro, Suzana M.; Mandal, Santi M.; Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, Ana S.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Andrade, Cesar A. S.; Nascimento, Jessica M.; Fensterseifer, Isabel C. M.; Porto, William F.; Correa, Jose R.; Hancock, Robert. E. W.; Korpole, Suresh; Oliveira, Aline L.; Liao, Luciano M.; Franco, Octavio L.

    2016-01-01

    Clavanins is a class of peptides (23aa) histidine-rich, free of post-translational modifications. Clavanins have been studied largely for their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes. In the present study, the interaction of clavanin A with membranes was assessed by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential and permeabilization assays. We observed through those assays that clavanin A lysis bacterial cells at concentrations corresponding to its MIC. Further, the structure and function of clavanin A was investigated. To better understand how clavanin interacted with bacteria, its NMR structure was elucidated. The solution state NMR structure of clavanin A in the presence of TFE-d3 indicated an α-helical conformation. Secondary structures, based on circular dichroism measurements in anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and TFE (2,2,2-trifluorethanol), in silico lipid-peptide docking and molecular simulations with lipids DPPC and DOPC revealed that clavanin A can adopt a variety of folds, possibly influencing its different functions. Microcalorimetry assays revealed that clavanin A was capable of discriminating between different lipids. Finally, clavanin A was found to eradicate bacterial biofilms representing a previously unrecognized function. PMID:27292548

  17. Structural Studies of a Lipid-Binding Peptide from Tunicate Hemocytes with Anti-Biofilm Activity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Osmar N; Alves, Eliane S F; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Ribeiro, Suzana M; Mandal, Santi M; Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, Ana S; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Andrade, Cesar A S; Nascimento, Jessica M; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Porto, William F; Correa, Jose R; Hancock, Robert E W; Korpole, Suresh; Oliveira, Aline L; Liao, Luciano M; Franco, Octavio L

    2016-01-01

    Clavanins is a class of peptides (23aa) histidine-rich, free of post-translational modifications. Clavanins have been studied largely for their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes. In the present study, the interaction of clavanin A with membranes was assessed by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential and permeabilization assays. We observed through those assays that clavanin A lysis bacterial cells at concentrations corresponding to its MIC. Further, the structure and function of clavanin A was investigated. To better understand how clavanin interacted with bacteria, its NMR structure was elucidated. The solution state NMR structure of clavanin A in the presence of TFE-d3 indicated an α-helical conformation. Secondary structures, based on circular dichroism measurements in anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and TFE (2,2,2-trifluorethanol), in silico lipid-peptide docking and molecular simulations with lipids DPPC and DOPC revealed that clavanin A can adopt a variety of folds, possibly influencing its different functions. Microcalorimetry assays revealed that clavanin A was capable of discriminating between different lipids. Finally, clavanin A was found to eradicate bacterial biofilms representing a previously unrecognized function. PMID:27292548

  18. Microscopic structure of heterogeneous lipid-based formulations revealed by 13C high-resolution solid-state and 1H PFG NMR methods.

    PubMed

    Guillermo, Armel; Gerbaud, Guillaume; Bardet, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Lipid-based formulations such as lip glosses that are very alike on the base of their components may have significant differences in their expected macroscopic properties as cosmetics. To differentiate such formulations, high-resolution (13)C NMR was performed under magic angle spinning to investigate the properties at both molecular and microscopic levels. Temperature studies were carried out and no polymorphism in the solid domains could be evidenced after the thermal treatment performed for obtaining the commercial lip glosses. (13)C NMR spectra also showed that some waxes remain partially solubilized in the oils of formulations. The microscopic structure of the wax-oil liquid domains was worked out on the basis of restricted diffusion properties obtained with proton pulsed-field gradient NMR. Changing a single wax component, in two identical formulations, yields significant morphological differences. In the first one the liquid phase appears as a continuum whereas in the second one, the liquid phase is fractionated into micrometric droplets.

  19. Structural characterization of the pulmonary innate immune protein SPLUNC1 and identification of lipid ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Fangkun; Wang, Chao; Berry, Karin Zemski; Kandasamy, Pitchaimani; Liu, Haolin; Murphy, Robert C.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Nho, Chu Won; Pan, Choel-Ho; Dai, Shaodong; Niu, Liwen; Chu, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Gongyi

    2014-01-01

    The short palate, lung and nasal epithelial clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is a member of the palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone (PLUNC) family, also known as bactericidal/permeability-increasing (BPI) fold-containing protein, family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). SPLUNC1 is an abundant protein in human airways, but its function remains poorly understood. The lipid ligands of SPLUNC1 as well as other PLUNC family members are largely unknown, although some reports provide evidence that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) could be a lipid ligand. Unlike previous hypotheses, we found significant structural differences between SPLUNC1 and BPI. Recombinant SPLUNC1 produced in HEK 293 cells harbored several molecular species of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine as its ligands. Significantly, in vitro lipid-binding studies failed to demonstrate interactions between SPLUNC1 and LPS, lipoteichoic acid, or polymyxin B. Instead, one of the major and most important pulmonary surfactant phospholipids, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), bound to SPLUNC1 with high affinity and specificity. We found that SPLUNC1 could be the first protein receptor for DPPC. These discoveries provide insight into the specific determinants governing the interaction between SPLUNC1 and lipids and also shed light on novel functions that SPLUNC1 and other PLUNC family members perform in host defense.—Ning, F., Wang, C., Berry, K. Z., Kandasamy, P., Liu, H., Murphy, R. C., Voelker, D. R., Nho, C. W., Pan, C.-H., Dai, S., Niu, L., Chu, H.-W., Zhang, G. Structural characterization of the pulmonary innate immune protein SPLUNC1 and identification of lipid ligands. PMID:25223608

  20. Regulatory Mechanisms Underlying Oil Palm Fruit Mesocarp Maturation, Ripening, and Functional Specialization in Lipid and Carotenoid Metabolism1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tranbarger, Timothy J.; Dussert, Stéphane; Joët, Thierry; Argout, Xavier; Summo, Marilyne; Champion, Antony; Cros, David; Omore, Alphonse; Nouy, Bruno; Morcillo, Fabienne

    2011-01-01

    Fruit provide essential nutrients and vitamins for the human diet. Not only is the lipid-rich fleshy mesocarp tissue of the oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) fruit the main source of edible oil for the world, but it is also the richest dietary source of provitamin A. This study examines the transcriptional basis of these two outstanding metabolic characters in the oil palm mesocarp. Morphological, cellular, biochemical, and hormonal features defined key phases of mesocarp development. A 454 pyrosequencing-derived transcriptome was then assembled for the developmental phases preceding and during maturation and ripening, when high rates of lipid and carotenoid biosynthesis occur. A total of 2,629 contigs with differential representation revealed coordination of metabolic and regulatory components. Further analysis focused on the fatty acid and triacylglycerol assembly pathways and during carotenogenesis. Notably, a contig similar to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed oil transcription factor WRINKLED1 was identified with a transcript profile coordinated with those of several fatty acid biosynthetic genes and the high rates of lipid accumulation, suggesting some common regulatory features between seeds and fruits. We also focused on transcriptional regulatory networks of the fruit, in particular those related to ethylene transcriptional and GLOBOSA/PISTILLATA-like proteins in the mesocarp and a central role for ethylene-coordinated transcriptional regulation of type VII ethylene response factors during ripening. Our results suggest that divergence has occurred in the regulatory components in this monocot fruit compared with those identified in the dicot tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fleshy fruit model. PMID:21487046

  1. Structure of the Disulfide Bond Generating Membrane Protein DsbB in the Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Nesbitt, Anna E.; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Gennis, Robert B.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2013-01-01

    The integral membrane protein DsbB in Escherichia coli is responsible for oxidizing the periplasmic protein DsbA, which forms disulfide bonds in substrate proteins. We have developed a high-resolution structural model by combining experimental X-ray and solid-state NMR with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We embedded the high-resolution DsbB structure, derived from the joint calculation with X-ray reflections and solid-state NMR restraints, into the lipid bilayer and performed MD simulations to provide a mechanistic view of DsbB function in the membrane. Further, we revealed the membrane topology of DsbB by selective proton spin diffusion experiments, which directly probe the correlations of DsbB with water and lipid acyl chains. NMR data also support the model of a flexible periplasmic loop and an interhelical hydrogen bond between Glu26 and Tyr153. PMID:23416557

  2. Function and structure of lipid storage droplet protein 1 studied in lipoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Arrese, Estela L; Rivera, Laticia; Hamada, Masakazu; Mirza, Saima; Hartson, Steve D; Weintraub, Susan; Soulages, Jose L

    2008-05-01

    Triglycerides (TG) stored in lipid droplets (LDs) are the main energy reserve in all animals. The mechanism by which animals mobilize TG is complex and not fully understood. Several proteins surrounding the LDs have been implicated in TG homeostasis such as mammalian perilipin A and insect lipid storage proteins (Lsd). Most of the knowledge on LD-associated proteins comes from studies using cells or LDs leaving biochemical properties of these proteins uncharacterized. Here we describe the purification of recombinant Lsd1 and its reconstitution with lipids to form lipoprotein complexes suitable for functional and structural studies. Lsd1 in the lipid bound state is a predominately alpha-helical protein. Using lipoprotein complexes containing triolein it is shown that PKA mediated phosphorylation of Lsd1 promoted a 1.7-fold activation of the main fat body lipase demonstrating the direct link between Lsd1 phosphorylation and activation of lipolysis. Serine 20 was identified as the Lsd1-phosphorylation site triggering this effect. PMID:18342616

  3. Polymer-Lipid Microbubbles for Biosensing and the Formation of Porous Structures

    PubMed Central

    Hettiarachchi, Kanaka; Lee, Abraham P.

    2010-01-01

    Polymer-lipid microbubbles (PLBs) are generated by microfluidic flow-focusing devices to form a new class of long-lasting hybrid particles. The specific PLB construct developed is an elastic gas-filled microsphere with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) shell containing phospholipids conjugated to functionalized polyethyleneglycol (PEG). Digital “droplet-based” microfluidics technology enables control of particle composition, size, and polydispersity (σ < 10%). Use of PDMS as a shell component improves the functionality and stability (lifetime > 6 months) of the hybrid particles due to the thermally maneuverable solidification process. With a gas core, they serve as a template material for creating three-dimensional porous structures and surfaces, requiring no cumbersome post-processing removal steps. By adding biotinylated PEG-lipid derivatives that offer targeting capabilities, we demonstrate the immobilization of fluorescent IgG antibodies on stationary PDMS-lipid microbubbles through biotinavidin interactions and on-chip trapping for immunoassays. A PDMS-lipid composition offers several advantages such as biocompatibility and biodegradability for future in-vivo use as porous engineered scaffolds, packing materials, or delivery (i.e. therapeutic) agents with cell targeting capability. PMID:20163798

  4. Structures of the EphA2 Receptor at the Membrane: Role of Lipid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chavent, Matthieu; Seiradake, Elena; Jones, E. Yvonne; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ephs are transmembrane receptors that mediate cell-cell signaling. The N-terminal ectodomain binds ligands and enables receptor clustering, which activates the intracellular kinase. Relatively little is known about the function of the membrane-proximal fibronectin domain 2 (FN2) of the ectodomain. Multiscale molecular dynamics simulations reveal that FN2 interacts with lipid bilayers via a site comprising K441, R443, R465, Q462, S464, S491, W467, F490, and P459–461. FN2 preferentially binds anionic lipids, a preference that is reduced in the mutant K441E + R443E. We confirm these results by measuring the binding of wild-type and mutant FN2 domains to lipid vesicles. In simulations of the complete EphA2 ectodomain plus the transmembrane region, we show that FN2 anchors the otherwise flexible ectodomain at the surface of the bilayer. Altogether, our data suggest that FN2 serves a dual function of interacting with anionic lipids and constraining the structure of the EphA2 ectodomain to adopt membrane-proximal configurations. PMID:26724997

  5. Structure and synthesis of a unique isonitrile lipid isolated from the marine mollusk Actinocyclus papillatus.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Emiliano; Carbone, Marianna; Mollo, Ernesto; Irace, Carlo; Di Pascale, Antonio; Li, Yan; Ciavatta, Maria Letizia; Cimino, Guido; Guo, Yue-Wei; Gavagnin, Margherita

    2011-04-15

    The first chemical study of an Actinocyclidae nudibranch, Actinocyclus papillatus, resulted in the isolation of (-)-actisonitrile (1), a lipid based on a 1,3-propanediol ether skeleton. The structure was established by spectroscopic methods, whereas the absolute configuration of the chiral center was determined by comparing the optical properties of natural actisonitrile with those of (+)- and (-)-synthetic enantiomers, opportunely prepared. Both (-)- and (+)-actisonitrile were tested in preliminary in vitro cytotoxicity bioassays on tumor and nontumor mammalian cells. PMID:21405058

  6. Spherical nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers for the structural study of membrane geometry-sensitive molecules.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Gill, Richard L; Kim, Edward Y; Briley, Nicole E; Tyndall, Erin R; Xu, Jie; Li, Conggang; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S; Flanagan, John M; Tian, Fang

    2015-11-11

    Many essential cellular processes including endocytosis and vesicle trafficking require alteration of membrane geometry. These changes are usually mediated by proteins that can sense and/or induce membrane curvature. Using spherical nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers (SSLBs), we characterize how SpoVM, a bacterial development factor, interacts with differently curved membranes by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR. Our results demonstrate that SSLBs are an effective system for structural and topological studies of membrane geometry-sensitive molecules.

  7. Effect of bioactive substances found in rapeseed, raspberry and strawberry seed oils on blood lipid profile and selected parameters of oxidative status in rats.

    PubMed

    Pieszka, Marek; Tombarkiewicz, Barbara; Roman, Adam; Migdał, Władysław; Niedziółka, Jerzy

    2013-11-01

    Rapeseed, strawberry and raspberry seed oils are a rich source of polyunsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants such as tocols, bioflavonoids and phytosterols. The aim of the study was to determine changes in the blood lipid profile of rats fed with rapeseed, strawberry and raspberry seed oils and their effects on selected parameters of oxidative status. The experiment was carried out on male Wistar rats. The oils were administered by oral gavage for 5 weeks once daily at the dose of about 0.8 ml per rat. Blood samples were taken before and after supplementation period. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (cGPx) was assessed in erythrocytes and contents of triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, low-density fraction of cholesterol (LDL) and high-density fraction of cholesterol (HDL) were assessed in plasma. The experiment shows that oils supplemented in the diet for 5 weeks had no significant effect on the level of triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol as well as HDL and LDL fractions. Reduced activity of cGPX and SOD in the group of rats receiving raspberry and strawberry seed oils suggests that these native oils may contribute to oxidative stability (improves antioxidant status). Thus, strawberry and raspberry seed oils can be considered as special biological oils, which constitute potential nutraceuticals reducing oxidative stress.

  8. Characterization of Oilseed Lipids from “DHA-Producing Camelina sativa”: A New Transformed Land Plant Containing Long-Chain Omega-3 Oils

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Maged P.; Shrestha, Pushkar; Belide, Srinivas; Petrie, James R.; Nichols, Peter D.; Singh, Surinder P.

    2014-01-01

    New and sustainable sources of long-chain (LC, ≥C20) omega-3 oils containing DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6ω3) are required to meet increasing demands. The lipid content of the oilseed of a novel transgenic, DHA-producing land plant, Camelina sativa, containing microalgal genes able to produce LC omega-3 oils, contained 36% lipid by weight with triacylglycerols (TAG) as the major lipid class in hexane extracts (96% of total lipid). Subsequent chloroform-methanol (CM) extraction recovered further lipid (~50% polar lipid, comprising glycolipids and phospholipids) and residual TAG. The main phospholipid species were phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. The % DHA was: 6.8% (of total fatty acids) in the TAG-rich hexane extract and 4.2% in the polar lipid-rich CM extract. The relative level of ALA (α-linolenic acid, 18:3ω3) in DHA-camelina seed was higher than the control. Major sterols in both DHA- and control camelina seeds were: sitosterol, campesterol, cholesterol, brassicasterol and isofucosterol. C16–C22 fatty alcohols, including iso-branched and odd-chain alcohols were present, including high levels of iso-17:0, 17:0 and 19:0. Other alcohols present were: 16:0, iso-18:0, 18:0 and 18:1 and the proportions varied between the hexane and CM extracts. These iso-branched odd-chain fatty alcohols, to our knowledge, have not been previously reported. These components may be derived from wax esters, or free fatty alcohols. PMID:24566436

  9. Characterization of oilseed lipids from "DHA-producing Camelina sativa": a new transformed land plant containing long-chain omega-3 oils.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Maged P; Shrestha, Pushkar; Belide, Srinivas; Petrie, James R; Nichols, Peter D; Singh, Surinder P

    2014-02-21

    New and sustainable sources of long-chain (LC, ≥C₂₀) omega-3 oils containing DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6ω3) are required to meet increasing demands. The lipid content of the oilseed of a novel transgenic, DHA-producing land plant, Camelina sativa, containing microalgal genes able to produce LC omega-3 oils, contained 36% lipid by weight with triacylglycerols (TAG) as the major lipid class in hexane extracts (96% of total lipid). Subsequent chloroform-methanol (CM) extraction recovered further lipid (~50% polar lipid, comprising glycolipids and phospholipids) and residual TAG. The main phospholipid species were phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. The % DHA was: 6.8% (of total fatty acids) in the TAG-rich hexane extract and 4.2% in the polar lipid-rich CM extract. The relative level of ALA (α-linolenic acid, 18:3ω3) in DHA-camelina seed was higher than the control. Major sterols in both DHA- and control camelina seeds were: sitosterol, campesterol, cholesterol, brassicasterol and isofucosterol. C₁₆-C₂₂ fatty alcohols, including iso-branched and odd-chain alcohols were present, including high levels of iso-17:0, 17:0 and 19:0. Other alcohols present were: 16:0, iso-18:0, 18:0 and 18:1 and the proportions varied between the hexane and CM extracts. These iso-branched odd-chain fatty alcohols, to our knowledge, have not been previously reported. These components may be derived from wax esters, or free fatty alcohols.

  10. Structures, dynamics, and water permeation free energy across bilayers of Lipid A and its analog studied with molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tao; Huang, Tiefan; Qiao, Baofu; Zhang, Mo; Ma, Heng; Zhang, Lin

    2014-11-20

    Fundamental studies of the supramolecular layer structures, dynamics and water permeation free energy of hexa-acyl-chain Lipid A and its analogue of tetra-acyl chains would be useful for polymer membranes design for endotoxin removal in water treatment, drug delivery and other biotechnologies. In this work, we studied their supramolecular bilayer by using molecular dynamics simulations and efficient free energy computations. Our simulation accuracy was verified by the agreement between the bilayer structural properties (structure factor, bilayer thickness, and the area per lipid) and lateral diffusion coefficient in our simulation and experimental measurements. More importantly, our simulation for the first time illustrated hexagonal compact packing of the hydrocarbon acyl chains within a leaflet of Lipid A membrane (at 298 K and water content of 40 wt %), which is consistent with experiments. In contrast, Lipid A analogue is found with less ordered ripple structures at the same condition. Our study also demonstrated slower dynamics and larger and broader free energy barrier (∼23 kJ/mol) for water permeation for Lipid A, compared with that of Lipid A analogue. Moreover, the analysis of dynamics showed that highly hydrated hydrophilic diglucosamine backbone is structurally stable, whereas the interdigitated hydrophobic acyl chain tails inside the membrane with faster dynamics screen the aqueous environment from the lipid interior and also reinforce the membrane's structural stability.

  11. Identification of lipid droplet structure-like/resident proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Na, Huimin; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yong; Zhu, Xiaotong; Liu, Yi; Liu, Yangli; Xie, Kang; Xu, Ningyi; Yang, Fuquan; Yu, Yong; Cichello, Simon; Mak, Ho Yi; Wang, Meng C; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Pingsheng

    2015-10-01

    The lipid droplet (LD) is a cellular organelle that stores neutral lipids in cells and has been linked with metabolic disorders. Caenorhabditis elegans has many characteristics which make it an excellent animal model for studying LDs. However, unlike in mammalian cells, no LD structure-like/resident proteins have been identified in C. elegans, which has limited the utility of this model for the study of lipid storage and metabolism. Herein based on three lines of evidence, we identified that MDT-28 and DHS-3 previously identified in C. elegans LD proteome were two LD structure-like/resident proteins. First, MDT-28 and DHS-3 were found to be the two most abundant LD proteins in the worm. Second, the proteins were specifically localized to LDs and we identified the domains responsible for this targeting in both proteins. Third and most importantly, the depletion of MDT-28 induced LD clustering while DHS-3 deletion reduced triacylglycerol content (TAG). We further characterized the proteins finding that MDT-28 was ubiquitously expressed in the intestine, muscle, hypodermis, and embryos, whereas DHS-3 was expressed mainly in intestinal cells. Together, these two LD structure-like/resident proteins provide a basis for future mechanistic studies into the dynamics and functions of LDs in C. elegans.

  12. Structure activity characterization of Bordetella petrii lipid A, from environment to human isolates.

    PubMed

    Basheer, Soorej M; Bouchez, Valerie; Novikov, Alexey; Augusto, Luis A; Guiso, Nicole; Caroff, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella petrii, a facultative anaerobic species, is the only known member of the Bordetella genus with environmental origin. However it was also recently isolated from humans. The structures of the B. petrii lipid A moieties of the endotoxins were characterized here for the first time for an environmental strain and compared to that of human isolates. Characterization was achieved using chemical analyses, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation mass spectrometry. The analyses revealed that the different lipid A structures contain a common bisphosphorylated β-(1→6)-linked d-glucosamine disaccharide with hydroxytetradecanoic acid in amide as well at the C-3' in ester linkages. Similar to Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica lipids A, the hydroxytetradecanoic acid at the C-2' position was substituted by tetradecanoic acid. Unlike B. pertussis, the hydroxytetradecanoic acid at the C-2 position was substituted with either 12:0 or 14:0 and/or their 2-OH forms. Depending on the environmental or human origin the structures differed in the length and degree of fatty acid acylation and impacted the IL-6 and TNF-α inflammatory responses tested. In one isolate we showed the presence at the C-3 position of the short-chain 10:0(3-OH), which according to our previous analyses is more characteristic of the human pathogens in the genus like B. pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis. PMID:26164553

  13. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris.

    PubMed

    Gizatullina, Albina K; Finkina, Ekaterina I; Mineev, Konstantin S; Melnikova, Daria N; Bogdanov, Ivan V; Telezhinskaya, Irina N; Balandin, Sergey V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Arseniev, Alexander S; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V

    2013-10-01

    Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600Å(3)). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours.

  14. Crystal structure of soluble MD-1 and its interaction with lipid IVa

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-il; Hong, Minsun; Han, Gye Won; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-07-22

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria is a common pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) that induces potent innate immune responses. The host immune response against LPS is triggered by myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) in association with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on the cell surface. The MD-2/TLR4-mediated LPS response is regulated by the evolutionarily related complex of MD-1 and Toll-like receptor homolog RP105. Here, we report crystallographic and biophysical data that demonstrate a previously unidentified direct interaction of MD-1 with LPS. The crystal structure of chicken MD-1 (cMD-1) at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution exhibits a {beta}-cup-like fold, similar to MD-2, that encloses a hydrophobic cavity between the two {beta}-sheets. A lipid-like moiety was observed inside the cavity, suggesting the possibility of a direct MD-1/LPS interaction. LPS was subsequently identified as an MD-1 ligand by native gel electrophoresis and gel filtration analyses. The crystal structure of cMD-1 with lipid IVa, an LPS precursor, at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution revealed that the lipid inserts into the deep hydrophobic cavity of the {beta}-cup-like structure, but with some important differences compared with MD-2. These findings suggest that soluble MD-1 alone, in addition to its complex with RP105, can regulate host LPS sensitivity.

  15. Structure activity characterization of Bordetella petrii lipid A, from environment to human isolates.

    PubMed

    Basheer, Soorej M; Bouchez, Valerie; Novikov, Alexey; Augusto, Luis A; Guiso, Nicole; Caroff, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella petrii, a facultative anaerobic species, is the only known member of the Bordetella genus with environmental origin. However it was also recently isolated from humans. The structures of the B. petrii lipid A moieties of the endotoxins were characterized here for the first time for an environmental strain and compared to that of human isolates. Characterization was achieved using chemical analyses, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation mass spectrometry. The analyses revealed that the different lipid A structures contain a common bisphosphorylated β-(1→6)-linked d-glucosamine disaccharide with hydroxytetradecanoic acid in amide as well at the C-3' in ester linkages. Similar to Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica lipids A, the hydroxytetradecanoic acid at the C-2' position was substituted by tetradecanoic acid. Unlike B. pertussis, the hydroxytetradecanoic acid at the C-2 position was substituted with either 12:0 or 14:0 and/or their 2-OH forms. Depending on the environmental or human origin the structures differed in the length and degree of fatty acid acylation and impacted the IL-6 and TNF-α inflammatory responses tested. In one isolate we showed the presence at the C-3 position of the short-chain 10:0(3-OH), which according to our previous analyses is more characteristic of the human pathogens in the genus like B. pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis.

  16. Garlic essential oil protects against obesity-triggered nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through modulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Syuan; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Shih-Hang; Tseng, Hui-Chun; Lin, Shuw-Yuan; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2014-06-25

    This study investigated the protective properties of garlic essential oil (GEO) and its major organosulfur component (diallyl disulfide, DADS) against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal or high-fat diet (HFD) with/without GEO (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) or DADS (10 and 20 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. GEO and DADS dose-dependently exerted antiobesity and antihyperlipidemic effects by reducing HFD-induced body weight gain, adipose tissue weight, and serum biochemical parameters. Administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg GEO and 20 mg/kg DADS significantly decreased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in liver, accompanied by elevated antioxidant capacity via inhibition of cytochrome P450 2E1 expression during NAFLD development. The anti-NAFLD effects of GEO and DADS were mediated through down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, as well as stimulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. These results demonstrate that GEO and DADS dose-dependently protected obese mice with long-term HFD-induced NAFLD from lipid accumulation, inflammation, and oxidative damage by ameliorating lipid metabolic disorders and oxidative stress. The dose of 20 mg/kg DADS was equally as effective in preventing NAFLD as 50 mg/kg GEO containing the same amount of DADS, which demonstrates that DADS may be the main bioactive component in GEO.

  17. Crystallization modifiers in lipid systems.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula Badan; Masuchi, Monise Helen; Miyasaki, Eriksen Koji; Domingues, Maria Aliciane Fontenele; Stroppa, Valter Luís Zuliani; de Oliveira, Glazieli Marangoni; Kieckbusch, Theo Guenter

    2015-07-01

    Crystallization of fats is a determinant physical event affecting the structure and properties of fat-based products. The stability of these processed foods is regulated by changes in the physical state of fats and alterations in their crystallization behavior. Problems like polymorphic transitions, oil migration, fat bloom development, slow crystallization and formation of crystalline aggregates stand out. The change of the crystallization behavior of lipid systems has been a strategic issue for the processing of foods, aiming at taylor made products, reducing costs, improving quality, and increasing the applicability and stability of different industrial fats. In this connection, advances in understanding the complex mechanisms that govern fat crystallization led to the development of strategies in order to modulate the conventional processes of fat structuration, based on the use of crystallization modifiers. Different components have been evaluated, such as specific triacyglycerols, partial glycerides (monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols), free fatty acids, phospholipids and emulsifiers. The knowledge and expertise on the influence of these specific additives or minor lipids on the crystallization behavior of fat systems represents a focus of current interest for the industrial processing of oils and fats. This article presents a comprehensive review on the use of crystallization modifiers in lipid systems, especially for palm oil, cocoa butter and general purpose fats, highlighting: i) the removal, addition or fractionation of minor lipids in fat bases; ii) the use of nucleating agents to modify the crystallization process; iii) control of crystallization in lipid bases by using emulsifiers. The addition of these components into lipid systems is discussed in relation to the phenomena of nucleation, crystal growth, morphology, thermal behavior and polymorphism, with the intention of providing the reader with a complete panorama of the associated mechanisms

  18. Structural Evolution of Environmentally Responsive Cationic Liposome–DNA Complexes with a Reducible Lipid Linker

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Rahau S.; Ewert, Kai K.; Silva, Bruno F. B.; Leal, Cecilia; Li, Youli; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2012-01-01

    Environmentally responsive materials, i.e., materials that respond to changes in their environment with a change in their properties or structure, are attracting an increasing amount of interest. We recently designed and synthesized a series of cleavable multivalent lipids (CMVLn, with n = 2 to 5 the number of positive headgroup charges at full protonation) with a disulfide bond in the linker between cationic headgroup and hydrophobic tails. The self-assembled complexes of the CMVLs and DNA are a prototypical environmentally responsive material, undergoing extensive structural rearrangement when exposed to reducing agents. We investigated the structural evolution of CMVL–DNA complexes at varied complex composition, temperature and incubation time using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). A related lipid with a stable linker, TMVL4, was used as a control. In a nonreducing environment CMVL–DNA complexes form the lamellar (LαC) phase, with DNA rods sandwiched between lipid bilayers. However, new self-assembled phases form when the disulfide linker is cleaved by dithiothreitol or the biologically relevant reducing agent glutathione. The released DNA and cleaved CMVL headgroups form a “loosely organized” phase, giving rise to a characteristic broad SAXS correlation profile. CMVLs of high headgroup charge also form condensed DNA bundles. Intriguingly, the cleaved hydrophobic tails of the CMVLs reassemble into tilted chain-ordered Lβ′ phases upon incubation at physiological temperature (37 °C), as indicated by characteristic WAXS peaks. X-ray scattering further reveals that two of the three phases (LβF, LβL, and LβI) comprised by the Lβ′ phase coexist in these samples. The described system may have applications in lipid-based nanotechnologies. PMID:22616637

  19. Development of Iron-Chelating Poly(ethylene terephthalate) Packaging for Inhibiting Lipid Oxidation in Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David R; Tian, Fang; Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2015-05-27

    Foods such as bulk oils, salad dressings, and nutritionally fortified beverages that are susceptible to oxidative degradation are often packaged in poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) bottles with metal chelators added to the food to maintain product quality. In the present work, a metal-chelating active packaging material is designed and characterized, in which poly(hydroxamic acid) (PHA) metal-chelating moieties were grafted from the surface of PET. Biomimetic PHA groups were grafted in a two-step UV-initiated process without the use of a photoinitiator. Surface characterization of the films by attenuated total reflective Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) suggested successful grafting and conversion of poly(hydroxyethyl acrylate) (PHEA) to PHA chelating moieties from the surface of PET. Colorimetric (ferrozine) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) assays demonstrated the ability of PET-g-PHA to chelate iron in a low-pH (3.0) environment containing a competitive metal chelator (citric acid). Lipid oxidation studies demonstrated the antioxidant activity of PET-g-PHA films in inhibiting iron-promoted oxidation in an acidified oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion model system (pH 3.0). Particle size and ζ-potential analysis indicated that the addition of PET-g-PHA films did not affect the physical stability of the emulsion system. This work suggests that biomimetic chelating moieties can be grafted from PET and effectively inhibit iron-promoted degradation reactions, enabling removal of metal-chelating additives from product formulations.

  20. Development of Iron-Chelating Poly(ethylene terephthalate) Packaging for Inhibiting Lipid Oxidation in Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David R; Tian, Fang; Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2015-05-27

    Foods such as bulk oils, salad dressings, and nutritionally fortified beverages that are susceptible to oxidative degradation are often packaged in poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) bottles with metal chelators added to the food to maintain product quality. In the present work, a metal-chelating active packaging material is designed and characterized, in which poly(hydroxamic acid) (PHA) metal-chelating moieties were grafted from the surface of PET. Biomimetic PHA groups were grafted in a two-step UV-initiated process without the use of a photoinitiator. Surface characterization of the films by attenuated total reflective Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) suggested successful grafting and conversion of poly(hydroxyethyl acrylate) (PHEA) to PHA chelating moieties from the surface of PET. Colorimetric (ferrozine) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) assays demonstrated the ability of PET-g-PHA to chelate iron in a low-pH (3.0) environment containing a competitive metal chelator (citric acid). Lipid oxidation studies demonstrated the antioxidant activity of PET-g-PHA films in inhibiting iron-promoted oxidation in an acidified oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion model system (pH 3.0). Particle size and ζ-potential analysis indicated that the addition of PET-g-PHA films did not affect the physical stability of the emulsion system. This work suggests that biomimetic chelating moieties can be grafted from PET and effectively inhibit iron-promoted degradation reactions, enabling removal of metal-chelating additives from product formulations. PMID:25985711

  1. Atomistic resolution structure and dynamics of lipid bilayers in simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Pabst, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Accurate details on the sampled atomistic resolution structures of lipid bilayers can be experimentally obtained by measuring C-H bond order parameters, spin relaxation rates and scattering form factors. These parameters can be also directly calculated from the classical atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and compared to the experimentally achieved results. This comparison measures the simulation model quality with respect to 'reality'. If agreement is sufficient, the simulation model gives an atomistic structural interpretation of the acquired experimental data. Significant advance of MD models is made by jointly interpreting different experiments using the same structural model. Here we focus on phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers, which out of all model membranes have been studied mostly by experiments and simulations, leading to the largest available dataset. From the applied comparisons we conclude that the acyl chain region structure and rotational dynamics are generally well described in simulation models. Also changes with temperature, dehydration and cholesterol concentration are qualitatively correctly reproduced. However, the quality of the underlying atomistic resolution structural changes is uncertain. Even worse, when focusing on the lipid bilayer properties at the interfacial region, e.g. glycerol backbone and choline structures, and cation binding, many simulation models produce an inaccurate description of experimental data. Thus extreme care must be applied when simulations are applied to understand phenomena where the interfacial region plays a significant role. This work is done by the NMRlipids Open Collaboration project running at https://nmrlipids.blogspot.fi and https://github.com/NMRLipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg.

  2. Atomistic resolution structure and dynamics of lipid bilayers in simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Pabst, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Accurate details on the sampled atomistic resolution structures of lipid bilayers can be experimentally obtained by measuring C-H bond order parameters, spin relaxation rates and scattering form factors. These parameters can be also directly calculated from the classical atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and compared to the experimentally achieved results. This comparison measures the simulation model quality with respect to 'reality'. If agreement is sufficient, the simulation model gives an atomistic structural interpretation of the acquired experimental data. Significant advance of MD models is made by jointly interpreting different experiments using the same structural model. Here we focus on phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers, which out of all model membranes have been studied mostly by experiments and simulations, leading to the largest available dataset. From the applied comparisons we conclude that the acyl chain region structure and rotational dynamics are generally well described in simulation models. Also changes with temperature, dehydration and cholesterol concentration are qualitatively correctly reproduced. However, the quality of the underlying atomistic resolution structural changes is uncertain. Even worse, when focusing on the lipid bilayer properties at the interfacial region, e.g. glycerol backbone and choline structures, and cation binding, many simulation models produce an inaccurate description of experimental data. Thus extreme care must be applied when simulations are applied to understand phenomena where the interfacial region plays a significant role. This work is done by the NMRlipids Open Collaboration project running at https://nmrlipids.blogspot.fi and https://github.com/NMRLipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26809025

  3. Biopolymer-Lipid Bilayer Interaction Modulates the Physical Properties of Liposomes: Mechanism and Structure.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chen; Zhang, Yating; Abbas, Shabbar; Feng, Biao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xia, Wenshui; Xia, Shuqin

    2015-08-19

    This study was conducted to elucidate the conformational dependence of the modulating ability of chitosan, a positively charged biopolymer, on a new type of liposome composed of mixed lipids including egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC) and nonionic surfactant (Tween 80). Analysis of the dynamic and structure of bilayer membrane upon interaction with chitosan by fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance techniques demonstrated that, in addition to providing a physical barrier for the membrane surface, the adsorption of chitosan extended and crimped chains rigidified the lipid membrane. However, the decrease in relative microviscosity and order parameter suggested that the presence of chitosan coils disturbed the membrane organization. It was also noted that the increase of fluidity in the lipid bilayer center was not pronounced, indicating the shallow penetration of coils into the hydrophobic interior of bilayer. Microscopic observations revealed that chitosan adsorption not only affected the morphology of liposomes but also modulated the particle aggregation and fusion. Especially, a number of very heterogeneous particles were visualized, which tended to confirm the role of chitosan coils as a "polymeric surfactant". In addition to particle deformation, the membrane permeability was also tuned. These findings may provide a new perspective to understand the physiological functionality of biopolymer and design biopolymer-liposome composite structures as delivery systems for bioactive components. PMID:26173584

  4. Adsorption of α-Synuclein on Lipid Bilayers: Modulating the Structure and Stability of Protein Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Farzin; Pandey, Anjan P.; Cambrea, Lee R.; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hovis, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of α-synuclein with phospholipid membranes has been examined using supported lipid bilayers and epi-fluorescence microscopy. The membranes contained phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidic acid (PA), which mix at physiological pH. Upon protein adsorption the lipids undergo fluid-fluid phase separation into PC-rich and PA-rich regions. The protein preferentially adsorbs to the PA-rich regions. The adsorption and subsequent aggregation of α-synuclein was probed by tuning several parameters: the charge on the lipids, the charge on the protein, and the screening environment. Conditions which promoted the greatest extent of adsorption resulted in structurally heterogeneous aggregates, while comparatively homogeneous aggregates were observed under conditions whereby adsorption did not occur as readily. Our observation that different alterations to the system lead to different degrees of aggregation and different aggregate structures poses a challenge for drug discovery. Namely, therapies aimed at neutralizing α-synuclein must target a broad range of potentially toxic, membrane-bound assemblies. PMID:20187615

  5. High-fat diet from perilla oil induces insulin resistance despite lower serum lipids and increases hepatic fatty acid oxidation in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of a high-fat diet from perilla oil on serum lipids, hepatic lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were fed either a control (CT) diet or a diet high in perilla oil (HP). After 16 weeks of feeding, the serum lipids were measured, and the gene expressions involved in hepatic fatty acid oxidation and synthesis were determined. In addition, hepatic fat deposition was detected, and insulin sensitivity was evaluated by means of euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Results Compared with the rats in the CT group, the HP-feeding significantly decreased the levels of triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TCH) and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c). HP-feeding did not change the levels of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c), free fatty acid (FFA), intrahepatic lipids or body weight. Moreover, the HP-feeding dramatically increased the mRNA expressions of fatty acid oxidation markers (PPAR-alpha, CPT1A) and fatty acid synthesis markers (SREBP-1, FASN and ACC) in the liver. The HP-feeding induced increased protein levels of CPT1A, while reducing the protein levels of FASN and ACC in the liver. However, the glucose infusion rate significantly increased in the HP group compared with the CT group. Conclusions Our data show that, in rats, excessive perilla oil intake may significantly lower serum lipids, strengthen hepatic fatty acid oxidation, and inhibit hepatic fatty acid synthesis, but at the same time may also lead to insulin resistance. PMID:24422660

  6. Evidence that lipid lateral phase separation induces functionally significant structural changes in the Ca+2ATPase of the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Asturias, F J; Pascolini, D; Blasie, J K

    1990-01-01

    We have studied lipid lateral phase separation (LPS) in the intact sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane and in bilayers of isolated SR membrane lipids as a function of temperature, [Mg+2], and degree of hydration. Lipid LPS was observed in both the intact membrane and in the bilayers of isolated SR lipids, and the LPS behavior of both systems was found to be qualitatively similar. Namely, lipid LPS occurs only at relatively low temperature and water content, independently of the [Mg+2], and the upper characteristic temperature (th) for lipid LPS for both the membrane and bilayers of its isolated lipids coincide to within a few degrees. However, at similar temperatures, isolated lipids show more LPS than the lipids in the intact membrane. Lipid LPS in the intact membrane and in bilayers of the isolated lipids is fully reversible, and more extensive for samples partially dehydrated at temperatures below th. Our previous x-ray diffraction studies established the existence of a temperature-induced transition in the profile structure of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca+2ATPase which occurs at a temperature corresponding to the [Mg+2]-dependent upper characteristic temperature for lipid LPS in the SR membrane. Furthermore, the functionality of the ATPase, and in particular the lifetime of the first phosphorylated enzyme conformation (E1 approximately P) in the Ca+2 transport cycle, were also found to be linked to the occurrence of this structural transition. The hysterisis observed in lipid LPS behavior as a function of temperature and water content provides a possible explanation for the more efficient transient trapping of the enzyme in the E1 approximately P conformation observed in SR membranes partially dehydrated at temperatures below th. The observation that LPS behavior for the intact SR membrane and bilayers of isolated SR lipids (no protein present) are qualitatively similar strongly suggests that the LPS behavior of the SR membrane lipids is responsible for the

  7. Structure of the body-centered cubic phase of lipid systems

    PubMed Central

    Saludjian, Pedro; Reiss-Husson, Françoise

    1980-01-01

    A new model is proposed for the structure of the body-centered cubic phase of lipid systems. Infinite rods of polar groups (and water) are arranged with axes parallel to the four cubic [unk]1 1 1[unk] directions. The hydrocarbon chains fill the space between the rods to form a continuous matrix. With this unified topology, the model explains satisfactorily the x-ray diffraction patterns of strontium soaps, lecithin, galactolipids, potassium soaps, and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide and explains the transition between cubic/HII phases. The paradoxical thermal effects on the lipid cubic phase, in particular the decrease of unit cell dimensions with increasing temperature, can be explained with the proposed model by mechanisms similar to those used for the monodimensional and bidimensional (mesomorphic) phases. Images PMID:16592934

  8. Incorporating headgroup structure into the Poisson-Boltzmann model of charged lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Muyang; Chen, Er-Qiang; Yang, Shuang; May, Sylvio

    2013-07-01

    Charged lipids often possess a complex headgroup structure with several spatially separated charges and internal conformational degrees of freedom. We propose a headgroup model consisting of two rod-like segments of the same length that form a flexible joint, with three charges of arbitrary sign and valence located at the joint and the two terminal positions. One terminal charge is firmly anchored at the polar-apolar interface of the lipid layer whereas the other two benefit from the orientational degrees of freedom of the two headgroup segments. This headgroup model is incorporated into the mean-field continuum Poisson-Boltzmann formalism of the electric double layer. For sufficiently small lengths of the two rod-like segments a closed-form expression of the charging free energy is calculated. For three specific examples—a zwitterionic headgroup with conformational freedom and two headgroups that carry an excess charge—we analyze and discuss conformational properties and electrostatic free energies.

  9. Construction and structural analysis of tethered lipid bilayer containing photosynthetic antenna proteins for functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Sumino, Ayumi; Dewa, Takehisa; Takeuchi, Toshikazu; Sugiura, Ryuta; Sasaki, Nobuaki; Misawa, Nobuo; Tero, Ryugo; Urisu, Tsuneo; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Hashimoto, Hideki; Nango, Mamoru

    2011-07-11

    The construction and structural analysis of a tethered planar lipid bilayer containing bacterial photosynthetic membrane proteins, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2), and light-harvesting core complex (LH1-RC) is described and establishes this system as an experimental platform for their functional analysis. The planar lipid bilayer containing LH2 and/or LH1-RC complexes was successfully formed on an avidin-immobilized coverglass via an avidin-biotin linkage. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that a smooth continuous membrane was formed there. Lateral diffusion of these membrane proteins, observed by a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), is discussed in terms of the membrane architecture. Energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC within the tethered membrane was observed by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, indicating that the tethered membrane can mimic the natural situation.

  10. Valorization of agroindustrial wastes: Identification by LC-MS and NMR of benzylglucosinolate from papaya (Carica papaya L.) seeds, a protective agent against lipid oxidation in edible oils.

    PubMed

    Castro-Vargas, Henry I; Baumann, Wolfram; Parada-Alfonso, Fabián

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we report the characterization of benzylglucosinolate (BG) isolated from papaya (Carica papaya L.) seeds. A methanolic extract was fractionated and further purified by solid phase extraction (SPE). It was analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H and (13) C-NMR) as well, and the target compound BG was identified by these two techniques. The effect of BG on lipid oxidation in edible vegetable oil (EO) was shown by observing some lipid oxidation products (linoleic acid hydroperoxides, LHP; hexanal, HEX; nonanal, NON; thiobarbituric acid reactives species, TBARS). BG reduced lipid oxidation production in EO by over 80%, as compared to a control sample and in this way has proved to be a useful antioxidant, even more effective than some antioxidants used by food industry.

  11. Valorization of agroindustrial wastes: Identification by LC-MS and NMR of benzylglucosinolate from papaya (Carica papaya L.) seeds, a protective agent against lipid oxidation in edible oils.

    PubMed

    Castro-Vargas, Henry I; Baumann, Wolfram; Parada-Alfonso, Fabián

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we report the characterization of benzylglucosinolate (BG) isolated from papaya (Carica papaya L.) seeds. A methanolic extract was fractionated and further purified by solid phase extraction (SPE). It was analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H and (13) C-NMR) as well, and the target compound BG was identified by these two techniques. The effect of BG on lipid oxidation in edible vegetable oil (EO) was shown by observing some lipid oxidation products (linoleic acid hydroperoxides, LHP; hexanal, HEX; nonanal, NON; thiobarbituric acid reactives species, TBARS). BG reduced lipid oxidation production in EO by over 80%, as compared to a control sample and in this way has proved to be a useful antioxidant, even more effective than some antioxidants used by food industry. PMID:26756135

  12. Extra virgin olive oil phenolic extracts counteract the pro-oxidant effect of dietary oxidized lipids in human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Incani, Alessandra; Serra, Gessica; Atzeri, Angela; Melis, Maria Paola; Serreli, Gabriele; Bandino, Giovanni; Sedda, Piergiorgio; Campus, Marco; Tuberoso, Carlo I G; Deiana, Monica

    2016-04-01

    The phenolic fraction of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) concentrates before absorption in the intestinal lumen, where it may contribute to the modulation of enterocytes response to oxidative and inflammatory stimuli. We evaluated the ability of two monovarietal EVOOs phenolic extracts, Bosana and Nera di Gonnos/Tonda di Cagliari, typical and widespread varieties in Sardinia (Italy), to counteract in enterocytes like Caco-2 cells the pro-oxidant action of oxidized lipids, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBH) or a mixture of oxysterols of dietary origin. We confirmed that TBH treatment causes a significant increase of ROS production, GSH depletion, increase of MDA, fatty acids hydroperoxides and 7-ketocholesterol, and showed first evidence of oxidative imbalance and cell damage due to oxysterols exposure. Preincubation of cells with the phenolic extracts significantly attenuated oxidative modifications. Bosana extract showed the highest concentration of total phenols, mainly hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol, and was the most active in presence of TBH, where the free radical scavenging activity of these simple phenols seems to be a determining factor. The two extracts were equally effective, in spite of the different composition, in presence of oxysterols, where ROS production probably occurs according to different and more complex mechanisms. PMID:26911552

  13. Anti-rancidity effect of essential oils, application in the lipid stability of cooked turkey meat patties and potential implications for health.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Monica R; Tundis, Rosa; Menichini, Francesco; Duthie, Garry

    2015-02-01

    Twenty-three commercial essential oils were tested for their anti-rancidity effect and potential implications to prolong the induction time of corn oil and extend the shelf life of cooked turkey patties. Moreover, the potential health benefit was investigated through DPPH, ABTS, β-carotene bleaching, FRAP, and α-amylase inhibitory assays. Essential oils' composition was investigated by GC-MS. Cumin, thyme, clove, and cinnamon oils improved oxidative stability and increased the induction time of the corn oil 1.5-3 fold. Clove and cinnamon oils were particularly effective in delaying lipid oxidation of cooked turkey patties (time of induction 11.04 and 9.43 h) compared with the plain burger (5.04 h). Both oils are also characterized by a potent radical scavenging activity in ABTS test (IC(50) values of 1.43 and 2.05 μg/ml for cinnamon and clove, respectively). In the α-amylase inhibitory assay, cumin and grape fruits were the most potent with IC(50) values of 21.88 and 23.95 μg/ml, respectively.

  14. Anti-rancidity effect of essential oils, application in the lipid stability of cooked turkey meat patties and potential implications for health.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Monica R; Tundis, Rosa; Menichini, Francesco; Duthie, Garry

    2015-02-01

    Twenty-three commercial essential oils were tested for their anti-rancidity effect and potential implications to prolong the induction time of corn oil and extend the shelf life of cooked turkey patties. Moreover, the potential health benefit was investigated through DPPH, ABTS, β-carotene bleaching, FRAP, and α-amylase inhibitory assays. Essential oils' composition was investigated by GC-MS. Cumin, thyme, clove, and cinnamon oils improved oxidative stability and increased the induction time of the corn oil 1.5-3 fold. Clove and cinnamon oils were particularly effective in delaying lipid oxidation of cooked turkey patties (time of induction 11.04 and 9.43 h) compared with the plain burger (5.04 h). Both oils are also characterized by a potent radical scavenging activity in ABTS test (IC(50) values of 1.43 and 2.05 μg/ml for cinnamon and clove, respectively). In the α-amylase inhibitory assay, cumin and grape fruits were the most potent with IC(50) values of 21.88 and 23.95 μg/ml, respectively. PMID:25265207

  15. Asymmetrical long-run dependence between oil price and US dollar exchange rate-Based on structural oil shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jiaqi; Gu, Rongbao

    2016-08-01

    The multifractal behavior in cross-correlation between oil prices and exchange rates is examined in this paper. We use the multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis to investigate the general cross-correlations, and further show that these cross-correlations are asymmetric by multifractal asymmetric cross-correlation analysis. We recover the structural oil shocks and then use these indicators to characterize the asymmetries along with oil price trend itself. Our empirical results show that their asymmetric degrees vary significantly. The sign of oil supply shock leads to the most significant asymmetry among them.

  16. Lipid classes and fatty acid regiodistribution in triacylglycerols of seed oils of two Sambucus species (S. nigra L. and S. ebulus L.).

    PubMed

    Dulf, Francisc Vasile; Oroian, Ioan; Vodnar, Dan Cristian; Socaciu, Carmen; Pintea, Adela

    2013-09-25

    The oil content and fatty acid composition of total lipids (TLs) and main lipid classes (NLs- neutral and PLs- polar lipids) in seeds of two wild Sambucus species (S. nigra and S. ebulus) from Transylvania (Romania) were determined by capillary gas chromatography (GC-MS). In addition, the positional distribution of fatty acids in seed triacylglycerols (TAGs) was determined by hydrolysis with pancreatic lipase. The seeds were found to be rich in fat (22.40-24.90 g/100g) with high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) ranging from 68.96% (S. ebulus) to 75.15% (S. nigra). High ratios of PUFAs/SFAs (saturated fatty acids), ranging from 7.06 (S. nigra) to 7.64 (S. ebulus), and low ratios of n-6/n-3, ranging from 0.84 (S. nigra) to 1.51 (S. ebulus), were determined in both oils. The lipid classes/subclasses analyzed (PLs, MAGs--monoacylglycerols, DAGs--diacylglycerols, FFAs--free fatty acids, TAGs and SEs--sterol esters) were separated and identified using thin-layer chromatography. The fatty acid compositions of the TAG fractions were practically identical to the profiles of TLs, with the same dominating fatty acids in both analyzed species. SEs and FFAs, were characterized by high proportions of SFAs. The sn-2 position of TAGs was esterified predominantly with linoleic acid (43.56% for S. nigra and 50.41% for S. ebulus).

  17. Hematological and lipid changes in newborn piglets fed milk replacer diets containing vegetable oils with different levels of n-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kramer, J K; Sauer, F D; Farnworth, E R; Wolynetz, M S; Jones, G; Rock, G A

    1994-12-01

    To test if linolenic acid (18:3n-3) from vegetable oils would affect bleeding times and platelet counts in newborns, piglets were used as a model fed milk replacer diets containing 25% (by wt) vegetable oils or oil mixtures for 28 d and compared to sow-reared piglets. The oils tested included soybean, canola, olive, high oleic sunflower (HOAS), a canola/coconut mixture and a mixture of oils mimicking canola in fatty acid composition. All piglets fed the milk replacer diets showed normal growth. Bleeding times increased after birth from 4-6 min to 7-10 min by week 4 (P < 0.001), and were higher in pigs fed diets containing 18:3n-3, as well as in sow-reared piglets receiving n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the milk, as compared to diets low in 18:3n-3. Platelet numbers increased within the first week in newborn piglets from 300 to 550 x 10(9)/L, and remained high thereafter. Milk replacer diets, containing vegetable oils, generally showed a transient delay in the rise of platelet numbers, which was partially associated with an increased platelet volume. The oils showed differences in the length of delay, but by the third week of age, all platelet counts were > 500 x 10(9)/L. The delay in rise in platelet counts appeared to be related to the fatty acid composition of the oil, as the effect was reproduced by a mixture of oils with a certain fatty acid profile, and disappeared upon the addition of saturated fatty acids to the vegetable oil. There were no alterations in the coagulation factors due to the dietary oils. Blood plasma, platelets and red blood cell membranes showed increased levels of 18:3n-3 and long-chain n-3 PUFA in response to dietary 18:3n-3. The level of saturated fatty acids in blood lipids was generally lower in canola and HOAS oil-fed piglets as compared to piglets fed soybean oil or reared with the sow. The results suggest that consumption of milk replacer diets containing vegetable oils rich in 18:3n-3 does not represent a bleeding risk

  18. Ca(2+)-mediated anionic lipid-plasmid DNA lipoplexes. Electrochemical, structural, and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Barrán-Berdón, Ana L; Yélamos, Belén; Malfois, Marc; Aicart, Emilio; Junquera, Elena

    2014-10-01

    Several experimental methods, such as zeta potential, gel electrophoresis, small-angle X-ray scattering, gene transfection, fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and cell viability/cytotoxicity assays, have been used to analyze the potential of anionic lipids (AL) as effective nontoxic and nonviral DNA vectors, assisted by divalent cations. The lipoplexes studied are those comprised of the green fluorescent protein-encoding plasmid DNA pEGFP-C3, an anionic lipid as 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (DOPG) or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (DOPS), and a zwitterionic lipid, the 1,2-dioleoyl-sn -glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE, not charged at physiological pH). The studies have been carried on at different liposome and lipoplex compositions and in the presence of a variety of [Ca2+]. Electrochemical experiments reveal that DOPG/DOPE and DOPS/DOPE anionic liposomes may compact more effectively pDNA at low molar fractions (with an excess of DOPE) and at AL/pDNA ratios ≈20. Calcium concentrations around 15-20 mM are needed to yield lipoplexes neutral or slightly positive. From a structural standpoint, DOPG/DOPE-Ca2+-pDNA lipoplexes are self-assembled into a HIIc phase (inverted cylindrical micelles in hexagonal ordering with plasmid supercoils inside the cylinders), while DOPS/DOPE-Ca2+-pDNA lipoplexes show two phases in coexistence: one classical HIIc phase which contains pDNA supercoils and one Lα phase without pDNA among the lamellae, i.e., a lamellar stack of lipidic bilayers held together by Ca2+ bridges. Transfection and cell viability studies were done with HEK293T and HeLa cells in the presence of serum. Lipoplexes herein studied show moderate-to-low transfection levels combined with moderate-to-high cell viability, comparable to those yield by Lipofectamine2000*, which is a cationic lipid (CL) standard formulation, but none of them improve the output of typical CL gen vectors, mostly if they are gemini or dendritic

  19. Network formation of lipid membranes: Triggering structural transitions by chain melting

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Matthias F.; Marsh, Derek; Jahn, Wolfgang; Kloesgen, Beate; Heimburg, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Phospholipids when dispersed in excess water generally form vesicular membrane structures. Cryo-transmission and freeze-fracture electron microscopy are combined here with calorimetry and viscometry to demonstrate the reversible conversion of phosphatidylglycerol aqueous vesicle suspensions to a three-dimensional structure that consists of extended bilayer networks. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that the structural transitions arise from two effects: (i) the enhanced membrane elasticity accompanying the lipid state fluctuations on chain melting and (ii) solvent-associated interactions (including electrostatics) that favor a change in membrane curvature. The material properties of the hydrogels and their reversible formation offer the possibility of future applications, for example in drug delivery, the design of structural switches, or for understanding vesicle fusion or fission processes. PMID:10588702

  20. Structure, location, and lipid perturbations of melittin at the membrane interface.

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, K; Dempsey, C E; White, S H

    2001-01-01

    Melittin is arguably the most widely studied amphipathic, membrane-lytic alpha-helical peptide. Although several lines of evidence suggest an interfacial membrane location at low concentrations, melittin's exact position and depth of penetration into the hydrocarbon core are unknown. Furthermore, the structural basis for its lytic action remains largely a matter of conjecture. Using a novel x-ray absolute-scale refinement method, we have now determined the location, orientation, and likely conformation of monomeric melittin in oriented phosphocholine lipid multilayers. Its helical axis is aligned parallel to the bilayer plane at the depth of the glycerol groups, but its average conformation differs from the crystallographic structure. As observed earlier for another amphipathic alpha-helical peptide, the lipid perturbations induced by melittin are remarkably modest. Small bilayer perturbations thus appear to be a general feature of amphipathic helices at low concentrations. In contrast, a dimeric form of melittin causes larger structural perturbations under otherwise identical conditions. These results provide direct structural evidence that self-association of amphipathic helices may be the crucial initial step toward membrane lysis. PMID:11159447

  1. Fish oil prevents colon cancer by modulation of structure and function of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Navneet; Sharma, Gayatri; Rani, Isha; Renuka; Bhatnagar, Archana

    2016-08-01

    Cancer cells are more susceptible to metabolic perturbations due to impaired electron transport chain (ETC) that promote uncontrolled proliferation. Mitochondria play a pivotal role in bioenergetics and apoptosis, hence are considered as a promising target in tumor cell eradication. Therefore, the present study is designed to elucidate chemopreventive action of fish oil (FO) in combination with corn oil (CO) on mitochondria in colorectal cancer (CRC). Male Wistar rats were divided into groups depending on dietary regimen-Control group, FO+CO(1:1) and FO+CO(2.5:1). These groups were further subdivided depending on whether these received a weekly intraperitoneal injection of ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) or N,N-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) for a period of 4 weeks. The animals sacrificed 48h and 16 weeks after EDTA/DMH treatment constituted initiation and post-initiation phase respectively. The structural and functional alterations in mitochondria were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by assaying electron transport chain (ETC) enzymes. Mitochondrial lipid composition and cholesterol levels were also assessed. DMH treatment led to mitochondrial degeneration, disrupted cristae and a significant decrease in ETC complexes suggestive of metabolic reprogramming. Moreover, an increase in cholesterol and cardiolipin (CL) levels in post-initiation phase led to evasion of apoptosis. FO in both the ratios resulted in stabilization and increase in number of mitochondria, however, FO+CO(2.5:1)+DMH group also exhibited mitophagy and crystolysis alongwith altered dynamics in ETC which facilitated apoptosis. It also decreased cholesterol and CL levels to increase apoptosis. Fish oil targets mitochondria in a dose dependent manner that augments apoptosis and hence attenuates carcinogenesis. PMID:27470343

  2. Effect of Lipid Partitioning on Predictions of Acute Toxicity of Oil Sands Process Affected Water to Embryos of Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Morandi, Garrett D; Zhang, Kun; Wiseman, Steve B; Pereira, Alberto Dos Santos; Martin, Jonathan W; Giesy, John P

    2016-08-16

    Dissolved organic compounds in oil sands process affected water (OSPW) are known to be responsible for most of its toxicity to aquatic organisms, but the complexity of this mixture prevents use of traditional bottom-up approaches for predicting toxicities of mixtures. Therefore, a top-down approach to predict toxicity of the dissolved organic fraction of OSPW was developed and tested. Accurate masses (i.e., m/z) determined by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry in negative and positive ionization modes were used to assign empirical chemical formulas to each chemical species in the mixture. For each chemical species, a predictive measure of lipid accumulation was estimated by stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) to poly(dimethyl)siloxane, or by partitioning to solid-supported lipid membranes (SSLM). A narcosis mode of action was assumed and the target-lipid model was used to estimate potencies of mixtures by assuming strict additivity. A model developed using a combination of the SBSE and SSLM lipid partitioning estimates, whereby the accumulation of chemicals to neutral and polar lipids was explicitly considered, was best for predicting empirical values of LC50 in 96-h acute toxicity tests with embryos of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Model predictions were within 4-fold of observed toxicity for 75% of OSPW samples, and within 8.5-fold for all samples tested, which is comparable to the range of interlaboratory variability for in vivo toxicity testing. PMID:27420640

  3. Effect of acetone accumulation on structure and dynamics of lipid membranes studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Posokhov, Yevgen O; Kyrychenko, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The modulation of the properties and function of cell membranes by small volatile substances is important for many biomedical applications. Despite available experimental results, molecular mechanisms of action of inhalants and organic solvents, such as acetone, on lipid membranes remain not well understood. To gain a better understanding of how acetone interacts with membranes, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a POPC bilayer in aqueous solution in the presence of acetone, whose concentration was varied from 2.8 to 11.2 mol%. The MD simulations of passive distribution of acetone between a bulk water phase and a lipid bilayer show that acetone favors partitioning into the water-free region of the bilayer, located near the carbonyl groups of the phospholipids and at the beginning of the hydrocarbon core of the lipid membrane. Using MD umbrella sampling, we found that the permeability barrier of ~0.5 kcal/mol exists for acetone partitioning into the membrane. In addition, a Gibbs free energy profile of the acetone penetration across a bilayer demonstrates a favorable potential energy well of -3.6 kcal/mol, located at 15-16Å from the bilayer center. The analysis of the structural and dynamics properties of the model membrane revealed that the POPC bilayer can tolerate the presence of acetone in the concentration range of 2.8-5.6 mol%. The accumulation of the higher acetone concentration of 11.2 mol% results, however, in drastic disordering of phospholipid packing and the increase in the membrane fluidity. The acetone molecules push the lipid heads apart and, hence, act as spacers in the headgroup region. This effect leads to the increase in the average headgroup area per molecule. In addition, the acyl tail region of the membrane also becomes less dense. We suggest, therefore, that the molecular mechanism of acetone action on the phospholipid bilayer has many common features with the effects of short chain alcohols, DMSO, and

  4. Chains, Sheets and Droplets: Assemblies of Hydrophobic Gold Nanocrystals with Saturated Phosphatidylcholine Lipid and Squalene

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Michael R.; Bosoy, Christian; Yu, Yixuan; Korgel, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Assemblies of saturated 1,2-diacyl-phosphatidylcholine lipid and hydrophobic dodecanethiol-capped 1.8 nm diameter gold nanocrystals were studied as a function of lipid chain length and the addition of the naturally-occurring oil, squalene. The gold nanocrystals formed various lipid-stabilized agglomerates, sometimes fusing with lipid vesicle bilayers. The nanocrystal assembly structure depended on the hydrocarbon chain length of the lipid fatty acids. Lipid with the shortest fatty acid length studied, dilauroyl-phosphatidylcholine, created extended chains of gold nanocrystals. Lipid with slightly longer fatty acid chains created planar sheets of nanocrystals. Further increases of the fatty acid chain length led to spherical agglomerates. The inclusion of squalene led to lipid- and nanocrystal-coated oil droplets. PMID:23033891

  5. Influence of Hydrophobic Mismatch on Structures and Dynamics of Gramicidin A and Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taehoon; Lee, Kyu Il; Morris, Phillip; Pastor, Richard W.; Andersen, Olaf S.; Im, Wonpil

    2012-01-01

    Gramicidin A (gA) is a 15-amino-acid antibiotic peptide with an alternating L-D sequence, which forms (dimeric) bilayer-spanning, monovalent cation channels in biological membranes and synthetic bilayers. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of gA dimers and monomers in all-atom, explicit dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers. The variation in acyl chain length among these different phospholipids provides a way to alter gA-bilayer interactions by varying the bilayer hydrophobic thickness, and to determine the influence of hydrophobic mismatch on the structure and dynamics of both gA channels (and monomeric subunits) and the host bilayers. The simulations show that the channel structure varied little with changes in hydrophobic mismatch, and that the lipid bilayer adapts to the bilayer-spanning channel to minimize the exposure of hydrophobic residues. The bilayer thickness, however, did not vary monotonically as a function of radial distance from the channel. In all simulations, there was an initial decrease in thickness within 4–5 Å from the channel, which was followed by an increase in DOPC and POPC or a further decrease in DLPC and DMPC bilayers. The bilayer thickness varied little in the monomer simulations—except one of three independent simulations for DMPC and all three DLPC simulations, where the bilayer thinned to allow a single subunit to form a bilayer-spanning water-permeable pore. The radial dependence of local lipid area and bilayer compressibility is also nonmonotonic in the first shell around gA dimers due to gA-phospholipid interactions and the hydrophobic mismatch. Order parameters, acyl chain dynamics, and diffusion constants also differ between the lipids in the first shell and the bulk. The lipid behaviors in the first shell around gA dimers are more complex than predicted from a simple mismatch

  6. Influence of hydrophobic mismatch on structures and dynamics of gramicidin a and lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Lee, Kyu Il; Morris, Phillip; Pastor, Richard W; Andersen, Olaf S; Im, Wonpil

    2012-04-01

    Gramicidin A (gA) is a 15-amino-acid antibiotic peptide with an alternating L-D sequence, which forms (dimeric) bilayer-spanning, monovalent cation channels in biological membranes and synthetic bilayers. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of gA dimers and monomers in all-atom, explicit dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers. The variation in acyl chain length among these different phospholipids provides a way to alter gA-bilayer interactions by varying the bilayer hydrophobic thickness, and to determine the influence of hydrophobic mismatch on the structure and dynamics of both gA channels (and monomeric subunits) and the host bilayers. The simulations show that the channel structure varied little with changes in hydrophobic mismatch, and that the lipid bilayer adapts to the bilayer-spanning channel to minimize the exposure of hydrophobic residues. The bilayer thickness, however, did not vary monotonically as a function of radial distance from the channel. In all simulations, there was an initial decrease in thickness within 4-5 Å from the channel, which was followed by an increase in DOPC and POPC or a further decrease in DLPC and DMPC bilayers. The bilayer thickness varied little in the monomer simulations-except one of three independent simulations for DMPC and all three DLPC simulations, where the bilayer thinned to allow a single subunit to form a bilayer-spanning water-permeable pore. The radial dependence of local lipid area and bilayer compressibility is also nonmonotonic in the first shell around gA dimers due to gA-phospholipid interactions and the hydrophobic mismatch. Order parameters, acyl chain dynamics, and diffusion constants also differ between the lipids in the first shell and the bulk. The lipid behaviors in the first shell around gA dimers are more complex than predicted from a simple mismatch model

  7. Effect of dietary fish oil on the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in liver and skeletal muscle of lactating sows.

    PubMed

    Gessner, D K; Gröne, B; Rosenbaum, S; Most, E; Hillen, S; Becker, S; Erhardt, G; Reiner, G; Eder, K

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that dietary supplementation of fish oil as a source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) influences the expression of target genes of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP)-1 and (SREBP)-2 involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis and fatty acid and cholesterol metabolism in the liver, and moreover activates the expression of target genes of peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR)-α involved in TAG and fatty acid catabolism in liver and skeletal muscle. Twenty lactating sows were fed a control diet or a fish oil diet with either 50 g of a mixture of palm oil and soya bean oil (4:1, w/w) or fish oil per kg. The diet of the fish oil group contained 19.1 g of n-3 PUFA (mainly 20:5 n-3 and 22:6 n-3) per 100 g of total fatty acids, while the diet of the control group contained 2.4 g of n-3 PUFA (mainly 18:3 n-3) per 100 g of total fatty acids. The fish oil group had reduced relative mRNA concentrations of various target genes of SREBP-1 involved in fatty acid and TAG synthesis in comparison with the control group (p < 0.05). Relative mRNA concentrations of target genes of PPARα involved in fatty acid catabolism in both liver and muscle, and mRNA concentrations of target genes of SREBP-2 involved in cholesterol synthesis and uptake were not influenced by fish oil supplementation. Concentrations of cholesterol and TAG in plasma, fat content of milk and weight gains of litters during the suckling period were not different between the two groups of sows. In conclusion, this study suggests that fish oil has only minor effects on hepatic lipid metabolism, which are non-critical with respect to milk production in sows.

  8. Enhanced lipid accumulation and biodiesel production by oleaginous Chlorella protothecoides under a structured heterotrophic-iron (II) induction strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuqin; Mu, Jinxiu; Chen, Di; Xu, Hua; Han, Fangxin

    2015-05-01

    A structured heterotrophic-iron (II) induction (HII) strategy was proposed to enhance lipid accumulation in oleaginous Chlorella protothecoides. C. protothecoides subjected to heterotrophic-iron (II) induction achieved a favorable lipid accumulation up to 62 % and a maximum lipid productivity of 820.17 mg/day, representing 2.78-fold and 3.64-fold increase respectively over heterotrophic cultivation alone. HII-induced cells produced significantly elevated levels of 16:0, 18:1(Δ9), and 18:2(Δ9,12) fatty acids (over 90 %). The lipid contents and plant lipid-like fatty acid compositions exhibit the potential of HII-induced C. protothecoides as biodiesel feedstock. Furthermore, 31 altered proteins in HII-induced algal cells were successfully identified. These differentially expressed proteins were assigned into nine molecular function categories, including carbohydrate metabolism, lipid biosynthesis, Calvin cycle, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, energy and transport, protein biosynthesis, regulate and defense, and unclassified. Analysis using the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes and gene ontology annotation showed that malic enzyme, acyltransferase, and ACP were key metabolic checkpoints found to modulate lipid accumulation in C. protothecoides. The results provided possible applications of HII cultivation strategy in other microalgal species and new possibilities in developing genetic and metabolic engineering microalgae for desirable lipid productivity.

  9. Influence of the type of vegetable oil on the drug release profile from lipid-core nanocapsules and in vivo genotoxicity study.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Lucas Almeida; Frescura, Viviane; Fiel, Luana; Coradini, Karine; Ourique, Aline Ferreira; Emanuelli, Tatiana; Quatrin, Andréia; Tedesco, Solange; Silva, Cristiane B da; Guterres, Silvia Staniçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver

    2014-11-01

    The use of rice bran (RB), soybean (SB) or sunflower seed (SF) oils to prepare lipid-core nanocapsules (LNCs) as controlled drug delivery systems was investigated. LNCs were prepared by interfacial deposition using the preformed polymer method. All formulations showed negative zeta potential and adequate nanotechnological characteristics (particle size 220-230  nm, polydispersity index < 0.20). The environmental safety was evaluated through an in vivo protocol (Allium cepa test) and LNCs containing RB, SB or SF oils did not present genotoxic potential. Clobetasol propionate (CP) was selected as a model drug to evaluate the influence of the type of vegetable oil on the control of the drug release from LNCs. Biphasic drug release profiles were observed for all formulations. After 168  h, the concentration of drug released from the formulation containing SF oil was lower (0.36  mg/mL) than from formulations containing SB (0.40  mg/mL) or RB oil (0.45  mg/mL). Good correlations between the consistency indices for the LNC cores and the burst and sustained drug release rate constants were obtained. Therefore, the type of the vegetal oil was shown as an important factor governing the control of drug release from LNCs.

  10. Avocado, sunflower and olive oils as replacers of pork back-fat in burger patties: effect on lipid composition, oxidative stability and quality traits.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carpena, J G; Morcuende, D; Estévez, M

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the effects of avocado, sunflower and olive oils used as back-fat replacers, on the fatty acid composition, oxidative stability, volatiles profile and color and texture properties of cooked pork patties. The vegetable oils modified the fatty acid profiles of the patties by lowering the percentages of SFA (from 36.96% to ~25.30%) and reducing the atherogenic index (from 0.41 to ~0.24). Vegetable oils had higher amounts of antioxidant compounds such as tocopherols (10.8-53.9 mg/100 g) than back-fat (5.9 mg/100 g). Consistently, patties manufactured with the oils had significantly lower amounts of lipid and protein oxidation products than control patties. Avocado oil contributed with specific aroma-active terpenes to patties and had a significant impact on particular color and texture parameters. The results from this study highlight the technological applications of the vegetable oils as food ingredients in the design of healthier meat commodities.

  11. Curcuma oil attenuates accelerated atherosclerosis and macrophage foam-cell formation by modulating genes involved in plaque stability, lipid homeostasis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishal; Rana, Minakshi; Jain, Manish; Singh, Niharika; Naqvi, Arshi; Malasoni, Richa; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-14

    In the present study, the anti-atherosclerotic effect and the underlying mechanism of curcuma oil (C. oil), a lipophilic fraction from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), was evaluated in a hamster model of accelerated atherosclerosis and in THP-1 macrophages. Male golden Syrian hamsters were subjected to partial carotid ligation (PCL) or FeCl3-induced arterial oxidative injury (Ox-injury) after 1 week of treatment with a high-cholesterol (HC) diet or HC diet plus C. oil (100 and 300 mg/kg, orally). Hamsters fed with the HC diet were analysed at 1, 3 and 5 weeks following carotid injury. The HC diet plus C. oil-fed group was analysed at 5 weeks. In hyperlipidaemic hamsters with PCL or Ox-injury, C. oil (300 mg/kg) reduced elevated plasma and aortic lipid levels, arterial macrophage accumulation, and stenosis when compared with those subjected to arterial injury alone. Similarly, elevated mRNA transcripts of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, cluster of differentiation 45 (CD45), TNF-α, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-1β and IL-6 were reduced in atherosclerotic arteries, while those of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and IL-10 were increased after the C. oil treatment (300 mg/kg). The treatment with C. oil prevented HC diet- and oxidised LDL (OxLDL)-induced lipid accumulation, decreased the mRNA expression of CD68 and CD36, and increased the mRNA expression of PPARα, LXRα, ABCA1 and ABCG1 in both hyperlipidaemic hamster-derived peritoneal and THP-1 macrophages. The administration of C. oil suppressed the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ and increased the expression of TGF-β in peritoneal macrophages. In THP-1 macrophages, C. oil supplementation prevented OxLDL-induced production of TNF-α and IL-1β and increased the levels of TGF-β. The present study shows that C. oil attenuates arterial injury-induced accelerated atherosclerosis, inflammation and macrophage foam-cell formation.

  12. Lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects of omega 3 ethyl esters and krill oil: a randomized, cross-over, clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Rosticci, Martina; Morbini, Martino; Cagnati, Marcella; Grandi, Elisa; Parini, Angelo; Borghi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) derived from different sources could have different lipid-lowering effects in humans. The main aim of our study was to compare the short-term triglyceride-lowering efficacy of krill oil and purified omega 3 ethyl ester PUFAs in mildly overweight hypertriglyceridemic subjects. Material and methods This double-blind, randomized clinical trial was carried out in 25 moderately hypertriglyceridemic subjects (TG = 150–500 mg/dl). After a 4-week run-in, participants were allocated to treatment with similar pills containing omega 3 ethyl ester PUFAs 1000 mg twice a day vs. krill oil 500 mg twice a day. After 4 weeks of treatment, participants were asked to observe a 4-week wash-out period, and they were then assigned to the alternative treatment for a further period of 4 weeks. Results Although both PUFA sources were able to improve TG plasma levels, esterified omega 3 PUFAs were more efficacious than krill oil (p < 0.05). Nonetheless, only krill oil treatment was able to significantly improve high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI levels, compared to both baseline (p < 0.05) and end of treatment with esterified omega 3 PUFAs (p < 0.05) values. Both treatments were able to significantly reduce high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels from the baseline (p < 0.05), but krill oil improved it more efficaciously than esterified omega 3 PUFAs (p < 0.05). Conclusions Krill oil has lipid-lowering effects comparable with those obtained through a 4-fold higher dose of purified omega 3 ethyl ester PUFAs in mildly overweight hypertriglyceridemic subjects, while more efficaciously reducing hs-CRP. PMID:27279841

  13. Structural organisation and phase behaviour of a stratum corneum lipid analogue: ceramide 3A.

    PubMed

    Garidel, Patrick

    2006-05-21

    The thermotropic phase behaviour and structural organisation of ceramide N-linoeoyl-phytosphingosine (ceramide 3A) is investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Its polymorphism and structural properties are compared with two ceramides of the type III class with various hydrocarbon chain saturation degrees. After hydration the main phase transition temperature of ceramide 3A is found at 76 degrees C with a phase transition enthalpy of +29 kJ mol(-1). Analysing the frequency of methylene stretching vibrations (by infrared spectroscopy) reveals that the fluidity (amount of trans-gauche isomers) is strongly increased for ceramide 3A compared to its stearoyl ceramide type III analogue. After lipid hydration, the acyl chains of all investigated phytosphingosine ceramides of type III adopt a hexagonal-like chain packing. The amide I and amide II vibrations are quite sensitive to the phase transition of the ceramide. The corresponding band analysis reveals strong inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds between the amide and hydroxyl groups in the ceramide head groups. The H-bonding network and conformation of the head group of ceramide 3A is only slightly influenced by hydration. The water penetration capacity of ceramide 3A is, however, considerably larger compared to other phytosphingosine derivatives. The structural and organisational properties of ceramides of type III class are discussed with respect to their physiological relevancies for the stratum corneum lipid barrier property of the skin. PMID:16688309

  14. Structural properties of archaeal lipid bilayers: small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Polak, Andraž; Tarek, Mounir; Tomšič, Matija; Valant, Janez; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Jamnik, Andrej; Kramar, Peter; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2014-07-22

    Aeropyrum pernix is an aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows in harsh environmental conditions and as such possesses unique structural and metabolic features. Its membrane interfaces with the extreme environment and is the first line of defense from external factors. Therefore, lipids composing this membrane have special moieties that increase its stability. The membrane of A. pernix is composed predominantly of two polar lipids 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-1'(2'-O-α-D-glucosyl)-myo-inositol (AGI) and 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-myo-inositol (AI). Both have methyl branches in their lipid tails and ether linkages and carbohydrates in their headgroup. These moieties significantly affect the structure and dynamics of the bilayer. To provide a molecular level insight into these characteristics, we used here Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of lipid bilayers of composition similar to those of the archaeal membranes. First, we show that the electron density profiles along the normal to the bilayers derived from the simulations are in good agreement with the profiles obtained by the small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique, which provides confidence in the force fields used. Analyses of the simulation data show that the archaeal lipid bilayers are less hydrated than conventional phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids and that their structure is not affected by the salt present in the surrounding solution. Furthermore, the lateral pressure in their hydrophobic core, due to the presence of the branched tails, is much higher than that at PC-based lipid bilayers. Both the methyl branched tails and the special headgroup moieties contribute to slow drastically the lateral diffusion of the lipids. Furthermore, we found that the lipid head groups associate via hydrogen bonding, which affects their reorientational dynamics. All together, our data provide links between the microscopic properties of these membranes and their overall

  15. Impact of iron, chelators, and free fatty acids on lipid oxidation in low-moisture crackers.

    PubMed

    Barden, Leann; Vollmer, Daniel; Johnson, David; Decker, Eric

    2015-02-18

    This research strove to understand the relationship between physical structure and oxidative stability in crackers since mechanisms of lipid oxidation are poorly understood in low-moisture foods. Confocal microscopy showed that lipids formed a continuous matrix surrounding starch granules, and starch-lipid, lipid-air, and protein-lipid interfaces were observed. Unlike bulk oils, meats, and emulsions, lipid hydroperoxides exhibited greater stability in low-moisture crackers as hexanal formation was delayed >20 d. Iron, added at 10 times the concentrations normally found in enriched flour, did not increase oxidation rates compared to the control. EDTA may reduce endogenous iron activity but not as greatly as in other matrices. Addition of fatty acids up to 1.0% of total lipid weight did not statistically affect lipid oxidation lag phases. The unique structure of low-moisture foods clearly affects their resistance to metal-promoted lipid oxidation. PMID:25641252

  16. Impact of iron, chelators, and free fatty acids on lipid oxidation in low-moisture crackers.

    PubMed

    Barden, Leann; Vollmer, Daniel; Johnson, David; Decker, Eric

    2015-02-18

    This research strove to understand t