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Sample records for oja toivo jrime

  1. Modulated Hebb-Oja learning rule--a method for principal subspace analysis.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Marko V; Ogawa, Hidemitsu

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents analysis of the recently proposed modulated Hebb-Oja (MHO) method that performs linear mapping to a lower-dimensional subspace. Principal component subspace is the method that will be analyzed. Comparing to some other well-known methods for yielding principal component subspace (e.g., Oja's Subspace Learning Algorithm), the proposed method has one feature that could be seen as desirable from the biological point of view--synaptic efficacy learning rule does not need the explicit information about the value of the other efficacies to make individual efficacy modification. Also, the simplicity of the "neural circuits" that perform global computations and a fact that their number does not depend on the number of input and output neurons, could be seen as good features of the proposed method.

  2. Modulated Hebb-Oja learning rule--a method for principal subspace analysis.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Marko V; Ogawa, Hidemitsu

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents analysis of the recently proposed modulated Hebb-Oja (MHO) method that performs linear mapping to a lower-dimensional subspace. Principal component subspace is the method that will be analyzed. Comparing to some other well-known methods for yielding principal component subspace (e.g., Oja's Subspace Learning Algorithm), the proposed method has one feature that could be seen as desirable from the biological point of view--synaptic efficacy learning rule does not need the explicit information about the value of the other efficacies to make individual efficacy modification. Also, the simplicity of the "neural circuits" that perform global computations and a fact that their number does not depend on the number of input and output neurons, could be seen as good features of the proposed method. PMID:16566463

  3. The effect of Oja-titun market effluent on the chemical quality of receiving OPA reservoir in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Eludoyin, A O; Ofoezie, I E; Ogunkoya, O O

    2004-09-01

    The effect of market effluent from the Oja-titun market in Ile-Ife, Nigeria on the chemical quality of the Opa Reservoir located 3.5 km downstream was investigated between February and November 2000. Water samples were collected in February, May, August and November from 16 sites, four along each of the market drainage channels (MDC), market stream, tributary stream and the Opa River and Reservoir. The peak level of each variable-biochemical oxygen demand, temperature, total alkalinity, Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), PO(4)(3+), SO(4)(2+), Cl(-), NO(3)(-), Pb and Zn-occurred at the MDC, and decreased significantly downstream, except pH, conductivity and dissolved oxygen, which increased. Seasonal fluctuation in most variables was pronounced. Generally, there were high values in the early dry and dry seasons and low values in the rainy and early rainy seasons. Comparison of the reservoir water with international limitation standards for drinking water supply showed that the quality of the reservoir water was very low and that treatment required to achieve minimum limitation standards for drinking water would be both intensive and expensive. The study concluded that the stream borne effluent from the market impacts significantly on the chemical quality of the reservoir water although other tributaries within the Reservoir's catchment are other possible sources of pollutants in the reservoir.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 1961-1999 UBV photometry of 14 variables (Oja, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oja, T.

    2011-11-01

    Photoelectric UBV photometry of the variable stars V636 Cas, alpha UMi, V440 Per, zeta Gem, UU Cnc, TYC2-880-515-1, V473 Lyr, chi Cyg, V1794 Cyg, DT Cyg, V1334 Cyg, V532 Cyg, pi Aqr, and DY Peg is reported. (15 data files).

  5. Heavy metal-induced differential gene expression of metallothionein in Javanese medaka, Oryzias javanicus.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seonock; Yum, Seungshic; Jung, Jee Hyun; Shim, Won Joon; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2006-01-01

    A metallothionein (MT) gene was isolated for the first time from Javanese medaka, Oryzias javanicus, which shows high adaptability from freshwater to seawater. The full-length cDNA of MT from O. javanicus (OjaMT) comprises 349 bp, excluding the poly(A)+ stretch, and codes for a total of 60 amino acids. The positions of cysteine residues are highly conserved. The pattern of OjaMT expression induced by six heavy metals was analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The level of hepatic OjaMT mRNA was increased in a dose-dependent manner by Ag, Cd, Cu, and Zn after 24 h of exposure. However, after Cr and Ni exposure, a significant decrease in OjaMT levels was observed. Cadmium-induced OjaMT expression was detectable in fishes as young as 3 months. After Cd exposure, OjaMT induction was prominent in intestine and liver and moderate in muscle and gill. OjaMT mRNA levels could represent a good biomarker for monitoring heavy metals in seawater. PMID:16967182

  6. Global Realities: Celebrating Our Differences, Honoring Our Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walz, Garry R., Ed.; Knowdell, Richard L., Ed.

    This publication contains papers based on program presentations from the 2003 International Career Development Conference. Chapters include: (1) How to Turn Your Passion into a Profit (S. Abbott); (2) Harnessing the Power of Career Transition Groups (M. Adoradio and A. Oja); (3) All the Worlds a Stage Using Theatre in Career Counseling (P.…

  7. Effects of Dose Frequency of Early Communication Intervention in Young Children with and without Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Paul; Woynaroski, Tiffany; Fey, Marc; Warren, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Children with intellectual disability were randomly assigned to receive Milieu Communication Teaching (MCT) at one 1-hr session per week (low dose frequency, LDF) or five 1-hr sessions per week (high dose frequency, HDF) over 9 months (Fey, Yoder, Warren, & Bredin-Oja, 2013. Non-Down syndrome (NDS) and Down syndrome (DS) subgroups were matched…

  8. Mind in ayurveda.

    PubMed

    Rao, A Venkoba

    2002-07-01

    Ayurveda now among the alternative complementary systems of medicine is over 5000 years old. Its origin and the compilation of Caraka Samhita are noted. The nature of mind as a sensory and a motor organ, its structure and functions are discussed. The concept of Thdosha theory and Trigunas are explained besides the so-called master-forms of Doshas namely Prana, Tejas and Ojas. The constituional and tempermental types depending upon the doshas are described. These determine diagnoses and guide treatment. Ayurveda is highlighted as a holistic system with its concern for prevention of disease and promotion of health. Disease denotes failure of prophylaxis. Some methods of Ayurvedic therapy are mentioned.

  9. A new modulated Hebbian learning rule--biologically plausible method for local computation of a principal subspace.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Marko; Ogawa, Hidemitsu

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents one possible implementation of a transformation that performs linear mapping to a lower-dimensional subspace. Principal component subspace will be the one that will be analyzed. Idea implemented in this paper represents generalization of the recently proposed infinity OH neural method for principal component extraction. The calculations in the newly proposed method are performed locally--a feature which is usually considered as desirable from the biological point of view. Comparing to some other wellknown methods, proposed synaptic efficacy learning rule requires less information about the value of the other efficacies to make single efficacy modification. Synaptic efficacies are modified by implementation of Modulated Hebb-type (MH) learning rule. Slightly modified MH algorithm named Modulated Hebb Oja (MHO) algorithm, will be also introduced. Structural similarity of the proposed network with part of the retinal circuit will be presented, too.

  10. Online kernel principal component analysis: a reduced-order model.

    PubMed

    Honeine, Paul

    2012-09-01

    Kernel principal component analysis (kernel-PCA) is an elegant nonlinear extension of one of the most used data analysis and dimensionality reduction techniques, the principal component analysis. In this paper, we propose an online algorithm for kernel-PCA. To this end, we examine a kernel-based version of Oja's rule, initially put forward to extract a linear principal axe. As with most kernel-based machines, the model order equals the number of available observations. To provide an online scheme, we propose to control the model order. We discuss theoretical results, such as an upper bound on the error of approximating the principal functions with the reduced-order model. We derive a recursive algorithm to discover the first principal axis, and extend it to multiple axes. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, both on synthetic data set and on images of handwritten digits, with comparison to classical kernel-PCA and iterative kernel-PCA.

  11. A new modulated Hebbian learning rule--biologically plausible method for local computation of a principal subspace.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Marko; Ogawa, Hidemitsu

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents one possible implementation of a transformation that performs linear mapping to a lower-dimensional subspace. Principal component subspace will be the one that will be analyzed. Idea implemented in this paper represents generalization of the recently proposed infinity OH neural method for principal component extraction. The calculations in the newly proposed method are performed locally--a feature which is usually considered as desirable from the biological point of view. Comparing to some other wellknown methods, proposed synaptic efficacy learning rule requires less information about the value of the other efficacies to make single efficacy modification. Synaptic efficacies are modified by implementation of Modulated Hebb-type (MH) learning rule. Slightly modified MH algorithm named Modulated Hebb Oja (MHO) algorithm, will be also introduced. Structural similarity of the proposed network with part of the retinal circuit will be presented, too. PMID:12964209

  12. A clinical study on the Naimittika Rasayana effect of Silajatu and Mamajjaka in type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjai; Singh, Girish; Pandey, Ajai Kumar; Singh, Ram Harsh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent years have shown an alarming rise in the incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) all over the world. The present management of DM it not satisfactory. Hence, alternative systems of medicine are also being explored. Prameha as described in Ayurveda is a disease synonymous with today's DM. The patients of Prameha inherently carry the risk of impaired Agni and depleted Ojas status, that is, hypometabolic and immuno-compromised state. Now the primary goal is not merely to achieve normoglycemia, but also to minimize its complications. In this context, many Ayurvedic drugs are undergoing extensive research. Aim: To evaluate the anti-diabetic, immune-enhancer and biofire balancing effects of Naimittika Rasayana drugs viz. Silajatu and Mamajjaka in type-2 DM. Materials and Methods: A total of 95 patients of type-2 DM were registered; in which 84 patients turned up for full follow-up. Patients were randomly allocated into three groups; Group-A was treated with Mamajjaka (500mg twice a day) and Group-B with Silajatu (500mg twice a day) and Group-C was treated with modern drug and assessment was done at monthly intervals for three months. Results: The selected Rasayana drugs have shown good response on subjective and objective parameters. The Mamajjaka treated patients responded better. However, as regards the reduction of post prandial blood sugar, Silajatu was superior. Conclusion: The Ayurveda-inspired holistic approach seems to have a unique response promoting Agni (biofire) and Ojas (immune strength) status leading to good health and wellness. PMID:26195903

  13. Independet Component Analyses of Ground-based Exoplanetary Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Martins-Filho, Walter; Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Pearson, Kyle; Waldmann, Ingo; Biddle, Lauren; Zellem, Robert Thomas; Alvarez-Candal, Alvaro

    2016-10-01

    Most observations of exoplanetary atmospheres are conducted when a "Hot Jupiter" exoplanet transits in front of its host star. These Jovian-sized planets have small orbital periods, on the order of days, and therefore a short transit time, making them more ameanable to observations. Measurements of Hot Jupiter transits must achieve a 10-4 level of accuracy in the flux to determine the spectral modulations of the exoplanetary atmosphere. In order to accomplish this level of precision, we need to extract systematic errors, and, for ground-based measurements, the effects of Earth's atmosphere, from the signal due to the exoplanet, which is several orders of magnitudes smaller. Currently, the effects of the terrestrial atmosphere and the some of the time-dependent systematic errors are treated by dividing the host star by a reference star at each wavelength and time step of the transit. More recently, Independent Component Analyses (ICA) have been used to remove systematic effects from the raw data of space-based observations (Waldmann 2014,2012; Morello et al.,2015,2016). ICA is a statistical method born from the ideas of the blind-source separation studies, which can be used to de-trend several independent source signals of a data set (Hyvarinen and Oja, 2000). One strength of this method is that it requires no additional prior knowledge of the system. Here, we present a study of the application of ICA to ground-based transit observations of extrasolar planets, which are affected by Earth's atmosphere. We analyze photometric data of two extrasolar planets, WASP-1b and GJ3470b, recorded by the 61" Kuiper Telescope at Stewart Observatory using the Harris B and U filters. The presentation will compare the light curve depths and their dispersions as derived from the ICA analysis to those derived by analyses that ratio of the host star to nearby reference stars.References: Waldmann, I.P. 2012 ApJ, 747, 12, Waldamann, I. P. 2014 ApJ, 780, 23; Morello G. 2015 ApJ, 806

  14. Effects of Dose Frequency of Early Communication Intervention in Young Children With and Without Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Paul J.; Woynaroski, Tiffany G.; Fey, Marc E.; Warren, Steven F.

    2014-01-01

    This study involves a re-analysis of spoken vocabulary outcomes of children with intellectual disabilities who were randomly assigned to receive Milieu Communication Teaching (MCT) at low (one 1-hour session per week) or high (five 1-hour sessions per week) dose frequency over nine months (Fey, Yoder, Warren, & Bredin-Oja, in press). Non-Down syndrome (NDS) and Down syndrome (DS) subgroups were matched on intelligence, mental age, and chronological age. A growth model including intercept, slope, and quadratic revealed that children in the NDS group had significantly more growth in spoken vocabulary than children in the DS group independent of dose frequency manipulations. Subsequent etiological subgroup analyses demonstrated that in the DS subgroup, children receiving MCT at the higher dose frequency had more spoken vocabulary growth than children receiving MCT at the lower dose frequency. Subgroup analyses also supported our previous findings that high dose frequency of MCT yielded greater vocabulary production outcomes than low dose frequency for children who played functionally with a range of objects, regardless of etiology. PMID:24450319

  15. Microbiological Safety Assessment of Fermented Cassava Flour "Lafun" Available in Ogun and Oyo States of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adebayo-Oyetoro, A O; Oyewole, O B; Obadina, A O; Omemu, M A

    2013-01-01

    The microorganisms involved in the fermentation and spoilage of fermented cassava flour were investigated. The water samples used at the different processing sites were also investigated to determine their safety status. There was predominance of Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus spp., and Escherichia coli in all samples. Coliforms were observed to be present in all of the processing water. In the fermented cassava flour, the total bacterial count ranged between 4.9 × 10(6) cfu/mL from Eleso, Bakatari, and Oja Odan processing sites and 8.10 × 10(6) cfu/mL in Eruku processing site. The majority of the microorganisms involved in the spoilage of "lafun" were found to be Aspergillus niger which ranged between 4.6 × 10(5) cfu/mL in Eleso and 8.1 × 10(5) cfu/mL in Kila. The control sample prepared in the laboratory had a low microbial load compared to samples collected from various sites and markets. PMID:26904609

  16. Lithospheric conductivity along the GGT/SVEKA transect in the Fennoscandian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahti, I.; Korja, T.; Petersen, L. B.

    2003-04-01

    LITHOSPHERIC CONDUCTIVITY ALONG THE GGT/SVEKA TRANSECT IN THE FENNOSCANDIAN SHIELD I. Lahti (1), T. Korja (1), L. Pedersen (2) and BEAR Working Group (1) Department of Geophysics, University of Oulu, Finland (2) Department of Earth Sciences, University of Uppsala, Sweden toivo.korja@oulu.fi The GGT/SVEKA transect traverses the main tectonic units in the central part of the Fennoscandian Shield in NE-SW direction. These units are the Archaean Karelian Province in the northeast and several Palaeoproterozoic arc complexes in the Svecofennian Domain in the southwest. Since 1985 over 150 magnetotelluric (MT) soundings of which 140 are short period and 10 long period soundings have been made in the survey area. We have performed several 2-D Occam inversions of the MT data using the REBOCC code (Siripunvaraporn and Egbert, 2000) to generate smooth conductivity models for the survey area. The best fitting model with the RMS error below 3.0% is obtained by using the determinant of impedance tensor as the inverted parameter. Highly conductive dipping conductors at both sides of the boundary zone between the arc complexes in southern and central Finland are seen in the final model. Both conductors represent borders of major crustal segments possibly indicating two subductions in the research area. In contrast, only minor conductivity variations are seen at the lithological boundary between the Karelian and Svecofennian domains in central Finland whereas a southwestward dipping conductor beneath the Palaeoproterozoic Kainuu Belt is revealed. The conductor suggests the presence of Palaeoproterozoic graphite bearing sedimentary rocks beneath the Archaean rocks of the Iisalmi complex. Lower crustal conductor is absent to NE from the Kainuu Belt while the conductor is present in the Palaeoproterozoic Svecofennian Domain to southwest from the Kainuu Belt. Thus, the main conductivity boundary between the Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic lithosphere is located beneath the Kainuu Belt

  17. Action spectra of photosystems II and I and quantum yield of photosynthesis in leaves in State 1.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Agu; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2014-02-01

    The spectral global quantum yield (YII, electrons/photons absorbed) of photosystem II (PSII) was measured in sunflower leaves in State 1 using monochromatic light. The global quantum yield of PSI (YI) was measured using low-intensity monochromatic light flashes and the associated transmittance change at 810nm. The 810-nm signal change was calibrated based on the number of electrons generated by PSII during the flash (4·O2 evolution) which arrived at the PSI donor side after a delay of 2ms. The intrinsic quantum yield of PSI (yI, electrons per photon absorbed by PSI) was measured at 712nm, where photon absorption by PSII was small. The results were used to resolve the individual spectra of the excitation partitioning coefficients between PSI (aI) and PSII (aII) in leaves. For comparison, pigment-protein complexes for PSII and PSI were isolated, separated by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, and their optical density was measured. A good correlation was obtained for the spectral excitation partitioning coefficients measured by these different methods. The intrinsic yield of PSI was high (yI=0.88), but it absorbed only about 1/3 of quanta; consequently, about 2/3 of quanta were absorbed by PSII, but processed with the low intrinsic yield yII=0.63. In PSII, the quantum yield of charge separation was 0.89 as detected by variable fluorescence Fv/Fm, but 29% of separated charges recombined (Laisk A, Eichelmann H and Oja V, Photosynth. Res. 113, 145-155). At wavelengths less than 580nm about 30% of excitation is absorbed by pigments poorly connected to either photosystem, most likely carotenoids bound in pigment-protein complexes.

  18. Lagrange constraint neural network for audio varying BSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold H.; Hsu, Charles C.

    2002-03-01

    Lagrange Constraint Neural Network (LCNN) is a statistical-mechanical ab-initio model without assuming the artificial neural network (ANN) model at all but derived it from the first principle of Hamilton and Lagrange Methodology: H(S,A)= f(S)- (lambda) C(s,A(x,t)) that incorporates measurement constraint C(S,A(x,t))= (lambda) ([A]S-X)+((lambda) 0-1)((Sigma) isi -1) using the vector Lagrange multiplier-(lambda) and a- priori Shannon Entropy f(S) = -(Sigma) i si log si as the Contrast function of unknown number of independent sources si. Szu et al. have first solved in 1997 the general Blind Source Separation (BSS) problem for spatial-temporal varying mixing matrix for the real world remote sensing where a large pixel footprint implies the mixing matrix [A(x,t)] necessarily fill with diurnal and seasonal variations. Because the ground truth is difficult to be ascertained in the remote sensing, we have thus illustrated in this paper, each step of the LCNN algorithm for the simulated spatial-temporal varying BSS in speech, music audio mixing. We review and compare LCNN with other popular a-posteriori Maximum Entropy methodologies defined by ANN weight matrix-[W] sigmoid-(sigma) post processing H(Y=(sigma) ([W]X)) by Bell-Sejnowski, Amari and Oja (BSAO) called Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Both are mirror symmetric of the MaxEnt methodologies and work for a constant unknown mixing matrix [A], but the major difference is whether the ensemble average is taken at neighborhood pixel data X's in BASO or at the a priori sources S variables in LCNN that dictates which method works for spatial-temporal varying [A(x,t)] that would not allow the neighborhood pixel average. We expected the success of sharper de-mixing by the LCNN method in terms of a controlled ground truth experiment in the simulation of variant mixture of two music of similar Kurtosis (15 seconds composed of Saint-Saens Swan and Rachmaninov cello concerto).

  19. PREFACE: International Conference on the Applications of the Mössbauer Effect (ICAME 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Herbert; Reissner, Michael; Steiner, Walter; Wiesinger, Günter

    2010-04-01

    . The positive atmosphere, the high attendance in the sessions and the lively discussions made the conference a great success and a memorable event. It was pointed out, that Mössbauer spectroscopy is still an interesting and powerful method with great opportunities in the future. Herbert Müller (Secretary) Michael Reissner (Chairman) This book is dedicated to our colleagues Nicol Malcom, who could not come, because he suddenly died a few weeks in advance to the conference and Hercilio Rechenberg, who died on his way home from Vienna. Conference photograph Conference Organisation Local Organizing Committee Reissner Michael (Chairman)Müller Herbert (Conference Secretary) Amthauer Georg Lottermoser WernerSteiner Walter Bauer Ernst Michor Herwig Vogl Gero Bühler-Paschen Silke Müller Martin Waas Monika Grodzicki Michael Redhammer Günther Wiesinger Günter Grössinger Roland Sassik Herbert Hilscher Gerfried Sepiol Bogdan International Programme Committee Amthauer Georg Gütlich Philipp Steiner Walter Baggio-Saitovich Elisa Litterst Fred Jochen Trautwein Alfred Xaver Berry Frank Long Gary Vogl Gero Felner Israel Nagy Denes Lajos Yoshida Yutaka Greneche Jean-Marc Rüffer Rudolf International Advisory Board Alp E ErcanGénin Jean-Marie Baggio-Saitovitch Elisa Greneche Jean-Marc Miglierini Marcel Balogh Judit Grodzicki Michael Musić Svetozar Bender Koch Christian Gütlich Philipp Nagy Dénes Lajos Berry Frank Häggström Lennart Nishida Tetsuaki Brown Dennis Hanzel Darko Pérez Alcázar German Campbell Stewart Hassaan Mohamed Yousri Rüffer Rudolf Carbucicchio Massimo Jumas Jean-Claude Ryan Dominic H Croci Simonetta Kadyrzhanov Kariat Sanchez Francisco Di Naili Katila Toivo Schünemann Volker Elzain Mohamed Kim Chul Sung Stanek Jan Fabris José Domingos Klingelhöfer Göstar Stevens John Felner Israel Langouche Guido Suzdalev Igor P Fern George R Lyubutin Igor S Szymanski Krzysztof Forder Sue D Marco Jose F Waanders Frans Gajbhiye Nandeo Mašlaň Miroslav Yoshida Yutaka

  20. Recent progresses of neural network unsupervised learning: I. Independent component analyses generalizing PCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold H.

    1999-03-01

    The early vision principle of redundancy reduction of 108 sensor excitations is understandable from computer vision viewpoint toward sparse edge maps. It is only recently derived using a truly unsupervised learning paradigm of artificial neural networks (ANN). In fact, the biological vision, Hubel- Wiesel edge maps, is reproduced seeking the underlying independent components analyses (ICA) among 102 image samples by maximizing the ANN output entropy (partial)H(V)/(partial)[W] equals (partial)[W]/(partial)t. When a pair of newborn eyes or ears meet the bustling and hustling world without supervision, they seek ICA by comparing 2 sensory measurements (x1(t), x2(t))T equalsV X(t). Assuming a linear and instantaneous mixture model of the external world X(t) equals [A] S(t), where both the mixing matrix ([A] equalsV [a1, a2] of ICA vectors and the source percentages (s1(t), s2(t))T equalsV S(t) are unknown, we seek the independent sources approximately equals [I] where the approximated sign indicates that higher order statistics (HOS) may not be trivial. Without a teacher, the ANN weight matrix [W] equalsV [w1, w2] adjusts the outputs V(t) equals tanh([W]X(t)) approximately equals [W]X(t) until no desired outputs except the (Gaussian) 'garbage' (neither YES '1' nor NO '-1' but at linear may-be range 'origin 0') defined by Gaussian covariance G equals [I] equals [W][A] Oja, Bell-Sejnowski, Amari-Cichocki, Cardoso), the LYAPONOV function L(v1,...,vn, w1,...wn,) equals E(v1,...,vn) - H(w1,...wn) is constructed as the HELMHOTZ free energy to prove both convergences of supervised energy E and unsupervised entropy H learning. Consequently, rather

  1. Titanium (IV) sol-gel chemistry in varied gravity environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Matthew; Martens, Wayde; Steinberg, Theodore

    . The test systems and experimental results obtained will be presented. 1. Okubo, T., Tsuchida, A., Okuda, T., Fujitsuna, K., Ishikawa, M., Morita, T., Tada, T. , Kinetic Analyses of Colloidal Crystallization in Microgravity -Aircraft Experiments. . Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 1999. 153: p. 515-524. 2. Okubo, T., Tsuchida, A., Kobayashi, K., Kuno, A., Morita, T., Fujishima, M., Kohno, Y., Kinetic Study of the Formation Reaction of Colloidal Silica Spheres in Microgravity Using Aircraft. Colloid Polymer Science, 1999. 277(5): p. 474-478. 3. Pienaar, C.L., Chiffoleau, G. J. A., Follens, L. R. A., Martens, J. A., Kirschhock, C. E. A., Steinberg, T. A., Effect of Gravity on the Gelation of Silica Sols. Chem. Mater., 2007. 19(4): p. 660-664. 4. Smith, D.D., et al., Effect of Microgravity on the Growth of Silica Nanostructures. Langmuir, 2000. 16(26): p. 10055-10060. 5. Zhang, X., Johnson, D.P., Manerbino, A.R., Moore, J.J., Schowengerdt, F. , Recent Mi-crogravity Results in the Synthesis of Porous Materials. AIP Conference Proceedings (Space Technology and Applications International Forum-1999, Pt. 1), 1999. 458: p. 88-93. 6. Dunbar, P.B., Bendzko, N.J.,, 1H and 13C NMR observation of the reaction of acetic acid with titanium isopropoxide. Materials Chemistry and Physics, 1999. 59: p. 26-35. 7. Krunks, M., Oja, I., T˜nsuaadu, K., Es-Souni, M., Gruselle, M., Niinistü,. L, Thermoanalytical study of acetylacetonate-modified titanium (iv) isopropoxide as precursor for TiO2 films. Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry, 2005: p. 483-488. 8. Moran, P.D., Bowmaker, G. A., Cooney, R. P., Vibrational Spectra and Molecular Associa-tion of Titanium Tetraisopropoxide. Inorg. Chem., 1998. 37(1): p. 2741-2748. 9. Somogyvari, A., Serpone, N.,, Evidence for five-coordination in titanium(1V) complexes. A nuclear magnetic resonance investigation. Canadian Journal of Chemistry, 1977. 56: p. 316-319.

  2. Preliminary observations of the SELENE Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forni, O.; Diez, B.; Gasnault, O.; Munoz, B.; D'Uston, C.; Reedy, R. C.; Hasebe, N.

    2008-09-01

    model, the data variables are assumed to be linear mixtures of some unknown latent variables, and the mixing system is also unknown. The latent variables are assumed non- Gaussian and mutually independent and they are called the independent components of the observed data. These independent components, also called sources or factors, can be found by ICA. This is done by maximising a non-gaussianity criterion of the sources. As in [8], we have used the JADE algorithm developed and described in [9] for our analysis that we focused in the energy range from 750 to 3000 keV. We identify at least three meaningful components. The first one is correlated to the Thorium map (Fig. 4). The corresponding correlation coefficient spectrum exhibits the lines of Thorium, Potassium and Uranium (Fig. 5). The second component (Fig. 6) is clearly correlated with the Iron as shown on its corresponding spectrum (Fig. 5). A third component, identified at lower resolution, seems to be partly correlated with the altitude of the spacecraft (not shown). Further improvement in the data reduction, like corrections for altitude, cosmic ray, and neutron current variations should allow a better interpretation of the data. Acknowledgement. The SELENE GRS team members are: N. Hasebe, O. Okudaira, N. Yamashita, S. Kobayashi, Y. Karouji, M. Hareyama, S. Kodaira, S. Komatsu, K. Hayatsu, K. Iwabuchi, S. Nemoto, E. Shibamura, M.-N. Kobayashi, R.C. Reedy, K.J. Kim, C. d'Uston, S. Maurice, O. Gasnault, O. Forni, B. Diez. References. [1] Hasebe, N. et al. (2008) Earth, Planets and Space, 60, 299-312.. [2] Lawrence, D.J. et al. (1999) Geophys. Res. Lett., 26 (17), 2681-2684. [3] Evans, L.E. et al. (2006) J. Geophys. Res., 111, E03S04. [4] Prettyman, T.H. et al. (2006) J. Geophys. Res., 111, E12007. [5] Gillis, J.J. et al. (2004) Geo. et Cosmo. Acta, 68 (18), 3791-3805. [6] Comon P. (1994) Signal Processing, 36, 287-314. [7] Hyvärinen, A. and E. Oja (2000) Neural Networks, 13(4-5), 411-430. [8] Forni O. et al