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Sample records for older italian adults

  1. Emotion experience and frailty in a sample of Italian community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Mulasso, Anna; Argiolu, Laura; Roppolo, Mattia; Azucar, Danny; Rabaglietti, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Frailty increases individual vulnerability to external stressors and involves high risk for adverse geriatric outcomes. To date, few studies have addressed the role of emotion perception and its association with frailty in aged populations. This cross-sectional study aimed to explore whether a significant association between frailty and emotional experience exists in a sample of Italian community-dwelling older adults. Our sample consisted of 104 older adults (age 76±8 years; 59.6% women) living in Piedmont, Italy. Frailty was measured using the Italian version of the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI), and emotion perception was measured with the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). The Mini–Mental State Examination was used as a screening tool for cognitive functions (people with a score ≤20 points were excluded). One-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), adjusted for interesting variables, and post hoc tests were performed where appropriate. According to the TFI, 57.7% of participants resulted as frail. Analysis showed a significant greater severity of frailty in the low positive affect (PA) group compared to the high PA group. Similarly, those with high negative affect (NA) showed significantly higher levels of frailty than the low NA group. As expected, significant differences for frailty were also found among the groups composed of 1) people with high PA and low NA, 2) people with low PA or high NA, and 3) people with low PA and high NA. Post hoc tests showed a greater severity of frailty in the second and in the third groups compared to the first one. Lastly, robust participants aged >75 years showed higher levels of PA than the group aged between 60 and 75 years. These findings demonstrate that both PA and NA may influence frailty, giving new insights for the evaluation and prevention of frailty in older adults. PMID:29238176

  2. Depression in Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home » Depression In Older Adults: More Facts Depression In Older Adults: More Facts Depression affects more ... combination of both. [8] Older Adult Attitudes Toward Depression: According to a Mental Health America survey [9] ...

  3. Older Adults and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Section Underage Drinking College Drinking Women Older Adults Minority Health & Health Disparities Other Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance ... Cough syrup Sleeping pills Pain medication Anxiety or depression medicine Drinking Guidelines for Older Adults Adults over ...

  4. Depression in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Fred; Onedera, Jill D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to address selected aspects of depression in older adults. Specifically, symptoms, risk factors, diagnosis, and interventions for depression in older adults are reviewed.

  5. Vaccinations in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Burke, Megan; Rowe, Theresa

    2018-02-01

    Vaccines are important for preventing infections in adults aged ≥65 years. Older adults are at increased risk for complications from vaccine-preventable illnesses due to age-associated changes in immune function and chronic medical comorbidities. Vaccination rates for older adults remain low despite widely accepted practice guidelines. Recommended vaccinations for older adults include (1) influenza; (2) pneumococcal; (3) herpes zoster; (4) tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis; and (5) hepatitis B. Cost influences vaccination rates in older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Older Adults and Drinking

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Rethinking Drinking Older Adults and Drinking Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Generally, ... liver problems, osteoporosis, memory problems, and mood disorders. Drinking and Medications Many medications, such as the ones ...

  7. Older Adults and Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... find more information? Reprints Share Older Adults and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... depression need treatment to feel better. Types of Depression There are several types of depression. The most ...

  8. Older adults' pain descriptions.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the types of pain information described by older adults with chronic osteoarthritis pain. Pain descriptions were obtained from older adults' who participated in a post-test-only double-blind study testing how the phrasing of health care practitioners' pain questions affected the amount of communicated pain information. The 207 community-dwelling older adults were randomized to respond to either the open-ended or the closed-ended pain question. They viewed and orally responded to a computer-displayed videotape of a practitioner asking them the respective pain question. All of them then viewed and responded to the general follow-up questions, "What else can you tell me?" and lastly, "What else can you tell me about your pain, aches, soreness or discomfort?" Audiotaped responses were transcribed and their content analyzed by trained independent raters using 16 a priori criteria from the American Pain Society's Guidelines for the Management of Pain in Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Juvenile Chronic Arthritis. Older adults described important but limited types of information primarily about pain location, timing, and intensity. Pain treatment information was elicited after repeated questioning. Therefore, practitioners need to follow up older adults' initial pain descriptions with pain questions that promote a more complete pain management discussion. Routine use of a multidimensional pain assessment instrument that measures information such as functional interference, current pain treatments, treatment effects, and side effects would be one way of ensuring a more complete pain management discussion with older adults.

  9. Factors associated with self-reported use of dental health services among older Greek and Italian immigrants.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Rodrigo; Wright, Clive; Schofield, Margot; Calache, Hanny; Minichiello, Victor

    2005-01-01

    The authors discuss utilization of dental health services by older Greek and Italian immigrants in Melbourne, Australia. Their study involved 374 Greek and 360 Italian adults who completed a questionnaire and received an oral examination. Nearly 41% of Greek and 45% of Italian respondents had used dental services in the previous year. As barriers to care, Greek participants most often cited waiting lists and waiting time in the office. Italian participants most often identified cost, length of waiting lists and language barriers. Multivariate analyses associated recent use of dental services with number of teeth, oral health knowledge, age and occupation before retirement for both groups, as well as living arrangements among Greek participants and perceived barriers among Italian participants. Findings highlight the need for oral health promotion programs targeted toward older adults from immigrant populations and reductions of the structural barriers that prevent these adults from seeking oral health care.

  10. Exercise and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Mora, Jorge Camilo; Valencia, Willy M

    2018-02-01

    Regular exercise is essential for healthy aging and offers many health benefits, including reduced risk of all-cause mortality, chronic disease, and premature death. Because physical inactivity is prevalent, greater focus is needed on integrating exercise into care plans and counseling, and developing partnerships that support exercise opportunities. Older adults should be as physically active as their abilities and conditions allow. For substantial health benefits, older adults need to do aerobic, muscle-strengthening, and stretching exercises weekly, and balance activities as needed. Appropriate planning must take account of factors such as prescribed medications, nutrition, injuries, hip and knee arthroplasties, and chronic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Older Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Jeffrey

    In an effort to improve the quality of life for area senior citizens, De Anza College has established an older adult education program which combines adaptive physical education with holistic health care principles to instruct students in relaxation, nutrition, and physical activity. Classes are held in convalescent hospitals, retirement homes,…

  12. Sleep Changes in Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystsde Quervain’s Tenosynovitis Home Family Health Seniors Sleep Changes in Older Adults Sleep Changes in Older Adults Share Print Most adults need ... or older. As you age, you may have changes in your sleep patterns. These changes can cause ...

  13. Tuberculosis in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Shobita

    2016-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the world's most lethal infectious diseases. Preventive and control strategies among other high-risk groups, such as the elderly population, continues to be a challenge. Clinical features of TB in older adults may be atypical and confused with age-related diseases. Diagnosis and management of TB in the elderly person can be difficult; treatment can be associated with adverse drug reactions. This article reviews the current global epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, management, and prevention of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in community-dwelling and institutionalized aging adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Vaccines for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Worz, Chad; Martin, Caren McHenry; Travis, Catherine

    2017-09-01

    Several vaccine-preventable diseases-influenza, pneumonia, herpes zoster, and pertussis-threaten the health of older adults in the United States. Both the costs associated with treating these diseases and the potential to increase morbidity and mortality are high for this patient population. Pharmacists and other health care professionals play a significant role in ensuring the elderly patient receives the recommended vaccines at the recommended intervals.

  15. Health Tips for Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... daily vitamin like iron or vitamin C. Vitamin Power for Older Adults Government dietary guidelines recommend these ... you regular. Are my eating habits healthy? Many factors may affect an older adult’s ability to eat ...

  16. The role of individual characteristics and physical frailty on health related quality of life (HRQOL): a cross sectional study of Italian community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Mulasso, Anna; Roppolo, Mattia; Rabaglietti, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the relationship between individual characteristics and HRQOL, and to identify which components of physical frailty measured according to Fried's criteria provided a better explanation of HRQOL. Two hundred and fifty-nine older adults (age 74±6 years; 69% were women) living in Piemonte Region were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Socio-demographic and medical characteristics were captured by self-reported questionnaires. Physical frailty was assessed using the five criteria of Fried: shrinking, weakness, poor endurance and energy, slowness, and low physical activity level. HRQOL was measured with the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), using both the mental (MCS) and the Physical Component Summary (PCS). Among individual characteristics, gender was the best predictor for SF-36, the MCS, and the PCS, with values of R(2) of 12.7%, 12.1%, and 8.8%, respectively. Among the five Fried's criteria, poor endurance and energy had the largest effect on HRQOL with values of ΔR(2) of 13.9% for SF-36, 13.4% for the MCS, and 9.4% for the PCS. Results highlighted the role of the individual characteristics and the single weight of the five components of physical frailty on HRQOL. This knowledge may give new insights about the relations between individual functioning and self-rated health, allowing the development of individualized and more effective preventive interventions for a healthy aging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dehydration in the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Miller, Hayley J

    2015-09-01

    Dehydration affects 20% to 30% of older adults. It has a greater negative outcome in this population than in younger adults and increases mortality, morbidity, and disability. Dehydration is often caused by water deprivation in older adults, although excess water loss may also be a cause. Traditional markers for dehydration do not take into consideration many of the physiological differences present in older adults. Clinical assessment of dehydration in older adults poses different findings, yet is not always diagnostic. Treatment of dehydration should focus on prevention and early diagnosis before it negatively effects health and gives rise to comorbidities. The current article discusses what has most thoroughly been studied; the best strategies and assessment tools for evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of dehydration in older adults; and what needs to be researched further. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 41(9), 8-13.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Nutrition: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Physical Activity Prevention Related News Drinking Diet Soda May Add Inches to Your Waist Monday, March 23, 2015 Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nutrition Unique to Older Adults This section provides information to help older adults ...

  19. Clinical Interviewing with Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohlman, Jan; Sirota, Karen Gainer; Papp, Laszlo A.; Staples, Alison M.; King, Arlene; Gorenstein, Ethan E.

    2012-01-01

    Over the next few decades the older adult population will increase dramatically, and prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders are also expected to increase in the elderly cohort. These demographic projections highlight the need for diagnostic instruments and methods that are specifically tailored to older adults. The current paper discusses the…

  20. Effective communication with older adults.

    PubMed

    Daly, Louise

    2017-06-07

    Communication is an essential aspect of life, yet it can be taken for granted. Its centrality to being in the world and in professional practice often becomes evident when nurses and older adults encounter communication difficulties. The factors that can affect nurses' communication with older adults relate to the older adult, the nurse, sociocultural considerations and the environment, and the interactions between these factors. In adopting a person-centred approach to communicating with older adults, it is necessary to get to know the person as an individual and ensure communication meets their needs and abilities. Effective communication is essential in nursing practice and requires professional competence and engagement. This article can be used by nurses to support effective communication with older adults across the continuum of care.

  1. COPD: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z COPD Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... care and improve or maintain quality of life. COPD and Other Medical Conditions Depression and COPD When ...

  2. Diabetes: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke Urinary Incontinence Related Documents PDF Choosing Wisely: Diabetes Tests and Treatments Download Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Diabetes Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ...

  3. How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls?

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Falls and Older Adults How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls? Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents ... Articles Preventing Falls / Great Help for Older Adults / How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls? / Home Improvements Prevent Falls Winter 2014 Issue: ...

  4. Weight Management in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Lydia E.; Bartels, Stephen J.; Batsis, John A.

    2017-01-01

    As the number of older adults increases rapidly, the national epidemic of obesity is also affecting our aging population. This is particularly concerning given the numerous health risks and increased costs associated with this condition. Weight management is extremely important for older adults given the risks associated with abdominal adiposity, which is a typical fat redistribution during aging, and the prevalence of comorbid conditions in this age group. However, approaches to weight loss must be considered critically given the dangers of sarcopenia (a condition that occurs when muscle mass and quality is lost), the increase risk of hip fracture with weight loss, and the association between reduced mortality and increased BMI in older adults. This overview highlights the challenges and implications of measuring adiposity in older adults, the dangers and benefits of weight loss in this population, and provides an overview of the new Medicare Obesity Benefit. In addition we provide a summary of outcomes from successful weight loss interventions for older adults and discuss implications for advancing clinical practice. PMID:26627496

  5. Managing older adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hainer, Theresa A

    2006-07-01

    To review special considerations in the management of adults 65 years of age and older with diabetes mellitus (DM) with particular attention to initiation of insulin in the management of type 2 DM (DM2), Medicare eligibility for insulin pump therapy, and intensive insulin therapy in both type 1 DM (DM1) and DM2 in older adults. American Diabetes Association Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, selected research articles, textbooks, and Internet sources. American Diabetes Association, American Association of Diabetes Educators, and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologist acknowledge that no long-term studies have been conducted in older adults with DM. Furthermore, these groups as well as the American Geriatric Society conclude that a person's functional capacity and not age should determine the treatment modality most beneficial in each situation. Management of diabetes in the older adult is a common clinical scenario for primary care providers (PCPs). Treatment strategies follow a continuum over time from lifestyle modification to intensive management. Intensive insulin therapy, through the use of either multiple daily injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion using insulin pumps, has demonstrated benefit in both DM1 and DM2; however, there is evidence that PCPs are reluctant to initiate insulin. Moreover, in the management of older adults with diabetes, evidence-based outcomes regarding intensive management are lacking. Further studies are needed.

  6. Health Literacy and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chesser, Amy K.; Keene Woods, Nikki; Smothers, Kyle; Rogers, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this review was to assess published literature relating to health literacy and older adults. Method: The current review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta Analyses. Results: Eight articles met inclusion criteria. All studies were conducted in urban settings in the United States. Study sample size ranged from 33 to 3,000 participants. Two studies evaluated health-related outcomes and reported significant associations between low health literacy and poorer health outcomes. Two other studies investigated the impact of health literacy on medication management, reporting mixed findings. Discussion: The findings of this review highlight the importance of working to improve health care strategies for older adults with low health literacy and highlight the need for a standardized and validated clinical health literacy screening tool for older adults. PMID:28138488

  7. Vaccinations for the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Gnanasekaran, Gowrishankar; Biedenbender, Rex; Davidson, Harley Edward; Gravenstein, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Vaccine response declines with age, but currently recommended vaccines are safe and effective in reducing, if not preventing, disease altogether. Over the last decade, advancements in vaccine immunogenicity, either by increasing dose or conjugating vaccines to protein, have resulted in more immunogenic vaccines that also seem more effective in reducing clinical disease both for influenza and pneumococcus. Meanwhile, there is a resurgence in incident pertussis, exceeding prevalence from five decades ago, adding older adults to a recommended target vaccination group. This article discusses currently available vaccines, in the context of current epidemiology and recommendations, for older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Teaching Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Henry G.; Briggs, Halaine S.

    1979-01-01

    Teachers must understand the physiological and psychological changes that occur in adulthood as a normal part of aging and recognize the implications that these changes have for the teaching-learning process in order to be sensitive to the unique needs and characteristics of adults over 50 as learners. (CT)

  9. Visuomotor Binding in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloesch, Emily K.; Abrams, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Action integration is the process through which actions performed on a stimulus and perceptual aspects of the stimulus become bound as a unitary object. This process appears to be controlled by the dopaminergic system in the prefrontal cortex, an area that is known to decrease in volume and dopamine functioning in older adults. Although the…

  10. Sexuality in Older Adults: A Deconstructionist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffstetler, Beverly

    2006-01-01

    Societal myths argue against active expression of sexuality in older adults, but these prejudices are unfounded. Using a deconstructionist framework, this article addresses issues surrounding sexuality in older adults. Implications for clinical practice are given.

  11. Changing Medical Students' Attitudes toward Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Ernest; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Gilbert, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Given the growth in the number of older adults and the ageist attitudes many in the health care profession hold, interventions aimed at improving health professionals' attitudes toward older adults are imperative. Vital Visionaries is an intergenerational art program designed to improve medical students' attitudes toward older adults. Participants…

  12. Nutrition Goals for Older Adults: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwath, Caroline C.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses specific goals of nutrition education for older adults and high-risk groups within the elderly population through review of three crucial areas: current knowledge of eating patterns, nutrient intake, and supplement use of older adults; existing information on multiple influences on eating habits of older adults; and potential benefits…

  13. Older Adults and Gambling: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariyabuddhiphongs, Vanchai

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses the social cognitive theory model to review the literature on older adult gambling, and related personal and environment characteristics. Results show that lottery is the kind of gambling most frequently played by older adults, followed by casino games. Older adults take trips to casinos to socialize, find excitement, and win…

  14. Empowering the Older Adult through Folklore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Dorothy Anne

    2006-01-01

    An opportunity exists for those working with older adults in nursing homes to significantly encourage independence in the older adult using a creative approach. The use of folklore is suggested as a means for assisting the older adult toward a reconnection with the individuation process.

  15. Cochlear Implantation in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank R.; Chien, Wade W.; Li, Lingsheng; Niparko, John K.; Francis, Howard W.

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear implants allow individuals with severe-to-profound hearing loss access to sound and spoken language. The number of older adults in the United States who are potential candidates for cochlear implantation is approximately 150,000 and will continue to increase with the aging of the population. Should cochlear implantation (CI) be routinely recommended for these older adults, and do these individuals benefit from CI? We reviewed our 12 year experience with cochlear implantation in adults ≥60 years (n = 445) at Johns Hopkins to investigate the impact of CI on speech understanding and to identify factors associated with speech performance. Complete data on speech outcomes at baseline and 1 year post-CI were available for 83 individuals. Our results demonstrate that cochlear implantation in adults ≥60 years consistently improved speech understanding scores with a mean increase of 60. 0% (S. D. 24. 1) on HINT sentences in quiet . The magnitude of the gain in speech scores was negatively associated with age at implantation such that for every increasing year of age at CI the gain in speech scores was 1. 3 percentage points less (95% CI: 0. 6 – 1. 9) after adjusting for age at hearing loss onset. Conversely, individuals with higher pre-CI speech scores (HINT scores between 40–60%) had significantly greater post-CI speech scores by a mean of 10. 0 percentage points (95% CI: 0. 4 – 19. 6) than those with lower pre-CI speech scores (HINT <40%) after adjusting for age at CI and age at hearing loss onset. These results suggest that older adult CI candidates who are younger at implantation and with higher preoperative speech scores obtain the highest speech understanding scores after cochlear implantation with possible implications for current Medicare policy. Finally, we provide an extended discussion of the epidemiology and impact of hearing loss in older adults. Future research of CI in older adults should expand beyond simple speech outcomes to take into

  16. Older Adults and Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... Safety / Older Adults and Food Safety Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

  17. Sexuality in Nigerian older adults.

    PubMed

    Olatayo, Adeoti Adekunle; Kubwa, Ojo Osaze; Adekunle, Ajayi Ebenezer

    2015-01-01

    Oftentimes the older adults are assumed to be asexual as few studies explore into the sexuality of this age group worldwide and even in Nigeria. It is an important aspect of quality of life which is often neglected by people in this age group, attending physicians and the society as a whole. The study was aimed at determining the perception of older adults about sexuality, identify the factors that could militate against sexuality and fill any void in information in this regard. Descriptive study conducted in one hundred older adults. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered to consenting participants between 1(st) of September 2013 and 31(st) of March 2014. Mean age of respondents was 66.42 ± 5.77 years. Seventy-eight percent of the male respondents considered engaging in sexual activity as safe compared to 45.8% of the female respondents. More of the women (33.3%) regarded sexuality in the older adults as a taboo when compared to the men (5.4%). However, the men were more favourably disposed to discussing sexual problems than the women with their spouses (42% vs 20%) and Physicians (23.2% vs 0.0%). Major factors responsible for sexual inactivity were participants' medical ailments (65%), partners' failing health (15%) as well as anxiety about sexual performance (25%) in the men and dyspareunia (25%) in women. There is an urgent need to correct the misconception about sexuality in this age group especially among the women and for the physicians to explore the sexual history of every patient.

  18. Exercise Prescriptions in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pearl Guozhu; Jackson, Elizabeth A; Richardson, Caroline R

    2017-04-01

    Regular physical activity and exercise are important for healthy aging and are beneficial for chronic disease management. Exercise prescriptions for older adults should account for the individual's health status and functional capacity. Any amount of exercise is better than being sedentary, even if health status prevents a person from achieving recommended goals. For most health outcomes, more benefits occur with physical activity performed at higher intensity, greater frequency, or longer duration. Guidelines recommend at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity and at least two days of muscle-strengthening activities per week. Key components of the prescription include setting achievable activity goals, identifying barriers and providing potential solutions, and providing specific recommendations on the type, frequency, and intensity of activities. Older adults will derive distinct benefits from aerobic exercise, strength or resistance training, flexibility or stretching exercises, and balance training. Many community resources are available to help older adults begin a more active lifestyle.

  19. Helping Older Adults Adjust to Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sink, Clay V.; D'Abrosca, Louis A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses some of the fears and anxieties of automation held by older adults. Teaching techniques that aid the older adult learning process are suggested. The article also contains an interview with Anna M. Tucker, director of the Rhode Island Department of Elderly Affairs, concerning the elder adult's fear of automation. (CT)

  20. Older adults' definitions of health: A metasynthesis.

    PubMed

    Song, Misoon; Kong, Eun-Hi

    2015-06-01

    Despite many gerontological studies focusing on the health of older adults, little attention has been paid to their perceptions of health. Understanding older adults' health perceptions is important because their self-perceptions are important predictors of and strongly related to survival and mortality. Older adults have different perceptions of health compared with younger adults because of their age-related changes, diseases, and limitations. There are also differences between older adults' and health professionals' perceptions of health. The purpose of this systematic review was to analyze and synthesize qualitative studies that have explored older adults' perceptions of health. Four electronic databases were searched for qualitative studies published from the earliest year to 2013, revealing 12 studies for inclusion. The systematic review employed three components of the meta-study including meta-data-analysis, meta-method, and meta-theory. Five health themes are identified from the included studies: ability to do something independently, absence or management of symptoms, acceptance and adjustment with optimism, connectedness with others, and feeling enough energy. Future gerontological research should use appropriate existing health theories and develop new health theories specific to older adults. Healthcare providers should evaluate and revise their health definitions according to older adults' health perceptions and provide appropriate health interventions. Policymakers should have an in-depth understanding of older adults' health perceptions to establish effective older-adult-centered health policies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Everyday Cognition in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Sarah Tomaszewski; Park, Lovingly Quitania; Harvey, Danielle J.; Simon, Christa; Reed, Bruce R.; Carmichael, Owen; Mungas, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The recently developed Everyday Cognition scales (ECog) measure multiple cognitively-relevant functional domains (e.g. Everyday Memory, Everyday Language, Everyday Visuospatial abilities and three everyday executive domains). The present study further evaluated the validity of the ECog by examining its relationship with objective measures of neuropsychological function, and neurobiological markers of disease as reflected by structural neuroimaging. Participants included 474 older adults (244 normals, 142 with MCI, 88 with dementia). The neuropsychological domains measured were episodic memory, semantic memory, spatial ability, and executive functioning. Brain MRI volumes included total brain (BV), hippocampus (HC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Neuropsychological measures of episodic memory and executive function were most consistently related to the ECog domains; spatial abilities had a specific relationship to the Everyday Visuospatial ECog domain. HC and BV volumes were related to most ECog domains, while DLPFC volume was independently related to two everyday executive domains (Everyday Planning and Everyday Organization). The pattern of associations varied somewhat as a function of diagnosis. Episodic memory and HC had more consistent associations with the ECog domains in older adults with MCI/dementia than in cognitively normal elderly. PMID:23369894

  2. Tobacco myths: the older adult perspective.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lana M

    2015-05-01

    Twenty adults ages 50 and older who had ceased using tobacco for 1 year or longer were interviewed. Participants provided personal insights into three myths found in the literature surrounding tobacco use and cessation in older adults and were asked to describe any perceived benefits of tobacco use. The findings indicate older adult tobacco users may need additional education on tobacco risks and cessation benefits provided by health care providers during routine office visits. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Are older adults more social than younger adults? Social importance increases older adults' prospective memory performance.

    PubMed

    Altgassen, Mareike; Kliegel, Matthias; Brandimonte, Maria; Filippello, Pina

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of social importance on prospective remembering in younger and older adults as a possible factor contributing to the age-prospective memory paradox. Using a between-subjects design, 40 younger and 40 older adults worked on a time-based prospective memory task in which social importance was varied. Overall, younger adults outperformed older adults in the prospective memory task. Importantly, in contrast to younger adults, older adults' prospective memory performance was significantly better in the social importance condition than in the standard condition. This interaction was not reflected in participants' time-monitoring behaviour. Findings are discussed in the context of recent prospective memory theories.

  4. Flashbulb memories in older adults.

    PubMed

    Cohen, G; Conway, M A; Maylor, E A

    1994-09-01

    In this study of age differences in flashbulb memory, groups of young and older adults gave detailed accounts of how they heard the news of the resignation of the British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. They were tested within 14 days after the event and again 11 months later. They also gave ratings for the encoding variables (surprise, emotion, importance, knowledge, and interest) and for frequency of rehearsal. Memories that met a strict criterion of consistency between the original and delayed responses were classified as flashbulb memories. Although 90% of young Ss had flashbulb memories, only 42% of the elderly met the criterion. The age groups also differed in the type of details remembered and in the relationship between the encoding and rehearsal variables and the occurrence of flashbulb memory. The age-related deficit in flashbulb memory is related to source amnesia and to a deficit in memory for context.

  5. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Older Adults' Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, M. Dianne; Toth, Ellen L.

    1994-01-01

    Examined knowledge, attitudes, and opinions of 60 older adults about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Most had little or no accurate knowledge of CPR. Knowledge deficits and misconceptions of older adults should be addressed so that they may become informed and active participants in CPR decision-making process. (BF)

  6. Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Presents the American Psychological Association Guidelines for psychological practice with older adults. The present document is intended to assist psychologists in evaluating their own readiness for working clinically with older adults and in seeking and using appropriate education and training to increase their knowledge, skills, and experience…

  7. Saskatchewan Older Adult Literacy Survey. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regina Univ. (Saskatchewan). Univ. Extension. Seniors Education Centre.

    The Saskatchewan Older Adult Literacy Survey involved 16 literacy programs offered by the regional colleges, public libraries, and technical institutes throughout the province of Saskatchewan, Canada. The 2-month survey acquired information for an overview of the current state of older adults and literacy in Saskatchewan through mailed…

  8. Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated variables contributing to older adults' information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults' information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were…

  9. Older Adults Have Difficulty in Decoding Sarcasm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Louise H.; Allen, Roy; Bull, Rebecca; Hering, Alexandra; Kliegel, Matthias; Channon, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Younger and older adults differ in performance on a range of social-cognitive skills, with older adults having difficulties in decoding nonverbal cues to emotion and intentions. Such skills are likely to be important when deciding whether someone is being sarcastic. In the current study we investigated in a life span sample whether there are…

  10. Exploring Older Adults' Health Information Seeking Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore older adults' (55-70 years) health information-seeking behaviors. Methods: Using a qualitative methodology, based on grounded theory, data were collected using in-depth interviews. Participants were community-living, older adults in Toronto, Canada who independently seek nutrition and health information. Interview transcripts…

  11. Education: A Possibility for Empowering Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kump, Sonja; Krasovec, Sabina Jelenc

    2007-01-01

    Educating older adults (in the so-called third age) is becoming an increasingly important activity for the elderly, above all because it empowers them, while at the same time reducing their social exclusion. The aim of this paper is to closely examine the actual state of affairs and the education possibilities for older adults in Slovenia. The…

  12. Changing Students' Stereotypes of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtele, Sandy K.; Maruyama, LaRae

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that university students tend to hold negative attitudes about older adults. However, there is some evidence to suggest that these ageist attitudes can be challenged and changed through curricular intervention. The current study was designed to determine whether the "Activities of Older Adults" exercise as part of a…

  13. Interpretations of Child Behavior by Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Constance R.; Docherty, Edward M., Jr.

    This study examined sex-role typing in older adults' interpretations of young children's behavior. Participants were 48 older adults averaging 64.7 years of age. Videotapes were made of the play behavior of each of two toddlers, a female and a male matched in body type, hair length, dress (plain tee shirt and shorts), and in the activities in…

  14. Health Contract with Sedentary Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David; Rhodes, Darson

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Health educators used health contracts with sedentary older adults for the purpose of increasing exercise or physical activity. Design and Methods: Two health educators helped 25 sedentary older adults complete health contracts, and then they conducted follow-up evaluations. The percentage of scheduled exercise sessions successfully…

  15. Textile Recycling, Convenience, and the Older Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domina, Tanya; Koch, Kathryn

    2001-01-01

    Results of a study to examine the recycling practices and needs of older adults (n=217) indicated that older adults do recycle traditional materials, but need accommodations for physical limitations. They report textile recycling as time consuming and difficult and used donations to religious organizations as their principal means of textile…

  16. Older Adult Women Learners in Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Mary Alice

    2009-01-01

    This chapter examines the potential for personal growth, development, and learning of older adult women who will have many productive years in the workforce. What implications are there for adult education communities who will interact with these older women? How do they adapt to the educational environment, and what social support will enable…

  17. Habitual attention in older and young adults.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhong V; Koutstaal, Wilma; Twedell, Emily L

    2016-12-01

    Age-related decline is pervasive in tasks that require explicit learning and memory, but such reduced function is not universally observed in tasks involving incidental learning. It is unknown if habitual attention, involving incidental probabilistic learning, is preserved in older adults. Previous research on habitual attention investigated contextual cuing in young and older adults, yet contextual cuing relies not only on spatial attention but also on context processing. Here we isolated habitual attention from context processing in young and older adults. Using a challenging visual search task in which the probability of finding targets was greater in 1 of 4 visual quadrants in all contexts, we examined the acquisition, persistence, and spatial-reference frame of habitual attention. Although older adults showed slower visual search times and steeper search slopes (more time per additional item in the search display), like young adults they rapidly acquired a strong, persistent search habit toward the high-probability quadrant. In addition, habitual attention was strongly viewer-centered in both young and older adults. The demonstration of preserved viewer-centered habitual attention in older adults suggests that it may be used to counter declines in controlled attention. This, in turn, suggests the importance, for older adults, of maintaining habit-related spatial arrangements. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Psychotropic medications in older adults: a review.

    PubMed

    Ćurković, Mario; Dodig-Ćurković, Katarina; Erić, Anamarija Petek; Kralik, Kristina; Pivac, Nela

    2016-03-01

    Prevalence of prescribing psychotropic medications, particularly inappropriate prescription, is widespread in older adults, both in nursing home residents as well as community-dwelling older adults. This review describes prevalence and prevention of inappropriate prescribing and risk factors associated with psychotropic medications. MEDLINE and GOOGLE SCHOLAR data base were searched for the key words "older adults", "psychotropic drugs", "inappropriate prescribing", "nursing home residents", "community-dwelling older adults". The study was limited to the articles published in English in the period from 2007 to 2014. The list of references includes additional articles that were searched manually. The utilization of different psychotropic medications is prevalent among older adults worldwide, regardless of whether they live in nursing homes or in the community. Among older adults, nursing home residents are the most vulnerable individuals for potentially inappropriate drug prescription. The most common potentially inappropriate prescribed medications in the elderly are benzodiazepines, particularly long-acting, antipsychotics and antidepressants, particularly SSRIs. All classes of listed medications have been associated with different adverse events, particularly falls and falls-related fractures and increased risk for mortality. Many different pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions, such as monitoring polypharmacy, reviewing medications, spending more time in the institution by a physician, reducing the number of prescribers in the institution as well as greater involvement of geriatricians, general practitioners and pharmacists should be implemented to reduce this health issue. The prevalence of prescribing psychotropic medications to older adults is high. Inappropriate prescribing of psychotropic drugs and polypharmacy are present in institutionalized and non-institutionalized older adults and can cause adverse health events, and can significantly

  19. Falls Prevention: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... your bone mineral density (BMD), which tells you how much calcium is in your bones. A low BMD ... or ‘acid stomach’) decrease absorption (for example, mineral oil laxatives prevent vitamins from being absorbed). Older adults who are ...

  20. Healthy Weights for Healthy Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... strong muscles and bones. Enjoy the Power of Protein People of all ages need protein for strong, healthy bodies. Some older adults do not get the protein they need to maintain muscle mass, fight infection ...

  1. Population Health Management for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tkatch, Rifky; Musich, Shirley; MacLeod, Stephanie; Alsgaard, Kathleen; Hawkins, Kevin; Yeh, Charlotte S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The older adult population is expanding, living longer, with multiple chronic conditions. Understanding and managing their needs over time is an integral part of defining successful aging. Population health is used to describe the measurement and health outcomes of a population. Objectives: To define population health as applied to older adults, summarize lessons learned from current research, and identify potential interventions designed to promote successful aging and improved health for this population. Method: Online search engines were utilized to identify research on population health and health interventions for older adults. Results: Population health management (PHM) is one strategy to promote the health and well-being of target populations. Interventions promoting health across a continuum tend to be disease, risk, or health behavior specific rather than encompassing a global concept of health. Conclusion: Many existing interventions for older adults are simply research based with limited generalizability; as such, further work in this area is warranted. PMID:28680938

  2. Socially Assistive Robots: Measuring Older Adults' Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Beuscher, Linda M; Fan, Jing; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Dietrich, Mary S; Newhouse, Paul A; Miller, Karen F; Mion, Lorraine C

    2017-12-01

    To address manpower shortages, health care leaders recommend technology, including robots, to facilitate and augment processes for delivery of efficient, safe care. Little is known regarding older adults' perceptions of socially assistive robots (SARs). Using the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use Technology framework, a survey was developed and tested for capturing older adults' likelihood to use SARs. The Robot Acceptance Survey (RAS) comprises three subscales: Performance Expectancy, Effort Expectancy, and Attitude. Older adults completed the RAS pre- and post-experimental procedure with a SAR. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the subscales ranged from 0.77 to 0.89. Subscales were sensitive to change, with more positive reactions after exposure to SAR activities. Future studies must identify robotic programming capable of providing cognitive, physical, and social assistance, as well as person-, activity-, situation-, and robot-specific factors that will influence older adults' acceptance of SARs. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(12), 35-43.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Safe Travel Tips for Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... these expert tips and recommendations from the American Geriatrics Society’s Health in Aging Foundation. Whether you are ...

  4. Older Adults' Knowledge of Internet Hazards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Galen A.; Hough, Michelle G.; Mazur, Elizabeth; Signorella, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    Older adults are less likely to be using computers and less knowledgeable about Internet security than are younger users. The two groups do not differ on trust of Internet information. The younger group shows no age or gender differences. Within the older group, computer users are more trusting of Internet information, and along with those with…

  5. Psychoactive drug abuse in older adults.

    PubMed

    Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Yang, Huiwen Keri

    2006-12-01

    Misuse and abuse of legal and illegal drugs constitute a growing problem among older adults. This article reviews the prevalence, risks and protective factors, and screening and diagnosis of drug abuse in older adults. Treatment concerns and the consequences of drug problems are examined briefly. MEDLINE and PsychInfo were searched using the terms substance-related disorders, drug-use disorders, abuse, dependency, opioid-related disorders, stimulant-related disorders, cocaine-related disorders, marijuana-related disorders, and withdrawal syndrome. The review included articles published in English between January 1, 1990, and May 31, 2006. Despite a wealth of information on the epidemiology and treatment of alcohol abuse in older adults, few comparable data are available on drug abuse in this population. The evidence suggests that although illegal drug use is relatively rare among older adults compared with younger adults and adolescents, there is a growing problem of the misuse and abuse of prescription drugs with abuse potential. It is estimated that up to 11% of older women misuse prescription drugs and that nonmedical use of prescription drugs among all adults aged > or =50 years will increase to 2.7 million by the year 2020. Factors associated with drug abuse in older adults include female sex, social isolation, history of a substance-use or mental health disorder, and medical exposure to prescription drugs with abuse potential. No validated screening or assessment instruments are available for identifying or diagnosing drug abuse in the older population. Special approaches may be necessary when treating substance-use disorders in older adults with multiple comorbidities and/or functional impairment, and the least intensive approaches should be considered first. Psychoactive medications with abuse potential are used by at least 1 in 4 older adults, and such use is likely to grow as the population ages. The treatment of disorders of prescription drug use in

  6. Screening for Medication Appropriateness in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Zullo, Andrew R; Gray, Shelly L; Holmes, Holly M; Marcum, Zachary A

    2018-02-01

    Older adults are at high risk for inappropriate medication use given their myriad medical conditions and medications. Screening efforts may seem overwhelming, but starting with a focused approach and leveraging a team-based strategy can help practicing clinicians gain initial momentum. Future research is needed to strengthen the evidence base for medication use in older adults and to elucidate effective and scalable interventions to improve medication safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Frailty and food insecurity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Zepeda, Mario Ulises; Castrejón-Pérez, Roberto Carlos; Wynne-Bannister, Emma; García-Peña, Carmen

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the current work was to determine the association between food insecurity and frailty in older adults, within the context of a country with accelerated ageing and nutritional problems. Cross-sectional analysis of a representative nationwide survey on health and nutrition. Mexican nationwide survey. A sample of 7108 adults aged 60 years or older living in communities, representative of Mexican older adults. Multivariate regression and descriptive analyses of food insecurity and frailty were performed. From a total of 7108 adults aged 60 years or older, with a mean age of 70·7 years, most (54·7 %) were women. Food security categories were: 26·3 % had food security, 40·3 % had mild food insecurity, 20·5 % had moderate food insecurity and 12·9 % had severe food insecurity. Food insecurity categories were associated with frailty, with the severe category having the highest odds ratio of 2·41 (95 % CI 2·03, 2·86; P<0·001) after adjustment for confounding factors. According to our results, food insecurity is associated to frailty, which in turn is a condition that renders the older adult at a higher risk of developing adverse outcomes. Targeted food programmes for older adults with a high risk of having food insecurity or of being frail may improve health in this population group.

  8. Forgetfulness and older adults: concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Julianne

    2010-06-01

    This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept of forgetfulness as it applies to older adults. Perceived increases in forgetfulness cause much distress for older adults due to the stigma associated with memory loss and dementia. The difference between forgetfulness in a healthy ageing state and memory loss associated with cognitive impairment requires clarification for nurses involved in screening and caring for older adults. Literature for this concept analysis was obtained by searches of CINAHL, EMBASE and Internurse covering the years 1962-2009, as well as gerontology textbooks. The evolutionary method of Rodgers was the framework for the concept analysis. As we age there is a slight increase in occasions of forgetfulness (particularly remembering to do things in the near future) that can be offset by limiting distractions and enhancing focus. This is contrasted with forgetfulness patterns, also more likely as we age, that are indicative of disease processes. Older adults' awareness of their own forgetfulness has the potential to cause fear, embarrassment, anger and/or low self-esteem. It is important to avoid labelling or dismissal of concerns related to forgetfulness in older adults. Further research, with an emphasis on the choice of assessment tool, is recommended to investigate the benefits of nurse-led population screening for memory deficits in older adults. Nurses require training in assessment of memory and access to adequate referral pathways if abnormal results are uncovered.

  9. Stroke: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... hospitalization, and a higher risk of death. Post-stroke rehabilitation is much more difficult. Older patients are more likely to suffer from delirium after a stroke. About half of stroke survivors become depressed and ...

  10. Critical reflections on families of older adults.

    PubMed

    Keating, N

    2011-01-01

    Families are a central feature in the debate about how societies will face the challenges of population aging. In much of the contemporary discourse about families they are viewed as fully responsible for the care and support of their older members, with national differences in whether this responsibility is seen as a societal obligation or an unreasonable burden. Researchers and policy makers have expressed rising concerns about how structural changes to families and their increasing geographic mobility may threaten their caring capacity. Across regions and countries, there is considerable research on whether older adults are embedded in stable family networks from which they can draw support if needed. A more muted theme about the place of families in the lives of older adults places older persons as agents rather than passive recipients in their families. Within this body of literature, there is evidence of the important role of older adults in strengthening cohesion in families, fostering generational connections and caring for younger family members. The transfer of resources from older to younger members is an important feature in both marginalized and affluent families in different regions of the world. It illustrates the way that older adults provide stability to their families in the face of rapid social change. In this paper an overview is presented of the international literature on these complex issues of the place of families in the lives of older adults. Myths about families, regional variation in beliefs about their roles and obligations, and evidence of family structure and household composition of older persons are addressed and regional differences considered.

  11. Evaluation of Verbal Behavior in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Amy C.; Fuqua, Wayne; Merritt, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 5% of older adults have a dementia diagnosis, and language deterioration is commonly associated with this disorder (Kempler, 2005). Several instruments have been developed to diagnose dementia and assess language capabilities of elderly adults. However, none of these instruments take a functional approach to language assessment as…

  12. Young and Older Adults' Reading of Distracters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Susan; Mcdowd, Joan; Metcalf, Kim; Liu, Chiung-Ju

    2008-01-01

    Eye-tracking technology was employed to examine young and older adults' performance in the reading with distraction paradigm. Distracters of 1, 2, and 4 words that formed meaningful phrases were used. There were marked age differences in fixation patterns. Young adults' fixations to the distracters and targets increased with distracter length.…

  13. Offset Analgesia is reduced in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Naugle, Kelly M.; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Fillingim, Roger B.; Riley, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that aging is associated with dysfunctional changes in pain modulatory capacity, potentially contributing to increased incidence of pain in older adults. However, age-related changes in offset analgesia (offset), a form of temporal pain inhibition, remain poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate age differences in offset analgesia of heat pain in healthy younger and older adults. To explore the peripheral mechanisms underlying offset, an additional aim of the study was to test offset at two anatomical sites with known differences in nociceptor innervation. Twenty-five younger adults and twenty older adults completed six offset trials in which the experimental heat stimulus was presented to the volar forearm and glabrous skin of the palm. Each trial consisted of three continuous phases: an initial 15s painful stimulus (T1), a slight increase in temperature from T1 for 5s (T2), and a slight decrease back to the initial testing temperature for 10s (T3). During each trial, subjects rated pain intensity continuously using an electronic visual analogue scale (0–100). Older subjects demonstrated reduced offset compared to younger adults when tested on the volar forearm. Interestingly, offset analgesia was nonexistent on the palm for all subjects. The reduced offset found in older adults may reflect an age-related decline in endogenous inhibitory systems. However, while the exact mechanisms underlying offset remain unknown, the absence of offset at the palm suggests that peripheral mechanisms may be involved in initiating this phenomenon. PMID:23872117

  14. Nutritional Needs of the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Melissa

    2017-11-01

    Older adults are particularly vulnerable to compromised nutritional status. With advancing age, the consumption of a high-quality, nutritionally dense diet is increasingly essential to optimize health and well-being. Proportionally, macronutrient needs for older adults are similar to younger adults, however overall calorie requirements tend to decline with age. Unique factors influencing food intake should be considered and individualized guidance should be designed to help overcome medical, physical, and social barriers to a healthy diet. The goal for nutrition intervention should ultimately be to promote health and quality of life across the continuum of the aging process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Urinary tract infection in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Theresa A; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria are common in older adults. Unlike in younger adults, distinguishing symptomatic urinary tract infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria is problematic, as older adults, particularly those living in long-term care facilities, are less likely to present with localized genitourinary symptoms. Consensus guidelines have been published to assist clinicians with diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infection; however, a single evidence-based approach to diagnosis of urinary tract infection does not exist. In the absence of a gold standard definition of urinary tract infection that clinicians agree upon, overtreatment with antibiotics for suspected urinary tract infection remains a significant problem, and leads to a variety of negative consequences including the development of multidrug-resistant organisms. Future studies improving the diagnostic accuracy of urinary tract infections are needed. This review will cover the prevalence, diagnosis and diagnostic challenges, management, and prevention of urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria in older adults. PMID:24391677

  16. The Digital Divide and urban older adults.

    PubMed

    Cresci, M Kay; Yarandi, Hossein N; Morrell, Roger W

    2010-01-01

    Computers and the Internet offer older adults opportunities and resources for independent living. However, many urban older adults do not use computers. This study examined the demographic, health, and social activities of urban older adults to determine variables that might predict the use and nonuse of computers in this population. A secondary data analysis was performed using the 2001 Detroit City-Wide Needs Assessment of Older Adults (n = 1410) data set. Logistic regression was used to explore potential differences in predictor variables between computer users and nonusers. Overall, computer users were younger (27%), had a higher level of education, were more likely to be employed, had an annual income greater than $20,000, and were healthier and more active than nonusers. They also were more likely to have memberships in community organizations and do volunteer work. Preferred computer activities included conducting Internet searches, playing games, writing, and communicating with family members and friends. The results suggest significant differences in demographic and health-related characteristics between computer users and nonusers among urban older adults. Although about a quarter of participants in this study used computers, the Digital Divide continues to exist in urban settings for scores of others.

  17. Substance abuse in older adults: policy issues.

    PubMed

    Gage, Susan; Melillo, Karen Devereaux

    2011-12-01

    By 2020, it is projected that the number of older adults needing treatment for drug and alcohol addictions will increase dramatically. Although Medicare covers treatment for mental health issues, copayments can be prohibitive for those with lower incomes. The Positive Aging Act, an amendment to the Public Health Service Act, is a policy alternative that could address substance abuse in the older adult population by (a) demonstrating ways of integrating mental health services for older adults into primary care settings, and (b) supporting the establishment and maintenance of interdisciplinary geriatric mental health outreach teams in community settings where older adults reside or receive social services. Increasing funding to states to emphasize primary care provider education on the detection, evaluation, and treatment of substance abuse problems of older adults has the potential to better meet the substance abuse needs of this population. Educating primary care providers, including gerontological nurses, to recognize signs of substance abuse in this population and providing age-appropriate treatment options is critically important but will require funding beyond what is currently available. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Alice H; Rasmussen, Helen; Yu, Winifred W; Epstein, Susanna R; Russell, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    In 1999 we proposed a Modified Food Guide Pyramid for adults aged 70+ y. It has been extensively used in a variety of settings and formats to highlight the unique dietary challenges of older adults. We now propose a Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults in a format consistent with the MyPyramid graphic. It is not intended to substitute for MyPyramid, which is a multifunctional Internet-based program allowing for the calculation of individualized food-based dietary guidance and providing supplemental information on food choices and preparation. Pedagogic issues related to computer availability, Web access, and Internet literacy of older adults suggests a graphic version of MyPyramid is needed. Emphasized are whole grains and variety within the grains group; variety and nutrient density, with specific emphasis on different forms particularly suited to older adults' needs (e.g. frozen) in the vegetables and fruits groups; low-fat and non-fat forms of dairy products including reduced lactose alternatives in the milk group; low saturated fat and trans fat choices in the oils group; and low saturated fat and vegetable choices in the meat and beans group. Underlying themes stress nutrient- and fiber-rich foods within each group and food sources of nutrients rather than supplements. Fluid and physical activity icons serve as the foundation of MyPyramid for Older Adults. A flag to maintain an awareness of the potential need to consider supplemental forms of calcium, and vitamins D and B-12 is placed at the top of the pyramid. Discussed are newer concerns about potential overnutrition in the current food landscape available to older adults.

  19. The impact of resilience among older adults.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Stephanie; Musich, Shirley; Hawkins, Kevin; Alsgaard, Kathleen; Wicker, Ellen R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to provide an overview of resilience for the purpose of informing potential intervention designs that may benefit older adults. While numerous reviews have focused on various specific aspects of resilience, none have provided the necessary information required to design an effective resilience intervention. Research examining resilience suggests that older adults are capable of high resilience despite socioeconomic backgrounds, personal experiences, and declining health. Thus opportunities to inform interventions in this area exist. Research studies have identified the common mental, social, and physical characteristics associated with resilience. High resilience has also been significantly associated with positive outcomes, including successful aging, lower depression, and longevity. Interventions to enhance resilience within this population are warranted, but little evidence of success exists. Thus this review provides an overview of resilience that may aid in the design of resilience interventions for the often underserved population of older adults. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Attitudes toward advertisements of the older adults.

    PubMed

    Estrada, M; Moliner, M A; Sánchez, J

    2010-01-01

    In this study we will analyze the attitude of older adults to advertisements, differentiating between advertisements that contain rhetorical figures (trope ads) and those that do not (explicit ads). We will also study their attitude toward the brand advertised according to their degree of involvement with the product. In the course of the empirical research, a total of 183 personal surveys were carried out with people aged over 65 taking as reference 2 products with different prices and durabilities. Analysis of the results indicated that in products involving little economic effort, older adults showed the same attitude toward both trope and explicit advertisements. However, with products requiring greater economic effort, older adults showed differences in their attitudes to trope ads and to explicit ads depending on their degree of involvement with the product. These differences had a strong effect on their attitudes to the brands of the products analyzed.

  1. Vitamin B12 and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the prevalence, causes and functional significance of vitamin B12 deficiency in vulnerable subpopulations including older adults and the developing embryo. Recent findings It is becoming increasingly recognized that the susceptibility to vitamin B12 deficiency may change throughout the life cycle, with the developing embryo and older adults exhibiting elevated risk. Recent data implicate low vitamin B12 status as a risk factor for birth defects resulting from improper neural tube development. The potential for vitamin supplementation and/or food fortification to ameliorate the risk of deficiency in these subpopulations is discussed. Summary The prevalence and impact of vitamin B12 deficiency varies throughout the life cycle, with older adults and potentially the developing embryo having the greatest risk and susceptibility. Additional research is needed to develop effective public health interventions that address the unique causes of this nutritional deficiency, which differ among at-risk subpopulations. PMID:19904199

  2. Interventions to Improve Walking in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Brach, Jennifer S.; VanSwearingen, Jessie M.

    2013-01-01

    Interventions to improve walking in older adults have historically been multifactorial (i.e. strengthening, endurance and flexibility programs) focusing on improving the underlying impairments. These impairment-based programs have resulted in only modest improvements in walking. In older adults, walking is slow, less stable, inefficient, and the timing and coordination of stepping with postures and phases of gait is poor. We argue the timing and coordination problems are evidence of the loss of motor skill in walking. Taking a lesson from the sports world and from neurorehabilitation, task-oriented motor learning exercise is an essential component of training to improve motor skill and may be a beneficial approach to improving walking in older adults. In this article we: 1) briefly review the current literature regarding impairment-based interventions for improving mobility, 2) discuss why the results have been only modest, and 3) suggest an alternative approach to intervention (i.e. task oriented motor learning). PMID:24319641

  3. Barriers to dental services for older adults.

    PubMed

    Montini, Theresa; Tseng, Tuo-Yen; Patel, Helly; Shelley, Donna

    2014-09-01

    To explore barriers to older adults' accessing dental care. We performed oral exams on 184 community-dwelling older adults; those who needed dental care were contacted 6-12 weeks later to determine if they were able to access treatment. Those who could not access care were interviewed regarding barriers. Of those examined, 89% needed dental treatment. After 6 weeks, 52% had received treatment, 48% had not. Those unable to access treatment had fewer teeth, were more likely to be referred regarding dentures, and were less likely to have a dentist. Reasons cited for not accessing care among the 35 participants we interviewed included a lack of finances, transportation, or assistance in navigating dental service. Older adults have a high burden of oral disease and access barriers remain.

  4. Everyday Memory Errors in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ossher, Lynn; Flegal, Kristin E.; Lustig, Cindy

    2012-01-01

    Despite concern about cognitive decline in old age, few studies document the types and frequency of memory errors older adults make in everyday life. In the present study, 105 healthy older adults completed the Everyday Memory Questionnaire (EMQ; Sunderland, Harris, & Baddeley, 1983), indicating what memory errors they had experienced in the last 24 hours, the Memory Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (MSEQ; West, Thorn, & Bagwell, 2003), and other neuropsychological and cognitive tasks. EMQ and MSEQ scores were unrelated and made separate contributions to variance on the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE; Folstein, Folstein, & McHugh, 1975), suggesting separate constructs. Tip-of-the-tongue errors were the most commonly reported, and the EMQ Faces/Places and New Things subscales were most strongly related to MMSE. These findings may help training programs target memory errors commonly experienced by older adults, and suggest which types of memory errors could indicate cognitive declines of clinical concern. PMID:22694275

  5. Assessing older adults in civil litigation cases.

    PubMed

    Kohutis, Eileen A

    With the population aging, the legal and mental health systems need to be prepared for cases that involve older adults beyond the customary matters of guardianship and competency. Assessing older adults with the current tests raises concerns because these measures may not be adequately normed for this age group. Malingering, factitious disorders, and somatoform disorders are discussed due to health-related issues of normal aging. These topics complicate the assessment procedure and need consideration because they may affect the claimant's performance or symptom presentation. Although claims of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common in civil litigation cases, it can be additionally complex in older adults. The evaluator needs to weigh not only factors related to the normal biological process of aging but also those that are attendant with the litigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy with Older Adults: Rationale and Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petkus, Andrew J.; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2013-01-01

    Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the population. With these changing demographics, mental health professionals will be seeing more older clients. Additionally, older adults are an underserved population in that most older adults in need of mental health services do not receive treatment. Thus, it is essential that treatments for…

  7. Comprehension of Health-Related Written Materials by Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chiung-Ju; Kemper, Susan; Bovaird, James A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how Flesch Reading Ease and text cohesion affect older adults' comprehension of common health texts. All older adults benefited when high Flesh Reading Ease was combined with high cohesion. Older adults with small working memories had more difficulty understanding texts high in Flesch Reading Ease. Additionally, older adults…

  8. [Substance abuse in older adults].

    PubMed

    Bitar, Raoul; Dürsteler, Kenneth M; Rösner, Susanne; Grosshans, Martin; Herdener, Marcus; Mutschler, Jochen

    2014-09-03

    In respect of demographic change, the number of older patients with substance abuse and addiction is on the raise. In this review we present important clinical and therapeutic aspects of substance abuse and addiction in the elderly and focus on alcohol, benzodiazepines and opioids. Daily and risky alcohol consumption is common among older people. They also have an increased risk getting alcohol-related complications. For early detection, laboratory parameters and questionnaires such as the AUDIT-C are suitable. Therapeutically brief interventions have been proved successful. Also, abuse of benzodiazepines, especially low-dose addiction, is widespread among older persons, although often overlooked, and patients often do not recognize their addiction. The physician has to know the correct indication, adequate dosage and pharmacological interactions. A slow-dose reduction is recommended in case of addiction. Thanks to opioid substitution therapy, patients with an opioidaddiction can reach a higher age. Age influences the effects of the substitute, which may require an adjustment of the dosage. Treatment of elderly patients should be based on their needs and resources and is usually very effective.

  9. Belonging, Idealized Self and Wellbeing: Key Motivators among Adult Learners of Italian in Sydney

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmieri, Christiana

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a study that examines the motivations of adult Australians of non-Italian origin to learn Italian in continuing education contexts in Sydney. The study embraces a view of motivation as a multifaceted phenomenon that is produced in a social environment through the interaction between the second language…

  10. Canada and Brazil. Health satisfaction older adults.

    PubMed

    Paskulin, Lisiane M Girardi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare patterns of social factors explaining health satisfaction of older adults in selected regions of Canada and Brazil. The study was a secondary analysis of data from two descriptive exploratory studies of quality of life of older adults in Canada and Brazil. A secondary analysis of two data sets was conducted. The data sets included responses from 202 older adults from Canada and 288 older adults from Brazil. The Canadian data were collected in a mail survey of randomly selected older adults conducted in early 2004 and the Brazilian data were collected in a household survey in the fall of 2004. In both countries, instruments used in data collection were the short version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF) and a demographic data sheet. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine predictors of health satisfaction in each of the samples. The independent variables were: age, gender, perceptions of access to health services, transport, social support, personal relationships, capacity for work, opportunities for leisure activities and enough money to meet needs. All indicators (except for age and gender) were taken from the WHOQOL-BREF instrument and were measured by a single global item on a five point Likert scale. In the Canadian data set, it was found that perceptions regarding capacity to work and opportunities for leisure activities were significant predictors of health satisfaction. In Brazil, the significant predictors were perceptions of capacity to work and enough money to meet needs. This study identifies some common social factors that explain health satisfaction, but many other variables thought to be important were not significant in these samples. Examination of social factors influencing health at the individual as well as societal level may help in planning interventions that enhance health and well-being of older adults.

  11. Wellness in older adults: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Siobhan; Fleury, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to examine the concept of wellness within the context of older adulthood. Identifying characteristics of wellness will clarify and develop conceptual strengths and limitations, providing a step toward evaluating its relevance in older adults and increasing utility in geriatric nursing. Rodger's evolutionary perspective. Computer and manual searches were conducted of articles in the English language from 1950 to 2010, addressing wellness across the life span or among older adult populations. An inductive analysis of articles produced descriptive themes. A historical time line traced the evolution of the wellness concept and its operationalization. Wellness has evolved from a little used concept to one commonly applied across many industries. Antecedents, attributes, and consequences of wellness are described. Concepts related to wellness are also identified. This concept analysis adds clarity to wellness in older adults. The state of wellness development as a concept in geriatric nursing is moving from conceptualization to use and testing in nursing theory and interventions. Increased knowledge of wellness will enable geriatric nurses to discover the strengths of older adults thereby promoting their ongoing growth and development while simultaneously guiding care for their changing and diverse health. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Excessive Body Weight in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Porter Starr, Kathryn N; Bales, Connie W

    2015-08-01

    The health challenges prompted by obesity in the older adult population are poorly recognized and understudied. A defined treatment of geriatric obesity is difficult to establish, as it must take into account biological heterogeneity, age-related comorbidities, and functional limitations (sarcopenia/dynapenia). This retrospective article highlights the current understanding of the optimal body mass index (BMI) in later life, addressing appropriate recommendations based on BMI category, age, and health history. The findings of randomized control trials of weight loss/maintenance interventions help one to move closer to evidence-based and appropriately individualized recommendations for body weight management in older adults. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Optimal management of ADHD in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Torgersen, Terje; Gjervan, Bjorn; Lensing, Michael B; Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Background The manifestation of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among older adults has become an interesting topic of interest due to an increasing number of adults aged 50 years and older (≥50 years) seeking assessment for ADHD. Unfortunately, there is a lack of research on ADHD in older adults, and until recently only a few case reports existed. Method A systematic search was conducted in the databases Medline/PubMed and PsycINFO in order to identify studies regarding ADHD in adults ≥50 years. Results ADHD persists into older ages in many patients, but the prevalence of patients fulfilling the criteria for the diagnosis at age ≥50 years is still unknown. It is reason to believe that the prevalence is falling gradually with age, and that the ADHD symptom level is significantly lower in the age group 70–80 years than the group 50–60 years. There is a lack of controlled studies of ADHD medication in adults ≥50 years, but this review suggests that many patients aged ≥50 years experience beneficial effects of pharmacological treatment. The problem with side effects and somatic complications may rise to a level that makes pharmacotherapy for ADHD difficult after the age of 65 years. Physical assessment prior to initiation of ADHD medication in adults ≥50 years should include a thorough clinical examination, and medication should be titrated with low doses initially and with a slow increase. In motivated patients, different psychological therapies alone or in addition to pharmacotherapy should be considered. Conclusion It is essential when treating older adult patients with ADHD to provide good support based on knowledge and understanding of how ADHD symptoms have affected health, quality of life, and function through the life span. Individualized therapy for each elderly patient should be recommended to balance risk–benefit ratio when pharmacotherapy is considered to be a possible treatment. PMID:26811680

  14. Atomoxetine Treatment for ADHD: Younger Adults Compared with Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durell, Todd; Adler, Lenard; Wilens, Timothy; Paczkowski, Martin; Schuh, Kory

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Atomoxetine is a nonstimulant medication for treating child, adolescent, and adult ADHD. This meta-analysis compared the effects in younger and older adults. Method: A post hoc analysis was conducted using data from two double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials. Data from patients aged 18-25 years were compared with data from…

  15. Independent older adults perspectives on oral health.

    PubMed

    Khabra, K K; Compton, S M; Keenan, L P

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore oral health experiences from the perspective of older adults' living in community dwellings. The two objectives of this study were to identify facilitators and barriers to oral health care, and to determine how utilization of oral health services compares to utilization of other healthcare services. An interpretive descriptive methodology was employed with a purposive sample of 12 adults, aged 70 years or older. The inclusion criterion was English-speaking seniors residing in community dwellings. Community dwellings were defined as any housing outside of long-term care or other supportive living facilities. Semi-structured interviews were 30-80 min, audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Three researchers participated in the comparative analysis process to develop codes, generate categories, interpret patterns and construct themes. Three central themes surfacing from the data were as follows: life course influences on oral health, transparency in delivery of oral health services and interrelationships between oral health and overall health. Older adults in this study emphasized the value of establishing collaborative and trusting relationships between oral health practitioners and older adults. Oral health practitioners should be clear and transparent when communicating information about oral health costs and be cognizant of different circumstances from childhood to older adulthood that inhibit or promote routine utilization of oral health services. Including oral health services as part of interdisciplinary care teams could help promote understandings of the reciprocal relationship between oral health and general health and improve oral health status for older adults. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Geriatric syndromes in older homeless adults.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca T; Kiely, Dan K; Bharel, Monica; Mitchell, Susan L

    2012-01-01

    The average age of the US homeless population is increasing. Little is known about the prevalence of geriatric syndromes in older homeless adults. To determine the prevalence of common geriatric syndromes in a sample of older homeless adults, and to compare these prevalences to those reported in the general older population. Cross-sectional. Two hundred and forty-seven homeless adults aged 50-69 recruited from eight homeless shelters in Boston, MA. Interviews and examinations for geriatric syndromes, including functional impairment, cognitive impairment, frailty, depression, hearing impairment, visual impairment, and urinary incontinence. The prevalences of these syndromes in the homeless cohort were compared to those reported in three population-based cohorts. The mean age of the homeless cohort was 56.0 years, and 19.8% were women. Thirty percent of subjects reported difficulty performing at least one activity of daily living, and 53.2% fell in the prior year. Cognitive impairment, defined as a Mini-Mental State Examination score <24, was present in 24.3% of participants; impaired executive function, defined as a Trail Making Test Part B duration >1.5 standard deviations above population-based norms, was present in 28.3% of participants. Sixteen percent of subjects met criteria for frailty, and 39.8% had major depression, defined as a score ≥10 on the Patient Health Questionnaire 9. Self-reported hearing and visual impairment was present among 29.7% and 30.0% of subjects, respectively. Urinary incontinence was reported by 49.8% of subjects. After multivariate adjustment for demographic characteristics, homeless adults were more likely to have functional impairment, frailty, depression, visual impairment and urinary incontinence compared to three population-based cohorts of older persons. Geriatric syndromes that are potentially amenable to treatment are common in older homeless adults, and are experienced at higher rates than in the general older population.

  17. Joint Attention is Slowed in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Deroche, Thomas; Castanier, Carole; Perrot, Alexandra; Hartley, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The automatic propensity to orient to the location where other people are looking is the main way of establishing joint attention with others. Whereas joint attention has been mostly investigated with young adults, the present study examines age-related differences in the magnitude and time course of joint attention. Forty-three community-dwelling seniors and 43 younger adults performed a visuospatial task. The procedures closely follow those of gaze-cueing tasks commonly used to investigate joint attention. The findings revealed that a gaze-cueing effect occurs for both younger and older adults, with an equivalent average magnitude but with different time courses. The effect peaks later in older adults. Age-related differences in joint attention could be linked to a more general cognitive slowing rather than to poorer basic social skills. The present study adds to the growing interest in gerontological research regarding social attention.

  18. Strategies to improve diet in older adults.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mary Ann

    2013-02-01

    It is estimated that by 2050 there will be 2 billion people aged 60 years and older in the world. The evidence base for the health benefits of good nutrition and physical activity, as well as weight loss among overweight and obese adults, is growing and a number of policies and guidelines are available to guide health professionals in serving older people at various stages of the lifecycle. There are many potential influences on dietary habits including individual factors, families and friends, community characteristics, the food and supplement industry, and public policy. This review focuses on the evidence base for factors influencing diet in older adults, food insecurity, Na, vitamin D, vitamin B12, protein, obesity and the benefits of energy restriction in overweight and obese older adults. Research is needed to continue to increase the evidence base for appropriate ways to improve diet and health in older people. Also, much of the available information is from the US, so there is a need to conduct research in other areas of the world.

  19. The International Network for Older Adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Dianne

    1992-07-01

    Although funds were not available to bring members of the Older Adults Network to the World Assembly of Adult Education in January 1990, there was, among the delegates, considerable interest in the subject and several meetings were arranged. The thing that struck me most was not how different were our situations, coming as we did from every corner of the earth, but how many problems and concerns we had in common. With the second Network Newsletter, sent out in the spring of 1991, questionnaires asked for brief details of schemes which involved older people in projects that were, in some way, conservational. They could be involved in conserving language, mythology or history. They might be working to improve and save their environment. The aim is to establish a small but useful register of such projects in sufficient detail to encourage contact and replication by others. For this purpose, small grants are being made available from the money given by CIDA. Slowly but surely, the Older Adults Network is gathering information about positive actions being taken to ensure that older people, in all countries, have the skills and opportunities they need to continue as fully participating citizens. With the rapidly increasing number of older people in all our countries, this small beginning will, hopefully, be a foundation on which much important work will be done in the years to come.

  20. Optimizing Tailored Health Promotion for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Marcus-Varwijk, Anne Esther; Koopmans, Marg; Visscher, Tommy L. S.; Seidell, Jacob C.; Slaets, Joris P. J.; Smits, Carolien H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study explores older adults’ perspectives on healthy living, and their interactions with professionals regarding healthy living. This perspective is necessary for health professionals when they engage in tailored health promotion in their daily work routines. Method: In a qualitative study, 18 semi-structured interviews were carried out with older adults (aged 55-98) living in the Netherlands. The framework analysis method was used to analyze the transcripts. Results: Three themes emerged from the data—(a) healthy living: daily routines and staying active, (b) enacting healthy living: accepting and adapting, (c) interaction with health professionals with regard to healthy living: autonomy and reciprocity. Discussion: Older adults experience healthy living in a holistic way in which they prefer to live active and independent lives. Health professionals should focus on building an equal relationship of trust and focus on positive health outcomes, such as autonomy and self-sufficiency when communicating about healthy living. PMID:28138485

  1. Older Adults' Perceptions of Home Telehealth Services

    PubMed Central

    Brenčič, Maja Makovec; Trkman, Peter; de Leonni Stanonik, Mateja

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The success of home telemedicine depends on end-user adoption, which has been slow despite rapid advances in technological development. This study focuses on an examination of significant factors that may predict the successful adoption of home telemedicine services (HTS) among older adults. Based on previous studies in the fields of remote patient monitoring, assisted living technologies, and consumer health information technology acceptance, eight factors were identified as a framework for qualitative testing. Twelve focus groups were conducted with an older population living in both urban and rural environments. The results reveal seven predictors that play an important role in perceptions of HTS: perceived usefulness, effort expectancy, social influence, perceived security, computer anxiety, facilitating conditions, and physicians' opinion. The results provide important insights in the field of older adults' acceptance of HTS, with guidelines for the strategic planning, developing, and marketing of HTS for the graying market. PMID:23931702

  2. Optimizing Sleep in Older Adults: Treating Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Wennberg, Alexandra M.; Canham, Sarah L.; Smith, Michael T.; Spira, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    As the world’s population ages, the elevated prevalence of insomnia in older adults is a growing concern. Insomnia is characterized by difficulty falling or remaining asleep, or by non-restorative sleep, and resultant daytime dysfunction. In addition to being at elevated risk for primary insomnia, older adults are at greater risk for comorbid insomnia, which results from, or occurs in conjunction with another medical or psychiatric condition. In this review, we discuss normal changes in sleep that accompany aging, circadian rhythm changes and other factors that can contribute to late-life insomnia, useful tools for the assessment of insomnia and related problems in older people, and both non-pharmacological and pharmacological strategies for the management of insomnia and optimization of sleep in later life. PMID:23746664

  3. Healthy Weights for Healthy Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... also can be a problem for some older adults. Here are a few tasty tips to pump up your protein intake, without upsetting your food budget or energy balance. Enjoy More Beans. Add canned beans to salads, soups, rice dishes and ...

  4. Social participation and older adults' sleep.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Hao; Lauderdale, Diane S; Waite, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Sleep complaints are common among older adults, and poor sleep has been found to predict chronic diseases and mortality. Many studies suggest that social participation benefits healthy aging. We examined the relationships between older adults' social participation and their sleep using two waves (2005-2006, 2010-2011) of data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP). The NSHAP recorded older adults' social participation (including religious attendance, volunteer work, and attendance at meetings of organized groups) over five years, and included self-reported sleep duration in both waves and, in the second wave, measures of insomnia symptoms and measures of sleep patterns and rhythms using actigraphy for a subsample. Cross-sectional analysis of the second wave indicates that those reporting higher levels of social participation had better actigraphic sleep but not better self-reported sleep. However, longitudinal analysis suggests that change in social participation was not associated with actigraphic or self-reported sleep characteristics in the second wave data. Further analysis using fixed-effects model showed no association between change in social participation and change in self-reported sleep duration. Thus, although older adults with greater social participation slept better, we did not find that increasing social participation improved sleep. These findings imply that a self-selection process may at work; or if social participation does affect sleep, the causal effect may be over a much shorter time frame than five years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Online Attention Training for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Wennberg, Alexandra; Kueider, Alexandra; Spira, Adam; Adams, Gregory; Rager, Robert; Rebok, George

    Evidence suggests that cognitive training interventions can improve older adults' cognitive performance. Successful training programs are adaptable and train multiple cognitive domains to target individual strengths and weaknesses. Computerized training programs are useful because they allow older adults to easily access training. This pilot study used an online attention training program, ATTENTION WORKOUT™, to enhance three aspects of attention- coordination, allocation, and selective focus -in community-dwelling older adults randomized to either an abbreviated (n=13) or an extended (n=17) practice training program over a 6-week period. Participants in the extended practice group significantly improved on selective focus reading distraction tasks with unrelated words (U=39.5; Z=-2.34; p=.02) and blanks (U=26.5; Z=-3.05; p=.002) as well as a matching attributes task (U=49.5; Z=-2.33; p=.02). The extended practice group significantly improved on three tasks of coordinating attention - radio-tuning (U=30; Z=-2.73; p=.01), circuit-breaker resetting (U=46; Z=-2.24; p=.03), and the combination of the two tasks (U=15; Z=-3.51; p<.0001) - as well as a memory generalization task (U=20; Z=-3.27; p=.001). A post-test satisfaction survey found both groups enjoyed the program, but the abbreviated practice group felt the tasks were more difficult. These findings suggest online attention training programs, like ATTENTION WORKOUT, can improve attention-related skills in community-dwelling older adults.

  6. Blueberry supplementation improves memory in older adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The prevalence of dementia, in particular Alzheimer’s disease, is increasing with the expansion of the older adult population. In the absence of effective therapy, preventive approaches are essential to mitigate this public health problem. Blueberries contain polyphenolic compounds, most prominent...

  7. Attitudes toward Advertisements of the Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, M.; Moliner, M. A.; Sanchez, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we will analyze the attitude of older adults to advertisements, differentiating between advertisements that contain rhetorical figures (trope ads) and those that do not (explicit ads). We will also study their attitude toward the brand advertised according to their degree of involvement with the product. In the course of the…

  8. Current Psychopathology in Previously Assaulted Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acierno, Ron; Lawyer, Steven R.; Rheingold, Alyssa; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Resnick, Heidi S.; Saunders, Benjamin E.

    2007-01-01

    Older adult women age 55+ years (N = 549) were interviewed as part of a population-based epidemiological research study of lifetime experiences with physical and sexual assault and current mental health problems. Although overall rates of psychopathology were low, producing very small cells for comparison, women who reported experiencing physical…

  9. Sensory-Cognitive Interactions in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Humes, Larry E.; Young, Levi A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To review evidence regarding sensory and cognitive interactions in older adults published since 2009, the approximate date of the most recent reviews on this topic. Design Following an electronic database search of articles published in English since 2009 on measures of hearing and cognition or vision and cognition in older adults, a total of 437 articles were identified. Screening by title and abstract for appropriateness of topic and for articles presenting original research in peer-reviewed journals reduced the final number of articles reviewed to 34. These articles were qualitatively evaluated and synthesized with the existing knowledge base. Results Additional evidence has been obtained since 2009 associating declines in vision, hearing, or both with declines in cognition among older adults. The observed sensory-cognitive associations are generally stronger when more than one sensory domain is measured and when the sensory measures involve more than simple threshold sensitivity. Conclusions Evidence continues to accumulate supporting a link between decline in sensory function and cognitive decline in older adults. PMID:27355770

  10. Transnational Older Adults and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treas, Judith

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the international migration patterns and the family lives of older adults. Informants (N = 54) reported that they came to the United States to help out their grown children with housekeeping, child care, and domestic economizing. They described how they strategically navigated U.S. immigration laws choosing to…

  11. Services for Older Adults: Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumme, Debbie

    This curriculum guide contains materials for a course that provides occupationally specific training designed to develop knowledge and skills for employment in the area of services for older adults. Contents include an introduction, the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) covered; sample course outlines; instructional strategies organized…

  12. Dietary Patterns and Survival of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    ANDERSON, AMY L.; HARRIS, TAMARA B.; TYLAVSKY, FRANCES A.; PERRY, SARA E.; HOUSTON, DENISE K.; HUE, TRISHA F.; STROTMEYER, ELSA S.; SAHYOUN, NADINE R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent research has linked overall dietary patterns to survival in older adults. Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the dietary patterns of a cohort of older adults, and to explore associations of these dietary patterns with survival over a 10-year period. A secondary goal was to evaluate participants’ quality of life and nutritional status according to their dietary patterns. Design The Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study is a prospective cohort study of 3,075 older adults. In this study, all-cause mortality was assessed from baseline through Year 10. Food intake was estimated with a modified Block food frequency questionnaire, and dietary patterns of 2,582 participants with complete data were derived by cluster analysis. Results Six dietary pattern clusters were identified, including a Healthy Foods cluster, characterized by higher intake of low-fat dairy products, fruit, whole grains, poultry, fish, and vegetables. Both the High-Fat Dairy Products and Sweets and Desserts clusters had a 1.4-fold higher risk of mortality than the Healthy Foods cluster after adjusting for potential confounders. The Healthy Foods cluster also had significantly more years of healthy life and more favorable levels of selected nutritional biomarkers than the other clusters. Conclusions A dietary pattern consistent with current guidelines to consume relatively high amounts of vegetables, fruit, whole grains, poultry, fish, and low-fat dairy products may be associated with superior nutritional status, quality of life and survival in older adults. PMID:21185969

  13. Exercise Prescribing: Computer Application in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kressig, Reto W.; Echt, Katharina V.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if older adults are capable and willing to interact with a computerized exercise promotion interface and to determine to what extent they accept computer-generated exercise recommendations. Design and Methods: Time and requests for assistance were recorded while 34 college-educated volunteers,…

  14. Mobility in Older Adults: A Comprehensive Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Sandra C.; Porter, Michelle M.; Menec, Verena H.

    2010-01-01

    Mobility is fundamental to active aging and is intimately linked to health status and quality of life. Although there is widespread acceptance regarding the importance of mobility in older adults, there have been few attempts to comprehensively portray mobility, and research has to a large extent been discipline specific. In this article, a new…

  15. Dementia literacy in older adults.

    PubMed

    Loi, Samantha M; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2015-09-01

    With the increasing aging population, it is predicted that there will also be a rise in the number of people with dementia. Although there is no definitive cure, early detection and access to treatment and services remains the cornerstone of management. Misinformation and poor knowledge about dementia may lead to delayed diagnosis. A study of dementia literacy was undertaken to explore current knowledge in a metropolitan city in Australia. A vignette describing an older person with symptoms of cognitive impairment was posted out to volunteers at the local hospital. The majority of participants surveyed correctly identified that the person in the vignette was suffering from symptoms of dementia or cognitive impairment. However, there was more variation with regard to types of treatment available and appropriate help-seeking behavior. Although people are able to identify symptoms of dementia when they are presented in a scenario, the reality is often not as clear. More education to improve knowledge with regard to this increasingly common disorder is required so that appropriate interventions can be made available. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Socioeconomic differences in sport and physical activity among Italian adults.

    PubMed

    Federico, Bruno; Falese, Lavinia; Marandola, Diego; Capelli, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to assess the extent of socioeconomic differences in sport and physical activity among Italian adults. A secondary data analysis of a multipurpose survey carried out by the National Institute of Statistics in 2006 in Italy was performed. We found marked differences in the practice of physical activity and sport by socioeconomic position. Subjects with a higher educational level were more likely to be physically active, practising more frequently both sport and physical activity. The Odds Ratio (OR) of regular physical activity for the highest educated compared to the lowest educated males was 1.70 (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.38, 2.08), and the OR of sport participation was 2.03 (95% CI: 1.51, 2.72). Among females, the corresponding ORs were 1.32 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.63) and 2.26 (95% CI: 1.51, 3.38). Similar differences in physical activity and sport were found in relation to occupation and material conditions. Almost all sports were more frequently practised by subjects of higher socioeconomic status. Socioeconomic differences in sport and physical activity may derive from economic or cultural barriers. Policies to reduce inequalities and ensure access to sport independently of socioeconomic position are strongly needed.

  17. Living with Multiple Health Problems: What Older Adults Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke Related Documents PDF Living With Multiple Health Problems: What Older Adults Should Know Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Living With Multiple Health Problems: What Older Adults Should Know Tools and Tips ...

  18. What Older Adults Need to Know about Retail Clinics

    MedlinePlus

    What Older Adults Need to Know about Retail Clinics Expert Information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in the Care of Older Adults Retail clinics are medical clinics based in pharmacies, ...

  19. Chronic Eccentric Exercise and the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Gluchowski, Ashley; Harris, Nigel; Dulson, Deborah; Cronin, John

    2015-10-01

    Eccentric exercise has gained increasing attention as a suitable and promising intervention to delay or mitigate the known physical and physiological declines associated with aging. Determining the relative efficacy of eccentric exercise when compared with the more conventionally prescribed traditional resistance exercise will support evidence-based prescribing for the aging population. Thus, original research studies incorporating chronic eccentric exercise interventions in the older adult population were included in this review. The effects of a range of eccentric exercise modalities on muscular strength, functional capacity, body composition, muscle architecture, markers of muscle damage, the immune system, cardiovascular system, endocrine system, and rating of perceived exertion were all reviewed as outcomes of particular interest in the older adult. Muscular strength was found to increase most consistently compared with results from traditional resistance exercise. Functional capacity and body composition showed significant improvements with eccentric endurance protocols, especially in older, frail or sedentary cohorts. Muscle damage was avoided with the gradual progression of novel eccentric exercise, while muscle damage from intense acute bouts was significantly attenuated with repeated sessions. Eccentric exercise causes little cardiovascular stress; thus, it may not generate the overload required to elicit cardiovascular adaptations. An anabolic state may be achievable following eccentric exercise, while improvements to insulin sensitivity have not been found. Finally, rating of perceived exertion during eccentric exercise was often significantly lower than during traditional resistance exercise. Overall, evidence supports the prescription of eccentric exercise for the majority of outcomes of interest in the diverse cohorts of the older adult population.

  20. Nursing student attitudes towards older people: validity and reliability of the Italian version of the Kogan Attitudes towards Older People scale.

    PubMed

    Matarese, Maria; Lommi, Marzia; Pedone, Claudio; Alvaro, Rosaria; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a study testing the validity and reliability of the Italian version of the Kogan Attitude towards Older People scale. Nursing students' attitudes towards older people can affect their preference for working with them. One of the most common instruments used to assess these attitudes is the Kogan Attitude towards Older People scale. Previous validation studies performed on college students internationally have demonstrated good reliability and validity. The psychometric properties of the Italian version have not yet been tested. A cross-sectional, descriptive study. The study was conducted from March-June 2010 with a convenience sample of nursing students attending two Italian universities. Reliability was evaluated using internal consistency and item-to-total correlation. Content and construct validity were evaluated using a content validity index and principal factor analysis. A total of 1637 nursing students participated in the study. Two factors were extracted from the factor analysis: prejudice describing a negative disposition and appreciation indicating a favourable feeling and opinion towards older people. The Kogan Attitude towards Older People scale applied to Italian nursing students exhibited good internal consistency. The two-dimensional construct of the scale was congruent with some, but not all, results of previous studies due to methodological differences among the studies. Based on the study findings, the scale can be recommended for future research studies in Italy including use as pre/post-test measurement associated with nursing education programmes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Child's play: the creativity of older adults.

    PubMed

    Capps, Donald

    2012-09-01

    In this article, I discuss Paul W. Pruyser's view presented in his article "An Essay on Creativity" (Pruyser in Bull Menninger Clin 43:294-353, 1979) that creative persons manifest early childhood qualities of playfulness, curiosity, and pleasure seeking and that adaptation is itself a form of creativity. I then discuss his article "Creativity in Aging Persons" (Pruyser in Bull Menninger Clin 51:425-435, 1987) in which he presents his view that aging itself is a potentially creative process, that creativity among older adults is not limited to the talented few, and that older adulthood has several specific features that are conducive to creativity. Significant among these features are object loss (especially involving human relationships) and functional loss (due to the vicissitudes of aging). Noting his particular emphasis on object loss and its role in late-life creativity, I focus on functional loss, and I emphasize the importance of adaptation in sustaining the creativity of older adults who experience such loss. I illustrate this adaptation by considering well-known painters who in late life suffered visual problems common to older adults. I suggest that in adapting to their visual problems these artists drew on the early childhood qualities (playfulness, curiosity and pleasure seeking) that all creative persons possess and that they are therefore illustrative for other older adults who are experiencing functional losses. I conclude with Erik H. Erikson's (Toys and reasons: stages in the ritualization of experience, W. W. Norton, New York, 1977) and Paul W. Pruyser's (Pastor Psychol 35:120-131, 1986) reflections on the relationship between seeing and hoping.

  2. Multimorbidity in Older Adults with Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Older adults with atrial fibrillation often have multiple comorbid conditions, including common geriatric syndromes. Pharmacologic therapy, whether for rate control or rhythm control, can result in complications related to polypharmacy in patients who are often on multiple medications for other conditions. Because of uncertainty about the relative risks and benefits of rate versus rhythm control (including antiarrhythmic or ablation therapy), anticoagulation, and procedural treatments (eg, ablation, left atrial appendage closure, pacemaker placement) in older patients with multimorbidity, shared decision-making is essential. However, this may be challenging in patients with cognitive dysfunction, high fall risk, or advanced comorbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Mental Health of Older LGBT Adults.

    PubMed

    Yarns, Brandon C; Abrams, Janet M; Meeks, Thomas W; Sewell, Daniel D

    2016-06-01

    There are approximately one million older lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adults in the USA. Their mental health issues result from interactions between genetic factors and stress associated with membership in a sexual minority group. Although advancements in acceptance and equal treatment of LGBT individuals have been occurring, sexual minority status remains associated with risks to physical and mental well-being. Older LGBT adults are more likely to have experienced mistreatment and discrimination due to living a majority of their lives prior to recent advancements in acceptance and equal treatment. All LGBT adults experience one common developmental challenge: deciding if, when, and how to reveal to others their gender identity and/or sexual orientation. LGBT individuals have higher rates of anxiety, depression, and substance use disorders and also are at increased risk for certain medical conditions like obesity, breast cancer, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Improved education and training of clinicians, coupled with clinical research efforts, holds the promise of improved overall health and life quality for older LGBT adults.

  4. Nutraceutical Intervention Improves Older Adults' Cognitive Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Kerri S.; Martin, Christina; Eisel, Sarah L.; Sanberg, Cyndy D.; McEvoy, Cathy L.; Sanberg, Paul R.; Shytle, R. Douglas; Tan, Jun; Bickford, Paula C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Interventions to improve the cognitive health of older adults are of critical importance. In the current study, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial using a pill-based nutraceutical (NT-020) that contained a proprietary formulation of blueberry, carnosine, green tea, vitamin D3, and Biovin to evaluate the impact on changes in multiple domains of cognitive functioning. One hundred and five cognitively intact adults aged 65–85 years of age (M=73.6 years) were randomized to receive NT-020 (n=52) or a placebo (n=53). Participants were tested with a battery of cognitive performance tests that were classified into six broad domains—episodic memory, processing speed, verbal ability, working memory, executive functioning, and complex speed at baseline and 2 months later. The results indicated that persons taking NT-020 improved significantly on two measures of processing speed across the 2-month test period in contrast to persons on the placebo whose performance did not change. None of the other cognitive ability measures were related to intervention group. The results also indicated that the NT-020 was well tolerated by older adults, and the presence of adverse events or symptoms did not differ between the NT-020 and placebo groups. Overall, the results of the current study were promising and suggest the potential for interventions like these to improve the cognitive health of older adults. PMID:24134194

  5. Resilience in Rural Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Context: Identifying ways to meet the health care needs of older adults is important because their numbers are increasing and they often have more health care issues. High resilience level may be one factor that helps older adults adjust to the hardships associated with aging. Rural community-dwelling older adults often face unique challenges such…

  6. Older Adults and E-Learning: Opportunities and Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Githens, Rod P.

    2007-01-01

    E-learning and distance education can play a role in helping older adults become integrated with the rest of society. As demographic and cultural changes affect the place of older adults in society, online learning programs become increasingly appealing to older adults. In this article, I discuss (1) the changing notion of work and learning in…

  7. Effects of a Forgiveness Intervention for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allemand, Mathias; Steiner, Marianne; Hill, Patrick L.

    2013-01-01

    The authors' aim in the present study was to examine the effects of a brief forgiveness intervention for older adults. The psychoeducational group intervention consists of (a) established core components of previous forgiveness interventions and (b) additional components considering specific needs of older adults. Seventy-eight older adults (mean…

  8. Multimorbidity in Older Adults with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Dharmarajan, Kumar; Dunlay, Shannon M

    2016-05-01

    Multimorbidity is common among older adults with heart failure and creates diagnostic and management challenges. Diagnosis of heart failure may be difficult, as many conditions commonly found in older persons produce dyspnea, exercise intolerance, fatigue, and weakness; no singular pathognomonic finding or diagnostic test differentiates them from one another. Treatment may also be complicated, as multimorbidity creates high potential for drug-disease and drug-drug interactions in settings of polypharmacy. The authors suggest that management of multimorbid older persons with heart failure be patient, rather than disease-focused, to best meet patients' unique health goals and minimize risk from excessive or poorly-coordinated treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The oral health of institutionalized older adults in Malta.

    PubMed

    Santucci, Daniela; Attard, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the oral health status of institutionalized older adults are less prevalent than those of community-dwelling older adults, as institutionalized older adults tend to be frailer. Poor oral health in older adults has a negative impact on the quality of life and self-confidence of older people and potentially poses a financial burden on both the older adult and society in general. The objective of this study was to assess and compare the oral health status of state institutionalized older adults in Malta with that of their European counterparts. A total of 278 older adults with an average age of 83.6 ± 6.5 years from nine state institutions in Malta were randomly selected. Participants were clinically examined for caries, periodontal disease, oral mucosal lesions, and prosthetic status. The oral health status of state institutionalized older adults was poor, with a very low routine dental attendance (29.3%) and, consequently, a high level of treatment need (44.4% of dentate individuals required extractions and 42.1% of dentate individuals required restorations). Only 2% of dentate individuals had healthy periodontal tissues with no clinical attachment loss over 4 mm. Edentulism among state institutionalized older adults stood at 41%. Institutionalized older adults from Malta have a poor oral health status comparable to institutionalized older adults from Europe in general, which poses fiscal and cultural challenges that need to be addressed by the dental community.

  10. Treatment of specific phobia in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Pachana, Nancy A; Woodward, Rana M; Byrne, Gerard JA

    2007-01-01

    Phobias are common in later life, yet treatment research in this population remains scant. The efficacy of exposure therapy, in combination with other Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) components, in the treatment of specific phobia with a middle and older aged sample was examined. Sixteen adults aged 45–68 with DSM-IV diagnosis of a specific phobia received a manualized intervention over ten weeks, and were compared with a control group. Results indicated significant time effects in the treatment group for the primary outcome variables of phobic severity and avoidance as well as secondary outcome variables including depression and anxiety. Symptom presence and severity also significantly declined in the treatment group. No significant changes in state anxiety were noted across the treatment period. Such results provide support for the efficacy of exposure combined with CBT treatment for specific phobia in middle to older aged adults. PMID:18044196

  11. Astrophysics for Older adults in Chicago.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grin, Daniel; Landsberg, Randall H.; Flude, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Gerontology research continues to show that the adage "Use it or Lose it" is a clinical fact when it comes to cognitive engagement post-retirement. Here, I'll discuss a new program developed at the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, bringing classes on astrophysics to older adults throughout the city, at retirement homes, at senior center, and at public libraries, bookended by an engaging trip to the Adler Planetarium. In my presentation, I'll present the gerontological and policy motivations for this program, the presenter training techniques, our partner collaboration strategy, and the results of our effort, which engaged hundreds of older adults throughout Chicago from a variety of socioeconomic strata.

  12. Older Adults' Acceptance of Activity Trackers.

    PubMed

    Preusse, Kimberly C; Mitzner, Tracy L; Fausset, Cara Bailey; Rogers, Wendy A

    2017-02-01

    To assess the usability and acceptance of activity tracking technologies by older adults. First in our multimethod approach, we conducted heuristic evaluations of two activity trackers that revealed potential usability barriers to acceptance. Next, questionnaires and interviews were administered to 16 older adults ( M age = 70, SD age = 3.09, range age = 65-75) before and after a 28-day field study to understand facilitators and additional barriers to acceptance. These measurements were supplemented with diary and usage data and assessed whether and why users overcame usability issues. The heuristic evaluation revealed usability barriers in System Status Visibility, Error Prevention, and Consistency and Standards. The field study revealed additional barriers (e.g., accuracy, format) and acceptance-facilitators (e.g., goal tracking, usefulness, encouragement). The acceptance of wellness management technologies, such as activity trackers, may be increased by addressing acceptance-barriers during deployment (e.g., providing tutorials on features that were challenging, communicating usefulness).

  13. THE OLDER ADULT DRIVER WITH COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT

    PubMed Central

    Carr, David B.; Ott, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Although automobiles remain the transportation of choice for older adults, late life cognitive impairment and dementia often impair the ability to drive safely. There is, however, no commonly utilized method of assessing dementia severity in relation to driving, no consensus on the assessment of older drivers with cognitive impairment, and no gold standard for determining driving fitness. Yet, clinicians are called upon by patients, their families, other health professionals, and often the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to assess their patients' fitness-to-drive and to make recommendations about driving privileges. Using the case of Mr W, we describe the challenges of driving with cognitive impairment for both the patient and caregiver, summarize the literature on dementia and driving, discuss evidenced-based assessment of fitness-to-drive, and address important ethical and legal issues. We describe the role of physician assessment, referral to neuropsychology, functional screens, dementia severity tools, driving evaluation clinics, and DMV referrals that may assist with evaluation. Finally, we discuss mobility counseling (eg, exploration of transportation alternatives) since health professionals need to address this important issue for older adults who lose the ability to drive. The application of a comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to the older driver with cognitive impairment will have the best opportunity to enhance our patients' social connectedness and quality of life, while meeting their psychological and medical needs and maintaining personal and public safety. PMID:20424254

  14. Perceived age discrimination in older adults.

    PubMed

    Rippon, Isla; Kneale, Dylan; de Oliveira, Cesar; Demakakos, Panayotes; Steptoe, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    to examine perceived age discrimination in a large representative sample of older adults in England. this cross-sectional study of over 7,500 individuals used data from the fifth wave of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), a longitudinal cohort study of men and women aged 52 years and older in England. Wave 5 asked respondents about the frequency of five everyday discriminatory situations. Participants who attributed any experiences of discrimination to their age were treated as cases of perceived age discrimination. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratios of experiencing perceived age discrimination in relation to selected sociodemographic factors. approximately a third (33.3%) of all respondents experienced age discrimination, rising to 36.8% in those aged 65 and over. Perceived age discrimination was associated with older age, higher education, lower levels of household wealth and being retired or not in employment. The correlates of age discrimination across the five discriminatory situations were similar. understanding age discrimination is vital if we are to develop appropriate policies and to target future interventions effectively. These findings highlight the scale of the challenge of age discrimination for older adults in England and illustrate that those groups are particularly vulnerable to this form of discrimination.

  15. Perceived age discrimination in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Rippon, Isla; Kneale, Dylan; de Oliveira, Cesar; Demakakos, Panayotes; Steptoe, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: to examine perceived age discrimination in a large representative sample of older adults in England. Methods: this cross-sectional study of over 7,500 individuals used data from the fifth wave of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), a longitudinal cohort study of men and women aged 52 years and older in England. Wave 5 asked respondents about the frequency of five everyday discriminatory situations. Participants who attributed any experiences of discrimination to their age were treated as cases of perceived age discrimination. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratios of experiencing perceived age discrimination in relation to selected sociodemographic factors. Results: approximately a third (33.3%) of all respondents experienced age discrimination, rising to 36.8% in those aged 65 and over. Perceived age discrimination was associated with older age, higher education, lower levels of household wealth and being retired or not in employment. The correlates of age discrimination across the five discriminatory situations were similar. Conclusion: understanding age discrimination is vital if we are to develop appropriate policies and to target future interventions effectively. These findings highlight the scale of the challenge of age discrimination for older adults in England and illustrate that those groups are particularly vulnerable to this form of discrimination. PMID:24077751

  16. Clinical Features of Infection in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Norman, Dean C

    2016-08-01

    The impact of infectious diseases on older adults is far greater than on younger adults because of significantly higher morbidity and mortality caused by infection. The reasons for this greater impact include factors such as lower physiologic reserve due to age and chronic disease, age-related changes in host defenses, loss of mobility, higher risk for polypharmacy and adverse drug reactions, and being on drugs that increase the risk for infection (e.g., anticholinergic and other sedating medications increase the risk for pneumonia). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recognition of dementia in hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Katie; Mezey, Mathy

    2008-01-01

    Many hospital patients with dementia have no documented dementia diagnosis. In some cases, this is because they have never been diagnosed. Recognition of Dementia in Hospitalized Older Adults proposes several approaches that hospital nurses can use to increase recognition of dementia. This article describes the Try This approaches, how to implement them, and how to incorporate them into a hospital's current admission procedures. For a free online video demonstrating the use of these approaches, go to http://links.lww.com/A216.

  18. Principles of Antimicrobial Therapy in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Suzanne F

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic use is common in older adults, and much of it is deemed unnecessary. Complications of antibiotic use may occur as a consequence of changes in age-related physiology and dosing with resulting drug toxicity and secondary infection. Knowing when it is appropriate to initiate antibiotics may help reduce unnecessary antibiotic use and prevent adverse drug events. Careful attention to antibiotic selection, dosing adjustments, and drug-drug interactions may also help prevent antibiotic-related adverse events. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Chronic use of benzodiazepines among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Alvarenga, Jussara Mendonça; Giacomin, Karla Cristina; de Loyola, Antônio Ignácio; Uchoa, Elizabeth; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the perception of and motivation for the chronic use of benzodiazepine among older adults. METHODS A qualitative study was conducted on 22 older adults living in Bambuí, MG, Southeastern Brazil, who were taking benzodiazepines and had the clinical and cognitive ability to respond to interview questions. The collected data were analyzed on the basis of the “signs, meanings, and actions” model. RESULTS The main reasons pointed out for the use of benzodiazepines were “nervousness”, “sleep problems”, and “worry” due to family and financial problems, everyday problems, and existential difficulties. None of the interviewees said that they used benzodiazepines in a dose higher than that recommended or had been warned by health professionals about any risks of their continuous use. Different strategies were used to obtain the prescription for the medication, and any physician would prescribe it, indicating that a bond was established with the drug and not with the health professional or healthcare service. Obtaining and consuming the medication turned into a crucial issue because benzodiazepine assumes the status of an essential food, which leads users to not think but sleep. It causes a feeling of relief from their problems such as awareness of human finitude and fragility, existential difficulties, and family problems. CONCLUSIONS Benzodiazepine assumes the characteristics of polyvalence among older adults, which extrapolate specific clinical indications, and of essentiality to deal with life’s problems in old age. Although it relieves the “nerves”, the chronic use of benzodiazepines buffers suffering and prevents older adults from going through the suffering. This shows important difficulties in the organization and planning of strategies that are necessary for minimizing the chronic use in this population. PMID:26039388

  20. Dental Hygiene Students’ Perceptions of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R. Constance; Shockey, Alcinda Trickett; Long, D. Leann

    2015-01-01

    Geriatric education is an important component of the dental hygiene curriculum because, in it, students acquire skills and attitudes to help provide quality care to older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine if off-site exposure to nursing home residents with supervised oversight had the potential to improve dental hygiene students’ attitudes toward older adults. Senior dental hygiene students at one school completed a pre-nursing home experience questionnaire. A series of geriatric lectures and discussions, which included discussions about students’ anxieties of working with institutionalized older adults, were held prior to the nursing home experience. The students then participated in two supervised four-hour nursing home experiences, were debriefed after the experiences, and completed a second questionnaire. Of thirty-nine potential participants in the study, thirty-two took part in the pre-nursing home experience questionnaire (82.1 percent). They had a mean split Fabroni score of 34.2 (95 percent confidence interval: 32.2, 36.3). The thirty participants in the post-experience questionnaire (76.9 percent of total) had a mean split score of 32.7 (95 percent confidence interval: 30.1, 35.3). This study failed to reject the null hypothesis of no mean difference between the pre- and post-nursing home experience; however, the post-experience mean score was lower than the pre-nursing home experience mean score, indicating a more positive attitude toward older adults after the experience. PMID:25480277

  1. Older black adult osteoarthritis pain communication.

    PubMed

    Puia, Denise; McDonald, Deborah Dillon

    2014-03-01

    A quantitative descriptive secondary data analysis design was used to describe older black adult communication of osteoarthritis pain and the communication strategies used to convey the pain information. Pain content from 74 older black adults with persistent osteoarthritis pain was analyzed using criteria from the American Pain Society arthritis pain management guidelines that included type of pain (nociceptive/neuropathic), quality of pain, source, location, intensity, duration/time course, pain affect, effect on personal lifestyle, functional status, current pain treatments, use of recommended glucosamine sulfate, effectiveness of prescribed treatments, prescription analgesic side effects, weight management to ideal body weight, exercise regimen or physical therapy and/or occupational therapy, and indications for surgery. Communication strategies were analyzed with criteria derived from Communication Accommodation Theory that included being clear, using medical syntax, using ethnic specific syntax, being explicit, and staying on topic when discussing pain. The majority of communicated pain content included pain location, intensity, and timing. Regarding communication strategies, most of the older black adults used specific descriptions of pain and remained on topic. Fewer used explicit descriptions of pain that produced a vivid mental image, and few used medical terminology. Use of medical syntax and more explicit descriptions might improve communication about pain between health care practitioners and patients. Practitioners might assist older black adults with persistent osteoarthritis pain to communicate important clinical pain information by helping them to use relevant medical terminology and more explicit pain descriptions when discussing pain management. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dietary patterns and survival of older adults.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Amy L; Harris, Tamara B; Tylavsky, Frances A; Perry, Sara E; Houston, Denise K; Hue, Trisha F; Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Sahyoun, Nadine R

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has linked overall dietary patterns to survival in older adults. The objective of this study was to determine the dietary patterns of a cohort of older adults, and to explore associations of these dietary patterns with survival over a 10-year period. A secondary goal was to evaluate participants' quality of life and nutritional status according to their dietary patterns. The Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study is a prospective cohort study of 3,075 older adults. In this study, all-cause mortality was assessed from baseline through Year 10. Food intake was estimated with a modified Block food frequency questionnaire, and dietary patterns of 2,582 participants with complete data were derived by cluster analysis. Six dietary pattern clusters were identified, including a Healthy Foods cluster, characterized by higher intake of low-fat dairy products, fruit, whole grains, poultry, fish, and vegetables. Both the High-Fat Dairy Products and Sweets and Desserts clusters had a 1.4-fold higher risk of mortality than the Healthy Foods cluster after adjusting for potential confounders. The Healthy Foods cluster also had significantly more years of healthy life and more favorable levels of selected nutritional biomarkers than the other clusters. A dietary pattern consistent with current guidelines to consume relatively high amounts of vegetables, fruit, whole grains, poultry, fish, and low-fat dairy products may be associated with superior nutritional status, quality of life and survival in older adults. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neighborhood characteristics and disability in older adults.

    PubMed

    Beard, John R; Blaney, Shannon; Cerda, Magda; Frye, Victoria; Lovasi, Gina S; Ompad, Danielle; Rundle, Andrew; Vlahov, David

    2009-03-01

    To characterize the influence of the residential neighborhood of older adults on the prevalence of disability. We combined Census data on disability in older adults living in New York City with environmental information from a comprehensive geospatial database. We used factor analysis to derive dimensions of compositional and physical neighborhood characteristics and linear regression to model their association with levels of disability. Measures of neighborhood collective efficacy were added to these models to explore the impact of the social environment. Low neighborhood socioeconomic status, residential instability, living in areas with low proportions of foreign born and high proportions of Black residents, and negative street characteristics were associated with higher prevalence of both "physical" disability and "going outside the home" disability. High crime levels were additionally associated with physical disability, although this relationship disappeared when misdemeanor arrests were removed from the crime variable. Low levels of collective efficacy were associated with more going-outside-the-home disability, with racial/ethnic composition dropping out of this model to be replaced by an interaction term. The urban environment may have a substantial impact on whether an older adult with a given level of functional impairment is able to age actively and remain independent.

  4. Neighborhood Characteristics and Disability in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Blaney, Shannon; Cerda, Magda; Frye, Victoria; Lovasi, Gina S.; Ompad, Danielle; Rundle, Andrew; Vlahov, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective To characterize the influence of the residential neighborhood of older adults on the prevalence of disability. Methods We combined Census data on disability in older adults living in New York City with environmental information from a comprehensive geospatial database. We used factor analysis to derive dimensions of compositional and physical neighborhood characteristics and linear regression to model their association with levels of disability. Measures of neighborhood collective efficacy were added to these models to explore the impact of the social environment. Results Low neighborhood socioeconomic status, residential instability, living in areas with low proportions of foreign born and high proportions of Black residents, and negative street characteristics were associated with higher prevalence of both “physical” disability and “going outside the home” disability. High crime levels were additionally associated with physical disability, although this relationship disappeared when misdemeanor arrests were removed from the crime variable. Low levels of collective efficacy were associated with more going-outside-the-home disability, with racial/ethnic composition dropping out of this model to be replaced by an interaction term. Conclusion The urban environment may have a substantial impact on whether an older adult with a given level of functional impairment is able to age actively and remain independent. PMID:19181694

  5. Influences on Neighborhood Walking in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose; Clarke, Philippa J.; Ronis, David L.; Cherry, Carol Loveland; Nyquist, Linda; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional survey study was to examine the influence of self-efficacy, outcome expectations and environment on neighborhood walking in older adults with (n=163, mean age=78.7, SD=7.96 years) and without (n=163, mean age=73.6, SD=7.93 years) mobility limitations (controlling for demographic characteristics). Measures included: Neighborhood Physical Activity Questionnaire, Multidimensional Outcome Expectations for Exercise Scale, Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale, and self-efficacy scales. Multiple regression revealed that in mobility-limited older adults, demographic characteristics, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations explained 17.4% of variance in neighborhood walking, while environment (neighborhood destinations and design) explained 9.5%. Destinations, self-efficacy, gender, and outcome expectations influenced walking. In those without mobility limitations, demographic characteristics, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations explained 15.6% of the variance, while environment explained 5.7%. Self-efficacy, gender, and design influenced walking. Neighborhood walking interventions for older adults should include self-efficacy strategies tailored to mobility status and neighborhood characteristics. PMID:22998660

  6. Personality and sexuality in older adults.

    PubMed

    Allen, Mark S; Desille, Annelil E

    2017-07-01

    This study explored cross-time associations between personality and multiple components of sexual functioning and behaviour in a large cohort of older adults (n = 5745). Participants (M age  = 65.57 ± 8.28 years) completed questionnaires in 2010 and 2012. Outcomes explored included sexual attitudes, sexual activity, sexual satisfaction, lifetime sexual partners, sexual orientation and sexual dysfunction. We found that higher levels of openness and lower levels of agreeableness were related to more liberal attitudes toward sex, a greater number of sexual partners, a higher sex drive, more frequent sexual activity, lower levels of sexual dysfunction and (for women) a greater tendency towards homosexuality. Higher levels of conscientiousness were also related to more conservative attitudes towards sex, lower levels of sexual dysfunction and a greater tendency towards heterosexuality. For sexually active older adults, higher levels of extraversion and lower levels of neuroticism were related to greater sexual satisfaction. Higher levels of extraversion and lower levels of conscientiousness were also related to a greater number of sexual partners in men but not women. These findings provide evidence that personality is an important correlate of sexual functioning and behaviour in older adults.

  7. Access to transportation for Chittenden County Vermont older adults.

    PubMed

    Hadley Strout, Emily; Fox, Leah; Castro, Alejandro; Haroun, Pishoy; Leavitt, Blake; Ross, Cordelia; Sayan, Mutlay; Delaney, Thomas; Platzer, Alyson; Hutchins, Jeanne; Carney, Jan K

    2016-08-01

    Aging often leads to decreased independence and mobility, which can be detrimental to health and well-being. The growing population of older adults will create a greater need for reliable transportation. Explore whether and how lack of transportation has compromised areas of daily lives in older adults. 1221 surveys with 36 questions assessing transportation access, usage, and impact on activities were distributed to Chittenden County, Vermont older adults; 252 met criteria for analysis. Older adults reported overwhelming difficulty getting to activities considered important, with 69 % of participants delaying medical appointments due to transportation barriers. Although family and friends represent a primary method of transportation, older adults reported difficulty asking them for help. Lack of accessible transportation leads to missed healthcare appointments and social isolation, which may have detrimental effects on older adults' quality of life. Many older adults face significant transportation challenges that negatively affect their health and well-being.

  8. Recognition of rapid speech by blind and sighted older adults

    PubMed Central

    Gordon-Salant, Sandra; Friedman, Sarah A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to determine if older blind participants recognize time-compressed speech better than older sighted participants. Method Three groups of adults with normal hearing participated (n = 10/group): older sighted, older blind, and younger sighted listeners. Low-predictability sentences that were uncompressed (0% time compression ratio, TCR) and compressed at three rates (40%, 50%, and 60% TCR) were presented to listeners in quiet and noise. Results Older blind listeners recognized all time-compressed speech stimuli significantly better than older sighted listeners in quiet. In noise, the older blind adults recognized the uncompressed and 40% TCR speech stimuli better than the older sighted adults. Performance differences between the younger sighted adults and older blind adults were not observed. Conclusions The findings support the notion that older blind adults recognize time-compressed speech considerably better than older sighted adults in quiet and noise. Their performance levels are similar to those of younger adults, suggesting that age-related difficulty in understanding time-compressed speech is not an inevitable consequence of aging. Rather, frequent listening to speech at rapid rates, which was highly correlated with performance of the older blind adults, may be a useful technique to minimize age-related slowing in speech understanding. PMID:20689022

  9. Sexual Consent Capacity Assessment with Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Syme, Maggie L; Steele, Debora

    2016-09-01

    Many healthcare providers have a limited knowledge of sexual and intimate expression in later life, often due to attitudinal and informational limitations. Further, the likelihood of an older adult experiencing cognitive decline increases in a long-term care (LTC) setting, complicating the ability of the providers to know if the older adult can make his or her own sexual decisions, or has sexual consent capacity. Thus, the team is left to question if and how to support intimacy and/or sexuality among residents with intimacy needs. Psychologists working with LTC need to be aware and knowledgeable about sexual consent capacity in older adulthood to be prepared to conduct evaluations and participate in planning care. Limited research is available to consult for best practices in sexual consent capacity assessment; however, models of assessment have been developed based on the best available evidence, clinical judgment, and practice. Existing models will be discussed and an integrated model will be illustrated via a case study. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The Seattle Care Pathway: Defining Dental Care for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Pretty, Iain

    2015-08-01

    It is well-recognized that the demographic shift in the population will result in a larger proportion of older adults and those adults will live longer than ever before. There is, therefore, a need to ensure dental services recognize this transition and plan for the management of older adults in primary care dental practices. This article describes the evidence for, and the details of, the Seattle Care Pathway to ensure older adults receive optimum dental care.

  11. Neuropsychological status in older adults influences susceptibility to false memories.

    PubMed

    Meade, Michelle L; Geraci, Lisa D; Roediger, Henry L

    2012-01-01

    In 2 experiments we examined the influence of frontal lobe function on older adults' susceptibility to false memory in a categorized list paradigm. Using a neuropsychological battery of tests developed by Glisky, Polster, and Routhieaux (1995), we designated older adults as having high- or low-frontal function. Young and older adults studied and were tested on categorized lists using free report cued recall and forced report cued recall instructions, with the latter requiring participants to produce responses even if they had to guess. Under free report cued recall instructions, frontal lobe function was a strong predictor of false memories in older adults: Older adults who scored low on tests of frontal functioning demonstrated much higher levels of false recall than younger adults, whereas levels of false recall in high-frontal older adults were more similar to those of young adults. However, after forced report cued recall, high- and low-frontal older adults performed similarly to each other, and both demonstrated higher levels of false recall than young adults. On a final recognition test, high-frontal older adults in both the free report cued recall and forced report cued recall conditions were more successful than low-frontal older adults in using source information to reduce memory errors. The results indicate that older adults show higher levels of false recall than younger adults, but type of test (free report or forced report) and neuropsychological status of older adults mediate these effects. Low-frontal older adults are particularly susceptible to producing false memories on free report tests that entail source monitoring.

  12. Going it Alone: A Scoping Review of Unbefriended Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Stephanie; Baik, Sol; Estabrooks, Carole

    2018-03-01

    Older adults who have reduced decision-making capacity and no family or friends to compensate for these deficiencies are known as unbefriended and require a public guardian. The purpose of this study was to review the peer-reviewed and grey literature to determine the scope of available research on unbefriended older adults in Canada and the United States. We found limited research examining unbefriended older adults. No Canadian studies or reports were located. Unbefriended older adults were childless or had fewer children, were more cognitively impaired, and were older than older adults who were not unbefriended. These findings demonstrate a stark scarcity of studies on unbefriended older adults. Research is urgently needed using standardized data collection of guardianship status in order to enable studies of the prevalence of public guardianship in Canada.

  13. Organizational Support and Volunteering Benefits for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Fengyan; Choi, Eunhee; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested a theoretical model of volunteering benefits and examined the mechanism through which volunteering benefits older adults. Design and Methods: This is a 2-wave study of 253 older adult volunteers serving in 10 volunteer programs. Older volunteers completed the mailed surveys in 2005 and 2006. Structural equation modeling…

  14. Explicit Instruction, Bilingualism, and the Older Adult Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Jessica G.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about older adult language learners and effects of aging on L2 learning. This study investigated learning in older age through interactions of learner-internal and -external variables; specifically, late-learned L2 (bilingualism) and provision of grammar explanation (explicit instruction, EI). Forty-three older adults (age 60+) who…

  15. The Capacity to Consent to Research among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Minhong

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate an assessment tool for research consent competence in older participants. A four-item instrument was developed to assess the capacity of the older adults to consent to research. Data were obtained from 203 nursing home residents from two facilities and 201 community-dwelling older adults in a…

  16. On the origins of ageism among older and younger adults.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Ehud

    2009-12-01

    Ageism is apparent in many social structures and contexts and in diverse forms over the life cycle. This review discusses the development and consequences of ageism toward elderly people by others of any age, according to the Terror Management Theory (TMT) and the Social Identity Theory (SIT). A systematic search of the literature was carried out on the social and psychological origins of ageism in younger and older adults. Studies on the reasons for ageism among older adults point to attitudes that older adults have toward their own age group, while studies on ageism in young adults explain it as an unconscious defensive strategy which younger adults use against death anxiety. In other words, TMT can serve as a suitable framework for ageism in younger adults, and SIT appears to explain ageism in older adults. A dissociation of the linkage between death and old age in younger adults can be achieved by changing the concepts of death and old age. For older adults, it is recommended to improve self-worth by encouraging social contacts in which older adults contribute to younger adults, weaken the effects of age stereotypes in TV programs, and prepare middle-aged adults for living healthy lives as older adults. However, these conclusions should be regarded with caution, because several key areas (age related cues, activated cognitive processes, impact of death awareness on ageism) need to be investigated in order to validate this understanding of the origins of ageism among younger and older adults.

  17. Recognition of Rapid Speech by Blind and Sighted Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon-Salant, Sandra; Friedman, Sarah A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether older blind participants recognize time-compressed speech better than older sighted participants. Method: Three groups of adults with normal hearing participated (n = 10/group): (a) older sighted, (b) older blind, and (c) younger sighted listeners. Low-predictability sentences that were uncompressed (0% time…

  18. Neighborhood Amenities and Mobility in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Andrea L.; Grubesic, Tony H.; Auchincloss, Amy H.; Tabb, Loni P.; Michael, Yvonne L.

    2013-01-01

    Diversity of neighborhood amenities may promote the mobility of older adults. A 2010 community-based sample of 510 adults aged ≥65 years in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and geospatial data from the Esri Business Analyst database (Esri, Inc., Redlands, California) were used to assess associations of neighborhood amenity diversity with mobility. Neighborhoods were defined by census tract, and diversity of amenities was derived by using the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design's neighborhood development index (US Green Building Council, Washington, DC). Generalized estimating equations adjusted for demographic, socioeconomic, and neighborhood characteristics were used to estimate differences in mobility score by tertile of amenity diversity. Analyses were stratified by participants' routine travel habits (stayed at home, stayed in home zip code, or traveled beyond home zip code). We found that for those who spent most of their time in their home neighborhoods, mobility scores (from the Life-Space Assessment, which ranges from 0 to 104 points) were 8.3 points higher (95% confidence interval: 0.1, 16.6) among those who lived in neighborhoods with the most amenity diversity compared with those who lived in neighborhoods with the least amenity diversity. No significant associations between amenity diversity and mobility were observed for those who did not leave home or who regularly traveled outside their neighborhoods. Neighborhoods with a high diversity of amenities may be important promoters of mobility in older adults who do not routinely travel outside their neighborhoods. PMID:23666814

  19. Neighborhood amenities and mobility in older adults.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Andrea L; Grubesic, Tony H; Auchincloss, Amy H; Tabb, Loni P; Michael, Yvonne L

    2013-09-01

    Diversity of neighborhood amenities may promote the mobility of older adults. A 2010 community-based sample of 510 adults aged ≥65 years in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and geospatial data from the Esri Business Analyst database (Esri, Inc., Redlands, California) were used to assess associations of neighborhood amenity diversity with mobility. Neighborhoods were defined by census tract, and diversity of amenities was derived by using the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design's neighborhood development index (US Green Building Council, Washington, DC). Generalized estimating equations adjusted for demographic, socioeconomic, and neighborhood characteristics were used to estimate differences in mobility score by tertile of amenity diversity. Analyses were stratified by participants' routine travel habits (stayed at home, stayed in home zip code, or traveled beyond home zip code). We found that for those who spent most of their time in their home neighborhoods, mobility scores (from the Life-Space Assessment, which ranges from 0 to 104 points) were 8.3 points higher (95% confidence interval: 0.1, 16.6) among those who lived in neighborhoods with the most amenity diversity compared with those who lived in neighborhoods with the least amenity diversity. No significant associations between amenity diversity and mobility were observed for those who did not leave home or who regularly traveled outside their neighborhoods. Neighborhoods with a high diversity of amenities may be important promoters of mobility in older adults who do not routinely travel outside their neighborhoods.

  20. Nursing teams caring for hospitalised older adults.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Sherry; Baumbusch, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    To offer an explanation of how registered nurses' are providing care to hospitalised older adults in nursing teams comprised of a variety of roles and educational levels. Around the globe economic pressures, nursing shortages and increased patient acuity have resulted in tasks being shifted to healthcare workers with less education and fewer qualifications than registered nurses. In acute care hospitals, this often means reducing the number of registered nurses and adding licensed practical nurses and care aides (also referred to as unregulated healthcare workers) to the nursing care team. The implications of these changes are not well understood especially in the context of hospitalised older adults, who are complex and the most common care recipients. Thematic analysis of data that were collected in a previous grounded theory study to provide an opportunity in-depth analysis of how nurses provided care to hospitalised older adults within nursing teams. Data collected in western Canada on two hospital units in two different health authorities were analysed in relation to how nursing teams provide care. Hand coding and thematic analysis were employed. The themes of scrutinised skill mix and working together highlighted how the established nursing value of reciprocity is challenging to enact in teams with a variety of scopes of practice. The value of reciprocity both aided and hindered the nursing team in engaging in team behaviours to effectively manage patient care. Educators and leaders could assist the nursing care team in re-thinking how they engage in teamwork by providing education about roles and communication techniques to support teams and ultimately improve nursing care. The value of reciprocity within nursing teams needs to be re-examined within the context of team members with varying abilities to reciprocate in kind. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Challenges with Diagnosing and Managing Sepsis in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Kalin M.; Dy-Boarman, Eliza A.; Haase, Krystal K.; Maxvill, Kristen (Hesch); Pass, Steven; Alvarez, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis in older adults has many challenges that affect rate of septic diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring parameters. Numerous age-related changes and comorbidities contribute to increased risk of infections in older adults, but also atypical symptomatology that delays diagnosis. Due to various pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic changes in the older adult, medications are absorbed, metabolized, and eliminated at different rates as compared to younger adults, which increases risk of adverse drug reactions due to use of drug therapy needed for sepsis management. This review provides information to aid in diagnosis as well as offers recommendations for monitoring and treating sepsis in the older adult population. PMID:26687340

  2. Screening older adults for executive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gary J; Smyth, Carole A

    2008-12-01

    Studies suggest that executive cognitive dysfunction can more reliably predict loss of autonomy than memory impairment can. Executive cognitive function allows for abstract thought, the planning and taking of actions toward a goal, and adaptation to the unexpected. And because executive function and memory operate in distinct regions of the brain, executive dysfunction can occur even when memory isn't impaired. The detection of executive dysfunction is essential to helping a patient remain as safe and independent as possible. Watch a free video demonstrating best practices for evaluating executive dysfunction in older adults at http://links.lww.com/A326.

  3. Older adults abuse in three Brazilian cities.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rosalina Aparecida Partezani; Monteiro, Edilene Araújo; Santos, Ana Maria Ribeiro Dos; Pontes, Maria de Lourdes de Farias; Fhon, Jack Roberto Silva; Bolina, Alisson Fernandes; Seredynskyj, Fernanda Laporti; Almeida, Vanessa Costa; Giacomini, Suelen Borelli Lima; Defina, Giovanna Partezani Cardoso; Silva, Luipa Michele

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the police reports filed by older adults who suffered abuse in order to identify the socio-demographic characteristics of victims and aggressors, type of violence, location, as well as to compare rates in three Brazilian cities in the period from 2009 to 2013. Ecological study, in which 2,612 police reports registered in Police Stations were analyzed. An instrument was used to obtain data from the victim, the aggressor and the type of violence. Psychological abuse predominated and most cases occurred in the older adults own home. In the cities of Ribeirão Preto and João Pessoa, the older adults presented similar rates for both gender. Regarding the standardized rates, in João Pessoa, there was a rise of this type of abuse in the two first years, and later there was a certain stability. In the city of Teresina, there was an increase, also observed in the city of Ribeirão Preto in the three first years, followed by a decrease. Older adults abuse is a cultural phenomenon difficult to be reported by them, since it occurs in the family context. Analisar os boletins de ocorrência registrados por idosos que sofreram violência, a fim de identificar características sociodemográficas das vítimas e dos agressores, tipo de violência, local, bem como comparar as taxas em três municípios brasileiros no período de 2009 a 2013. Estudo ecológico, em que foram analisados 2.612 boletins de ocorrência registrados em Delegacias do Idoso. Utilizou-se um instrumento para obter dados da vítima, do agressor e tipo de violência. Predominou a violência psicológica, na maioria dos casos na própria residência do idoso. Em Ribeirão Preto e João Pessoa, os idosos mais jovens apresentaram taxas semelhantes entre ambos os sexos. Na comparação das taxas padronizadas, em João Pessoa, houve ascensão deste tipo de violência nos dois primeiros anos, e, posteriormente, certa estabilidade. Em Teresina, houve ascensão, também observada em Ribeirão Preto nos tr

  4. Screening Older Adults for Mental Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gary J; Ceïde, Mirnova E

    2018-02-01

    Avoidable disability associated with depression, anxiety, and impaired cognition among older adults is pervasive. Incentives for detection of mental disorders in late life include increased reimbursement, reduced cost, and less burden for patients and families. However, screening not aligned with diagnosis, intervention, and outcome assessment has questionable utility. The link between screening, treatment, and outcomes is well established for depression, less so for anxiety and impaired cognition. This article details the use of common instruments to screen and assess depression, anxiety, and cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Multimorbidity in Older Adults with Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lindman, Brian R; Patel, Jay N

    2016-05-01

    Aortic stenosis is a disease of older adults; many have associated comorbidities. With the aging of the population and the emergence of transcatheter aortic valve replacement as a treatment, clinicians will increasingly be confronted with aortic stenosis and multimorbidity, making the evaluation, management, and treatment of aortic stenosis more complex. To optimize patient-centered clinical outcomes, new treatment paradigms are needed that recognize the import and influence of multimorbidity on patients with aortic stenosis. The authors review the prevalence of medical and aging-related comorbidities in patients with aortic stenosis, their impact on outcomes, and discuss how they influence management and treatment decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mental Health Services and Older Adult Minorities: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fellin, Phillip A; Powell, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    After efforts to improve mental health services for older adults, services to older adult minorities were compared with services to non-minority counterparts by questioning aging specialists (N=72). Found although aging specialists perceived substantial growth in services, mental health services for ethnic minority adults showed a lower rate of…

  7. Perceptions of Older Adults: The Voices of Eldercare Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tailor, Megha; Zaturenskaya, Mariya; Iwamasa, Gayle Y.; Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2007-01-01

    Eldercare employees (73 women, 15 men) at rural and urban facilities in Australia responded to two open-ended questions related to perceptions of older adults. On average, employees assisted 62 adults per week, working at the facility for 19 years. Participants identified the following characteristics of an "independent older adult:"…

  8. Sexual Abuse of Older Adults: Aps Cases and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaster, Pamela B.; Roberto, Karen A.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a profile of sexual abuse cases among adults aged 60 and older receiving attention from Adult Protective Services units in Virginia over a 5-year period. Design and Methods: We used bivariate analysis to characterize older adults (n = 82) experiencing sexual abuse and the circumstances of the…

  9. Fruit and vegetable intake among older adults: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Kadell, Andria R.

    2013-01-01

    Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the world population. Older adults are also at heightened risk of chronic conditions (such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer) and specific geriatric conditions (such as cognitive impairment, frailty, and falls). Research studies have examined the relationship between fruit and vegetable intake and subsequent health outcomes and the correlates of fruit and vegetable intake in the U.S. population. However, relatively few studies have specifically examined health impacts and correlates of fruit and vegetable intake among older adults, who have unique biophysical and socioeconomic circumstances. Evidence is reviewed to (1) describe findings related to consumption and chronic, geriatric, and other health outcomes among older adults and (2) describe patterns in fruit and vegetable consumption among older adults and how these patterns vary within and among populations. This review addresses specific barriers faced by older adults in obtaining and consuming fruits and vegetables in community settings. Recommendations for practice and policy are discussed. PMID:23769545

  10. Depression among older adults with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mijung; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Depression is among the leading causes of decreased disability-adjusted life years in the world1 and a serious public health problem.2 Older adults with DM experience greater risk for comorbid depression compared to those who do not have DM.3 Having DM increases the risk of subsequent development or recurrence of depression. Conversely, history of depression increases the risk for new onset DM.4 As an unwanted co-traveler of DM, undetected, untreated or undertreated depression impinges an individual’s ability to manage their DM successfully, hindering their adherence to treatment regime.5 It also undermines the effectiveness of provider-patient communication and decays therapeutic relationships. Thus, in the context of caring for older adults with DM, comorbid depression presents special challenges and opportunities for clinicians. Moreover, recent studies have suggested that co-occurring depression and DM may accelerate cognitive decline, highlighting the importance of treating depression and DM. Several treatment modalities are available, which can be used to treat and manage depression in primary care settings: pharmaceutical, brief psychotherapeutic, behavioral and life style interventions, and combination therapies. An evidence-based health care delivery model is also available for treating depression in primary care settings. In this article, we summarize the clinical presentation of late-life depression, potential mechanisms of comorbidity of depression and DM, importance of depression in the successful management of DM, and available best practice models for depression treatment. PMID:25453305

  11. The Ethics of Deprescribing in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Emily; Denig, Petra; Hilmer, Sarah N; Ter Meulen, Ruud

    2016-12-01

    Deprescribing is the term used to describe the process of withdrawal of an inappropriate medication supervised by a clinician. This article presents a discussion of how the Four Principles of biomedical ethics (beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy, and justice) that may guide medical practitioners' prescribing practices apply to deprescribing medications in older adults. The view of deprescribing as an act creates stronger moral duties than if viewed as an omission. This may explain the fear of negative outcomes which has been reported by prescribers as a barrier to deprescribing. Respecting the autonomy of older adults is complex as they may not wish to be active in the decision-making process; they may also have reduced cognitive function and family members may therefore have to step in as surrogate decision-makers. Informed consent is intended as a process of information giving and reflection, where consent can be withdrawn at any time. However, people are rarely updated on the altered risks and benefits of their long-term medications as they age. Cessation of inappropriate medication use has a large financial benefit to the individual and the community. However, the principle of justice also dictates equal rights to treatment regardless of age.

  12. Measuring Fluid Intelligence in Healthy Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Mohammed K; Goghari, Vina M

    2017-01-01

    The present study evaluated subjective and objective cognitive measures as predictors of fluid intelligence in healthy older adults. We hypothesized that objective cognitive measures would predict fluid intelligence to a greater degree than self-reported cognitive functioning. Ninety-three healthy older (>65 years old) community-dwelling adults participated. Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices (RAPM) were used to measure fluid intelligence, Digit Span Sequencing (DSS) was used to measure working memory, Trail Making Test (TMT) was used to measure cognitive flexibility, Design Fluency Test (DFT) was used to measure creativity, and Tower Test (TT) was used to measure planning. The Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) was used to measure subjective perceptions of cognitive functioning. RAPM was correlated with DSS, TT, and DFT. When CFQ was the only predictor, the regression model predicting fluid intelligence was not significant. When DSS, TMT, DFT, and TT were included in the model, there was a significant change in the model and the final model was also significant, with DFT as the only significant predictor. The model accounted for approximately 20% of the variability in fluid intelligence. Our findings suggest that the most reliable means of assessing fluid intelligence is to assess it directly.

  13. Measuring Fluid Intelligence in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Goghari, Vina M.

    2017-01-01

    The present study evaluated subjective and objective cognitive measures as predictors of fluid intelligence in healthy older adults. We hypothesized that objective cognitive measures would predict fluid intelligence to a greater degree than self-reported cognitive functioning. Ninety-three healthy older (>65 years old) community-dwelling adults participated. Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices (RAPM) were used to measure fluid intelligence, Digit Span Sequencing (DSS) was used to measure working memory, Trail Making Test (TMT) was used to measure cognitive flexibility, Design Fluency Test (DFT) was used to measure creativity, and Tower Test (TT) was used to measure planning. The Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) was used to measure subjective perceptions of cognitive functioning. RAPM was correlated with DSS, TT, and DFT. When CFQ was the only predictor, the regression model predicting fluid intelligence was not significant. When DSS, TMT, DFT, and TT were included in the model, there was a significant change in the model and the final model was also significant, with DFT as the only significant predictor. The model accounted for approximately 20% of the variability in fluid intelligence. Our findings suggest that the most reliable means of assessing fluid intelligence is to assess it directly. PMID:28250990

  14. Blueberry Supplementation Improves Memory in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    KRIKORIAN, ROBERT; SHIDLER, MARCELLE D; NASH, TIFFANY A; KALT, WILHELMINA; VINQVIST-TYMCHUK, MELINDA R; SHUKITT-HALE, BARBARA; JOSEPH, JAMES A

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia is increasing with expansion of the older adult population. In the absence of effective therapy, preventive approaches are essential to address this public health problem. Blueberries contain polyphenolic compounds, most prominently anthocyanins, which have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In addition, anthocyanins have been associated with increased neuronal signaling in brain centers mediating memory function as well as improved glucose disposal, benefits that would be expected to mitigate neurodegeneration. We investigated the effects of daily consumption of wild blueberry juice in a sample of nine older adults with early memory changes. At 12 weeks, we observed improved paired associate learning (p = 0.009) and word list recall (p = 0.04). In addition, there were trends suggesting reduced depressive symptoms (p = 0.08) and lower glucose levels (p = 0.10). We also compared the memory performances of the blueberry subjects with a demographically-matched sample who consumed a berry placebo beverage in a companion trial of identical design and observed comparable results for paired associate learning. The findings of this preliminary study suggest that moderate-term blueberry supplementation can confer neurocognitive benefit and establish a basis for more comprehensive human trials to study preventive potential and neuronal mechanisms. PMID:20047325

  15. Older Adults' Acceptance of Activity Trackers

    PubMed Central

    Preusse, Kimberly C.; Mitzner, Tracy L.; Fausset, Cara Bailey; Rogers, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the usability and acceptance of activity tracking technologies by older adults. Method First in our multi-method approach, we conducted heuristic evaluations of two activity trackers that revealed potential usability barriers to acceptance. Next, questionnaires and interviews were administered to 16 older adults (Mage=70, SDage=3.09, rangeage= 65-75) before and after a 28-day field study to understand facilitators and additional barriers to acceptance. These measurements were supplemented with diary and usage data and assessed if and why users overcame usability issues. Results The heuristic evaluation revealed usability barriers in System Status Visibility; Error Prevention; and Consistency and Standards. The field study revealed additional barriers (e.g., accuracy, format), and acceptance-facilitators (e.g., goal-tracking, usefulness, encouragement). Discussion The acceptance of wellness management technologies, such as activity trackers, may be increased by addressing acceptance-barriers during deployment (e.g., providing tutorials on features that were challenging, communicating usefulness). PMID:26753803

  16. Hyposalivation and xerostomia in dentate older adults

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R. Constance; Wu, Bei; Crout, Richard; Wiener, Michael; Plassman, Brenda; Kao, Elizabeth; McNeil, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Background Older adults are susceptible to reduced saliva production related to certain medications, radiation and chronic conditions. Many of these people have many physical and oral health problems and limited access to dental care. The use of effective screening tools for xerostomia and hyposalivation would be helpful in identifying those at risk. The authors conducted a study to investigate the association between three measures of oral dryness: hyposalivation (low unstimulated salivary flow), self-reported xerostomia and clinically assessed dry mouth. Methods The authors included a convenience sample of 252 nondemented and dentate West Virginia participants 70 years and older who were part of a larger study on oral health and cognition among older adults. Participants completed a self-reported xerostomia index, provided an unstimulated salivary sample and underwent an oral assessment for the study. Results Twenty-eight (11.1 percent) had hyposalivation, eight of whom reported having xerostomia (sensitivity = 28.6 percent). Of the 43 participants who reported having xerostomia, only eight had hyposalivation (positive predictive value = 18.6 percent). Hyposalivation and self-reported xerostomia were not significantly related. Clinically assessed dry mouth correlated modestly, but significantly, with hyposalivation and self-reported xerostomia. Conclusions Obtaining routine unstimulated salivary flow rates in addition to self-reported information and oral evaluations may increase early detection of oral dryness, which would assist in implementing early interventions to improve patients’ quality of life. Clinical Implications Visually inspecting oral tissues for dryness and asking a patient if his or her mouth is dry are insufficient measures for clinicians to use to determine if the patient has hyposalivation. The authors recommend that clinicians determine the patients’ unstimulated salivary flow rate. PMID:20194383

  17. Hyposalivation and xerostomia in dentate older adults.

    PubMed

    Wiener, R Constance; Wu, Bei; Crout, Richard; Wiener, Michael; Plassman, Brenda; Kao, Elizabeth; McNeil, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Older adults are susceptible to reduced saliva production related to certain medications, radiation and chronic conditions. Many of these people have many physical and oral health problems and limited access to dental care. The use of effective screening tools for xerostomia and hyposalivation would be helpful in identifying those at risk. The authors conducted a study to investigate the association between three measures of oral dryness: hyposalivation (low unstimulated salivary flow), self-reported xerostomia and clinically assessed dry mouth. The authors included a convenience sample of 252 nondemented and dentate West Virginia participants 70 years and older who were part of a larger study on oral health and cognition among older adults. Participants completed a self-reported xerostomia index, provided an unstipulated salivary sample and underwent an oral assessment for the study. Twenty-eight participants (11.1 percent) had hyposalivation, eight of whom reported having xerostomia (sensitivity=28.6 percent). Of the 43 participants who reported having xerostomia, only eight had hyposalivation (positive predictive value=18.6 percent). Hyposalivation and self-reported xerostomia were not significantly related. Clinically assessed dry mouth correlated modestly, but significantly, with hyposalivation and self-reported xerostomia. Obtaining routine unstimulated salivary flow rates in addition to self-reported information and oral evaluations may increase early detection of oral dryness, which would assist in implementing early interventions to improve patients' quality of life. Visually inspecting oral tissues for dryness and asking a patient if his or her mouth is dry are insufficient measures for clinicians to use to determine if the patient has hyposalivation. The authors recommend that clinicians determine the patient's unstimulated salivary flow rate.

  18. Social, Economic, and Health Disparities Among LGBT Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Emlet, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    LGBT older adults are a heterogeneous population with collective and unique strengths and challenges. Health, personal, and economic disparities exist in this group when compared to the general population of older adults, yet subgroups such as transgender and bisexual older adults and individuals living with HIV are at greater risk for disparities and poorer health outcomes. As this population grows, further research is needed on factors that contribute to promoting health equity, while decreasing discrimination and improving competent service delivery. PMID:28366981

  19. Suicide in older adults: the role of emotions and cognition.

    PubMed

    Kiosses, Dimitris N; Szanto, Katalin; Alexopoulos, George S

    2014-11-01

    Suicide in older adults is a significant clinical concern. In this review of recent findings, we concentrate on the role of emotions and cognition in suicide risk and behavior in older adults. We discuss the epidemiology of suicide in older adults, integrate recent findings on non-psychotic major depression, schizophrenia and suicidal ideation, explore the relationship of emotion regulation with suicide, present recent advances on suicide in demented patients, and describe the latest developments on cognition and decision processes in suicide.

  20. Face Age and Eye Gaze Influence Older Adults' Emotion Recognition.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anna; Murray, Janice E; Atkinson, Lianne; Ruffman, Ted

    2017-07-01

    Eye gaze has been shown to influence emotion recognition. In addition, older adults (over 65 years) are not as influenced by gaze direction cues as young adults (18-30 years). Nevertheless, these differences might stem from the use of young to middle-aged faces in emotion recognition research because older adults have an attention bias toward old-age faces. Therefore, using older face stimuli might allow older adults to process gaze direction cues to influence emotion recognition. To investigate this idea, young and older adults completed an emotion recognition task with young and older face stimuli displaying direct and averted gaze, assessing labeling accuracy for angry, disgusted, fearful, happy, and sad faces. Direct gaze rather than averted gaze improved young adults' recognition of emotions in young and older faces, but for older adults this was true only for older faces. The current study highlights the impact of stimulus face age and gaze direction on emotion recognition in young and older adults. The use of young face stimuli with direct gaze in most research might contribute to age-related emotion recognition differences.

  1. Correlates of, and barriers to, Internet use among older adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, Janet; McAllister, Carolyn; McCaslin, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Older adults constitute the group with the greatest increase in Internet usage in the past decade; however, usage varies greatly within this population. Services to older adults require a current understanding of Internet-use trends. This study utilized a quantitative survey method to examine correlates of, and barriers to, current Internet use in a demographically diverse county in Southern California. Findings indicate that the presence of a computer at home, a job requiring computer use, age, education, and ethnicity are important factors in predicting Internet use in older adults. Implications for social work practice with older adults is discussed.

  2. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Managing Pain in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Wickson-Griffiths, Abigail; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Herr, Keela

    2016-11-01

    An interdisciplinary approach to managing pain has been widely used in managing specific pain conditions (eg, lower back and fibromyalgia) but not reviewed specifically for older adults. Interdisciplinary approaches have been used in primary, residential long-term, and acute care settings, where a variety of health care professionals work on pain teams to manage pain in older adults. Given the multidimensional nature of pain in older adults, interdisciplinary approaches to managing pain are recommended in practice. This article reviews the rationale supporting an interdisciplinary approach to managing pain in older adults and summarizes studies that have evaluated this approach. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Community nutrition policy for older adults in Canada.

    PubMed

    More, Caitlin; Keller, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Current prevention-focused nutrition policy for community-dwelling older adults in Canada is discussed. Government websites were searched and key informants asked to identify relevant documents and policies specific to older adults. These were reviewed to find specific legislation on community nutrition programs for older adults. Despite this population's known nutritional risk, policies guiding community nutrition programs are extremely limited. Current policies and significant documents and organizations that could influence legislation are acknowledged. Dietitians in diverse settings need to advocate for specific policy concerning preventive nutrition programs for older adults in Canada.

  4. Maintenance of physical function in frail older adults.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Carol E; Cordeiro, Maria; Perryman, Erica

    2014-06-01

    Inactivity leads to frailty and loss of function for older adults. Most older adults are sedentary. Participating in a regular routine of physical activity is recommended for maintaining physical function required to sustain quality of life and independence for older adults. Annual screening for level of physical activity is required to determine changes from year to year. Research shows older adults are more likely to initiate a regular routine of physical activity when a health care provider writes a prescription for physical activity including the type, frequency, and specific duration of physical activity sessions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Snow and Rain Modify Neighbourhood Walkability for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Philippa; Hirsch, Jana A; Melendez, Robert; Winters, Meghan; Sims Gould, Joanie; Ashe, Maureen; Furst, Sarah; McKay, Heather

    2017-06-01

    The literature has documented a positive relationship between walkable built environments and outdoor mobility in older adults. Yet, surprisingly absent is any consideration of how weather conditions modify the impact of neighbourhood walkability. Using archived weather data linked to survey data collected from a sample of older adults in Vancouver, Canada, we found that car-dependent neighbourhoods (featuring longer block lengths, fewer intersections, and greater distance to amenities) became inaccessible in snow. Even older adults who lived in very walkable neighbourhoods walked to 25 per cent fewer destinations in snow. It is crucial to consider the impact of weather in the relationship between neighbourhood walkability and older adult mobility.

  6. Young Adults' Implicit and Explicit Attitudes towards the Sexuality of Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ashley E; O'Sullivan, Lucia F; Byers, E Sandra; Shaughnessy, Krystelle

    2014-09-01

    Sexual interest and capacity can extend far into later life and result in many positive health outcomes. Yet there is little support for sexual expression in later life, particularly among young adults. This study assessed and compared young adults' explicit and implicit attitudes towards older adult sexuality. A sample of 120 participants (18-24 years; 58% female) completed a self-report (explicit) measure and a series of Implicit Association Tests capturing attitudes towards sexuality among older adults. Despite reporting positive explicit attitudes, young people revealed an implicit bias against the sexual lives of older adults. In particular, young adults demonstrated implicit biases favouring general, as compared to sexual, activities and young adults as compared to older adults. Moreover, the bias favouring general activities was amplified with regard to older adults as compared to younger adults. Our findings challenge the validity of research relying on self-reports of attitudes about older adult sexuality.

  7. Improving older adults' memory performance using prior task success.

    PubMed

    Geraci, Lisa; Miller, Tyler M

    2013-06-01

    Holding negative aging stereotypes can lead older adults to perform poorly on memory tests. We attempted to improve older adults' memory performance by giving them task experience that would counter their negative performance expectations. Before participating in a memory experiment, younger and older adults were given a cognitive task that they could either successfully complete, not successfully complete, or they were given no prior task. For older adults, recall was significantly higher and self-reported anxiety was significantly lower for the prior task success group relative to the other groups. There was no effect of prior task experience on younger adults' memory performance. Results suggest that older adults' memory can be improved with a single successful prior task experience. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Nursing Students' Willingness to Care for Older Adults in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mei-Ju; Shyu, Meei-Ling; Wang, Shou-Yu; Chuang, Hsiu-Ching; Chuang, Yeu-Hui

    2016-03-01

    The possibilities that nurses will take care of persons 65 years of age or older in hospitals and communities are increasing due to a growing aged population. Nursing students should be prepared to face the challenges of their future practice. Therefore, factors associated with nursing students' willingness to care for older adults need to be identified. This study aimed to explore Taiwanese nursing students' willingness to work with older persons and factors associated with this. A cross-sectional research design was used. Stratified sampling was applied to recruit participants from seven nursing schools in northern, central, southern, and eastern areas of Taiwan. There were 612 nursing students who successful completed the questionnaire including demographic data, the Attitudes Toward the Elderly Scale, and the Willingness Toward the Elderly Care Scale. Data were collected between November 2012 and January 2013. A stepwise regression analysis was conducted to identify predictors of nursing students' willingness to care for older adults. The mean score of nursing students' attitudes toward older people was 73.86 (SD = 8.9), with a range of 44-106. The mean score on the willingness to care for older adults was 55.01 (SD = 6.4), with a range of 36-75. The length of time with older adults per week (r = 0.12, p = .003) and grandparents having served as caregivers during the students' childhood (t = -2.147, β = .032) were both positively associated with the willingness to care for older adults. The best predictors of nursing students' willingness to care for older adults were students' attitudes toward older adults (β = 0.38, p < .001), paying attention to issues related to older adults (β = 0.24, p < .001), and having the experience of being a volunteer who served older people (β = 0.10, p = .005), which explained 26.8% of the total variance. Taiwanese undergraduate nursing students had neutral to slightly favorable attitudes toward working with older adults

  9. Multimorbidity in Older Adults with Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Aortic stenosis is a disease of older adults, many of whom have associated medical and aging-related comorbidities. With the aging of the population and the emergence of transcatheter aortic valve replacement as a treatment option, clinicians will increasingly be confronted with the intersection of aortic stenosis and multimorbidity. This convergence makes the evaluation, management, and treatment of aortic stenosis more complex in multiple ways. To optimize patient-centered clinical outcomes, new treatment paradigms are needed that recognize the import and influence of multimorbidity on patients with aortic stenosis. We review the prevalence of medical and aging-related comorbidities in patients with aortic stenosis, their impact on outcomes, and discuss how they influence management and treatment decisions. PMID:27113148

  10. Older Adult Strategies for Community Wayfinding.

    PubMed

    Marquez, David X; Hunter, Rebecca H; Griffith, Michelle H; Bryant, Lucinda L; Janicek, Sarah J; Atherly, Adam J

    2017-02-01

    Community wayfinding becomes more challenging with age and decrements in functioning. Given the growth in numbers of older adults, we need to understand features that facilitate or inhibit wayfinding in outdoor settings to enhance mobility and community engagement. This exploratory study of 35 short- ( n = 14) and long-term ( n = 21) residents in an ethnically diverse neighborhood identified relevant wayfinding factors. Data collection included an interview, map-drawing task, and walk along a previously audited, prescribed route to identify key wayfinding strategies. Most participants sought information from other people as a primary method of route planning. Street signs and landmarks were overwhelming favorites as helpful wayfinding features. When asked to recall the route following the walk, only half of participants gave completely correct directions. Findings reinforce the importance of landmarks and legible, systematic, and consistently available signage, as well as trustworthy person-to-person information sources. Findings also underscore the need for wayfinding research in diverse environments.

  11. Fatigue in Older Adults Postmyocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Crane, Patricia Barton; Efird, Jimmy T; Abel, Willie Mae

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to comprehensively examine putative factors that may independently contribute to fatigue and subsequent persistence of fatigue in elderly adults 6-8 months post-myocardial infarction (MI). Studies suggest cardiac function, comorbidities, daytime sleepiness, depression, anemia, interleukins, and social support are correlates of fatigue; however, no studies have systematically examined these factors 6 months post-MI in an aging population. Study participants included 49 women and men (N = 98) ages 65-91 who were 6-8 months post-MI. Data collection included the demographic health status questionnaire (heart rate, blood pressure, body mass index, and medications), fatigue-related comorbidity scale, revised Piper fatigue scale, Epworth sleepiness scale, geriatric depression scale, social provisions scale, and venous blood tests (B-natriuretic peptide, hemoglobin, and interleukin-6). Fatigue persisted after MI in 76% of older men and women with no difference by sex. Only depression scores (P trend = 0.0004) and mean arterial pressure (P trend = 0.015) were found to be linearly independent predictors for fatigue, controlling for age, Il-6 levels, and body mass index. Post-MI depression and mean arterial blood pressure are important to assess when examining fatigue post-MI in older populations.

  12. Data Sources Available for Modeling Environmental Exposures in Older Adults

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report, “Data Sources Available for Modeling Environmental Exposures in Older Adults,” focuses on information sources and data available for modeling environmental exposures in the older U.S. population, defined here to be people 60 years and older, with an emphasis on those...

  13. Assertiveness by Older Adults with Visual Impairment: Context Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Ellen Bouchard; Anas, Ann P.; Mays, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Within a communication predicament of aging and disability framework, this study examined the impact of two types of contextual variation on perceptions of older adult assertiveness within problematic service encounters. Young (N = 66) and older (N = 66) participants evaluated conversational scenarios in which a visually-impaired older woman…

  14. Older adults' driving reduction and cessation: perspectives of adult children.

    PubMed

    Connell, Cathleen M; Harmon, Annie; Janevic, Mary R; Kostyniuk, Lidia P

    2013-12-01

    Adult children are often directly affected by aging parents' decision to limit or stop driving. This qualitative study examined the process of driving reduction and cessation (DRC) from the perspective of adult children, with a focus on family communication. Four focus group interviews were conducted with 37 adult children (29/37 female; mean age = 45.5) of older parents using a structured protocol. Transcripts were analyzed by two independent coders to identify major themes. Themes represented three aspects of the DRC process: family communication and dynamics (i.e., discussion, negotiation, and planning; avoidance and side stepping; resignation and refusal), taking action to end a parent's driving career (i.e., engaging a third party; taking away the car), and post-cessation reflection (i.e., relief; social benefits; resentment and guilt). Despite the potential benefits of planning for DRC, families are unsure about how best to approach this topic. Adult children worry about assuming responsibility for their parents' transportation needs and their parents' reactions to restricted mobility. Despite a reluctance to communicate openly about DRC, adult children and their parents share similar and significant concerns that merit increased attention.

  15. Anxiety disorders and falls among older adults.

    PubMed

    Holloway, K L; Williams, L J; Brennan-Olsen, S L; Morse, A G; Kotowicz, M A; Nicholson, G C; Pasco, J A

    2016-11-15

    Falls are common among older adults and can lead to serious injuries, including fractures. We aimed to determine associations between anxiety disorders and falls in older adults. Participants were 487 men and 376 women aged ≥60 years enrolled in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study, Australia. Using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Non-patient edition (SCID-I/NP), lifetime history of anxiety disorders was determined. Falls were determined by self-report. In men, a falls-risk score (Elderly Falls Screening Test (EFST)) was also calculated. Among fallers, 24 of 299 (8.0%) had a lifetime history of anxiety disorder compared to 36 of 634 (5.7%) non-fallers (p=0.014). Examination of the association between anxiety and falls suggested differential relationships for men and women. In men, following adjustment for psychotropic medications, mobility and blood pressure, lifetime anxiety disorder was associated with falling (OR 2.96; 95%CI 1.07-8.21) and with EFST score (OR 3.46; 95%CI 1.13-10.6). In women, an association between lifetime anxiety disorder and falls was explained by psychotropic medication use, poor mobility and socioeconomic status. Sub-group analyses involving types of anxiety and anxiety disorders over the past 12-months were not performed due to power limitations. Although anxiety disorders were independently associated with a 3-fold increase in likelihood of reported falls and high falls risk among men, an independent association was not detected among women. These results may aid in prevention of falls through specific interventions aimed at reducing anxiety, particularly in men. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Memory training plus yoga for older adults.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Graham J; Vance, David E; Wayde, Ernest; Ford, Katy; Ross, Jeremiah

    2015-06-01

    Previous tests of the SeniorWISE intervention with community-residing older adults that were designed to improve affect and cognitive performance were successful and positively affected these outcomes. In this study, we tested whether adding yoga to the intervention would affect the outcomes. Using a quasiexperimental pre-post design, we delivered 12 hours of SeniorWISE memory training that included a 30-minute yoga component before each training session. The intervention was based on the four components of self-efficacy theory: enactive mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and physiologic arousal. We recruited 133 older adults between the ages of 53 and 96 years from four retirement communities in Central Texas. Individuals were screened and tested and then attended training sessions two times a week over 4 weeks. A septuagenarian licensed psychologist taught the memory training, and a certified yoga instructor taught yoga. Eighty-three participants completed at least 9 hours (75%) of the training and completed the posttest. Those individuals who completed made significant gains in memory performance, instrumental activities of daily living, and memory self-efficacy and had fewer depressive symptoms. Thirteen individuals advanced from poor to normal memory performance, and seven improved from impaired to poor memory performance; thus, 20 individuals improved enough to advance to a higher functioning memory group. The findings from this study of a memory training intervention plus yoga training show that the benefits of multifactorial interventions had additive benefits. The combined treatments offer a unique model for brain health programs and the promotion of nonpharmacological treatment with the goals of maintaining healthy brain function and boosting brain plasticity.

  17. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in older adults in China.

    PubMed

    Yong, Jian; Lin, Dong; Tan, Xue-Rui

    2017-09-16

    Over the past two decades, the percentage of Chinese who is 60 years or older has increased from 5.2% in 1995 to 10.5% in 2015. Approximately 16% of the population in China was 60 years old and above in 2015. Since 1990, cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the leading cause of death in China. Cardiovascular medications of older adults are usually more complicated than younger age groups due to polypharmacy, the presence of comorbidities and more susceptible to treatment-related adverse outcomes. Therefore, effective primary prevention of CVD for older adults is important in sustaining the health of older adults and reducing the burden of the healthcare system. Proper management of CVD-related risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes and obesity, can remarkably reduce risks of CVDs in older Chinese. These risk factors can be modified by managing blood pressure, glucose and lipids via lifestyle modifications or receiving medications. Smoking cessation, healthy diets, strict alcohol intake and moderate physical exercise are examples of recommended lifestyle changes for remarkably recovering health conditions of older adults who have hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, diabetes or complications. Treatment prescriptions of older adults, in general, are recommended to be individualized and to be initiated at a low dose. The future directions for better primary CVD prevention in older adults include establishing guidelines for primary prevention of CVD for different older adults and further research on better management strategies of CVD risks for elderly Chinese.

  18. Prevention and Screening of Unhealthy Substance Use by Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Han, Benjamin H; Moore, Alison A

    2018-02-01

    The number of older adults who engage in unhealthy substance use is expected to increase substantially to levels never seen before. Older adults, owing to physiologic changes in aging, are at high risk for the adverse effects of alcohol and illegal drug use. Screening and prevention can help older patients to be better informed of the risks of substance use, and reduce high-risk behaviors and its potential negative outcomes. The authors review the prevalence and trends of substance use and their potential impact on health outcomes, and discuss an approach to screening and prevention for older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Older Adults' Motivation to Learn in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yi-Yin

    2011-01-01

    A limited amount of literature has discussed older adults in formal education, especially their motivations to learn in higher education. This study aims to understand older adults' learning in the context of higher education. Specifically, this study argues that higher education can function as a stimulating learning environment that helps older…

  20. Emotional Wellness Needs: Older Adults in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ, Randall

    2009-01-01

    The importance of emotional wellness for rural older adults is a topic of growing significance. Older adults, now the fastest growing United States population sector, have special wellness needs. By the year 2030, about 70 million people will be over the age of 65. A low or declining sense of control over one's life increases depression. Emotional…

  1. Health-Related Variables and Functional Fitness among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkin, Linda D.; Haddock, Bryan L.

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses the functional fitness of a convenient sample of older adults (greater than 70 years), to examine correlations between functional fitness and several other health-related variables and to compare with criterion performance data as established by Rikli and Jones (2001). One hundred and seven community-dwelling older adults with…

  2. Older Adult Representation in the Counseling Psychology Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werth, James L., Jr.; Kopera-Frye, Karen; Blevins, Dean; Bossick, Brian

    2003-01-01

    The increasing older adult population has implications for the training and practice of counseling psychologists because of the field's avowed dedication to lifespan development. The present study examined the degree to which older adults were represented in articles in the "Journal of Counseling Psychology" and "The Counseling Psychologist" from…

  3. Dare to Dream: New Venture Incubator for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantman, Shira; Gimmon, Eli

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a project that aims to foster active aging through entrepreneurial activities among older adults. The project establishes the feasibility of implementing an intervention program that assimilates the concept and capabilities of entrepreneurship among older adults and supports them while launching new…

  4. An Exploration of Personality Traits in Older Adult Amateur Musicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Don D.

    2007-01-01

    The primary research question for the study was, "Will older adult amateur musicians' personality profiles reflect the traits found in professional musicians?" Participants (N = 58, ages 52 to 79) recruited from a New Horizons Institute "band camp" for older adult amateur musicians completed a musical background questionnaire and the Cattell…

  5. Medication Adherence in Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Elizabeth W.; Rung, Ariane L.; Leon, Kyla A.; Firestein, Catherine; Krousel-Wood, Marie

    2014-01-01

    To effectively address medication adherence and improve cardiovascular health among older adults, a deeper understanding is needed of the barriers that this age group faces and of approaches that would be most effective and feasible for improving adherence. We conducted a focus group study (n = 25) in a diverse population of older adults with…

  6. Volunteerism, Health, and Civic Engagement among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Benjamin H.; Gillespie, Alayna A.

    2008-01-01

    In North America, 40-50 per cent of older adults are actively involved as formal volunteers in providing diverse health and human services. We review empirical studies concerning older adults' motivations for volunteering, as well as the health and morale benefits they derive from this expression of altruism. Knowledge of the exact nature and…

  7. Health Literacy Programs for Older Adults: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Older adults make up the fastest growing age group in North America. This has demanded increased attention in supporting the health and well-being of this population and, in particular, the role of health information in promoting the health and well-being of older adults. Increased availability and accessibility of information as well as a greater…

  8. The Family Life Education Needs of Midlife and Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Sharon M.; Morris Michael Lane

    2003-01-01

    Using a life course perspective, reports the findings from a needs assessment for midlife and older adults regarding family life education. A sample of 264 adults aged 50 and older indicated interest in 29 family life education topics. The highest rated topics were nutrition and health, fitness and exercise, and positive aspects of aging.…

  9. Effectiveness of weight loss interventions for obese older adults.

    PubMed

    Felix, Holly C; West, Delia S

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of obesity among older adults are significant, yet few obesity interventions target this group. Unfamiliarity with weight loss intervention effectiveness and concerns that weight loss negatively affects older adults may be inhibiting targeting this group. This paper reviews the evidence on intentional weight loss and effective weight loss interventions for obese older adults to help dispel concerns and guide health promotion practice. PubMed articles. Randomized controlled trials examining behavioral and pharmaceutical weight loss strategies with 1-year follow-up targeting obese (body mass index ≥ 30) older adults (mean age ≥ 60 years), and studies with quasi-experimental designs examining surgical weight loss strategies targeting older adults were examined. Abstracts were reviewed for study objective relevancy, with relevant articles extracted and reviewed. Data were inserted into an analysis matrix. Evidence indicates behavioral strategies are effective in producing significant (all p < .05) weight loss without significant risk to obese older adults, but effectiveness evidence for surgical and pharmaceutical strategies for obese older adults is lacking, primarily because this group has not been targeted in trials or analyses did not isolate this group. These findings support the promotion of intentional weight loss among obese older adults and provide guidance to health promotion practitioners on effective weight loss interventions to use with this group.

  10. Older Adults Seeking Healthcare Information on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardt, Jeffrey H.; Hollis-Sawyer, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Due to an aging population and increases in healthcare costs, particular attention needs to be focused on developing Internet sites that provide older adults with credible and accurate healthcare information. Present research findings suggest that motivation is only one factor that influences whether or not older adults utilize the World Wide Web…

  11. Ethical Issues Involving Research Conducted with Homebound Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locher, Julie L.; Bronstein, Janet; Robinson, Caroline O.; Williams, Charlotte; Ritchie, Christine S.

    2006-01-01

    Conducting research in the home setting with homebound older adults presents distinct ethical and practical challenges that require special consideration. This article describes the methodological issues that make studying homebound older adults especially vulnerable to therapeutic misconception and researcher role conflict and offers practical…

  12. Self-Report Measure of Psychological Abuse of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Kendon J.; Iris, Madelyn; Ridings, John W.; Langley, Kate; Anetzberger, Georgia J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested key psychometric properties of the Older Adult Psychological Abuse Measure (OAPAM), one self-report scale of the Older Adult Mistreatment Assessment (OAMA). Design and Methods: Items and theory were developed in a prior concept mapping study. Subsequently, the measures were administered to 226 substantiated clients by 22…

  13. Therapeutic Uses of Music with Older Adults. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clair, Alicia Ann; Memmott, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    In this comprehensively updated second edition, written by Alicia Ann Clair and Jenny Memmott the extraordinary benefits of music therapy for older adults are detailed. "Therapeutic Uses of Music with Older Adults" not only examines these benefits but also clarifies the reasons that music is beneficial. This important book shows both informal and…

  14. Older Adults' Memory for Verbally Presented Medical Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankoff, Sarah M.; Sandberg, Elisabeth Hollister

    2012-01-01

    Previous research demonstrates that patients typically have difficulty remembering information presented during healthcare consultations. This study examined how older adults learn and remember verbally presented medical information. Healthy older adults were tested for recall in experimental and field settings. Participants viewed a five-minute…

  15. Effectiveness of Weight Loss Interventions for Obese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Holly C.; West, Delia S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The consequences of obesity among older adults are significant, yet few obesity interventions target this group. Unfamiliarity with weight loss intervention effectiveness and concerns that weight loss negatively affects older adults may be inhibiting targeting this group. This paper reviews the evidence on intentional weight loss and effective weight loss interventions for obese older adults to help dispel concerns and guide health promotion practice. Data Source PubMed articles. Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria Randomized controlled trials examining behavioral and pharmaceutical weight loss strategies with 1-year follow-up targeting obese (body mass index ≥30) older adults (mean age ≥60 years), and studies with quasi-experimental designs examining surgical weight loss strategies targeting older adults were examined. Data Extraction Abstracts were reviewed for study objective relevancy, with relevant articles extracted and reviewed. Data Synthesis Data were inserted into an analysis matrix. Results Evidence indicates behavioral strategies are effective in producing significant (all p < .05) weight loss without significant risk to obese older adults, but effectiveness evidence for surgical and pharmaceutical strategies for obese older adults is lacking, primarily because this group has not been targeted in trials or analyses did not isolate this group. Conclusion These findings support the promotion of intentional weight loss among obese older adults and provide guidance to health promotion practitioners on effective weight loss interventions to use with this group. PMID:23286596

  16. Older Adults' Comprehension of Transformational and Deactivation Negation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolin, Sara J.

    2015-01-01

    The present research aimed to examine young and older adults' comprehension of negated text to determine the locus of older adults' difficulty in understanding this text construction. Participants were asked to read short passages at their own pace, complete a lexical decision task, and answer a comprehension question about what they had read.…

  17. Older Adults: Community College Students of the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Ford M.

    With a declining pool of youth to draw from, community colleges need to be concerned about what can be done to serve the needs of a burgeoning older adult population. Recent research on the educational needs of older adults reveals that they are interested in: (1) information on such personal business and financial topics as social security…

  18. Food Insecurity and Health Care Utilization Among Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Vibha; Lee, Jung Sun

    2017-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between food insecurity and health care utilization (physician, inpatient, emergency room, and home health visits) among older adults. Survey data collected from Georgia Advanced Performance Outcomes Measures Project 6 linked to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (GA Advanced POMP6-CMS) data 2008 ( N = 957) were analyzed. Nearly one half of the sample (48.3%) was food insecure. Food insecure individuals were significantly less likely than food secure individuals to have any physician (69.7% vs. 80.2%) and home health visits (24.9% vs. 32.3%) during 2008. However, there were no significant differences in levels of health care utilization by food secure and food insecure older adults. Food secure and food insecure older adults utilized comparable levels of health care services. Public assistance programs such as Medicare and meal services targeted toward older adults may enable economically constrained, food insecure older adults to access needed health care services.

  19. Factors Affecting Life Satisfaction of Older Adults in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Celik, Sevilay S; Celik, Yusuf; Hikmet, Neset; Khan, Mahmud M

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the determinants of life satisfaction of older adults in Turkey. The sample consisted of 2,959 older adults over 65 years. The effects of psychological, daily life and instrumental activity, physical health and health status, and other important variables on life satisfaction were analyzed. The variables lessening life satisfaction for older adults included poverty, a lower self-reported health status, a decline in physical health, ability to chew, ability to do household activities, and an increase in feelings of depression and feeling social withdrawn. In contrast, being married, having a higher education level, and having an income-generating work increased life satisfaction among older adults. This study suggests the necessity of developing local and national policies that enable older adults to become more active in their communities. These policies should be coordinated under the framework of national aging policies that bridge health, social, and economic issues.

  20. Examining Rural Older Adults' Perceptions of Cognitive Health.

    PubMed

    Bacsu, Juanita; Abonyi, Sylvia; Viger, Marc; Morgan, Debra; Johnson, Shanthi; Jeffery, Bonnie

    2017-09-01

    Existing cognitive health literature focuses on the perspectives of older adults with dementia. However, little is known about the ways in which healthy older adults without dementia understand their cognitive health. In rural communities, early dementia diagnosis may be impeded by numerous factors including transportation challenges, cultural obstacles, and inadequate access to health and support services. Based on participant observation and two waves of 42 semi-structured interviews, this study examined healthy, rural older adults' perceptions of cognitive health. By providing an innovative theoretical foundation informed by local perspectives and culture, findings reveal a complex and multidimensional view of cognitive health. Rural older adults described four key areas of cognitive health ranging from independence to social interaction. As policy makers, community leaders, and researchers work to address the cognitive health needs of the rural aging demographic, it is essential that they listen to the perspectives of rural older adults.

  1. Non-native Speech Learning in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Ingvalson, Erin M; Nowicki, Casandra; Zong, Audrey; Wong, Patrick C M

    2017-01-01

    Though there is an extensive literature investigating the ability of younger adults to learn non-native phonology, including investigations into individual differences in younger adults' lexical tone learning, very little is known about older adults' ability to learn non-native phonology, including lexical tone. There are several reasons to suspect that older adults would use different learning mechanisms when learning lexical tone than younger adults, including poorer perception of dynamic pitch, greater reliance on working memory capacity in second language learning, and poorer category learning in older adulthood. The present study examined the relationships among older adults' baseline sensitivity for pitch patterns, working memory capacity, and declarative memory capacity with their ability to learn to associate tone with lexical meaning. In older adults, baseline pitch pattern sensitivity was not associated with generalization performance. Rather, older adults' learning performance was best predicted by declarative memory capacity. These data suggest that training paradigms will need to be modified to optimize older adults' non-native speech sound learning success.

  2. Validation of the Italian version of the dissociative experience scale for adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    De Pasquale, Concetta; Sciacca, Federica; Hichy, Zira

    2016-01-01

    The Dissociative Experience Scale for adolescent (A-DES), a 30-item, multidimensional, self-administered questionnaire, was validated using a large sample of American young people sample. We reported the linguistic validation process and the metric validity of the Italian version of A-DES in the Italy. A set of questionnaires was provided to a total of 633 participants from March 2015 to April 2016. The participants consisted of 282 boys and 351 girls, and their average age was between 18 and 24 years old. The translation process consisted of two consecutive steps: forward-backward translation and acceptability testing. The psychometric testing was applied to Italian students who were recruited from the Italian Public Schools and Universities in Sicily. Informed consent was obtained from all participants at the research. All individuals completed the A-DES. Reliability and validity were tested. The translated version was validated on a total of 633 Italian students. The reliability of A-DES total is .926. It is composed by 4 subscales: Dissociative amnesia, Absorption and imaginative involvement, Depersonalization and derealization, and Passive influence. The reliability of each subscale is: .756 for dissociative amnesia, .659 for absorption and imaginative involvement, .850 for depersonalization and derealization, and .743 for passive influence. The Italian version of the A-DES constitutes a useful instrument to measure dissociative experience in adolescents and young adults in Italy.

  3. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination for older adults

    PubMed Central

    Fedson, David S

    2014-01-01

    Hollingsworth and Isturiz1 have raised several questions about our earlier review of the use of pneumococcal conjugate (PCV) or polysaccharide (PPV) vaccine for older adults (i.e., ≥65 y of age).2 They begin by citing two metaanalyses published in 2009 and 2013 that concluded that prevention of pneumococcal pneumonia could not be demonstrated for PPV.3,4 They overlook my earlier review of five metaanalyses that was published in 2004.5 This review showed that the study populations in prospective trials of PPV were often not representative of the populations of elderly and high-risk adults for whom PPV is recommended. Furthermore, the five metaanalyses often omitted clinical trials that should have been evaluated, included trials that should have been omitted, and frequently miscounted the numbers of subjects and outcome events in the individual clinical trials. More important, retrospective sample size calculations showed that none of the five metaanalyses included an adequate number of person years of observation to rule out false-negative results. The numbers speak for themselves and cannot be ignored. Simply put, metaanalyses of the PPV clinical trials will never tell us whether the vaccine prevents pneumococcal pneumonia or all-cause pneumonia in elderly and high-risk adults, and consequently they must be regarded as inconclusive and uninformative. Since 2004, only one small prospective clinical trial of PPV has been published (reviewed in 6). Nothing new has been added to our knowledge of PPV efficacy by the more recent metaanalyses.3,4 Epidemiologists have reminded us that the lack of evidence of PPV efficacy is not evidence of its absence. The conclusions of our earlier review still stand.5 PMID:24030320

  4. Domestic violence and mental health in older adults.

    PubMed

    Knight, Lucy; Hester, Marianne

    2016-10-01

    Domestic violence affects every age group and is present throughout the life span, but, while the mental health impact of domestic violence is clearly established in working age adults, less is known about the nature and impact of domestic violence among older adults. This review, therefore, aimed to synthesize findings on the prevalence, nature, and impact of domestic violence among older adults, and its identification and management. Electronic searches were conducted of Medline, PsycINFO, Cinahl, and Embase to identify studies reporting on the mental health and domestic violence in older adults. Findings suggested that, although prevalence figures are variable, the likely lifetime prevalence for women over the age of 65 is between 20-30%. Physical abuse is suggested to decrease with age, but rates of emotional abuse appear to be stable over the lifespan. Among older adults, domestic violence is strongly associated with physical and mental health problems, and the scarce research comparing the impact of domestic violence across the age cohorts suggests that the physical health of older victims may be more severely affected than younger victims. In contrast, there is evidence that older victims may experience less psychological distress in response to domestic violence than younger victims. Internationally, evidence on the management of domestic violence in older adults is sparse. Findings suggest, however, that identification of domestic violence is poor among older adults, and there are very limited options for onwards referral and support.

  5. Older Adults Make Less Advantageous Decisions than Younger Adults: Cognitive and Psychological Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Fein, George; McGillivray, Shannon; Finn, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that older adults make less advantageous decisions than younger adults on the Iowa gambling task (IGT). Less advantageous decisions, as measured by the IGT, are characterized by choices that favor larger versus smaller immediate rewards, even though such choices may result in long-term negative consequences. The IGT, and measures of neuropsychological function, personality, and psychopathology were administered to 164 healthy adults 18–85 years of age. Older adults performed less advantageously on the IGT compared with younger adults. Additionally, a greater number of older adult’s IGT performances were classified as ‘impaired’ when compared to younger adults. Less advantageous decisions were associated with obsessive symptoms in older adults and with antisocial symptoms in younger adults. Performance on the IGT was positively associated with auditory working memory and psychomotor function in young adults, and in immediate memory in older adults. PMID:17445297

  6. Current drug treatment of hyperlipidemia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Dave L; Donohoe, Krista L; Ogbonna, Kelechi C; Barden, Sarah M

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) remains the leading cause of death, especially in older adults. Managing modifiable risk factors (e.g., hyperlipidemia, hypertension) remains the primary approach to prevent ASCVD events and ASCVD-related mortality. Statins are generally considered one of the most effective approaches to reduce ASCVD risk, especially for secondary prevention, yet remain underutilized in older adults. The evidence to support statin therapy in older adults is less robust than in their younger counterparts, especially in individuals aged 75 years and older. Recent lipid guidelines have raised this concern, yet statin therapy is recommended in 'at risk' older adults. Determining which older adults should receive statin therapy for primary prevention of ASCVD is challenging, as the currently available risk estimation tools are of limited use in those aged over 75 years. Furthermore, non-statin therapies have been de-emphasized in recent clinical practice guidelines and remain understudied in the older adult population. This is unfortunate given that older adults are less likely to tolerate moderate- to high-intensity statins. Non-statin therapies could be viable options in this population if more was understood about their ability to lower ASCVD risk and safety profiles. Nevertheless, lipid-lowering agents remain an integral component of the overall strategy to reduce atherogenic burden in older adults. Future research in this area should aim to enroll more older adults in clinical trials, determine the utility of ASCVD risk estimation for primary prevention, and investigate the role of non-statin therapies in this population.

  7. Improper Medication Use Rising Among Older Adults | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine Interactions Improper Medication Use Rising Among Older Adults Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Problems ... drugs, such as sleeping pills. Risks for Older Adults Older adults may suffer serious consequences from even ...

  8. Young children's attitudes and perceptions of older adults.

    PubMed

    Burke, J L

    Children ages four to seven judged relative ages of unfamiliar adults from photographs and chose photographs of adults in response to sociometric items. Age discrimination was highly accurate by age six. Children identified older adults as sad, lonely and not busy, but older adults were bypassed on items like "knows a lot" and preferences for teachers. In interviews, most of the children accurately identified older people by relying on physiognomic cues. Most described their grandparents as examples of known older people and expressed positive views of the activities they share. Images of passivity, and of older people engaged in domestic, but not "outside" work were also present. Children's attitudes were found to parallel those held by older adults in recent polls; older children in the sample were more likely to hold stereotypical images. Two-thirds of the children preferred not to grow old. Contact of children with older adults other than their grandparents was limited, especially in work settings or schools. It was concluded that deliberate programming in preschools and elementary schools is important to offset early ageist attitude formation.

  9. The thermic effect of food is reduced in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shichun; Rajjo, Tamim; Santosa, Sylvia; Jensen, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The thermic effect of food accounts for ~ 10% of daily energy expenditure. A reduction in the thermic effect of food, which has been variably observed in the older adults, could predispose to fat gain. We tested whether the thermic effect of food is reduced in older adults compared with young adults by analyzing our database of standardized studies conducted at the Mayo Clinic between 1999 and 2009. Methods Data was available from 136 older adults volunteers age 60 to 88 (56 females) and 141 young adults ages 18 to 35 years (67 female). Basal energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry to assess basal metabolic rate. Body fat, fat free mass and visceral fat were measured using a combination of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and an abdominal CT scan. We measured the thermic effect of food and postprandial insulinemia in 123 older adults (52 female) and 86 young (38 female) of these volunteers. Results Basal metabolic rate adjusted for fat free mass was less in older adults (P = 0.01) and the thermic effect of food was ~ 1% (P = 0.02) less in the older adults. After controlling for meal size and fat free mass, body fat and fat distribution did not predict the thermic effect of food. Conclusions Both basal metabolic rate and the thermic effect of food are less in older adults than young adults, even when they have similar amounts of lean tissue and consume a similar size meal. These factors contribute to lower daily energy expenditure in the older adults. PMID:24155251

  10. Dental Care Utilization among North Carolina Rural Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Savoca, Margaret R.; Anderson, Andrea M.; Chen, Haiying; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Bell, Ronny A.; Leng, Xiaoyan; Reynolds, Teresa; Quandt, Sara A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This analysis delineates the predisposing, need, and enabling factors that are significantly associated with regular and recent dental care in a multi-ethnic sample of rural older adults. Methods A cross-sectional comprehensive oral health survey conducted with a random, multi-ethnic (African American, American Indian, white) sample of 635 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and older was completed in two rural southern counties. Results Almost no edentulous rural older adults received dental care. Slightly more than one-quarter (27.1%) of dentate rural older adults received regular dental care and slightly more than one-third (36.7%) received recent dental care. Predisposing (education) and enabling (regular place for dental care) factors associated with receiving regular and recent dental care among dentate participants point to greater resources being the driving force in receiving dental care. Contrary to expectations of the Behavioral Model of Health Services, those with the least need (e.g., better self-rated oral health) received regular dental care; this has been referred to as the Paradox of Dental Need. Conclusions Regular and recent dental care are infrequent among rural older adults. Those not receiving dental care are those who most need care. Community access to dental care and the ability of older adults to pay for dental care must be addressed by public health policy to improve the health and quality of life of older adults in rural communities. PMID:22536828

  11. Understanding the Potential of PARO for Healthy Older Adults.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Sean A; Kemple, Shawn; Mitzner, Tracy L; King, Chih-Hung Aaron; Rogers, Wendy A

    2017-04-01

    As the population ages, there is an increasing need for socio-emotional support for older adults. A potential way to meet this need is through interacting with pet-type robots such as the seal robot, PARO. There was a need to extend research on PARO's potential benefits beyond cognitively impaired and dependently living older adults. Because independently living, cognitively intact older adults may also have socio-emotional needs, the primary goal of this study was to investigate their attitudes, emotions, and engagement with PARO to identify its potential applicability to this demographic. Thirty older adults participated in an interaction period with PARO, and their attitudes and emotions toward PARO were assessed before and after using a multi-method approach. Video of the interaction was coded to determine the types and frequency of engagements participants initiated with PARO. Overall, there were no pre-post interaction differences on these measures. However, semi-structured interviews suggested that these older adults had positive attitudes towards PARO's attributes, thought it would be easy to use, and perceived potential uses for both themselves and others. Participants varied in their frequency of engagement with PARO. A novel finding is that this active engagement frequency uniquely predicted post-interaction period positive affect. This study advances understanding of healthy older adults' attitudes, emotions, and engagement with PARO and of possible ways in which PARO could provide social and emotional support to healthy older adults. The results are informative for future research and design of pet-type robots.

  12. Design of smart home sensor visualizations for older adults.

    PubMed

    Le, Thai; Reeder, Blaine; Chung, Jane; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Smart home sensor systems provide a valuable opportunity to continuously and unobtrusively monitor older adult wellness. However, the density of sensor data can be challenging to visualize, especially for an older adult consumer with distinct user needs. We describe the design of sensor visualizations informed by interviews with older adults. The goal of the visualizations is to present sensor activity data to an older adult consumer audience that supports both longitudinal detection of trends and on-demand display of activity details for any chosen day. The design process is grounded through participatory design with older adult interviews during a six-month pilot sensor study. Through a secondary analysis of interviews, we identified the visualization needs of older adults. We incorporated these needs with cognitive perceptual visualization guidelines and the emotional design principles of Norman to develop sensor visualizations. We present a design of sensor visualization that integrate both temporal and spatial components of information. The visualization supports longitudinal detection of trends while allowing the viewer to view activity within a specific date. Appropriately designed visualizations for older adults not only provide insight into health and wellness, but also are a valuable resource to promote engagement within care.

  13. Design of smart home sensor visualizations for older adults.

    PubMed

    Le, Thai; Reeder, Blaine; Chung, Jane; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2014-07-24

    Smart home sensor systems provide a valuable opportunity to continuously and unobtrusively monitor older adult wellness. However, the density of sensor data can be challenging to visualize, especially for an older adult consumer with distinct user needs. We describe the design of sensor visualizations informed by interviews with older adults. The goal of the visualizations is to present sensor activity data to an older adult consumer audience that supports both longitudinal detection of trends and on-demand display of activity details for any chosen day. The design process is grounded through participatory design with older adult interviews during a six-month pilot sensor study. Through a secondary analysis of interviews, we identified the visualization needs of older adults. We incorporated these needs with cognitive perceptual visualization guidelines and the emotional design principles of Norman to develop sensor visualizations. We present a design of sensor visualization that integrate both temporal and spatial components of information. The visualization supports longitudinal detection of trends while allowing the viewer to view activity within a specific date.CONCLUSIONS: Appropriately designed visualizations for older adults not only provide insight into health and wellness, but also are a valuable resource to promote engagement within care.

  14. Health, family strains, dependency, and life satisfaction of older adults.

    PubMed

    Chokkanathan, Srinivasan; Mohanty, Jayashree

    2017-07-01

    Using stress process theory and structural equation modelling, this study investigated the complex relationship between health status, family strain, dependency, and the life satisfaction of rural older adults with reported functional impairments in India. Data were extracted from a large-scale study of 903 randomly selected adults aged 61 years and older from 30 rural clusters of India. The sample for this study was confined to 653 older adults who reported functional impairments. Structural equation modelling showed that poor health status indirectly lowered the life satisfaction of older adults through family strains. Moreover, poor health status also indirectly influenced life satisfaction through dependency and family strain (poor health→dependency→family strains→life satisfaction). The findings indicate that for professionals who deal with the health of older adults, exploring relationship strains and dependency is vital to the assessment and intervention of subjective wellbeing. Inter-sectoral coordination and communication between healthcare and social service agencies might facilitate effective management of health problems among older adults. Moreover, taking family strains and dependency into account when caring for older adults with health problems is critical to help improve their quality of life and maintain their wellbeing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors related to Chinese older adults' suicidal thoughts and attempts.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Xu, Ling; Chi, Iris

    2016-07-01

    Guided by the biopsychosocial framework and empirical evidence, this study examined protective and risk factors of older adults' suicidal thoughts and attempts during the previous month, 12 months, and 5 years. The data used in this study were extracted from the Sample Survey on Aged Population in Urban/Rural China conducted in 2006, which included 15,957 older adults from mainland China. Multiple penalized logistic regressions were used to conduct the analyses. During the previous month, 12 months, and 5 years, 5.1‰, 10.0‰, and 17.7‰ of older adults indicated that they thought about suicide, whereas 2.2‰, 3.5‰, and 6.3‰ reported suicidal attempts, respectively. Older adults' age, financial strain, functional limitations, depression, children's filial piety, social network, loneliness, and urban residence were significantly related to suicidal thoughts during the different time periods. In addition, older adults' religious affiliation, depression, loneliness, and urban residence were significantly related to suicidal attempts during the different time periods. Older adults' suicidal thoughts and attempts need to be assessed by mental health care professionals and primary care doctors. Programs addressing these important protective and risk factors may help reduce older adults' suicidal thoughts and attempts.

  16. A physical fitness model of older adults.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, H; Itoh, H; Furuna, T

    1995-10-01

    Physical fitness for young people is viewed as a multidimensional construct, in that it consists of specific components such as strength, mobility, balance, flexibility, and stamina. This study examined whether this structure underlying physical fitness is also relevant to older adults. A 10-item performance test, which was assumed to assess six components of physical fitness, was administered to 69 healthy volunteers ranging in age from 61 to 83 years. A covariance structure model was applied to the test data: the second-order factor was Physical Fitness, and the first-order factors were Strength, Walking, Balance, Flexibility, Stamina, and Manual Speed which were assumed to be measured based on the ten observed variables. Goodness-of-fit index (GFI) of the model was acceptable (GFI = 0.93). While four factors relating to basic motor performances (Strength, Walking, Balance, and Manual Speed) had loadings more than 0.62 to Physical Fitness, Flexibility and Stamina had less than 0.35. It was suggested for elderly people that strength, mobility, balance, and speed components of physical fitness were highly correlated and explainable by a single factor, while flexibility and cardiorespiratory endurance were to be measured by use of specific measures.

  17. Personality and Lung Function in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Terracciano, Antonio; Stephan, Yannick; Luchetti, Martina; Gonzalez-Rothi, Ricardo; Sutin, Angelina R

    2017-10-01

    Lung disease is a leading cause of disability and death among older adults. We examine whether personality traits are associated with lung function and shortness of breath (dyspnea) in a national cohort with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Participants (N = 12,670) from the Health and Retirement Study were tested for peak expiratory flow (PEF) and completed measures of personality, health behaviors, and a medical history. High neuroticism and low extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness were associated with lower PEF, and higher likelihood of COPD and dyspnea. Conscientiousness had the strongest and most consistent associations, including lower risk of PEF less than 80% of the predicted value (OR = 0.67; 0.62-0.73) and dyspnea (OR = 0.52; 0.47-0.57). Although attenuated, the associations remained significant when accounting for smoking, physical activity, and chronic diseases including cardiovascular and psychiatric disorders. The associations between personality and PEF or dyspnea were similar among those with or without COPD, suggesting that psychological links to lung function are not disease dependent. In longitudinal analyses, high neuroticism (β = -0.019) and low conscientiousness (β = 0.027) predicted steeper declines in PEF. A vulnerable personality profile is common among individuals with limited lung function and COPD, predicts shortness of breath and worsening lung function.

  18. Teaching resourcefulness skills to older adults.

    PubMed

    Zauszniewski, J A

    1997-02-01

    With rapidly increasing numbers of elders in the United States, there is a growing need for interventions to promote independence and productive, healthy lifestyles among the elderly. Highly resourceful persons have been found to function better in their daily activities than those who lack resourcefulness skills. These skills, including self-controlling techniques and problem-solving, are believed to be learned and therefore can be taught. This pilot study examined the effects of teaching resourcefulness skills to healthy elders on measures of learned resourcefulness, anxiety, depression, adaptive functioning, and life satisfaction using a quasi-experimental pre-test-post-test design. The intervention group consisted of 20 elders and the placebo group had 17 elders. Those elders who received the 6-week small group intervention that taught the skills constituting resourcefulness scored significantly higher on post-test measures of learned resourcefulness, adaptive functioning, and life satisfaction. Although significant negative correlations were found between resourcefulness scores and scores on measures of anxiety and depression, there were no significant differences in anxiety and depression between the intervention and placebo groups on the post-test measures. The findings suggest that learned resourcefulness training (LRT) is an important nursing intervention for promoting healthy, independent, and productive lifestyles among older adults.

  19. Improving associative memory in older adults with unitization.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Fahad N; Fernandes, Myra; Hockley, William E

    2015-01-01

    We examined if unitization inherent preexperimentally could reduce the associative deficit in older adults. In Experiment 1, younger and older adults studied compound word (CW; e.g., store keeper) and noncompound word (NCW; e.g., needle birth) pairs. We found a reduction in the age-related associative deficit such that older but not younger adults showed a discrimination advantage for CW relative to NCW pairs on a yes-no associative recognition test. These results suggest that CW compared to NCW word pairs provide schematic support that older adults can use to improve their memory. In Experiment 2, reducing study time in younger adults decreased associative recognition performance, but did not produce a discrimination advantage for CW pairs. In Experiment 3, both older and younger adults showed a discrimination advantage for CW pairs on a two-alternative forced-choice recognition test, which encourages greater use of familiarity. These results suggest that test format influenced young adults' use of familiarity during associative recognition of unitized pairs, and that older adults rely more on familiarity than recollection for associative recognition. Unitization of preexperimental associations, as in CW pairs, can alleviate age-related associative deficits.

  20. Perceptual processing deficits underlying reduced FFOV efficiency in older adults.

    PubMed

    Power, Garry F; Conlon, Elizabeth G

    2017-01-01

    Older adults are known to perform more poorly on measures of the functional field of view (FFOV) than younger adults. Specific contributions by poor bottom-up and or top-down control of visual attention to the reduced FFOV of older adults were investigated. Error rates of older and younger adults were compared on a FFOV task in which a central identification task, peripheral localization task, and peripheral distractors were presented in high and low contrast. Older adults made more errors in all conditions. The effect of age was independent of the contrast of the peripheral target or distractors. The performance cost of including the central task was measured and found to be negligible for younger adults. For older adults performance costs were present in all conditions, greater with distractors than without, and greater for a low rather than high contrast central stimulus when the peripheral target was high contrast. These results are consistent with older adults compensating for reduced sensory input or bottom-up capture of attention by relying more heavily on top-down control for which they are resource limited.

  1. A Comparison of Health Visualization Evaluation Techniques with Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Le, Thai; Thompson, Hilaire J; Demiris, George

    2016-01-01

    Aging-associated changes in visual acuity, cognition, and motor control in addition to attitudinal and affective perceptions of technology impact the design of information systems for older adults. Although design guidelines and cognitive theories on information visualization exist, they are often understudied for use with older adults. In an effort to evaluate interactive health visualizations with older adults, the authors applied and compared a benchmark evaluation, an insight-based evaluation, and a subjective usability questionnaire. They were unable to identify statistically significant differences between visualizations using the benchmark evaluation, but found moderate differences with the perceived usability scale and more granular differences through the insight evaluation.

  2. Individualized Approach to Cancer Screening in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kimberley T; Harris, Russell P; Schoenborn, Nancy L

    2018-02-01

    The primary goal of cancer screening is early detection of cancer to reduce cancer-specific mortality and morbidity. The benefits of screening in older adults are uncertain due to paucity of evidence. Extrapolating data from younger populations, evidence suggests that the benefit occurs years later from the time of initial screening and therefore may not be applicable in those older adults with limited life expectancy. Contrast this with the harms of screening, which are more immediate and increase with age and comorbidities. An individualized approach to cancer screening takes these factors into consideration, allowing for thoughtful decision making for older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Music as a healing art for older adults.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Jeannette A; Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2008-03-01

    There is increasing evidence of the importance of regular mental and physical exercise to maximize overall health and functioning in older adults. However, many individuals find that reduced strength or disabilities prevent them from participating in the kinds of exercise they enjoyed when they were younger. Music can provide the important benefits of both mental and physical stimulation to even frail older adults. Whether using Conductorcise for aerobic exercise, enjoying the communal experience of singing in a choir, or quietly reflecting on a music recording, music can serve as a healing art for older adults.

  4. Priorities for Action in a Rural Older Adults Study

    PubMed Central

    Averill, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a recent study of older adults in the rural southwestern United States and discusses practice and research implications. The aim of the study was to analyze health disparities and strengths in the contexts of rurality, aging, a depressed economy, and limited health resources. Identified themes needing action included sustained access to prescriptions, transportation solutions for older adults in isolated communities, inadequate access to care, poor infrastructure and coordination of services, scarce assisted living and in-home care for frail older adults, and barriers related to culture, language, and economics. PMID:22929381

  5. Suicide in Older Adults: The Role of Emotions and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Szanto, Katalin; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2014-01-01

    Suicide in older adults is a significant clinical concern. In this review of recent findings, we concentrate on the role of emotions and cognition in suicide risk and behavior in older adults. We discuss the epidemiology of suicide in older adults, integrate recent findings on non-psychotic major depression, schizophrenia and suicidal ideation, explore the relationship of emotion regulation with suicide, present recent advances on suicide in demented patients, and describe the latest developments on cognition and decision processes in suicide. PMID:25226883

  6. [Health policies for older adults: thoughts for action].

    PubMed

    Marín, Pedro Paulo

    2007-03-01

    The speed of growth of the population of older adults has been much faster than expected in every country. In Chile today one out of ten persons is an older adult and in the next twenty years this proportion will duplicate. Population aging is a success of development but also presents a medical and social challenge. The health issues of the National Policy addressing the needs of the older population in Chile are severely delayed in their implementation due to the lack of human resources trained in medicine of older adults and geriatric services. The consensus evidence on how to develop appropriate geriatric health services for older adults should include services coordinated in a continuum, including health promotion and disease prevention targeting older people to achieve "healthy aging" in the majority of the older population; outpatient health care services; acute care in hospitals with physicians trained in geriatrics; special services for geriatric rehabilitation and restoration of function (short term care) and a variety of settings and services offering long term care ranging from home to institutions. To be able to implement this vision of appropriate, coordinated and integrated health and social services for older people, the country needs a minimum number of geriatricians (at least 260), health care teams trained in the basics of geriatrics and continuing development of human resources to meet the increasing demand on health services by the fast growing older population.

  7. Health status of independently living older adults in Romania.

    PubMed

    Ghinescu, Minerva; Olaroiu, Marinela; van Dijk, Jitse P; Olteanu, Tatiana; van den Heuvel, Wim J A

    2014-10-01

    Aging is affecting health care all over Europe, but it is expected to have a much greater impact in Eastern Europe. Reliable data on various indicators of health of older adults in Eastern Europe are lacking. The objectives of the present study were to describe the health of older Romanian adults, and to examine its relationship with sociodemographic, psychological and social factors. This cross-sectional study used a stratified sample of 600 independent-living older Romanian adults from the great metropolitan area of Bucharest; 549 citizens aged ≥ 65 years participated. Data were collected by a mailed questionnaire and interviews. Measurements included self-rated health, the number of chronic conditions, the Short Form-20, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and Social support. Romanian older adults rate their health as "fair". On average, they report three chronic conditions. They more frequently have problems in executing daily activities as compared with older adults from other European countries. Three components of health are identified: independent functioning, suffering from chronic diseases and psychological health. Regression analysis shows that age, education and social support are related to each component, and neuroticism and extraversion to two components of health. A comparison with international data shows various indicators of health of older Romanian adults to be relatively worse. The three identified components of health offer opportunities for an integrated approach to deal with the health care needs of older citizens. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Older Adults Expend More Listening Effort than Young Adults Recognizing Speech in Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Penny Anderson; Gagne, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Listening in noisy situations is a challenging experience for many older adults. The authors hypothesized that older adults exert more listening effort compared with young adults. Listening effort involves the attention and cognitive resources required to understand speech. The purpose was (a) to quantify the amount of listening effort…

  9. Factors Associated with Geriatric Syndromes in Older Homeless Adults

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rebecca T.; Kiely, Dan K.; Bharel, Monica; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Although older homeless adults have high rates of geriatric syndromes, risk factors for these syndromes are not known. We used multivariable regression to estimate the association of subject characteristics with the total number of geriatric syndromes in 250 homeless adults aged 50 years and older. Geriatric syndromes included falls, cognitive impairment, frailty, major depression, sensory impairment, and urinary incontinence. A higher total number of geriatric syndromes was associated with having less than a high school education, medical comorbidities (diabetes and arthritis), alcohol and drug use problems, and difficulty performing one or more ADLs. Clinicians who care for older homeless patients with these characteristics should consider screening them for geriatric syndromes. Moreover, this study identifies potentially modifiable risk factors associated with the total number of geriatric syndromes in older homeless adults. This knowledge may provide targets for clinical interventions to improve the health of older homeless patients. PMID:23728022

  10. Serotonin Modulation of Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Depressed Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gwenn S.; Kramer, Elisse; Hermann, Carol.; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Chaly, Thomas; Eidelberg, David

    2009-01-01

    Background Monoamine dysfunction, particularly of the serotonin system, has been the dominant hypothesis guiding research and treatment development in affective disorders. The majority of research has been performed in mid-life depressed adults. The importance of understanding the neurobiology of depression in older adults is underscored by increased rates of mortality and completed suicide and an increased risk of Alzheimer's dementia. To evaluate the dynamic response of the serotonin system, the acute effects of citalopram infusion on cerebral glucose metabolism was measured in depressed older adults and control subjects. The hypothesis was tested that smaller decreases in metabolism would be observed in cortical and limbic regions in depressed older adults relative to controls. Methods Sixteen depressed older adults and thirteen controls underwent two resting Positron Emission Tomography (PET) studies with the radiotracer [18F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose after placebo and citalopram infusions. Results In controls compared to depressed older adults, greater citalopram induced decreases in cerebral metabolism were observed in the right anterior cingulate, middle temporal (bilaterally), left precuneus, and left parahippocampal gyri. Greater decreases in the depressed older adults than controls was observed in left superior and left middle frontal gyri and increases in left inferior parietal lobule, left cuneus, left thalamus and right putamen. Conclusion In depressed older adults relative to controls, the cerebral metabolic response to citalopram is blunted in cortico-cortico and cortico-limbic pathways and increased in the left hemisphere (greater decrease interiorly and increases posterior). These findings suggest both blunted and compensatory cerebral metabolic responses to citalopram in depressed older adults. PMID:19368900

  11. Gun Access and Safety Practices among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Hillary D.; Flaten, Hanna K.; Betz, Marian E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Given high rates of gun ownership among older adults, geriatric providers can assess firearm safety practices using a “5 Ls” approach: Locked; Loaded; Little children; feeling Low; and Learned owner. This study describes gun access and the “5 Ls” among US older adults. Methods. Data on the “5 Ls” from the Second Injury Control and Risk Survey (ICARIS-2), a national telephone survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, were analyzed. Weighted variables were used to generate national estimates regarding prevalence of gun ownership and associated gun safety among older adults (≥55 years). Results. Of 2939 older adults, 39% (95% CI 37%–42%) reported ≥1 gun stored at home. Among those with guns at home, 21% (95% CI 18–24%) stored guns loaded and unlocked; 9.2% (95% CI 6.6–12%) had ≥1 child in household; 5.1% (95% CI 3.5–6.8%) reported past-year suicidal ideation and 3.6% (95% CI 2.1–5.2%) reported history of a suicide attempt; and 55% (95% CI 51–59%) stated that ≥1 adult had attended firearm safety workshop. Conclusion. Some older adults may be at elevated risk of firearm injury because of storage practices, suicidal thoughts, or limited safety training. Future work should assess effective approaches to reduce the risk of gun-related injuries among older adults. PMID:26949391

  12. Gaps in nutritional research among older adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Presley, Carolyn J; Dotan, Efrat; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Jatoi, Aminah; Mohile, Supriya G; Won, Elizabeth; Alibhai, Shabbir; Kilari, Deepak; Harrison, Robert; Klepin, Heidi D; Wildes, Tanya M; Mustian, Karen; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-07-01

    Nutritional issues among older adults with cancer are an understudied area of research despite significant prognostic implications for treatment side effects, cancer-specific mortality, and overall survival. In May of 2015, the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute on Aging co-sponsored a conference focused on future directions in geriatric oncology research. Nutritional research among older adults with cancer was highlighted as a major area of concern as most nutritional cancer research has been conducted among younger adults, with limited evidence to guide the care of nutritional issues among older adults with cancer. Cancer diagnoses among older adults are increasing, and the care of the older adult with cancer is complicated due to multimorbidity, heterogeneous functional status, polypharmacy, deficits in cognitive and mental health, and several other non-cancer factors. Due to this complexity, nutritional needs are dynamic, multifaceted, and dependent on the clinical scenario. This manuscript outlines the proceedings of this conference including knowledge gaps and recommendations for future nutritional research among older adults with cancer. Three common clinical scenarios encountered by oncologists include (1) weight loss during anti-cancer therapy, (2) malnutrition during advanced disease, and (3) obesity during survivorship. In this manuscript, we provide a brief overview of relevant cancer literature within these three areas, knowledge gaps that exist, and recommendations for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gaps in nutritional research among older adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Presley, Carolyn J.; Dotan, Efrat; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Jatoi, Aminah; Mohile, Supriya G.; Won, Elizabeth; Alibhai, Shabbir; Kilari, Deepak; Harrison, Robert; Klepin, Heidi D.; Wildes, Tanya M.; Mustian, Karen; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional issues among older adults with cancer are an understudied area of research despite significant prognostic implications for treatment side effects, cancer-specific mortality, and overall survival. In May of 2015, the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute on Aging co-sponsored a conference focused on future directions in geriatric oncology research. Nutritional research among older adults with cancer was highlighted as a major area of concern as most nutritional cancer research has been conducted among younger adults, with limited evidence to guide the care of nutritional issues among older adults with cancer. Cancer diagnoses among older adults are increasing, and the care of the older adult with cancer is complicated due to multimorbidity, heterogeneous functional status, polypharmacy, deficits in cognitive and mental health, and several other non-cancer factors. Due to this complexity, nutritional needs are dynamic, multifaceted, and dependent on the clinical scenario. This manuscript outlines the proceedings of this conference including knowledge gaps and recommendations for future nutritional research among older adults with cancer. Three common clinical scenarios encountered by oncologists include (1) weight loss during anti-cancer therapy, (2) malnutrition during advanced disease, and (3) obesity during survivorship. In this manuscript, we provide a brief overview of relevant cancer literature within these three areas, knowledge gaps that exist, and recommendations for future research. PMID:27197919

  14. Feasibility study of an attention training application for older adults.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nikki L; Mogle, Jacqueline; Colancecco, Elise; Dick, Robert; Hannan, John; Lin, Feng Vankee

    2015-09-01

    Technology-based attention training has demonstrated promise in its potential to improve cognitive functioning in older people. Developing mobile applications, with older users specifically in mind, may support future dissemination of these interventions and integration into daily life. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of an Attention Training Application (ATA) for community-dwelling older adults using mobile technology. A descriptive, mixed-methods design was used to capture older adults' feedback on the usability and acceptability of the ATA. A convenience sample of older adults (n = 9) from two independent living facilities participated in a 2-hour training and practice session with the ATA. Participants were given personally tailored instructions for using the mobile device and the ATA specifically. Following a practice session, participants provided ratings on multiple components of the ATA and completed an audio-recorded, semi-structured interview to provide detailed descriptions of their experience and perceptions. An iterative process of content analysis was used to characterise the open-ended responses. Participants rated the ATA favourably overall on several 0-10 scales including likeability [8.5 (1.6)], interest [8.8 (2.3)] and satisfaction [8.2 (1.9)]. The qualitative analyses revealed several issues relevant to the feasibility of the ATA among older people including the importance of the technological background of the user, limiting negative feedback, challenges with the touch screen interface, personal preferences for challenge, extending the practice period and the difficulty of the dual-task condition. The use of the ATA is feasible in the older adult population. Future development should specifically consider personal characteristics as well as preferences to maximise usability and acceptability among older people. Older adults enjoyed the ATA. This opens doors to user-friendly technological interventions that may be

  15. Connecting Socially Isolated Older Rural Adults with Older Volunteers through Expressive Arts.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Ann; Skinner, Mark W; Wilkinson, Fay; Reid, Heather

    2016-03-01

    Employing a participatory arts-based research approach, we examined an innovative program from rural Ontario, Canada, designed to address social isolation among older people. Older socially isolated adults were matched to trained volunteers, where in dyads, the eight pairs created expressive art in their home setting over the course of 10 home visits. With thematic and narrative inquiry, we analysed the experiences and perceptions of the program leader, older participants, and older volunteers via their artistic creations, weekly logs, evaluations, and field notes. The findings reveal a successful intervention that positively influenced the well-being of older adult participants and older volunteers, especially in regards to relationships, personal development, and creating meaning as well as extending the intervention's impact beyond the program's duration. We also discuss opportunities for similar programs to inform policy and enable positive community-based health and social service responses to rural social isolation.

  16. Methodological issues in pharmacotherapy research in older adults.

    PubMed

    Orwig, Denise; Rickles, Nathaniel M; Martin, Linda Gore

    2011-06-01

    The shifting of demographics to an aging society with multiple chronic illnesses and increased heterogeneity has created an undeniable imperative regarding the knowledge about pharmacotherapy in older patients, especially because older adults have a higher rate of medication use compared with the general population. More research on pharmacotherapy in older adults is needed to maximize not only the appropriate use of medications but also the benefits of available treatments in this historically underrepresented group. Investigators face many challenges that may greatly affect the outcomes of research on pharmacotherapy in older adults. This commentary discusses the common challenges of research on pharmacotherapy in older adults and provides strategies to overcome such challenges. The following databases were searched for examples of concepts (dates: 1976-September 14, 2010; key terms: research [in the title], aged, elderly, older adult, and geriatric): PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature Database (CINAHL), Family & Societal Studies Worldwide, Women's Studies International, Academic Search Premier, Health Source: Academic/Nursing Edition, ISI Web of Knowledge, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, PsycInfo, and Social Work Abstracts. There are several methodological challenges related to study design, including the measurement of outcomes and the analytical plan; study implementation, such as the recruitment of sites and individuals; the informed-consent process; retention; and other practical considerations. A crucial area to consider is the measurement of medication adherence, both as an independent factor and as a confounder. Many challenges of research in older patients reflect the complexities of the aging process, including psychosocial consequences, and the resultant effects on study participation and outcomes. It is hoped that the recommendations provided will help researchers and clinicians overcome the methodological

  17. Exercises for Older Adults, Using Free and Inexpensive Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, David E.; Metal-Corbin, Josie

    1986-01-01

    This article illustrates how old bicycle inner tubes, wire coat hangers, stockings, panty hose, and milk dispenser bladders can be used as part of an exercise program for older adults. Specific exercises and activities are suggested. (MT)

  18. Neighborhood Influences and BMI in Urban Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Arlesia L; Rooks, Ronica N; Tawk, Rima H; Kruger, Daniel J

    2017-06-01

    Increases in body weight and declining physical activity that may accompany aging are linked to a range of problems affecting daily life (i.e., decreased mobility and overall quality of life). This study investigates the actual and perceived neighborhood environment on overweight and obese urban older adults. We selected 217 individuals aged 65+ who answered questions about their neighborhood on the 2009 Speak to Your Health survey. Using multinomial regression models and geospatial models, we examined relationships between neighborhood environment and BMI. We found that obese older adults were 63% less likely to have a park within their neighborhood ( p = .04). Our results also show that older adults who perceive their neighborhood crime as very high are 12 times more likely to be overweight ( p = .04). Findings suggest that parks may affect BMI in older adults; however, neighborhood perceptions play a greater role.

  19. Quick Guide to Health Literacy and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention and Health Promotion Quick Guide to Health Literacy and Older Adults skip to content ODPHP Health ... Healthy People 2010 Health Communication Focus Area Health Literacy Improvement Consumer and Patient e-Health Resources Health ...

  20. Religion and spirituality as defined by older adults.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Harriet L; Thomas, Cecilia L; Williamson, Celia

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study examined the intrinsic definitions of spirituality and religion across three different religious or ethnic groups of older adults--Jewish, African American Protestants and Caucasian Protestants. The study explores how older adults from these various backgrounds self-identify with the terms religion and spirituality. Because both African-Americans and Jewish older adults are underrepresented in the research on spirituality and religion, their inclusion lends insights to this topic and helps to anchor the findings in a cross-cultural context. Focus groups were employed to understand how these groups characterize their relationship to spirituality and religion. Social work professionals can utilize these findings to work more effectively with the diverse and complex issues of older adults.

  1. Hydrate for health: listening to older adults' need for information.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Mary H; Marquez, Celine S; Kline, Katherine V; Morris, Erin; Linares, Brenda; Carlson, Barbara W

    2014-10-01

    An interdisciplinary team of faculty and students developed the Hydrate for Health project to provide relevant and evidence-based information to community-dwelling older adults. Evidence-based factsheets on bladder health, nighttime urination, medication safety, and physical activity/exercise, as well as a fluid intake self-monitoring tool, were developed. Four focus groups were conducted and included older adults (N = 21) who participated in activities at two local senior centers to obtain their feedback about the relevance of the factsheets. Extensive revisions were required based on the feedback received. Older adults expressed a desire for pragmatic information (i.e., how to determine fluid sources from food, how to measure water, how to determine their own fluid needs). They also wanted information that could be easily incorporated into daily life. Nurses play a central role in listening to and incorporating older adults' voices into consumer education materials. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Fitness for Those with Disabilities and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Healthy New Year Fitness for Those with Disabilities and Older Adults Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Fitness for Those with Disabilities Physical activity is great ...

  3. Preventing Elder Abuse and Neglect in Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    Donate News About Foundation Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Resources › Preventing ...

  4. Methadone Maintenance Treatment for Older Adults: Cost and Logistical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Brandi P; Bryson, William Culbertson; Bruce, Martha L

    2017-11-01

    In a demographic shift, older adults now comprise an increasing proportion of those receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for opioid use disorder. A study of MMT recipients in New York City suggests that 13% of the population is over 60 years of age. Adults ages 50-59 are among the largest age demographic, evidence that the number of older adults receiving MMT will continue to increase. Because medical comorbidities, cognitive impairment, and neurobehavioral changes often accumulate with age, older adults on MMT become increasingly vulnerable. The cost of MMT and logistical considerations also pose challenges to continued care. Together, these issues warrant a reconsideration of emerging concerns and health policies related to use of MMT in this growing and understudied population. Given the changing health care system and the opioid epidemic, the need for evidence-based guidelines and supportive policies that consider the unique treatment needs of older populations is especially relevant.

  5. Stereotype threat can reduce older adults' memory errors.

    PubMed

    Barber, Sarah J; Mather, Mara

    2013-01-01

    Stereotype threat often incurs the cost of reducing the amount of information that older adults accurately recall. In the current research, we tested whether stereotype threat can also benefit memory. According to the regulatory focus account of stereotype threat, threat induces a prevention focus in which people become concerned with avoiding errors of commission and are sensitive to the presence or absence of losses within their environment. Because of this, we predicted that stereotype threat might reduce older adults' memory errors. Results were consistent with this prediction. Older adults under stereotype threat had lower intrusion rates during free-recall tests (Experiments 1 and 2). They also reduced their false alarms and adopted more conservative response criteria during a recognition test (Experiment 2). Thus, stereotype threat can decrease older adults' false memories, albeit at the cost of fewer veridical memories, as well.

  6. Insomnia symptoms, nightmares, and suicidal ideation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Nadorff, Michael R; Fiske, Amy; Sperry, Jeannie A; Petts, Rachel; Gregg, Jeffrey J

    2013-03-01

    Prior research has found that insomnia symptoms and nightmares are associated with suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and death by suicide. However, to the best of our knowledge, no research has examined the relation between insomnia symptoms, nightmares, and suicidal ideation in older adults. The current project aimed to fill this void by investigating the relation between insomnia symptoms, nightmares, and suicidal ideation in an older adult sample. The study utilized a cross-sectional design. The sample consisted of 81 older adult patients (age ≥ 65 years) recruited from a family medicine clinic. The participants were asked to complete surveys about their sleep, symptoms of depression, and suicidal ideation. Insomnia symptoms, but not nightmares, were significantly related to suicidal ideation. In addition, insomnia symptoms were related to suicidal ideation independent of nightmares. Furthermore, the relation between insomnia symptoms and suicidal ideation was mediated by depressive symptoms. These findings have implications for the identification and treatment of suicidal ideation in older adults.

  7. Low Blood Sodium in Older Adults: A Concern?

    MedlinePlus

    ... et al. Hyponatremia: Special considerations in older patients. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2014;3:944. Sterns RH. Causes of hyponatremia in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 21, ...

  8. Familism and Health Care Provision to Hispanic Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Savage, Brittany; Foli, Karen J; Edwards, Nancy E; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic older adult population's rapid growth calls for an awareness of values that can affect the rendering and receipt of care. Familism, or familismo, a traditional Hispanic value, places importance of family over the self and can potentially affect health care perceptions and practices for Hispanic older adults. The current article discusses familism, which is upheld by some Hispanic older adults, and the potential for underuse of health care services. The traditional feminine role, marianismo, and masculine role, machismo, are considered, as well as implications for how decision making may be made by family members rather than the patient. Clinical implications for the provision of health care to Hispanic older adults are provided, along with the importance of considering acculturation and ethnic heterogeneity. Health care management strategies that reflect recognition and respect of familism, yet emphasize optimization of adherence and self-care, are described. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Perceptions of successful aging in Black older adults.

    PubMed

    Troutman, Meredith; Nies, Mary A; Mavellia, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Successful aging is important; however, there is a lack of knowledge on how to promote successful aging in Black older adults. In this study, which examined Black older adults' perceptions of successful aging, a cross-sectional descriptive design was used to examine the psychometric properties of the Successful Aging Inventory and qualitative characteristics of successful aging in 100 Black older adults. The participants' responses to an open-ended question, "What does successful aging mean to you?" revealed relevant aspects of successful aging. Six broad categories emerged: Independence/Ability, Health, Mindset, Activity/Service, Family, and Spirituality. These categories suggest foci for potential interventions to promote successful aging in Black older adults.

  10. Falls among Older Adults: Public Health Impact and Prevention Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Judy A.

    2003-01-01

    Provides an overview of the epidemiology of falls among older adults, describes current prevention strategies, and highlights key areas that need to be addressed, including risk assessments, exercise, and environmental changes. (Contains 50 references.) (JOW)

  11. Stereotype threat can reduce older adults' memory errors

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Sarah J.; Mather, Mara

    2014-01-01

    Stereotype threat often incurs the cost of reducing the amount of information that older adults accurately recall. In the current research we tested whether stereotype threat can also benefit memory. According to the regulatory focus account of stereotype threat, threat induces a prevention focus in which people become concerned with avoiding errors of commission and are sensitive to the presence or absence of losses within their environment (Seibt & Förster, 2004). Because of this, we predicted that stereotype threat might reduce older adults' memory errors. Results were consistent with this prediction. Older adults under stereotype threat had lower intrusion rates during free-recall tests (Experiments 1 & 2). They also reduced their false alarms and adopted more conservative response criteria during a recognition test (Experiment 2). Thus, stereotype threat can decrease older adults' false memories, albeit at the cost of fewer veridical memories, as well. PMID:24131297

  12. Antimnemonic effects of schemas in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Badham, Stephen P.; Maylor, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Schema-consistent material that is aligned with an individual’s knowledge and experience is typically more memorable than abstract material. This effect is often more extreme in older adults and schema use can alleviate age deficits in memory. In three experiments, young and older adults completed memory tasks where the availability of schematic information was manipulated. Specifying nonobvious relations between to-be-remembered word pairs paradoxically hindered memory (Experiment 1). Highlighting relations within mixed lists of related and unrelated word pairs had no effect on memory for those pairs (Experiment 2). This occurred even though related word pairs were recalled better than unrelated word pairs, particularly for older adults. Revealing a schematic context in a memory task with abstract image segments also hindered memory performance, particularly for older adults (Experiment 3). The data show that processing schematic information can come with costs that offset mnemonic benefits associated with schema-consistent stimuli. PMID:25980799

  13. Illusory recollection in older adults and younger adults under divided attention.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Erin I; Fernandes, Myra A

    2009-03-01

    The authors investigated the effect of divided attention, study-list repetition, and age on recollection and familiarity. Older and younger adults under full attention and younger adults under divided attention at study viewed word lists highly associated with a single unstudied word (critical lure) once or three times, and subsequently performed a remember-know recognition test. Younger adults made fewer false remember responses to critical lures from repeated study lists, whereas younger adults under divided attention and older adults both showed an increase with repetition. Findings suggest older adults' susceptibility to illusory memories is related to a deficit in available attention during encoding.

  14. The Susceptibility of Older Adults to Environmental Hazards

    EPA Science Inventory

    This rapid growth in the number of older Americans has many implications for public health, including the need to better understand the health risks posed by environmental exposures to older adults. This paper describes the need to link environmental exposures, the processing of...

  15. Extended Workforce Participation of Older Adults: Issues and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Laura M.

    Demographic, social, and economic trends are pointing in the direction of increased work force participation for older adults. The four major forces responsible for change in work patterns are the changing work force, changing older people, economic forces, and social forces. These forces are mediated by social convention, especially the…

  16. EVALUATING RISK IN OLDER ADULTS USING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid growth in the number of older Americans has many implications for public health, including the need to better understand the risks posed by environmental exposures to older adults. An important element for evaluating risk is the understanding of the doses of environment...

  17. Listeriosis Prevention for Older Adults: Effective Messages and Delivery Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Sheryl C.; Kosa, Katherine M.; Moore, Christina M.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Ten Eyck, Toby A.; Cowen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Individuals aged 60 years and older are at an increased risk for listeriosis and other foodborne illnesses. They can reduce their risk by following recommended food safety practices. A total of 8 focus groups were conducted to characterize older adults' food safety knowledge and practices, their impressions of educational materials on listeriosis…

  18. The Utility of Existential Therapy with Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Mary Miller

    Older adults, defined as those aged 65 or older, are rapidly becoming the largest group of individuals in the United States. As this population steadily increases, so will the demand for adequate and appropriate mental health care. Counselors need to be prepared to meet this increasing demand by understanding efficacious ways to conceptualize and…

  19. Introducing Computer-Based Concept Mapping to Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Iñaki; Elorriaga, Jon A.; Arruarte, Ana; Larrañaga, Mikel; Gutiérrez, Julián

    2017-01-01

    The dramatic eruption of information and communication technology has had a remarkable effect on modern life, including the capacity to help older adults improve their quality of life and remain independent longer. However, while technology use is generally widespread, there is an observable underutilization by older people. There is sound…

  20. A Comparison of Cohabiting Relationships among Older and Younger Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Valarie; Scott, Mindy E.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores how cohabitation differs for older and younger adults, drawing on data from 966 cohabitors in each of the first 2 waves of the National Survey of Families and Households. Older cohabitors report significantly higher levels of relationship quality and stability than younger cohabitors, although they are less likely to have plans…

  1. Older Adult Inmates: The Challenge for Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Cindy; van Wormer, Katherine; Chadha, Janice; Jaggers, Jeremiah W.

    2009-01-01

    Older adult inmates have grown both in proportion and in number due to the confluence of a number of factors. This aging of the prison population has created a host of policy and practice issues that encompass justice considerations, cost containment issues, and biopsychosocial care needs. The older prisoner's physical, social, and psychological…

  2. Medication Management Assessment for Older Adults in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orwig, Denise; Brandt, Nicole; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the Medication Management Instrument for Deficiencies in the Elderly (MedMaIDE) and to provide results of reliability and validity testing. Design and Methods: Participants were 50 older adults, aged 65 and older, who lived in the community, took at least one prescription medication, and were then…

  3. Perspectives on Wellness Self-Monitoring Tools for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jina; Le, Thai; Reeder, Blaine; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Demiris, George

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Our purpose was to understand different stakeholder perceptions about the use of self-monitoring tools, specifically in the area of older adults’ personal wellness. In conjunction with the advent of personal health records, tracking personal health using self-monitoring technologies shows promising patient support opportunities. While clinicians’ tools for monitoring of older adults have been explored, we know little about how older adults may self-monitor their wellness and health and how their health care providers would perceive such use. Methods We conducted three focus groups with health care providers (n=10) and four focus groups with community-dwelling older adults (n=31). Results Older adult participants’ found the concept of self-monitoring unfamiliar and this influenced a narrowed interest in the use of wellness self-monitoring tools. On the other hand, health care provider participants showed open attitudes towards wellness monitoring tools for older adults and brainstormed about various stakeholders’ use cases. The two participant groups showed diverging perceptions in terms of: perceived uses, stakeholder interests, information ownership and control, and sharing of wellness monitoring tools. Conclusions Our paper provides implications and solutions for how older adults’ wellness self-monitoring tools can enhance patient-health care provider interaction, patient education, and improvement in overall wellness. PMID:24041452

  4. Multidimensional attitudes of emergency medicine residents toward older adults.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Teresita M; Chan, Shu B; Hansoti, Bhakti

    2014-07-01

    The demands of our rapidly expanding older population strain many emergency departments (EDs), and older patients experience disproportionately high adverse health outcomes. Trainee attitude is key in improving care for older adults. There is negligible knowledge of baseline emergency medicine (EM) resident attitudes regarding elder patients. Awareness of baseline attitudes can serve to better structure training for improved care of older adults. The objective of the study is to identify baseline EM resident attitudes toward older adults using a validated attitude scale and multidimensional analysis. Six EM residencies participated in a voluntary anonymous survey delivered in summer and fall 2009. We used factor analysis using the principal components method and Varimax rotation, to analyze attitude interdependence, translating the 21 survey questions into 6 independent dimensions. We adapted this survey from a validated instrument by the addition of 7 EM-specific questions to measures attitudes relevant to emergency care of elders and the training of EM residents in the geriatric competencies. Scoring was performed on a 5-point Likert scale. We compared factor scores using student t and ANOVA. 173 EM residents participated showing an overall positive attitude toward older adults, with a factor score of 3.79 (3.0 being a neutral score). Attitudes trended to more negative in successive post-graduate year (PGY) levels. EM residents demonstrate an overall positive attitude towards the care of older adults. We noted a longitudinal hardening of attitude in social values, which are more negative in successive PGY-year levels.

  5. Potentially inappropriate medications among older adults in Pelotas, Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Bárbara Heather; Miranda, Vanessa Irribarem Avena; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To assess the use of potentially inappropriate medications among older adults. METHODS This is a population-based cross-sectional study with 1,451 older individuals aged 60 years or more in the city of Pelotas, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in 2014. We have investigated the use of medications in the last 15 days. Using the Beers criteria (2012), we have verified the use of potentially inappropriate medications and their relationship with socioeconomic and demographic variables, polypharmacy, self-medication, and burden of disease. RESULTS Among the 5,700 medications used, 5,651 could be assessed as to being inappropriate. Of these, 937 were potentially inappropriate for the older adults according to the 2012 Beers criteria (16.6%). Approximately 42.4% of the older adults studied used at least one medication considered as potentially inappropriate. The group of medications for the nervous system accounted for 48.9% of the total of the potentially inappropriate medications. In the adjusted analysis, the variables female, advanced age, white race, low educational level, polypharmacy, self-medication, and burden of disease were associated with the use of potentially inappropriate medications. CONCLUSIONS It is important to known the possible consequences of the use of medication among older adults. Special attention should be given to the older adults who use polypharmacy. Specific lists should be created with more appropriate medications for the older population in the National Essential Medicine List. PMID:28658367

  6. The invisible elderly: lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Rita A; Vance, David E; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2013-11-01

    More than 2 million older adults identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT). The purpose of this article is to present an overview of the physical and mental health needs of LGBT older adults to sensitize nurses to the specific needs of this group. Nurses are in a prominent position to create health care environments that will meet the needs of this invisible, and often misunderstood, group of people. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Depressive symptoms among adolescents and older adults in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, Sergio; García-Peña, Carmen; González-Forteza, Catalina; Jiménez-Tapia, Alberto; Gallo, Joseph J; Wagner, Fernando A

    2014-06-01

    Determine the structure of depressive symptoms among adolescents and older adults through the person-centered approach of latent class analysis (LCA). The study is based on data from two independent samples collected in Mexico City (2,444 adolescents and 2,223 older adults) which included the revised version of the CES-D. The presence or absence of depressed mood (dysphoria), diminished pleasure (anhedonia), drastic change in weight, sleep problems, thinking and concentration difficulties, excessive or inappropriate guilt, fatigue, psychomotor agitation/retardation, and suicide ideation were used in LCA to determine the structure of depressive symptoms for adolescents and older adults. Adolescents reported higher excessive or inappropriate guilt compared to older adults, while older adults had higher proportions of anhedonia, sleep problems, fatigue, and psychomotor agitation/retardation. Similar proportions were found in other symptoms. The LCA analysis showed the best fit with four latent classes (LC): LC 1, "symptoms suggestive of major depressive episode (MDE)" with prevalence of 5.9 % (n = 144) and 10.3 % (n = 230) among adolescents and older adults, respectively; LC 2, "probable MDE symptoms" 18.2 % (n = 446) and 23.0 % (n = 512); LC 3, "possible MDE" 27.7 % (n = 676) and 21.8 % (n = 485); LC 4, "without significant depressive symptoms" 48.2 % (n = 1,178) and 44.8 % (n = 996). The differences in item thresholds between the two groups (adolescents vs. older adults) were statistically significant (Wald test = 255.684, df = 1, p < 0.001). This study documented important similarities and differences in the structure of depressive symptoms between adolescents and older adults that merit acknowledgment, further study, and consideration of their potential clinical and public health implications.

  8. Cardiovascular Screening and Primary Prevention in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Orkaby, Ariela R; Rich, Michael W

    2018-02-01

    Evidence for preventive screening and therapeutic intervention for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease is limited for older adults. In this article, we review screening and prevention strategies, including lifestyle, modifiable risk factors, and medications, that may be considered in older adults, with a focus on those ≥75 years, accounting for age, frailty and functional status, medical conditions, and life expectancy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Assessment and measurement of pain in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Keela A.; Garand, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Although the empirical base is still limited when providing clear directions for pain assessment and management in older adults, it is possible to identify recommendations for guiding practice based on consensus and a developing scientific base to support best practice activities. This article offers a brief overview of the epidemiology and consequences of pain, followed by a summary of issues and approaches relevant to pain assessment in older adults. Cohort specific recommendations for comprehensive pain assessment and measurement are then addressed. PMID:11459715

  10. Drug Burden Index in older adults: theoretical and practical issues

    PubMed Central

    Kouladjian, Lisa; Gnjidic, Danijela; Chen, Timothy F; Mangoni, Arduino A; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2014-01-01

    Anticholinergic and sedative medications are commonly used in older adults and are associated with adverse clinical outcomes. The Drug Burden Index was developed to measure the cumulative exposure to these medications in older adults and its impact on physical and cognitive function. This narrative review discusses the research and clinical applications of the Drug Burden Index, and its advantages and limitations, compared with other pharmacologically developed measures of high-risk prescribing. PMID:25246778

  11. Cognitive mechanisms of false facial recognition in older adults.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Emily C; Glisky, Elizabeth L; Bartlett, James C; Rapcsak, Steven Z

    2012-03-01

    Older adults show elevated false alarm rates on recognition memory tests involving faces in comparison to younger adults. It has been proposed that this age-related increase in false facial recognition reflects a deficit in recollection and a corresponding increase in the use of familiarity when making memory decisions. To test this hypothesis, we examined the performance of 40 older adults and 40 younger adults on a face recognition memory paradigm involving three different types of lures with varying levels of familiarity. A robust age effect was found, with older adults demonstrating a markedly heightened false alarm rate in comparison to younger adults for "familiarized lures" that were exact repetitions of faces encountered earlier in the experiment, but outside the study list, and therefore required accurate recollection of contextual information to reject. By contrast, there were no age differences in false alarms to "conjunction lures" that recombined parts of study list faces, or to entirely new faces. Overall, the pattern of false recognition errors observed in older adults was consistent with excessive reliance on a familiarity-based response strategy. Specifically, in the absence of recollection older adults appeared to base their memory decisions on item familiarity, as evidenced by a linear increase in false alarm rates with increasing familiarity of the lures. These findings support the notion that automatic memory processes such as familiarity remain invariant with age, while more controlled memory processes such as recollection show age-related decline.

  12. Kidney transplantation in the older adult.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Greg A

    2013-05-01

    The end-stage renal disease population is aging. Nearly half of all new patients are older than 65 years and one third are older than 70 years. Assessing the possibility of transplantation for older patients with end-stage renal disease often involves contemplating more complex issues, including cognitive impairment, decreased functional status, and frailty, which makes selecting appropriate candidates more difficult. Older transplant recipients have decreased patient and transplant survival compared with younger recipients. For example, 75% of deceased donor transplant recipients aged 30-49 years are alive after 5 years compared to only 61% for those older than 65 years. Despite poorer outcomes compared with younger recipients, older transplant recipients have a significant improvement in survival compared with similar patients who remain on the wait list, with decreases in mortality of 41%-61% depending on the study. Use of living donors, even older living donors, provides significantly better outcomes for elderly recipients compared with the use of deceased donors. However, in the absence of a living donor, survival is improved significantly by accepting an expanded criteria donor organ rather than waiting for a standard criteria deceased donor. Older transplant recipients experience more infectious complications and less acute rejection, but the risk of transplant loss from rejection is increased compared with younger patients. These immunologic issues, along with the fact that older patients often are excluded from transplant trials, have made selecting an ideal immunosuppressive regimen challenging. Prospective comparative trials of different agents in the elderly population are warranted to better define the risk-benefit profile. This review discusses transplantation outcomes, including patient and transplant survival, different donor types, quality of life, and immunosuppression for older dialysis patients. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc

  13. Oral Health in Low-Income Older Adults in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Shin; Kim, Hee-Gerl; Hur, Jung-Yi; Yang, Kyeongra

    2016-01-01

    Oral diseases among older adults are prevalent and a major public health problem, but public attention regarding this matter is quite limited. Many older adults experience limited access to oral care services. The study aimed to describe characteristics of oral health conditions, perceived oral health status, and oral health practices and to examine factors related to living status and accessibility to dental health care among 9,660 low-income older adults living in a suburban city in Korea. Approximately 42% of low-income older adults lived alone; 68% perceived their oral health as either excellent or good; and 31% reported difficulty accessing dental services. Lack of accessibility to oral care services was significantly more common in older adults with low incomes, living alone, having poor oral conditions, poor self-perceived oral health, and poor tooth-brushing behavior. Strategies to promote access to dental care services for underserved older adults should be developed to prevent further oral problems and their impact on overall health conditions.

  14. Health maintenance in older adults: combining evidence and individual preferences.

    PubMed

    Gestuvo, Maria Kristina

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in maintaining health and delaying disability for older adults as this population segment expands. And instead of focusing on a traditional disease-specific approach to health maintenance, there is an ongoing shift to a patient-centered approach, and defining outcomes based on the older adults' goals. In this approach, their goals and preferences are central, and other factors such as their health status and prognosis help determine which goals may be realistic. These subjective goals and objective characteristics are then balanced with the risks, benefits, and harms of established evidence-driven health-maintenance recommendations. Hence, older adults share their goals and preferences with clinicians; while clinicians share information on risks, benefits, harms, and uncertainties of existing health-maintenance recommendations, and help guide the older adult through how existing evidence can respond to their health goals and preferences. In this article, the concept of patient-centered care in the context of health maintenance for older adults is discussed; and health maintenance recommendations for older adults are reviewed. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  15. Dietary intake and nutritional status in cancer patients; comparing adults and older adults.

    PubMed

    Gómez Valiente da Silva, Henyse; Fonseca de Andrade, Camila; Bello Moreira, Annie Seixas

    2014-04-01

    Evaluate the nutrient intake and nutritional status of food in cancer patients admitted to a university hospital, with comparison of adult and older adult age category. Cross-sectional study. This study involved cancer patients admitted to a hospital in 2010. Dietary habits were collected using a Brazilian food frequency questionnaire. Participants were divided in two groups: adults or older adults and in 4-cancer category: hematologic, lung, gastrointestinal and others. Body Mass Index evaluated nutritional status. A total of 86 patients with a mean age of 56.5 years, with 55% males and 42% older adults were evaluated. The older adult category had a higher frequency of being underweight (24.4% vs 16.3%, p < 0.01) and a lower frequency of being overweight (7% vs. 15.1%, p < 0.01) than adults. Both, adult and older adults had a high frequency of smoking, alcohol consumption and physical inactivity. The older adults had lower consumption of calories, intake of iron and folic acid. Inadequacy of vitamin intake was observed in both groups; respectively, 52%, 43%, 95%, 76% and 88% for Vitamin A, C, D, E and folic acid. The older adults had a higher folic acid and calcium inadequacy than the adults (97% vs 82%, p <0.01; 88% vs 72%, p < 0.01). There was no association of micronutrient intake with cancer, nor with nutritional status. The food intake, macro and micronutrients ingestion is insufficient among cancer individuals. Food intake of older adults was inferior, when compared to the adult category. There was a high prevalence of BMI excess in the adult group and a worst nutritional status in the older adult category. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. Interventional Techniques for Management of Pain in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Amber K; Udoji, Mercy A

    2016-11-01

    Chronic pain in older patients is often treated with pain medications, physical rehabilitation, interventional pain management, and/or psychological interventions. The administration of pain medications is the most common form of chronic pain treatment. Physiologic changes in older adults make them more susceptible to the potential side effects of oral pain medications, especially opioids. Interventional pain management offers an alternative treatment option. This article reviews some of the interventional techniques used to treat the most common sites of pain in older adults: back, knee, and hip. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Digital Dating: Online Profile Content of Older and Younger Adults.

    PubMed

    Davis, Eden M; Fingerman, Karen L

    2016-11-01

    Older adults are utilizing online dating websites in increasing numbers. Adults of different ages may share motivations for companionship and affection, but dating profiles may reveal differences in adults' goals. Theories addressing age-related changes in motivation suggest that younger adults are likely to emphasize themselves, achievements, attractiveness, and sexuality. Older adults are likely to present themselves positively and emphasize their existing relationships and health. We collected 4,000 dating profiles from two popular websites to examine age differences in self-presentations. We used stratified sampling to obtain a sample equally divided by gender, aged 18-95 years. We identified 12 themes in the profiles using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count software (Pennebaker, Booth, & Francis, 2007). Regression analyses revealed that older adults were more likely to use first-person plural pronouns (e.g., we, our) and words associated with health and positive emotions. Younger adults were more likely to use first-person singular pronouns (e.g., I, my) and words associated with work and achievement. Findings suggest that younger adults enhance the "self" when seeking romantic partnership. In contrast, older adults are more positive in their profiles and focus more on connectedness and relationships to others. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Living Arrangements and Health of Older Adults in India.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Tannistha; Chen, Feinian; Vanneman, Reeve

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the association between the multigenerational household context and health of older adults in India, taking into account potential selection effects. Using data from the India Human Development Survey (2004-05), a nationally representative multitopic data set, we employed a two-step analytical strategy--logistic regression followed by propensity score stratification method--to model the effect of contrasting living arrangement types on short-term illness. Overall, older adults living in multigenerational households have the lowest levels of short-term illness. Among them, those who live with their spouse, adult children, and young grandchildren experience the highest health gains. Health advantage diminishes when older adults live only with a spouse and adult children, and further diminishes when they live only with their spouse. Solitary living is associated with the highest likelihood of short-term morbidity. Good health is also shown to be associated with household wealth, gender, household size, and urban residence. Our study demonstrates that multigenerational households--the traditional and the most dominant form of living arrangement in India--have protective health benefits for older adults, while taking into account potential selection mechanisms. On Contrary to some epidemiological studies, we do not find any elevated risk of exposure to short-term illness, when older adults are living in households with young grandchildren. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Physical activity behavior predicts endogenous pain modulation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Naugle, Kelly M; Ohlman, Thomas; Naugle, Keith E; Riley, Zachary A; Keith, NiCole R

    2017-03-01

    Older adults compared with younger adults are characterized by greater endogenous pain facilitation and a reduced capacity to endogenously inhibit pain, potentially placing them at a greater risk for chronic pain. Previous research suggests that higher levels of self-reported physical activity are associated with more effective pain inhibition and less pain facilitation on quantitative sensory tests in healthy adults. However, no studies have directly tested the relationship between physical activity behavior and pain modulatory function in older adults. This study examined whether objective measures of physical activity behavior cross-sectionally predicted pain inhibitory function on the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) test and pain facilitation on the temporal summation (TS) test in healthy older adults. Fifty-one older adults wore an accelerometer on the hip for 7 days and completed the CPM and TS tests. Measures of sedentary time, light physical activity (LPA), and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were obtained from the accelerometer. Hierarchical linear regressions were conducted to determine the relationship of TS and CPM with levels of physical activity, while controlling for demographic, psychological, and test variables. The results indicated that sedentary time and LPA significantly predicted pain inhibitory function on the CPM test, with less sedentary time and greater LPA per day associated with greater pain inhibitory capacity. Additionally, MVPA predicted pain facilitation on the TS test, with greater MVPA associated with less TS of pain. These results suggest that different types of physical activity behavior may differentially impact pain inhibitory and facilitatory processes in older adults.

  20. On the time course of attentional focusing in older adults.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Lisa N; Roggeveen, Alexa B; Enns, James T; Bennett, Patrick J; Sekuler, Allison B; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Many sensory and cognitive changes accompany normal ageing, including changes to visual attention. Several studies have investigated age-related changes in the control of attention to specific locations (spatial orienting), but it is unknown whether control over the distribution or breadth of attention (spatial focus) also changes with age. In the present study, we employed a dual-stream attentional blink task and assessed changes to the spatial distribution of attention through the joint consequences of temporal lag and spatial separation on second-target accuracy. Experiment 1 compared the rate at which attention narrows in younger (mean age 22.6, SD 4.25) and older (mean age 66.8, SD 4.36) adults. The results showed that whereas young adults can narrow attention to one stream within 133 ms, older adults were unable to do the same within this time period. Experiment 2 showed that older adults can narrow their attention to one stream when given more time (266 ms). Experiment 3 confirmed that age-related changes in retinal illuminance did not account for delayed attentional narrowing in older adults. Considered together, these experiments demonstrate that older adults can narrow their attentional focus, but that they are delayed in initiating this process compared to younger adults. This finding adds to previously reported reductions in attentional dynamics, deficits in inhibitory processes, and reductions in posterior parietal cortex function that accompany normal ageing.

  1. Top-down processing modulates older adults' susceptibility to noise.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Wythe L; Sample, Camille H; Hagan, Sarah E

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined older and younger adults' ability to use top-down processes to mitigate the effects of display noise during simple feature, visual search. As display noise levels increased, older adults (age 60-74 years, n = 32) exhibited greater top-down search reaction time (RT) benefits (bottom-up minus top-down search RT), compared to younger adults (age 18-27, n = 32). Older adults' ability to mitigate the effects of noise was further assessed with RT variability, as measured by intra-individual standard deviations across trials. Older adults again exhibited larger top-down benefits (i.e., less RT variability) compared to younger adults, and more so when display noise was present vs. absent. These results suggest a sparing of top-down processes with age (Madden, Whiting, Spaniol, & Bucur, 2005; Psychology and Aging, 20, 317), and that top-down processes in older adults enhance search efficiency by optimizing signal-to-noise ratios.

  2. Suicide in older adults: a comparison with middle-aged adults using the Queensland Suicide Register.

    PubMed

    Koo, Yu Wen; Kõlves, Kairi; De Leo, Diego

    2017-03-01

    Globally, suicide rates increase with age, being highest in older adults. This study analyzed differences in suicides in older adults (65 years and over) compared to middle-aged adults (35-64 years) in Queensland, Australia, during the years 2000-2012. The Queensland Suicide Register was utilized for the analysis. Annual suicide rates were calculated by gender and age group, and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were examined. In Queensland, the average annual rate of suicides for older adults was 15.27 per 100,000 persons compared to 18.77 in middle-aged adults in 2000-2012. There were no significant changes in time trends for older adults in 2002-2012. Suicide methods differed between gender and age groups. Older adults who died by suicide were more likely to be male, widowed, living alone or in a nursing home, and out of the work force. The prevalence of untreated psychiatric conditions, diagnosed psychiatric disorders, and consultations with a mental health professional three months prior to death was lower in older adults than middle-aged adults. Somatic illness, bereavement, and attention to suicide in the media were more common among older adults than middle-age adults. Older females were particularly more likely to pay attention to suicide in the media. Our findings show older adults who died by suicide were more likely to experience somatic illnesses, bereavement, and pay attention to suicide in the media compared to middle aged. Preventing suicide in older adults would therefore require holistic and comprehensive approaches.

  3. INTERACTIVE VIDEO DANCE GAMES FOR HEALTHY OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    STUDENSKI, S.; PERERA, S.; HILE, E.; KELLER, V.; SPADOLA-BOGARD, J.; GARCIA, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity promotes health in older adults but participation rates are low. Interactive video dance games can increase activity in young persons but have not been designed for use with older adults. The purpose of this research was to evaluate healthy older adults’ interest and participation in a dance game adapted for an older user. Methods Healthy older adults were recruited from 3 senior living settings and offered three months of training and supervision using a video dance game designed for older people. Before and after the program, data was collected on vital signs, physical function and self reported quality of life. Feedback was obtained during and after training. Results Of 36 persons who entered (mean age 80.1 ± 5.4 years, 83 % female), 25 completed the study. Completers were healthier than non completers. Completers showed gains in narrow walk time, self-reported balance confidence and mental health. While there were no serious adverse events, 4 of 11 non completers withdrew due to musculoskeletal complaints. Conclusions Adapted Interactive video dance is feasible for some healthy older adults and may help achieve physical activity goals. PMID:21125204

  4. Executive functioning in older adults with hoarding disorder.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Catherine R; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Schiehser, Dawn; Almklov, Erin; Golshan, Shahrokh; Saxena, Sanjaya

    2013-11-01

    Hoarding disorder (HD) is a chronic and debilitating psychiatric condition. Midlife HD patients have been found to have neurocognitive impairment, particularly in areas of executive functioning, but the extent to which this is due to comorbid psychiatric disorders has not been clear. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine executive functioning in geriatric HD patients without any comorbid Axis I disorders (n = 42) compared with a healthy older adult comparison group (n = 25). We hypothesized that older adults with HD would perform significantly worse on measures of executive functioning (Wisconsin Card Sort Task [Psychological Assessment Resources, Lutz, Florida, USA] ( Psychological Assessment Resources, 2003) and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV digit span and letter-number sequencing tests [Pearson, San Antonio, TX, USA]). Older adults with HD showed significant differences from healthy older controls in multiple aspects of executive functioning. Compared with healthy controls, older adults with HD committed significantly more total, non-perseverative errors and conceptual level responses on the Wisconsin Card Sort Task and had significantly worse performance on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV digit span and letter-number sequencing tests. Hoarding symptom severity was strongly correlated with executive dysfunction in the HD group. Compared with demographically-matched controls, older adults with HD have dysfunction in several domains of executive functioning including mental control, working memory, inhibition, and set shifting. Executive dysfunction is strongly correlated with hoarding severity and is not because of comorbid psychiatric disorders in HD patients. These results have broad clinical implications suggesting that executive functioning should be assessed and taken into consideration when developing intervention strategies for older adults with HD. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Assessing and Meeting the Needs of LGBT Older Adults via the Older Americans Act.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael; Tax, Aaron D

    2017-12-01

    SAGE and its partners have been focused on bridging the chasm between the greater need that LGBT older adults have for care, services, and supports, and the lower rate at which they access them, compared with their heterosexual and cisgender counterparts. The chasm is caused by discrimination, social isolation, disproportionate poverty and health disparities, and a lack of access to culturally competent providers. SAGE has used federal administrative and legislative advocacy to encourage the Aging Network to bridge this chasm by assessing and meeting the needs of LGBT older adults that can be addressed via the programs created under the Older Americans Act.

  6. Guidelines for the Productive Employment of Older Adults in Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Sally M.; And Others

    This publication offers guidelines that policymakers, advocates of children and older adults, and child care practitioners can use to provide older adults with opportunities to work in the child care field. Guidelines that address developmental issues relating to older adults concern employers' sensitivity to older adults and staffing patterns in…

  7. Encouraging homework completion among older adults in therapy.

    PubMed

    Coon, David W; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    2002-05-01

    A growing body of research suggests that homework assignments facilitate positive outcomes in psychotherapy. We describe a cognitive behavioral outpatient therapy that stresses the important role homework plays in psychotherapy outcomes and that is found to be successful for treating emotional distress in both older adults and family caregivers. Just as a number of barriers can make it difficult for older clients to commit to regular therapy appointments, a variety of factors can also influence their completion of homework. We also address key issues frequently encountered when fostering homework compliance among older adults and utilize case vignettes to illustrate successful approaches to address these barriers. We present basic tenets for effective homework completion regardless of age group as well as several methods to address homework challenges that we find to be particularly pertinent for therapists treating today's older adults. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Phenomenological Characteristics of Emotional Memories in Younger and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mickley, Katherine R.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Older adults sometimes show a “positivity effect” in memory, remembering proportionally more positive information than young adults. Using a modified Memory Characteristics, the present study examined whether emotional valence impacts the phenomenological qualities associated with young and older adults’ memories. Aging did not impact the effect of valence on the qualities of high-arousal memories. However, aging sometimes impacted subjective memory for detail of low-arousal memories: In Experiment 2, older adults reported remembering more thoughts, feelings, and temporal order details about positive low-arousal stimuli, while young adults’ ratings for those dimensions were higher for negative low-arousal stimuli. These findings suggest that valence most readily affects the qualities of young and older adults’ emotional memories when those memories are low in arousal. PMID:19468956

  9. Helping older adults find meaning and purpose through storytelling.

    PubMed

    Scott, Katie; DeBrew, Jacqueline Kayler

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a storytelling project that was designed to help community-dwelling older adults find meaning and purpose in their lives through reminiscing about the past. The storytelling project was successful not only for the older adults who participated but also for the nursing students, who were given an opportunity to learn about interviewing and communicating with older adults. The value of life review and storytelling as a nursing intervention became evident from this project. When time is taken to listen to the valuable stories and life lessons of the older population, nurses create a better understanding of their patients while their patients recall special memories and feel proud of their lives. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Domestic Robots for Older Adults: Attitudes, Preferences, and Potential

    PubMed Central

    Mitzner, Tracy L.; Beer, Jenay M.; Prakash, Akanksha; Chen, Tiffany L.; Kemp, Charles C.; Rogers, Wendy A.

    2014-01-01

    The population of older adults in America is expected to reach an unprecedented level in the near future. Some of them have difficulties with performing daily tasks and caregivers may not be able to match pace with the increasing need for assistance. Robots, especially mobile manipulators, have the potential for assisting older adults with daily tasks enabling them to live independently in their homes. However, little is known about their views of robot assistance in the home. Twenty-one independently living older Americans (65–93 years old) were asked about their preferences for and attitudes toward robot assistance via a structured group interview and questionnaires. In the group interview, they generated a diverse set of 121 tasks they would want a robot to assist them with in their homes. These data, along with their questionnaire responses, suggest that the older adults were generally open to robot assistance but were discriminating in their acceptance of assistance for different tasks. They preferred robot assistance over human assistance for tasks related to chores, manipulating objects, and information management. In contrast, they preferred human assistance to robot assistance for tasks related to personal care and leisure activities. Our study provides insights into older adults' attitudes and preferences for robot assistance with everyday living tasks in the home which may inform the design of robots that will be more likely accepted by older adults. PMID:25152779

  11. Risks of Combined Alcohol-Medication Use in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Alison A.; Whiteman, Elizabeth J.; Ward, Katherine T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many older adults drink alcohol and use medications that may be harmful when consumed together. Objective This article reviews the literature on alcohol and medication interactions with a focus on older adults. Methods Relevant articles were identified through a search of MEDLINE (1966-August 2006) for articles on alcohol medication interactions, diseases worsened by alcohol use, alcohol metabolism, absorption and distribution. Additional articles were identified by a manual search of the reference lists of the identified articles and review articles. Results Many older adults drink alcohol and take medications that may interact negatively with alcohol. Some of these interactions are due to age-related changes in the absorption, distribution and metabolism of alcohol and medications. Others are due to disulfiram-like reactions observed with some medications, exacerbation of therapeutic effects and adverse effects of medications when combined with alcohol, and alcohol’s interference with the effectiveness of some medications. Conclusions Older adults who drink alcohol and who take medications are at risk for a variety of harms depending on the amount of alcohol and the type of medications consumed. It is important for clinicians to know how much alcohol their older patients are drinking to be able to effectively assess their risks and to counsel them about safe use of alcohol and medications. Similarly, it is important for older adults to understand the potential risks of their combined alcohol and medication use to avoid the myriad of harms possible with unsafe use of these substances. PMID:17608249

  12. Why few older adults participate in complex motor skills: a qualitative study of older adults' perceptions of difficulty and challenge.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Katarina P; Steel, Kylie A; Macmillan, Freya; Olson, Rebecca; Merom, Dafna

    2015-11-26

    Maintaining neuromotor fitness across the life course is imperative. It can reduce falls in older individuals and improve/maintain physical and cognitive functioning. Complex motor skills (CMS) are involved in many physical activities (e.g., ball games, dance), which can improve neuromotor fitness. However, few older adults participate in CMS. This study aimed to understand how older adults perceive the degree of difficulty and challenge, using Gentile's taxonomy of motor skills as a framework. Six focus groups (FGs) were conducted with older adults (aged 61-92 years; N = 36) using a semi-structured question guide, to explore older adults' perceptions of difficulty and challenges associated with physical activity types. FGs were conducted in three villages and community groups in Sydney, Australia. Verbatim transcripts were coded inductively following a grounded theory approach to analysis to discover categories and concepts based on participants' views. Older adults perceived physical effort and pace as influencing difficulty where as challenging activities were not found to hinder older adults' willingness to participate. Other challenges in performing activities were attributed to: skill level, environment conditions (e.g., pool versus ocean swimming) and variations influencing complexity. Social and interpersonal issues, such as embarrassment, rapport with instructors, prior experience/ familiarity, in addition to physical effort, were other central features of older adults' perceptions of physical activities. Themes that appeared to increase the likelihood of participation in CMS were: age appropriate modification; enjoyment; social aspects; past experience; and having experienced instructors. This study offers recommendations for increasing participation in CMS. Modifying activities to suit ability and age and increasing exposure during the life span may help maintain participation into old age. Gentile's taxonomy provides an appropriate framework for

  13. Incidence of Dementia in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strydom, Andre; Chan, Trevor; King, Michael; Hassiotis, Angela; Livingston, Gill

    2013-01-01

    Dementia may be more common in older adults with intellectual disability (ID) than in the general population. The increased risk for Alzheimer's disease in people with Down syndrome (DS) is well established, but much less is known about dementia in adults with ID who do not have DS. We estimated incidence rates from a longitudinal study of…

  14. Health Literacy, Social Support, and Health Status among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Arozullah, Ahsan M.; Cho, Young Ik; Crittenden, Kathleen; Vicencio, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The study examines whether social support interacts with health literacy in affecting the health status of older adults. Health literacy is assessed using the short version of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Social support is measured with the Medical Outcome Study social support scale. Results show, unexpectedly, that rather…

  15. Older Adults' Perceptions of Closeness in Sibling Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Helgola G.; And Others

    Decreasing numbers of peers in the lives of older adults give a special meaning to closeness in their sibling relationships. Interviews elicited perceptions of closeness from 30 adults. Content analyses revealed several patterns, i.e., participants perceived themselves as always having been close, as having grown more or less close over time, or…

  16. Perceptions of Physical Activity by Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancey, Jonine M.; Clarke, Ann; Howat, Peter; Maycock, Bruce; Lee, Andy H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To identify issues and perceptions concerning physical activity in older adults. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Perth, Western Australia. Methods: Sixteen adults aged 65 to 74 years were interviewed in their own homes using a semi-structured interview schedule. Data were analysed using a descriptive qualitative methodology.…

  17. Educating Older Adults: Discourses, Ideologies & Policies 1999-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This article tells the story of policies relevant to education, ageism and older adults between 1999 and 2005. It follows an article published in a previous "New Zealand Journal of Adult Learning" that described and critiqued policy developments between the 1980s and 2001. The story is located in the context of ongoing historical…

  18. Creative Ageing? Selfhood, Temporality and the Older Adult Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabeti, Shari

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on a long-term ethnography of an adult creative writing class situated in a major urban art gallery in the United Kingdom. It takes the claims of one group of older adults--that creative writing made them "feel younger"--as the starting point for exploring this connection further. It places these claims broadly within…

  19. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  20. Written Language Comprehension in Younger and Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Joyce L.; Rogers, Wendy A.; Qualls, Constance D.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined effects of text genre and repeated reading on written language comprehension in younger (mean age 21) and older (mean age 72) healthy adults. Although reading time was significantly faster for younger adults, there were appreciable influences of text genre and repeated reading on measures of text processing and comprehension in…

  1. "Family Comes First!" Relationships with family and friends in Italian emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Meeus, Wim

    2014-12-01

    We conducted two studies to examine relationships with family and friends in Italian emerging adults, paying attention to the potential moderating role of gender and occupational status. In Study I, we aimed at capturing emerging adults' perspective on interactions with both family and friends by means of a qualitative approach. Participants were 39 emerging adults (51% males), who were interviewed individually or within a focus group. In Study II, we sought to examine how family and friend importance to identity were related to life satisfaction through a quantitative approach. Participants were 474 (47.3% males) emerging adults who filled a self-report questionnaire. Overall, findings indicated solid family ties and a strong impact of family importance to identity for life satisfaction. Results were independent of gender and occupational status (university students vs. workers). Thus, findings highlighted that in the Italian context young people's transition to adulthood is strongly intertwined with family relationships. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient Portal Use and Experience Among Older Adults: Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi-Tang, Dawn K; Bosold, Alyssa L; Choi, Yong K; Turner, Anne M

    2017-10-16

    The older adult population (65 years or older) in the United States is growing, and it is important for communities to consider ways to support the aging population. Patient portals and electronic personal health records (ePHRs) are technologies that could better serve populations with the highest health care needs, such as older adults. The aim of this study was to assess the existing research landscape related to patient portal and ePHR use and experience among older adults and to understand the benefits and barriers to older adults' use and adoption of patient portals and ePHRs. We searched six pertinent bibliographic databases for papers, published from 2006 to 2016 and written in English, that focused on adults 60 years or older and their use of or experience with patient portals or ePHRs. We adapted preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines to review papers based on exclusion and inclusion criteria. We then applied thematic analysis to identify key themes around use, experience, and adoption. We retrieved 199 papers after an initial screening and removal of duplicate papers. Then we applied an inclusion and exclusion criteria, resulting in a final set of 17 papers that focused on 15 separate projects. The majority of papers described studies involving qualitative research, including interviews and focus groups. They looked at the experience and use of ePHRs and patient portals. Overall, we found 2 main barriers to use: (1) privacy and security and (2) access to and ability to use technology and the Internet. We found 2 facilitators: (1) technical assistance and (2) family and provider advice. We also reported on older adults' experience, including satisfaction with the system and improvement of the quality of their health care. Several studies captured features that older adults wanted from these systems such as further assistance managing health-related tasks and contextual health advice and tips. More research is

  3. [Wellbeing of Chilean older adults is associated with group participation].

    PubMed

    Palma-Candia, Oskarina; Hueso-Montoro, César; Ortega-Valdivieso, Azucena; Montoya-Juárez, Rafael; Cruz-Quintana, Francisco

    2016-10-01

    Subjective aspects such as personal growth and the development of their potential are relevant for the perception of wellbeing of older adults. These dimensions appear to be connected with meaningful group participation. To assess the perception of psychological wellbeing of older adults in a Chilean region and determine its association with socio-demographic variables and participation in organizations. Ryff's scale of psychological wellbeing perception was applied to 101 adults (43 men) from Magallanes, aged 60 and 88 years. Sociodemographic data was also collected. Mean wellbeing scores reported were 193.7 ± 20 (maximum score: 234). Those older adults who participated in organizations had higher scores than those who did not take part in them. Participation in organizations appeared to be specifically associated to positive relationships (p = 0.03) and personal growth (p < 0.01). The number of organizations in which older adults participated was positively correlated with the perception of wellbeing (p < 0.01). Greater personal wellbeing was associated with leadership roles in organizations (p = 0.01). Significant differences between level of schooling and personal growth (p = 0.01) were also observed found. There were no differences associated with sex, age and marital status. The perception of wellbeing of older adults is influenced by their participation in organizations. Leadership is associated with the highest levels of wellbeing.

  4. Dental care utilization among North Carolina rural older adults.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Savoca, Margaret R; Anderson, Andrea M; Chen, Haiying; Gilbert, Gregg H; Bell, Ronny A; Leng, Xiaoyan; Reynolds, Teresa; Quandt, Sara A

    2012-01-01

    This analysis delineates the predisposing, need, and enabling factors that are associated with regular and recent dental care in a multiethnic sample of rural older adults. A cross-sectional, comprehensive, oral-health survey conducted with a random, multiethnic (African American, American Indian, white) sample of 635 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and older was completed in two rural southern counties. Logistic regression models assessed the simultaneous associations of dental care with predisposing, enabling, and need factors. Almost no edentulous rural older adults received dental care; 27.1 percent of dentate rural older adults had received regular dental care, and 36.7 percent had received recent dental care. Predisposing (less than high-school education, dental anxiety), enabling (no regular place for dental care), and need factors (no filled teeth) reduced the odds of regular dental, while predisposing (dental anxiety), enabling (no regular place for dental care), and need factors (no filled teeth) reduced the odds of recent dental care. Having excellent, very good, or good self-rated oral health increased the odds of receiving regular and recent dental care. Regular and recent dental care are infrequent among rural older adults. Contrary to expectations, those not receiving dental care are those who most need care; this has been referred to as the Paradox of Dental Need. Community access to dental care and the ability of older adults to pay for dental care must be addressed by public-health policy to improve the health and quality of life of older adults in rural communities. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  5. Neighborhood safety, socioeconomic status, and physical activity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Tucker-Seeley, Reginald D; Subramanian, S V; Li, Yi; Sorensen, Glorian

    2009-09-01

    Neighborhood environment can have a substantial influence on the level of physical activity among older adults. Yet, the moderating influence of various measures of SES on the association between perceived neighborhood safety and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) among older adults remains unknown. The study was designed to investigate the association between perceived neighborhood safety and LTPA in a nationally representative sample of older adults, and to evaluate SES characteristics as potential effect modifiers in the association between perceived neighborhood safety and LTPA. Cross-sectional data from the 2004 Health and Retirement Study of older adults aged >or=50 years were used to examine the association between perceived neighborhood safety and LTPA. Differences in LTPA were evaluated across three measures of SES: education, household income, and household wealth. SES was also evaluated as a potential effect modifier in the association between perceived neighborhood safety and LTPA. The analysis was conducted in 2008. An SES gradient in LTPA was noted across measures of SES used in this study. After controlling for SES and demographic characteristics and functional limitations, older adults who perceived their neighborhood as safe had an 8% higher mean rate of LTPA compared to older adults who perceived their neighborhood as unsafe. The association was no longer significant when self-rated health was added. Additionally, SES was not a significant effect modifier in the association between perceived neighborhood safety and LTPA. SES, demographic characteristics, and functional limitations substantially attenuated the positive association between perceived neighborhood safety and LTPA; however, with the inclusion of self-rated health, the association was no longer present. This finding suggests that self-rated health may mediate this association. The lack of significance in the interaction between perceived neighborhood safety and SES suggests that

  6. Older adults' intrinsic and extrinsic motivation toward physical activity.

    PubMed

    Dacey, Marie; Baltzell, Amy; Zaichkowsky, Len

    2008-01-01

    To examine how motives discriminate 3 physical activity levels of inactive, active, and sustained maintainers. Six hundred forty-five adults (M age = 63.8) completed stage-of-change and Exercise Motivations Inventory (EMI-2) scales. Exploratory factor analysis established psychometric properties of the EMI-2 suitable for older adults. Six factors emerged in the EMI-2: health and fitness, social/emotional benefits, weight management, stress management, enjoyment, and appearance. Enjoyment contributed most to differentiating activity levels. Moderators of age and gender were delineated. Intrinsic motivation and self-determined extrinsic motivation distinguish older adults' activity levels.

  7. Motivations of older Chinese adult learners in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyi; Fu, Yuanyuan; Chui, Ernest W T

    2016-01-01

    Motivation for learning, as an important aspect pertaining to studying the phenomenon of elder learning, is not fully explored in Hong Kong. This study was designed to create a measurement to investigate the possible diversity of motivations of elder learners, so as to harness the older people's potential in learning and thus capitalize on productive ageing. 283 older learners participating in learning activities at elder centres were interviewed. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to identify the latent factors in the learning motivation scale. Reliability of the scale was assessed. ANOVA testing was used to assess for differences in learning motivation by different socio-demographic variables. Four dimensions of older Chinese adults' motivations for engaging in learning have been found: 'keeping up with and contributing to society', 'fulfilment', 'social integration' and 'reemployment'. Elders with higher education levels were more likely to seek out opportunities for lifelong learning. Younger (aged 55 to 64) participants of learning activities were more likely than their older (aged 75 or above) counterparts to learn for fulfillment. Older adults who had volunteer experience were more motivated to engage in learning through keeping up with and contributing to society. Older learners in Hong Kong participated in learning for self-fulfilment and development, contributing to society, maintaining social connection, and acquisition of knowledge and qualifications for possible (re)employment. Some of their socio-demographic features might influence their motivations. Learning programmes could be designed and improved based on older adults' motivations to meet their needs.

  8. Strategies used by older adults to change travel direction.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jason R; Adkin, Allan L; Vallis, Lori Ann

    2007-03-01

    A distinct body reorientation strategy during steering tasks has been reported in young adults. As challenges to whole-body stability in older adults occur when navigating complex environments, this study was designed to examine control strategies used by older adults to initiate a voluntary change in travel direction. Thirteen older adults, recruited from an independent living division of a local retirement residence, were instrumented with reflective markers and whole-body kinematic data were monitored using a video camera (30 Hz). Participants executed self-paced walking trials 3-m along a straight path and were instructed prior to the trial to continue either straight ahead or randomly turn 40 degrees left or right and continue walking for an additional 2-m. Timing of changes with respect to when the trunk crossed the turning point were calculated for deviations in head and trunk position and foot rotation in the medial-lateral plane. Older adults reoriented themselves into the new travel direction in a top-down, segmental sequence, beginning with head reorientation followed by trunk reorientation, foot rotation and foot displacement into the new travel direction. These changes were initiated over two or more steps 69% of the time and over one step 31% of the time. A significant relationship between turning strategy used and balance confidence was observed; the frequency of using a turning strategy involving two or more steps to initiate a change in travel direction increased as balance confidence decreased. Older adults made segmental changes to voluntarily reorient themselves in a new travel direction in a similar sequence to that observed in young adults. Older adults chose primarily to initiate these changes two or more steps prior to the turn; the selection of this strategy was related to balance confidence.

  9. Strategies for Preventing Cognitive Decline in Healthy Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Julie A

    2017-11-01

    Many advances have been made in the understanding of age-related changes in cognition. As research details the cognitive and neurobiological changes that occur in aging, there is increased interest in developing and understanding methods to prevent, slow, or reverse the cognitive decline that may occur in normal healthy older adults. The Institute of Medicine has recently recognized cognitive aging as having important financial and public health implications for society with the increasing older adult population worldwide. Cognitive aging is not dementia and does not result in the loss of neurons but rather changes in neurotransmission that affect brain functioning. The fact that neurons are structurally intact but may be functionally affected by increased age implies that there is potential for remediation. This review article presents recent work using medication-based strategies for slowing cognitive changes in aging. The primary method presented is a hormonal approach for affecting cognition in older women. In addition, a summary of the work examining modifiable lifestyle factors that have shown promise in benefiting cognition in both older men and women is described. Much work remains to be done so that evidence-based recommendations can be made for slowing cognitive decline in healthy older adults. The success of some of these methods thus far indicates that the brains of healthy older adults are plastic enough to be able to respond to these cognitive decline prevention strategies, and further work is needed to define the most beneficial methods.

  10. Suvorexant for insomnia in older adults: a perspective review.

    PubMed

    Tampi, Rajesh R; Manikkara, Geetha; Balachandran, Silpa; Taparia, Piyush; Hrisko, Stephanie; Srinivasan, Shilpa; Tampi, Deena J

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify published randomized control trials (RCTs) that evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of suvorexant for the treatment of insomnia among older adults (≥65 years). A literature search was conducted of PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Cochrane collaboration databases for RCTs in any language evaluating suvorexant for the treatment of insomnia in older adults. Additionally, references of full-text articles that were included in this review were searched for further studies. Data from three RCTs of suvorexant were included in this review. All the three studies fulfilled the criteria for being of good quality based on the items listed by the Center for Evidence Based Medicine (CEBM) for the assessment of RCTs. None of the three studies were conducted exclusively among older adults. However, they also included older individuals diagnosed with primary insomnia. These studies included a total of 1298 participants aged ≥65 years in age. Trial durations ranged from 3 months to 1 year. Available data from these studies indicate that suvorexant improves multiple subjective and polysomnographic sleep parameters for sleep onset and maintenance among older individuals with a diagnosis of primary insomnia and is generally well tolerated. Current evidence, although limited, indicates that suvorexant benefits older adults with primary insomnia and is generally well tolerated.

  11. Negotiating Depression Treatment with Older Adults: Primary Care Providers’ Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wittink, Marsha N.; Givens, Jane L.; Knott, Kathryn A.; Coyne, James C.; Barg, Frances K.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Whether and how primary care providers consider older patients’ perceptions of depression may have an impact on patients’ acceptance of treatment. AIM To explore how physicians view and experience the process of discussing depression diagnosis and care with older adults. METHOD Semi-structured interviews conducted with 15 providers involved with intervention studies of depression management for older adults. We used the constant comparative method to identify themes related to negotiating the diagnosis and treatment of depression with older adults. RESULTS Providers felt that older patients often attribute depression to non-medical causes. They talked about the challenges of treating older adults and described the need to “convince” them of the medical model of depression to enter them into standard treatment (medication). CONCLUSION How primary care physicians surmise patients’ views of depression may influence whether and how depression is discussed in practice. Given that they most often provide medication for depression treatment, some may feel compelled to convince their patients of biomedical explanations while others may avoid treating depression altogether. DECLARATION OF INTEREST Dr. Marsha Wittink was supported by an NIMH Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (MH073658). Provider interviews were funded by the Advanced Center for Interventions and Services Research of the University of Pennsylvania. PMID:21780938

  12. Prescription of benzodiazepines for adults and older adults from a mental health clinic.

    PubMed

    Naloto, Daniele Cristina Comino; Lopes, Francine Cristiane; Barberato Filho, Silvio; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Del Fiol, Fernando de Sá; Bergamaschi, Cristiane de Cássia

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare benzodiazepine (bzd) prescriptions for adults and older adults regarding appropriate use indicator. It is a cross-sectional study for collecting data on patients treated at the City's Mental Health Clinic in Sorocaba/SP, between March and December 2013. Appropriate use indicators were used: appropriate drug, with adequate posology and period of use; as well as the use of a single bzd, as anxiolytic for less than 3 months in depression treatment with antidepressants, use for less than 2 months if associated to an antidepressant and no use of long-acting bzd in older adults. From the 330 participants, most were women, with a family history of mental disorders and bzd use, without monitoring of a psychologist and using other psychotropic and polypharmacy (p>0.05).The minority of prescriptions had indication for the use of bzd (37.5% for older adults and 32.4% for adults) (p>0.05). Only 5.8% of the prescriptions for older adults and 1.9 for adults were rational (p>0.05). The chronic use was observed in all adults and older adults with depressive and anxiety disorders (p>0.05). A minority of prescriptions for adults and older adults was appropriate.

  13. Anticoagulation in Older Adults with Multimorbidity.

    PubMed

    Parks, Anna L; Fang, Margaret C

    2016-05-01

    The number of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who are of advanced age or have multiple comorbidities is expected to increase substantially. Older patients with AF generally gain a net benefit from anticoagulation. Guidelines typically recommend anticoagulation. There are multiple challenges in the safe use of anticoagulation in frail patients, including bleeding risk, monitoring and adherence, and polypharmacy. Although there are options for chronic oral anticoagulation, clinicians must understand the unique advantages and disadvantages of these medications when developing a management plan. This article reviews issues surrounding the appropriate use and selection of anticoagulants in complex older patients with AF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lack of immunity against rubella among Italian young adults.

    PubMed

    Gallone, Maria Serena; Gallone, Maria Filomena; Larocca, Angela Maria Vittoria; Germinario, Cinzia; Tafuri, Silvio

    2017-03-07

    To support the evaluation of the 2010-15 National Plan for Measles and Congenital Rubella Elimination, the authors designed and performed a serosurveillance survey to verify the immunity/susceptibility rate against rubella among Apulian young adults. The study was carried out from May 2011 to June 2012 in the Department of Transfusion Medicine/Blood Bank of Policlinico General Hospital in Bari. Subjects were enrolled by a convenience sampling. For each enrolled patient a 5 ml serum sample was collected and tested for anti-rubella IgG. The geometrical means (GMT) of anti-rubella IgG was calculated. T student test or ANOVA test, when appropriate, was used to compare the means of age per gender and GMT of anti-rubella IgG titres per age classes. Chi-square test was used to compare the proportion of anti-rubella IgG positive subjects per gender and per age classes. For all tests, a p value <0.05 was considered as significant. At the end of the study 1764 subjects were enrolled, 1362 (77.2%) of which were male. The mean age was 38.4 ± 11.7 years (range: 17-65). 86.7% (95% CI = 85.0-88.2) had a positive titre of anti-rubella IgG. GMT of anti-rubella IgG titre was 4.3. The proportion of positive subjects was of 76.8% (n = 279/363; 95% CI = 72.2-81.1) in persons aged 18-26 years; 88.1% (n = 310/352; 95% CI = 84.2-91.3) in 27-35 year-old people; 88.5% (n = 464/524; 95% CI = 85.5-91.1) in 36-45 year-old people; 90.7% (n = 350/386; 95% CI = 87.3-93.4) among people aged 46-55 years and 90.6% (n = 126/139; 95% CI = 84.5-94.9) in 55-65 year-old people (Chi-square = 39.7; p < 0.0001). GMT of anti-rubella IgG titre was 4.3 (4.3 in male and 4.2 in female, t = 2.2; p = 0.03) and seems to differ dividing the enrolled subjects by age group (F = 14.3; p < 0.0001). According to our data, too many women of child-bearing age are still unprotected from rubella in the elimination era and in this scenario the public

  15. Systematic Review of Falls in Older Adults with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wildes, Tanya M; Dua, Priya; Fowler, Susan A.; Miller, J. Philip; Carpenter, Christopher R.; Avidan, Michael S.; Stark, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives lder adults frequently experience falls, at great cost to themselves and society. Older adults with cancer may be at greater risk for falls and have unique risk factors. Materials and Methods We undertook a systematic review of the available medical literature to examine the current evidence regarding factors associated with falls in older adults with cancer. PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, CENTRAL, DARE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and clinical trials.gov were searched using standardized terms for concepts of oncology/cancer, people 60 and older, screening, falls and diagnosis. Eligible studies included cohort or case-control studies or clinical trials in which all patients, or a subgroup of patients, had a diagnosis of cancer and in which falls were either the primary or secondary outcome. Results We identified 31 studies that met our inclusion criteria. Several studies suggest that falls are more common in older adults with a diagnosis of cancer than those without. Among the 11 studies that explored factors associated with outpatient falls, some risk factors for falls established in the general population were also associated with falls in older adults with cancer, including dependence in activities of daily living and prior falls. Other factors associated with falls in a general population, such as age, polypharmacy and opioid use, were not predictive of falls among oncology populations. Falls among older adults with cancer in the inpatient setting were associated with established risk factors for falls in people without cancer, but also with factors unique to an oncology population, such as brain metastases. Conclusions Falls in older adults with cancer are more common than in the general population, and are associated with risk factors unique to people with cancer. Further study is needed to establish methods of screening older adults with cancer for fall risk and ultimately implement interventions to reduce their risk of falls. Identifying

  16. Loneliness in older adults is associated with diminished cortisol output.

    PubMed

    Schutter, N; Holwerda, T J; Stek, M L; Dekker, J J M; Rhebergen, D; Comijs, H C

    2017-04-01

    Loneliness in older adults has been associated with increased mortality and health problems. One of the assumed underlying mechanisms is dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPA-axis). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether loneliness in older adults is associated with HPA-axis dysregulation and whether this association differs between depressed and non-depressed persons. Cross-sectional data of 426 lonely and non-lonely older adults in the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons (NESDO) were used. Linear regression analyses and multinominal logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between loneliness and morning cortisol, cortisol awakening response, diurnal slope and dexamethasone suppression ratio. In all analyses, confounders were introduced. In order to examine whether the association between loneliness and cortisol measures is different in depressed versus non-depressed persons, an interaction term for loneliness x depression diagnosis was tested. Cortisol output in the first hour after awakening and dexamethasone suppression ratio was lower in lonely participants. There were no significant interactions between loneliness and depression diagnosis in the association with the cortisol measures. This study is the first to investigate the association between the HPA-axis and loneliness in a large group of older adults aged 60-93years. We found lower cortisol output in the first hour after awakening and lower dexamethasone suppression ratio in lonely older depressed and non-depressed adults. Whether diminished cortisol output is the underlying mechanism that leads to health problems in lonely older adults is an interesting object for further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Improving Quality and Value of Cancer Care for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Ramsdale, Erika E; Csik, Valerie; Chapman, Andrew E; Naeim, Arash; Canin, Beverly

    2017-01-01

    The concepts of quality and value have become ubiquitous in discussions about health care, including cancer care. Despite their prominence, these concepts remain difficult to encapsulate, with multiple definitions and frameworks emerging over the past few decades. Defining quality and value for the care of older adults with cancer can be particularly challenging. Older adults are heterogeneous and often excluded from clinical trials, severely limiting generalizable data for this population. Moreover, many frameworks for quality and value focus on traditional outcomes of survival and toxicity and neglect goals that may be more meaningful for older adults, such as quality of life and functional independence. A history of quality and value standards and an evaluation of some currently available standards and frameworks elucidate the potential gaps in application to older adults with cancer. However, narrowing the focus to processes of care presents several opportunities for improving the care of older adults with cancer now, even while further work is ongoing to evaluate outcomes and efficiency. New models of care, including the patient-centered medical home, as well as new associated bundled payment models, would be advantageous for older adults with cancer, facilitating collaboration, communication, and patient-centeredness and minimizing the fragmentation that impairs the current provision of cancer care. Advances in information technology support the foundation for these models of care; these technologies facilitate communication, increase available data, support shared decision making, and increase access to multidisciplinary specialty care. Further work will be needed to define and to continue to tailor processes of care to achieve relevant outcomes for older patients with cancer to fulfill the promise of quality and value of care for this vulnerable and growing population.

  18. Bridging the digital divide in older adults: a study from an initiative to inform older adults about new technologies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya-Huei; Damnée, Souad; Kerhervé, Hélène; Ware, Caitlin; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2015-01-01

    In a society where technology progresses at an exponential rate, older adults are often unaware of the existence of different kinds of information and communication technologies (ICTs). To bridge the gap, we launched a 2-year project, during which we conducted focus groups (FGs) with demonstrations of ICTs, allowing older adults to try them out and to share their opinions. This study aimed at investigating how participants perceived this kind of initiative and how they reacted to different kinds of ICTs. In total, 14 FGs were conducted with community-dwelling older adults, with a frequency of two FGs on the same topic once per trimester. Twenty-three older adults (four men and 19 women) attended at least one FG but only nearly half of them were regular attendants (ten participating in at least five sessions). Age of participants ranged from 63 years to 88 years, with a mean of 77.1 years. All of them had completed secondary education. The analyses of the data were performed according to inductive thematic analysis. Four overarching themes emerged from the analysis. The first concerned participants' motivation for and assessment of the project. The second theme identified the underlying factors of the "digital divide" between the younger and the older generations. The third theme concerned the factors of technology adoption among older adults. The fourth one identified participants' attitudes toward assistive ICTs, designed specifically for older adults ("gerontechnologies"). This project encouraging older adults to be informed about different kinds of ICTs was positively rated. With regard to ICTs, participants perceived a digital divide. The underlying factors are generation/cohort effects, cognitive and physical decline related to aging, and negative attitudes toward technologies. However, more and more older adults adopt different kinds of ICTs in order to fit in with the society. Concerning assistive ICTs, they manifested a lack of perceived need and usefulness

  19. Bridging the digital divide in older adults: a study from an initiative to inform older adults about new technologies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ya-Huei; Damnée, Souad; Kerhervé, Hélène; Ware, Caitlin; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In a society where technology progresses at an exponential rate, older adults are often unaware of the existence of different kinds of information and communication technologies (ICTs). To bridge the gap, we launched a 2-year project, during which we conducted focus groups (FGs) with demonstrations of ICTs, allowing older adults to try them out and to share their opinions. This study aimed at investigating how participants perceived this kind of initiative and how they reacted to different kinds of ICTs. Patients and methods In total, 14 FGs were conducted with community-dwelling older adults, with a frequency of two FGs on the same topic once per trimester. Twenty-three older adults (four men and 19 women) attended at least one FG but only nearly half of them were regular attendants (ten participating in at least five sessions). Age of participants ranged from 63 years to 88 years, with a mean of 77.1 years. All of them had completed secondary education. The analyses of the data were performed according to inductive thematic analysis. Results Four overarching themes emerged from the analysis. The first concerned participants’ motivation for and assessment of the project. The second theme identified the underlying factors of the “digital divide” between the younger and the older generations. The third theme concerned the factors of technology adoption among older adults. The fourth one identified participants’ attitudes toward assistive ICTs, designed specifically for older adults (“gerontechnologies”). Discussions and conclusion This project encouraging older adults to be informed about different kinds of ICTs was positively rated. With regard to ICTs, participants perceived a digital divide. The underlying factors are generation/cohort effects, cognitive and physical decline related to aging, and negative attitudes toward technologies. However, more and more older adults adopt different kinds of ICTs in order to fit in with the society

  20. Older Adults Do Not Notice Their Names: A New Twist to a Classic Attention Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Kilb, Angela; Maddox, Geoffrey B.; Thomas, Jenna; Fine, Hope C.; Chen, Tina; Cowan, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Although working memory spans are, on average, lower for older adults than young adults, we demonstrate in 5 experiments a way in which older adults paradoxically resemble higher capacity young adults. Specifically, in a selective-listening task, older adults almost always failed to notice their names presented in an unattended channel. This is an…

  1. Major depressive and anxiety disorders in visually impaired older adults.

    PubMed

    van der Aa, Hilde P A; Comijs, Hannie C; Penninx, Brenda W J H; van Rens, Ger H M B; van Nispen, Ruth M A

    2015-01-20

    We assessed the prevalence of subthreshold depression and anxiety, and major depressive, dysthymic, and anxiety disorders (panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, and general anxiety disorder) in visually impaired older adults and compared these estimates with those of normally sighted peers. Cross-sectional data were analyzed based on telephone interviews with visually impaired older adults aged ≥ 60 years (n = 615) with a visual acuity of ≥ 0.30 logMAR (20/40 Snellen) in the best eye from outpatient low vision rehabilitation centers, and face-to-face interviews with community-dwelling normally sighted peers (n = 1232). To determine prevalence rates, the normally sighted population was weighted on sex and age to fit the visually impaired population. Logistic regression analyses were used to compare the populations and to correct for confounders. The prevalence of major depressive disorder (5.4%) and anxiety disorders (7.5%), as well as the prevalence of subthreshold depression (32.2%) and subthreshold anxiety (15.6%), were significantly higher in visually impaired older adults compared to their normally sighted peers (P < 0.05). Agoraphobia and social phobia were the most prevalent anxiety disorders in visually impaired older adults. This study shows that depression and anxiety are major public health problems in visually impaired older adults. Research on psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic interventions to improve depression and anxiety in this population is warranted. (http://www.trialregister.nl number, NTR3296.). Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  2. Substance abuse treatment for older adults in private centers.

    PubMed

    Rothrauff, Tanja C; Abraham, Amanda J; Bride, Brian E; Roman, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    By 2020, an estimated 4.4 million older adults will require substance abuse treatment compared to 1.7 million in 2000-01. This study examined the availability of special services for older adults, adoption of recommended treatment approaches, and organizational characteristics of centers that offer special services. Data were collected via face-to-face interviews with administrators and/or clinical directors from a nationally representative sample of 346 private treatment centers participating in the 2006-07 National Treatment Center Study. Results indicated that only 18% provided special services for older adults; age-specific recommendations were generally adopted; more older adult-specialty centers offered prescription drug addiction treatment, primary medical care, and housing assistance. The proportion of patients with Medicare payment predicted availability of special services. As more older adults will seek help with a myriad of substance use disorders (SUDs) over the next decade, treatment centers need to get ready for a plethora of challenges as well as unique opportunities for growth.

  3. Exercise and Sleep in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junxin; Gooneratne, Nalaka

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia and other sleep complaints are highly prevalent in community-dwelling older adults yet often go under detected. Age-related physiological changes may affect sleep, but sleep disturbances and complaints should not be considered normal in this population. Various physiological, psychological, and social consequences have been associated with insomnia and sleep complaints. Treatment options are available so it is imperative to diagnose and treat these individuals to promote healthy aging. Exercise is known to have a wide variety of health benefits, but unfortunately most older adults engage in less exercise with advancing age. This paper describes age-related changes in sleep, clinical correlates of insomnia, consequences of untreated insomnia, and nonpharmacological treatments for insomnia in older adults, with a focus on the relationship between exercise and sleep in community-dwelling older adults with insomnia or sleep complaints. Possible mechanisms explaining the relationship between exercise and sleep are discussed. While the research to date shows promising evidence for exercise as a safe and effective treatment for insomnia and sleep complaints in community-dwelling older adults, future research is needed before exercise can be a first-line treatment for insomnia and sleep complaints in this population. PMID:27088071

  4. Sleep disorders in the older adult - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Neikrug, Ariel B; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 50% of older adults complain of difficulty sleeping. Poor sleep results in increased risk of significant morbidity and mortality. The decrements seen in the sleep of the older adult are often due to a decrease in the ability to get needed sleep. However, the decreased ability is less a function of age and more a function of other factors that accompany aging, such as medical and psychiatric illness, increased medication use, advances in the endogenous circadian clock and a higher prevalence of specific sleep disorders. Given the large number of older adults with sleep complaints and sleep disorders, there is a need for health care professionals to have an increased awareness of these sleep disturbances to better enable them to assess and treat these patients. A thorough sleep history (preferably in the presence of their bed partner) is required for a proper diagnosis, and when appropriate, an overnight sleep recording should be done. Treatment of primary sleep problems can improve the quality of life and daytime functioning of older adults. This paper reviews the diagnoses and characteristics of sleep disorders generally found in the older adult. While aimed at the practicing geriatrician, this paper is also of importance for any gerontologist interested in sleep. 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Validity of the International Fitness Scale "IFIS" in older adults.

    PubMed

    Merellano-Navarro, Eugenio; Collado-Mateo, Daniel; García-Rubio, Javier; Gusi, Narcís; Olivares, Pedro R

    2017-09-01

    To validate the "International Fitness Scale" (IFIS) in older adults. Firstly, cognitive interviews were performed to ensure that the questionnaire was comprehensive for older Chilean adults. After that, a transversal study of 401 institutionalized and non-institutionalized older adults from Maule region in Chile was conducted. A battery of validated fitness tests for this population was used in order to compare the responses obtained in the IFIS with the objectively measured fitness performance (back scratch, chair sit-and-reach, handgrip, 30-s chair stand, timed up-and-go and 6-min walking). Indicated that IFIS presented a high compliance in the comprehension of the items which defined it, and it was able of categorizing older adults according to their measured physical fitness levels. The analysis of covariance ANCOVA adjusted by sex and age showed a concordance between IFIS and the score in physical fitness tests. Based on the results of this study, IFIS questionnaire is a good alternative to assess physical fitness in older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An Evaluation of Wellness Assessment Visualizations for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Blaine; Yoo, Daisy; Aziz, Rafae; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Demiris, George

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Smart home technologies provide a valuable resource to unobtrusively monitor health and wellness within an older adult population. However, the breadth and density of data available along with aging associated decreases in working memory, prospective memory, spatial cognition, and processing speed can make it challenging to comprehend for older adults. We developed visualizations of smart home health data integrated into a framework of wellness. We evaluated the visualizations through focus groups with older adults and identified recommendations to guide the future development of visualizations. Materials and Methods We conducted four focus groups with older adult participants (n=31) at an independent retirement community. Participants were presented with three different visualizations from a wellness pilot study. A qualitative descriptive analysis was conducted to identify thematic content. Results We identified three themes related to processing and application of visualizations: (1) values of visualizations for wellness assessment, (2) cognitive processing approaches to visualizations, and (3) integration of health data for visualization. In addition, the focus groups highlighted key design considerations of visualizations important towards supporting decision-making and evaluation assessments within integrated health displays. Conclusions Participants found inherent value in having visualizations available to proactively engage with their healthcare provider. Integrating the visualizations into a wellness framework helped reduce the complexity of raw smart home data. There has been limited work on health visualizations from a consumer perspective, in particular for an older adult population. Creating appropriately designed visualizations is valuable towards promoting consumer involvement within the shared decision-making process of care. PMID:25401414

  7. Location tracking: views from the older adult population.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lisa; Little, Linda; Briggs, Pam; McInnes, Lynn; Jones, Emma; Nicholson, James

    2013-11-01

    there has been a rise in the use of social media applications that allow people to see where friends, family and nearby services are located. Yet while uptake has been high for younger people, adoption by older adults is relatively slow, despite the potential health and social benefits. In this paper, we explore the barriers to acceptance of location-based services (LBS) in a community of older adults. to understand attitudes to LBS technologies in older adults. eighty-six older adults used LBS for 1-week and completed pre- and post-use questionnaires. Twenty available volunteers from the first study also completed in-depth interviews after their experience using the LBS technology. the pre-use questionnaire identified perceptions of usefulness, individual privacy and visibility as predictive of intentions to use a location-tracking service. Post-use, perceived risk was the only factor to predict intention to use LBS. Interviews with participants revealed that LBS was primarily seen as an assistive technology and that issues of trust and privacy were important. the findings from this study suggest older adults struggle to see the benefits of LBS and have a number of privacy concerns likely to inhibit future uptake of location-tracking services and devices.

  8. Are Healthier Older Adults Choosing Managed Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Gail A.; Morrisey, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We attempt to determine whether older workers and early retirees avoid managed care plans and to explore whether health plan choices are linked to the health status of workers or their spouses. Design and Methods: We use the responses of those born between 1931 and 1941 to the 1994 and 1998 waves of the Health and Retirement Survey. We…

  9. Vitamin D recommendations for older adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many randomized, controlled trials indicate that vitamin D will lower falls and fractures, so it was reasonable for Sanders et al. to hypothesize that a single annual 500,000 IU oral dose of vitamin D3 would be effective in reducing falls and fractures in older women with one or more risk factors fo...

  10. Worry in Older Community-Residing Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Kaye; Clemson, Lindy; Cant, Rosemary; Ke, Liang; Cumming, Robert G.; Kendig, Hal; Mathews, Mark

    2011-01-01

    With rising longevity, increasing numbers of older people are experiencing changes in their everyday family and social life, changes in their financial status, and a greater number of chronic conditions affecting their health. We took the opportunity to explore these relationships with worry in a group of volunteer community-living elderly (n =…

  11. OLDER ADULTS: AN ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The baby boom generation is quickly becoming the geriatric generation. The over-65 age bracket hit 13% of Americans in 1997, and is expected to reach 20% by 2030 accounting for 73 million Americans. World-wide the total number of older people (>60years) is expected to double from...

  12. Older Learners: The Challenge to Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Susanna, Ed.; Phillipson, Chris, Ed.

    These 11 papers consider the older learner as a consumer of education and examine how the concepts of education, educators, institutions, and learners must be revised if educational involvement in later life is to be regarded as the norm. Following a prologue, "Education and the Interpretation of Life Experience" (Michel Philibert), the…

  13. Mental Health Care Delivered to Younger Adults and Older Adults by Office-Based Physicians Nationally

    PubMed Central

    Maust, Donovan T.; Kales, Helen C.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives While older adults comprise the most rapidly growing population segment, little is known about the provision of mental health care to older adults relative to younger adults. Design Analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Setting Visits to office-based physicians, 2007-2010 (N=100,661). Participants Patient encounters with a mental health diagnosis or treatment, defined as visits: 1) resulting in mental disorder diagnosis; 2) including prescription or continuation of psychotropic medication; 3) to a psychiatrist; or 4) including psychotherapy. Measurements Visits were stratified by patient age (21-64y, ≥65y) and the percentage of each mental health care visit type among all office-based care was estimated by age group and converted to an annual rate per 100 population. Within each visit type, age groups were compared by clinical and demographic characteristics such as gender, diagnosed mental illness, and use of psychotropic agents. Results Relative to younger adults, older adults had a smaller proportion of visits with a mental disorder diagnosis (4.76% v. 9.53%, X2=228.21, p<.001), to a psychiatrist (0.94% v. 4.01%; X2=233.76, p<.001), and including psychotherapy (0.65% v. 2.30%; X2=57.65, p<.001). The percentage of older adult psychotropic visits was slightly smaller than among younger adults (18.06% v. 19.23%; X2=5.33, p=.02). Older adults had a higher rate of psychotropic visits (121.40 per 100 population) than adults (56.77). Conclusions Less care of older adults is from psychiatrists or incorporates psychotherapy. On a per-population basis, older adults have a far higher rate of psychotropic use compared to younger adults. Addressing the mental health care needs of older adults will require care in non-specialty settings. PMID:26140422

  14. Patient Portal Use and Experience Among Older Adults: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background The older adult population (65 years or older) in the United States is growing, and it is important for communities to consider ways to support the aging population. Patient portals and electronic personal health records (ePHRs) are technologies that could better serve populations with the highest health care needs, such as older adults. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the existing research landscape related to patient portal and ePHR use and experience among older adults and to understand the benefits and barriers to older adults’ use and adoption of patient portals and ePHRs. Methods We searched six pertinent bibliographic databases for papers, published from 2006 to 2016 and written in English, that focused on adults 60 years or older and their use of or experience with patient portals or ePHRs. We adapted preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines to review papers based on exclusion and inclusion criteria. We then applied thematic analysis to identify key themes around use, experience, and adoption. Results We retrieved 199 papers after an initial screening and removal of duplicate papers. Then we applied an inclusion and exclusion criteria, resulting in a final set of 17 papers that focused on 15 separate projects. The majority of papers described studies involving qualitative research, including interviews and focus groups. They looked at the experience and use of ePHRs and patient portals. Overall, we found 2 main barriers to use: (1) privacy and security and (2) access to and ability to use technology and the Internet. We found 2 facilitators: (1) technical assistance and (2) family and provider advice. We also reported on older adults’ experience, including satisfaction with the system and improvement of the quality of their health care. Several studies captured features that older adults wanted from these systems such as further assistance managing health-related tasks and contextual

  15. HIV behavioural interventions targeted towards older adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing number of people living with HIV aged 50 years and older has been recognised around the world yet non-pharmacologic HIV behavioural and cognitive interventions specifically targeted to older adults are limited. Evidence is needed to guide the response to this affected group. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the available published literature in MEDLINE, Embase and the Education Resources Information Center. A search strategy was defined with high sensitivity but low specificity to identify behavioural interventions with outcomes in the areas of treatment adherence, HIV testing uptake, increased HIV knowledge and uptake of prevention measures. Data from relevant articles were extracted into excel. Results Twelve articles were identified all of which originated from the Americas. Eight of the interventions were conducted among older adults living with HIV and four for HIV-negative older adults. Five studies included control groups. Of the included studies, four focused on general knowledge of HIV, three emphasised mental health and coping, two focused on reduced sexual risk behaviour, two on physical status and one on referral for care. Only four of the studies were randomised controlled trials and seven – including all of the studies among HIV-negative older adults – did not include controls at all. A few of the studies conducted statistical testing on small samples of 16 or 11 older adults making inference based on the results difficult. The most relevant study demonstrated that using telephone-based interventions can reduce risky sexual behaviour among older adults with control reporting 3.24 times (95% CI 1.79-5.85) as many occasions of unprotected sex at follow-up as participants. Overall however, few of the articles are sufficiently rigorous to suggest broad replication or to be considered representative and applicable in other settings. Conclusions More evidence is needed on what interventions work among older adults to

  16. How Attention Modulates Encoding of Dynamic Stimuli in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Oren, Noga; Shapira-Lichter, Irit; Lerner, Yulia; Hendler, Talma; Giladi, Nir; Ash, Elissa L

    2018-02-25

    Aging is marked by memory decline that is exacerbated with attentional loading. Achieving a complex understanding of older adults' neural functions when encoding information in conditions of high and low attentional load is a necessary step toward understanding this phenomenon. Furthermore, the information gained may be used to devise strategies aimed to prevent age-related decline in these processes. To address this issue, a group of older adults underwent fMRI scanning while encoding short movies under two levels of attentional loading. High attentional load was associated with increased inter-subject correlation (inter-SC) in only a subset of prefrontal regions that were previously identified in younger adults. It was also associated with lower inter-SC in task-relevant visual regions, suggesting that as load increased, visual processing became less synchronized across participants. Critically, while we have shown that inter-SC in the dorsal posterior cingulate cortex (dPCC) was increased for younger adults at high load, older adults did not generally show this effect. However, those older adults who did display this pattern also displayed a 'younger-like' behavioral profile. These results point to a pivotal role of the dPCC in the interplay between attention and memory across the lifespan. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Multidimensional Attitudes of Emergency Medicine Residents Toward Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Teresita M.; Chan, Shu B.; Hansoti, Bhakti

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The demands of our rapidly expanding older population strain many emergency departments (EDs), and older patients experience disproportionately high adverse health outcomes. Trainee attitude is key in improving care for older adults. There is negligible knowledge of baseline emergency medicine (EM) resident attitudes regarding elder patients. Awareness of baseline attitudes can serve to better structure training for improved care of older adults. The objective of the study is to identify baseline EM resident attitudes toward older adults using a validated attitude scale and multidimensional analysis. Methods Six EM residencies participated in a voluntary anonymous survey delivered in summer and fall 2009. We used factor analysis using the principal components method and Varimax rotation, to analyze attitude interdependence, translating the 21 survey questions into 6 independent dimensions. We adapted this survey from a validated instrument by the addition of 7 EM-specific questions to measures attitudes relevant to emergency care of elders and the training of EM residents in the geriatric competencies. Scoring was performed on a 5-point Likert scale. We compared factor scores using student t and ANOVA. Results 173 EM residents participated showing an overall positive attitude toward older adults, with a factor score of 3.79 (3.0 being a neutral score). Attitudes trended to more negative in successive post-graduate year (PGY) levels. Conclusion EM residents demonstrate an overall positive attitude towards the care of older adults. We noted a longitudinal hardening of attitude in social values, which are more negative in successive PGY-year levels. PMID:25035760

  18. Driving Cessation and Health Outcomes in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Chihuri, Stanford; Mielenz, Thelma J; DiMaggio, Charles J; Betz, Marian E; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn; Jones, Vanya C; Li, Guohua

    2016-02-01

    To determine what effect driving cessation may have on subsequent health and well-being in older adults. Systematic review of the evidence in the research literature on the consequences of driving cessation in older adults. Community. Drivers aged 55 and older. Studies pertinent to the health consequences of driving cessation were identified through a comprehensive search of bibliographic databases. Studies that presented quantitative data for drivers aged 55 and older; used a cross-sectional, cohort, or case-control design; and had a comparison group of current drivers were included in the review. Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Driving cessation was reported to be associated with declines in general health and physical, social, and cognitive function and with greater risks of admission to long-term care facilities and mortality. A meta-analysis based on pooled data from five studies examining the association between driving cessation and depression revealed that driving cessation almost doubled the risk of depressive symptoms in older adults (summary odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.61-2.27). Driving cessation in older adults appears to contribute to a variety of health problems, particularly depression. These adverse health consequences should be considered in making the decision to cease driving. Intervention programs ensuring mobility and social functions may be needed to mitigate the potential adverse effects of driving cessation on health and well-being in older adults. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Healthcare-Associated Meningitis or Ventriculitis in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Srihawan, Chanunya; Habib, Onaizah; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2017-12-01

    Healthcare-associated meningitis or ventriculitis (HCAMV) is a serious and life-threatening complication of invasive neurosurgical procedures or penetrating head trauma. Older adults are at higher risk of adverse outcomes in community-acquired meningitis but studies of HCAMV are lacking. Therefore, we perform the study to define the differences in clinical outcomes between older and younger adults with HCAMV. Retrospective study. A large tertiary care hospital in Houston, Texas, from July 2003 to November 2014. Adults with a diagnosis of HCAMV (N = 160) aged ≥65 (n = 35), aged 18-64 (n = 125). Demographic characteristics, clinical presentation, laboratory results, treatments, and outcomes (Glasgow Outcome Scale). Older adults had more comorbidities and CSF abnormalities [pleocytosis, high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein, low CSF glucose) and were more likely to have altered mental status than younger adults (P < .05). An adverse clinical outcome was seen in 142 participants (89%) (death (n = 18, 11%), persistent vegetative state (n = 26, 16%), severe disability (n = 68, 43%), moderate disability (n = 30, 19%). There was no difference in adverse outcomes between older (97%) and younger (86%) adults (P = .13). On logistic regression analysis, abnormal neurological examination (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 7.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.15-23.63, P = .001) and mechanical ventilation (aOR = 11.03, 95% CI = 1.35-90.51, P = .02) were associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Older adults with HCAMV have more comorbidities and CSF abnormalities and are more likely to have altered mental status than younger adults but have similar high rates of adverse clinical outcomes. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Care Coordination for Cognitively Impaired Older Adults and Their Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Mary D.; Hirschman, Karen B.; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Bixby, M. Brian; Konick-McMahan, JoAnne; Stephens, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Dementia and delirium, the most common causes of cognitive impairment (CI) among hospitalized older adults, are associated with higher mortality rates, increased morbidity and higher health care costs. A growing body of science suggests that these older adults and their caregivers are particularly vulnerable to systems of care that either do not recognize or meet their needs. The consequences can be devastating for these older adults and add to the burden of hospital staff and caregivers, especially during the transition from hospital to home. Unfortunately, little evidence exists to guide optimal care of this patient group. Available research findings suggest that hospitalized cognitively impaired elders may benefit from interventions aimed at improving care management of both CI and co-morbid conditions but the exact nature and intensity of interventions needed are not known. This article will explore the need for improved transitional care for this vulnerable population and their caregivers. PMID:18032200

  1. Non-Digital Game Playing by Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Mortenson, W Ben; Sixsmith, Andrew; Kaufman, David

    2017-09-01

    Research on video games' effect on cognition and behaviour has been extensive, yet little research has explored non-digital forms of game playing, especially among older adults. As part of a larger survey on game playing, 886 respondents (≥ age 55) filled out questionnaires about non-digital game play. The study aims were to determine perceived benefits of non-digital game play and to determine socio-demographic factors that might predict perceived benefits. Survey results indicate that non-digital game playing is social in nature and common (73% of respondents) among older adults. Older adults play for fun, but also to help maintain their cognition. Regression analyses indicated various socio-demographic factors - age, education, gender, and race - were independently associated with perceived benefits from game playing. The results thus emphasize the importance of non-digital game playing in this population and suggest that efforts to facilitate game playing may improve social interactions and quality of life.

  2. Impact of Older Adults' Neighborhood Perceptions on Walking Behavior.

    PubMed

    Maisel, Jordana L

    2016-04-01

    Built environment features can have varying impacts on user behavior depending on the perceptions of the opportunities and obstacles that the environments create. This study systematically evaluated the relationship between neighborhood perceptions and the specific types of self-reported walking behavior for 121 older adults who resided in urban, suburban, or rural neighborhoods. Perceptions of street connectivity, crime and traffic safety, and overall satisfaction were associated with specific types of walking behaviors, and the strength of the relationships differed by neighborhood type. Sociodemographic variables such as age and sex were associated with certain types and amounts of older adults' walking behaviors both across and within each neighborhood type. The results of this study support the importance of perceived street connectivity regardless of neighborhood type and perceived crime safety in rural neighborhoods to impact the walking behavior among older adults.

  3. Use of technology to enhance mental health for older adults.

    PubMed

    Cangelosi, Pamela R; Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2014-09-01

    Recent research suggests that older adults may gain significant mental health benefits from health resources made available through emerging modern technologies, especially because this population is becoming more Internet savvy. Technology-enhanced interventions for older adults have been shown to be helpful not only for general wellness activities (i.e., exercise), but also to specifically enhance mental health. This article focuses on two types of interventions for mental health: (a) cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression and anxiety and (b) assistive technology for individuals with dementia. Nurses should reevaluate their assumptions that older adults fear technology and explore whether different types of modern technology might be effective in enhancing mental health for these clients. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Nutritional Vulnerability in Older Adults: A Continuum of Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Porter Starr, Kathryn N.; McDonald, Shelley R.; Bales, Connie W.

    2015-01-01

    A nutritionally vulnerable older adult has a reduced physical reserve that limits the ability to mount a vigorous recovery in the face of an acute health threat or stressor. Often this vulnerability contributes to more medical complications, longer hospital stays, and increased likelihood of nursing home admission. We have characterized in this review the etiology of nutritional vulnerability across the continuum of the community, hospital, and long term care settings. Frail older adults may become less vulnerable with strong, consistent, and individualized nutritional care. Interventions for the vulnerable older adult must take their nutritional needs into account to optimize resiliency in the face of the acute and/or chronic health challenges they will surely face in their life course. PMID:26042189

  5. Staphylococcus aureus infections and antibiotic resistance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Suzanne F

    2002-01-15

    The prevalence of infection with Staphylococcus aureus among older adults is unknown, but clinical syndromes caused by this organism are common. Bacteremia, pneumonia, endocarditis, and bone and joint infections are encountered with relative frequency in this population, and the clinical presentation may be atypical. Underlying disease and functional debility, rather than age itself, predispose the older adult to staphylococcal carriage and infection. Infections with methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus are acquired primarily in hospital, rather than in nursing homes or in the community. Lack of clinical suspicion for S. aureus infection and delays in appropriate therapy can be fatal. Staphylococcal infection should be considered for an older adult with risk factors for staphylococcal carriage, comorbid illness, debility, and history of recent hospitalization or nursing home stay. Choices regarding empirical therapy should be made on the basis of knowledge of local antibiotic susceptibility patterns.

  6. Middle-Aged and Older Adult Health Care Selection.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Scott R; Erickson, Lance D; Call, Vaughn R A; McKnight, Matthew L

    2017-04-01

    This study assesses the prevalence of primary-care physician (PCP) bypass among rural middle-aged and older adults. Bypass is a behavior where people travel beyond local providers to obtain health care. This article applies a precise Geographic Information System (GIS)-based measure of bypass and examines the role of community and non-health-care-related characteristics on bypass. Our results indicate that bypass behavior among rural middle-aged and older adults is multifaceted. In addition to the perceived quality of local primary care, dissatisfaction with local services, such as shopping, creates an effect that increases the likelihood of bypass, whereas strong community ties decrease the likelihood of bypass. The results suggest that the "outshopping theory," where respondents select services in larger regional economic centers rather than local "mom and pop" providers, now extends to older adult health care selection.

  7. Older Adults' Online Dating Profiles and Successful Aging.

    PubMed

    Wada, Mineko; Mortenson, William Bennett; Hurd Clarke, Laura

    2016-12-01

    This study examined how relevant Rowe and Kahn's three criteria of successful aging were to older adults' self-portrayals in online dating profiles: low probability of disease and disability, high functioning, and active life engagement. In this cross-sectional study, 320 online dating profiles of older adults were randomly selected and coded based on the criteria. Logistic regression analyses determined whether age, gender, and race/ethnicity predicted self-presentation. Few profiles were indicative of successful aging due to the low prevalence of the first two criteria; the third criterion, however, was identified in many profiles. Native Americans were significantly less likely than other ethnic groups to highlight the first two criteria. Younger age predicted presenting the first criterion. Women's presentation of the third criterion remained significantly high with age. The findings suggest that the criteria may be unimportant to older adults when seeking partners, or they may reflect the exclusivity of this construct.

  8. Hearing aid user guides: suitability for older adults.

    PubMed

    Caposecco, Andrea; Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the content, design, and readability of printed hearing aid user guides to determine their suitability for older adults, who are the main users of hearing aids. Hearing aid user guides were assessed using four readability formulae and a standardized tool to assess content and design (SAM - Suitability Assessment of Materials). A sample of 36 hearing aid user guides (four user guides from nine different hearing aid manufacturers) were analysed. Sixty nine percent of user guides were rated 'not suitable' and 31% were rated 'adequate' for their suitability. Many scored poorly for scope, vocabulary, aspects of layout and typography, and learning stimulation and motivation. The mean reading grade level for all user guides was grade 9.6 which is too high for older adults. The content, design, and readability of hearing aid user guides are not optimal for older adults and thus may serve as a barrier to successful hearing aid outcomes for this population.

  9. Nutritional Vulnerability in Older Adults: A Continuum of Concerns.

    PubMed

    Porter Starr, Kathryn N; McDonald, Shelley R; Bales, Connie W

    2015-06-01

    A nutritionally vulnerable older adult has a reduced physical reserve that limits the ability to mount a vigorous recovery in the face of an acute health threat or stressor. Often this vulnerability contributes to more medical complications, longer hospital stays, and increased likelihood of nursing home admission. We have characterized in this review the etiology of nutritional vulnerability across the continuum of the community, hospital, and long term care settings. Frail older adults may become less vulnerable with strong, consistent, and individualized nutritional care. Interventions for the vulnerable older adult must take their nutritional needs into account to optimize resiliency in the face of the acute and/or chronic health challenges they will surely face in their life course.

  10. Older adults' views about "Managing Your Medications" booklet.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Jill; Farris, Karen B; Schultz, Susan K; Carnahan, Ryan M; Gryzlak, Brian; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A

    2013-04-01

    The objectives were to evaluate Managing Your Medications (MYM) booklet to improve medication management. Mailed packets, including MYM booklet and 4-page survey assessing comprehensibility, communicative effectiveness, and usefulness, were sent to a random sample of 250 older adults. The survey included perceptions of booklet, how to disseminate, and respondent's health history. Descriptive statistics were used, and individuals were stratified by number of prescription medications and whether they reported side effects. A 59.6% response rate was obtained. The readability was Grade 8. Older adults reported it was comprehensible and 17% reported behavioral intentions to change their current actions regarding medications. Overall, 12.7% of respondents agreed that MYM changed their opinion of the topic. The most popular means to disseminate were doctors' offices and senior citizens' centers. Most older adults indicated the MYM booklet was readable, comprehensible, and would generate some behavior change regarding medication management.

  11. Treatment of depression in older adults beyond fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gabriela Arantes

    2015-01-01

    This review aimed to discuss the importance of the comprehensive treatment of depression among older adults in Brazil. The abuse of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including fluoxetine hydrochloride, as antidepressants has been considered a serious public health problem, particularly among older adults. Despite the consensus on the need for a comprehensive treatment of depression in this population, Brazil is still unprepared. The interface between pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy is limited due to the lack of healthcare services, specialized professionals, and effective healthcare planning. Fluoxetine has been used among older adults as an all-purpose drug for the treatment of depressive disorders because of psychosocial adversities, lack of social support, and limited access to adequate healthcare services for the treatment of this disorder. Preparing health professionals is a sine qua non for the reversal of the age pyramid, but this is not happening yet. PMID:25830872

  12. Health promotion among older adults in Austria: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Boggatz, Thomas; Meinhart, Christoph Matthias

    2017-04-01

    To determine the types of attitudes to health promotion among older Austrians. Health promotion in old age becomes increasingly important in the current period of demographic transition. Interventions are likely to be successful if they take the attitude of older persons into consideration. There may be several types of attitudes to health promotion among older adults. Cross-sectional qualitative study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in a purposive sample consisting of 36 home-dwelling older persons from local communities in the federal province of Salzburg, Austria. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis according to Mayring and subsequent construction of types. There are three main types of attitudes to health promotion. 'Health promoters through everyday activities' considered domestic work and walks to be sufficient in keeping up their health. Fitness-oriented persons practised sports of some type. Users of complementary methods practised such methods to some degree. These types of attitudes could be further differentiated according to their outcome expectations. In addition to benefits for health, socialising was also an important outcome. Physical decline may reduce a fitness-oriented attitude, whereas encouragement by others may trigger it. Older adults have various attitudes to health promotion, but these are not immutable. Health promotion programmes that are not restricted to a narrow focus on health but provide the opportunity to socialise may support older adults in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Singapore Healthy Older People Everyday (HOPE) Study: Prevalence of Frailty and Associated Factors in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Reshma A; Chen, Matthew Zhixuan; Tan, Linda Wei Lin; Lim, Moses YiDong; Ho, Han Kwee; van Dam, Rob M

    2017-08-01

    In the context of a rapidly ageing population, Singapore is anticipating a rise in multimorbidity, disability, and dependency, which are driven by physical frailty. Healthy Older People Everyday (HOPE) is an epidemiologic population-based study on community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older in Singapore. To investigate the prevalence of frail and prefrail states and their association with polypharmacy, multimorbidity, cognitive and functional status, and perceived health status among community-dwelling older adults in Singapore. Participants for HOPE were older adults aged 65 years and older recruited from a cohort study on the northwest region of Singapore. Analysis was performed on data collected from a combination of interviewer-administered questionnaires (including FRAIL scale, EQ-5D, Mini Mental State Examination, Barthel index, and Lawton IADL scale), clinical assessments, and physical measurements (including hand grip strength and Timed-Up-and-Go [TUG] test). A total of 1051 older adults (mean age 71.2 years) completed the study. More than half (57.2%) were female. The prevalence of frailty and prefrailty was 6.2% and 37%, respectively. Frailty was associated with older age, female gender, Indian (instead of Chinese) ethnicity, multimorbidity, polypharmacy, cognitive and functional impairment, weaker hand grip strength, longer TUG times, and poor perceived health status. Those with underlying cognitive impairment and frailty were at greater risk of adverse health outcome. Frailty is a complex health state with multiple domains and dimensions. In our study in a multiethnic Asian population, we identified nonmodifiable factors and modifiable risk factors (multimorbidity, polypharmacy, cognitive and functional impairment) that were associated with frailty. Interventions will have to be multipronged and will require a collaborated effort in order to effect change and improve the health span in rapidly ageing populations. Copyright © 2017 AMDA

  14. Undergraduate nurse attitudes toward older adults and perceptions of working with older adults: an analysis of measurement instruments.

    PubMed

    Neville, Christine

    2015-01-01

    An undergraduate nurse's attitude toward older adults or their perception of working with older adults can influence the quality of care provided and their career choice, respectively. As such, it is important to conduct research that contributes to the evaluation of attitudes and perceptions. In the conduct of comprehensive and rigorous research, it is necessary to make the right choice of an instrument to measure outcomes. The identification of a valid and reliable instrument to suit a specific research question is a complex process. In order to deal with this complexity, this paper reviews instruments that have been used to measure undergraduate nurse attitudes toward older adults and their perceptions of working with older adults. Data were sourced from Medline, CINAHL, Healthsource/Academic Edition, PsycINFO and PubMed for the years 2008-2013. Eight readily available instruments were identified and their characteristics analyzed for their purpose, number of items, design, reliability and validity. The strengths and weaknesses of each of the instruments and recent use are also discussed. The choice of a suitable instrument is likely to be critical to the testing of intervention strategies such as curriculum activities, which target attitude improvements to enhance the quality and effectiveness of nursing care provided to older adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Emergency department visits by older adults for motor vehicle collisions.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Jody A; Ginde, Adit A; Lowenstein, Steven R; Betz, Marian E

    2013-11-01

    To describe the epidemiology and characteristics of emergency department (ED) visits by older adults for motor vehicle collisions (MVC) in the United States (U.S.). We analyzed ED visits for MVCs using data from the 2003-2007 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). Using U.S. Census data, we calculated annual incidence rates of driver or passenger MVC-related ED visits and examined visit characteristics, including triage acuity, tests performed and hospital admission or discharge. We compared older (65+ years) and younger (18-64 years) MVC patients and calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to measure the strength of associations between age group and various visit characteristics. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of admissions for MVC-related injuries among older adults. From 2003-2007, there were an average of 237,000 annual ED visits by older adults for MVCs. The annual ED visit rate for MVCs was 6.4 (95% CI 4.6-8.3) visits per 1,000 for older adults and 16.4 (95% CI 14.0-18.8) visits per 1,000 for younger adults. Compared to younger MVC patients, after adjustment for gender, race and ethnicity, older MVC patients were more likely to have at least one imaging study performed (OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.46-9.36). Older MVC patients were not significantly more likely to arrive by ambulance (OR 1.47; 95% CI 0.76-2.86), have a high triage acuity (OR 1.56; 95% CI 0.77-3.14), or to have a diagnosis of a head, spinal cord or torso injury (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.42-2.23) as compared to younger MVC patients after adjustment for gender, race and ethnicity. Overall, 14.5% (95% CI 9.8-19.2) of older MVC patients and 6.1% (95% CI 4.8-7.5) of younger MVC patients were admitted to the hospital. There was also a non-statistically significant trend toward hospital admission for older versus younger MVC patients (OR 1.78; 95% CI 0.71-4.43), and admission to the ICU if hospitalized (OR 6.9, 95% CI 0

  16. No place like home: older adults and their housing.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jonathan D; Johnson, David S; Marchand, Joseph T; Smeeding, Timothy M; Torrey, Barbara Boyle

    2007-03-01

    The home is both older Americans' largest asset and their largest consumption good. This article employs new data on the consumption and assets of older Americans to investigate what role the home plays in the economic lives of older adults. We used 20 years of data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey to examine the asset and consumption trends of four cohorts of older Americans. We compared the data with other survey results. Older Americans' homeownership rates were stable until age 80. The homes were increasingly mortgage free; home equity increased with age, and relatively few older adults took out home equity loans or reverse annuity mortgages. Housing consumption flows increased with age; nonhousing consumption flows declined after age 60 at a rate of approximately 1.4% per year. The results suggest that the consumption of cohorts of older Americans does not decrease dramatically over a 20-year period and that they are also not converting their housing assets into other types of income or consumption, at least up to age 80. A number of reasons, including the bequest motive and the life cycle hypothesis, might explain this behavior.

  17. Clinical characteristics of generalized anxiety disorder: older vs. young adults.

    PubMed

    Altunoz, Umut; Kokurcan, Ahmet; Kirici, Sevinc; Bastug, Gulbahar; Ozel-Kizil, Erguvan Tugba

    2018-02-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most common anxiety disorders in older people. Although GAD in older adults seems to differ in many aspects like clinical presentation, severity and treatment response, there is a paucity of comparative research. The aim of the study is to compare the clinical presentation of GAD between older and young adults. One hundred and two non-demented older patients (age ≥65) and 64 young patients (age <45) who were diagnosed with GAD according to the DSM-IV-TR criteria were included to the study. Socio-demographic Data Form, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders-1 (SCID-1), the Questionnaire for the Suggested Behavioral Criteria of GAD for DSM-5, the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale (GADSS) and the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) were applied to both groups. Older GAD patients had more disturbances of sleep, less reassurance seeking behaviors, higher rates of depression and higher depression severity when compared to the young patients. Although older people seemed to have a lower severity of GAD, they had higher disability due to worries. Older patients worried more about their own health and family well-being, whereas young patients worried more about future and other's health.

  18. Living arrangements and suicidal ideation among the Korean older adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jibum; Lee, Yun-Suk; Lee, Jinkook

    2016-12-01

    This study examines how living arrangements are associated with suicidal ideation for older adults in South Korea, which has the highest suicide rate among OECD countries, and a particularly high suicide rate for older persons. Analyzing a sample of 5795 women and 3758 men aged 65 and older from a nationwide representative cross-sectional data-set, we examined how many older adults think about suicide over a one-year period, why they think about suicide, and whether living arrangements are associated with suicidal ideation. About 1 out of 12 respondents in our sample reported suicidal ideation. While women and men did not differ in the prevalence of suicidal ideation, women attributed their suicidal feelings to health problems, while men attributed theirs to economic difficulties. Logistic regression results indicated that living arrangements are associated with suicidal ideation for men but not women. Older men living with a spouse were less likely to have suicidal ideation than older men with other living arrangements (i.e., living alone, living with children without spouse, living with spouse, and others). Our results highlight the importance of living arrangements to older men's suicidal ideation. We discuss gender differences in the implications of living arrangements to suicidal ideation within the context of Confucian culture.

  19. Portuguese nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Tavares, João Paulo; da Silva, Alcione Leite; Sá-Couto, Pedro; Boltz, Marie; Capezuti, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Portugal is impacted by the rapid growth of the aging population, which has significant implications for its health care system. However, nurses have received little education focusing on the unique and complex care needs of older adults. This gap in the nurses' education has an enormous impact in their knowledge and attitudes and affects the quality of nursing care provided to older adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1068 Portuguese nurses in five hospitals (northern and central region) with the following purposes: (i) explore the knowledge and attitudes of nurses about four common geriatric syndromes (pressure ulcer, incontinence, restraint use and sleep disturbance) in Portuguese hospitals; and (ii) evaluate the influence of demographic, professional and nurses' perception about hospital educational support, geriatric knowledge, and burden of caring for older adults upon geriatric nursing knowledge and attitudes. The mean knowledge and attitudes scores were 0.41 ± 0.15 and 0.40 ± 0.21, respectively (the maximum score was 1). Knowledge of nurses in Portuguese hospitals about the four geriatric syndromes (pressure ulcers, sleep disturbance, urinary incontinence and restraint use) was found inadequate. The nurses' attitudes towards caring for hospitalized older adults were generally negative. Nurses who work in academic hospitals demonstrated significantly more knowledge than nurses in hospital centers. The attitudes of nurses were significantly associated with the hospital and unit type, region, hospital educational support, staff knowledge, and perceived burden of caring for older adults. The study findings support the need for improving nurses' knowledge and attitudes towards hospitalized older adults and implementing evidence-based guidelines in their practice. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  20. Anxiety symptoms bias memory assessment in older adults.

    PubMed

    Williams, M W; Kueider, A M; Dmitrieva, N O; Manly, J J; Pieper, C F; Verney, S P; Gibbons, L E

    2017-09-01

    Older adults with anxiety and/or depression experience additional memory dysfunction beyond that of the normal aging process. However, few studies have examined test bias in memory assessments due to anxiety and/or depressive symptoms. The current study investigated the influence of self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depression on the measurement equivalence of memory tests in older adults. This is a secondary analysis of the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly dataset, a randomized controlled trial of community-dwelling older adults. Baseline data were included in this study (n = 2802). Multiple indicators multiple causes modeling was employed to assess for measurement equivalence, differential item functioning (DIF), in memory tests. The DIF was present for anxiety symptoms but not for depressive symptoms, such that higher anxiety placed older adults at a disadvantage on measures of memory performance. Analysis of DIF impact showed that compared with participants scoring in the bottom quartile of anxious symptoms, participants in the upper quartile exhibited memory performance scores that were 0.26 standard deviation lower. Anxious but not depressive symptoms introduce test bias into the measurement of memory in older adults. This indicates that memory models for research and clinical purposes should account for the direct relationship between anxiety symptoms and memory tests in addition to the true relationship between anxiety symptoms and memory construct. These findings support routine assessments of anxiety symptoms among older adults in settings in which cognitive testing is being conducted. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Home modification by older adults and their informal caregivers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heejung; Ahn, Yong Han; Steinhoff, Andreanna; Lee, Kang Hee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine dyadic factors of home modification in frail older adults and their informal caregivers for improving health care at home in the United States. A secondary data analysis used the National Alliance for Caregiving and the American Association of Retired Persons caregiver survey dataset. Among randomly selected samples from 7 states in the U.S., 737dyads of informal caregivers and frail older adults were selected based on age and medical conditions. Descriptive analyses and a hierarchical binary logistic regression analysis were performed. The study findings showed that the prevalence of home modification in the survey population was 42.20% in the United States. The home modifying group was likely to live together in a rural area, to consist of older care-recipients and younger caregivers, and to be Caucasian (p<.05). Physically functional impairments were the strongest factors of home modification (p<.01), while older adults living with heart disease were more likely to modify their homes (p=.03). In conclusion, older adults' and their caregivers' factors clearly affect home modification for health care at home. Our findings revealed that home modification represents an important contribution to multidisciplinary care and is based on comprehensive assessments, multidisciplinary decision-making processes, and careful planning of individualized interventions. Relevant policy suggestions may enhance the effectiveness of home modification to support aging in place in the United States. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The pleasurable recreational activities among community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Joji; Masuda, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Yusuke; Gotoh, Tadao; Kawamura, Takashi; Iguchi, Akihisa

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify what pleasurable recreational activities older adults like to participate in, and to investigate the relationship between those activities and quality of life (QOL). Questionnaires were delivered to older residents (65 years and above) in a Japanese rural area. The residents' background information, the amount of pleasure for various activities, and the QOL were surveyed. The QOL was evaluated by the revised Philadelphia Geriatric Center (PGC) morale scale. The amount of pleasure taken in a majority of the activities, such as conversation with family or neighbors showed a significant association with the happiness score, but only a few activities showed significant association between the revised PGC morale scale and the amount of pleasure. The multiple regression analyses indicated that the amount of pleasure in exercise, the difficulty in managing finances, and amount of pleasure taken in watching TV were significant variables for predicting the happiness score. The results indicated that the amount of pleasure older adults experienced when engaging in activities such as conversation with family or neighbors showed significant association with the older adults' happiness. These results may be helpful in understanding contributions of various activities to the perception of pleasure in older adults.

  3. Supportive Care in Older Adults with Cancer: Across the Continuum.

    PubMed

    Koll, Thuy; Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Holmes, Holly M; Pieters, Huibrie C; van Londen, G J; Marcum, Zachary A; MacKenzie, Amy R; Steer, Christopher B

    2016-08-01

    Supportive care is an essential component of anticancer treatment regardless of age or treatment intent. As the number of older adults with cancer increases, and supportive care strategies enable more patients to undergo treatment, greater numbers of older patients will become cancer survivors. These patients may have lingering adverse effects from treatment and will need continued supportive care interventions. Older adults with cancer benefit from geriatric assessment (GA)-guided supportive care interventions. This can occur at any stage across the cancer treatment continuum. As a GA commonly uncovers issues potentially unrelated to anticancer treatment, it could be argued that the assessment is essentially a supportive care strategy. Key aspects of a GA include identification of comorbidities, assessing for polypharmacy, screening for cognitive impairment and delirium, assessing functional status, and screening for psychosocial issues. Treatment-related issues of particular importance in older adults include recognition of increased bone marrow toxicity, management of nausea and vomiting, identification of anemia, and prevention of neurotoxicity. The role of physical therapy and cancer rehabilitation as a supportive care strategy in older adults is important regardless of treatment stage or intent.

  4. Sexual Behavior of Older Adults Living with HIV in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Negin, Joel; Geddes, Louise; Brennan-Ing, Mark; Kuteesa, Monica; Karpiak, Stephen; Seeley, Janet

    2016-02-01

    Sexual behavior among older adults with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa has been understudied despite the burgeoning of this population. We examined sexual behavior among older adults living with HIV in Uganda. Participants were eligible for the study if they were 50 years of age or older and living with HIV. Quantitative data were collected through face-to-face interviews, including demographic characteristics, health, sexual behavior and function, and mental health. Of respondents, 42 were men and 59 women. More than one-quarter of these HIV-positive older adults were sexually active. A greater proportion of older HIV-positive men reported being sexually active compared to women (54 vs. 15%). Among those who are sexually active, a majority never use condoms. Sixty-one percent of men regarded sex as at least somewhat important (42%), while few women shared this opinion (20%). Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that odds of sexual activity in the past year were significantly increased by the availability of a partner (married/cohabitating), better physical functioning, and male gender. As more adults live longer with HIV, it is critical to understand their sexual behavior and related psychosocial variables in order to improve prevention efforts.

  5. An empirical examination of subjective age in older adults.

    PubMed

    Agogo, David; Hajjat, Fatima; Milne, George R; Schewe, Charles D; Perrott, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    It has been observed that subjective age (SA) often trails chronological age, especially in older adults. In a previously published article, we argued that differences in individual's SA is a function of their level of activity on biological, mental, and social dimensions. This article empirically tests this proposition using a newly created Subjective Aging Index (SAI). The SAI is related to SA above the effect of age with differences existing across age groups and sex. The findings contribute to the literature on successful aging strategies with important implications for health care practitioners, marketers, and individuals heading towards older adult years.

  6. Older Adults' Reasons for Using Technology while Aging in Place.

    PubMed

    Peek, Sebastiaan T M; Luijkx, Katrien G; Rijnaard, Maurice D; Nieboer, Marianne E; van der Voort, Claire S; Aarts, Sil; van Hoof, Joost; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Wouters, Eveline J M

    2016-01-01

    Most older adults prefer to age in place, and supporting older adults to remain in their own homes and communities is also favored by policy makers. Technology can play a role in staying independent, active and healthy. However, the use of technology varies considerably among older adults. Previous research indicates that current models of technology acceptance are missing essential predictors specific to community-dwelling older adults. Furthermore, in situ research within the specific context of aging in place is scarce, while this type of research is needed to better understand how and why community-dwelling older adults are using technology. To explore which factors influence the level of use of various types of technology by older adults who are aging in place and to describe these factors in a comprehensive model. A qualitative explorative field study was set up, involving home visits to 53 community-dwelling older adults, aged 68-95, living in the Netherlands. Purposive sampling was used to include participants with different health statuses, living arrangements, and levels of technology experience. During each home visit: (1) background information on the participants' chronic conditions, major life events, frailty, cognitive functioning, subjective health, ownership and use of technology was gathered, and (2) a semistructured interview was conducted regarding reasons for the level of use of technology. The study was designed to include various types of technology that could support activities of daily living, personal health or safety, mobility, communication, physical activity, personal development, and leisure activities. Thematic analysis was employed to analyze interview transcripts. The level of technology use in the context of aging in place is influenced by six major themes: challenges in the domain of independent living; behavioral options; personal thoughts on technology use; influence of the social network; influence of organizations, and the

  7. Regional Rheumatic Disorders and Rehabilitation in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Ana T; Jackson, Adrienne; Alter, Katharine E

    2017-02-01

    Musculoskeletal problems are the most frequently reported complaints among older adults living in the community. The impact of the aging process on skeletal muscles and joints can have a profound effect on the ability of individuals with and without disabilities to function. This article reviews the rehabilitation medicine approach to the evaluation of older adults with regional rheumatic disorders, and the rehabilitation medicine considerations for clinical interventions. Future research considerations are encouraged in order to gain a greater understanding of the subject matter and its impact on the provision of care and patients' quality of life. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Multiple Chronic Conditions in Older Adults with Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Alfredsson, Joakim; Alexander, Karen P

    2016-05-01

    Older adults presenting with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) often have multiple chronic conditions (MCCs). In addition to traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors (ie, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes), common CV comorbidities include heart failure, stroke, and atrial fibrillation, whereas prevalent non-CV comorbidities include chronic kidney disease, anemia, depression, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The presence of MCCs affects the presentation (eg, increased frequency of type 2 myocardial infarctions [MIs]), clinical course, and prognosis of ACS in older adults. In general, higher comorbidity burden increases mortality following MI, reduces utilization of ACS treatments, and increases the importance of developing individualized treatment plans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Urinary Tract Infection and Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Penfield, Nicolas W.; Trautner, Barbara W.; Jump, Robin

    2018-01-01

    Synopsis Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a significant cause of morbidity among older adults; however, antibiotic prescriptions for clinically suspected UTIs are often inappropriate. Healthcare providers frequently struggle to differentiate UTI from asymptomatic bacteriuria, particularly in patients presenting with nonspecific symptoms. Patients with baseline cognitive impairments that limit history-taking can be particularly challenging. Here, we review the epidemiology and pathogenesis of UTI in older adults. We also discuss an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of UTIs, focusing on recognizing patients who would likely benefit from antibiotic treatment and on identifying patients for whom empiric antibiotic therapy should not be given. PMID:29079155

  10. Food Insecurity and Peripheral Arterial Disease in Older Adult Populations.

    PubMed

    Redmond, M L; Dong, F; Goetz, J; Jacobson, L T; Collins, T C

    2016-01-01

    Food insecurity, defined as the limited or uncertain availability of nutritious and safe foods, is a complex phenomenon and is linked to poor nutrition and diet-sensitive chronic diseases. Dietary patterns that include saturated fats and meat products are potential risk factors for the progression of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This study explored whether there is a relationship between food insecurity and PAD among a national sample of older adults. We conducted a cross-sectional data analysis using data from the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Food security was assessed using the US Household Food Security Survey Module. Bivariate analyses were conducted using the Rao-Scott Chi-square test to examine associations between PAD and sociodemographic variables. Multivariable generalized logistic regression was employed to assess the effect of food security on the presence of PAD, with adjustment for respondent's socio demographic characteristics. A total of 2,027 adults with PAD were included (Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) score ≤ 0.90).We excluded participants less than 60 years of age. Compared to older adults who are food secure, those who are food insecure have an increased risk for PAD. Food insecurity is associated with peripheral arterial disease among older adults (adults adjusted odds ratio, 1.50 [95% CI 1.11-2.03). Older adults with peripheral arterial disease are experiencing food insecurity. While nutrition and PAD are not well-defined, previous literature indicates there is a connection between food insecurity and diet-sensitive chronic diseases (diabetes and hypertension) which are risk factors for PAD. Food insecurity should be taken into consideration when treating older adults with PAD to help decrease poor health outcomes that are linked to an insufficient amount of nutritious foods.

  11. Predictors of suicide ideation among older adults with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Heisel, Marnin J.; Canham, Sarah L.; Sixsmith, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Bipolar disorder (BD) carries the greatest risk of death by suicide of all psychiatric conditions as 25%–50% of those with BD will make one or more suicide attempt, and about 15% will intentionally end their lives. Among young adults with BD, substance misuse, medication non-adherence, age at onset, and comorbid psychiatric conditions each predict self-harm. It is currently unclear if these same factors or others predict suicide ideation among older adults with BD. Methods We recruited a global sample of 220 older adults with BD over 19 days using socio-demographically targeted, social media advertising and online data collection (Mean = 58.50, SD = 5.42; range 50 to 81 years). Path analyses allowed us to identify direct and indirect predictors of suicide ideation among older adults with BD. Results Cognitive failures (perception, memory, and motor function), depressive symptoms, alcohol misuse, and dissatisfaction with life as direct predictors of suicide ideation; duration of BD symptoms and medication non-adherence emerged as indirect predictors. Of note, the significant impact of sleep on suicide ideation is indirect via depressive symptoms, cognitive failures, medication non-adherence and life dissatisfaction. Conclusions As with young adults with BD, alcohol misuse and medication non-adherence emerged as significant predictors of suicide ideation. In addition, cognitive failures directly and indirectly predict suicide ideation in this sample of older adults with BD. Population aging and treatment efficacy are leading to ever growing numbers of older adults with BD. Both direct and indirect predictors of suicide ideation need to be considered in future BD research and treatment planning. PMID:29145409

  12. Predictors of suicide ideation among older adults with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Norm; Heisel, Marnin J; Canham, Sarah L; Sixsmith, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) carries the greatest risk of death by suicide of all psychiatric conditions as 25%-50% of those with BD will make one or more suicide attempt, and about 15% will intentionally end their lives. Among young adults with BD, substance misuse, medication non-adherence, age at onset, and comorbid psychiatric conditions each predict self-harm. It is currently unclear if these same factors or others predict suicide ideation among older adults with BD. We recruited a global sample of 220 older adults with BD over 19 days using socio-demographically targeted, social media advertising and online data collection (Mean = 58.50, SD = 5.42; range 50 to 81 years). Path analyses allowed us to identify direct and indirect predictors of suicide ideation among older adults with BD. Cognitive failures (perception, memory, and motor function), depressive symptoms, alcohol misuse, and dissatisfaction with life as direct predictors of suicide ideation; duration of BD symptoms and medication non-adherence emerged as indirect predictors. Of note, the significant impact of sleep on suicide ideation is indirect via depressive symptoms, cognitive failures, medication non-adherence and life dissatisfaction. As with young adults with BD, alcohol misuse and medication non-adherence emerged as significant predictors of suicide ideation. In addition, cognitive failures directly and indirectly predict suicide ideation in this sample of older adults with BD. Population aging and treatment efficacy are leading to ever growing numbers of older adults with BD. Both direct and indirect predictors of suicide ideation need to be considered in future BD research and treatment planning.

  13. Loneliness and Mortality Among Older Adults in China

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the relationships between loneliness, social and health behaviors, health, and mortality among older adults in China. Method. Data came from a nationally representative sample of 14,072 adults aged 65 and older from the 2002, 2005, and 2008 waves of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey. A cross-lagged model combined with survival analysis was used to assess the relationships between loneliness, behavioral and health outcomes, and risk of mortality. Results. About 28% of older Chinese adults reported feeling lonely, and lonely adults faced increased risks of dying over the subsequent years. Some of the effect was explained by social and health behaviors, but most of the effect was explained by health outcomes. Loneliness both affects and is affected by social activities, solitary leisure activities, physical exercise, emotional health, self-rated health, and functional limitations over a 3-year period. Discussion. Loneliness is part of a constellation of poor social, emotional, and health outcomes for Chinese older adults. Interventions to increase the social involvement of lonely individuals may improve well-being and lengthen life. PMID:24550354

  14. Social relevance enhances memory for impressions in older adults.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Brittany S; Gutchess, Angela H

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that older adults have difficulty retrieving contextual material over items alone. Recent research suggests this deficit can be reduced by adding emotional context, allowing for the possibility that memory for social impressions may show less age-related decline than memory for other types of contextual information. Two studies investigated how orienting to social or self-relevant aspects of information contributed to the learning and retrieval of impressions in young and older adults. Participants encoded impressions of others in conditions varying in the use of self-reference (Experiment 1) and interpersonal meaningfulness (Experiment 2), and completed memory tasks requiring the retrieval of specific traits. For both experiments, age groups remembered similar numbers of impressions. In Experiment 1 using more self-relevant encoding contexts increased memory for impressions over orienting to stimuli in a non-social way, regardless of age. In Experiment 2 older adults had enhanced memory for impressions presented in an interpersonally meaningful relative to a personally irrelevant way, whereas young adults were unaffected by this manipulation. The results provide evidence that increasing social relevance ameliorates age differences in memory for impressions, and enhances older adults' ability to successfully retrieve contextual information.

  15. Differences in Risk Aversion between Young and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Albert, Steven M; Duffy, John

    2012-01-15

    Research on decision-making strategies among younger and older adults suggests that older adults may be more risk averse than younger people in the case of potential losses. These results mostly come from experimental studies involving gambling paradigms. Since these paradigms involve substantial demands on memory and learning, differences in risk aversion or other features of decision-making attributed to age may in fact reflect age-related declines in cognitive abilities. In the current study, older and younger adults completed a simpler, paired lottery choice task used in the experimental economics literature to elicit risk aversion. A similar approach was used to elicit participants' discount rates. The older adult group was more risk averse than younger adults (p < .05) and also had a higher discount rate (15.6-21.0% vs. 10.3-15.5%, p < .01), indicating lower expected utility from future income. Risk aversion and implied discount rates were weakly correlated. It may be valuable to investigate developmental changes in neural correlates of decision-making across the lifespan.

  16. Antisocial Personality Disorder in Older Adults: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Katherine J; Vaughn, Michael G

    2017-11-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) has enormous negative impacts on the affected individuals, their loved ones, and society. This burden is intensified by the social and functional changes related to age. The lower prevalence of ASPD in older adults compared to younger adults is well-documented. This discrepancy, often attributed solely to antisocial "burnout," contributes to the lack of attention given to this disorder in older adults and may signify difficulty measuring ASPD in this population. These measurement issues likely stem from problems with the validity of the diagnostic criteria for older adults which may not effectively capture changes that occur with age. This review focuses on the current literature surrounding the validity of ASPD criteria with older adults and relevant concepts, including the connection between criminality and ASPD. Issues with screening tools and the measurement of ASPD caused by problems with the criteria are also discussed. Finally, recommendations for improvement, including use of dimensional models of personality disorders, a potential geriatric subclassification of criteria, and modification of the existing criteria are presented with clinical implications and suggestions for future research.

  17. Permissive beliefs and attitudes about older adult suicide: a suicide enabling script?

    PubMed

    Winterrowd, Erin; Canetto, Silvia Sara; Benoit, Kathrin

    2017-02-01

    In the United States, suicide rates are highest among European American older adults. This phenomenon calls attention to cultural factors, specifically, the suicide beliefs and attitudes of European Americans. Beliefs and attitudes matter in the vulnerability to suicide. As predicted by cultural scripts of suicide theory, suicide is most likely among individuals and in communities where it is expected and is most acceptable. This study examined beliefs about the precipitants of, and protectors against older adult suicide, as well as suicide attitudes, in a predominantly European American community. Two hundred and fifty-five older adults (86% European American) and 281 younger adults (81% European American) indicated what they thought were the most likely older adult suicide precipitants and protectors, and their opinion about older adult suicide, depending on precipitant. Health problems were the most endorsed older adult suicide precipitants. Suicide precipitated by health problems was also rated most positively (e.g., rational, courageous). Older adults, persons with more education, and persons who did not identify with a religion expressed the most favorable attitudes about older adult suicide, across suicide precipitants. Men viewed older adult suicide as more admissible, and women, with more sympathy. Perceived suicide protectors included religiosity among older adults, and supportive relationships among younger adults. The belief, in this study's predominantly European American community, that older adult suicide is triggered by health problems, together with favorable attitudes about older adult suicide, suggest an enabling older adult suicide script, with implications for suicide risk and prevention.

  18. Associations between Exposure to Alienating Behaviors, Anxiety, and Depression in an Italian Sample of Adults.

    PubMed

    Verrocchio, Maria Cristina; Baker, Amy J L; Bernet, William

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine associations between exposure to alienating behaviors (ABs) and anxiety and depression as mediated through psychological maltreatment and parental bonding in a sample of Italian adults in the community. Five hundred and nine adults were given a measure of exposure to ABs, the Baker Strategy Questionnaire; the Psychological Maltreatment Measure; the Parental Bonding Instrument; the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Y; and the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Exposure to ABs was associated with psychological maltreatment, which was associated with parental bonding, which was associated with each of the three mental health outcomes: depression, state anxiety, and trait anxiety. The authors conclude that exposure to ABs in childhood represents a risk factor for subsequent poor mental health. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  19. Experience of discrimination among U.S. Chinese older adults.

    PubMed

    Dong, XinQi; Chen, Ruijia; Simon, Melissa A

    2014-11-01

    Experiences of discrimination are detrimental to health and well-being. This study aimed to examine experiences of discrimination and responses to unfair treatment among community-dwelling U.S. Chinese older adults. Guided by a community-based participatory research approach, 3,159 community-dwelling Chinese older adults aged 60 years and older in the Greater Chicago area were interviewed in person between 2011 and 2013. Of the 3,159 participants interviewed, 58.9% were women and the mean age was 72.8 years. A total of 671 (21.3%) participants reported having experienced discrimination and 1,454 (48.2%) reported passive response to unfair treatment. Older adults living in Chicago's Chinatown had the lowest prevalence of perceived discrimination compared with those living in other areas. Younger age, higher education, higher income, fewer children, more years in the United States, more years in the community, poorer health status, lower quality of life, and worsening health over the last year were associated with higher frequency of discrimination reported. Younger age, higher education, higher income, being married, living with more people, having fewer children, more years in the United States, and better health over the past year were associated with engaged responses to unfair treatment. U.S. Chinese older adults suffered considerable discrimination, but tended to have passive responses to unfair treatment. Future longitudinal studies are needed to improve our understanding of the risk factors and outcomes associated with discrimination among U.S. Chinese older adults. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Experience of Discrimination Among U.S. Chinese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruijia; Simon, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Experiences of discrimination are detrimental to health and well-being. This study aimed to examine experiences of discrimination and responses to unfair treatment among community-dwelling U.S. Chinese older adults. Method. Guided by a community-based participatory research approach, 3,159 community-dwelling Chinese older adults aged 60 years and older in the Greater Chicago area were interviewed in person between 2011 and 2013. Results. Of the 3,159 participants interviewed, 58.9% were women and the mean age was 72.8 years. A total of 671 (21.3%) participants reported having experienced discrimination and 1,454 (48.2%) reported passive response to unfair treatment. Older adults living in Chicago’s Chinatown had the lowest prevalence of perceived discrimination compared with those living in other areas. Younger age, higher education, higher income, fewer children, more years in the United States, more years in the community, poorer health status, lower quality of life, and worsening health over the last year were associated with higher frequency of discrimination reported. Younger age, higher education, higher income, being married, living with more people, having fewer children, more years in the United States, and better health over the past year were associated with engaged responses to unfair treatment. Conclusion. U.S. Chinese older adults suffered considerable discrimination, but tended to have passive responses to unfair treatment. Future longitudinal studies are needed to improve our understanding of the risk factors and outcomes associated with discrimination among U.S. Chinese older adults. PMID:25326642

  1. Orchestrating care: nursing practice with hospitalised older adults.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Sherry Ann; Phinney, Alison; Hall, Wendy Ann; Rodney, Patricia; Baumbusch, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    The increased incidence of health challenges with aging means that nurses are increasingly caring for older adults, often in hospital settings. Research about the complexity of nursing practice with this population remains limited. To seek an explanation of nursing practice with hospitalised older adults. Design. A grounded theory study guided by symbolic interactionism was used to explore nursing practice with hospitalised older adults from a nursing perspective. Glaserian grounded theory methods were used to develop a mid-range theory after analysis of 375 hours of participant observation, 35 interviews with 24 participants and review of selected documents. The theory of orchestrating care was developed to explain how nurses are continuously trying to manage their work environments by understanding the status of the patients, their unit, mobilising the assistance of others and stretching available resources to resolve their problem of providing their older patients with what they perceived as 'good care' while sustaining themselves as 'good' nurses. They described their practice environments as hard and under-resourced. Orchestrating care is comprised of two subprocesses: building synergy and minimising strain. These two processes both facilitated and constrained each other and nurses' abilities to orchestrate care. Although system issues presented serious constraints to nursing practice, the ways in which nurses were making meaning of their work environment both aided them in managing their challenges and constrained their agency. Nurses need to be encouraged to share their important perspective about older adult care. Administrators have a role to play in giving nurses voice in workplace committees and in forums. Further research is needed to better understand how multidisciplinary teams influence care of hospitalized older adults. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Developmental trajectory of time perspective: From children to older adults.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Liu, Lu-Lu; Cui, Ji-Fang; Chen, Xing-Jie; Wang, Ya

    2016-12-01

    Time perspective is a fundamental dimension of the psychological time construct, with a pervasive and powerful influence on human behavior. However, the developmental trajectory of time perspective across a human lifespan remains unclear. The current study aimed to portray the developmental trajectory of all dimensions of time perspectives from children to older adults in a large sample. A total of 1,901 individuals (aged 9-84 years) completed measures of time perspective. They were then divided into five age groups: children, teenagers, young adults, middle-aged adults, and older adults. Results suggested that each time perspective showed a unique developmental pattern across the lifespan. Moreover, perceived economic situation and education were related to some dimensions of time perspective. © 2016 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Intelligibility of Noise-Adapted and Clear Speech in Child, Young Adult, and Older Adult Talkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiljanic, Rajka; Gilbert, Rachael C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined intelligibility of conversational and clear speech sentences produced in quiet and in noise by children, young adults, and older adults. Relative talker intelligibility was assessed across speaking styles. Method: Sixty-one young adult participants listened to sentences mixed with speech-shaped noise at -5 dB…

  4. [German National Physical Activity Recommendations for Adults and Older Adults: Methods, Database and Rationale].

    PubMed

    Füzéki, Eszter; Vogt, Lutz; Banzer, Winfried

    2017-03-01

    National physical activity recommendations are regarded as crucial elements of comprehensive physical activity promotion strategies. To date, Germany has no such national physical activity recommendations. The aim of this study was to provide physical activity recommendations based on a comprehensive summary of scientific evidence on the relationships between physical activity and a range of health outcomes in adults and older adults. The recommendations were developed in a 3-phase process (systematic literature review, development and use of quality criteria, synthesis of content) based on already existing high-quality guidelines. Based on the analysis of documents included in this study, the following recommendations were formulated. To gain wide-ranging health benefits, adults and older adults should be physically active regularly and avoid inactivity. Adults and older adults should carry out at least 150 min/week moderate intensity or 75 min/week high intensity aerobic activity. Adults and older adults can also reach the recommended amount of physical activity by performing activities in an appropriate combination in both intensity ranges. Optimally, physical activity should be distributed over the week and it can be accumulated in bouts of at least 10 min. Physical activity beyond 150 min/week yields further health benefits. At the same time, physical activity below 150 min/week is associated with meaningful health gains. Accordingly, all adults and older adults should be encouraged to be physically active whenever possible. Adults and older adults should also perform muscle strengthening activities at least twice a week. Regular balance exercises (3 times a week) can reduce the risk of falls in older adults. Adults and older adults should avoid long periods of sitting and should break up sitting time by physical activity. Physical activity can lead to adverse events, such as musculoskeletal injuries, which can be mitigated through appropriate

  5. Depressive symptoms in institutionalized older adults

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Lívia Maria; Mattos, Inês Echenique

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms among institutionalized elderly individuals and to analyze factors associated with this condition. METHODS This was a cross-sectional study involving 462 individuals aged 60 or older, residents in long stay institutions in four Brazilian municipalities. The dependent variable was assessed using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. Poisson’s regression was used to evaluate associations with co-variables. We investigated which variables were most relevant in terms of presence of depressive symptoms within the studied context through factor analysis. RESULTS Prevalence of depressive symptoms was 48.7%. The variables associated with depressive symptoms were: regular/bad/very bad self-rated health; comorbidities; hospitalizations; and lack of friends in the institution. Five components accounted for 49.2% of total variance of the sample: functioning, social support, sensory deficiency, institutionalization and health conditions. In the factor analysis, functionality and social support were the components which explained a large part of observed variance. CONCLUSIONS A high prevalence of depressive symptoms, with significant variation in distribution, was observed. Such results emphasize the importance of health conditions and functioning for institutionalized older individuals developing depression. They also point to the importance of providing opportunities for interaction among institutionalized individuals. PMID:24897042

  6. Toward a New Motivation to Learn Framework for Older Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yi-Yin; Sandmann, Lorilee R.

    2012-01-01

    Although existing literature addresses adults' motivation to learn, and some specifically focuses on older adults, it is now recognized that older adults are more heterogeneous and complex than other age groups. Therefore, this study seeks to provide an alternative theoretical framework to investigate motivation to learn for older adult learners…

  7. Goals and Everyday Problem Solving: Manipulating Goal Preferences in Young and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoppmann, Christiane A.; Blanchard-Fields, Fredda

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the link between goal and problem-solving strategy preferences in 130 young and older adults using hypothetical family problem vignettes. At baseline, young adults preferred autonomy goals, whereas older adults preferred generative goals. Imagining an expanded future time perspective led older adults to show…

  8. Attitudes toward Younger and Older Adults: The German Aging Semantic Differential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluth, Sebastian; Ebner, Natalie C.; Schmiedek, Florian

    2010-01-01

    The present study used the German Aging Semantic Differential (ASD) to assess attitudes toward younger and older adults in a heterogeneous sample of n = 151 younger and n = 143 older adults. The questionnaire was administered in two versions, one referring to the evaluation of younger adults, the other to the evaluation of older adults.…

  9. A novel approach to enhancing limb control in older adults.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Jason B; Kennedy, Deanna M; Shea, Charles H

    2015-07-01

    Two recent experiments have demonstrated that young adult participants were able to make faster and more harmonic movements in a typical reciprocal Fitts task (ID = 6) following a practice session of sine wave tracking (Boyle et al. in Exp Brain Res 223:377-387, 2012; J Mot Behav 46:277-285, 2014). The purpose of the present experiment was to replicate these findings with a young adult population (age 18-25) and determine whether sine wave tracking also enhances goal-directed limb movements in an older adult population (age 65-90). To establish a performance baseline, all participants were first pretested on a typical ID = 6 Fitts task. Participants in each age group were then randomly assigned to one of the two training conditions where they practiced (45 trials) on a typical Fitts task (ID = 6) or they were asked to track a sine wave template (45 trials). Following practice, all participants were then posttested under the ID = 6 Fitts conditions. The results demonstrated that both young and older adult participants that practiced under the sine wave conditions enhanced their Fitts task performance compared to participants in their respective age groups who practiced under the Fitts conditions. These enhancements included faster movement times, smaller dwell times, and more harmonic movements, all without decreases in movement accuracy. These results replicate our previous findings with young adults and extend the finding to older adult participants. Interestingly, the performances of the older adults following sine wave practice were as fast and as accurate as the young adults following Fitts task practice.

  10. Designing User Interfaces for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Douglas; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Of 45 adults over 50 who had computer experience, 44% reported difficulty reading screens, 53% were frustrated by complex software, and 27% had difficulty with the mouse. The physical characteristics of aging should be considered in designing special software features such as dynamic text resizing and menu buttons instead of pull-down menus. (SK)

  11. Story Processing Ability in Cognitively Healthy Younger and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Heather Harris; Capilouto, Gilson J.; Srinivasan, Cidambi; Fergadiotis, Gerasimos

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships among measures of comprehension and production for stories depicted in wordless pictures books and measures of memory and attention for 2 age groups. Method Sixty cognitively healthy adults participated. They consisted of two groups—young adults (20–29 years of age) and older adults (70–89 years of age). Participants completed cognitive measures and several discourse tasks; these included telling stories depicted in wordless picture books and answering multiple-choice comprehension questions pertaining to the story. Results The 2 groups did not differ significantly for proportion of story propositions conveyed; however, the younger group performed significantly better on the comprehension measure as compared with the older group. Only the older group demonstrated a statistically significant relationship between the story measures. Performance on the production and comprehension measures significantly correlated with performance on the cognitive measures for the older group but not for the younger group. Conclusions The relationship between adults’ comprehension of stimuli used to elicit narrative production samples and their narrative productions differed across the life span, suggesting that discourse processing performance changes in healthy aging. Finally, the study’s findings suggest that memory and attention contribute to older adults’ story processing performance. PMID:21106701

  12. [Adaptation Process to Group Home Living by Older Adults].

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hee Sook; Sok, Sohyune

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore and describe the adaptation process of older people to group homes. Participants were twenty older adults aged 65 or older who were living in group homes. Data were collected from January to April, 2015. In-depth unstructured interviews were conducted with individual participants. Data were analyzed using Strauss and Corbin's grounded theory method. From open coding, 100 concepts, 38 sub-categories, and 14 categories were identified. Analysis showed that the central phenomenon of the adaptation process of older people to group homes was 'gradually giving up'. Causal conditions were 'good-for-nothing body', contextual conditions were 'pushed', 'beleaguered'. Intervening conditions were 'reliable pillar: children', 'having affection more than having it from family: facility workers', 'comfort - like feeling at home', 'relieved: system'. Action/interaction strategies were 'facing the unfamiliar reality', 'building relationships with other people', 'accepting reality'. Consequences were 'a good place, more than expected', 'hope for the remaining days', 'waiting for a peaceful death'. The results of this study provide an in-depth understanding of the experience of the adaptation process of older people to group homes. The findings from this study can be used as basic data to establish policies to increase the number of small scale facilities which can help older adults adapt easily to the facilities.

  13. Older adults' perspectives on naturopathic medicine's impact on healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Erica B; Thomas, Marie-Sabine; McCarty, Melissa; Berg, Jennifer; Burlingham, Bonnie; Bradley, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    High rates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization among older adults are of interest because studies suggest relationships among CAM, self-care, and healthy lifestyle. These potential relationships are of particular interest because of the contribution of self-care in maintaining physical, emotional, and spiritual health as key strategies to successful aging. Naturopathic medicine (NM) is a type of primary care CAM used by older adults, yet little is known about older adults' use of NM or its role in healthy aging. We sought to examine perceptions about, and utilization of, NM and the experience of addressing health and wellness as part of the aging process. Phenomenology-based qualitative inquiry. A total of 13 community-based clinics affiliated with a naturopathic medical school. A total of 47 adults aged 58-100 years. Qualitative analysis of semi-structured focus groups with quantitative analysis of clinical administrative data. Over 2543 older adults used NM services affiliated with a natural academic clinic in Seattle in 2011 for diagnoses consistent with primary care: fatigue, anxiety, diabetes, diarrhea, and depression, in rank order. Participants reported they sought NM because it offered a different system of care aligned with their values. Themes included (1) feeling heard, (2) a focus on health education including prevention and self-care, and (3) feeling supported. Themes further distilled into optimal descriptive characteristics of patient-centered providers that may best support older adults' healthy aging. A final theme described barriers to further utilization. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Stereotype Threat Lowers Older Adults' Self-Reported Hearing Abilities.

    PubMed

    Barber, Sarah J; Lee, Soohyoung Rain

    2015-01-01

    Although stereotype threat is a well-documented phenomenon, previous studies examining it in older adults have almost exclusively focused on objective cognitive outcomes. Considerably less attention has been paid to the impact of stereotype threat on older adults' subjective assessments of their own abilities or to the impact of stereotype threat in noncognitive domains. Older adults are stereotyped as having experienced not only cognitive declines, but physical declines as well. The current study tested the prediction that stereotype threat can negatively influence older adults' subjective hearing abilities. To test this, 115 adults (mean age 50.03 years, range 41-67) read either a positive or negative description about how aging affects hearing. All participants then answered a questionnaire in which they assessed their own hearing abilities. The impact of stereotype threat on self-reported hearing was moderated by chronological age. Participants in their 40s and early 50s were unaffected by the stereotype threat manipulation. In contrast, participants in their late 50s and 60s rated their hearing as being subjectively worse when under stereotype threat. The current study provides a clear demonstration that stereotype threat negatively impacts older adults' subjective assessments of their own abilities. It is also the first study to demonstrate an effect of stereotype threat within the domain of hearing. These results have important implications for researchers investigating age-related hearing decline. Stereotype threat can lead to overestimation of the prevalence of age-related hearing decline. It can also serve as a confounding variable when examining the psychosocial correlates of hearing loss. Because of this, researchers studying age-related hearing loss should aim to provide a stereotype threat-free testing environment and also include assessments of stereotype threat within their studies. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Health Literacy in Older Adults With and Without Low Vision.

    PubMed

    Warren, Mary; DeCarlo, Dawn K; Dreer, Laura E

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether older adults with low vision (LV) from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) demonstrated lower functional health literacy than older adults without LV. Fifty adults with AMD were matched with adults without LV on age, gender, education, and income. We measured visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and reading speed and administered the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) using two test time conditions, standard and unlimited, to measure health literacy levels. The group with LV had considerably lower TOFHLA scores for both time conditions (p < .001) and took notably longer to complete the test (p < .001). Poorer acuity correlated with lower TOFHLA scores in the group with LV. Older adults with LV may take longer to read and understand health information, which has important implications for providing health education to support self-management. Modifying components of the reading task may facilitate reading performance and understanding of health education materials. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  16. Fecal microbiota transplant for Clostridium difficile infection in older adults.

    PubMed

    Tauxe, William M; Haydek, John P; Rebolledo, Paulina A; Neish, Emma; Newman, Kira L; Ward, Angela; Dhere, Tanvi; Kraft, Colleen S

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the safety of fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) among older adults. We performed a case review of all FMT recipients aged 65 or older treated at Emory University Hospital, a tertiary care and referral center for Georgia and surrounding states. CDI resolved in 27 (87%) of 31 respondents, including three individuals who received multiple FMTs. Among four whose CDI was not resolved at follow up, three respondents did well initially before CDI recurred, and one individual never eradicated his CDI despite repeating FMT. During the study, five deaths and eight serious adverse events requiring hospitalization were reported within the study group during the follow-up period. Fecal transplant was not a causative factor in these events. The most common adverse event reported in 4 (13%) of 31 respondents was subjective worsening of arthritis. FMT is a generally safe and effective treatment option for older adults with CDI.

  17. Sleep and Suicide in Older Adults: An Opportunity for Intervention.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Todd M; Simons, Kelsey V; King, Deborah A; Pigeon, Wilfred R

    2016-11-01

    Whether as a standalone disorder or as a symptom associated with existing pathology, the prevalence of sleep disturbance increases with age. Older adults also experience a myriad of risk factors for suicide, including depression, and have elevated rates of suicide. There is now significant evidence linking sleep disturbances to suicidal thoughts and behaviors. The use of pharmacologic means to treat insomnia (e.g., sedative hypnotics) is also commonplace among older cohorts and has been associated with suicide. Behavioral treatment of insomnia represents an efficacious alternative to pharmacotherapy among older adults, which while improving sleep, may concurrently reduce depressive symptomatology. Implications and clinical recommendations of the sleep-suicide relationship are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Identifying Factors Associated With Mobility Decline Among Hospitalized Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Chase, Jo-Ana D; Lozano, Alicia; Hanlon, Alexandra; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2018-02-01

    Hospitalization can negatively affect mobility among older adults. Early detection of older patients most at risk for mobility decline can lead to early intervention and prevention of mobility loss. This study's purpose was to identify factors from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health associated with mobility decline among hospitalized elders. We conducted a secondary analysis of data from 959 hospitalized adults age 65 and older. We estimated the effects of health conditions and environmental and personal factors on mobility decline using logistic regression. Almost half of the sample declined in mobility function during hospitalization. Younger age, longer length of hospital stay, having a hearing impairment, and non-emergency admit type were associated with mobility decline, after adjusting for covariates. Findings may be used to develop an evidence-based, risk-determination tool for hospitalized elders. Future research should focus on individual, environmental, and policy-based interventions promoting physical activity in the hospital.

  19. Antidepressants and Driving in Older Adults: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Duncan H; Rapoport, Mark J

    2016-06-01

    With an increasing number of older drivers who are prescribed antidepressants, the potential consequences of antidepressant use on driving skills in an aging population are becoming a pressing issue. We conducted a systematic review using MEDLINE, targeting articles specifically pertaining to antidepressants and driving in a population or subgroup of older adults (≥ 55 years of age). The search yielded 267 references, nine of which pertained to the effects of antidepressants on driving in older adults. The single experimental study found imipramine to have detrimental effects on highway driving, whereas nefazodone did not. Seven of eight population-based studies reported a significant increased risk of involvement in a collision associated with antidepressant use. Although the studies indicated a negative effect of antidepressants on driving, the epidemiological designs cannot exclude the possibility that the underlying illness, generally major depression, is the culprit.

  20. Older Adults' Reports of Formal Care Hours and Administrative Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Steven M.; Brassard, Andrea B.; Simone, Bridget; Stern, Yaakov

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Personal assistance care is a Medicaid benefit in New York, but few data are available on its prevalence and contribution to home care. We examined these issues in a New York City sample by assessing older adults' reports of weekly home care hours and Medicaid billing records. Design and Methods: With help from New York City's Human…

  1. Differentiating true and false schematic memories in older adults.

    PubMed

    Webb, Christina E; Dennis, Nancy A

    2018-02-06

    While schemas aid memory for schematically related information, the gist induced by the schema can also lead to high rates of false memories, especially in older adults. The neural mechanisms that support and differentiate true and false memories in aging are not well understood. The current study sought to clarify this, using a novel scene paradigm to investigate the role of schemas on true and false memories in older adults. Healthy older adults encoded schematic scenes (e.g., bathroom). At retrieval, participants were tested on their memory for both schematic and non-schematic targets and lures while fMRI data was collected. Results indicate that true memories were supported by the typical retrieval network, and activity in this network was greater for true than false memories. Schema specific retrieval was supported by mPFC, extending this common finding to aging. While no region differentiated false memories compared to correct rejections, results showed that individual differences in false memory rates were associated with variability in neural activity. The findings underscore the importance of elucidating the neural basis of cognition within older adults, as well as the specific contribution of individual differences to the neural basis of memory errors in aging.

  2. Dietary considerations for reducing cardiometabolic risk in older adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The aim of dietary guidance specifically targeted for older adults to minimize the risk of developing cardiometabolic disorders is, for the most part, consistent with that associated with optimal health outcomes throughout adulthood. Evidence suggests that there is a direct link between healthy diet...

  3. List Formats Improve Medication Instructions for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Daniel; And Others

    1995-01-01

    In 3 experiments older adults (n=27, n=36, and n=27) were given medication instructions as categorized lists, simple lists, or paragraphs. The first group preferred categorized lists; the second answered questions about listed instructions more quickly, and the third group recalled more information from simple lists. List format was considered…

  4. Mature Stuff. Physical Activity for the Older Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, David K., Ed.

    This book on physical education for the older adult is divided into three parts. The first part contains a chapter that introduces the reader to the topic of aging in American society and ties that topic to the interests of health professionals. Chapters 2 through 6 address the foundation areas of health, physical education, recreation and dance…

  5. Bilateral Brain Regions Associated with Naming in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obler, Loraine K.; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Schnyer, David; Clark-Cotton, Manuella R.; Spiro, Avron, III; Hyun, JungMoon; Kim, Dae-Shik; Goral, Mira; Albert, Martin L.

    2010-01-01

    To determine structural brain correlates of naming abilities in older adults, we tested 24 individuals aged 56-79 on two confrontation-naming tests (the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and the Action Naming Test (ANT)), then collected from these individuals structural Magnetic-Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data. Overall,…

  6. Visual Arts and Older Adult Learners in Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Irma

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of visual arts and its impact on successful aging and older adult learners in retirement. Retirement is one of the most important economic, psychological, and social transitions in most people's lives. Longevity has increased in the last sixty years such that in 2010, the average person can…

  7. Digital Skills Acquisition: Future Trends among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify future trends and barriers that will either facilitate or impede the narrowing of the digital skills divide among older adults during the next 10 years. Methodology: To address the research questions, this study used a modified version of the Delphi process using a panel of experts who…

  8. Older Japanese Adults and Mobile Phones: An Applied Ethnographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hachiya, Kumiko

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research investigates the meaning of "keitai" (mobile phones) for older Japanese adults between the ages of 59 and 79. Participants' emails from keitai, handwritten daily logs, and audio and video recordings from meetings and interviews were collected during my stay of nearly seven months in one of the largest cities in…

  9. Understanding Arthritis Promoting Healthy Lifestyles for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremethick, Mary Jane; Hogan, Patricia I.; Coleman, Barb; Adams, Kady

    2010-01-01

    One of the goals of "Healthy People 2010" is to decrease the incidence of limitation in physical activity due to arthritis. Physical education, recreation, and dance professionals can play an important role in meeting this objective by addressing barriers to physical activity and exercise in older adults with arthritis, and by successfully…

  10. The Application of a Generativity Model for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehlman, Katie; Ligon, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Generativity is a concept first introduced by Erik Erikson as a part of his psychosocial theory which outlines eight stages of development in the human life. Generativity versus stagnation is the main developmental concern of middle adulthood; however, generativity is also recognized as an important theme in the lives of older adults. Building on…

  11. Dietary screening tool identifies nutritional risk in older adults123

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paige E; Mitchell, Diane C; Hartman, Terryl J; Lawrence, Frank R; Sempos, Christopher T; Smiciklas-Wright, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Background: No rapid methods exist for screening overall dietary intakes in older adults. Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a scoring system for a diet screening tool to identify nutritional risk in community-dwelling older adults. Design: This cross-sectional study in older adults (n = 204) who reside in rural areas examined nutrition status by using an in-person interview, biochemical measures, and four 24-h recalls that included the use of dietary supplements. Results: The dietary screening tool was able to characterize 3 levels of nutritional risk: at risk, possible risk, and not at risk. Individuals classified as at nutritional risk had significantly lower indicators of diet quality (Healthy Eating Index and Mean Adequacy Ratio) and intakes of protein, most micronutrients, dietary fiber, fruit, and vegetables. The at-risk group had higher intakes of fats and oils and refined grains. The at-risk group also had the lowest serum vitamin B-12, folate, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin concentrations. The not-at-nutritional-risk group had significantly higher lycopene and β-carotene and lower homocysteine and methylmalonic acid concentrations. Conclusion: The dietary screening tool is a simple and practical tool that can help to detect nutritional risk in older adults. PMID:19458013

  12. The chemical senses and nutrition in older adults.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Claire

    2008-01-01

    Taste and smell are critical to dietary selection, especially for older adults, whose appetite is reduced. Neuroimaging studies can elucidate the process that causes the decrease of chemosensory functions with aging. The profound lost of olfactory functions in persons with Alzheimer disease accentuate the problem of inadequate food intake and disease progression.

  13. The Impact of Arthritis on Life Satisfaction of Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burckhardt, Carol S.

    Poor health has been implicated as a suppressor of the life satisfaction of older adults. To clarify the contribution of arthritis to this process, functional disability, negative affect, pain, current severity of the disease, self-esteem, perception of general health, and internal health locus of control, were placed within a causal model as…

  14. Sleep Reduces False Memory in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lo, June C.; Sim, Sam K. Y.; Chee, Michael W. L.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the effects of post-learning sleep and sleep architecture on false memory in healthy older adults. Design: Balanced, crossover design. False memory was induced using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm and assessed following nocturnal sleep and following a period of daytime wakefulness. Post-learning sleep structure was evaluated using polysomnography (PSG). Setting: Sleep research laboratory. Participants: Fourteen healthy older adults from the Singapore-Longitudinal Aging Brain Study (mean age ± standard deviation = 66.6 ± 4.1 y; 7 males). Measurements and Results: At encoding, participants studied lists of words that were semantically related to non-presented critical lures. At retrieval, they made “remember”/“know” and “new” judgments. Compared to wakefulness, post-learning sleep was associated with reduced “remember” responses, but not “know” responses to critical lures. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the veridical recognition of studied words, false recognition of unrelated distractors, discriminability, or response bias between the sleep and the wake conditions. More post-learning slow wave sleep was associated with greater reduction in false memory. Conclusions: In healthy older adults, sleep facilitates the reduction in false memory without affecting veridical memory. This benefit correlates with the amount of slow wave sleep in the post-learning sleep episode. Citation: Lo JC; Sim SK; Chee MW. Sleep reduces false memory in healthy older adults. SLEEP 2014;37(4):665-671. PMID:24744453

  15. Attitudes toward Older Adults: A Reexamination of Two Major Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwasaki, Michiko; Jones, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to reexamine the psychometric properties of two major scales measuring attitudes toward older adults. The Kogan Attitudes Toward Old People Scale (Kogan OP Scale; Kogan, 1961b) was administered to a sample of 512 college students in Study One. The refined version (Polizzi & Millikin, 2002) of the Aging Semantic…

  16. Pain Energy Model of Mobility Limitation in the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Peter C; Schrack, Jennifer A; Hicks, Gregory E

    2017-05-22

    Chronic pain is prevalent, costly, and disabling among older adults. Although mobility decline is inevitable with aging, it is clear, from current evidence, that older adults with chronic pain experience a greater rate of functional mobility decline than their pain-free peers. Past studies suggest that pain expedites the age-related decline in functional mobility; however, the pathways through which pain affects mobility remain unclear. Gerontological experts hypothesize that the age-related decline in mobility may be driven by alterations in energy expenditure; these concepts are outlined in a model known as the Energetic Pathway of Mobility Loss. Pain may play a critical role in this process through a pathway of energetic inefficiency, physical inactivity, and decreased capacity.  The purposes of this article are to 1) summarize the current literature that supports the Energetic Pathway of Mobility Loss model and 2) propose a new framework, known as the Pain Energy Model, to clarify how the disablement process may be amplified among older adults with painful conditions.  This new framework is designed to generate new clinical research and to suggest new clinical implications for older adults with painful conditions by identifying key steps and potential treatment targets in the pathway to functional mobility decline.

  17. Cognitive spare capacity in older adults with hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sushmit; Stenfelt, Stefan; Lunner, Thomas; Rönnberg, Jerker; Rudner, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC) are associated with speech recognition in adverse conditions, reflecting the need to maintain and process speech fragments until lexical access can be achieved. When working memory resources are engaged in unlocking the lexicon, there is less Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) available for higher level processing of speech. CSC is essential for interpreting the linguistic content of speech input and preparing an appropriate response, that is, engaging in conversation. Previously, we showed, using a Cognitive Spare Capacity Test (CSCT) that in young adults with normal hearing, CSC was not generally related to WMC and that when CSC decreased in noise it could be restored by visual cues. In the present study, we investigated CSC in 24 older adults with age-related hearing loss, by administering the CSCT and a battery of cognitive tests. We found generally reduced CSC in older adults with hearing loss compared to the younger group in our previous study, probably because they had poorer cognitive skills and deployed them differently. Importantly, CSC was not reduced in the older group when listening conditions were optimal. Visual cues improved CSC more for this group than for the younger group in our previous study. CSC of older adults with hearing loss was not generally related to WMC but it was consistently related to episodic long term memory, suggesting that the efficiency of this processing bottleneck is important for executive processing of speech in this group. PMID:24904409

  18. Formal caregivers of older adults: reflection about their practice.

    PubMed

    Batista, Marina Picazzio Perez; Barros, Juliana de Oliveira; Almeida, Maria Helena Morgani de; Mângia, Elisabete Ferreira; Lancman, Selma

    2014-10-01

    To understand the job function of caregivers of older adults and contribute to the debate on the consolidation of this professional practice. This is a descriptive, qualitative, and exploratory study. Four focal group sessions were performed in 2011 with 11 elderly companions, formal caregivers of older adults in the Programa Acompanhante de Idosos (Program for Caregivers of Older Adults), Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil. These sessions, guided by a semi-structured script, were audio-recorded and fully transcribed. Data were analyzed using the Content Analysis technique, Thematic Modality. In view of considering the caregivers of older adults as a new category of workers, it was difficult to define their duties. The elderly companions themselves as well as the care receivers, their families, and the professionals that comprised the team were unclear about their duties. The professional practice of these formal caregivers has been built on the basis of constant discussions and negotiations among them and other team members in Programa Acompanhante de Idosos during daily work. This was achieved via a recognition process of their job functions and by setting apart other workers' exclusive responsibilities. The delimitation of specific job functions for elderly companions is currently one of the greatest challenges faced by these workers to develop and consolidate their professional role as well as improve Programa Acompanhante de Idosos.

  19. Formal caregivers of older adults: reflection about their practice

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Marina Picazzio Perez; Barros, Juliana de Oliveira; de Almeida, Maria Helena Morgani; Mângia, Elisabete Ferreira; Lancman, Selma

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To understand the job function of caregivers of older adults and contribute to the debate on the consolidation of this professional practice. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES This is a descriptive, qualitative, and exploratory study. Four focal group sessions were performed in 2011 with 11 elderly companions, formal caregivers of older adults in the Programa Acompanhante de Idosos (Program for Caregivers of Older Adults), Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil. These sessions, guided by a semi-structured script, were audio-recorded and fully transcribed. Data were analyzed using the Content Analysis technique, Thematic Modality. RESULTS In view of considering the caregivers of older adults as a new category of workers, it was difficult to define their duties. The elderly companions themselves as well as the care receivers, their families, and the professionals that comprised the team were unclear about their duties. The professional practice of these formal caregivers has been built on the basis of constant discussions and negotiations among them and other team members in Programa Acompanhante de Idosos during daily work. This was achieved via a recognition process of their job functions and by setting apart other workers’ exclusive responsibilities. CONCLUSIONS The delimitation of specific job functions for elderly companions is currently one of the greatest challenges faced by these workers to develop and consolidate their professional role as well as improve Programa Acompanhante de Idosos. PMID:25372163

  20. The Level of Willingness to Evacuate among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray-Graves, Amy; Turner, Keith W.; Swan, James H.

    2011-01-01

    The issues of rising numbers of disasters, overwhelming increases in number of older adults, and historically flawed evacuations present real challenges. During the next two decades, the number of American baby boomers, who turn 65, will increase by 40%. As evidenced by recent disasters, the imperfections and vulnerabilities of flawed evacuations…

  1. Auditory Processing of Older Adults with Probable Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Jerri D.; Lister, Jennifer J.; Elias, Maya N.; Tetlow, Amber M.; Sardina, Angela L.; Sadeq, Nasreen A.; Brandino, Amanda D.; Bush, Aryn L. Harrison

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Studies suggest that deficits in auditory processing predict cognitive decline and dementia, but those studies included limited measures of auditory processing. The purpose of this study was to compare older adults with and without probable mild cognitive impairment (MCI) across two domains of auditory processing (auditory performance in…

  2. Cognitive Benefits of Online Social Networking for Healthy Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Myhre, Janelle W; Mehl, Matthias R; Glisky, Elizabeth L

    2017-09-01

    Research suggests that older adults who remain socially active and cognitively engaged have better cognitive function than those who are isolated and disengaged. This study examined the efficacy of learning and using an online social networking website, Facebook.com, as an intervention to maintain or enhance cognitive function in older adults. Forty-one older adults were assigned to learn and use Facebook (n = 14) or an online diary website (active control, n = 13) for 8 weeks or placed on a waitlist (n = 14). Outcome measures included neuropsychological tests of executive functions, memory, and processing speed and self-report questionnaires about social engagement. The Facebook group showed a significant increase in a composite measure of updating, an executive function factor associated with complex working memory tasks, compared to no significant change in the control groups. Other measures of cognitive function and social support showed no differential improvement in the Facebook group. Learning and using an online social networking site may provide specific benefits for complex working memory in a group of healthy older adults. This may reflect the particular cognitive demands associated with online social networking and/or the benefits of social engagement more generally.

  3. Operant Conditioning in Older Adults with Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spira, Adam P.; Edelstein, Barry A.

    2007-01-01

    Behavioral interventions based on operant principles are commonly attempted to manage agitation in older adults with dementia. The extent to which operant conditioning can occur in persons with particular dementias, however, is unclear. The present study involved use of a button-pressing task to evaluate the sensitivity of the responding of older…

  4. Older Adults Caring for Children: Intergenerational Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfgott, Kim Pawley

    The result of a project that also developed a database of intergenerational child care program, this publication summarizes intergenerational child care programs in which adults age 55 or older provide child care services to infants, toddlers, and school-age children on a volunteer or salaried basis. Chapter 1 provides a rationale for…

  5. Participation in Learning and Wellbeing among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to identify the effects of participation in learning on the subjective wellbeing of older adults. Data were from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), a large-scale, nationally representative survey of those aged 50 and above. The survey contains several wellbeing measures and information on three…

  6. Civic Engagement and Older Adults: A Critical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinson, Marty; Minkler, Meredith

    2006-01-01

    The aging of the baby boom generation, together with research that links volunteerism and positive health outcomes in later life, has contributed to a burgeoning of interest in initiatives and programs promoting civic engagement among older adults. Although useful in potentially expanding role options in later life, this growing attention also…

  7. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Lynda; LeBlanc, Melanie; Morin, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia is associated with significant morbidity and is often a persistent problem, particularly in older adults. It is important to attend to this complaint and not assume that it will remit spontaneously. In many cases, unfortunately, insomnia remains unrecognized and untreated, often because it is presumed that insomnia is an inevitable…

  8. Elevator and Escalator Safety Education for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanks, Roma Stovall

    1996-01-01

    In eight focus groups in five cities, older adults identified their concerns about safety on elevators and escalators, often related to misunderstanding of the equipment. Their preferences for delivery of safety information included video/television, pamphlets, discussions, and posters. Educational interventions and modifications for disabilities…

  9. Ethnically Diverse Older Adults' Beliefs about Staying Mentally Sharp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Daniela B.; Laditka, Sarah B.; Laditka, James N.; Wu, Bei; Liu, Rui; Price, Anna E.; Tseng, Winston; Corwin, Sara J.; Ivey, Susan L.; Hunter, Rebecca; Sharkey, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined diverse older adults' (n = 396, ages 50+) views about how to stay mentally sharp. We conducted 42 focus groups in four languages at nine United States locations using a standardized discussion guide and methods. The groups represented African Americans, American Indians, Chinese Americans, Latinos, Whites other than Latinos,…

  10. Factor Structure of Mental Health Measures for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zautra, Alex J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined factor structure of mental health self-reports among older adults who were either physically disabled (N=59), recently widowed (N=52), or matched controls (N=113). Subjects completed Mental Health Inventory, Psychiatric Epidemiology Research Interview Demoralization Composite, and Bradburn Positive Affect Scale. Analyses suggest…

  11. Barriers to Mental Health Treatment in Rural Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Brenes, Gretchen A; Danhauer, Suzanne C; Lyles, Mary F; Hogan, Patricia E; Miller, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the barriers to seeking mental health treatment experienced by rural older adults. We also examined if barriers differed by age and worry severity. Participants were 478 rural older adults responding to a flyer for a psychotherapy intervention study. Interested participants were screened by telephone, and barriers to mental health treatment were assessed. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire and the Penn State Worry Questionnaire-Abbreviated. The most commonly reported barrier to treatment was the personal belief that "I should not need help." Other commonly reported barriers included practical barriers (cost, not knowing where to go, distance), mistrust of mental health providers, not thinking treatment would help, stigma, and not wanting to talk with a stranger about private matters. Multivariable analyses indicated that worry severity and younger age were associated with reporting more barriers. Multiple barriers interfere with older adults seeking treatment for anxiety and depression. Older age is associated with fewer barriers, suggesting that the oldest old may have found strategies for overcoming these barriers. Young-old adults may benefit from interventions addressing personal beliefs about mental health and alternative methods of service delivery. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Involving Grandparents and Other Older Adults in the Preschool Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latimer, Deborah J.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the benefits derived from an intergenerational program in a child-care or preschool setting. Describes the planning and implementation of such a program, designed to foster a positive emotional relationship between grandparents, or other older adults as surrogate grandparents, and preschool children. (BB)

  13. Keeping It Safe: Aging in Place among Rural Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peek, Gina G.; Bishop, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study addressed in this article was to identify ways to reduce risk and improve safe aging in place among rural older adults. Resident and Extension faculty and county educators visited study participants at home to assess functional capacity and the home environment. Extension professionals may be uniquely positioned to provide…

  14. Home environmental problems and physical function in Taiwanese older adults.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tzuo-Yun; Wu, Shwu-Chong; Chang, Wen-Chiung; Chen, Ching-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Environmental hazards play an important role in the disablement process. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between home environmental problems and personal physical function. Data were based on a two-stage nationwide survey and evaluation on the needs of long-term care in Taiwan. A total of 10,596 individuals aged 65 and over were included in this study. These participants were identified with physical or cognitive problems at the screening interview and further evaluated at the second interview on health condition, functional status, needs of long-term care, and home environmental problems. Six items of environmental hazards were assessed at the participants' homes with direct observation. The prevalence rates of home environmental problems were similar among older adults with different levels of physical function. No grab bars (79.6-85.1%) and no protections against slip (81.9-92.8%) in the bathroom were two commonly present hazards in older adults' homes. Older adults with a higher income (Odds ratio=OR=0.75), without income information (OR=0.78) or living with other persons (OR=0.74) were less likely to experience environmental problems at home. Results from this study revealed that home environment condition was associated with factors other than personal disabling conditions for the elderly. Modifying home environment, especially the bathroom, should be attached with great importance for physically disabled older adults.

  15. What Motivates Older Adults to Improve Diet and Exercise Patterns?

    PubMed

    Bardach, Shoshana H; Schoenberg, Nancy E; Howell, Britteny M

    2016-02-01

    Dietary intake and physical activity are lifestyle behaviors that are learned, developed, and practiced throughout an individual's lifetime. These lifestyle behaviors have a profound role on health and quality of life--with late-life changes still resulting in notable improvements. Despite well documented benefits of behavior change, such changes are extremely challenging. The purpose of this study is to better understand from the perspective of older adults themselves, the factors that may influence their likelihood of making lifestyle changes. Participants were recruited two primary care clinics. 104 older adults ranging in age from 65 to 95 were included. Participants were interviewed about their motivations and plans to change diet and physical activity behaviors following a routine primary care visit. All interviews were transcribed and transcripts were analyzed using a line-by-line coding approach. Older adults reported that their likelihood of making a lifestyle change related to perceptions of old age, personal motivation, and perceived confidence in the ability to make effective changes. These findings suggest the importance of creating more positive images of old age and tailoring health promotion efforts to older adults' motivations and confidence in their ability to make behavior changes.

  16. Older Adults Talk Technology: Technology Usage and Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Mitzner, Tracy L.; Boron, Julie B.; Fausset, Cara Bailey; Adams, Anne E.; Charness, Neil; Czaja, Sara J.; Dijkstra, Katinka; Fisk, Arthur D.; Rogers, Wendy A.; Sharit, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Older adults (n = 113) participated in focus groups discussing their use of and attitudes about technology in the context of their home, work, and healthcare. Participants reported using a wide variety of technology items, particularly in their homes. Positive attitudes (i.e., likes) outnumbered negative attitudes (i.e., dislikes), suggesting that older adults perceive the benefits of technology use to outweigh the costs of such use. Positive attitudes were most frequently related to how the technology supported activities, enhanced convenience, and contained useful features. Negative attitudes were most frequently associated with technology creating inconveniences, unhelpful features, as well as security and reliability concerns. Given that older adults reported more positive than negative attitudes about the technologies they use, these results contradict stereotypes that older adults are afraid or unwilling to use technology. These findings also highlight the importance of perceived benefits of use and ease of use for models of technology acceptance. Emphasizing the benefits of technology in education and training programs may increase future technology adoption. PMID:20967133

  17. Technology: Education and Training Needs of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Lesa; Watson, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The impact of the global aging of the population on social, economic, political, and health care institutions is unequaled. Parallel to this, evolving developments in technology promise opportunities for sales and product development to support positive aging. Older adults are excited to utilize technologies that they perceive as practical.…

  18. Ecological Relevance Determines Task Priority in Older Adults' Multitasking.

    PubMed

    Doumas, Michail; Krampe, Ralf Th

    2015-05-01

    Multitasking is a challenging aspect of human behavior, especially if the concurrently performed tasks are different in nature. Several studies demonstrated pronounced performance decrements (dual-task costs) in older adults for combinations of cognitive and motor tasks. However, patterns of costs among component tasks differed across studies and reasons for participants' resource allocation strategies remained elusive. We investigated young and older adults' multitasking of a working memory task and two sensorimotor tasks, one with low (finger force control) and one with high ecological relevance (postural control). The tasks were performed in single-, dual-, and triple-task contexts. Working memory accuracy was reduced in dual-task contexts with either sensorimotor task and deteriorated further under triple-task conditions. Postural and force performance deteriorated with age and task difficulty in dual-task contexts. However, in the triple-task context with its maximum resource demands, older adults prioritized postural control over both force control and memory. Our results identify ecological relevance as the key factor in older adults' multitasking. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Instructional Videos for Supporting Older Adults Who Use Interactive Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gramss, Denise; Struve, Doreen

    2009-01-01

    The study reported in this paper investigated the usefulness of different instructions for guiding inexperienced older adults through interactive systems. It was designed to compare different media in relation to their social as well as their motivational impact on the elderly during the learning process. Precisely, the video was compared with…

  20. Older adults and mobile phones for health: a review.

    PubMed

    Joe, Jonathan; Demiris, George

    2013-10-01

    To report on the results of a review concerning the use of mobile phones for health with older adults. PubMed and CINAHL were searched for articles using "older adults" and "mobile phones" along with related terms and synonyms between 1965 and June 2012. Identified articles were filtered by the following inclusion criteria: original research project utilizing a mobile phone as an intervention, involve/target adults 60 years of age or older, and have an aim emphasizing the mobile phone's use in health. Twenty-one different articles were found and categorized into ten different clinical domains, including diabetes, activities of daily life, and dementia care, among others. The largest group of articles focused on diabetes care (4 articles), followed by COPD (3 articles), Alzheimer's/dementia Care (3 articles) and osteoarthritis (3 articles). Areas of interest studied included feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness. While there were many different clinical domains, the majority of studies were pilot studies that needed more work to establish a stronger base of evidence. Current work in using mobile phones for older adult use are spread across a variety of clinical domains. While this work is promising, current studies are generally smaller feasibility studies, and thus future work is needed to establish more generalizable, stronger base of evidence for effectiveness of these interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Patterns of sedentary behavior and physical function in older adults.

    PubMed

    Gennuso, Keith P; Thraen-Borowski, Keith M; Gangnon, Ronald E; Colbert, Lisa H

    2016-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the relationship between various objectively measured sedentary behavior (SB) variables and physical function in older adults, examine the measurement properties of an SB questionnaire, and describe the domains of SB in our sample. Forty-four older adults (70 ± 8 years, 64 % female) had their SB measured via activPAL activity monitor and SB questionnaire for 1 week followed by performance-based tests of physical function. The pattern of SB was more important than total SB time. Where a gender by SB interaction was found, increasing time in SB and fewer breaks were associated with worse function in the males only. The SB questionnaire had acceptable test-retest reliability but poor validity compared to activPAL-measured SB. The majority of SB time was spent watching television, using the computer and reading. This study provides further evidence for the association between SB and physical function and describes where older adults are spending their sedentary time. This information can be used in the design of future intervention to reduce sedentary time and improve function in older adults.

  2. Cognitive Style Predictors of Affect Change in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacowitz, Derek M.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2002-01-01

    Cognitive styles are the lenses through which individuals habitually process information from their environment. In this study, we evaluated whether different cognitive style individual difference variables, such as explanatory style and dispositional optimism, could predict changes in affective state over time in community-dwelling older adults.…

  3. Motivational Interviewing to Affect Behavioral Change in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Sherry M.; Cooper, R. Lyle; Cassie, Kim McClure

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews and assesses the existing research literature on the efficacy of motivational interviewing (MI) to promote lifestyle changes and improve functioning among older adults confronting serious health challenges. A comprehensive literature review was conducted of intervention studies that tested the use of MI to achieve behavioral…

  4. Motivations and Benefits of the Travel Experiences of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Young-Joo; Janke, Megan C.

    2011-01-01

    The motivations and benefits of educational travel among individuals aged 55 years old and over were examined in this study. A total of 136 older adults enrolled in Elderhostel programs participated in this study and reported their perceived benefits and motivations for engaging in educational travel experiences. Correlation analyses were used to…

  5. A Plan for: A Consumer Conference for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarakov, Selma

    This document provides a step-by-step description of the planning and implementation of a two day consumer concerns conference for older adults held at Palomar Community College (California). The bulk of the document is made up of practical discussions of such planning phases as facility selection and decoration, conference publicity, snack and…

  6. Services for Older Adults. Reference Book [and] Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    This student activity book and reference book, which are part of a family and consumer sciences education series focusing on a broad range of employment opportunities, are intended for use in 1- and 2- programs preparing Texas high school students for employment in occupations related to providing services for older adults. The reference book…

  7. Creative Retirement: Survey of Older Adults' Educational Interests and Motivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloane-Seale, Atlanta; Kops, Bill

    2004-01-01

    The University of Manitoba's Continuing Education Division (CED) and Creative Retirement Manitoba (CRM) formed a partnership to promote applied research on lifelong learning and older adults, to develop new and to complement existing educational activities, and to explore new program models and instructional methods to meet the educational needs…

  8. Social media use of older adults: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Leist, Anja K

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining social relationships has been defined as a core element of aging well. With a considerable amount of older adults living alone, social media provides the possibility to engage in meaningful social contact, e.g. by joining online social networks and online discussion forums. The review encompasses current knowledge of prerequisites in social media use of older adults such as functional capacity, information and communications technology-related knowledge, and favorable attitudes towards social media. Then, the potential of social media use for clinical practice and possible negative consequences are outlined. Literature on social media use from a gerontological perspective was reviewed in July and August 2012. Online communities are suitable for providing and receiving social support when confronted with a difficult life situation, regardless of geographical location or time. From a practitioner's perspective, social media can be used to advance health-related knowledge such as information on prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of specific conditions and disorders. Further positive consequences have been shown to be overcoming loneliness, relieving stress, and raising feelings of control and self-efficacy. Possible negative consequences could be misuse of personal data as well as the distribution and uncritical adoption of potentially harmful information via online communities. The potential of social media in clinical practice is reflected in a wide range of intervention possibilities for older adults. However, with the rise of social media, new threats emerge for older adults as well. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Clergy as mental health service providers to older adults.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Joseph G; Guo, Baorong

    2008-09-01

    Older adults tend to seek help for emotional problems from clergy at greater rates than they do from other sources. However, their help-seeking from clergy is largely understudied. We used data from the Naturally Occurring Retirement Community (NORC) Demonstration Project to examine older adults' patterns of help-seeking from clergy. We studied a sample of adults aged 65 or older (n = 317) to determine which factors were related to help-seeking from a religious leader. This study was framed within the Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization. Results of hierarchical logistic regression analyses indicated that having less social support and greater frequency of attendance at religious services was related to help-seeking from clergy for this sample, while other predisposing, enabling, need and religiosity variables were not found to be related to help-seeking from clergy. Discussion focuses on the need for mental health workers to be aware of the important role that clergy play in service provision and to find ways to leverage knowledge and skills to enhance provider-clergy relationships in order to improve services that older adults receive.

  10. Influencing and protective factors of suicidal ideation among older adults.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Bi; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Liu, Chia-Yih; Chen, Ying-Jen

    2017-04-01

    Suicide is a global issue, but few studies have explored the triggers and psychological feelings of suicidal ideation in older adults. A qualitative design with face-to-face semistructured interviews examined the experience of suicidal ideation in adults aged 65 years and older. A purposive sampling of 32 outpatients with suicidal ideation from a medical centre in northern Taiwan participated. Interview data identified three themes: triggers for suicidal ideation, contributing psychological changes, and factors of adaptive response. The triggers for suicidal ideation included physical discomfort, loss of respect and/or support from family, impulsive emotions due to conflicts with others, and painful memories. Psychological changes contributed to suicidal ideation: feelings of loneliness, a sense of helplessness, or lack of self-worth. Participants described adaptive responses that acted as protective factors of suicidal ideation: support from family and friends, control of emotions, establishing a support network, comfort from religion, medication, and focussing on the family. Mental health nurses and clinicians should incorporate evaluations of stressful life events and psychological changes into a screening scale for older adults to improve detection of those at risk for suicide. Teaching coping strategies could provide timely interventions to secure the safety of this older population of adults. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  11. Metabolites associated with circulating interleukin-6 in older adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Circulating levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels are elevated in older adults, but mechanisms are unclear. In the current study, we used an untargeted metabolomic approach to develop an improved understanding about mechanisms related to circulating IL-6 in ...

  12. Visual Object Pattern Separation Varies in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Heather M.; Toner, Chelsea; Pirogovsky, Eva; Kirwan, C. Brock; Gilbert, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Young and nondemented older adults completed a visual object continuous recognition memory task in which some stimuli (lures) were similar but not identical to previously presented objects. The lures were hypothesized to result in increased interference and increased pattern separation demand. To examine variability in object pattern separation…

  13. Hyphens for Disambiguating Phrases: Effectiveness for Young and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anema, Inge; Obler, Loraine K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hyphens that disambiguate phrasing in ambiguous sentences influence reading rate and reading comprehension for younger and older adults. Moreover, as working memory (WM) has been implicated in age-related changes in sentence comprehension for both auditory and written materials, we asked if it…

  14. Older Korean-American Adults' Attitudes toward the Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Hyuckhoon

    2009-01-01

    This study seeks to gain a holistic understanding of how older Korean-American adults' socio-demographic factors affect their attitudes toward the computer. The research was guided by four main questions: (1) What do participants describe as the consequences of their using the computer? (2) What attitudes toward the computer do participants…

  15. Older Adults in Lifelong Learning: Participation and Successful Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloane-Seale, Atlanta; Kops, Bill

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between the participation of older adult learners in educational activities and successful aging. In partnership with seniors' organizations, focus-group interviews were conducted on seniors' involvement in learning and their perceptions of its influence on successful aging. Successful aging is defined in…

  16. Measuring Successful Aging in Southern Black Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troutman, Meredith; Nies, Mary A.; Bentley, Monica

    2011-01-01

    With the growing size of the population of aging Black individuals, it is important to understand successful aging in this group. This study, therefore, piloted the Successful Aging Inventory (SAI) with a convenience sample of Black older adults. Participants completed a demographic form, the SAI, Purpose in Life Test, Life Satisfaction…

  17. Digital Gaming Perspectives of Older Adults: Content vs. Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marston, Hannah R.

    2013-01-01

    There were two objectives to this study: (a) to establish flow and (2) to establish whether computer game interaction or content was important to the older adult, using the Nintendo Wii and the Sony PlayStation 2 consoles. An earlier study had identified the sports genre as a preference, and three games (golf, tennis, and boxing) were selected…

  18. Alternating and Sequential Motion Rates in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, John E.; Cotton, Susan; Perry, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alternating motion rate (AMR) and sequential motion rate (SMR) are tests of articulatory diadochokinesis that are widely used in the evaluation of motor speech. However, there are no quality normative data available for adults aged 65 years and older. Aims: There were two aims: (1) to obtain a representative, normative dataset of…

  19. Lay Meanings of Health among Rural Older Adults in Appalachia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Spencer, S. Melinda; Williams, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Self-perceptions of health vary depending on one's social and cultural context. Rural residents have been characterized as having a distinct culture, and health differences by residence have been well documented. While there is evidence of poor health among rural older adults, little research has examined how they perceive and define…

  20. Positivity Effect Specific to Older Adults with Subclinical Memory Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, Stephanie L.; Noche, Jessica A.; Murray, Elizabeth A.; Yassa, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that older adults preferentially remember positive information ("positivity effect"), however others have reported mixed results. One potential source of conflict is that aging is not a unitary phenomenon and individual differences exist. We modified a standard neuropsychological test to vary emotional…

  1. Prescribing an Exercise Program and Motivating Older Adults To Comply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    To help motivate older adults to initiate and adhere to an exercise program, a seven-step approach was developed: education about benefits, screening, goal setting, exposure to exercise, exposure to role models, verbal encouragement from credible sources, and reinforcement and rewards. (Contains 65 references.) (SK)

  2. Social Relevance Enhances Memory for Impressions in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Brittany S.; Gutchess, Angela H.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that older adults have difficulty retrieving contextual material over items alone. Recent research suggests this deficit can be reduced by adding emotional context, allowing for the possibility that memory for social impressions may show less age-related decline than memory for other types of contextual information. Two studies investigated how orienting to social or self-relevant aspects of information contributed to the learning and retrieval of impressions in young and older adults. Participants encoded impressions of others in conditions varying in the use of self-reference (Experiment 1) and interpersonal meaningfulness (Experiment 2), and completed memory tasks requiring the retrieval of specific traits. For both experiments, age groups remembered similar numbers of impressions. In Experiment 1, using more self-relevant encoding contexts increased memory for impressions over orienting to stimuli in a non-social way, regardless of age. In Experiment 2, older adults had enhanced memory for impressions presented in an interpersonally meaningful relative to a personally irrelevant way, whereas young adults were unaffected by this manipulation. The results provide evidence that increasing social relevance ameliorates age differences in memory for impressions, and enhances older adults’ ability to successfully retrieve contextual information. PMID:22364168

  3. Binaural Advantage for Younger and Older Adults with Normal Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubno, Judy R.; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Horwitz, Amy R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Three experiments measured benefit of spatial separation, benefit of binaural listening, and masking-level differences (MLDs) to assess age-related differences in binaural advantage. Method: Participants were younger and older adults with normal hearing through 4.0 kHz. Experiment 1 compared spatial benefit with and without head shadow.…

  4. Biobehavioral Rehabilitation for Older Adults with Essential Tremor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Poppen, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET), the most prevalent movement disorder, has a peak prevalence in the sixth decade of life, primarily affecting the hands and head. Persons with ET are often significantly disabled and medical intervention often had limited effectiveness. Describes a biobehavioral rehabilitation model for older adults with ET. (Author/JBJ)

  5. Using Advance Organizers to Improve Reading Comprehension in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Dennis N.; And Others

    Using an advance organizer, an instructional aid designed to precede a main passage and to provide an effective organizational framework for older adults who may not have spontaneously employed their own strategy for understanding written material, a study investigated whether (1) reading comprehension could be instructionally influenced and (2)…

  6. Reasons for Older Adult Participation in University Programs in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villar, Feliciano; Triado, Carme; Pinazo, Sacramento; Celdran, Montserrat; Sole, Carme

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the reasons expressed by older adults for attending a university program in Barcelona (Spain). Results were based on the responses of 36 elders to questions from a semistructured interview. These were (a) reasons for joining a university course and (b) factors that prevent enrolling in that course. Participants mentioned more…

  7. Differential Diagnosis in Older Adults: Dementia, Depression, and Delirium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gintner, Gary G.

    1995-01-01

    Examines three common disorders, dementia, depression, and delirium, which can be particularly difficult to diagnose in older adults. Presents three aspects that are helpful in making a decision: age-related differences, medical issues that need to be ruled out, and assessment methods particularly useful in the diagnostic process. (JPS)

  8. Adapting Homework for an Older Adult Client with Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coon, David W.; Thompson, Larry W.; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that psychosocial treatments incorporating behavioral intervention strategies can be effective in the treatment of depression in older adults with cognitive impairment. However, less work with such cases has focused on the use of cognitive interventions in tandem with these behavioral intervention strategies. This case…

  9. Treatment of Depression and Suicide in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhar, Sunil S.; Brown, Gregory K.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) intervention for suicide prevention in older adults. Although many studies have found that CBT interventions are efficacious for reducing depressive symptoms in the elderly, researchers have yet to evaluate the efficacy of such interventions for preventing suicide or reducing suicide risk…

  10. Assessment of Implicit Self-Esteem in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Demeyer, Ineke; Romero, Nuria; De Raedt, Rudi

    2017-02-01

    The interplay between actual and ideal self-esteem may be a key component in emotional disorders. Since automatic self-evaluations are not always consciously accessible, assessment through implicit measures is necessary. Given the lack of implicit self-esteem measures in late life, we aimed to identify a reliable measure and to clarify the role of actual and ideal self-esteem in mood and depressive symptoms in older adults. Forty-nine older adults completed two adapted Go/No go Association tasks measuring implicit actual and ideal self-esteem and measures of mood and depressive symptoms. The two Go/No go Association tasks showed satisfactory internal consistency. Moderation analyses revealed that lower actual self-esteem in older adults is related to higher levels of sad mood when ideal self-esteem is high. Moreover, lower actual self-esteem is related to more anxious mood. Given the role of self-esteem in emotional well-being, a reliable measure for older adults is crucial to improve age-appropriate diagnostics and treatment.

  11. Older adults present better back endurance than young adults during a dynamic trunk extension exercise.

    PubMed

    Parreira, Rodolfo B; de Oliveira, Márcio R; Amorim, César F; Teixeira And, Denilson C; da Silva, Rubens A

    2014-01-01

    Poor back endurance is a predictor of low back pain. Few studies have investigated back muscle fatigue in older people. The purpose of this study was to compare the back muscle fatigue by endurance time and perceived effort between young and older adults during dynamic exercise. Sixteen older and 16 young adults, all healthy, participated in this study. The subjects performed a fatiguing trunk extension-flexion exercise on a Roman chair until exhaustion. Endurance time and perceived muscle fatigue (Borg CR-10 scale) were used as fatigue criteria. The older adults were significantly (T_{(30)} = -2,073; p = 0.039) more resistant to back muscle fatigue (time in mean 133 ± 52 s) than the young adults (mean 97 ± 27 s). In general, both groups had the same perception of high-level fatigue during the exercise bout (T_{(29)} = 1.73; p=0.092). The older adults presented better back endurance than young adults during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. These results have implications for back endurance in the primary prevention of low back pain in both young and older adults.

  12. Ageist attitudes block young adults' ability for compassion toward incapacitated older adults.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Yoav S; Bodner, Ehud

    2015-09-01

    Upon encountering older adults, individuals display varying degrees of prosocial attitudes and behaviors. While some display compassion and empathy, others draw away and wish to maintain their distance from them. The current study examined if and how ageist attitudes influence the association between the sight of physical incapacity in older age and compassionate reactions toward them. We predicted that ageist attitudes would interfere with the ability to respond to them with compassion. Young adults (N = 149, ages 19-29) were randomly distributed into two experimental conditions, each viewing a short video portraying different aspects of older adult physicality; one group viewed older adults displaying incapacitated behavior, and the other viewed fit behavior. Participants subsequently filled out scales assessing aging anxieties, and ageist and compassionate attitudes. Ageism was associated with reduced compassion toward the figures. Moreover, viewing incapacitated older adults led to increased concern toward them and perceived efficacy in helping them. However, significant interactions proved that higher scores of ageism in response to the videos led to increased need for distance and reduced efficacy toward incapacitated adults, an effect not observed among subjects with lower ageism scores. Ageism seems to be a factor which disengages individuals from older adults displaying fragility, leading them to disregard social norms which dictate compassion. The results are discussed from the framework of terror management theory, as increased mortality salience and death-related thoughts could have led to the activation of negative attitudes which, in turn, reduce compassion.

  13. Physical therapists' health promotion activities for older adults.

    PubMed

    Healey, William E; Broers, K Blaire; Nelson, Julie; Huber, Gail

    2012-01-01

    It is not known to what extent and how effectively physical therapists working with older adults are promoting health with their patients. The purpose of this study was to describe what physical therapists in a midwestern urban area do with older adults (65 years and older) for health and wellness promotion in the clinical setting. A total of 65 physical therapists were invited to participate in the study. Of them, 24 respondents met the inclusion criteria and 14 were able to attend 1 of 3 focus group interviews held at the investigators' university location. Participants were female physical therapists mostly in their 30s who worked with older adults greater than 60% of the time in inpatient, outpatient, or home care settings. Focus group interviews were tape-recorded and field notes were taken. Data were transcribed, coded individually, and underwent member-checking and peer review to ensure trustworthiness of the study's findings. Three major themes emerged. First, participants believed health promotion is a part of physical therapist practice. Second, participants described the health promotion benefits of more one-on-one time with patients. Third, these physical therapists acknowledged several factors that impact their delivery of health promotion. We found that these experienced physical therapists from a variety of practice settings were consistently practicing health promotion while treating older adults. Participants reported the one-on-one time spent that helped build relationships as the main facilitator of practicing health promotion. Although there were no objective measures of the effectiveness of their health-promoting efforts, subjectively all felt confident in their ability to promote health with their older patients.

  14. Attitudes and Experiences With Older Adults: A Case for Service Learning for Undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Obhi, Hardeep K; Woodhead, Erin L

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined whether relationship quality with older adults currently and in childhood, as well as experience with older adults, was associated with biases toward older adults and interest in working with older adults as a possible career area. The authors sampled undergraduate students (N = 753, M = 18.97 years, SD = 2.11 years) from a Northern California university. In hierarchical regression analyses, higher perceived quality of relationships with older adult family members, higher perceived social support, and lower perceived conflict from relationships with older adults was significantly associated with positive attitudes toward older adults. Interest in working with older adults was significantly associated with taking courses in aging, providing care to an older adult, and volunteering with older adults. These results suggest that positive relationships with older adults are useful in reducing biases, though student interactions with older adults are key in helping to promote interest in working with older adults.

  15. Piloting the older adult financial exploitation measure in adult safeguarding services.

    PubMed

    Phelan, A; Fealy, G; Downes, C

    Financial abuse is arguably the most complex form of elder abuse as it may occur remote to the older person and it is impacted by issues such as cultural values, perpetrator intent and family expectations. Financial abuse may not be recognised by either the older person or the perpetrator, thus, its prevention, early identification and amelioration are important. The (Irish) National Centre for the Protection of Older People undertook a study to determine the appropriateness of the Older Adult Financial Exploitation Measure for use by the national safeguarding older person services. Findings from a small pilot study involving 16 safeguarding staff's use of the Older Adult Financial Exploitation Measure with 52 community dwelling older people referred to their service demonstrate a higher suspicion of financial abuse as well as identifying multiple instances of possible financial exploitation in a single individual. Thus, the Older Adult Financial Exploitation Measure is considered appropriate to assist safeguarding personnel's assessment of older people related to a suspicion of financial abuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Emotional memory for musical excerpts in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Irene; Dellacherie, Delphine; Samson, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    The emotions evoked by music can enhance recognition of excerpts. It has been suggested that memory is better for high than for low arousing music (Eschrich et al., 2005; Samson et al., 2009), but it remains unclear whether positively (Eschrich et al., 2008) or negatively valenced music (Aubé et al., 2013; Vieillard and Gilet, 2013) may be better recognized. Moreover, we still know very little about the influence of age on emotional memory for music. To address these issues, we tested emotional memory for music in young and older adults using musical excerpts varying in terms of arousal and valence. Participants completed immediate and 24 h delayed recognition tests. We predicted highly arousing excerpts to be better recognized by both groups in immediate recognition. We hypothesized that arousal may compensate consolidation deficits in aging, thus showing more prominent benefit of high over low arousing stimuli in older than younger adults on delayed recognition. We also hypothesized worst retention of negative excerpts for the older group, resulting in a recognition benefit for positive over negative excerpts specific to older adults. Our results suggest that although older adults had worse recognition than young adults overall, effects of emotion on memory do not seem to be modified by aging. Results on immediate recognition suggest that recognition of low arousing excerpts can be affected by valence, with better memory for positive relative to negative low arousing music. However, 24 h delayed recognition results demonstrate effects of emotion on memory consolidation regardless of age, with a recognition benefit for high arousal and for negatively valenced music. The present study highlights the role of emotion on memory consolidation. Findings are examined in light of the literature on emotional memory for music and for other stimuli. We finally discuss the implication of the present results for potential music interventions in aging and dementia.

  17. Adapting Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Older Adults at Risk for Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Heisel, Marnin J.; Talbot, Nancy L.; King, Deborah A.; Tu, Xin M.; Duberstein, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To pilot a psychological intervention adapted for older adults at-risk for suicide. Design A focused, uncontrolled, pre-to-post-treatment psychotherapy trial. All eligible participants were offered the study intervention. Setting Outpatient mental healthcare provided in the psychiatry department of an academic medical center in a mid-sized Canadian city. Participants Seventeen English-speaking adults 60 years or older, at- risk for suicide by virtue of current suicide ideation, death ideation, and/or recent self-injury. Intervention A 16-session course of Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) adapted for older adults at-risk for suicide who were receiving medication and/or other standard psychiatric treatment for underlying mood disorders. Measurements Participants completed a demographics form, screens for cognitive impairment and alcohol misuse, a semi-structured diagnostic interview, and measures of primary (suicide ideation and death ideation), and secondary study outcomes (depressive symptom severity; social adjustment and support; psychological well-being), and psychotherapy process measures. Results Participants experienced significant reductions in suicide ideation, death ideation, and depressive symptom severity, and significant improvement in perceived meaning in life, social adjustment, perceived social support, and other psychological well-being variables. Conclusions Study participants experienced enhanced psychological well-being and reduced symptoms of depression and suicide ideation over the course of IPT adapted for older adults at-risk for suicide. Larger, controlled trials are needed to further evaluate the impact of this novel intervention and to test methods for translating and integrating focused interventions into standard clinical care with at-risk older adults. PMID:24840611

  18. Emotional memory for musical excerpts in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Irene; Dellacherie, Delphine; Samson, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    The emotions evoked by music can enhance recognition of excerpts. It has been suggested that memory is better for high than for low arousing music (Eschrich et al., 2005; Samson et al., 2009), but it remains unclear whether positively (Eschrich et al., 2008) or negatively valenced music (Aubé et al., 2013; Vieillard and Gilet, 2013) may be better recognized. Moreover, we still know very little about the influence of age on emotional memory for music. To address these issues, we tested emotional memory for music in young and older adults using musical excerpts varying in terms of arousal and valence. Participants completed immediate and 24 h delayed recognition tests. We predicted highly arousing excerpts to be better recognized by both groups in immediate recognition. We hypothesized that arousal may compensate consolidation deficits in aging, thus showing more prominent benefit of high over low arousing stimuli in older than younger adults on delayed recognition. We also hypothesized worst retention of negative excerpts for the older group, resulting in a recognition benefit for positive over negative excerpts specific to older adults. Our results suggest that although older adults had worse recognition than young adults overall, effects of emotion on memory do not seem to be modified by aging. Results on immediate recognition suggest that recognition of low arousing excerpts can be affected by valence, with better memory for positive relative to negative low arousing music. However, 24 h delayed recognition results demonstrate effects of emotion on memory consolidation regardless of age, with a recognition benefit for high arousal and for negatively valenced music. The present study highlights the role of emotion on memory consolidation. Findings are examined in light of the literature on emotional memory for music and for other stimuli. We finally discuss the implication of the present results for potential music interventions in aging and dementia. PMID

  19. Overgeneral autobiographical memory effect in older depressed adults.

    PubMed

    Ricarte, Jorge J; Latorre, José M; Ros, Laura; Navarro, Beatriz; Aguilar, María J; Serrano, Juan Pedro

    2011-11-01

    This research aims to investigate the characteristics of autobiographical retrieval in a group of older depressed adults compared with a control group of the same age. The sample was recruited from local primary care services. All participants were administered a demographic questionnaire and completed the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE; Lobo, A., Ezquerra, J., Gómez-Burgada, F., Sala, J.M., & Seva-Díaz, A. (1979). El Mini-Examen Cognoscitivo: Un test sencillo y práctico para detectar alteraciones intelectuales en pacientes médicos. Actas Luso-Españolas de Neurología, Psiquiatría y Ciencia, 3, 189-202), the Life Satisfaction Index (LSI; Stock, W., Okun, M., & Gómez, J. (1994). Subjective well-being measures: Reliability and validity among Spanish elders. International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 38, 221-235), and the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS; Beck, A.T., Weissman, A., Lester, D., & Trexler, L. (1974). The measurement of pessimism: The hopelessness scale. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 42, 861-865). Finally, all participants completed the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT; Williams, J.M.G., & Broadbent, K. (1986). Autobiographical memory in suicide attempters. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 95, 144-149). Older adults with depression were less specific in their memories than the controls. Higher categoric retrieval for negative cue words compared with positive cue words was only found for older adults with depression. Specific retrieval in the group without depression was positively related to Life Satisfaction and negatively to hopelessness. The overgeneral effect appeared for older adults with depression due to the higher presence of extended memories (events lasting for more than 24 h) rather than categoric retrievals (summary of repeated events). The strong correlation between specific memories and Life Satisfaction among non-depressed older adults suggests its potential role as a protective factor for depression.

  20. Older adults, chronic disease and leisure-time physical activity.

    PubMed

    Ashe, Maureen C; Miller, William C; Eng, Janice J; Noreau, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Participating in regular physical activity is an important part of healthy aging. There is an increased risk for inactivity associated with aging and the risk becomes greater for adults who have a chronic disease. However, there is limited information on current physical activity levels for older adults and even less for those with chronic diseases. Our primary objective was to determine the proportion of older adults who achieved a recommended amount of weekly physical activity (>or=1,000 kcal/week). The secondary objectives were to identify variables associated with meeting guideline leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), and to describe the type of physical activities that respondents reported across different chronic diseases. In this study we used the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 1.1 (2000/2001) to report LTPA for adults aged 65 years and older. This was a population-based self-report telephone survey. We used univariate logistic regression to provide odds ratios to determine differences in activity and the likelihood of meeting guideline recommendations. For adults over 65 years of age with no chronic diseases, 30% reported meeting guideline LTPA, while only 23% met the recommendations if they had one or more chronic diseases. Factors associated with achieving the guideline amount of physical activity included a higher level of education, higher income and moderate alcohol consumption. Likelihood for not achieving the recommended level of LTPA included low BMI, pain and the presence of mobility and dexterity problems. Walking, gardening and home exercises were the three most frequent types of reported physical activities. This study provides the most recent evidence to suggest that older Canadians are not active enough and this is accentuated if a chronic disease is present. It is important to develop community-based programs to facilitate LTPA, in particular for older people with a chronic disease. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.