Science.gov

Sample records for oleoresins

  1. 21 CFR 73.615 - Turmeric oleoresin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Turmeric oleoresin. 73.615 Section 73.615 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.615 Turmeric oleoresin. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive turmeric oleoresin is the combination of flavor and color principles obtained from turmeric (Curcuma...

  2. 21 CFR 73.615 - Turmeric oleoresin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Turmeric oleoresin. 73.615 Section 73.615 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.615 Turmeric oleoresin. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive turmeric oleoresin is the combination of flavor and color principles obtained from turmeric (Curcuma...

  3. 21 CFR 73.615 - Turmeric oleoresin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Turmeric oleoresin. 73.615 Section 73.615 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.615 Turmeric oleoresin. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive turmeric oleoresin is the combination of flavor and color principles obtained from turmeric (Curcuma...

  4. 21 CFR 73.615 - Turmeric oleoresin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Turmeric oleoresin. 73.615 Section 73.615 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.615 Turmeric oleoresin. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive turmeric oleoresin is the combination of flavor and color principles obtained from turmeric (Curcuma...

  5. 21 CFR 73.615 - Turmeric oleoresin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Turmeric oleoresin. 73.615 Section 73.615 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.615 Turmeric oleoresin. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive turmeric oleoresin is the combination of flavor and color principles obtained from turmeric (Curcuma...

  6. 21 CFR 73.345 - Paprika oleoresin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Paprika oleoresin. 73.345 Section 73.345 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.345 Paprika oleoresin. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paprika oleoresin is the combination of flavor and color principles obtained from paprika (Capsicum...

  7. 21 CFR 73.345 - Paprika oleoresin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Paprika oleoresin. 73.345 Section 73.345 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.345 Paprika oleoresin. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paprika oleoresin is the combination of flavor and color principles obtained from paprika (Capsicum...

  8. 21 CFR 73.345 - Paprika oleoresin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.345 Paprika oleoresin. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paprika oleoresin is the combination of flavor and color principles obtained from paprika (Capsicum annuum... the provisions of § 70.25 of this chapter. (e) Exemption from certification. Certification of...

  9. 21 CFR 73.345 - Paprika oleoresin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.345 Paprika oleoresin. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paprika oleoresin is the combination of flavor and color principles obtained from paprika (Capsicum annuum... the provisions of § 70.25 of this chapter. (e) Exemption from certification. Certification of...

  10. 21 CFR 73.345 - Paprika oleoresin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.345 Paprika oleoresin. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paprika oleoresin is the combination of flavor and color principles obtained from paprika (Capsicum annuum... the provisions of § 70.25 of this chapter. (e) Exemption from certification. Certification of...

  11. 21 CFR 182.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., oleoresins, and natural extracts. 182.50 Section 182.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION..., oleoresins, and natural extracts. Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts that are generally recognized as safe for their intended use, within the meaning of section 409...

  12. 21 CFR 182.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., oleoresins, and natural extracts. 182.50 Section 182.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION..., oleoresins, and natural extracts. Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts that are generally recognized as safe for their intended use, within the meaning of section 409...

  13. Oleoresin Capsicum toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) is an extract of the pepper plant used for centuries as a culinary spice (hot peppers). This material has been identified as a safe and effective Less-Than- Lethal weapon for use by Law enforcement and security professionals against assault. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is currently also evaluating its use in conjunction with other Less-Than-Lethal agents such as aqueous foam for use in corrections applications. Therefore, a comprehensive toxicological review of the literature was performed for the National Institute of Justice Less-Than-Lethal Force program to review and update the information available on the toxicity and adverse health effects associated with OC exposure. The results of this evaluation indicate that exposure to OC can result in dermatitis, as well as adverse nasal, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal effects in humans. The primary effects of OC exposure include pain and irritation of the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and lining of the mouth. Blistering and rash have been shown to occur after chronic or prolonged dermal exposure. Ingestion of capsicum may cause acute stinging of the lips, tongue, and oral mucosa and may lead to vomiting and diarrhea with large doses. OC vapors may also cause significant pulmonary irritation and prolonged cough. There is no evidence of long term effects associated with an acute exposure to OC, and extensive use as a culinary additive and medicinal ointment has further provided no evidence of long term adverse effects following repeated or prolonged exposure.

  14. Α-Cyclodextrin encapsulation of supercritical CO₂ extracted oleoresins from different plant matrices: A stability study.

    PubMed

    Durante, Miriana; Lenucci, Marcello Salvatore; Marrese, Pier Paolo; Rizzi, Vito; De Caroli, Monica; Piro, Gabriella; Fini, Paola; Russo, Gian Luigi; Mita, Giovanni

    2016-05-15

    Here we describe the encapsulation in α-cyclodextrins (α-CDs) of wheat bran, pumpkin and tomato oleoresins, extracted by supercritical carbon dioxide, to obtain freeze-dried powders useful as ready-to-mix ingredients for novel functional food formulation. The stability of tocochromanols, carotenoids and fatty acids in the oleoresin/α-CD complexes, compared to the corresponding free oleoresins, was also monitored over time in different combinations of storage conditions. Regardless of light, storage at 25°C of free oleoresins determined a rapid decrease in carotenoids, tocochromanols and PUFAs. α-CD encapsulation improved the stability of most bioactive compounds. Storage at 4°C synergized with encapsulation in preventing degradation of bioactives. Unlike all other antioxidants, lycopene in tomato oleoresin/α-CD complex resulted to be more susceptible to oxidation than in free oleoresin, likely due to its selective sequestration from the interaction with other lipophilic molecules of the oleoresin. PMID:26776025

  15. Α-Cyclodextrin encapsulation of supercritical CO₂ extracted oleoresins from different plant matrices: A stability study.

    PubMed

    Durante, Miriana; Lenucci, Marcello Salvatore; Marrese, Pier Paolo; Rizzi, Vito; De Caroli, Monica; Piro, Gabriella; Fini, Paola; Russo, Gian Luigi; Mita, Giovanni

    2016-05-15

    Here we describe the encapsulation in α-cyclodextrins (α-CDs) of wheat bran, pumpkin and tomato oleoresins, extracted by supercritical carbon dioxide, to obtain freeze-dried powders useful as ready-to-mix ingredients for novel functional food formulation. The stability of tocochromanols, carotenoids and fatty acids in the oleoresin/α-CD complexes, compared to the corresponding free oleoresins, was also monitored over time in different combinations of storage conditions. Regardless of light, storage at 25°C of free oleoresins determined a rapid decrease in carotenoids, tocochromanols and PUFAs. α-CD encapsulation improved the stability of most bioactive compounds. Storage at 4°C synergized with encapsulation in preventing degradation of bioactives. Unlike all other antioxidants, lycopene in tomato oleoresin/α-CD complex resulted to be more susceptible to oxidation than in free oleoresin, likely due to its selective sequestration from the interaction with other lipophilic molecules of the oleoresin.

  16. Characterization of active paper packaging incorporated with ginger pulp oleoresin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiastuti, T.; Khasanah, L. U.; Atmaka Kawiji, W.; Manuhara, G. J.; Utami, R.

    2016-02-01

    Utilization of ginger pulp waste from herbal medicine and instant drinks industry in Indonesia currently used for fertilizer and fuel, whereas the ginger pulp still contains high oleoresin. Active paper packaging were developed incorporated with ginger pulp oleoresin (0%, 2%, 4%, and 6% w/w). Physical (thickness, tensile strength, and folding endurance, moisture content), sensory characteristics and antimicrobial activity of the active paper were evaluated. Selected active paper then were chemically characterized (functional groups). The additional of ginger pulp oleoresin levels are reduced tensile strength, folding endurance and sensory characteristic (color, texture and overall) and increased antimicrobial activity. Due to physical, sensory characteristic and antimicrobial activity, active paper with 2% ginger pulp oleoresin incorporation was selected. Characteristics of selected paper were 9.93% of water content; 0.81 mm of thickness; 0.54 N / mm of tensile strength; 0.30 of folding endurance; 8.43 mm inhibits the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescence and 27.86 mm inhibits the growth of Aspergillus niger (antimicrobial activity) and neutral preference response for sensory properties. For chemical characteristic, selected paper had OH functional group of ginger in 3422.83 cm-1 of wave number and indicated contain red ginger active compounds.

  17. Effects of capsicum oleoresin, garlic botanical, and turmeric oleoresin on gene expression profile of ileal mucosa in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Song, M; Che, T M; Bravo, D; Maddox, C W; Pettigrew, J E

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted to characterize the effects of feeding 3 plant extracts on gene expression in ileal mucosa of weaned pigs. Weaned pigs (n = 32, 6.3 ± 0.2 kg BW, and 21 d old) were housed in individual pens for 9 d and fed 4 different diets: a nursery basal diet as control diet, basal diet supplemented with 10 mg/kg of capsicum oleoresin, garlic botanical, or turmeric oleoresin. Results reported elsewhere showed that the plant extracts reduced diarrhea and increased growth rate of weaning pigs. Total RNA (4 pigs/treatment) was extracted from ileal mucosa of pigs at d 9. Double-stranded cDNA was amplified, labeled, and further hybridized to the microarray. Microarray data were analyzed in R using packages from the Bioconductor project. Differential gene expression was tested by fitting a mixed linear model equivalent to ANOVA using the limma package. Bioinformatics analysis was conducted by DAVID Bioinformatics Resources. Three pairwise comparisons were used to compare each plant extract diet with the control diet. Quantitative real time PCR was applied to verify the mRNA expression detected by microarray. Compared with the control diet, feeding capsicum oleoresin altered (P < 0.05) the expression of 490 genes (280 up, 210 down), and feeding garlic botanical altered (P < 0.05) the expression of 64 genes (33 up, 31 down), while feeding turmeric oleoresin altered (P < 0.05) the expression of 327 genes (232 up, 95 down). Compared with the control diet, feeding capsicum oleoresin and turmeric oleoresin increased [Expression Analysis Systematic Explorer (EASE) < 0.05] the expression of genes related to integrity of membranes and tight junctions, indicating enhanced gut mucosa health, but decreased (EASE < 0.05) the cell cycle pathway. Feeding each of the 3 plant extracts enhanced (EASE < 0.05) the expression of genes associated with immune responses, indicating that feeding these plant extracts may stimulate the immune responses of pigs in the normal conditions

  18. 21 CFR 182.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Provisions § 182.50 Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts. Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and...

  19. 21 CFR 182.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils... Provisions § 182.50 Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts. Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts that are...

  20. 21 CFR 582.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Provisions § 582.50 Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts. Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and...

  1. 21 CFR 182.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Provisions § 182.50 Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts. Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and...

  2. 21 CFR 582.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Provisions § 582.50 Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts. Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and...

  3. 21 CFR 582.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Provisions § 582.50 Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts. Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and...

  4. Dietary supplementation of young broiler chickens with Capsicum and turmeric oleoresins increases resistance to necrotic enteritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Clostridium-related poultry disease, necrotic enteritis (NE), causes substantial economic losses on a global scale. In this study, a mixture of two plant-derived phytonutrients, Capsicum oleoresin and turmeric oleoresin (XT), was evaluated for its effects on local and systemic immune responses ...

  5. Estimating terpene and terpenoid emissions from conifer oleoresin composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Rosa M.; Doskey, Paul V.

    2015-07-01

    The following algorithm, which is based on the thermodynamics of nonelectrolyte partitioning, was developed to predict emission rates of terpenes and terpenoids from specific storage sites in conifers: Ei =xoriγoripi∘ where Ei is the emission rate (μg C gdw-1 h-1) and pi∘ is the vapor pressure (mm Hg) of the pure liquid terpene or terpenoid, respectively, and xori and γori are the mole fraction and activity coefficient (on a Raoult's law convention), respectively, of the terpene and terpenoid in the oleoresin. Activity coefficients are calculated with Hansen solubility parameters that account for dispersive, polar, and H-bonding interactions of the solutes with the oleoresin matrix. Estimates of pi∘ at 25 °C and molar enthalpies of vaporization are made with the SIMPOL.1 method and are used to estimate pi∘ at environmentally relevant temperatures. Estimated mixing ratios of terpenes and terpenols were comparatively higher above resin-acid- and monoterpene-rich oleoresins, respectively. The results indicated a greater affinity of terpenes and terpenols for the non-functionalized and carboxylic acid containing matrix through dispersive and H-bonding interactions, which are expressed in the emission algorithm by the activity coefficient. The correlation between measured emission rates of terpenes and terpenoids for Pinus strobus and emission rates predicted with the algorithm were very good (R = 0.95). Standard errors for the range and average of monoterpene emission rates were ±6 - ±86% and ±54%, respectively, and were similar in magnitude to reported standard deviations of monoterpene composition of foliar oils (±38 - ±51% and ±67%, respectively).

  6. Biological activities and cytotoxicity of diterpenes from Copaifera spp. Oleoresins.

    PubMed

    de S Vargas, Fabiano; D O de Almeida, Patrícia; Aranha, Elenn Suzany P; de A Boleti, Ana Paula; Newton, Peter; de Vasconcellos, Marne C; Junior, Valdir F Veiga; Lima, Emerson S

    2015-04-09

    Copaifera spp. are Amazonian species widely studied and whose oleoresins are used by local people for various medicinal purposes. However, a detailed study of the activity of the main phytochemical components of these oleoresins remains to be done. Here, we studied the cytotoxicity and in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of six diterpene acids: copalic, 3-hydroxy-copalic, 3-acetoxy-copalic, hardwickiic, kolavic-15-metyl ester, and kaurenoic, isolated from the oleoresins of Copaifera spp. The diterpenes did not show cytotoxicity in normal cell lines, nor did they show significant changes in viability of tumoral line cells. The 3-hydroxy-copalic was able to inhibit the enzyme tyrosinase (64% ± 1.5%) at 250 µM. The kolavic-15-metyl ester at 200 µM showed high inhibitory effect on lipoxygenase (89.5% ± 1.2%). Among the diterpenes tested, only kaurenoic and copalic acids showed significant hemolytic activities with 61.7% and 38.4% at 100 µM, respectively. In addition, it was observed that only the copalic acid (98.5% ± 1.3%) and hardwickiic acid (92.7% ± 4.9%) at 100 mM inhibited nitric oxide production in macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide. In this assay, the diterpenes did not inhibit tumor necrosis factor-α production. The acids inhibited the production of IL-6, 3-acetoxy-copalic (23.8% ± 8.2%), kaurenoic (11.2% ± 5.7%), kolavic-15-methyl ester (17.3% ± 4.2%), and copalic (4.2% ± 1.8%), respectively, at 25 µM. The kaurenoic, 3-acetoxy-copalic and copalic acids increased IL-10 production. This study may provide a basis for future studies on the therapeutic role of diterpenic acids in treating acute injuries such as inflammation or skin disorders.

  7. Investigation on the wound healing activity of oleo-resin from Copaifera langsdorffi in rats.

    PubMed

    Paiva, L A F; de Alencar Cunha, K M; Santos, F A; Gramosa, N V; Silveira, E R; Rao, V S N

    2002-12-01

    The wound healing activity of oleo-resin from Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. (Leguminaceae) bark was evaluated in rats on experimental wounds. The oleo-resin was tested by monitoring wound contraction in excised wounds and by measuring tensile strength in healing incision wounds. The topical application of oleo-resin at a concentration of 4% accelerated wound contraction in open wounds. The mean values of wound contraction in oleo-resin treated rats on day 9 was 84.05% +/- 2.37% as against 51.29% +/- 9.54% seen in controls and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). No significant differences in the rates of wound contraction were observed on days 12, 15, 18 and 21. Also, the tensile strength in healing incised wounds was found to be significantly higher in the group of animals treated with 4% oleo-resin on day 5 but not on days 7 and 12 (controls: 35.95 +/- 7.44 g/cm; oleo-resin: 71.48 +/- 5.77 g/cm; p < 0.05). These results indicate the beneficial effect of C. langsdorffii oleo-resin on wound healing and justify its traditional use for the treatment of wounds.

  8. In vitro Evaluation of Copaifera oblongifolia Oleoresin Against Bacteria Causing Oral Infections and Assessment of Its Cytotoxic Potential.

    PubMed

    da S Moraes, Thaís; Leandro, Luis F; de O Silva, Larissa; Santiago, Mariana B; Souza, Ariana B; Furtado, Ricardo A; Tavares, Denise C; Veneziani, Rodrigo C S; Ambrósio, Sérgio R; Bastos, Jairo K; Martins, Carlos H G

    2016-01-01

    The oral cavity, which harbors more than 750 bacterial species, is one of the most diverse sites of the human body. Some of these bacteria have been associated with oral diseases, such as dental caries and endodontic infections. We report on the antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of Copaifera oblongifolia oleoresin against bacteria that cause caries and endodontic infections. The aim of this study is to determine the minimum (MIC) and the bactericidal (MBC) inhibitory concentrations as well as the biofilm inhibition ability (through determination of MBIC50) of the C. oblongifolia oleoresin. This study also investigated the bactericidal kinetics (time-kill curves) and the synergistic effect of the C. oblongifolia oleoresin. Additionally, this study evaluated the cytotoxic activity of the oleoresin toward V79 cells by means of the colony-forming assay. The C. oblongifolia oleoresin gave promising MIC and MBC values, which ranged from 25 to 200 μg/mL. Analysis of the MBIC50values of the oleoresin revealed it displayed biofilm inhibitory activity against all the assayed bacteria. Analysis of the bactericidal kinetics showed different behaviors of the oleoresin against the tested bacteria at the different time intervals and concentrations assayed in this study. An additive effect of the oleoresin with chlorhexidine dihydrochloride occurred only for S. mitis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The C. oblongifolia oleoresin showed cytotoxic activity at concentrations ≥ 625 μg/mL.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of nano-encapsulated black pepper oleoresin using hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin for antioxidant and antimicrobial applications.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bruna N; Ozdemir, Necla; Hill, Laura E; Gomes, Carmen L

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have reported antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of black pepper oleoresin which is associated to its phenolic compounds and piperine. The ability of cyclodextrins to form an inclusion complex with a guest molecule could improve black pepper oleoresin application, bioavailability, and stability in foods. Hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HPBCD) inclusion complex with black pepper olereosin were synthesized using the kneading method and characterized for its physico-chemical properties and its antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Inclusion complex size was 103.9 ± 7.6 nm and indicated to be a polydisperse system. The entrapment efficiency was 78.3 ± 3.6%, which suggests that other constituents in black pepper oleoresin have higher affinities for HPBCD than piperine (major compound in black pepper oleoresin). Thermograms showed the disappearance of oxidation peaks of black pepper oleoresin, proving complex formation with HPBCD. Phase solubility results indicated 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex formation and an increase of black pepper oleoresin aqueous solubility with HPBCD concentration. Nano-encapsulation with HPBCD did not affect (P > 0.05) total phenolic content; however, it enhanced (P < 0.05) black pepper oleoresin antioxidant activity. Black pepper oleoresin and its inclusion complex were analyzed for their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli K12 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Both free and encapsulated black pepper oleoresin effectively inhibited bacterial growth within the concentration range tested. Black pepper oleoresin encapsulated in HPBCD was able to inhibit Salmonella at lower (P < 0.05) concentrations than its corresponding free extract. Therefore, black pepper oleoresin-HPBCD nanocapsules could have important applications in the food industry as antimicrobial and antioxidant system. PMID:24329956

  10. Synthesis and characterization of nano-encapsulated black pepper oleoresin using hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin for antioxidant and antimicrobial applications.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bruna N; Ozdemir, Necla; Hill, Laura E; Gomes, Carmen L

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have reported antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of black pepper oleoresin which is associated to its phenolic compounds and piperine. The ability of cyclodextrins to form an inclusion complex with a guest molecule could improve black pepper oleoresin application, bioavailability, and stability in foods. Hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HPBCD) inclusion complex with black pepper olereosin were synthesized using the kneading method and characterized for its physico-chemical properties and its antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Inclusion complex size was 103.9 ± 7.6 nm and indicated to be a polydisperse system. The entrapment efficiency was 78.3 ± 3.6%, which suggests that other constituents in black pepper oleoresin have higher affinities for HPBCD than piperine (major compound in black pepper oleoresin). Thermograms showed the disappearance of oxidation peaks of black pepper oleoresin, proving complex formation with HPBCD. Phase solubility results indicated 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex formation and an increase of black pepper oleoresin aqueous solubility with HPBCD concentration. Nano-encapsulation with HPBCD did not affect (P > 0.05) total phenolic content; however, it enhanced (P < 0.05) black pepper oleoresin antioxidant activity. Black pepper oleoresin and its inclusion complex were analyzed for their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli K12 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Both free and encapsulated black pepper oleoresin effectively inhibited bacterial growth within the concentration range tested. Black pepper oleoresin encapsulated in HPBCD was able to inhibit Salmonella at lower (P < 0.05) concentrations than its corresponding free extract. Therefore, black pepper oleoresin-HPBCD nanocapsules could have important applications in the food industry as antimicrobial and antioxidant system.

  11. Antioxidant capacity and antimutagenic activity of natural oleoresin from greenhouse grown tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, Eustolia; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; Pedraza-Aboytes, Gustavo; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2009-03-01

    Natural oleoresins rich in lycopene were obtained from two varieties of tomato (Zedona and Gironda) and their nutraceutical potential (antioxidant and antimutagenic capacity) was evaluated. Both oleoresins had a high content of lycopene, 58.33+/-1.67 mg/g (Zedona) and 63.97+/-0.80 mg/g (Gironda). The antioxidant activity (AA) of the oleoresins by beta-carotene method were 56.4-74.5% (Zedona) and 51-72.8% (Gironda), while when using the free radical stable 2,2-diphenyl-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) method, the antiradical activity (ARA) was determined to be 18.2-32.7% (Zedona) and 16.6-26.7% (Gironda) for the concentrations tested that of 200-400 microM equivalents of lycopene. The antimutagenic activity of the oleoresins was tested against aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) using the microsuspension assay, both varieties had a very high antimutagenic potential against AFB1 (60-66%).These results suggest the NCRT can be taken advantage to obtaining rich oleoresin in lycopene with a nutraceutical value. PMID:19020978

  12. Antioxidant capacity and antimutagenic activity of natural oleoresin from greenhouse grown tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, Eustolia; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; Pedraza-Aboytes, Gustavo; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2009-03-01

    Natural oleoresins rich in lycopene were obtained from two varieties of tomato (Zedona and Gironda) and their nutraceutical potential (antioxidant and antimutagenic capacity) was evaluated. Both oleoresins had a high content of lycopene, 58.33+/-1.67 mg/g (Zedona) and 63.97+/-0.80 mg/g (Gironda). The antioxidant activity (AA) of the oleoresins by beta-carotene method were 56.4-74.5% (Zedona) and 51-72.8% (Gironda), while when using the free radical stable 2,2-diphenyl-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) method, the antiradical activity (ARA) was determined to be 18.2-32.7% (Zedona) and 16.6-26.7% (Gironda) for the concentrations tested that of 200-400 microM equivalents of lycopene. The antimutagenic activity of the oleoresins was tested against aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) using the microsuspension assay, both varieties had a very high antimutagenic potential against AFB1 (60-66%).These results suggest the NCRT can be taken advantage to obtaining rich oleoresin in lycopene with a nutraceutical value.

  13. Chemistry and in vitro antioxidant activity of volatile oil and oleoresins of black pepper (Piper nigrum).

    PubMed

    Kapoor, I P S; Singh, Bandana; Singh, Gurdip; De Heluani, Carola S; De Lampasona, M P; Catalan, Cesar A N

    2009-06-24

    Essential oil and oleoresins (ethanol and ethyl acetate) of Piper nigrum were extracted by using Clevenger and Soxhlet apparatus, respectively. GC-MS analysis of pepper essential oil showed the presence of 54 components representing about 96.6% of the total weight. beta-Caryophylline (29.9%) was found as the major component along with limonene (13.2%), beta-pinene (7.9%), sabinene (5.9%), and several other minor components. The major component of both ethanol and ethyl acetate oleoresins was found to contain piperine (63.9 and 39.0%), with many other components in lesser amounts. The antioxidant activities of essential oil and oleoresins were evaluated against mustard oil by peroxide, p-anisidine, and thiobarbituric acid. Both the oil and oleoresins showed strong antioxidant activity in comparison with butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) but lower than that of propyl gallate (PG). In addition, their inhibitory action by FTC method, scavenging capacity by DPPH (2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical), and reducing power were also determined, proving the strong antioxidant capacity of both the essential oil and oleoresins of pepper.

  14. Microencapsulation of Nigella sativa oleoresin by spray drying for food and nutraceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Edris, Amr E; Kalemba, Danuta; Adamiec, Janusz; Piątkowski, Marcin

    2016-08-01

    Oleoresin of Nigella sativa L. (Black cumin) was obtained from the seeds using hexane extraction at room temperature. The oleoresin was emulsified in an aqueous solution containing gum Arabic/maltodextrin (1:1 w/w) and then encapsulated in powder form by spray drying. The characteristics of the obtained powder including moisture content, bulk density, wettability, morphology, encapsulation efficiency were evaluated. The effect of the spray drying on the chemical composition of the volatile oil fraction of N. sativa oleoresin was also evaluated using gas chromatographic-mass spectroscopic analysis. Results indicated that the encapsulation efficiency of the whole oleoresin in the powder can range from 84.2±1.5% to 96.2±0.2% depending on the conditions of extracting the surface oil from the powder. On the other hand the encapsulation efficiency of the volatile oil fraction was 86.2% ±4.7. The formulated N. sativa L. oleoresin powder can be used in the fortification of processed food and nutraceuticals. PMID:26988509

  15. Antimicrobial terpenes from oleoresin of ponderosa pine tree Pinus ponderosa: A defense mechanism against microbial invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Himejima, Masaki; Hobson, K.R.; Otsuka, Toshikazu; Wood, D.L.; Kubo, Isao )

    1992-10-01

    The oleoresin of the ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa (Pinaceae) exhibited broad antimicrobial activity. In order to identify the active compounds, the oleoresin was steam distilled to give a distillate and residue. The distillate contained mainly monoterpenes and some sesquiterpenes, while the residue consisted chiefly of four structurally related diterpene acids. An antimicrobial assay with the pure compounds indicated that the monoterpenes were active primarily against fungi, but there was also some activity against gram-positive bacteria. The diterpene acids, in contrast, only exhibited activity against gram-positive bacteria. Although not all of the identified sesquiterpenes could be tested, longifolene showed activity only against gram-positive bacteria. Therefore, it appears that the oleoresin of P. ponderosa functions as a biochemical defense against microbial invasion.

  16. Microencapsulation of garlic oleoresin using maltodextrin as wall material by spray drying technology.

    PubMed

    Balasubramani, P; Palaniswamy, P T; Visvanathan, R; Thirupathi, V; Subbarayan, A; Prakash Maran, J

    2015-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on microencapsulation of garlic oleoresin by spray drying with garlic oleoresin concentration (10%, 20% and 30%) as core material, maltodextrin concentration (40%, 50% and 60%) as wall material and inlet temperature of drying air (180 °C, 200 °C and 220 °C) as process parameters. The process in-terms of encapsulation efficiency was optimised following response surface methodology and Pareto analysis of variance (ANOVA). Second order polynomial regression model showed good fit of the experimental data with high coefficient of determination (R(2)) along with predicted values. The relationships between the independent and dependent parameters were represented using response surface and contour plots. The optimum levels of process parameters, viz., garlic oleoresin concentration, maltodextrin concentration and inlet temperature of air drying were found to be 10%, 60% and 200 °C, respectively with the maximum encapsulation efficiency of 81.9% and desirability of 0.998. The microencapsulated garlic oleoresin powder obtained at optimized conditions was spherical with smooth surface as analysed through scanning electron microscopy.

  17. Antioxidant and biocidal activities of Carum nigrum (seed) essential oil, oleoresin, and their selected components.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurdip; Marimuthu, Palanisamy; de Heluani, Carola S; Catalan, Cesar A N

    2006-01-11

    In the present study, chemical constituents of the essential oil and oleoresin of the seed from Carum nigrum obtained by hydrodistillation and Soxhlet extraction using acetone, respectively, have been studied by GC and GC-MS techniques. The major component was dillapiole (29.9%) followed by germacrene B (21.4%), beta-caryophyllene (7.8%), beta-selinene (7.1%), and nothoapiole (5.8%) along with many other components in minor amounts. Seventeen components were identified in the oleoresin (Table 2) with dillapiole as a major component (30.7%). It also contains thymol (19.1%), nothoapiole (15.2.3%), and gamma-elemene (8.0%). The antioxidant activity of both the essential oil and oleoresin was evaluated in mustard oil by monitoring peroxide, thiobarbituric acid, and total carbonyl and p-anisidine values of the oil substrate. The results showed that both the essential oil and oleoresin were able to reduce the oxidation rate of the mustard oil in the accelerated condition at 60 degrees C in comparison with synthetic antioxidants such as butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene at 0.02%. In addition, individual antioxidant assays such as linoleic acid assay, DPPH scavenging activity, reducing power, hydroxyl radical scavenging, and chelating effects have been used. The C. nigrum seed essential oil exhibited complete inhibition against Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 2000 and 3000 ppm, respectively, by agar well diffusion method. Antifungal activity was determined against a panel of foodborne fungi such as Aspergillus niger, Penicillium purpurogenum, Penicillium madriti, Acrophialophora fusispora, Penicillium viridicatum, and Aspergillus flavus. The fruit essential oil showed 100% mycelial zone inhibition against P. purpurogenum and A. fusispora at 3000 ppm in the poison food method. Hence, both oil and oleoresin could be used as an additive in food and pharmaceutical preparations after screening.

  18. Biochemical changes of Culex pipiens larvae treated with oil and oleo-resin extracts of Myrrh Commiphora molmol.

    PubMed

    Massoud, A M; Labib, I M; Rady, M

    2001-08-01

    The mosquitocidal plant extracts of the Myrrh, Commiphora molmol namely; oil and oleo-resin, were proved to demonstrate larvicidal activity against Culex pipiens larvae. Oleo-resin was found to induce significant higher toxic action than oil. Solvent (cremophore EL) did not perform any toxic activity. The Impact of both oleo-resin and oil extracts on the protein profile of the treated larvae was evaluated in order to explain their mode of action. Electrophoretic analysis of total proteins, lipoproteins and glycoproteins revealed inhibitory action of the used plant extracts on the protein contents. Larvicidal activity of the oleo-resin and oil was explained as to be related to the loss of certain enzymes inhibited by these extracts which affect the metabolic processes. PMID:11478451

  19. Dietary Capsicum and Curcuma longa oleoresins increase intestinal microbiome and necrotic enteritis in three commercial broiler breeds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Hong, Yeong Ho; Kim, Geun Bae; Lee, Sung Hyen; Lillehoj, Erik P; Bravo, David M

    2015-10-01

    Three commercial broiler breeds were fed from hatch with a diet supplemented with Capsicum and Curcuma longa oleoresins, and co-infected with Eimeria maxima and Clostridium perfringens to induce necrotic enteritis (NE). Pyrotag deep sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA showed that gut microbiota compositions were quite distinct depending on the broiler breed type. In the absence of oleoresin diet, the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs), was decreased in infected Cobb, and increased in Ross and Hubbard, compared with the uninfected. In the absence of oleoresin diet, all chicken breeds had a decreased Candidatus Arthromitus, while the proportion of Lactobacillus was increased in Cobb, but decreased in Hubbard and Ross. Oleoresin supplementation of infected chickens increased OTUs in Cobb and Ross, but decreased OTUs in Hubbard, compared with unsupplemented/infected controls. Oleoresin supplementation of infected Cobb and Hubbard was associated with an increased percentage of gut Lactobacillus and decreased Selenihalanaerobacter, while Ross had a decreased fraction of Lactobacillus and increased Selenihalanaerobacter, Clostridium, Calothrix, and Geitlerinema. These results suggest that dietary Capsicum/Curcuma oleoresins reduced the negative consequences of NE on body weight and intestinal lesion, in part, through alteration of the gut microbiome in 3 commercial broiler breeds. PMID:26412535

  20. Changes in the contents of oleoresin and pungent bioactive principles of Jamaican ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe.) during maturation.

    PubMed

    Bailey-Shaw, Yvonne A; Williams, Lawrence A D; Junor, Grace-Ann O; Green, Cheryl E; Hibbert, Sheridan L; Salmon, Colleen N A; Smith, Ann Marie

    2008-07-23

    Changes in the yields of the oleoresin and content of pungent bioactive principles: [6], [8], [10] gingerols and [6] shogaol of Jamaican ginger ( Zingiber officinale) were investigated during different stages of maturity (7-9 months). Ethanolic oleoresin extracts were prepared (95%, w/w) by cold maceration of dried ginger powder, and their percentage yields were calculated (w/w). The pungent bioactive principles in the ginger oleoresin were extracted with methanol and quantitatively analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Ginger harvested at 8 months from Bourbon, Portland had the highest oleoresin yield (8.46 +/- 0.46%). [6] Gingerol was found to be the most abundant pungent bioactive principle in all the oleoresin samples investigated, with the 9 months sample from Bourbon, Portland containing the highest level (28.94 +/- 0.39%). The content of [6] gingerols was also found to be consistently high (7-9 months) in oleoresin samples from Johnson Mountain, St. Thomas (15.12 +/- 0.39 to 16.02 +/- 0.95%). The results suggest that Bourbon in Portland may be the most ideal location for cultivating ginger for high yields and quality, however, Johnson Mountain in St. Thomas could prove to be the least restrictive location, allowing for harvesting of good quality material throughout the maturity period (7-9 months). PMID:18564850

  1. Chemodiversity of ursane- and oleanane-type triterpenes in Amazonian Burseraceae oleoresins.

    PubMed

    Rüdiger, André L; Veiga-Junior, Valdir F

    2013-06-01

    The oleoresins exuded from species of the Burseraceae family present high potential due to their biological and pharmacological properties. The evaluation of the chemodiversity of the oleoresins of 23 Amazonian species of Burseraceae provided a profile of the principal constituents, viz., the ursane-type triterpenes α-amyrin (1), α-amyrenone (3), and brein (5) and the oleanane-type triterpenes β-amyrin (2), β-amyrenone (4), and maniladiol (6), and allowed to determine which of these species have the highest biotechnological potential and which ones are rich in other, potentially new, triterpenes or volatile compounds of interest for the cosmetics industry. The oleoresin compositions obtained by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses were submitted to principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering on principal components (HCPC), which divided the 23 samples in five clusters. Protium giganteum and Trattinnickia peruviana, constituting the first cluster, presented high oleoresin contents of 3 and 4 (28.8 and 16.3% on average, resp.). The seven species of Burseraceae composing the second cluster were potential producers of new triterpenes and volatile compounds. Dacryodes hopkinsii and five Protium species (third cluster) presented average contents for all the triterpenes analyzed. The highest contents of 5 and 6 (averages of 3.9 and 5.4%, resp.) were observed in P. heptaphyllum ssp. ullei and T. glaziovii (fourth cluster). Finally, the six Protium species forming the fifth cluster showed high contents of 1 and 2 (48.0 and 19.9% on average, resp.). Moreover, this study allowed the description of the triterpene composition of 13 not previously investigated species.

  2. Microencapsulation of H. pluvialis oleoresins with different fatty acid composition: Kinetic stability of astaxanthin and alpha-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Andrés; Masson, Lilia; Velasco, Joaquín; del Valle, José Manuel; Robert, Paz

    2016-01-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is a natural source of astaxanthin (AX). However, AX loses its natural protection when extracted from this microalga. In this study, a supercritical fluid extract (SFE) of H. pluvialis was obtained and added to oils with different fatty acid compositions (sunflower oil (SO) or high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO)). The oleoresins of H. pluvialis ((SO+SFE) and (HOSO+SFE)) were encapsulated with Capsul by spray drying. The stability of the oleoresins and powders were studied at 40, 50 and 70° C. AX and alpha-tocopherol (AT) degradation followed a zero-order and first-order kinetic model, respectively, for all systems. The encapsulation of oleoresins improved the stability of AX and AT to a greater extent in oleoresins with a monounsaturated fatty acid profile, as shown by the significantly lowest degradation rate constants and longest half-lives. Therefore, the encapsulation of H. pluvialis oleoresins is an alternative to developing a functional ingredient for healthy food design. PMID:26213069

  3. Genome-Wide Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with the High Yielding of Oleoresin in Secondary Xylem of Masson Pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb) by Transcriptomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qinghua; Zhou, Zhichun; Wei, Yongcheng; Shen, Danyu; Feng, Zhongping; Hong, Shanping

    2015-01-01

    Masson pine is an important timber and resource for oleoresin in South China. Increasing yield of oleoresin in stems can raise economic benefits and enhance the resistance to bark beetles. However, the genetic mechanisms for regulating the yield of oleoresin were still unknown. Here, high-throughput sequencing technology was used to investigate the transcriptome and compare the gene expression profiles of high and low oleoresin-yielding genotypes. A total of 40,690,540 reads were obtained and assembled into 137,499 transcripts from the secondary xylem tissues. We identified 84,842 candidate unigenes based on sequence annotation using various databases and 96 unigenes were candidates for terpenoid backbone biosynthesis in pine. By comparing the expression profiles of high and low oleoresin-yielding genotypes, 649 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. GO enrichment analysis of DEGs revealed that multiple pathways were related to high yield of oleoresin. Nine candidate genes were validated by QPCR analysis. Among them, the candidate genes encoding geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPS) and (-)-alpha/beta-pinene synthase were up-regulated in the high oleoresin-yielding genotype, while tricyclene synthase revealed lower expression level, which was in good agreement with the GC/MS result. In addition, DEG encoding ABC transporters, pathogenesis-related proteins (PR5 and PR9), phosphomethylpyrimidine synthase, non-specific lipid-transfer protein-like protein and ethylene responsive transcription factors (ERFs) were also confirmed to be critical for the biosynthesis of oleoresin. The next-generation sequencing strategy used in this study has proven to be a powerful means for analyzing transcriptome variation related to the yield of oleoresin in masson pine. The candidate genes encoding GGPS, (-)-alpha/beta-pinene, tricyclene synthase, ABC transporters, non-specific lipid-transfer protein-like protein, phosphomethylpyrimidine synthase, ERFs and pathogen

  4. Association genetics of oleoresin flow in loblolly pine: discovering genes and predicting phenotype for improved resistance to bark beetles and bioenergy potential.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Jared W; Resende, Marcio F R; Munoz, Patricio; Walker, Alejandro R; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Nelson, C Dana; Neale, David B; Kirst, Matias; Huber, Dudley A; Gezan, Salvador A; Peter, Gary F; Davis, John M

    2013-07-01

    Rapidly enhancing oleoresin production in conifer stems through genomic selection and genetic engineering may increase resistance to bark beetles and terpenoid yield for liquid biofuels. We integrated association genetic and genomic prediction analyses of oleoresin flow (g 24 h(-1)) using 4854 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in expressed genes within a pedigreed population of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) that was clonally replicated at three sites in the southeastern United States. Additive genetic variation in oleoresin flow (h(2) ≈ 0.12-0.30) was strongly correlated between years in which precipitation varied (r(a) ≈ 0.95), while the genetic correlation between sites declined from 0.8 to 0.37 with increasing differences in soil and climate among sites. A total of 231 SNPs were significantly associated with oleoresin flow, of which 81% were specific to individual sites. SNPs in sequences similar to ethylene signaling proteins, ABC transporters, and diterpenoid hydroxylases were associated with oleoresin flow across sites. Despite this complex genetic architecture, we developed a genomic prediction model to accelerate breeding for enhanced oleoresin flow that is robust to environmental variation. Results imply that breeding could increase oleoresin flow 1.5- to 2.4-fold in one generation.

  5. Composition, in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of essential oil and oleoresins obtained from black cumin seeds (Nigella sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Singh, Sunita; Das, S S; Singh, G; Schuff, Carola; de Lampasona, Marina P; Catalán, César A N

    2014-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed the major components in black cumin essential oils which were thymoquinone (37.6%) followed by p-cymene (31.2%), α-thujene (5.6%), thymohydroquinone (3.4%), and longifolene (2.0%), whereas the oleoresins extracted in different solvents contain linoleic acid as a major component. The antioxidant activity of essential oil and oleoresins was evaluated against linseed oil system at 200 ppm concentration by peroxide value, thiobarbituric acid value, ferric thiocyanate, ferrous ion chelating activity, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging methods. The essential oil and ethyl acetate oleoresin were found to be better than synthetic antioxidants. The total phenol contents (gallic acid equivalents, mg GAE per g) in black cumin essential oil, ethyl acetate, ethanol, and n-hexane oleoresins were calculated as 11.47 ± 0.05, 10.88 ± 0.9, 9.68 ± 0.06, and 8.33 ± 0.01, respectively, by Folin-Ciocalteau method. The essential oil showed up to 90% zone inhibition against Fusarium moniliforme in inverted petri plate method. Using agar well diffusion method for evaluating antibacterial activity, the essential oil was found to be highly effective against Gram-positive bacteria.

  6. Dietary Capsicum and Curcuma longa oleoresins alter the intestinal microbiome and Necrotic Enteritis Severity in three commercial broiler breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three commercial broiler breeds were fed from hatch with a diet supplemented with Capsicum and Curcuma longa oleoresins, and co-infected with Eimeria maxima and Clostridium perfringens to induce necrotic enteritis (NE). Pyrotag deep sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA showed that gut microbiota compos...

  7. Composition, In Vitro Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Essential Oil and Oleoresins Obtained from Black Cumin Seeds (Nigella sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sunita; Das, S. S.; Singh, G.; Schuff, Carola; de Lampasona, Marina P.; Catalán, César A. N.

    2014-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed the major components in black cumin essential oils which were thymoquinone (37.6%) followed by p-cymene (31.2%), α-thujene (5.6%), thymohydroquinone (3.4%), and longifolene (2.0%), whereas the oleoresins extracted in different solvents contain linoleic acid as a major component. The antioxidant activity of essential oil and oleoresins was evaluated against linseed oil system at 200 ppm concentration by peroxide value, thiobarbituric acid value, ferric thiocyanate, ferrous ion chelating activity, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging methods. The essential oil and ethyl acetate oleoresin were found to be better than synthetic antioxidants. The total phenol contents (gallic acid equivalents, mg GAE per g) in black cumin essential oil, ethyl acetate, ethanol, and n-hexane oleoresins were calculated as 11.47 ± 0.05, 10.88 ± 0.9, 9.68 ± 0.06, and 8.33 ± 0.01, respectively, by Folin-Ciocalteau method. The essential oil showed up to 90% zone inhibition against Fusarium moniliforme in inverted petri plate method. Using agar well diffusion method for evaluating antibacterial activity, the essential oil was found to be highly effective against Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:24689064

  8. High-throughput gene expression analysis of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes following oral feeding of Carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, or capsicum oleoresin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among dietary phytonutrients, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and Capsicum oleoresin are well-known for their anti-inflammatory and antibiotic effects in human and veterinary medicine. To further define the molecular and genetic mechanisms responsible for these properties, broiler chickens were fed a st...

  9. Effects of dietary Capsicum oleoresin on productivity and immune responses in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Oh, J; Giallongo, F; Frederick, T; Pate, J; Walusimbi, S; Elias, R J; Wall, E H; Bravo, D; Hristov, A N

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of Capsicum oleoresin in granular form (CAP) on nutrient digestibility, immune responses, oxidative stress markers, blood chemistry, rumen fermentation, rumen bacterial populations, and productivity of lactating dairy cows. Eight multiparous Holstein cows, including 3 ruminally cannulated, were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design experiment. Experimental periods were 25 d in duration, including a 14-d adaptation and an 11-d data collection and sampling period. Treatments included control (no CAP) and daily supplementation of 250, 500, or 1,000 mg of CAP/cow. Dry matter intake was not affected by CAP (average 27.0±0.64 kg/d), but milk yield tended to quadratically increase with CAP supplementation (50.3 to 51.9±0.86 kg/d). Capsicum oleoresin quadratically increased energy-corrected milk yield, but had no effect on milk fat concentration. Rumen fermentation variables, apparent total-tract digestibility of nutrients, and N excretion in feces and urine were not affected by CAP. Blood serum β-hydroxybutyrate was quadratically increased by CAP, whereas the concentration of nonesterified fatty acids was similar among treatments. Rumen populations of Bacteroidales, Prevotella, and Roseburia decreased and Butyrivibrio increased quadratically with CAP supplementation. T cell phenotypes were not affected by treatment. Mean fluorescence intensity for phagocytic activity of neutrophils tended to be quadratically increased by CAP. Numbers of neutrophils and eosinophils and the ratio of neutrophils to lymphocytes in peripheral blood linearly increased with increasing CAP. Oxidative stress markers were not affected by CAP. Overall, in the conditions of this experiment, CAP did not affect feed intake, rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility, T cell phenotypes, and oxidative stress markers. However, energy-corrected milk yield was quadratically increased by CAP, possibly as a result of enhanced mobilization of body fat reserves. In

  10. Effects of dietary Capsicum oleoresin on productivity and immune responses in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Oh, J; Giallongo, F; Frederick, T; Pate, J; Walusimbi, S; Elias, R J; Wall, E H; Bravo, D; Hristov, A N

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of Capsicum oleoresin in granular form (CAP) on nutrient digestibility, immune responses, oxidative stress markers, blood chemistry, rumen fermentation, rumen bacterial populations, and productivity of lactating dairy cows. Eight multiparous Holstein cows, including 3 ruminally cannulated, were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design experiment. Experimental periods were 25 d in duration, including a 14-d adaptation and an 11-d data collection and sampling period. Treatments included control (no CAP) and daily supplementation of 250, 500, or 1,000 mg of CAP/cow. Dry matter intake was not affected by CAP (average 27.0±0.64 kg/d), but milk yield tended to quadratically increase with CAP supplementation (50.3 to 51.9±0.86 kg/d). Capsicum oleoresin quadratically increased energy-corrected milk yield, but had no effect on milk fat concentration. Rumen fermentation variables, apparent total-tract digestibility of nutrients, and N excretion in feces and urine were not affected by CAP. Blood serum β-hydroxybutyrate was quadratically increased by CAP, whereas the concentration of nonesterified fatty acids was similar among treatments. Rumen populations of Bacteroidales, Prevotella, and Roseburia decreased and Butyrivibrio increased quadratically with CAP supplementation. T cell phenotypes were not affected by treatment. Mean fluorescence intensity for phagocytic activity of neutrophils tended to be quadratically increased by CAP. Numbers of neutrophils and eosinophils and the ratio of neutrophils to lymphocytes in peripheral blood linearly increased with increasing CAP. Oxidative stress markers were not affected by CAP. Overall, in the conditions of this experiment, CAP did not affect feed intake, rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility, T cell phenotypes, and oxidative stress markers. However, energy-corrected milk yield was quadratically increased by CAP, possibly as a result of enhanced mobilization of body fat reserves. In

  11. Extraction, processing, and storage effects on curcuminoids and oleoresin yields from Curcuma longa L. grown in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Green, Cheryl E; Hibbert, Sheridan L; Bailey-Shaw, Yvonne A; Williams, Lawrence A D; Mitchell, Sylvia; Garraway, Eric

    2008-05-28

    Aromatic diarylheptanoid compounds from Curcuma longa Linn grown in Jamaica were quantified by UV-vis spectrophotometry and high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analyses. The oleoresin yields from ethanolic extracts were quantified and evaluated with regard to the effects of the type of postharvesting process and the type of extraction method conducted on the plant material. Fresh samples that were hot solvent extracted provided the highest oleoresin yields of 15.7% +/- 0.4 ( n = 3), and the lowest oleoresin yields of 7.8% +/- 0.2 ( n = 3) were from the dried milled samples that were cold solvent extracted. Data from the ASTA spectrophotometer assay confirmed that dried samples contained the highest curcuminoid content of 55.5% +/- 2.2 ( n = 6) at the fifth month of storage, and the fresh samples showed a curcuminoid content of 47.1% +/- 6.4 ( n = 6) at the third month of storage. A modified HPLC analysis was used to quantify curcumin content. Data from the HPLC analysis confirmed that the dried treated, hot extracted, room temperature stored samples had the highest curcumin content of 24.3%. A novel high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) method provided a chemical fingerprint of the C. longa with the use of a commercial curcumin standard. PMID:18454547

  12. Enhanced extraction of oleoresin from ginger (Zingiber officinale) rhizome powder using enzyme-assisted three phase partitioning.

    PubMed

    Varakumar, Sadineni; Umesh, Kannamangalam Vijayan; Singhal, Rekha S

    2017-02-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale R.) is a popular spice used worldwide. The oleoresin consists of gingerols, shogaols and other non-volatiles as chief bioactive constituents. Three phase partitioning (TPP), a bioseparation technique, based on partitioning of polar constituents, proteins, and hydrophobic constituents in three phases comprising of water, ammonium sulphate and t-butanol, was explored for extraction of oleoresin and gingerols from dry powder. Parameters optimized for maximum recovery of gingerols and [6]-shogaol were ammonium sulphate concentration, ratio of t-butanol to slurry, solid loading and pH. Ultrasound and enzymatic pretreatments increased the yield of oleoresin and its phytoconstituents. Ultrasound pretreatment showed separation of starch in the bottom aqueous phase but is an additional step in extraction. Enzymatic pretreatment using accellerase increased the yield of [6]-, [8]-, [10]-gingerols and [6]-shogaol by 64.10, 87.8, 62.78 and 32.0% within 4h and is recommended. The efficacy of the enzymatic pretreatment was confirmed by SEM and FTIR. PMID:27596388

  13. Enhanced extraction of oleoresin from ginger (Zingiber officinale) rhizome powder using enzyme-assisted three phase partitioning.

    PubMed

    Varakumar, Sadineni; Umesh, Kannamangalam Vijayan; Singhal, Rekha S

    2017-02-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale R.) is a popular spice used worldwide. The oleoresin consists of gingerols, shogaols and other non-volatiles as chief bioactive constituents. Three phase partitioning (TPP), a bioseparation technique, based on partitioning of polar constituents, proteins, and hydrophobic constituents in three phases comprising of water, ammonium sulphate and t-butanol, was explored for extraction of oleoresin and gingerols from dry powder. Parameters optimized for maximum recovery of gingerols and [6]-shogaol were ammonium sulphate concentration, ratio of t-butanol to slurry, solid loading and pH. Ultrasound and enzymatic pretreatments increased the yield of oleoresin and its phytoconstituents. Ultrasound pretreatment showed separation of starch in the bottom aqueous phase but is an additional step in extraction. Enzymatic pretreatment using accellerase increased the yield of [6]-, [8]-, [10]-gingerols and [6]-shogaol by 64.10, 87.8, 62.78 and 32.0% within 4h and is recommended. The efficacy of the enzymatic pretreatment was confirmed by SEM and FTIR.

  14. Copaifera reticulata oleoresin: Chemical characterization and antibacterial properties against oral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bardají, Danae Kala Rodríguez; da Silva, Jonas Joaquim Mangabeira; Bianchi, Thamires Chiquini; de Souza Eugênio, Daniele; de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Leandro, Luís Fernando; Rogez, Hervé Louis Ghislain; Venezianni, Rodrigo Cassio Sola; Ambrosio, Sergio Ricardo; Tavares, Denise Crispim; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; Martins, Carlos Henrique G

    2016-08-01

    Oral infections such as periodontitis and tooth decay are the most common diseases of humankind. Oleoresins from different copaifera species display antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities. Copaifera reticulata is the commonest tree of this genus and grows abundantly in several Brazilian states, such as Pará, Amazonas, and Ceará. The present study has evaluated the chemical composition and antimicrobial potential of the Copaifera reticulata oleoresin (CRO) against the causative agents of tooth decay and periodontitis and has assessed the CRO cytotoxic potential. Cutting edge analytical techniques (GC-MS and LC-MS) aided the chemical characterization of CRO. Antimicrobial assays included determination of the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC), determination of the Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC), determination of the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Biofilm (MICB50), Time Kill Assay, and Checkerboard Dilution. Conduction of XTT assays on human lung fibroblasts (GM07492-A cells) helped to examine the CRO cytotoxic potential. Chromatographic analyses revealed that the major constituents of CRO were β-bisabolene, trans-α-bergamotene, β-selinene, α-selinene, and the terpene acids ent-agathic-15-methyl ester, ent-copalic acid, and ent-polyalthic acid. MIC and MBC results ranged from 6.25 to 200 μg/mL against the tested bacteria. The time-kill assay conducted with CRO at concentrations between 50 and 100 μg/mL showed bactericidal activity against Fusobacterium nucleatum (ATCC 25586) and Streptococcus mitis (ATCC 49456) after 4 h, Prevotella nigrescens (ATCC 33563) after 6 h, Porphyromonas gingivalis (ATCC 33277) and Lactobacillus casei (clinical isolate) after 12 h, and Streptococcus salivarius (ATCC 25975) and Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 25175) after 18 h. The fractional inhibitory concentration indexes (FICIs) revealed antagonistic interaction for Lactobacillus casei (clinical isolate), indifferent effect for Porphyromonas gingivalis

  15. Effect of varieties composition of wall material on physical and chemistry characteristics of microcapsulated kaffir lime leave oleoresin (Citrus hystrix DC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifatunissa, Zhulfani Nur; Kawiji, Khasanah, Lia Umi; Utami, Rohula

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of variety composition of wall material on characteristic of micro capsulated kaffir lime leave oleoresin which includes yield, water content, and solubility in water, microstructure, residual solvent content and active compound content. This study used variety composition of maltodextrin and carrageenan (100%: 0%; 97%: 3%; 95%: 5%; 90%: 10%) as wall material, and kaffir lime leave oleoresin as core material which was extracted by maceration using ethanol as solvent. Analysis's result showed that the varieties composition of wall material influenced on yield and water content significantly. However, there was no significant influence discovered in solubility in water and residual solvent content. Active compounds contained in the product of oleoresin microcapsules kaffir lime leaves are citronella, citronellol, citronellyl acetate, nerolidol, phytol, farnesol while the levels of residual solvents in this study ranged from 0.01-0.015%. Based on experiment result showed that use carrageenan can produce preferable microstructure.

  16. Classification of Sunflower Oil Blends Stabilized by Oleoresin Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) Using Multivariate Kinetic Approach.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Rohit; Mishra, Hari Niwas

    2015-08-01

    The sunflower oil-oleoresin rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) blends (SORB) at 9 different concentrations (200 to 2000 mg/kg), sunflower oil-tertiary butyl hydroquinone (SOTBHQ ) at 200 mg/kg and control (without preservatives) (SO control ) were oxidized using Rancimat (temperature: 100 to 130 °C; airflow rate: 20 L/h). The oxidative stability of blends was expressed using induction period (IP), oil stability index and photochemiluminescence assay. The linear regression models were generated by plotting ln IP with temperature to estimate the shelf life at 20 °C (SL20 ; R(2) > 0.90). Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to classify the oil blends depending upon the oxidative stability and kinetic parameters. The Arrhenius equation adequately described the temperature-dependent kinetics (R(2) > 0.90, P < 0.05) and kinetic parameters viz. activation energies, activation enthalpies, and entropies were calculated in the range of 92.07 to 100.50 kJ/mol, 88.85 to 97.28 kJ/mol, -33.33 to -1.13 J/mol K, respectively. Using PCA, a satisfactory discrimination was noted among SORB, SOTBHQ , and SOcontrol samples. HCA classified the oil blends into 3 different clusters (I, II, and III) where SORB1200 and SORB1500 were grouped together in close proximity with SOTBHQ indicating the comparable oxidative stability. The SL20 was estimated to be 3790, 6974, and 4179 h for SO control, SOTBHQ, and SORB1500, respectively. The multivariate kinetic approach effectively screened SORB1500 as the best blend conferring the highest oxidative stability to sunflower oil. This approach can be adopted for quick and reliable estimation of the oxidative stability of oil samples.

  17. Aqueous two-phase extraction combined with chromatography: new strategies for preparative separation and purification of capsaicin from capsicum oleoresin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pei-Pei; Lu, Yan-Min; Tan, Cong-Ping; Liang, Yan; Cui, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin was preparatively separated and purified from capsicum oleoresin with a new method combined with aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) and chromatography. Screening experiments of ATPE systems containing salts and hydrophilic alcohols showed that potassium carbonate/ethanol system was the most suitable system for capsaicin recovery among the systems considered. Response surface methodology was used to determine an optimized aqueous two-phase system for the extraction of capsaicin from capsaicin oleoresin. In a 20 % (w/w) ethanol/22.3 % (w/w) potassium carbonate system, 85.4 % of the capsaicin was recovered in the top ethanol-rich phase while most oil and capsanthin ester were removed in the interphase. The capsaicinoid extract was then subjected to two chromatographic steps using D101 macroporous resin and inexpensive SKP-10-4300 reverse-phase resin first applied for the purification of capsaicin. After simple optimization of loading/elution conditions for D101 macroporous resin chromatography and SKP-10-4300 reverse-phase resin chromatography, the purities of capsaicin were improved from 7 to 85 %. In the two chromatography processes, the recoveries of capsaicin were 93 and 80 % respectively; the productivities of capsaicin were 1.86 and 4.2 (g capsaicin/L resin) per day respectively. It is worth mentioning that a by-product of capsaicin production was also obtained with a high purity (90 %). PMID:25355002

  18. Aqueous two-phase extraction combined with chromatography: new strategies for preparative separation and purification of capsaicin from capsicum oleoresin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pei-Pei; Lu, Yan-Min; Tan, Cong-Ping; Liang, Yan; Cui, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin was preparatively separated and purified from capsicum oleoresin with a new method combined with aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) and chromatography. Screening experiments of ATPE systems containing salts and hydrophilic alcohols showed that potassium carbonate/ethanol system was the most suitable system for capsaicin recovery among the systems considered. Response surface methodology was used to determine an optimized aqueous two-phase system for the extraction of capsaicin from capsaicin oleoresin. In a 20 % (w/w) ethanol/22.3 % (w/w) potassium carbonate system, 85.4 % of the capsaicin was recovered in the top ethanol-rich phase while most oil and capsanthin ester were removed in the interphase. The capsaicinoid extract was then subjected to two chromatographic steps using D101 macroporous resin and inexpensive SKP-10-4300 reverse-phase resin first applied for the purification of capsaicin. After simple optimization of loading/elution conditions for D101 macroporous resin chromatography and SKP-10-4300 reverse-phase resin chromatography, the purities of capsaicin were improved from 7 to 85 %. In the two chromatography processes, the recoveries of capsaicin were 93 and 80 % respectively; the productivities of capsaicin were 1.86 and 4.2 (g capsaicin/L resin) per day respectively. It is worth mentioning that a by-product of capsaicin production was also obtained with a high purity (90 %).

  19. Effect of commercial rosemary oleoresin preparations on ground chicken thigh meat quality packaged in a high-oxygen atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Keokamnerd, T; Acton, J C; Han, I Y; Dawson, P L

    2008-01-01

    Four commercial rosemary oleoresin preparations were added to ground chicken thigh meat at the recommended levels of the manufacturer then packaged in 80% O(2)-20% CO(2) modified atmosphere trays. The rosemary preparations differed in oil and water solubility, dispersion properties, or both. Addition of rosemary to ground chicken had an overall positive effect on raw meat appearance during storage and cooked meat flavor. No effect on bacterial growth was observed due to rosemary addition. However, oxidation was slowed in meat with added rosemary as indicated by lower TBA values, lower hexanal concentrations, and sensory scores. Color (redness) was more stable in meat with added rosemary compared with meat without rosemary, as reflected in redness (a*) values, hue angles, and visual scores. Of the 4 rosemary preparations tested, the oil-soluble, most concentrated preparation (HT-O) was most effective in maintaining meat quality compared with the other 3 types tested.

  20. DFT Calculations and ROESY NMR Data for the Diastereochemical Characterization of Cytotoxic Tetraterpenoids from the Oleoresin of Abies balsamea.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Serge; Gauthier, Charles; Mshvildadze, Vakhtang; Legault, Jean; Roger, Benoit; Pichette, André

    2015-12-24

    Eight non-carotenoid tetraterpenoids, abibalsamins C-J (3-10), were isolated from the oleoresin of Abies balsamea. Their chemical structures were determined based on analysis of 1D/2D NMR and MS data. The assignment of their relative configurations was accomplished using homonuclear coupling constants in tandem with ROESY data. However, the presence of two stereogenic centers on a flexible side chain complicated the characterization. In silico models and ROESY data were analyzed in order to assign relative configurations of the isolated tetraterpenoids. Abibalsamins B and H-J showed moderate cytotoxicity against human A549 lung carcinoma cells, with IC50 values ranging between 6.7 and 10 μM.

  1. Isocratic non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic separation of capsanthin and capsorubin in red peppers (Capsicum annuum L.), paprika and oleoresin.

    PubMed

    Weissenberg, M; Schaeffler, I; Menagem, E; Barzilai, M; Levy, A

    1997-01-01

    A simple, rapid high-performance liquid chromatography method has been devised in order to separate and quantify the xanthophylls capsorubin and capasanthin present in red pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) fruits and preparations made from them (paprika and oleoresin). A reversed-phase isocratic non-aqueous system allows the separation of xanthophylls within a few minutes, with detection at 450 nm, using methyl red as internal standard to locate the various carotenoids and xanthophylls found in plant extracts. The selection of extraction solvents, mild saponification conditions, and chromatographic features is evaluated and discussed. The method is proposed for rapid screening of large plant populations, plant selection, as well as for paprika products and oleoresin, and also for nutrition and quality control studies.

  2. In vitro evaluation of antimicrobial activities of various commercial essential oils, oleoresin and pure compounds against food pathogens and application in ham.

    PubMed

    Dussault, Dominic; Vu, Khanh Dang; Lacroix, Monique

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the application of commercially available essential oils (EOs) and oleoresins to control bacterial pathogens for ready to eat food. In this study, sixty seven commercial EOs, oleoresins (ORs) and pure compounds were used to evaluate in vitro their antimicrobial activity against six food pathogens. These products were first screened for their antimicrobial activity using disk diffusion assay. Forty one products were then chosen for further analysis to determine their minimum inhibitory concentration against 6 different bacteria. There were 5 different products (allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamon Chinese cassia, cinnamon OR, oregano and red thyme) that showed high antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria. Further analysis examined the effect of four selected EOs on controlling the growth rate of mixed cultures of Listeria monocytogenes in ham. A reduction of the growth rate by 19 and 10% was observed when oregano and cinnamon cassia EOs were respectively added in ham at a concentration of 500 ppm. PMID:24012976

  3. Anti-Candida and radical scavenging activities of essential oils and oleoresins of Zingiber officinale Roscoe and essential oils of other plants belonging to the family Zingiberaceae.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Inouye, S; Abe, S

    2011-10-01

    Essential oils of young and mature rhizomes, air-dried and steamed rhizomes, and seed rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger) were prepared, and their inhibition of filamentation by Candida albicans was examined. Ginger essential oils, and particularly those from seed and air-dried rhizomes, had potent inhibitory activity compared to ginger oleoresins obtained by ethanol and hypercritical carbon dioxide extraction and essential oils of 5 other plants in the family Zingiberaceae. Of the constituents, [6]-shogaol was most active against filament formation and growth of C. albicans, followed by citral and [6]-gingerol. Ginger oleoresin, and especially that obtained by ethanol extraction, with a high [6]-gingerol content exhibited potent scavenging activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals in comparison to essential oils of ginger and other Zingiberaceae plants. PMID:22466370

  4. Multivariate optimization of a synergistic blend of oleoresin sage (Salvia officinalis L.) and ascorbyl palmitate to stabilize sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Rohit; Mishra, Hari Niwas

    2016-04-01

    The simultaneous optimization of a synergistic blend of oleoresin sage (SAG) and ascorbyl palmitate (AP) in sunflower oil (SO) was performed using central composite and rotatable design coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) and response surface methodology (RSM). The physicochemical parameters viz., peroxide value, anisidine value, free fatty acids, induction period, total polar matter, antioxidant capacity and conjugated diene value were considered as response variables. PCA reduced the original set of correlated responses to few uncorrelated principal components (PC). The PC1 (eigen value, 5.78; data variance explained, 82.53 %) was selected for optimization using RSM. The quadratic model adequately described the data (R (2) = 0. 91, p < 0.05) and lack of fit was insignificant (p > 0.05). The contour plot of PC 1 score indicated the optimal synergistic combination of 1289.19 and 218.06 ppm for SAG and AP, respectively. This combination of SAG and AP resulted in shelf life of 320 days at 25 °C estimated using linear shelf life prediction model. In conclusion, the versatility of PCA-RSM approach has resulted in an easy interpretation in multiple response optimizations. This approach can be considered as a useful guide to develop new oil blends stabilized with food additives from natural sources.

  5. Thermal degradation products formed from carotenoids during a heat-induced degradation process of paprika oleoresins (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio; Rios, José J; Mínguez-Mosquera, María Isabel

    2005-06-15

    The high-temperature treatment of paprika oleoresins (Capsicum annuum L.) modified the carotenoid profile, yielding several degradation products, which were analyzed by HPLC-APCI-MS. From the initial MS data, compounds were grouped in two sets. Set 1 grouped compounds with m/z 495, and set 2 included compounds with m/z 479, in both cases for the protonated molecular mass. Two compounds of the first set were tentatively identified as 9,10,11,12,13,14,19,20-octanor-capsorubin (compound II) and 9,10,11,12,13,14,19,20-octanor-5,6-epoxide-capsanthin (compound IV), after isolation by semipreparative HPLC and analysis by EI-MS. Compounds VII, VIII, and IX from set 2 were assigned as 9,10,11,12,13,14,19,20-octanor-capsanthin and isomers, respectively. As these compounds were the major products formed in the thermal process, it was possible to apply derivatization techniques (hydrogenation and silylation) to analyze them by EI-MS, before and after chemical derivatization. Taking into account structures of the degradation products, the cyclization of polyolefins could be considered as the general reaction pathway in thermally induced reactions, yielding in the present study xylene as byproduct and the corresponding nor-carotenoids.

  6. Multivariate optimization of a synergistic blend of oleoresin sage (Salvia officinalis L.) and ascorbyl palmitate to stabilize sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Rohit; Mishra, Hari Niwas

    2016-04-01

    The simultaneous optimization of a synergistic blend of oleoresin sage (SAG) and ascorbyl palmitate (AP) in sunflower oil (SO) was performed using central composite and rotatable design coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) and response surface methodology (RSM). The physicochemical parameters viz., peroxide value, anisidine value, free fatty acids, induction period, total polar matter, antioxidant capacity and conjugated diene value were considered as response variables. PCA reduced the original set of correlated responses to few uncorrelated principal components (PC). The PC1 (eigen value, 5.78; data variance explained, 82.53 %) was selected for optimization using RSM. The quadratic model adequately described the data (R (2) = 0. 91, p < 0.05) and lack of fit was insignificant (p > 0.05). The contour plot of PC 1 score indicated the optimal synergistic combination of 1289.19 and 218.06 ppm for SAG and AP, respectively. This combination of SAG and AP resulted in shelf life of 320 days at 25 °C estimated using linear shelf life prediction model. In conclusion, the versatility of PCA-RSM approach has resulted in an easy interpretation in multiple response optimizations. This approach can be considered as a useful guide to develop new oil blends stabilized with food additives from natural sources. PMID:27413218

  7. Evaluation of oleoresin capsicum of Capsicum frutescenes var. Nagahari containing various percentages of capsaicinoids following inhalation as an active ingredient for tear gas munitions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pravin; Deb, Utsab; Kaushik, M P

    2012-08-01

    Comparative efficacy as peripheral sensory irritant, oral and inhalation exposure studies were carried out on oleoresin capsicum (OC) of Capsicum frutescence var. Nagahari containing various percentages of capsaicinoids and two synthetic isomers of capsaicin in Swiss albino male mouse model to come up with a suitable active ingredient from natural source for tear gas munitions. The compounds screened were OC having varying percentages of capsaicinoids (20, 40 and 80%, respectively) and synthetic isomers (E and Z) of capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide). Mice were exposed to pyrotechnically generated smoke of the compounds in an all glass static exposure chamber for 15 min to determine acute inhalation toxicity (LC₅₀) and quantitative sensory irritation potential (RD₅₀). Acute oral median lethal dose (LD₅₀) was also evaluated. Safety index of tear gas (SITG), a ratio of lethal concentration 50% (LC₅₀) and the concentration which depresses respiration by 50% (RD₅₀) due to peripheral sensory irritation is also proposed. The compound having highest SITG is considered as the most suitable to be used for tear gas munitions. The study revealed that oleoresin capsicum containing 40% capsaicinoids had the highest SITG among the compounds studied. The oral dosage versus mortality pattern of some compounds did not follow a true dose-response curve (DRC); however, following inhalation, all the compounds followed DRC. It was concluded that oleoresin capsicum (40% capsaicinoids) may be considered as the most suitable and environmental friendly compound from natural source to be used as an active ingredient for tear gas munitions.

  8. Circulating and in situ lymphocyte subsets and Langerhans cells in patients with compositae oleoresin dermatitis and increased ultraviolet A sensitivity during treatment with azathioprine

    SciTech Connect

    Baadsgaard, O.

    1986-04-01

    Circulating and in situ lymphocyte subsets and Langerhans cells in four patients with compositae oleoresin dermatitis and increased ultraviolet A sensitivity before and during treatment with azathioprine were estimated. It was found that the number of Leu 6+ Langerhans cells decreased during therapy. This decrease was accompanied by a reduction in the number of Leu 2a+, Leu 3a+, Leu 4+, DR+, and Leu M2+ cells in the blood and a reduction in the number of Leu 2a+, Leu 3a+, Leu 4+, and DR+ cells in the skin. Concomitantly with the changes in the number of immunocompetent cells, the eczema cleared.

  9. Influence of cultivar and maturity at harvest on the essential oil composition, oleoresin and [6]-gingerol contents in fresh ginger from northeast India.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Challa Ravi; Chakka, Ashok Kumar; Amma, K P Padmakumari; Menon, A Nirmala; Kumar, M M Sree; Venugopalan, V V

    2013-05-01

    Severe flooding of the Brahmaputra River during the monsoon season and continuous rainfall in the northeast region (NER) of India cause an enormous loss of ginger crop every year. In this context, the present study investigates the variation in the essential oil composition and oleoresin and [6]-gingerol contents in 10 different fresh ginger cultivars harvested at 6- and 9-month maturity from five different states of NER. Monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and citral composition in the essential oil were evaluated to ascertain their dependence upon the maturity of ginger. Except Mizoram Thinglaidum, Mizoram Thingria, Nagaland Nadia, and Tripura I ginger cultivars, all other cultivars showed an increase in the citral content during the maturity that was observed for the first time. At 6-month maturity, a higher undecanone level was found in Nagaland Nadia (7.36 ± 0.61%), Tripura I (6.23 ± 0.61%), and Tripura III (9.17 ± 0.76%) cultivars, and these data can be used as a benchmark to identify those immature varieties. Interestingly, the Nagaland Nadia cultivar showed higher ar-curcumene (9.57 ± 0.58%) content than zingiberene (5.84 ± 0.24%), which was unique among all cultivars. Ginger harvested at 9-month maturity from the Tripura II cultivar had the highest citral content (22.03 ± 0.49%), and the Meghalaya Mahima cultivar had the highest zingiberene content (29.89 ± 2.92%). The oleoresin content was found to decrease with maturity in all cultivars, except Assam Fibreless and Manipur I. Moreover, the highest oleoresin (11.43 ± 0.58 and 9.42 ± 0.63%) and [6]-gingerol (1.67 ± 0.03 and 1.67 ± 0.05 g) contents were observed for Tripura II and Nagaland Nadia, respectively. This study suggests that Tripura and Nagaland are the most ideal locations in NER for ginger cultivation to obtain high yields of oleoresin and [6]-gingerol contents and harvesting at the 6-month maturation will compensate for the loss of ginger crop caused by the Brahmaputra River flooding in NER

  10. Enzyme-assisted supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of black pepper oleoresin for enhanced yield of piperine-rich extract.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sayantani; Bhattacharjee, Paramita

    2015-07-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum L.), the King of Spices is the most popular spice globally and its active ingredient, piperine, is reportedly known for its therapeutic potency. In this work, enzyme-assisted supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction of black pepper oleoresin was investigated using α-amylase (from Bacillus licheniformis) for enhanced yield of piperine-rich extract possessing good combination of phytochemical properties. Optimization of the extraction parameters (without enzyme), mainly temperature and pressure, was conducted in both batch and continuous modes and the optimized conditions that provided the maximum yield of piperine was in the batch mode, with a sample size of 20 g of black pepper powder (particle diameter 0.42 ± 0.02 mm) at 60 °C and 300 bar at 2 L/min of CO2 flow. Studies on activity of α-amylase were conducted under these optimized conditions in both batch and continuous modes, with varying amounts of lyophilized enzyme (2 mg, 5 mg and 10 mg) and time of exposure of the enzyme to SC-CO2 (2.25 h and 4.25 h). The specific activity of the enzyme increased by 2.13 times when treated in the continuous mode than in the batch mode (1.25 times increase). The structural changes of the treated enzymes were studied by (1)H NMR analyses. In case of α-amylase assisted extractions of black pepper, both batch and continuous modes significantly increased the yields and phytochemical properties of piperine-rich extracts; with higher increase in batch mode than in continuous.

  11. Enzyme-assisted supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of black pepper oleoresin for enhanced yield of piperine-rich extract.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sayantani; Bhattacharjee, Paramita

    2015-07-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum L.), the King of Spices is the most popular spice globally and its active ingredient, piperine, is reportedly known for its therapeutic potency. In this work, enzyme-assisted supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction of black pepper oleoresin was investigated using α-amylase (from Bacillus licheniformis) for enhanced yield of piperine-rich extract possessing good combination of phytochemical properties. Optimization of the extraction parameters (without enzyme), mainly temperature and pressure, was conducted in both batch and continuous modes and the optimized conditions that provided the maximum yield of piperine was in the batch mode, with a sample size of 20 g of black pepper powder (particle diameter 0.42 ± 0.02 mm) at 60 °C and 300 bar at 2 L/min of CO2 flow. Studies on activity of α-amylase were conducted under these optimized conditions in both batch and continuous modes, with varying amounts of lyophilized enzyme (2 mg, 5 mg and 10 mg) and time of exposure of the enzyme to SC-CO2 (2.25 h and 4.25 h). The specific activity of the enzyme increased by 2.13 times when treated in the continuous mode than in the batch mode (1.25 times increase). The structural changes of the treated enzymes were studied by (1)H NMR analyses. In case of α-amylase assisted extractions of black pepper, both batch and continuous modes significantly increased the yields and phytochemical properties of piperine-rich extracts; with higher increase in batch mode than in continuous. PMID:25617183

  12. Anti-obesity efficacy of nanoemulsion oleoresin capsicum in obese rats fed a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo-Yeon; Lee, Mak-Soon; Jung, Sunyoon; Joo, Hyunjin; Kim, Chong-Tai; Kim, In-Hwan; Seo, Sangjin; Oh, Soojung; Kim, Yangha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study determined the effects of oleoresin capsicum (OC) and nanoemulsion OC (NOC) on obesity in obese rats fed a high-fat diet. Methods The rats were randomly separated into three groups: a high-fat (HF) diet group, HF + OC diet group, and HF + NOC diet group. All groups were fed the diet and water ad libitum for 14 weeks. Results NOC reduced the body weight and adipose tissue mass, whereas OC did not. OC and NOC reduced mRNA levels of adipogenic genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, and fatty acid-binding protein in white adipose tissue. The mRNA levels of genes related to β-oxidation or thermogenesis including PPAR-α, palmitoyltransferase-1α, and uncoupling protein-2 were increased by the OC and NOC relative to the HF group. Both OC and NOC clearly stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. In particular, PPAR-α, palmitoyltransferase-1α, uncoupling protein-2 expression, and AMPK activity were significantly increased in the NOC group compared to in the OC group. NOC decreased glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity whereas OC did not. Conclusion From these results, NOC could be suggested as a potential anti-obesity agent in obese rats fed a HF diet. The effects of the NOC on obesity were associated with changes of multiple gene expression, activation of AMPK, and inhibition of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in white adipose tissue. PMID:24403834

  13. Influence of oleoresin constituents fromPinus ponderosa andPinus jeffreyi on growth of mycangial fungi fromDendroctonus ponderosae andDendroctonus jeffreyi.

    PubMed

    Paine, T D; Hanlon, C C

    1994-10-01

    Dendroctonus jeffreyi andD. ponderosae are morphologically similar sympatric species of pine bark beetles over portions of their geographic ranges; however,D. jeffreyi is monophagous onP. jeffreyi whileD. ponderosae is highly polyphagous. Both species carry a species of mycangial fungi that are also very similar in appearance. Growth of the two mycangial fungi and of the fungusLeptographium terebrantis (associated with the polyphagous and non-tree-killingDendroctonus valens) in the presence of oleoresin constituents of host and nonhost conifers was tested by placing individual chemicals on agar growth medium and by growing the cultures in saturated atmospheres of the chemicals. The fungus associated withD. jeffreyi showed greater tolerance for chemical constituents placed on the growth medium than the other two fungi, and growth after three days was enhanced by heptane, the dominant constituent ofP. jeffreyi oleoresin. Growth of all three species of fungi was reduced by the resin constituents when the chemicals were presented as saturated atmospheres. The results suggest that the influence of the tree on growth of the symbiotic fungi of the bark beetles during the initial attack process may be different than after colonization by the beetles is complete. The difference in the responses of the apparently related species of mycangial fungi may provide some new insight into the evolutionary history of these beetle/mycangial fungus/host tree systems.

  14. Generation and annotation of lodgepole pine and oleoresin-induced expressed sequences from the blue-stain fungus Ophiostoma clavigerum, a Mountain Pine Beetle-associated pathogen.

    PubMed

    DiGuistini, Scott; Ralph, Steven G; Lim, Young W; Holt, Robert; Jones, Steven; Bohlmann, Jörg; Breuil, Colette

    2007-02-01

    Ophiostoma clavigerum is a destructive pathogen of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests in western North America. It is therefore a relevant system for a genomics analysis of fungi vectored by bark beetles. To begin characterizing molecular interactions between the pathogen and its conifer host, we created an expressed sequence tag (EST) collection for O. clavigerum. Lodgepole pine sawdust and oleoresin media were selected to stimulate gene expression that would be specific to this host interaction. Over 6500 cDNA clones, derived from four normalized cDNA libraries, were single-pass sequenced from the 3' end. After quality screening, we identified 5975 high-quality reads with an average PHRED 20 of greater than 750 bp. Clustering and assembly of this high-quality EST set resulted in the identification of 2620 unique putative transcripts. BLASTX analysis revealed that only 67% of these unique transcripts could be matched to known or predicted protein sequences in public databases. Functional classification of these sequences provided initial insights into the transcriptome of O. clavigerum. Of particular interest, our ESTs represent an extensive collection of cytochrome P450 s, ATP-binding-cassette-type transporters and genes involved in 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene-melanin biosynthesis. These results are discussed in the context of detoxification of conifer oleoresins and fungal pathogenesis.

  15. Pistacia lentiscus Oleoresin: Virtual Screening and Identification of Masticadienonic and Isomasticadienonic Acids as Inhibitors of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1.

    PubMed

    Vuorinen, Anna; Seibert, Julia; Papageorgiou, Vassilios P; Rollinger, Judith M; Odermatt, Alex; Schuster, Daniela; Assimopoulou, Andreana N

    2015-04-01

    In traditional medicine, the oleoresinous gum of Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, so-called mastic gum, has been used to treat multiple conditions such as coughs, sore throats, eczema, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. Mastic gum is rich in triterpenes, which have been postulated to exert antidiabetic effects and improve lipid metabolism. In fact, there is evidence of oleanonic acid, a constituent of mastic gum, acting as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist, and mastic gum being antidiabetic in mice in vivo. Despite these findings, the exact antidiabetic mechanism of mastic gum remains unknown. Glucocorticoids play a key role in regulating glucose and fatty acid metabolism, and inhibition of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 that converts inactive cortisone to active cortisol has been proposed as a promising approach to combat metabolic disturbances including diabetes. In this study, a pharmacophore-based virtual screening was applied to filter a natural product database for possible 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 inhibitors. The hit list analysis was especially focused on the triterpenoids present in Pistacia species. Multiple triterpenoids, such as masticadienonic acid and isomasticadienonic acid, main constituents of mastic gum, were identified. Indeed, masticadienonic acid and isomasticadienonic acid selectively inhibited 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 over 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 at low micromolar concentrations. These findings suggest that inhibition of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 contributes to the antidiabetic activity of mastic gum.

  16. Use of spray-cooling technology for development of microencapsulated capsicum oleoresin for the growing pig as an alternative to in-feed antibiotics: a study of release using in vitro models.

    PubMed

    Meunier, J-P; Cardot, J-M; Manzanilla, E G; Wysshaar, M; Alric, M

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop sustained release microspheres of capsicum oleoresin as an alternative to in-feed additives. Two spray-cooling technologies, a fluidized air bed using a spray nozzle system and a vibrating nozzle system placed on top of a cooling tower, were used to microencapsulate 20% of capsicum oleoresin in a hydrogenated, rapeseed oil matrix. Microencapsulation was intended to reduce the irritating effect of capsicum oleoresin and to control its release kinetics during consumption by the animal. Particles produced by the fluidized air bed process (batch F1) ranged from 180 to 1,000 microm in size. The impact of particle size on release of capsaicin, the main active compound of capsicum oleoresin, was studied after sieving batch F1 to obtain 4 formulations: F1a (180 to 250 microm), F1b (250 to 500 microm), F1c (500 to 710 microm), and F1d (710 to 1,000 microm). The vibrating nozzle system can produce a monodispersive particle size distribution. In this study, particles of 500 to 710 microm were made (batch F2). The release kinetics of the formulations was estimated in a flow-through cell dissolution apparatus (CFC). The time to achieve a 90% dissolution value (T90%) of capsaicin for subbatches of F1 increased with the increase in particle size (P < 0.05), with the greatest value of 165.5 +/- 13.2 min for F1d. The kinetics of dissolution of F2 was slower than all F1 subbatches, with a T90% of 422.7 +/- 30.0 min. Nevertheless, because CFC systems are ill suited for experiments with solid feed and thus limit their predictive values, follow-up studies were performed on F1c and F2 using an in vitro dynamic model that simulated more closely the digestive environment. For both formulations a lower quantity of capsaicin dialyzed was recorded under fed condition vs. fasting condition with 46.9% +/- 1.0 vs. 74.7% +/- 2.7 for F1c and 32.4% +/- 1.4 vs. 44.2% +/- 2.6 for F2, respectively. This suggests a possible interaction between capsaicin and the

  17. 21 CFR 582.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. Chicory Cichorium intybus L. Cinnamon bark, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  18. 21 CFR 582.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. Chicory Cichorium intybus L. Cinnamon bark, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  19. 21 CFR 182.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. Chicory Cichorium intybus L. Cinnamon bark, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  20. 21 CFR 582.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. Chicory Cichorium intybus L. Cinnamon bark, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  1. 21 CFR 182.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. Chicory Cichorium intybus L. Cinnamon bark, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  2. 21 CFR 182.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Cinnamon bark, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon leaf, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Citronella...

  3. 21 CFR 182.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. Chicory Cichorium intybus L. Cinnamon bark, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  4. 21 CFR 582.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. Chicory Cichorium intybus L. Cinnamon bark, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  5. 21 CFR 582.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. Chicory Cichorium intybus L. Cinnamon bark, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  6. 21 CFR 182.20 - Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. Chicory Cichorium intybus L. Cinnamon bark, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees. Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume. Cinnamon...

  7. Induced oleoresin biosynthesis in grand fir as a defense against bark beetles.

    PubMed Central

    Steele, C L; Lewinsohn, E; Croteau, R

    1995-01-01

    Grand fir (Abies grandis) saplings and derived cell cultures are useful systems for studying the regulation of defensive oleoresinosis in conifers, a process involving both the constitutive accumulation of resin (pitch) in specialized secretory structures and the induced production of monoterpene olefins (turpentine) and diterpene resin acids (rosin) by nonspecialized cells at the site of injury. The pathways and enzymes involved in monoterpene and diterpene resin acid biosynthesis are described, as are the coinduction kinetics following stem injury as determined by resin analysis, enzyme activity measurements, and immunoblotting. The effects of seasonal development, light deprivation, and water stress on constitutive and wound-induced oleoresinosis are reported. Future efforts, including a PCR-based cloning strategy, to define signal transduction in the wound response and the resulting gene activation processes are delineated. Images Fig. 6 PMID:7753778

  8. Cytotoxicity and antiangiogenic effects of Rhus coriaria, Pistacia vera and Pistacia khinjuk oleoresin methanol extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mirian, M.; Behrooeian, M.; Ghanadian, M.; Dana, N.; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, H.

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis, formation of new blood vessels, play an important role in some diseases such as cancer and its metastasis. Using angiogenesis inhibitors, therefore, is one of the ways for cancer treatment and prevention of metastasis. Medicinal plants have been shown to play a major role in the treatment of a variety of cancers. In this direction, cytotoxic and angiogenic effects of oleo gum resin extracts of Rhus coriaria, Pistacia vera and Pistacia khinjuk from Anacardiaceae family were studied. For IC50 values, cytotoxic effects of the plant extracts were evaluated at different concentrations (1, 10, 20, 40, 80,100 μg/ml) against human umbilical vein endothelial normal cell (HUVEC) and Y79 cell lines using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. In vitro tube formation on matrigel base was used to evaluate angiogenic effects in the presence of increasing concentrations (50, 100, 250 μg/ml) of the extracts. Vascular endothelium growth factor was used as angiogenesis stimulator. Gas chromatography results showed that α-pinene and β-pinene were the major essential oils constituents of all plant extracts. According to the MTT assay results, the R. coriaria resin extract was more cytotoxic than those of P. vera and P. khinjuk extracts (IC50, 9.1 ± 1.6 vs 9.8 ± 2.1 and 12.0 ± 1.9, respectively; P<0.05). Cytotoxic effects of all extracts against Y79 cell line was significantly higher than those of HUVEC used as a normal cell line (P<0.05). Tube formation assay also showed that extract of R. coriaria resin inhibited angiogenesis more significantly than other tested extracts (P<0.05). It could be concluded that R. coriaria resin extract possess cytotoxic effect and antiangiogenesis against cancer cells and as an anticancer natural product has a good potential for future studies. PMID:26600850

  9. The analysis of essential oils and extracts (oleoresins) from seasonings--a critical review.

    PubMed

    Salzer, U J

    1977-01-01

    A critical review of the analytical methods employed for the determination of the relevant components of seasonings is presented. Where the available methods were inadequate, new ones have been devised. Particular emphasis has been placed on those methods of analysis that provide a rapid and sufficiently accurate appraisal of seasoning extracts and essential oils from seasonings under routine control laboratory conditions. At the same time, the margin of error of these methods has been determined. The individual seasoning extracts were assessed according to the following criteria: (1) essential oil--cardamom, laurel leaves, cloves, origanum (marjoram), sage, and thyme; (2) essential oil and nonvolatile lipids--dillseed, coriander, caraway, mace, nutmeg, pimento (allspice), and celery seed; (3) essential oil and/or pungent ingredients--capsicum, ginger, and pepper; (4) essential oil and/or coloring matter--turmeric (curcuma) and paprika; (5) essential oil and other components--garlic, onion, and cinnamon. PMID:336288

  10. 21 CFR 582.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES... fiber L. and C. canadensis Kuhl. Civet (zibeth, zibet, zibetum) Civet cats, Viverra civetta Schreber...

  11. 21 CFR 582.50 - Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES... fiber L. and C. canadensis Kuhl. Civet (zibeth, zibet, zibetum) Civet cats, Viverra civetta Schreber...

  12. Photosensitivity and allergy to aromatic lichen acids, Compositae oleoresins and other plant substances.

    PubMed

    Thune, P O; Solberg, Y J

    1980-01-01

    Sixteen patients with verified light sensitivity to both UVB and UVA wavebands showed allergic reactions to various lichen plants (Parmelia spp., Hypogymnia spp., Pseuodovernia spp., Cladonia spp., Platismatia spp., Physcia spp., Umbilicaria spp. and Cetraria spp.). Among the aromatic lichen compounds, atranorin was observed to be the most frequently involved allergen but also several other isolated lichen acids were immunologically active: d-usnic, evernic, stictic, fumarprotocetraric, lobaric, salazinic, diffractaic and physodic/physodalic acid. Several patients showed allergy to other plant substances from other sources such as seven different species from the Compositae family, alantolactone, balsam of Peru, colophony and wood tars. Sensitivity to known photosensitizers was observed in four patients. Aromatic lichen acids are UV-absorbing substances and several are evidently able to photosensitive human skin. PMID:7398280

  13. Photosensitivity and allergy to aromatic lichen acids, Compositae oleoresins and other plant substances.

    PubMed

    Thune, P O; Solberg, Y J

    1980-01-01

    Sixteen patients with verified light sensitivity to both UVB and UVA wavebands showed allergic reactions to various lichen plants (Parmelia spp., Hypogymnia spp., Pseudovernia spp., Cladonia spp., Platismatia spp., Physcia spp., Umbilicaria spp. and Cetraria spp.). Among the aromatic lichen compounds, atranorin was observed to be the most frequently involved allergen, but also several other isolated lichen acids were immunologically active: d-usnic, evernic, stictic, fumarprotocetraric, lobaric, salazinic, diffractaic and physodic/physodalic acid. Several patients showed allergy to other plant substances from other sources such as seven different species from the Compositae family, alantolactone, balsam of Peru, colophony and wood tars. Sensitivity to known photosensitizers was observed in four patients. Aromatic lichen acids are UV-absorbing substances and several are evidently able to photosensitize human skin. PMID:7398259

  14. Cytotoxicity and antiangiogenic effects of Rhus coriaria, Pistacia vera and Pistacia khinjuk oleoresin methanol extracts.

    PubMed

    Mirian, M; Behrooeian, M; Ghanadian, M; Dana, N; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, H

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis, formation of new blood vessels, play an important role in some diseases such as cancer and its metastasis. Using angiogenesis inhibitors, therefore, is one of the ways for cancer treatment and prevention of metastasis. Medicinal plants have been shown to play a major role in the treatment of a variety of cancers. In this direction, cytotoxic and angiogenic effects of oleo gum resin extracts of Rhus coriaria, Pistacia vera and Pistacia khinjuk from Anacardiaceae family were studied. For IC50 values, cytotoxic effects of the plant extracts were evaluated at different concentrations (1, 10, 20, 40, 80,100 μg/ml) against human umbilical vein endothelial normal cell (HUVEC) and Y79 cell lines using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. In vitro tube formation on matrigel base was used to evaluate angiogenic effects in the presence of increasing concentrations (50, 100, 250 μg/ml) of the extracts. Vascular endothelium growth factor was used as angiogenesis stimulator. Gas chromatography results showed that α-pinene and β-pinene were the major essential oils constituents of all plant extracts. According to the MTT assay results, the R. coriaria resin extract was more cytotoxic than those of P. vera and P. khinjuk extracts (IC50, 9.1 ± 1.6 vs 9.8 ± 2.1 and 12.0 ± 1.9, respectively; P<0.05). Cytotoxic effects of all extracts against Y79 cell line was significantly higher than those of HUVEC used as a normal cell line (P<0.05). Tube formation assay also showed that extract of R. coriaria resin inhibited angiogenesis more significantly than other tested extracts (P<0.05). It could be concluded that R. coriaria resin extract possess cytotoxic effect and antiangiogenesis against cancer cells and as an anticancer natural product has a good potential for future studies. PMID:26600850

  15. Oleoresin, Chemistry and Spectral Reflectance in "Stressed" Lodgepole and White Bark Pine, Mammoth Mountain, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, James C.; Birnie, Richard W.; Zhao, Mei-Xun

    2001-01-01

    Development of methods to identify the physical and chemical character of materials on the earth's surface is one of the foci of hyperspectral remote sensing activities. Enhancing the ability to elucidate changes in foliar chemistry that relate to the health of a plant is a benefit to plant physiologists, foresters, and plant ecologists, as well as geologist and environmental scientists. Vegetation covers the landscape throughout the temperate and tropical regions of the earth. The existence of vegetation in these areas presents special problems to remote sensing systems since geologic bedrock and alteration zones are masked. At times, however, alterations in the soil/sediment geochemical environment result in foliar chemical changes that are detectable via remote sensing. Examples include monitoring of chlorophyll reflectance/fluorescence and equivalent water thickness indices as indicators of drought-induced plant stress. Another processing and interpretation approach used with hyperspectral data has been principal components analysis (PCA). Rowan et al. used PCA to identify absorption feature patterns obtained from vegetated areas with discrete bedrock geology or mineralization as the substrate. Many researchers highlight the need to advance our ability for hyperspectral imaging in vegetated areas as a near-term priority.

  16. Photosensitivity and allergy to aromatic lichen acids, Compositae oleoresins and other plant substances.

    PubMed

    Thune, P O; Solberg, Y J

    1980-01-01

    Sixteen patients with verified light sensitivity to both UVB and UVA wavebands showed allergic reactions to various lichen plants (Parmelia spp., Hypogymnia spp., Pseuodovernia spp., Cladonia spp., Platismatia spp., Physcia spp., Umbilicaria spp. and Cetraria spp.). Among the aromatic lichen compounds, atranorin was observed to be the most frequently involved allergen but also several other isolated lichen acids were immunologically active: d-usnic, evernic, stictic, fumarprotocetraric, lobaric, salazinic, diffractaic and physodic/physodalic acid. Several patients showed allergy to other plant substances from other sources such as seven different species from the Compositae family, alantolactone, balsam of Peru, colophony and wood tars. Sensitivity to known photosensitizers was observed in four patients. Aromatic lichen acids are UV-absorbing substances and several are evidently able to photosensitive human skin.

  17. Effects of dietary supplementation with phytonutrients on vaccine-stimulated immunity against infection with Eimeria tenella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two phytonutrient mixtures, VAC (carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and Capsicum oleoresin), and MC (Capsicum oleoresin and turmeric oleoresin), were evaluated for their effects on local and systemic immune responses following immunization of chickens with an Eimeria recombinant protein. Chickens were fed ...

  18. 21 CFR 173.290 - Trichloroethylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... extract 10 parts per million. Spice oleoresins 30 parts per million (provided that if residues of other chlorinated solvents are also present, the total of all residues of such solvents in spice oleoresins...

  19. 21 CFR 173.290 - Trichloroethylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... extract 10 parts per million. Spice oleoresins 30 parts per million (provided that if residues of other chlorinated solvents are also present, the total of all residues of such solvents in spice oleoresins...

  20. 21 CFR 173.290 - Trichloroethylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... extract 10 parts per million. Spice oleoresins 30 parts per million (provided that if residues of other chlorinated solvents are also present, the total of all residues of such solvents in spice oleoresins...

  1. 21 CFR 173.290 - Trichloroethylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... million. Spice oleoresins 30 parts per million (provided that if residues of other chlorinated solvents are also present, the total of all residues of such solvents in spice oleoresins shall not exceed...

  2. A mixture of carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and capsicum oleoresin improves energy utilization and growth performance of broiler chickens fed maize-based diet.

    PubMed

    Bravo, D; Pirgozliev, V; Rose, S P

    2014-04-01

    A total of 210, 1-d-old Ross 308 male broiler chickens were used in an experiment to investigate the effects of a supplementary mixture containing 5% carvacrol, 3% cinnamaldehyde, and 2% capsicum on dietary energy utilization and growth performance. The 2 diets were offered ad libitum to the chickens from 0 to 21 d of age. These included a maize-based control diet and the control diet with 100 g/t of supplementary plant extracts. Dietary apparent ME, N retention (NR), and fat digestibility (FD) coefficients were determined in the follow-up metabolism study between 21 and 24 d of age. Feeding the mixture of carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and capsicum increased weight gain by 14.5% (P = 0.009), improved feed efficiency by 9.8% (P = 0.055), and tended to increase (P = 0.062) carcass energy retention and reduce (P = 0.062) total heat loss compared with feeding the control diet. There was a 16.1% increase (P = 0.015) in carcass protein retention but no difference in carcass fat retention. Feeding plant extracts improved dietary FD by 2.1% (P = 0.013) but did not influence dietary NR. Supplementation of plant extract resulted in a 12.5% increase (P = 0.021) in dietary NE for production (NEp), while no changes in dietary ME were observed. The experiment showed that although dietary essential oils did not affect dietary ME, they caused an improvement in the utilization of energy for growth. Plant extracts may affect metabolic utilization of absorbed nutrients. Studies that have focused solely on the effect of plant extracts on ME alone may well have not detected their full nutritional value.

  3. 29 CFR 780.116 - Commodities included by reference to the Agricultural Marketing Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... commodity’ includes, in addition to other agricultural commodities, crude gum (oleoresin) from a living tree... spirits of turpentine made from gum (oleoresin) from a living tree” and “ ‘gum rosin’ means rosin...) of the Agricultural Marketing Act is that derived from a living tree, the production of...

  4. 29 CFR 780.116 - Commodities included by reference to the Agricultural Marketing Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... commodity’ includes, in addition to other agricultural commodities, crude gum (oleoresin) from a living tree... spirits of turpentine made from gum (oleoresin) from a living tree” and “ ‘gum rosin’ means rosin...) of the Agricultural Marketing Act is that derived from a living tree, the production of...

  5. 29 CFR 780.116 - Commodities included by reference to the Agricultural Marketing Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... commodity’ includes, in addition to other agricultural commodities, crude gum (oleoresin) from a living tree... spirits of turpentine made from gum (oleoresin) from a living tree” and “ ‘gum rosin’ means rosin...) of the Agricultural Marketing Act is that derived from a living tree, the production of...

  6. 7 CFR 160.12 - Standard designations for rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... after the distillation of gum spirits of turpentine from the oleoresin (gum) obtained from living pine... distillation of the volatile oil from the oleoresin within or extracted from pine wood by any suitable process... of rosin remaining after the removal of the fatty acids from tall oil by fractional distillation,...

  7. 7 CFR 160.12 - Standard designations for rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... after the distillation of gum spirits of turpentine from the oleoresin (gum) obtained from living pine... distillation of the volatile oil from the oleoresin within or extracted from pine wood by any suitable process... of rosin remaining after the removal of the fatty acids from tall oil by fractional distillation,...

  8. 7 CFR 160.12 - Standard designations for rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... after the distillation of gum spirits of turpentine from the oleoresin (gum) obtained from living pine... distillation of the volatile oil from the oleoresin within or extracted from pine wood by any suitable process... of rosin remaining after the removal of the fatty acids from tall oil by fractional distillation,...

  9. 7 CFR 160.12 - Standard designations for rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... after the distillation of gum spirits of turpentine from the oleoresin (gum) obtained from living pine... distillation of the volatile oil from the oleoresin within or extracted from pine wood by any suitable process... of rosin remaining after the removal of the fatty acids from tall oil by fractional distillation,...

  10. 7 CFR 160.12 - Standard designations for rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... after the distillation of gum spirits of turpentine from the oleoresin (gum) obtained from living pine... distillation of the volatile oil from the oleoresin within or extracted from pine wood by any suitable process... of rosin remaining after the removal of the fatty acids from tall oil by fractional distillation,...

  11. 7 CFR 160.3 - Rosin defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... vitreous, well-strained, transparent, solid resin which (a) remains after the volatile terpene oils are distilled from (1) the oleoresin collected from living trees or (2) the oleoresin extracted from wood; or (b) remains after distillation of the fatty acids from tall oil recovered from wood in the course of...

  12. 7 CFR 160.3 - Rosin defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... vitreous, well-strained, transparent, solid resin which (a) remains after the volatile terpene oils are distilled from (1) the oleoresin collected from living trees or (2) the oleoresin extracted from wood; or (b) remains after distillation of the fatty acids from tall oil recovered from wood in the course of...

  13. 7 CFR 160.3 - Rosin defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... vitreous, well-strained, transparent, solid resin which (a) remains after the volatile terpene oils are distilled from (1) the oleoresin collected from living trees or (2) the oleoresin extracted from wood; or (b) remains after distillation of the fatty acids from tall oil recovered from wood in the course of...

  14. 7 CFR 160.3 - Rosin defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... vitreous, well-strained, transparent, solid resin which (a) remains after the volatile terpene oils are distilled from (1) the oleoresin collected from living trees or (2) the oleoresin extracted from wood; or (b) remains after distillation of the fatty acids from tall oil recovered from wood in the course of...

  15. 7 CFR 160.3 - Rosin defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... vitreous, well-strained, transparent, solid resin which (a) remains after the volatile terpene oils are distilled from (1) the oleoresin collected from living trees or (2) the oleoresin extracted from wood; or (b) remains after distillation of the fatty acids from tall oil recovered from wood in the course of...

  16. 29 CFR 780.116 - Commodities included by reference to the Agricultural Marketing Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... commodity’ includes, in addition to other agricultural commodities, crude gum (oleoresin) from a living tree, and the following products as processed by the original producers of the crude gum (oleoresin) from which derived: Gum spirits of turpentine, and gum resin, as defined in the Naval Stores Act,...

  17. 29 CFR 780.116 - Commodities included by reference to the Agricultural Marketing Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... commodity’ includes, in addition to other agricultural commodities, crude gum (oleoresin) from a living tree, and the following products as processed by the original producers of the crude gum (oleoresin) from which derived: Gum spirits of turpentine, and gum resin, as defined in the Naval Stores Act,...

  18. 9 CFR 424.23 - Prohibited uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 CFR Chapter III. (b) Nitrates. Nitrates shall not be used in curing bacon. ... greater value than it is. Therefore: (1) Paprika or oleoresin paprika may not be used in or on fresh meat... meat consisting of fresh meat (with or without seasoning). (2) Paprika or oleoresin paprika may be...

  19. 9 CFR 424.23 - Prohibited uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... be used in or on any product, only as provided in 9 CFR Chapter III. (b) Nitrates. Nitrates shall not... greater value than it is. Therefore: (1) Paprika or oleoresin paprika may not be used in or on fresh meat... meat consisting of fresh meat (with or without seasoning). (2) Paprika or oleoresin paprika may be...

  20. 9 CFR 424.23 - Prohibited uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... be used in or on any product, only as provided in 9 CFR Chapter III. (b) Nitrates. Nitrates shall not... greater value than it is. Therefore: (1) Paprika or oleoresin paprika may not be used in or on fresh meat... meat consisting of fresh meat (with or without seasoning). (2) Paprika or oleoresin paprika may be...

  1. 9 CFR 424.23 - Prohibited uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... be used in or on any product, only as provided in 9 CFR Chapter III. (b) Nitrates. Nitrates shall not... greater value than it is. Therefore: (1) Paprika or oleoresin paprika may not be used in or on fresh meat... meat consisting of fresh meat (with or without seasoning). (2) Paprika or oleoresin paprika may be...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1317 - Garlic and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... obtained from Allium sativum, a genus of the lily family. Its derivatives include essential oils, oleo-resins, and natural extractives obtained from garlic. (b) Garlic oil meets the specifications of...

  3. 21 CFR 173.290 - Trichloroethylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... coffee 25 parts per million. Decaffeinated soluble (instant) coffee extract 10 parts per million. Spice..., the total of all residues of such solvents in spice oleoresins shall not exceed 30 parts per million)....

  4. Corrosion inhibiting organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sasson, E.

    1984-10-16

    A corrosion inhibiting coating comprises a mixture of waxes, petroleum jelly, a hardener and a solvent. In particular, a corrosion inhibiting coating comprises candelilla wax, carnauba wax, microcrystalline waxes, white petrolatum, an oleoresin, lanolin and a solvent.

  5. Commiphora molmol extracts as plant molluscicide against Lymnaea natalensis.

    PubMed

    Massoud, Ahmad M; El-Shazly, Atef M; Nagaty, Ibrahim Maged; Morsy, Tosson A

    2007-08-01

    Two extracts from the herbal plant, Commiphora molmol showed a high molluscicidal effect against Lymnaea natalensis. The oil extract was more potent than the oleo-resin. A concentration of 10 ppm of the oil extract killed 100% of L. natalensis after 5th day, but the oleo-resin extract killed 100% of them at a concentration 20 ppm after 5th day. PMID:17985579

  6. Reference Genes for qPCR Analysis in Resin-Tapped Adult Slash Pine As a Tool to Address the Molecular Basis of Commercial Resinosis.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Júlio C; de Costa, Fernanda; Füller, Thanise N; Rodrigues-Corrêa, Kelly C da Silva; Kerber, Magnus R; Lima, Mariano S; Fett, Janette P; Fett-Neto, Arthur G

    2016-01-01

    Pine oleoresin is a major source of terpenes, consisting of turpentine (mono- and sesquiterpenes) and rosin (diterpenes) fractions. Higher oleoresin yields are of economic interest, since oleoresin derivatives make up a valuable source of materials for chemical industries. Oleoresin can be extracted from living trees, often by the bark streak method, in which bark removal is done periodically, followed by application of stimulant paste containing sulfuric acid and other chemicals on the freshly wounded exposed surface. To better understand the molecular basis of chemically-stimulated and wound induced oleoresin production, we evaluated the stability of 11 putative reference genes for the purpose of normalization in studying Pinus elliottii gene expression during oleoresinosis. Samples for RNA extraction were collected from field-grown adult trees under tapping operations using stimulant pastes with different compositions and at various time points after paste application. Statistical methods established by geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper softwares were consistent in pointing as adequate reference genes HISTO3 and UBI. To confirm expression stability of the candidate reference genes, expression profiles of putative P. elliottii orthologs of resin biosynthesis-related genes encoding Pinus contorta β-pinene synthase [PcTPS-(-)β-pin1], P. contorta levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase (PcLAS1), Pinus taeda α-pinene synthase [PtTPS-(+)αpin], and P. taeda α-farnesene synthase (PtαFS) were examined following stimulant paste application. Increased oleoresin yields observed in stimulated treatments using phytohormone-based pastes were consistent with higher expression of pinene synthases. Overall, the expression of all genes examined matched the expected profiles of oleoresin-related transcript changes reported for previously examined conifers. PMID:27379135

  7. Reference Genes for qPCR Analysis in Resin-Tapped Adult Slash Pine As a Tool to Address the Molecular Basis of Commercial Resinosis

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Júlio C.; de Costa, Fernanda; Füller, Thanise N.; Rodrigues-Corrêa, Kelly C. da Silva; Kerber, Magnus R.; Lima, Mariano S.; Fett, Janette P.; Fett-Neto, Arthur G.

    2016-01-01

    Pine oleoresin is a major source of terpenes, consisting of turpentine (mono- and sesquiterpenes) and rosin (diterpenes) fractions. Higher oleoresin yields are of economic interest, since oleoresin derivatives make up a valuable source of materials for chemical industries. Oleoresin can be extracted from living trees, often by the bark streak method, in which bark removal is done periodically, followed by application of stimulant paste containing sulfuric acid and other chemicals on the freshly wounded exposed surface. To better understand the molecular basis of chemically-stimulated and wound induced oleoresin production, we evaluated the stability of 11 putative reference genes for the purpose of normalization in studying Pinus elliottii gene expression during oleoresinosis. Samples for RNA extraction were collected from field-grown adult trees under tapping operations using stimulant pastes with different compositions and at various time points after paste application. Statistical methods established by geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper softwares were consistent in pointing as adequate reference genes HISTO3 and UBI. To confirm expression stability of the candidate reference genes, expression profiles of putative P. elliottii orthologs of resin biosynthesis-related genes encoding Pinus contorta β-pinene synthase [PcTPS-(−)β-pin1], P. contorta levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase (PcLAS1), Pinus taeda α-pinene synthase [PtTPS-(+)αpin], and P. taeda α-farnesene synthase (PtαFS) were examined following stimulant paste application. Increased oleoresin yields observed in stimulated treatments using phytohormone-based pastes were consistent with higher expression of pinene synthases. Overall, the expression of all genes examined matched the expected profiles of oleoresin-related transcript changes reported for previously examined conifers. PMID:27379135

  8. Bioassay-guided evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of pistachio, Pistacia vera L.

    PubMed

    Orhan, I; Küpeli, E; Aslan, M; Kartal, M; Yesilada, E

    2006-04-21

    The ethanolic and aqueous extracts prepared from different parts of Pistacia vera L. (Anacardiaceae) as well as its oleoresin were evaluated for their in vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. Among the extracts screened, only the oleoresin was shown to possess a marked anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model in mice without inducing any gastric damage at both 250 and 500 mg/kg doses whereas the rest of the extracts were totally inactive. While the oleoresin was found to display significant antinociceptive activity at 500 mg/kg dose, the ethanolic and aqueous extracts belonging to fruit, leaf, branch and peduncle of Pistacia vera did not exhibit any noticeable antinociception in p-benzoquinone-induced abdominal contractions in mice. Fractionation of the oleoresin indicated the n-hexane fraction to be active, which further led to recognition of some monoterpenes, mainly alpha-pinene (77.5%) by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as well as the oleoresin itself. alpha-Pinene was also assessed for its antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in the same manner and exerted a moderate anti-inflammatory effect at 500 mg/kg dose.

  9. Enzyme-assisted extraction of bioactive compounds from ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe).

    PubMed

    Nagendra chari, K L; Manasa, D; Srinivas, P; Sowbhagya, H B

    2013-08-15

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale R.) is a popular spice used in various foods and beverages. 6-Gingerol is the major bioactive constituent responsible for the antiinflammatory, antitumour and antioxidant activities of ginger. The effect of application of α-amylase, viscozyme, cellulase, protease and pectinase enzymes to ginger on the oleoresin yield and 6-gingerol content has been investigated. Pre-treatment of ginger with α-amylase or viscozyme followed by extraction with acetone afforded higher yield of oleoresin (20%±0.5) and gingerol (12.2%±0.4) compared to control (15%±0.6 oleoresin, 6.4%±0.4 gingerol). Extraction of ginger pre-treated with enzymes followed by extraction with ethanol provided higher yield of gingerol (6.2-6.3%) than the control (5.5%) with comparable yields of the oleoresin (31-32%). Also, ethanol extract of cellulase pre-treated ginger had the maximum polyphenol content (37.5 mg/g). Apart from 6-gingerol, 6-paradol along with 6- and 8-methyl shogaols were the other important bio-active constituents in the oleoresin from cellulase-treated ginger.

  10. Enzyme-assisted extraction of bioactive compounds from ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe).

    PubMed

    Nagendra chari, K L; Manasa, D; Srinivas, P; Sowbhagya, H B

    2013-08-15

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale R.) is a popular spice used in various foods and beverages. 6-Gingerol is the major bioactive constituent responsible for the antiinflammatory, antitumour and antioxidant activities of ginger. The effect of application of α-amylase, viscozyme, cellulase, protease and pectinase enzymes to ginger on the oleoresin yield and 6-gingerol content has been investigated. Pre-treatment of ginger with α-amylase or viscozyme followed by extraction with acetone afforded higher yield of oleoresin (20%±0.5) and gingerol (12.2%±0.4) compared to control (15%±0.6 oleoresin, 6.4%±0.4 gingerol). Extraction of ginger pre-treated with enzymes followed by extraction with ethanol provided higher yield of gingerol (6.2-6.3%) than the control (5.5%) with comparable yields of the oleoresin (31-32%). Also, ethanol extract of cellulase pre-treated ginger had the maximum polyphenol content (37.5 mg/g). Apart from 6-gingerol, 6-paradol along with 6- and 8-methyl shogaols were the other important bio-active constituents in the oleoresin from cellulase-treated ginger. PMID:23561138

  11. 26 CFR 31.3121(b)(1)-1 - Certain services performed by foreign agricultural workers, or performed before 1959 in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... agricultural workers, or performed before 1959 in connection with oleoresinous products. 31.3121(b)(1)-1 Section 31.3121(b)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... § 31.3121(b)(1)-1 Certain services performed by foreign agricultural workers, or performed before...

  12. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in spice oleoresins when present therein as a residue from the extraction of spice....

  13. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in spice oleoresins when present therein as a residue from the extraction of spice....

  14. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in spice oleoresins when present therein as a residue from the extraction of spice....

  15. 21 CFR 169.179 - Vanilla powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vanilla powder. 169.179 Section 169.179 Food and... § 169.179 Vanilla powder. (a) Vanilla powder is a mixture of ground vanilla beans or vanilla oleoresin...) Dried corn sirup. (6) Gum acacia. Vanilla powder may contain one or any mixture of two or more of...

  16. 7 CFR 160.7 - Gum spirits of turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Gum spirits of turpentine. 160.7 Section 160.7... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.7 Gum spirits of turpentine. The designation “gum spirits of turpentine” shall refer to the kind of spirits of turpentine obtained by distillation of the oleoresin...

  17. 7 CFR 160.7 - Gum spirits of turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Gum spirits of turpentine. 160.7 Section 160.7... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.7 Gum spirits of turpentine. The designation “gum spirits of turpentine” shall refer to the kind of spirits of turpentine obtained by distillation of the oleoresin...

  18. 9 CFR 424.23 - Prohibited uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... be used in or on any product, only as provided in 9 CFR Chapter III. (b) Nitrates. Nitrates shall not... in or on chorizo sausage and other meat in which paprika or oleoresin paprika is permitted as an... sorbate, sodium sorbate, and other salts of sorbic acid shall not be used in cooked sausages or any...

  19. Effects of dietary plant-derived phytonutrients on the genome-wide profiles and coccidiosis resistance in the broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary plant-derived phytonutrients, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde and Capsicum oleoresin, on the translational regulation of genes associated with immunology, physiology and metabolism using high-throughput microarray analysis and in vivo d...

  20. 21 CFR 173.230 - Ethylene dichloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethylene dichloride. 173.230 Section 173.230 Food... Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.230 Ethylene dichloride. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for ethylene dichloride in spice oleoresins when present...

  1. 21 CFR 173.230 - Ethylene dichloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethylene dichloride. 173.230 Section 173.230 Food... Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.230 Ethylene dichloride. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for ethylene dichloride in spice oleoresins when present...

  2. 21 CFR 173.230 - Ethylene dichloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethylene dichloride. 173.230 Section 173.230 Food... Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.230 Ethylene dichloride. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for ethylene dichloride in spice oleoresins when present...

  3. 21 CFR 173.230 - Ethylene dichloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethylene dichloride. 173.230 Section 173.230 Food... Related Substances § 173.230 Ethylene dichloride. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for ethylene dichloride in spice oleoresins when present therein as a residue from the extraction of...

  4. In vitro efficacy of Coriandrum sativum, Lippia sidoides and Copaifera reticulata against Leishmania chagasi.

    PubMed

    Rondon, Fernanda Cristina Macedo; Bevilaqua, Claudia Maria Leal; Accioly, Marina Parissi; de Morais, Selene Maia; de Andrade-Júnior, Heitor Franco; de Carvalho, Camila Aparecida; Lima, Josemar Coelho; Magalhães, Hilton César Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    The increased incidence of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil is due to a lack of effective disease control measures. In addition to that, no effective treatment exists for canine VL in response to synthetic drugs. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the essential oils of Coriandrum sativum and Lippia sidoides, and oleoresin from Copaifera reticulata, on Leishmania chagasi promastigotes and amastigotes. We also examined the toxicity of these treatments on the murine monocyte cell line RAW 264.7. To determine the IC50 a MTT test (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) was performed on promastigotes, and an in situ ELISA assay was conducted on amastigotes. Here, we demonstrate that oleoresin from C. reticulata was effective against both promastigotes (IC50 of 7.88 µg.mL-1) and amastigotes (IC50 of 0.52 µg.mL-1), and neither of the two treatments differed significantly (p > 0.05) from pentamidine (IC50 of 2.149 µg.mL-1) and amphotericin B (IC50 of 9.754 µg.mL-1). Of the three plant oils tested, only oleoresin showed no toxicity toward monocyte, with 78.45% viability after treatment. Inhibition of promastigote and amastigote growth and the lack of cytotoxicity by C. reticulata demonstrate that oleoresin may be a viable option for analyzing the in vivo therapeutic effects of leishmanicidal plants.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1317 - Garlic and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Garlic and its derivatives. 184.1317 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1317 Garlic and its derivatives. (a) Garlic is the... derivatives include essential oils, oleo-resins, and natural extractives obtained from garlic. (b) Garlic...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1317 - Garlic and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Garlic and its derivatives. 184.1317 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1317 Garlic and its derivatives. (a) Garlic is the... derivatives include essential oils, oleo-resins, and natural extractives obtained from garlic. (b) Garlic...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1317 - Garlic and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Garlic and its derivatives. 184.1317 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1317 Garlic and its derivatives. (a) Garlic is the... derivatives include essential oils, oleo-resins, and natural extractives obtained from garlic. (b) Garlic...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1317 - Garlic and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Garlic and its derivatives. 184.1317 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1317 Garlic and its derivatives. (a) Garlic is the... derivatives include essential oils, oleo-resins, and natural extractives obtained from garlic. (b) Garlic...

  9. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in spice oleoresins when present therein as a residue from the extraction of spice....

  10. 21 CFR 73.585 - Tomato lycopene extract; tomato lycopene concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tomato lycopene extract; tomato lycopene... extract; tomato lycopene concentrate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive tomato lycopene extract is a red to dark brown viscous oleoresin extracted with ethyl acetate from tomato pulp followed by...

  11. Effects of Mirazid® and myrrh volatile oil on adult Fasciola gigantica under laboratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Massoud, AM; Shalaby, HA; El Khateeb, RM; Mahmoud, MS; Kutkat, MA

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of Mirazid® and myrrh volatile oil on adult Fasciola gigantica (F. gigantica ) under laboratory conditions. Methods The effects of oleoresin extract of myrrh (Mirazid®) and myrrh volatile oil on the surface morphology of adult F. gigantica following treatment in vitro had been determined by scanning electron microscopy. The results were compared with those observed in the fluke tegument following incubation in triclabendazole sulphoxide (TCBZ-SO), active form, (Fasinex®, Ciba-Geigy). Results Observations of the efficacy of Mirazid® oleoresin extract and myrrh volatile oil indicated that both products showed dose-dependent anthelmintic efficacy. The anterior half of the fluke was consistently more severely affected than the posterior half. The surface changes induced by Mirazid® oleoresin extract were less severe than those observed after exposure to either myrrh volatile oil or TCBZ-SO. Flukes showed swelling after these treatments, but its level and blebbing were much greater with myrrh volatile oil; in which patches of tegumental sloughing were observed in the apical cone and the posterior mid-body region of flukes. This was not observed after treatment with Mirazid® oleoresin extract. Conclusions The comparatively more disruption, observed in myrrh volatile oil exposed specimens, compared to that exposed to Mirazid® oleoresin extract might suggest that the anthelmintic activity of Mirazid® oleo resin extract was attributed to its content of volatile oil. So, increasing the concentration of myrrh volatile oil in Mirazid® might possibly help to developing its anthelmintic activity. PMID:23569864

  12. Evaluation of Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) Bioactive Compounds in Increasing the Ratio of T-cell Surface Molecules of CD3+CD4+:CD3+CD8+ In-Vitro.

    PubMed

    Tejasari, Dr

    2007-09-01

    The potential ability of ginger bioactive compounds in increasing the ratio of T-cell surface molecules of CD3+CD4+:CD3+CD8+ was investigated using dual tagging FITC and PE of monoclonal antibody anti-human with its fluorescence measured by flow cytometer. Oleoresin was extracted using sinkhole distillation technique. Its components namely, gingerol in fraction-1, shogaol in fraction 2 and zingeron in fraction-3 were separated by column vacuum chromatography method. The doses of oleoresin, gingerol, shogaol, and zingeron tested were 50, 100,150, 200, and 250 μg/ml. Lymphocytes (2x106 cell/ml) from human peripheral blood were isolated using ficoll density gradient technique, and cultured in the presence of the compounds in RPMI-1640 medium and phytohemaglutinin (PHA) mitogen for 96 h under normal conditions. Percentages of T-cell surface molecules (CD4+ and CD8+) were determined using dual-tagging FITC and PE fluorescents labeled on monoclonal antibody anti human. The fluorescence-labeled bands on the T-cell surface molecules were counted using flow cytometer. The experiment revealed that oleoresin and its three fractions increased the percentage of CD3+CD4+. The compound in fraction 3 of oleoresin at 200 μg/ml increased by the highest percentage of CD3+CD4+ of 9%, but slightly decreased the percentage of CD3+CD8+. These ginger bioactive compounds increased the ratio of CD3+CD4:CD3+CD8+ T-cells with the highest increment of 30% from effects of 200 μg/ml fraction 3 of oleoresin. This in vitro finding revealed that ginger bioactive compounds potentially increased cellular and humoral immune response. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm the benefits of these ginger bioactive compounds as a potential functional food for testing on HIV infected patients. PMID:22691754

  13. Partial purification and characterization of the short-chain prenyltransferases, gernayl diphospate synthase and farnesyl diphosphate synthase, from Abies grandis (grand fir).

    PubMed

    Tholl, D; Croteau, R; Gershenzon, J

    2001-02-15

    In the conifer Abies grandis (grand fir), a secreted oleoresin rich in mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenes serves as a constitutive and induced defense against insects and pathogenic fungi. Geranyl diphosphate (GPP) and farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) synthase, two enzymes which form the principal precursors of the oleoresin mono- and sesquiterpenes, were isolated from the stems of 2-year-old grand fir saplings. These enzymes were partially purified by sequential chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose, Mono-Q, and phenyl-Sepharose to remove competing phosphohydrolase and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) isomerase activities. GPP and FPP synthase formed GPP and E,E-FPP, respectively, as the sole products of the enzymatic condensation of IPP and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). The properties of both enzymes are broadly similar to those of other prenyltransferases. The apparent native molecular masses are 54 +/- 3 kDa for GPP synthase and 110 +/- 6 kDa fo

  14. Tegumental histological effects of Mirazid® and myrrh volatile oil on adult Fasciola gigantica

    PubMed Central

    Massoud, Ahmad Mohamed; Shalaby, Hatem Abdel Mawgoud; El Khateeb, Rabab Mohamed; Mahmoud, Mona Said; Kutkat, Mohamed Abdel Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluated the histological changes within the tegument of adult Fasciola gigantica (F. gigantica) that led to the gross changes that were visible externally. Methods The effects of oleoresin extract of myrrh (Mirazid®), myrrh volatile oil and triclabendazole sulphoxide (reference drug) on the tegumental structure of adult F. gigantica following treatment in vitro had been determined by light microscopy. Results The internal changes in the tegument observed in this study were compatible with surface changes seen in the previous scanning electron microscopy study, using the same drugs. The swelling of tegumental syncytium was a particular feature of their action, but its level was much greater with myrrh volatile oil, in which vacuolization of the tegument and loss of spines were observed. Conclusions The present study demonstrated the fasciocidal properties of Mirazid® oleoresin extract, and it might be possible to reinforce its fasciocidal activity by increasing its content of myrrh volatile oil. PMID:23730566

  15. [Methods of treating tissues with subsequent embedding in paraffin].

    PubMed

    Suponitskiĭ, V Ia

    1985-01-01

    Two methods of tissue processing with subsequent embedding into paraffin are proposed. In the first method a mixture of 70% of gum turpentine and 30% oleoresin is used as the main solution. In the second one a mixture of gum turpentine, castor oil and cedar balm is used as the main solution. The treatment of the tissue pieces takes 23 hours. These methods permit avoiding the artifacts connected with tissue dehydration and obtaining histological slides of a high quality.

  16. Comparative study of chemical composition and antioxidant activity of fresh and dry rhizomes of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn.).

    PubMed

    Singh, G; Kapoor, I P S; Singh, Pratibha; de Heluani, Carola S; de Lampasona, Marina P; Catalan, Cesar A N

    2010-04-01

    The phytoconstituents of essential oil and ethanol oleoresin of fresh and dry rhizomes of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn.) were analyzed by GC-MS. The major constituents were aromatic-turmerone (24.4%), alpha-turmerone (20.5%) and beta-turmerone (11.1%) in fresh rhizome and aromatic-turmerone (21.4%), alpha-santalene (7.2%) and aromatic-curcumene (6.6%) in dry rhizome oil. Whereas, in oleoresins, the major components were alpha-turmerone (53.4%), beta-turmerone (18.1%) and aromatic-turmerone (6.2%) in fresh and aromatic-turmerone (9.6%), alpha-santalene (7.8%) and alpha-turmerone (6.5%) in dry rhizome. Results showed that alpha-turmerone, a major component in fresh rhizomes is only minor one in dry rhizomes. Also, the content of beta-turmerone in dry rhizomes is less than a half amount found in fresh rhizomes. The antioxidant properties have been assessed by various lipid peroxidation assays as well as DPPH radical scavenging and metal chelating methods. The essential oil and ethanol oleoresin of fresh rhizomes have higher antioxidant properties as compared dry ones. PMID:20096323

  17. Comparative study of chemical composition and antioxidant activity of fresh and dry rhizomes of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn.).

    PubMed

    Singh, G; Kapoor, I P S; Singh, Pratibha; de Heluani, Carola S; de Lampasona, Marina P; Catalan, Cesar A N

    2010-04-01

    The phytoconstituents of essential oil and ethanol oleoresin of fresh and dry rhizomes of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn.) were analyzed by GC-MS. The major constituents were aromatic-turmerone (24.4%), alpha-turmerone (20.5%) and beta-turmerone (11.1%) in fresh rhizome and aromatic-turmerone (21.4%), alpha-santalene (7.2%) and aromatic-curcumene (6.6%) in dry rhizome oil. Whereas, in oleoresins, the major components were alpha-turmerone (53.4%), beta-turmerone (18.1%) and aromatic-turmerone (6.2%) in fresh and aromatic-turmerone (9.6%), alpha-santalene (7.8%) and alpha-turmerone (6.5%) in dry rhizome. Results showed that alpha-turmerone, a major component in fresh rhizomes is only minor one in dry rhizomes. Also, the content of beta-turmerone in dry rhizomes is less than a half amount found in fresh rhizomes. The antioxidant properties have been assessed by various lipid peroxidation assays as well as DPPH radical scavenging and metal chelating methods. The essential oil and ethanol oleoresin of fresh rhizomes have higher antioxidant properties as compared dry ones.

  18. Antibacterial activity of Pinus elliottii against anaerobic bacteria present in primary endodontic infections.

    PubMed

    Caetano da Silva, Sandro Donizete; Mendes de Souza, Maria Gorete; Oliveira Cardoso, Miguel Jorge; da Silva Moraes, Thais; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Sola Veneziani, Rodrigo Cássio; Martins, Carlos Henrique G

    2014-12-01

    Endodontic infections have a polymicrobial nature, but anaerobic bacteria prevail among the infectious microbes. Considering that it is easy to eliminate planktonic bacteria, biofilm-forming bacteria still challenge clinicians during the fight against endodontic diseases. The chemical constituents of the oleoresin of Pinus elliottii, a plant belonging to the family Pinaceae, stand out in the search for biologically active compounds based on natural products with potential application in the treatment of endodontic infections. Indeed, plant oleoresins are an abundant natural source of diterpenes that display significant and well-defined biological activities as well as potential antimicrobial action. In this context, this study aimed to (1) evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of the oleoresin, fractions, and subfractions of P. elliottii as well as the action of dehydroabietic acid against 11 anaerobic bacteria that cause endodontic infection in both their planktonic and biofilm forms and (2) assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the same group of bacteria. The broth microdilution technique helped to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the oleoresin and fractions. This same technique aided determination of the MIC values of nine subfractions of Fraction 1, the most active fraction. The MIC, minimum bactericidal concentration, and antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the tested anaerobic bacteria were also examined. The oleoresin and fractions, especially fraction PE1, afforded promising MIC values, which ranged from 0.4 to 50 μg/mL. Concerning the nine evaluated subfractions, PE1.3 and PE1.4 furnished the most noteworthy MIC values, between 6.2 and 100 μg/mL. Dehydroabietic acid displayed antibacterial activity, with MIC values lying from 6.2 to 50 μg/mL, as well as bactericidal effect for all the investigated bacteria, except for Prevotella nigrescens. Assessment of the antibiofilm

  19. Antibacterial activity of Pinus elliottii against anaerobic bacteria present in primary endodontic infections.

    PubMed

    Caetano da Silva, Sandro Donizete; Mendes de Souza, Maria Gorete; Oliveira Cardoso, Miguel Jorge; da Silva Moraes, Thais; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Sola Veneziani, Rodrigo Cássio; Martins, Carlos Henrique G

    2014-12-01

    Endodontic infections have a polymicrobial nature, but anaerobic bacteria prevail among the infectious microbes. Considering that it is easy to eliminate planktonic bacteria, biofilm-forming bacteria still challenge clinicians during the fight against endodontic diseases. The chemical constituents of the oleoresin of Pinus elliottii, a plant belonging to the family Pinaceae, stand out in the search for biologically active compounds based on natural products with potential application in the treatment of endodontic infections. Indeed, plant oleoresins are an abundant natural source of diterpenes that display significant and well-defined biological activities as well as potential antimicrobial action. In this context, this study aimed to (1) evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of the oleoresin, fractions, and subfractions of P. elliottii as well as the action of dehydroabietic acid against 11 anaerobic bacteria that cause endodontic infection in both their planktonic and biofilm forms and (2) assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the same group of bacteria. The broth microdilution technique helped to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the oleoresin and fractions. This same technique aided determination of the MIC values of nine subfractions of Fraction 1, the most active fraction. The MIC, minimum bactericidal concentration, and antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the tested anaerobic bacteria were also examined. The oleoresin and fractions, especially fraction PE1, afforded promising MIC values, which ranged from 0.4 to 50 μg/mL. Concerning the nine evaluated subfractions, PE1.3 and PE1.4 furnished the most noteworthy MIC values, between 6.2 and 100 μg/mL. Dehydroabietic acid displayed antibacterial activity, with MIC values lying from 6.2 to 50 μg/mL, as well as bactericidal effect for all the investigated bacteria, except for Prevotella nigrescens. Assessment of the antibiofilm

  20. Defense Mechanisms of Conifers 1

    PubMed Central

    Lewinsohn, Efraim; Gijzen, Mark; Savage, Thomas J.; Croteau, Rodney

    1991-01-01

    Cell-free extracts from Pinus ponderosa Lawson (ponderosa pine) and Pinus sylvestris L. (Scotch pine) wood exhibited high levels of monoterpene synthase (cyclase) activity, whereas bark extracts of these species contained no detectable activity, and they inhibited cyclase activity when added to extracts from wood, unless polyvinylpyrrolidone was included in the preparation. The molecular mass of the polyvinylpyrrolidone added was of little consequence; however, polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (a cross-linked insoluble form of the polymer) was ineffective in protecting enzyme activity. Based on these observations, methods were developed for the efficient extraction and assay of monoterpene cyclase activity from conifer stem (wood and bark) tissue. The level of monoterpene cyclase activity for a given conifer species was shown to correlate closely with the monoterpene content of the oleoresin and with the degree of anatomical complexity of the specialized resin-secreting structures. Cyclase activity and monoterpene content were lowest in the stems of species containing only isolated resin cells, such as western red cedar (Thuja plicata D. Don). Increasing levels of cyclase activity and oleoresin monoterpenes were observed in advancing from species with multicellular resin blisters (true firs [Abies]) to those with organized resin passages, such as western larch (Larix occidentalis Nutt.), Colorado blue spruce (Picea pungens Engelm.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco). The highest levels of cyclase activity and oleoresin monoterpenes were noted in Pinus species that contain the most highly developed resin duct systems. The relationship between biosynthetic capacity, as measured by cyclase activity, monoterpene content, and the degree of organization of the secretory structures for a given species, may reflect the total number of specialized resin-producing cells per unit mass of stem tissue. PMID:16668182

  1. Quality of dry ginger (Zingiber officinale) by different drying methods.

    PubMed

    E, Jayashree; R, Visvanathan; T, John Zachariah

    2014-11-01

    Ginger rhizomes sliced to various lengths of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50 mm and whole rhizomes were dried from an initial moisture content of 81.3 % to final moisture content of less than 10 % by various drying methods like sun drying, solar tunnel drying and cabinet tray drying at temperatures of 50, 55, 60 and 65 °C. Slicing of ginger rhizomes significantly reduced the drying time of ginger in all the drying methods. It was observed that drying of whole ginger rhizomes under sun took the maximum time (9 days) followed by solar tunnel drying (8 days). Significant reduction in essential oil and oleoresin content of dry ginger was found as the slice length decreased. The important constituents of ginger essential oil like zingiberene, limonene, linalool, geraniol and nerolidol as determined using a gas chromatography was also found to decrease during slicing and as the drying temperature increased. The pungency constituents in the oleoresin of ginger like total gingerols and total shogoals as determined using a reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography also showed a decreasing trend on slicing and with the increase in drying temperature. It was observed from the drying studies that whole ginger rhizomes dried under sun drying or in a solar tunnel drier retained the maximum essential oil (13.9 mg/g) and oleoresin content (45.2 mg/g) of dry ginger. In mechanical drying, the drying temperature of 60 °C was considered optimum however there was about 12.2 % loss in essential oil at this temperature.

  2. Detection of bixin, lycopene, canthaxanthin, and beta-apo-8'-carotenal in products derived from red pepper.

    PubMed

    Mínguez-Mosquera, M I; Hornero-Méndez, D; Garrido-Fernández, J

    1995-01-01

    An analytical method using either thin layer or liquid chromatography is proposed for the detection of 4 pigments (bixin, lycopene, canthaxanthin and beta-apo-8'-carotenal) that can be used fraudulently to intensify the natural color of products derived from red pepper (oleoresins, paprika, paprika paste, etc.). Similarly, the addition of other colorant natural products containing some of these pigments as major pigments (such as tomato for lycopene and Bixa orellana seeds for bixin) can be detected. The method proposed can also be used to control the aforementioned pigments in their natural sources as well as in food products. PMID:7756865

  3. Functional, textural and sensory properties of dry pasta supplemented with lyophilized tomato matrix or with durum wheat bran extracts produced by supercritical carbon dioxide or ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Pasqualone, Antonella; Gambacorta, Giuseppe; Summo, Carmine; Caponio, Francesco; Di Miceli, Giuseppe; Flagella, Zina; Marrese, Pier Paolo; Piro, Gabriella; Perrotta, Carla; De Bellis, Luigi; Lenucci, Marcello Salvatore

    2016-12-15

    A study was carried out to produce functional pasta by adding bran aqueous extract (BW) and bran oleoresin (BO) obtained using ultrasound and supercritical CO2, respectively, or a powdery lyophilized tomato matrix (LT). The bioactive compounds, hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidant activity (HAA and LAA) in vitro, were evaluated. BW supplementation did not improve antioxidant activity, whilst LT pasta showed unconventional taste and odor. BO pasta had good levels of tocochromanols (2551μg/100g pasta f.w.) and carotenoids (40.2μg/100g pasta f.w.), and the highest HAA and LAA. The oleoresin altered starch swelling and gluten network, as evidenced by scanning electron microscopy, therefore BO pasta had structural characteristics poor compared with the control (4.8% vs. 3.2% cooking loss), although this difference did not affect significantly overall sensory judgment (74 vs. 79 for BO and control, respectively). BO supplementation was most effective for increasing antioxidant activity without jeopardizing pasta quality.

  4. Leishmania amazonensis: effects of oral treatment with copaiba oil in mice.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Adriana Oliveira; Costa, Marco Antonio; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias-Filho, Benedito Prado; da Veiga-Júnior, Valdir Florêncio; de Souza Lima, Marli Miriam; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2011-10-01

    Leishmaniasis is a severe public-health problem, with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Efforts to find new, effective and safe oral agents for the treatment of leishmaniasis have been ongoing for several decades, in order to avoid the problems with the currently used antimonials. In the present study, we found that a copaiba oil oral treatment (Group IV) caused a significant reduction in the average lesion size (1.1±0.4mm) against Leishmania amazonensis lesions compared with untreated mice (Group I) (4.4±1.3mm). To prove the safety of the oil, the toxicity and genotoxicity were also determined. Histopathological evaluation did not reveal changes in the copaiba oil-treated animals compared to the control animals. In the mutagenicity evaluation, (micronucleus test) the dose tested (2000mg/kg) showed no genotoxic effects. Morphological and ultrastructural analyses demonstrated notable changes in parasite cells treated with this oleoresin. The main ultrastructural effect was mitochondrial swelling. We also demonstrated that in vitro copaiba oil treatment of L. amazonensis led to an increase in plasma membrane permeability, and depolarization in the mitochondrial membrane potential in parasite cells. Although the mechanism of action of the oleoresin is still unclear, these findings indicate that copaiba oil is a possible new drug, which would provide a safer, shorter, less-expensive, and more easily administered treatment for leishmaniasis.

  5. Validation of a gas chromatographic method to quantify sesquiterpenes in copaiba oils.

    PubMed

    Sousa, João Paulo B; Brancalion, Ana P S; Souza, Ariana B; Turatti, Izabel C C; Ambrósio, Sérgio R; Furtado, Niege A J C; Lopes, Norberto P; Bastos, Jairo K

    2011-03-25

    Copaifera species (Leguminoseae) are popularly known as "copaiba" or "copaíva". The oleoresins obtained from the trunk of these species have been extensively used in folk medicine and are commercialized in Brazil as crude oil and in several pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. This work reports a complete validated method for the quantification of β-caryophyllene, α-copaene, and α-humulene in distinct copaiba oleoresins available commercially. Thus, essential oil samples (100μL) were dissolved in 20mL of hexanes containing internal standard (1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene, 3.0mM) in a 25mL glass flask. A 1μL aliquot was injected into the GC-FID system. A fused-silica capillary column HP-5, coated with 5% phenyl-methylsiloxane was used for this study. The developed method gave a good detection response with linearity in the range of 0.10-18.74mM. Limits of detection and quantitation variety ranged between 0.003 and 0.091mM. β-Caryophyllene, α-copaene, and α-humulene were recovered in a range from 74.71% to 88.31%, displaying RSD lower than 10% and relative errors between -11.69% and -25.30%. Therefore, this method could be considered as an analytical tool for the quality control of different Copaifera oil samples and its products in both cosmetic and pharmaceutical companies.

  6. Discovering candidate genes that regulate resin canal number in Pinus taeda stems by integrating genetic analysis across environments, ages, and populations.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Jared W; Walker, Alejandro R; Neves, Leandro G; Munoz, Patricio; Resende, Marcio F R; Neale, David B; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Huber, Dudley A; Kirst, Matias; Davis, John M; Peter, Gary F

    2015-01-01

    Genetically improving constitutive resin canal development in Pinus stems may enhance the capacity to synthesize terpenes for bark beetle resistance, chemical feedstocks, and biofuels. To discover genes that potentially regulate axial resin canal number (RCN), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4027 genes were tested for association with RCN in two growth rings and three environments in a complex pedigree of 520 Pinus taeda individuals (CCLONES). The map locations of associated genes were compared with RCN quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in a (P. taeda × Pinus elliottii) × P. elliottii pseudo-backcross of 345 full-sibs (BC1). Resin canal number was heritable (h(2) ˜ 0.12-0.21) and positively genetically correlated with xylem growth (rg ˜ 0.32-0.72) and oleoresin flow (rg ˜ 0.15-0.51). Sixteen well-supported candidate regulators of RCN were discovered in CCLONES, including genes associated across sites and ages, unidirectionally associated with oleoresin flow and xylem growth, and mapped to RCN QTLs in BC1. Breeding is predicted to increase RCN 11% in one generation and could be accelerated with genomic selection at accuracies of 0.45-0.52 across environments. There is significant genetic variation for RCN in loblolly pine, which can be exploited in breeding for elevated terpene content.

  7. Insect attack and wounding induce traumatic resin duct development and gene expression of (-)-pinene synthase in Sitka spruce.

    PubMed

    McKay, S Ashley Byun; Hunter, William L; Godard, Kimberley-Ann; Wang, Shawn X; Martin, Diane M; Bohlmann, Jörg; Plant, Aine L

    2003-09-01

    Conifers possess inducible terpenoid defense systems. These systems are associated with the formation of traumatic resin ducts (TRD) and are underpinned by enhanced gene expression and activity of terpene synthases (TPS), enzymes responsible for oleoresin formation. We first determined that Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis [Bong.] Carriere) had the capacity for TRD formation by mechanically wounding representative trees. We then proceeded to investigate whether the white pine weevil (Pissodes strobi Peck.), a stem-boring insect, can influence the expression of genes encoding monoterpene synthases (mono-tps) in Sitka spruce. We went on to compare this response with the effects of a simulated insect attack by drill wounding. A significant increase in mono-tps transcript level was observed in the leaders of lateral branches of weevil-attacked and mechanically wounded trees. In this study, weevils induced a more rapid enhancement of mono-tps gene expression. A full-length Sitka spruce mono-tps cDNA (PsTPS2) was isolated, expressed in Escherichia coli, and functionally identified as (-)-pinene synthase. The recombinant (-)-pinene synthase catalyzes the formation of (-)-alpha-pinene and (-)-beta-pinene, both of which are known constituents of stem oleoresin in Sitka spruce and increase in abundance after weevil attack. These data suggest that increased (-)-pinene synthase gene expression is an important element of the direct defense system deployed in Sitka spruce after insect attack.

  8. Monoterpene synthases of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) produce pinene isomers and enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M A; Savage, T J; Croteau, R

    1999-12-01

    The turpentine fraction of conifer oleoresin is a complex mixture of monoterpene olefins and plays important roles in defense and in the mediation of chemical communication between conifer hosts and insect predators. The stereochemistry of the turpentine monoterpenes is critical in these interactions, influencing host recognition, toxicity, and potency of derived pheromones, and the stereochemical composition of these compounds lends insight into their biogenetic origin, with implications for the numbers and types of enzymes responsible and their corresponding genes. Analysis of the oleoresin from several tissues of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) showed the derived turpentine to consist mainly of (+)-(3R:5R)-alpha-pinene and (-)-(3S:5S)-beta-pinene. Cell-free extracts from xylem tissue yielded three monoterpene synthases which together account for the monoterpene isomer and enantiomer content of the turpentine of this tissue. The major products of these enzymes, produced from the universal precursor of monoterpenes, geranyl diphosphate, were shown to be (+)-alpha-pinene, (-)-alpha-pinene, and (-)-beta-pinene, respectively. In most properties (molecular mass of approximately 60 kDa, K(m) for geranyl diphosphate of 3 microM, requirement for monovalent and divalent cations), these enzymes resemble other monoterpene synthases from conifer species.

  9. Functional, textural and sensory properties of dry pasta supplemented with lyophilized tomato matrix or with durum wheat bran extracts produced by supercritical carbon dioxide or ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Pasqualone, Antonella; Gambacorta, Giuseppe; Summo, Carmine; Caponio, Francesco; Di Miceli, Giuseppe; Flagella, Zina; Marrese, Pier Paolo; Piro, Gabriella; Perrotta, Carla; De Bellis, Luigi; Lenucci, Marcello Salvatore

    2016-12-15

    A study was carried out to produce functional pasta by adding bran aqueous extract (BW) and bran oleoresin (BO) obtained using ultrasound and supercritical CO2, respectively, or a powdery lyophilized tomato matrix (LT). The bioactive compounds, hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidant activity (HAA and LAA) in vitro, were evaluated. BW supplementation did not improve antioxidant activity, whilst LT pasta showed unconventional taste and odor. BO pasta had good levels of tocochromanols (2551μg/100g pasta f.w.) and carotenoids (40.2μg/100g pasta f.w.), and the highest HAA and LAA. The oleoresin altered starch swelling and gluten network, as evidenced by scanning electron microscopy, therefore BO pasta had structural characteristics poor compared with the control (4.8% vs. 3.2% cooking loss), although this difference did not affect significantly overall sensory judgment (74 vs. 79 for BO and control, respectively). BO supplementation was most effective for increasing antioxidant activity without jeopardizing pasta quality. PMID:27451216

  10. Discovering candidate genes that regulate resin canal number in Pinus taeda stems by integrating genetic analysis across environments, ages, and populations

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, JW; Walker, AR; Neves, LG; Munoz, P; Resende, MFR; Neale, DB; Wegrzyn, JL; Huber, DA; Kirst, M; Davis, JM; Peter, GF

    2014-09-30

    Genetically improving constitutive resin canal development in Pinus stems may enhance the capacity to synthesize terpenes for bark beetle resistance, chemical feedstocks, and biofuels. To discover genes that potentially regulate axial resin canal number (RCN), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4027 genes were tested for association with RCN in two growth rings and three environments in a complex pedigree of 520 Pinus taeda individuals (CCLONES). The map locations of associated genes were compared with RCN quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in a (P.taedaxPinuselliottii)xP.elliottii pseudo-backcross of 345 full-sibs (BC1). Resin canal number was heritable (h(2)0.12-0.21) and positively genetically correlated with xylem growth (r(g)0.32-0.72) and oleoresin flow (r(g)0.15-0.51). Sixteen well-supported candidate regulators of RCN were discovered in CCLONES, including genes associated across sites and ages, unidirectionally associated with oleoresin flow and xylem growth, and mapped to RCN QTLs in BC1. Breeding is predicted to increase RCN 11% in one generation and could be accelerated with genomic selection at accuracies of 0.45-0.52 across environments. There is significant genetic variation for RCN in loblolly pine, which can be exploited in breeding for elevated terpene content.

  11. Dynamic relationship between the VOC emissions from a Scots pine stem and the tree water relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhatalo, Anni; Chan, Tommy; Aalto, Juho; Kolari, Pasi; Rissanen, Kaisa; Hakola, Hannele; Hölttä, Teemu; Bäck, Jaana

    2013-04-01

    The stems of coniferous trees contain huge storages of oleoresin. The composition of oleoresin depends on e.g. tree species, age, provenance, health status, and environmental conditions. Oleoresin is under pressure in the extensive network of resin ducts in wood and needles. It flows out from a mechanically damaged site to protect the tree by sealing the wounded site. Once in contact with air, volatile parts of oleoresin evaporate, and the residual compounds harden to make a solid protective seal over damaged tissues. The hardening time of the resin depends on evaporation rate of the volatiles which in turn depends on temperature. The storage is also toxic to herbivores and attracts predators that restrict the herbivore damage. Despite abundant knowledge on emissions of volatile isoprenoids from foliage, very little is known about their emissions from woody plant parts. We set up an experiment to measure emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes as well as two oxygenated VOCs, methanol and acetone, from a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stem and branches. The measurements were started in early April and continued until mid-June, 2012. Simultaneously, we measured the dynamics of whole stem and xylem diameter changes, stem sap flow rate and foliage transpiration rate. These measurements were used to estimate A) pressure changes inside the living stem tissue and the water conducting xylem, B) the refilling of stem water stores after winter dehydration (the ratio of sap flow at the stem base to water loss by foliage), and C) the increase in tree water transport capacity (the ratio of maximum daily sap flow rate to the diurnal variation in xylem pressure) during spring due to winter embolism refilling and/or the temperature dependent root water uptake capacity. The results show that already very early in spring, significant VOC emissions from pine stem can be detected, and that they exhibit a diurnal cycle similar to that of ambient temperature. During the highest emission

  12. Monoterpene synthases from grand fir (Abies grandis). cDNA isolation, characterization, and functional expression of myrcene synthase, (-)-(4S)-limonene synthase, and (-)-(1S,5S)-pinene synthase.

    PubMed

    Bohlmann, J; Steele, C L; Croteau, R

    1997-08-29

    Grand fir (Abies grandis) has been developed as a model system for studying defensive oleoresin formation in conifers in response to insect attack or other injury. The turpentine fraction of the oleoresin is a complex mixture of monoterpene (C10) olefins in which (-)-limonene and (-)-alpha- and (-)-beta-pinene are prominent components; (-)-limonene and (-)-pinene synthase activities are also induced upon stem wounding. A similarity based cloning strategy yielded three new cDNA species from a wounded stem cDNA library that appeared to encode three distinct monoterpene synthases. After expression in Escherichia coli and enzyme assay with geranyl diphosphate as substrate, subsequent analysis of the terpene products by chiral phase gas chromatography and mass spectrometry showed that these sequences encoded a (-)-limonene synthase, a myrcene synthase, and a (-)-pinene synthase that produces both alpha-pinene and beta-pinene. In properties and reaction stereochemistry, the recombinant enzymes resemble the corresponding native monoterpene synthases of wound-induced grand fir stem. The deduced amino acid sequences indicated the limonene synthase to be 637 residues in length (73.5 kDa), the myrcene synthase to be 627 residues in length (72.5 kDa), and the pinene synthase to be 628 residues in length (71.5 kDa); all of these monoterpene synthases appear to be translated as preproteins bearing an amino-terminal plastid targeting sequence. Sequence comparison revealed that these monoterpene synthases from grand fir resemble sesquiterpene (C15) synthases and diterpene (C20) synthases from conifers more closely than other monoterpene synthases from angiosperm species. This similarity between extant monoterpene, sesquiterpene, and diterpene synthases of gymnosperms is surprising since functional diversification of this enzyme class is assumed to have occurred over 300 million years ago. Wound-induced accumulation of transcripts for monoterpene synthases was demonstrated by RNA

  13. Chemistry, technology, and nutraceutical functions of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L): an overview.

    PubMed

    Sowbhagya, H B

    2013-01-01

    Cumin is a seed spice belonging to the family umbelliferae. Cumin and value added products from cumin are used in food flavoring and perfumery. Cumin contains volatile oil (3-4%), cuminaldehyde, the major active principle, which is present to an extent of 45-50%. Cumin and value added products from cumin, viz., cumin oil and oleoresin are exported. Cumin powder forms the main component of many spice mixes and curry powders. Cuminaldehyde is an important phytochemical and possesses many health benefits. Alcohol and water extract of cumin are reported to possess many nutraceutical properties like antiallergic, antioxidant, anti-platelet aggregation, and hypoglycemic. Cumin and value added products from cumin can be a good source of nutraceuticals with many biological activities. Incorporation of cumin into food products will have the benefits of a flavorant and nutraceutical at the same time. In the present review, the chemistry, processing, and biological activities of cumin and its components are discussed.

  14. Bioactive rearranged and halogenated semisynthetic derivatives of the marine natural product sarcophine.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Swapnali S; Sylvester, Paul W; Avery, Mitchell A; Desai, Prashant; Youssef, Diaa T A; El Sayed, Khalid A

    2004-12-01

    Cembranoids are natural diterpenes with 14-membered macrocyclic rings. The simplest natural cembranoid, (+)-cembrene, was isolated from pine oleoresin. Sarcophytols A and B are known cembranoids that inhibit tumor promotion. Sarcophine is a related cembranoid isolated from the Red Sea soft coral Sarcophyton glaucum. Sarcophine and its bioconversion products and semisynthetic derivatives are reported to possess cancer chemopreventive activity. Oxymercuration-demercuration of sarcophine using Hg(OAc)2 and NaBH4 afforded four new rearranged and hydroxylated products. Bromination of sarcophine with N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) furnished two new brominated and rearranged products. Reaction with iodine gave the known iso-sarcophinone and (+)-sarcophytoxin B. Structure elucidation was based on a combination of transition state modeling, molecular dynamics, mechanistic considerations, and 2D NMR data. The antiproliferative activity of the new products is also reported.

  15. Lycopene synergistically inhibits LDL oxidation in combination with vitamin E, glabridin, rosmarinic acid, carnosic acid, or garlic.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, B; Volkova, N; Rosenblat, M; Aviram, M

    2000-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is atherogenic, and that atherosclerosis can be attenuated by natural antioxidants, which inhibit LDL oxidation. This study was conducted to determine the effect of tomato lycopene alone, or in combination with other natural antioxidants, on LDL oxidation. LDL (100 microg of protein/ml) was incubated with increasing concentrations of lycopene or of tomato oleoresin (lipid extract of tomatoes containing 6% lycopene, 0.1% beta-carotene, 1% vitamin E, and polyphenols), after which it was oxidized by the addition of 5 micromol/liter of CuSO4. Tomato oleoresin exhibited superior capacity to inhibit LDL oxidation in comparison to pure lycopene, by up to five-fold [97% vs. 22% inhibition of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, and 93% vs. 27% inhibition of lipid peroxides formation, respectively]. Because tomato oleoresin also contains, in addition to lycopene, vitamin E, flavonoids, and phenolics, a possible cooperative interaction between lycopene and such natural antioxidants was studied. A combination of lycopene (5 micromol/liter) with vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) in the concentration range of 1-10 micromol/liter resulted in an inhibition of copper ion-induced LDL oxidation that was significantly greater than the expected additive individual inhibitions. The synergistic antioxidative effect of lycopene with vitamin E was not shared by gamma-to-cotrienol. The polyphenols glabridin (derived from licorice), rosmarinic acid or carnosic acid (derived from rosemary), as well as garlic (which contains a mixture of natural antioxidants) inhibited LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner. When lycopene (5 micromol/liter) was added to LDL in combination with glabridin, rosmarinic acid, carnosic acid, or garlic, synergistic antioxidative effects were obtained against LDL oxidation induced either by copper ions or by the radical generator AAPH. Similar interactive

  16. Multidisciplinary research program directed toward utilization of solar energy through bioconversion of renewable resources

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Progress is reported in this multidisciplinary research program. Genetic selection of superior trees, physiological basis of vigor, tissue culture systems leading to cloning of diploid and haploid cell lines are discussed in the Program A report. The physiological basis of enhanced oleoresin formation in southern pines when treated with sublethal concentrations of the herbicide paraquat was investigated in Program B. In Program C, metabolic changes in the stems of slash pine, in vivo, after application with paraquat were determined. The use of phdoem and xylem tissue slices as a laboratory model for studying paraquat associated- and normal-terpene synthesis in pines is discussed. The biochemistry and physiology of methane formation from cellulose during anaerobic fermentation are discussed in the Program D report. (DMC)

  17. Effect of Simulated Acid Rain on Bursaphelenchus xylophilus Infection of Pine Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Bolla, R I; Fitzsimmons, K

    1988-10-01

    White, Scots, and Austrian 3-year-old pine seedlings were treated with conditions simulating acid rain and inoculated with the white pine specific pathotype of Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, VPSt-1. Oleoresin concentration increased slightly and carbohydrate concentration decreased in all seedlings treated with simulated acid rain (SAR). The changes were significantly increased after inoculation of SAR-treated white and Scots pine seedlings with VPSt-1. Wilting was delayed and nematode reproduction decreased in SAR-treated white pine seedlings inoculated with VPSt-1. SAR-treated Austrian pine seedlings were resistant to VPSt-1, but SAR-treated Scots pine seedlings lost tolerance to VPSt-1 and wilted 50-60 days after inoculation.

  18. A lethal danger in the home: turpentine poisoning.

    PubMed

    Güzel, Ahmet; Açıkgöz, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Turpentine is an oleoresin obtained from various species of pine. In turpentine poisoning, various signs and symptoms of toxicity may develop, including hematuria, renal failure, loss of vision, chest pain, vomiting, severe coughing, gastroesophageal hemorrhage, hypotension, swelling of the throat and even death. We report a case of turpentine ingestion in a 9-year-old boy. The patient was admitted to our clinic with suspected intoxication after accidentally drinking from a glass that held a turpentine oil preparation used by his father for hair care. The patient displayed no significant signs and symptoms other than bradycardia and hypotension. Laboratory investigations revealed no abnormalities. The patient was hospitalized for close monitoring and observation. During a two-and-a-half-day observation period, hypotension was corrected with administration of dopamine and intravenous fluids. In this report, we wish to draw attention to the dangerous effects of plant-derived drugs. PMID:26690600

  19. Molluscicidal activity of Lawsonia inermis and its binary and tertiary combinations with other plant derived molluscicides.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Singh, D K

    2001-03-01

    Molluscicidal activity of leaf, bark and seed of Lawsonia inermis against Lymnaea acuminata and Indoplanorbis exustus was studied. Highest toxicity was observed in the seed of Lawsonia inermis. Toxicity of binary (1:1) and tertiary (1:1:1) combinations of the essential oil of cedar (Cedrus deodara Roxh) and neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss), powder from bulb of garlic (Allium sativum Linn), and oleoresin extracted from rhizome of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc) with Lawsonia inermis and Embelia ribes fruit powder were studied against L. acuminata and I. exustus. L. inermis seed powder in combination with Cedrus deodara oil and Azadirachta indica oil was more toxic than their individual components and other combinations. PMID:11495286

  20. Mountain pine beetle attack associated with low levels of 4-allylanisole in ponderosa pine.

    PubMed

    Emerick, Jay J; Snyder, Aaron I; Bower, Nathan W; Snyder, Marc A

    2008-08-01

    Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is the most important insect pest in southern Rocky Mountain ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests. Tree mortality is hastened by the various fungal pathogens that are symbiotic with the beetles. The phenylpropanoid 4-allylanisole is an antifungal and semiochemical for some pine beetle species. We analyzed 4-allylanisole and monoterpene profiles in the xylem oleoresin from a total of 107 trees at six sites from two chemotypes of ponderosa pine found in Colorado and New Mexico using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Although monoterpene profiles were essentially the same in attacked and nonattacked trees, significantly lower levels of 4-allylanisole were found in attacked trees compared with trees that showed no evidence of attack for both chemotypes.

  1. Anti-pyretic activity of some plants in female albino rats: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Suresh, B; Dhanasekaran, S; Elango, K; Sethuraman, M; Rajan, S

    1995-04-01

    Ethanolic extracts of Ailanthus exceisa (AE). Toddalia asiatica (TA) and Araucaria bidwilli (AB) were screened by the anti-pyretic activity in yeast induced hyperthermic test model in the laboratory. Dose of AE (100), TA (60) and AB (30) mg., equivalent of the plant material per kg. Body weight of the extracts were administered orally to the female albino rats. Acute toxicity and preliminary phytochemical screening were conducted for all the extracts. LD 50 values on oral administration of the extracts were found to be AE (1000), AB (350) and TA (250) mg. per kg. body weight respectively. Both the root and aerial part fractions of TA displayed a pronounced anti-pyretic activity comparable to the standard drug paracetamol. AB oleoresin fraction was also found to show anti-pyretic effect. These observations however, confirm the folk-medical practices still prevailing among the tribes. PMID:22556707

  2. Modularity of Conifer Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis: P450 Enzymes of Different CYP720B Clades Use Alternative Substrates and Converge on the Same Products.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Katrin; Jensen, Niels Berg; Yuen, Macaire M S; Madilao, Lina; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP720B subfamily play a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids (DRAs), which are a major component of the conifer oleoresin defense system. CYP720Bs exist in families of up to a dozen different members in conifer genomes and fall into four different clades (I-IV). Only two CYP720B members, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) PtCYP720B1 and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) PsCYP720B4, have been characterized previously. Both are multisubstrate and multifunctional clade III enzymes, which catalyze consecutive three-step oxidations in the conversion of diterpene olefins to DRAs. These reactions resemble the sequential diterpene oxidations affording ent-kaurenoic acid from ent-kaurene in gibberellin biosynthesis. Here, we functionally characterized the CYP720B clade I enzymes CYP720B2 and CYP720B12 in three different conifer species, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and compared their activities with those of the clade III enzymes CYP720B1 and CYP720B4 of the same species. Unlike the clade III enzymes, clade I enzymes were ultimately found not to be active with diterpene olefins but converted the recently discovered, unstable diterpene synthase product 13-hydroxy-8(14)-abietene. Through alternative routes, CYP720B enzymes of both clades produce some of the same profiles of conifer oleoresin DRAs (abietic acid, neoabietic acid, levopimaric acid, and palustric acid), while clade III enzymes also function in the formation of pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. These results highlight the modularity of the specialized (i.e. secondary) diterpene metabolism, which produces conifer defense metabolites through variable combinations of different diterpene synthase and CYP720B enzymes. PMID:26936895

  3. Modularity of Conifer Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis: P450 Enzymes of Different CYP720B Clades Use Alternative Substrates and Converge on the Same Products.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Katrin; Jensen, Niels Berg; Yuen, Macaire M S; Madilao, Lina; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP720B subfamily play a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids (DRAs), which are a major component of the conifer oleoresin defense system. CYP720Bs exist in families of up to a dozen different members in conifer genomes and fall into four different clades (I-IV). Only two CYP720B members, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) PtCYP720B1 and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) PsCYP720B4, have been characterized previously. Both are multisubstrate and multifunctional clade III enzymes, which catalyze consecutive three-step oxidations in the conversion of diterpene olefins to DRAs. These reactions resemble the sequential diterpene oxidations affording ent-kaurenoic acid from ent-kaurene in gibberellin biosynthesis. Here, we functionally characterized the CYP720B clade I enzymes CYP720B2 and CYP720B12 in three different conifer species, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and compared their activities with those of the clade III enzymes CYP720B1 and CYP720B4 of the same species. Unlike the clade III enzymes, clade I enzymes were ultimately found not to be active with diterpene olefins but converted the recently discovered, unstable diterpene synthase product 13-hydroxy-8(14)-abietene. Through alternative routes, CYP720B enzymes of both clades produce some of the same profiles of conifer oleoresin DRAs (abietic acid, neoabietic acid, levopimaric acid, and palustric acid), while clade III enzymes also function in the formation of pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. These results highlight the modularity of the specialized (i.e. secondary) diterpene metabolism, which produces conifer defense metabolites through variable combinations of different diterpene synthase and CYP720B enzymes.

  4. Modularity of Conifer Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis: P450 Enzymes of Different CYP720B Clades Use Alternative Substrates and Converge on the Same Products1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Macaire M.S.; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP720B subfamily play a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids (DRAs), which are a major component of the conifer oleoresin defense system. CYP720Bs exist in families of up to a dozen different members in conifer genomes and fall into four different clades (I–IV). Only two CYP720B members, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) PtCYP720B1 and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) PsCYP720B4, have been characterized previously. Both are multisubstrate and multifunctional clade III enzymes, which catalyze consecutive three-step oxidations in the conversion of diterpene olefins to DRAs. These reactions resemble the sequential diterpene oxidations affording ent-kaurenoic acid from ent-kaurene in gibberellin biosynthesis. Here, we functionally characterized the CYP720B clade I enzymes CYP720B2 and CYP720B12 in three different conifer species, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and compared their activities with those of the clade III enzymes CYP720B1 and CYP720B4 of the same species. Unlike the clade III enzymes, clade I enzymes were ultimately found not to be active with diterpene olefins but converted the recently discovered, unstable diterpene synthase product 13-hydroxy-8(14)-abietene. Through alternative routes, CYP720B enzymes of both clades produce some of the same profiles of conifer oleoresin DRAs (abietic acid, neoabietic acid, levopimaric acid, and palustric acid), while clade III enzymes also function in the formation of pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. These results highlight the modularity of the specialized (i.e. secondary) diterpene metabolism, which produces conifer defense metabolites through variable combinations of different diterpene synthase and CYP720B enzymes. PMID:26936895

  5. Transcriptome resources and functional characterization of monoterpene synthases for two host species of the mountain pine beetle, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemic has affected lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) across an area of more than 18 million hectares of pine forests in western Canada, and is a threat to the boreal jack pine (Pinus banksiana) forest. Defence of pines against MPB and associated fungal pathogens, as well as other pests, involves oleoresin monoterpenes, which are biosynthesized by families of terpene synthases (TPSs). Volatile monoterpenes also serve as host recognition cues for MPB and as precursors for MPB pheromones. The genes responsible for terpene biosynthesis in jack pine and lodgepole pine were previously unknown. Results We report the generation and quality assessment of assembled transcriptome resources for lodgepole pine and jack pine using Sanger, Roche 454, and Illumina sequencing technologies. Assemblies revealed transcripts for approximately 20,000 - 30,000 genes from each species and assembly analyses led to the identification of candidate full-length prenyl transferase, TPS, and P450 genes of oleoresin biosynthesis. We cloned and functionally characterized, via expression of recombinant proteins in E. coli, nine different jack pine and eight different lodgepole pine mono-TPSs. The newly identified lodgepole pine and jack pine mono-TPSs include (+)-α-pinene synthases, (-)-α-pinene synthases, (-)-β-pinene synthases, (+)-3-carene synthases, and (-)-β-phellandrene synthases from each of the two species. Conclusion In the absence of genome sequences, transcriptome assemblies are important for defence gene discovery in lodgepole pine and jack pine, as demonstrated here for the terpenoid pathway genes. The product profiles of the functionally annotated mono-TPSs described here can account for the major monoterpene metabolites identified in lodgepole pine and jack pine. PMID:23679205

  6. Inhibition of fungal growth on bread by volatile components from spices and herbs, and the possible application in active packaging, with special emphasis on mustard essential oil.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P V; Rios, R

    2000-09-25

    The effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the most important spoilage fungi of bread was investigated. Penicillium commune, P. roqueforti, Aspergillus flavus and Endomyces fibuliger were able to grow at oxygen levels down to 0.03%, while the chalk mould E. fibuliger was capable of growing even in the presence of an oxygen absorber. High levels of carbon dioxide retarded growth but not completely. As an alternative to MAP active packaging (AP) using volatile essential oils (EO) and oleoresins (OL) from spices and herbs were tested against a range of fungi commonly found on bread. Concentrations of 1, 10 or 100 microl EO or OL were added to a filter paper placed in the lid of a Petri dish inoculated with one of the test fungi. The Petri dish was sealed hermetically to avoid the exchange of gases. Mustard essential oil showed the strongest effect. Cinnamon, garlic and clove also had high activity, while oregano oleoresin only inhibited growth weakly. Vanilla showed no inhibitory effect towards the tested microorganisms at the applied concentrations. A. flavus was more resistant than the other microorganisms while P. roqueforti was the most sensitive. Mustard essential oil was investigated in greater detail. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the active component, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), was determined for the same species and an additional three moulds and one yeast. MIC values ranged from 1.8 to 3.5 microg/ml gas phase. Results showed that whether AITC was fungistatic or fungicidal depended on its concentration, and the concentration of spores. When the gas phase contained at least 3.5 microg/ml, AITC was fungicidal to all tested fungi. Results of sensory evaluation showed, that hot-dog bread was more sensitive to AITC than rye bread. The minimal recognisable concentration of AITC was 2.4 microg/ml gas phase for rye bread and between 1.8 and 3.5 microg/ml gas phase for hot-dog bread. These findings showed that the required shelf-life of

  7. A conceptual framework: redefining forest soil's critical acid loads under a changing climate.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Steven G; Boggs, Johnny L

    2010-06-01

    Federal agencies of several nations have or are currently developing guidelines for critical forest soil acid loads. These guidelines are used to establish regulations designed to maintain atmospheric acid inputs below levels shown to damage forests and streams. Traditionally, when the critical soil acid load exceeds the amount of acid that the ecosystem can absorb, it is believed to potentially impair forest health. The excess over the critical soil acid load is termed the exceedance, and the larger the exceedance, the greater the risk of ecosystem damage. This definition of critical soil acid load applies to exposure of the soil to a single, long-term pollutant (i.e., acidic deposition). However, ecosystems can be simultaneously under multiple ecosystem stresses and a single critical soil acid load level may not accurately reflect ecosystem health risk when subjected to multiple, episodic environmental stress. For example, the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina receive some of the highest rates of acidic deposition in the eastern United States, but these levels are considered to be below the critical acid load (CAL) that would cause forest damage. However, the area experienced a moderate three-year drought from 1999 to 2002, and in 2001 red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) trees in the area began to die in large numbers. The initial survey indicated that the affected trees were killed by the southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimm.). This insect is not normally successful at colonizing these tree species because the trees produce large amounts of oleoresin that exclude the boring beetles. Subsequent investigations revealed that long-term acid deposition may have altered red spruce forest structure and function. There is some evidence that elevated acid deposition (particularly nitrogen) reduced tree water uptake potential, oleoresin production, and caused the trees to become more susceptible to insect colonization during the drought period

  8. Unexpected death related to restraint for excited delirium: a retrospective study of deaths in police custody and in the community

    PubMed Central

    Pollanen, M S; Chiasson, D A; Cairns, J T; Young, J G

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some people in states of excited delirium die while in police custody. Emerging evidence suggests that physical restraint in certain positions may contribute to such deaths. In this study the authors determined the frequency of physical restraint among people in a state of excited delirium who died unexpectedly. METHODS: The authors reviewed the records of 21 cases of unexpected death in people with excited delirium, which were investigated by the Office of the Chief Coroner for Ontario between 1988 and 1995. Eyewitness testimony, findings during postmortem examinations, clinical history, toxicological data and other official documents describing the events surrounding the deaths were analyzed. Specific reference was made to documented eyewitness testimony of restraint method, body position and use of capsicum oleoresin (pepper) spray. Because cocaine was detected in the blood of some of these people during the postmortem examination, the role of cocaine in excited delirium was examined by comparing the cocaine levels in these cases with levels in 2 control groups: 19 people who died from acute cocaine intoxication and 21 people who had used cocaine shortly before they died but who had died from other causes. RESULTS: In all 21 cases of unexpected death associated with excited delirium, the deaths were associated with restraint (for violent agitation and hyperactivity), with the person either in a prone position (18 people [86%]) or subjected to pressure on the neck (3 [14%]). All of those who died had suddenly lapsed into tranquillity shortly after being restrained. The excited delirium was caused by a psychiatric disorder in 12 people (57%) and by cocaine-induced psychosis in 8 (38%). Eighteen people (86%) were in police custody when they died. Four (19%) had been sprayed with capsicum oleoresin, and heart disease was found in another 4 at autopsy. The blood level of cocaine in those whose excited delirium was cocaine induced was similar to levels

  9. A conceptual framework: redefining forest soil's critical acid loads under a changing climate.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Steven G; Boggs, Johnny L

    2010-06-01

    Federal agencies of several nations have or are currently developing guidelines for critical forest soil acid loads. These guidelines are used to establish regulations designed to maintain atmospheric acid inputs below levels shown to damage forests and streams. Traditionally, when the critical soil acid load exceeds the amount of acid that the ecosystem can absorb, it is believed to potentially impair forest health. The excess over the critical soil acid load is termed the exceedance, and the larger the exceedance, the greater the risk of ecosystem damage. This definition of critical soil acid load applies to exposure of the soil to a single, long-term pollutant (i.e., acidic deposition). However, ecosystems can be simultaneously under multiple ecosystem stresses and a single critical soil acid load level may not accurately reflect ecosystem health risk when subjected to multiple, episodic environmental stress. For example, the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina receive some of the highest rates of acidic deposition in the eastern United States, but these levels are considered to be below the critical acid load (CAL) that would cause forest damage. However, the area experienced a moderate three-year drought from 1999 to 2002, and in 2001 red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) trees in the area began to die in large numbers. The initial survey indicated that the affected trees were killed by the southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimm.). This insect is not normally successful at colonizing these tree species because the trees produce large amounts of oleoresin that exclude the boring beetles. Subsequent investigations revealed that long-term acid deposition may have altered red spruce forest structure and function. There is some evidence that elevated acid deposition (particularly nitrogen) reduced tree water uptake potential, oleoresin production, and caused the trees to become more susceptible to insect colonization during the drought period

  10. Synergistic blends of monoterpenes for aggregation pheromones of the mountain pine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Borden, John H; Pureswaran, Deepa S; Lafontaine, Jean Pierre

    2008-08-01

    The superiority of the host monoterpene myrcene as a synergist for trans-verbenol and exo-brevicomin, aggregation pheromone components of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), suggests that the ancestral host of the mountain pine beetle is a pine rich in myrcene. A field trapping experiment in British Columbia testing reconstituted bole oleoresin of whitebark pine, Pinus albicaulis Engelmann, composed of mainly myrcene (20.7%), terpinolene (6.8%), and 3-carene (61.9%) showed it to be a better pheromone synergist than reconstituted bole oleoresin of lodgepole pine, Pinus contorta variety latifolia Engelmann, which contained only 2.7, 1.0, and 6.0%, respectively, of the above-mentioned three compounds. In the same experiment myrcene alone was the best synergist. In subsequent experiments, testing myrcene, terpinolene and 3-carene alone and in all possible binary and ternary combinations, a 50:50 blend of myrcene and terpinolene released at the same rate as either compound alone generally resulted in trap catches approximately 3 times higher than with myrcene as a synergist. This result held as long as the terpinolene was free of contaminants, and the traps were in the open, well away from potential interference of semiochemicals emitted by newly attacked trees. 3-Carene seemed to be inert or slightly inhibitory. No single monoterpene tested alone or in binary or ternary combination in the absence of pheromones was attractive. There was no effect of doubling or tripling the release rate of myrcene or terpinolene. In five of nine experiments, adding terpinolene to myrcene caused a significant increase in the percentage of female mountain pine beetles captured. Among host pines, the presence of highly synergistic monoterpenes at various levels in combination with other monoterpenes that are apparently either inert or inhibitory could account for different degrees of pheromone synergism, and thus host preference. The

  11. Biotechnological production of lutein and its applications.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sevilla, José M; Acién Fernández, F G; Molina Grima, E

    2010-03-01

    Lutein is an antioxidant that has gathered increasing attention due to its potential role in preventing or ameliorating age-related macular degeneration. Currently, it is produced from marigold oleoresin, but continuous reports of lutein-producing microalgae pose the question if those microorganisms can become an alternative source. Several microalgae have higher lutein contents than most marigold cultivars and have been shown to yield productivities hundreds of times higher than marigold crops on a per square meter basis. Microalgae and marigold are opposite alternatives in the use of resources such as land and labor and the prevalence of one or the other could change in the future as the lutein demand rises and if labor or land becomes more restricted or expensive in the producing countries. The potential of microalgae as a lutein source is analyzed and compared to marigold. It is suggested that, in the current state of the art, microalgae could compete with marigold even without counting on any of the improvements in microalgal technology that can be expected in the near future. PMID:20091305

  12. Gloss paints in late paintings by Francis Picabia: a multi-analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkori, Maria; Hubert, Marie-Odile; Balcar, Nathalie; Barabant, Gilles; Sutherland, Ken; Casadio, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a multi-analytical approach for the study of the materials used by Francis Picabia in two paintings dating from 1949 and 1950 is reported, with a particular reference to the possible use of enamel paints. The study is complemented by analysis of paints that had the appearance of glossy enamel sampled from the artist's easel in the collection of the Comité Francis Picabia. Analysis with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry with thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM-Py-GCMS) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that only few paints match the composition of historical reference samples of Ripolin enamels, while the majority of the glossy paints sampled likely consist of mixtures of binders and varnishes made by the artist. This study confirms the importance of scientific testing and comparison with reference materials, when determining artists' use of enamel paints. Results should be interpreted in the context of documentary/historical evidence, for a more informed characterization of oleoresinous paint media.

  13. The cytochromes P450 of Grosmannia clavigera: Genome organization, phylogeny, and expression in response to pine host chemicals.

    PubMed

    Lah, Ljerka; Haridas, Sajeet; Bohlmann, Joerg; Breuil, Colette

    2013-01-01

    Grosmannia clavigera is a fungal associate of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and a pathogen of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) that must overcome terpenoid oleoresin and phenolic defenses of host trees. G. clavigera responds to monoterpene influx with complementary mechanisms that include export and the use of these compounds as a carbon source. Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) may also be involved in the metabolism of host defense compounds. We have identified and phylogenetically classified G. clavigera CYPs (CYPome). We show that although the G. clavigera CYPome has contracted in evolution, certain CYP families have expanded by duplication. We analyzed RNA-seq data for CYP expression following treatment with terpenes and pine phloem extracts to identify CYPs potentially involved in detoxification of these pine defense compounds. We also used transcriptome analysis of G. clavigera grown on monoterpenes, triglycerides or oleic acid as a carbon source to identify up-regulated CYPs that may be involved in the utilization of these compounds to support fungal growth. Finally, we identify secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters that contain CYPs, and CYPs in clusters that may be involved in conversion of host chemicals. PMID:23111002

  14. Curcuma oil: reduces early accumulation of oxidative product and is anti-apoptogenic in transient focal ischemia in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Priyanka; Dohare, Preeti; Varma, Saurabh; Ray, Aparajita; Sharma, Uma; Jagannathan, N R; Jaganathanan, N R; Ray, Madhur

    2008-09-01

    Turmeric is a source of numerous aromatic compounds isolated from powdered rhizomes of Curcuma longa Linn. The constituents are present as volatile oil, the Curcuma oil (C.oil), semi-solid oleoresins and non-volatile compounds such as curcumin. A rapidly expanding body of data provides evidence of the anti-cancer action of Curcumin, and most importantly in the present context, its neuroprotective activity. Almost nothing is known about such activity of C.oil. We report that C.oil (500 mg Kg(-1) i.p.) 15 min before 2 h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) followed by 24 h reflow in rats significantly diminished infarct volume, improved neurological deficit and counteracted oxidative stress. The percent ischemic lesion volume on diffusion-weighted imaging was significantly attenuated. Mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen species, peroxynitrite levels, caspase-3 activities leading to delayed neuronal death were significantly inhibited after treatment with C.oil. These results suggest that the neuroprotective activity of C.oil against cerebral ischemia is associated with its antioxidant activities and further; there is attenuation of delayed neuronal death via a caspase-dependent pathway. C.oil appears to be a promising agent not only for the treatment of cerebral stroke, but also for the treatment of other disorders associated with oxidative stress. PMID:17955367

  15. Optimization of DNA extraction and PCR protocols for phylogenetic analysis in Schinopsis spp. and related Anacardiaceae.

    PubMed

    Mogni, Virginia Y; Kahan, Mariano A; de Queiroz, Luciano Paganucci; Vesprini, José L; Ortiz, Juan Pablo A; Prado, Darién E

    2016-01-01

    The Anacardiaceae is an important and worldwide distributed family of ecological and socio-economic relevance. Notwithstanding that, molecular studies in this family are scarce and problematic because of the particularly high concentration of secondary metabolites-i.e. tannins and oleoresins-that are present in almost all tissues of the many members of the group, which complicate the purification and amplification of the DNA. The objective of this work was to improve an available DNA isolation method for Schinopsis spp. and other related Anacardiaceae, as well as the PCR protocols for DNA amplification of the chloroplast trnL-F, rps16 and ndhF and nuclear ITS-ETS fragments. The modifications proposed allowed the extraction of 70-120 µg of non-degraded genomic DNA per gram of dry tissue that resulted useful for PCR amplification. PCR reactions produced the expected fragments that could be directly sequenced. Sequence analyses of amplicons showed similarity with the corresponding Schinopsis accessions available at GenBank. The methodology presented here can be routinely applied for molecular studies of the group aimed to clarify not only aspects on the molecular biology but also the taxonomy and phylogeny of this fascinating group of vascular plants. PMID:27217992

  16. Efficacy of Citrus reticulata and Mirazid in treatment of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Manal A; Hetta, Mona H

    2005-11-01

    This work has been carried out to investigate the effect of Schistosoma mansoni infection on mice livers after treatment with the ethanolic extract of Citrus reticulata root or the oleo-resin extract from Myrrh of Commiphora molmol tree (Mirazid), as a new antishistosomal drug. Marker enzymes for different cell organelles were measured; succinate dehydrogenase (SDH); lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and its isoenzymes; glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase); acid phosphatase (AP) and 5'- nucleotidase. Liver function enzymes; aspartate aminotransferase (AST); alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were also estimated. Parasitological studies through ova count and worm burden will also be taken into consideration. The results showed a marked reduction in SDH, LDH, AST, and ALT enzyme activities and a significant increase in G-6-Pase, AP, 5'- nucleotidase, and ALP after S. mansoni infection. A noticeable alteration in LDH subunits were also noticed. Treatment with C. reticulata or Mirazid improved all the previous enzyme activities with a noticeable reduction in ova count and worm burden. PMID:16410968

  17. Larvicidal activity of Commiphora molmol against Culex pipiens and Aedes caspius larvae.

    PubMed

    Massoud, A M; Labib, I M

    2000-04-01

    Myrrh (oleo-gum-resin) obtained from the stem of Commiphora molmol proved to have insecticidal activity against mosquito larvae. The oil extract of Myrrh possesses median lethal activity against 2nd, 3rd and 4th instar larvae of Culex pipiens at 0.016 x 10(2), 0.17 x 10(2) & 1.6 x 10(2) g/l respectively. While LC50 against 3rd instar larvae of Aedes caspius was 0.2 x 10(2) g/l. The oleo-resin extract showed toxicity against 2nd, 3rd, 4th instar larvae of C. pipiens recording the LC50 values of 0.06 x 10(2), 0.09 x 10(2) & 0.5 x 10(2) g/l respectively. While LC50 against 3rd instar larvae of A. caspius was 0.08 x 10(2) g/l. This plant extract has no marked toxic effect against the water bug Sphaerodema urinator (Dufor) and the water beetle Hydaticus leander (Rossi). Histological examinations of Myrrh treated mosquito larvae showed great pathological effect on their fat, muscles, gut and nervous tissues. PMID:10786023

  18. Field trials on the repellent activity of four plant products against mainly Mansonia population in western Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Hadis, Mamuye; Lulu, Mesfin; Mekonnen, Yared; Asfaw, Teffera

    2003-03-01

    The repellent activity of essential oils of lemon eucalyptus (Eucalyptus maculata citrodion), rue (Ruta chalepensis), oleoresin of pyrethrum (Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium) and neem (Azadiracta indica) have been field tested as 40%, 50% and 75% solutions in coconut oil against populations of mosquitoes consisting mainly of Mansonia in Gambella, western Ethiopia. A latin square design was used to randomize the test subjects for possible individual differences for mosquito attraction. Repellency was evaluated as the percentage protection. Deet was included in the study for comparison. All the plant products manifested repellency. At 50% concentration at which the highest repellency was recorded the protection was 91.6%, 87.0%, 96.0%, 97.9% for rue, neem, pyrethrum and deet, respectively. The essential oil of lemon eucalyptus was not tried at this concentration. At a 40% concentration deet, lemon eucalyptus and pyrethrum were significantly (p < 0.05) more effective than rue and neem. At a 50% concentration, deet and pyrethrum were significantly better (p < 0.05) than rue and neem. At a 75% concentration concentration, deet and lemon eucalypus performed significantly better (p < 0.05) than pyrethrum and neem. The difference between pyrethrum and neem was also significant (p < 0.01). PMID:12672146

  19. Phytonutrient diet supplementation promotes beneficial Clostridia species and intestinal mucus secretion resulting in protection against enteric infection

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarska, Marta; Willing, Benjamin P.; Bravo, David M.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2015-01-01

    Plant extracts, or phytonutrients, are used in traditional medicine practices as supplements to enhance the immune system and gain resistance to various infectious diseases and are used in animal production as health promoting feed additives. To date, there are no studies that have assessed their mechanism of action and ability to alter mucosal immune responses in the intestine. We characterized the immunomodulatory function of six phytonutrients: anethol, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, capsicum oleoresin and garlic extract. Mice were treated with each phytonutrient to assess changes to colonic gene expression and mucus production. All six phytonutrients showed variable changes in expression of innate immune genes in the colon. However only eugenol stimulated production of the inner mucus layer, a key mucosal barrier to microbes. The mechanism by which eugenol causes mucus layer thickening likely involves microbial stimulation as analysis of the intestinal microbiota composition showed eugenol treatment led to an increase in abundance of specific families within the Clostridiales order. Further, eugenol treatment confers colonization resistance to the enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. These results suggest that eugenol acts to strengthen the mucosal barrier by increasing the thickness of the inner mucus layer, which protects against invading pathogens and disease. PMID:25787310

  20. Antileishmanial activity of diterpene acids in copaiba oil

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Adriana Oliveira; Izumi, Erika; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias-Filho, Benedito Prado; da Veiga-Júnior, Valdir Florêncio; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease. According to the World Health Organization, there are approximately 1.5-two million new cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis each year worldwide. Chemotherapy against leishmaniasis is based on pentavalent antimonials, which were developed more than a century ago. The goals of this study were to investigate the antileishmanial activity of diterpene acids in copaiba oil, as well as some possible targets of their action against Leishmania amazonensis. Methyl copalate and agathic, hydroxycopalic, kaurenoic, pinifolic and polyaltic acids isolated from Copaifera officinales oleoresins were utilised. Ultrastructural changes and the specific organelle targets of diterpenes were investigated with electron microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. All compounds had some level of activity against L. amazonensis. Hydroxycopalic acid and methyl copalate demonstrated the most activity against promastigotes and had 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 2.5 and 6.0 µg/mL, respectively. However, pinifolic and kaurenoic acid demonstrated the most activity against axenic amastigote and had IC50 values of 3.5 and 4.0 µg/mL, respectively. Agathic, kaurenoic and pinifolic acid caused significant increases in plasma membrane permeability and mitochondrial membrane depolarisation of the protozoan. In conclusion, copaiba oil and its diterpene acids should be explored for the development of new antileishmanial drugs. PMID:23440116

  1. Separation and preparation of 6-gingerol from molecular distillation residue of Yunnan ginger rhizomes by high-speed counter-current chromatography and the antioxidant activity of ginger oils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhilin; Liang, Zheng; Chen, Xiaosong; Wen, Xin; Wang, Yuxiao; Li, Mo; Ni, Yuanying

    2016-02-01

    Molecular distillation residue (MD-R) from ginger had the most total phenol content of 247.6mg gallic acid equivalents per gram (GAE/g) among the ginger oils. High-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) technique in semi-preparative scale was successfully performed in separation and purification of 6-gingerol from MD-R by using a two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (10:2:5:7, v/v/v/v). The target compound was isolated, collected, purified by HSCCC in the head-tail mode, and then analyzed by HPLC. A total of 90.38±0.53mg 6-gingerol was obtained from 600mg MD-R, with purity of 99.6%. In addition, the structural identification of 6-gingerol was performed by EI/MS, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. Moreover, the orders of antioxidant activity were vitamin E (VE)>supercritical fluid extraction oleoresin (SFE-O)=MD-R=6-gingerol>molecular distillation essential oil (MD-EO) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)=VE>6-gingerol>MD-R=SFE-O>MD-EO, respectively in 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging and β-Carotene bleaching.

  2. Bifunctional cis-abienol synthase from Abies balsamea discovered by transcriptome sequencing and its implications for diterpenoid fragrance production.

    PubMed

    Zerbe, Philipp; Chiang, Angela; Yuen, Macaire; Hamberger, Björn; Hamberger, Britta; Draper, Jason A; Britton, Robert; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2012-04-01

    The labdanoid diterpene alcohol cis-abienol is a major component of the aromatic oleoresin of balsam fir (Abies balsamea) and serves as a valuable bioproduct material for the fragrance industry. Using high-throughput 454 transcriptome sequencing and metabolite profiling of balsam fir bark tissue, we identified candidate diterpene synthase sequences for full-length cDNA cloning and functional characterization. We discovered a bifunctional class I/II cis-abienol synthase (AbCAS), along with the paralogous levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase and isopimaradiene synthase, all of which are members of the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d subfamily. The AbCAS-catalyzed formation of cis-abienol proceeds via cyclization and hydroxylation at carbon C-8 of a postulated carbocation intermediate in the class II active site, followed by cleavage of the diphosphate group and termination of the reaction sequence without further cyclization in the class I active site. This reaction mechanism is distinct from that of synthases of the isopimaradiene- or levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase type, which employ deprotonation reactions in the class II active site and secondary cyclizations in the class I active site, leading to tricyclic diterpenes. Comparative homology modeling suggested the active site residues Asp-348, Leu-617, Phe-696, and Gly-723 as potentially important for the specificity of AbCAS. As a class I/II bifunctional enzyme, AbCAS is a promising target for metabolic engineering of cis-abienol production.

  3. Induction of isoprenyl diphosphate synthases, plant hormones and defense signalling genes correlates with traumatic resin duct formation in Norway spruce (Picea abies).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Axel; Nagel, Raimund; Krekling, Trygve; Christiansen, Erik; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Krokene, Paal

    2011-12-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies) defends itself against herbivores and pathogens by formation of traumatic resin ducts filled with terpenoid-based oleoresin. An important group of enzymes in terpenoid biosynthesis are the short-chain isoprenyl diphosphate synthases which produce geranyl diphosphate (C(10)), farnesyl diphosphate (C(15)), and geranylgeranyl diphosphate (C(20)) as precursors of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpene resin acids, respectively. After treatment with methyl jasmonate (MJ) we investigated the expression of all isoprenyl diphosphate synthase genes characterized to date from Norway spruce and correlated this with formation of traumatic resin ducts and terpene accumulation. Formation of traumatic resin ducts correlated with higher amounts of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and diterpene resin acids and an upregulation of isoprenyl diphosphate synthase genes producing geranyl diphosphate or geranylgeranyl diphosphate. Among defense hormones, jasmonate and jasmonate-isoleucine conjugate accumulated to higher levels in trees with extensive traumatic resin duct formation, whereas salicylate did not. Jasmonate and ethylene are likely to both be involved in formation of traumatic resin ducts based on elevated transcripts of genes encoding lipoxygenase and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase associated with resin duct formation. Other genes involved in defense signalling in other systems, mitogen-activated protein kinase3 and nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related gene1, were also associated with traumatic resin duct formation. These responses were detected not only at the site of MJ treatment, but also systemically up to 60 cm above the site of treatment on the trunk.

  4. Turmeric--chemistry, technology, and quality.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, V S

    1980-01-01

    Turmeric is a minor spice in the West, but a major one in the East. It is valued by Westerners mainly, if not solely, on account of its color, but to the Asians both color and aroma are equally important. This review critically appraises the existing knowledge on the chemistry of the functionally important constituents, the processing of the spice into wholes, powder, and oleoresins, and the objective methods and standards available for evaluation of quality. The importance of the mild (but persistent) aroma, and the lack of detailed knowledge on the significant volatiles are discussed. Some unpublished data on significant aroma components, a tristimulus study of color, and subjective evaluations of quality are summarized. Other areas briefly discussed are the production and trade, curry powder, allied spices, and biosynthetic and physiological aspects. The confusion existing in the literature on the nomenclature of species included in the genus Curcuma is pointed out. In view of the growing importance of turmeric and its extracts as a natural food color, recent results on toxicological aspects are discussed. The areas in which research is needed are indicated at the end.

  5. Supercritical fluid processing: opportunities for new resist materials and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher-Wetmore, Paula M.; Ober, Christopher K.; Gabor, Allen H.; Allen, Robert D.

    1996-05-01

    Over the past two decades supercritical fluids have been utilized as solvents for carrying out separations of materials as diverse as foods, polymers, pharmaceuticals, petrochemicals, natural products, and explosives. More recently they have been used for non-extractive applications such as recrystallization, deposition, impregnation, surface modification, and as a solvent alternative for precision parts cleaning. Today, supercritical fluid extraction is being practiced in the foods and beverage industries; there are commercial plants for decaffeinating coffee and tea, extracting beer flavoring agents from hops, and separating oils and oleoresins from spices. Interest in supercritical fluid processing of polymers has grown over the last ten years, and many new purification, fractionation, and even polymerization techniques have emerged. One of the most significant motivations for applying this technology to polymers has been increased performance demands. More recently, with increasing scrutiny of traditional solvents, supercritical fluids, and in particular carbon dioxide, are receiving widespread attention as 'environmentally conscious' solvents. This paper describes several examples of polymers applications, including a few involving photoresists, which demonstrate that as next- generation advanced polymer systems emerge, supercritical fluids are certain to offer advantages as cutting edge processing tools.

  6. Pepper spray projectile/disperser for countering hostage and barricade situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Roy

    1997-01-01

    An improved less-than-lethal projectile for use in hostage, barricade and tactical assault situations has been developed. The projectile is launched from a standoff position and disperse the incapacitating agent oleoresin capsicum in the form of atomized droplets. A literature search followed by an experimental study were conducted of the mechanism of barrier defeat for various shaped projectiles against the targets of interest in this work: window glass, plasterboard and plywood. Some of the trade- offs between velocity, standoff, projectile shape and size, penetration, and residual energy were quantified. Analysis of the ballistic trajectory and recoil, together with calculations of he amount of pepper spray needed to incapacitate the occupants of a typical barricaded structure, indicated the suitability of using a fin stabilized projectile fired from a conventional 37 mm riot control gas gun. Two projectile designs were considered, manufactured and tested. The results of static tests to simulate target impact, together with live firing trials against a variety of targets, showed that rear ejection of the atomized spray was more reproducible and effective than nose ejection. The performance characteristics of the finalized design were investigated in trials using the standard barrier for testing barrier penetrating tear gas agents as defined by the National Institute of Justice.

  7. Insect growth inhibition, antifeedant and antifungal activity of compounds isolated/derived from Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger) rhizomes.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, M; Walia, S; Dhingra, S; Khambay, B P

    2001-03-01

    Fresh rhizomes of Zingiber officinale (ginger), when subjected to steam distillation, yielded ginger oil in which curcumene was found to be the major constituent. The thermally labile zingiberene-rich fraction was obtained from its diethyl ether extract. Column chromatography of ginger oleoresin furnished a fraction from which [6]-gingerol was obtained by preparative TLC. Naturally occurring [6]-dehydroshogaol was synthesised following condensation of dehydrozingerone with hexanal, whereas zingerone and 3-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)butane were obtained by hydrogenation of dehydrozingerone with 10% Pd/C. The structures of the compounds were established by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass (EI-MS and ES-MS) spectral analysis. The test compounds exhibited moderate insect growth regulatory (IGR) and antifeedant activity against Spilosoma obliqua, and significant antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani. Among the various compounds, [6]-dehydroshogaol exhibited maximum IGR activity (EC50 3.55 mg ml-1), while dehydrozingerone imparted maximum antifungal activity (EC50 86.49 mg litre-1).

  8. Differential effect of soil and environment on metabolic expression of turmeric (Curcuma longa cv. Roma).

    PubMed

    Sandeep, I S; Sanghamitra, Nayak; Sujata, Mohanty

    2015-06-01

    Curcuma longa (Zingiberaceae) is known for its uses in medicine, cosmetics, food flavouring and textile industries. The secondary metabolites of turmeric like essential oil, oleoresin and curcumin are important for its multipurpose uses. These traits of turmeric vary from place to place due to the influence of environment, soil and agro-climatic conditions. Here, we analyzed turmeric from different agroclimatic regions for influence of various factors on its growth and yield of important phytochemicals. A high curcumin yielding cultivar i.e., Roma was collected from high altitude research station, Koraput (HARS) and planted in nine agroclimatic regions of Odisha. Analysis of soil texture, pH, organic carbon, micro and macro nutrients were done from all the studied zones up to 2nd generation. Plants grown in their released station i.e., Eastern Ghat High Land showed 5% of curcumin and were taken as control. Plants grown in different agroclimatic zones showed a range of 1.4-5% of curcumin and 0.3-0.7% of rhizome essential oil and 0.3-1% of leaf essential oil content. Gas chromatography and mass spectra analysis showed tumerone and alpha phellandrene as the major compounds in all the zones with 10-20% variation. The present study will be immensely helpful for standardization and management of environmental and ecological factors for high phytochemical yield in turmeric plant.

  9. Influence of vacuum packaging and long term storage on quality of whole chilli (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Chetti, Mahadev B; Deepa, G T; Antony, Roshny T; Khetagoudar, Mahadev C; Uppar, Dodappa S; Navalgatti, Channappa M

    2014-10-01

    Investigations were carried out to study the influence of vacuum packaging and long term storage on quality in red chilli. Chilli fruits were stored in vacuum packed and jute bags at two moisture levels (10 % and 12 %) in room and cold environments under both light and dark conditions for a period of 24 months. During storage period, average room and cool chamber temperatures were 25 ± 2 °C and 4 ± 1 °C, respectively. Changes of moisture (Halogen moisture analyzer), capsaicin (HPLC-UV), oleoresin and total extractable colour (spectrophotometer) were analyzed at 3 months interval up to 12 months and 6 months interval from 12 to 24 months. Statistical analysis (ANOVA) and Duncan's test were applied to the analytical data to evaluate the effect of treatments applied. It was observed that the vacuum packed chillies under cold storage were found to have the least per cent decline in various quality parameters. Chillies with 12 % moisture and stored in vacuum packaged bags recorded better quality parameters over 10 % moisture. PMID:25328233

  10. Determination of terpenoid content in pine by organic solvent extraction and fast-GC analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Harman-Ware, Anne E.; Sykes, Robert; Peter, Gary F.; Davis, Mark

    2016-01-25

    Terpenoids, naturally occurring compounds derived from isoprene units present in pine oleoresin, are a valuable source of chemicals used in solvents, fragrances, flavors, and have shown potential use as a biofuel. This paper describes a method to extract and analyze the terpenoids present in loblolly pine saplings and pine lighter wood. Various extraction solvents were tested over different times and temperatures. Samples were analyzed by pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectrometry before and after extractions to monitor the extraction efficiency. The pyrolysis studies indicated that the optimal extraction method used a 1:1 hexane/acetone solvent system at 22°C for 1 h. Extracts frommore » the hexane/acetone experiments were analyzed using a low thermal mass modular accelerated column heater for fast-GC/FID analysis. The most abundant terpenoids from the pine samples were quantified, using standard curves, and included the monoterpenes, α- and β-pinene, camphene, and δ-carene. Sesquiterpenes analyzed included caryophyllene, humulene, and α-bisabolene. In conclusion, diterpenoid resin acids were quantified in derivatized extractions, including pimaric, isopimaric, levopimaric, palustric, dehydroabietic, abietic, and neoabietic acids.« less

  11. Genome and transcriptome analyses of the mountain pine beetle-fungal symbiont Grosmannia clavigera, a lodgepole pine pathogen

    PubMed Central

    DiGuistini, Scott; Wang, Ye; Liao, Nancy Y.; Taylor, Greg; Tanguay, Philippe; Feau, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Chan, Simon K.; Hesse-Orce, Uljana; Alamouti, Sepideh Massoumi; Tsui, Clement K. M.; Docking, Roderick T.; Levasseur, Anthony; Haridas, Sajeet; Robertson, Gordon; Birol, Inanc; Holt, Robert A.; Marra, Marco A.; Hamelin, Richard C.; Hirst, Martin; Jones, Steven J. M.; Bohlmann, Jörg; Breuil, Colette

    2011-01-01

    In western North America, the current outbreak of the mountain pine beetle (MPB) and its microbial associates has destroyed wide areas of lodgepole pine forest, including more than 16 million hectares in British Columbia. Grosmannia clavigera (Gc), a critical component of the outbreak, is a symbiont of the MPB and a pathogen of pine trees. To better understand the interactions between Gc, MPB, and lodgepole pine hosts, we sequenced the ∼30-Mb Gc genome and assembled it into 18 supercontigs. We predict 8,314 protein-coding genes, and support the gene models with proteome, expressed sequence tag, and RNA-seq data. We establish that Gc is heterothallic, and report evidence for repeat-induced point mutation. We report insights, from genome and transcriptome analyses, into how Gc tolerates conifer-defense chemicals, including oleoresin terpenoids, as they colonize a host tree. RNA-seq data indicate that terpenoids induce a substantial antimicrobial stress in Gc, and suggest that the fungus may detoxify these chemicals by using them as a carbon source. Terpenoid treatment strongly activated a ∼100-kb region of the Gc genome that contains a set of genes that may be important for detoxification of these host-defense chemicals. This work is a major step toward understanding the biological interactions between the tripartite MPB/fungus/forest system. PMID:21262841

  12. Resin duct characteristics associated with tree resistance to bark beetles across lodgepole and limber pines.

    PubMed

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Kane, Jeffrey M; Mitton, Jeffry B

    2014-04-01

    Bark beetles have recently killed billions of trees, yet conifer defenses are formidable and some trees resist attack. A primary anti-insect defense of pines is oleoresin from a system of resin ducts throughout the tree. Resin defense traits are heritable, and evidence suggests that resin duct characteristics are associated with resistance to insects. However, comparisons of resin ducts in trees killed by bark beetles to trees that resisted attack are unavailable. We compared vertical resin duct characteristics (number, density, and size) and growth rates from trees that were "resistant" (survived mass attack) versus "susceptible" (killed by attack) to bark beetles in lodgepole (Pinus contorta) and limber (Pinus flexilis) pines. Resistant trees of both species had significantly more resin ducts in recent growth than susceptible trees. Discriminant analysis (DA) correctly categorized 84% of lodgepole and 92% of limber pines as susceptible/resistant based on combinations of resin duct and growth characteristics from recent 5- through 20-year growth intervals. DA models using measures from only the most recent 5 years of growth correctly categorized 72 and 81% of lodgepole and limber pines, respectively. Comparing resistant to susceptible trees independent of species identity led to the correct categorization of 82% of trees based on factors from 5- to 20-year intervals, and 73% of trees using only resin duct counts from the most recent 5 years. We conclude that resin duct characteristics can be used to assess tree resistance to bark beetles across pine species, and offer a metric for management to enhance pest resistance.

  13. The CYP51F1 Gene of Leptographium qinlingensis: Sequence Characteristic, Phylogeny and Transcript Levels.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lulu; Li, Zhumei; Yu, Jiamin; Ma, Mingyuan; Zhang, Ranran; Chen, Hui; Pham, Thanh

    2015-05-26

    Leptographium qinlingensis is a fungal associate of the Chinese white pine beetle (Dendroctonus armandi) and a pathogen of the Chinese white pine (Pinus armandi) that must overcome the terpenoid oleoresin defenses of host trees. L. qinlingensis responds to monoterpene flow with abundant mechanisms that include export and the use of these compounds as a carbon source. As one of the fungal cytochrome P450 proteins (CYPs), which play important roles in general metabolism, CYP51 (lanosterol 14-α demethylase) can catalyze the biosynthesis of ergosterol and is a target for antifungal drug. We have identified an L. qinlingensis CYP51F1 gene, and the phylogenetic analysis shows the highest homology with the 14-α-demethylase sequence from Grosmannia clavigera (a fungal associate of Dendroctonus ponderosae). The transcription level of CYP51F1 following treatment with terpenes and pine phloem extracts was upregulated, while using monoterpenes as the only carbon source led to the downregulation of CYP5F1 expression. The homology modeling structure of CYP51F1 is similar to the structure of the lanosterol 14-α demethylase protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae YJM789, which has an N-terminal membrane helix 1 (MH1) and transmembrane helix 1 (TMH1). The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of terpenoid and azole fungicides (itraconazole (ITC)) and the docking of terpenoid molecules, lanosterol and ITC in the protein structure suggested that CYP51F1 may be inhibited by terpenoid molecules by competitive binding with azole fungicides.

  14. Monoterpene metabolism in female mountain pine beetles,Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, attacking ponderosa pine.

    PubMed

    Pierce, H D; Conn, J E; Oehlschlager, A C; Borden, J H

    1987-06-01

    Abdominal volatiles of female mountain pine beetles,Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, fed in ponderosa pine,Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws, and in lodgepole pine,P. contorta var.latifolia Engelmann, were analyzed by gas chromatography and coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and were found to comprise host oleoresin components and beetle-produced alliylic alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones derived from host monoterpenes. Neitherexo- andendo-brevicomin nor frontalin were detected. Three metabolic pathways are proposed to account for the distribution of beetle-produced monoterpene alcohols. The first pathway involves hydroxylation of monoterpene substrates on allylic methyl groups which areE to a methylene or vinyl group. This oxidation pathway is indiscriminate with respect to substrate and probably functions to detoxify monoterpenes. A second pathway, which hydroxylates theendo-cyclic methyleneE to a vinyl methyl group of bicyclic monoterpenes to give almost exclusively thetrans alcohol, is hypothesized to be involved in pheromone production. A third detoxification pathway involves anti-Markovnikov addition of water to theexo-cyclic double bond of β-phellandrene to give predominantlytrans-2-p-menthen-7-ol.

  15. Separation and preparation of 6-gingerol from molecular distillation residue of Yunnan ginger rhizomes by high-speed counter-current chromatography and the antioxidant activity of ginger oils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhilin; Liang, Zheng; Chen, Xiaosong; Wen, Xin; Wang, Yuxiao; Li, Mo; Ni, Yuanying

    2016-02-01

    Molecular distillation residue (MD-R) from ginger had the most total phenol content of 247.6mg gallic acid equivalents per gram (GAE/g) among the ginger oils. High-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) technique in semi-preparative scale was successfully performed in separation and purification of 6-gingerol from MD-R by using a two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (10:2:5:7, v/v/v/v). The target compound was isolated, collected, purified by HSCCC in the head-tail mode, and then analyzed by HPLC. A total of 90.38±0.53mg 6-gingerol was obtained from 600mg MD-R, with purity of 99.6%. In addition, the structural identification of 6-gingerol was performed by EI/MS, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. Moreover, the orders of antioxidant activity were vitamin E (VE)>supercritical fluid extraction oleoresin (SFE-O)=MD-R=6-gingerol>molecular distillation essential oil (MD-EO) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)=VE>6-gingerol>MD-R=SFE-O>MD-EO, respectively in 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging and β-Carotene bleaching. PMID:26773887

  16. An impression on current developments in the technology, chemistry, and biological activities of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe).

    PubMed

    Kubra, I Rahath; Rao, L Jagan Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is widely cultivated as a spice for its aromatic and pungent components. The essential oil and oleoresins from ginger are valuable products responsible for the characteristic flavor and pungency. Both are used in several food products such as soft beverages and also in many types of pharmaceutical formulations. More than 100 compounds have been reported from ginger, some of which are isolated and characterized, others are tentatively identified by GC-MS and / or LC-MS. [6]-Gingerol, the major gingerol in ginger rhizomes, has been found to possess many interesting pharmacological and physiological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and cardiotonic effects. Ginger is considered as "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) by Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA. Due to all these properties, ginger has gained considerable attention in developed countries in recent years, especially for its use in the treatment of inflammatory conditions. The present review is a persuasive presentation of the current information on processing, chemistry, biological activities, and medicinal uses of ginger. Further studies are required for the validation of the beneficial uses. Formulation for novel products and new usages may emerge in the years to come, based on the revealed results of various studies. PMID:22591340

  17. Isolation and synthesis of acmellonate, a new unsaturated long chain 2-ketol ester from Spilanthes acmella.

    PubMed

    Ley, J P; Blings, M; Krammer, G; Reinders, G; Schmidt, C-O; Bertram, H-J

    2006-07-20

    Paracress (Spilanthes acmella) is commonly used as a spice, e.g., in Madagascar. To get more information about the taste active compounds, Jambu oleoresin produced from Spilanthes acmella and extracts prepared directly from the plant were fractionated and the fractions were analysed and evaluated by tasting. In addition to the long known tingling compounds (2E,6Z,8E)-deca-2,6,8-trienoic acid N-isobutyl amide (spilanthol) and (2E,6Z,8E)-deca-2,6,8-trienoic acid N-(2-methylbutyl) amide, as a minor constituent also the new 2-ketol ester (7Z,9E)-2-oxo-undeca-7,9-dienyl 3-methylbut-2-enoate (acmellonate) was isolated. The structure of the latter compound was verified by total synthesis of the ketol ester via the reaction of tris(trimethylsilyloxy)ethene and (6Z,8E)-deca-6,8-dienoic acid chloride and subsequent classical esterification. Acmellonate shows a weak tingling and numbing effect on the tongue and contributes only to a small extend to the overall flavour of Jambu. PMID:16753916

  18. Bifunctional cis-Abienol Synthase from Abies balsamea Discovered by Transcriptome Sequencing and Its Implications for Diterpenoid Fragrance Production*

    PubMed Central

    Zerbe, Philipp; Chiang, Angela; Yuen, Macaire; Hamberger, Björn; Hamberger, Britta; Draper, Jason A.; Britton, Robert; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The labdanoid diterpene alcohol cis-abienol is a major component of the aromatic oleoresin of balsam fir (Abies balsamea) and serves as a valuable bioproduct material for the fragrance industry. Using high-throughput 454 transcriptome sequencing and metabolite profiling of balsam fir bark tissue, we identified candidate diterpene synthase sequences for full-length cDNA cloning and functional characterization. We discovered a bifunctional class I/II cis-abienol synthase (AbCAS), along with the paralogous levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase and isopimaradiene synthase, all of which are members of the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d subfamily. The AbCAS-catalyzed formation of cis-abienol proceeds via cyclization and hydroxylation at carbon C-8 of a postulated carbocation intermediate in the class II active site, followed by cleavage of the diphosphate group and termination of the reaction sequence without further cyclization in the class I active site. This reaction mechanism is distinct from that of synthases of the isopimaradiene- or levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase type, which employ deprotonation reactions in the class II active site and secondary cyclizations in the class I active site, leading to tricyclic diterpenes. Comparative homology modeling suggested the active site residues Asp-348, Leu-617, Phe-696, and Gly-723 as potentially important for the specificity of AbCAS. As a class I/II bifunctional enzyme, AbCAS is a promising target for metabolic engineering of cis-abienol production. PMID:22337889

  19. Optimization of DNA extraction and PCR protocols for phylogenetic analysis in Schinopsis spp. and related Anacardiaceae.

    PubMed

    Mogni, Virginia Y; Kahan, Mariano A; de Queiroz, Luciano Paganucci; Vesprini, José L; Ortiz, Juan Pablo A; Prado, Darién E

    2016-01-01

    The Anacardiaceae is an important and worldwide distributed family of ecological and socio-economic relevance. Notwithstanding that, molecular studies in this family are scarce and problematic because of the particularly high concentration of secondary metabolites-i.e. tannins and oleoresins-that are present in almost all tissues of the many members of the group, which complicate the purification and amplification of the DNA. The objective of this work was to improve an available DNA isolation method for Schinopsis spp. and other related Anacardiaceae, as well as the PCR protocols for DNA amplification of the chloroplast trnL-F, rps16 and ndhF and nuclear ITS-ETS fragments. The modifications proposed allowed the extraction of 70-120 µg of non-degraded genomic DNA per gram of dry tissue that resulted useful for PCR amplification. PCR reactions produced the expected fragments that could be directly sequenced. Sequence analyses of amplicons showed similarity with the corresponding Schinopsis accessions available at GenBank. The methodology presented here can be routinely applied for molecular studies of the group aimed to clarify not only aspects on the molecular biology but also the taxonomy and phylogeny of this fascinating group of vascular plants.

  20. Spices: Potential Therapeutics for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Satheeshkumar, N; Vijayan, R S K; Lingesh, A; Santhikumar, S; Vishnuvardhan, Ch

    2016-01-01

    India has traditionally been known to all over the world for spices and medicinal plants. Spices exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities. In contemporary, Indian spices are used to rustle up delicious delicacies. However, the Indian spices are more than just adjuvant which adds aroma and fragrance to foods. A few spices are very widely used and grown commercially in many countries, contain many important chemical constituents in the form of essential oil, oleoresin, oleogum, and resins, which impart flavor, pungency, and color to the prepared dishes, simultaneously exerts diverse therapeutic benefits. Ayurveda, the traditional systems of medicine in India has many evidences for the utilization of spices to cure various diseases. Some of the activities have been scientifically proven. Among various indications central nervous system disorders are of prime importance and it has been evident in traditional books and published reports that spices in fact protect and cure neuronal ailments. Likewise there are many spices found in India used for culinary purpose and have been found to have reported specific activities against brain disorders. About 400 B.C., Hippocrates rightly said "Let food be thy medicine and medicine thy food." This review focuses on the importance of spices in therapeutics and the till date scientific findings of Indian spices in CNS pharmacology and explores the potential of Indian spices to cure CNS disorders.

  1. Quality and utilization of food co-products and residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, P.; Bao, G.; Broderick, C.; Fishman, M.; Liu, L.; Onwulata, C.

    2010-06-01

    Some agricultural industries generate large amounts of low value co-products/residues, including citrus peel, sugar beet pulp and whey protein from the production of orange juice, sugar and cheese commodities, respectively. National Program #306 of the USDA Agricultural Research Service aims to characterize and enhance quality and develop new processes and uses for value-added foods and bio-based products. In parallel projects, we applied scanning microscopies to examine the molecular organization of citrus pectin gels, covalent crosslinking to reduce debonding in sugar beet pulp-PLA composites and functional modification of whey protein through extrusion in order to evaluate new methods of processing and formulating new products. Also, qualitative attributes of fresh produce that could potentially guide germ line development and crop management were explored through fluorescence imaging: synthesis and accumulation of oleoresin in habanero peppers suggest a complicated mechanism of secretion that differs from the classical scheme. Integrated imaging appears to offer significant structural insights to help understand practical properties and features of important food co-products/residues.

  2. Chemistry, technology, and nutraceutical functions of celery (Apium graveolens L.): an overview.

    PubMed

    Sowbhagya, H B

    2014-01-01

    Celery is a commercially important seed spice belonging to the family Umbelliferrae. Celery is used in various forms such as fresh herb, stalk, seeds, oil, and oleoresin for flavoring of foods and for medicinal purposes. Celery seed contains 2% volatile oil that finds application for flavoring of foods and also in perfumery industry. Limonene and selinene form about 60% and 20% of the oil, respectively. However, the important flavor constituents of the oil responsible for the typical aroma are 3-n-butyl-4-5-dihydrophthalide (sedanenolide), 3-n-butyl phthalide, sedanolide, and sedanonic anhydride present in very low levels (1-3%). Celery contains 15% fatty oil with the fatty acids: petroselenic (64.3%), oleic (8.1%), linoleic (18%), linolenic (0.6%), and palmitic acids. Phthalides especially sedanenaloide possess many health benefits. Celery extracts are reported to possess many nutraceutical properties, viz., antioxidant, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic, and anti-platelet aggregation. In the present review, the chemistry, processing, and biological activities of celery and the components responsible are discussed.

  3. Overexpression of an Isoprenyl Diphosphate Synthase in Spruce Leads to Unexpected Terpene Diversion Products That Function in Plant Defense1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Raimund; Berasategui, Aileen; Paetz, Christian; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Schmidt, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Spruce (Picea spp.) and other conifers employ terpenoid-based oleoresin as part of their defense against herbivores and pathogens. The short-chain isoprenyl diphosphate synthases (IDS) are situated at critical branch points in terpene biosynthesis, producing the precursors of the different terpenoid classes. To determine the role of IDS and to create altered terpene phenotypes for assessing the defensive role of terpenoids, we overexpressed a bifunctional spruce IDS, a geranyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase in white spruce (Picea glauca) saplings. While transcript level (350-fold), enzyme activity level (7-fold), and in planta geranyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate levels (4- to 8-fold) were significantly increased in the needles of transgenic plants, there was no increase in the major monoterpenes and diterpene acids of the resin and no change in primary isoprenoids, such as sterols, chlorophylls, and carotenoids. Instead, large amounts of geranylgeranyl fatty acid esters, known from various gymnosperm and angiosperm plant species, accumulated in needles and were shown to act defensively in reducing the performance of larvae of the nun moth (Lymantria monacha), a conifer pest in Eurasia. These results show the impact of overexpression of an IDS and the defensive role of an unexpected accumulation product of terpenoid biosynthesis with the potential for a broader function in plant protection. PMID:24346420

  4. In vivo 13C NMR metabolite profiling: potential for understanding and assessing conifer seed quality.

    PubMed

    Terskikh, Victor V; Feurtado, J Allan; Borchardt, Shane; Giblin, Michael; Abrams, Suzanne R; Kermode, Allison R

    2005-08-01

    High-resolution 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy was used to profile a range of primary and secondary metabolites in vivo in intact whole seeds of eight different conifer species native to North America, including six of the Pinaceae family and two of the Cupressaceae family. In vivo 13C NMR provided information on the total seed oil content and fatty acid composition of the major storage lipids in a non-destructive manner. In addition, a number of monoterpenes were identified in the 13C NMR spectra of conifer seeds containing oleoresin; these compounds showed marked variability in individual seeds of Pacific silver fir within the same seed lot. In imbibed conifer seeds, the 13C NMR spectra showed the presence of considerable amounts of dissolved sucrose presumed to play a protective role in the desiccation-tolerance of seeds. The free amino acids arginine and asparagine, generated as a result of storage protein mobilization, were detected in vivo during seed germination and early seedling growth. The potential for NMR to profile metabolites in a non-destructive manner in single conifer seeds and seed populations is discussed. It is a powerful tool to evaluate seed quality because of its ability to assess reserve accumulation during seed development or at seed maturity; it can also be used to monitor reserve mobilization, which is critical for seedling emergence. PMID:15996983

  5. Milks pigmentation with astaxanthin and determination of colour stability during short period cold storage.

    PubMed

    Mezquita, Pedro Cerezal; Huerta, Blanca E Barragán; Ramírez, Jenifer C Palma; Hinojosa, Claudia P Ortíz

    2015-03-01

    Astaxanthin has been used as a colorant and antioxidant with excellent results, its application and stability in food matrices to human consumption has been little studied. The aim of this work was the incorporation of astaxanthin oleoresin to milks with different fat content, simulating the red-orange color that can impart apricot fruit. For astaxanthin determination by HPLC, a methodology was implemented for its extraction from the food matrix, followed by saponification with KOH. Milk samples were stored (5 ± 2 °C) and stability of color and astaxanthin content were determined by colorimetry and high performance liquid chromatography each 24 h for a week. Pigment degradation followed first-order kinetic with a constant degradation of 0.259 day(-1) and 0.104 day(-1), in whole and semi-skimmed milk, respectively. Chromaticity coordinates L*, a*, b* for different types of milk showed a low dispersion of their values during the storage time, indicating high stability of astaxanthin within the matrix. PMID:25745234

  6. Genome organisation and expression profiling of ABC protein-encoding genes in Heterobasidion annosum s.l. complex.

    PubMed

    Baral, Bikash; Kovalchuk, Andriy; Asiegbu, Fred O

    2016-03-01

    Members of Heterobasidion annosum species complex are widely regarded as the most destructive fungal pathogens of conifer trees in the boreal and temperate zones of Northern hemisphere. To invade and colonise their host trees, Heterobasidion fungi must overcome components of host chemical defence, including terpenoid oleoresin and phenolic compounds. ABC transporters may play an important role in this process participating in the export of toxic host metabolites and maintaining their intracellular concentration below the critical level. We have identified and phylogenetically classified Heterobasidion genes encoding ABC transporters and closely related ABC proteins. The number of ABC proteins in the Heterobasidion genome is one of the lowest among analysed species of Agaricomycotina. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we have analysed transcriptional response of Heterobasidion ABC transporter-encoding genes to monoterpenes as well as their expression profile during growth on pine wood in comparison to the growth on defined media. Several ABC transporters were up-regulated during growth on pine wood. The ABC-transporter encoding gene ABCG1.1 was induced both during growth of H. annosum on pine wood and upon exposure to monoterpenes. Our experimental data demonstrate the differential responses of Heterobasidion ABC genes to growth conditions and chemical stressors. The presented results suggest a potential role of Heterobasidion ABC-G transporters in the resistance to the components of conifer chemical defence. PMID:26895866

  7. Spices: Potential Therapeutics for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Satheeshkumar, N; Vijayan, R S K; Lingesh, A; Santhikumar, S; Vishnuvardhan, Ch

    2016-01-01

    India has traditionally been known to all over the world for spices and medicinal plants. Spices exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities. In contemporary, Indian spices are used to rustle up delicious delicacies. However, the Indian spices are more than just adjuvant which adds aroma and fragrance to foods. A few spices are very widely used and grown commercially in many countries, contain many important chemical constituents in the form of essential oil, oleoresin, oleogum, and resins, which impart flavor, pungency, and color to the prepared dishes, simultaneously exerts diverse therapeutic benefits. Ayurveda, the traditional systems of medicine in India has many evidences for the utilization of spices to cure various diseases. Some of the activities have been scientifically proven. Among various indications central nervous system disorders are of prime importance and it has been evident in traditional books and published reports that spices in fact protect and cure neuronal ailments. Likewise there are many spices found in India used for culinary purpose and have been found to have reported specific activities against brain disorders. About 400 B.C., Hippocrates rightly said "Let food be thy medicine and medicine thy food." This review focuses on the importance of spices in therapeutics and the till date scientific findings of Indian spices in CNS pharmacology and explores the potential of Indian spices to cure CNS disorders. PMID:27651248

  8. In vitro cytotoxic screening of selected Saudi medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Almehdar, Hussein; Abdallah, Hossam M; Osman, Abdel-Moneim M; Abdel-Sattar, Essam A

    2012-04-01

    Many natural products from plants have been identified to exert anticancer activity. It might be expected to be a challenge to look at the Saudi plants in order to discover new sources for new molecules which may have anticancer activity. The methanolic extracts of forty species of plants traditionally used in Saudi Arabia for the treatment of a variety of diseases were tested in vitro for their potential anticancer activity on different human cancer cell lines. The cytotoxic activity of the methanolic extracts of the tested plants were determined using three human cancer cell lines, namely, breast cancer (MCF7), hepatocellular carcinoma (HEPG2), and cervix cancer (HELA) cells. In addition, human normal melanocyte (HFB4) was used as normal nonmalignant cells. Sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay was used to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxic activity of the different extracts. The growth inhibition of 50% (IC(50)) for each extract was calculated from the optical density of treated and untreated cells. Doxorubicin, a broad-spectrum anticancer drug, was used as the positive control. Nine plant extracts were chosen for further fractionation based on their activity and availability. Interesting cytotoxic activity was observed for Hypoestes forskaolii, Withania somnifera, Solanum glabratum, Adenium obesum, Pistacia vera oleoresin, Caralluma quadrangula, Eulophia petersii, Phragmanthera austroarabica, and Asparagus officinalis. Other extracts showed poor activity. PMID:21953271

  9. Genome and transcriptome analyses of the mountain pine beetle-fungal symbiont Grosmannia clavigera, a lodgepole pine pathogen.

    PubMed

    DiGuistini, Scott; Wang, Ye; Liao, Nancy Y; Taylor, Greg; Tanguay, Philippe; Feau, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Chan, Simon K; Hesse-Orce, Uljana; Alamouti, Sepideh Massoumi; Tsui, Clement K M; Docking, Roderick T; Levasseur, Anthony; Haridas, Sajeet; Robertson, Gordon; Birol, Inanc; Holt, Robert A; Marra, Marco A; Hamelin, Richard C; Hirst, Martin; Jones, Steven J M; Bohlmann, Jörg; Breuil, Colette

    2011-02-01

    In western North America, the current outbreak of the mountain pine beetle (MPB) and its microbial associates has destroyed wide areas of lodgepole pine forest, including more than 16 million hectares in British Columbia. Grosmannia clavigera (Gc), a critical component of the outbreak, is a symbiont of the MPB and a pathogen of pine trees. To better understand the interactions between Gc, MPB, and lodgepole pine hosts, we sequenced the ∼30-Mb Gc genome and assembled it into 18 supercontigs. We predict 8,314 protein-coding genes, and support the gene models with proteome, expressed sequence tag, and RNA-seq data. We establish that Gc is heterothallic, and report evidence for repeat-induced point mutation. We report insights, from genome and transcriptome analyses, into how Gc tolerates conifer-defense chemicals, including oleoresin terpenoids, as they colonize a host tree. RNA-seq data indicate that terpenoids induce a substantial antimicrobial stress in Gc, and suggest that the fungus may detoxify these chemicals by using them as a carbon source. Terpenoid treatment strongly activated a ∼100-kb region of the Gc genome that contains a set of genes that may be important for detoxification of these host-defense chemicals. This work is a major step toward understanding the biological interactions between the tripartite MPB/fungus/forest system.

  10. Evaluation of less-lethal characteristics of a chemical delivery system for use by prison and corrections departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadros, Jaime H.

    1998-12-01

    The use of high pressure water streams to disperse crowds, in general, and to subdue unruly individuals in a prison environment has been shown to be an effective way to reduce the severity of the confrontations among the inmates and guards. The less lethal chemical delivery system (Hydro-Force) disperses chemicals, such as oleoresin capsicum or 'pepper spray' (OC), in the high pressure water stream. The high pressure water stream is aimed to impact the target individuals. A close miss overhead is still very effective as the water mixture can 'ran' on them and soak the target individuals. The effect of the OC is multiplied by the whole body exposure with excellent results in stopping any undesirable behavior of the target individuals, without bodily contact or struggle with the guards. The possibility of producing blunt trauma damage by the impact of the water stream, at close range, was a concern to be investigated. The water stream can be considered as a special fluid kinetic energy projectile. At impact, the kinetic energy of the mass and velocity of the stream of water is dissipated and its momentum is transferred to the target. The purpose of this cursory study is to evaluate whether the physiological effects of this impact is below the threshold of damage or lethality. Comparisons are made, where the two crucial elements, the force coupled to the target and the duration of its application, in order to establish the probably level of blunt trauma associated with the use of the water jet.

  11. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives and contaminants, with a view to recommending Acceptable Daily Intakes (ADIs) and tolerable intakes, respectively, and to prepare specifications for the identity and purity of food additives. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of food additives and contaminants (including flavouring agents), and the establishment and revision of specifications. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological data on various specific food additives (furfural, paprika oleoresin, caramel colour II, cochineal extract, carmines, aspartame-acesulfame salt, D-tagatose, benzoyl peroxide, nitrous oxide, stearyl tartrate and trehalose), flavouring agents and contaminants (cadmium and tin), and of intake data on calcium from calcium salts of food additives. Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for ADIs of the food additives and tolerable intakes of the contaminants considered, changes in the status of specifications of these food additives and specific flavouring agents, and further information required or desired.

  12. Christmas tree allergy: mould and pollen studies.

    PubMed

    Wyse, D M; Malloch, D

    1970-12-01

    A history of respiratory or other allergic symptoms during the Christmas season is occasionally obtained from allergic patients and can be related to exposure to conifers at home or in school. Incidence and mechanism of production of these symptoms were studied. Of 1657 allergic patients, respiratory and skin allergies to conifers occurred in 7%. This seasonal syndrome includes sneezing, wheezing and transitory skin rashes. The majority of patients develop their disease within 24 hours, but 15% experience symptoms after several days' delay. Mould and pollen studies were carried out in 10 test sites before, during and after tree placement in the home. Scrapings from pine and spruce bark yielded large numbers of Penicillium, Epicoccum and Alternaria, but these failed to become airborne. No significant alteration was discovered in the airborne fungi in houses when trees were present. Pollen studies showed release into air of weed, grass and tree pollens while Christmas trees were in the house. Oleoresins of the tree balsam are thought to be the most likely cause of the symptoms designated as Christmas tree allergy.

  13. Comparative transcriptome analysis of ginger variety Suprabha from two different agro-climatic zones of Odisha.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Mahendra; Das, Aradhana; Sahoo, Rajesh Kumar; Mohanty, Sujata; Joshi, Raj Kumar; Subudhi, Enketeswara

    2016-09-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.), a well-known member of family Zingiberaceae, is bestowed with number of medicinal properties which is because of the secondary metabolites, essential oil and oleoresin, it contains in its rhizome. The drug yielding potential is known to depend on agro-climatic conditions prevailing at the place cultivation. Present study deals with comparative transcriptome analysis of two sample of elite ginger variety Suprabha collected from two different agro-climatic zones of Odisha. Transcriptome assembly for both the samples was done using next generation sequencing methodology. The raw data of size 10.8 and 11.8 GB obtained from analysis of two rhizomes S1Z4 and S2Z5 collected from Bhubaneswar and Koraput and are available in NCBI accession number SAMN03761169 and SAMN03761176 respectively. We identified 60,452 and 54,748 transcripts using trinity tool respectively from ginger rhizome of S1Z4 and S2Z5. The transcript length varied from 300 bp to 15,213 bp and 8988 bp and N50 value of 1415 bp and 1334 bp respectively for S1Z4 and S2Z5. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome analysis of elite ginger cultivars Suprabha from two different agro-climatic conditions of Odisha, India which will help to understand the effect of agro-climatic conditions on differential expression of secondary metabolites. PMID:27408809

  14. Growth performance and endogenous losses of broilers fed wheat-based diets with and without essential oils and xylanase supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pirgozliev, V; Bravo, D; Mirza, M W; Rose, S P

    2015-06-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare the effect of a supplementary mixture of essential oils, with and without exogenous xylanase, on performance, carcass composition, dietary nitrogen (N)-corrected apparent metabolizable energy (AMEn), dry matter retention (DMR), N retention (NR), fat digestibility (FD) coefficients, and endogenous mucin losses (measured as sialic acid, SA) when fed to broiler chickens. Three hundred male Ross 308 broilers in total were reared in floor pens from 0 to 21 d of age. Birds were fed 1 of 3 wheat-based diets: basal diet (215 g/kg CP, 12.12 MJ/kg AME) with either no additive (control diet; C) or 100 g/tonne of a standardized combination of 5% carvacrol, 3% cinnamaldehyde, and 2% capsicum oleoresin (diet XT); or a combination of XT and commercial xylanase enzyme at a rate of 100 g of XT and 2,000 units (U) of xylanase/kg (diet XYL), respectively. Each diet was randomly allocated to 10 pens with 10 birds. Feeding XT and XYL diets improved birds' growth performance (P<0.05). Birds fed XT and XYL diets had an improved caloric conversion ratio (P<0.05) and consumed 1.3 MJ less AMEn per kilogram of growth compared to birds fed the control diet only. Feeding XT improved only the dietary FD coefficient (P<0.05) compared to control-fed birds, but the dietary FD coefficient did not differ for XYL diet (P>0.05). Birds fed XYL diet excreted 35% less endogenous mucin compared to control-fed birds (P<0.05). Birds fed XT alone gained more carcass protein than the control-fed birds (P<0.05) but did not differ from the birds fed XYL diet (P>0.05). There was no indication of a negative interaction between dietary essential oils and xylanase.

  15. Evolution of conifer diterpene synthases: diterpene resin acid biosynthesis in lodgepole pine and jack pine involves monofunctional and bifunctional diterpene synthases.

    PubMed

    Hall, Dawn E; Zerbe, Philipp; Jancsik, Sharon; Quesada, Alfonso Lara; Dullat, Harpreet; Madilao, Lina L; Yuen, Macaire; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2013-02-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are major components of pine (Pinus spp.) oleoresin. They play critical roles in conifer defense against insects and pathogens and as a renewable resource for industrial bioproducts. The core structures of DRAs are formed in secondary (i.e. specialized) metabolism via cycloisomerization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) by diterpene synthases (diTPSs). Previously described gymnosperm diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze the initial bicyclization of GGPP followed by rearrangement of a (+)-copalyl diphosphate intermediate at two discrete class II and class I active sites. In contrast, similar diterpenes of gibberellin primary (i.e. general) metabolism are produced by the consecutive activity of two monofunctional class II and class I diTPSs. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we discovered 11 diTPS from jack pine (Pinus banksiana) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). Three of these were orthologous to known conifer bifunctional levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthases. Surprisingly, two sets of orthologous PbdiTPSs and PcdiTPSs were monofunctional class I enzymes that lacked functional class II active sites and converted (+)-copalyl diphosphate, but not GGPP, into isopimaradiene and pimaradiene as major products. Diterpene profiles and transcriptome sequences of lodgepole pine and jack pine are consistent with roles for these diTPSs in DRA biosynthesis. The monofunctional class I diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis form a new clade within the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d3 subfamily that evolved from bifunctional diTPS rather than monofunctional enzymes (TPS-c and TPS-e) of gibberellin metabolism. Homology modeling suggested alterations in the class I active site that may have contributed to their functional specialization relative to other conifer diTPSs. PMID:23370714

  16. Resin duct characteristics associated with tree resistance to bark beetles across lodgepole and limber pines.

    PubMed

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Kane, Jeffrey M; Mitton, Jeffry B

    2014-04-01

    Bark beetles have recently killed billions of trees, yet conifer defenses are formidable and some trees resist attack. A primary anti-insect defense of pines is oleoresin from a system of resin ducts throughout the tree. Resin defense traits are heritable, and evidence suggests that resin duct characteristics are associated with resistance to insects. However, comparisons of resin ducts in trees killed by bark beetles to trees that resisted attack are unavailable. We compared vertical resin duct characteristics (number, density, and size) and growth rates from trees that were "resistant" (survived mass attack) versus "susceptible" (killed by attack) to bark beetles in lodgepole (Pinus contorta) and limber (Pinus flexilis) pines. Resistant trees of both species had significantly more resin ducts in recent growth than susceptible trees. Discriminant analysis (DA) correctly categorized 84% of lodgepole and 92% of limber pines as susceptible/resistant based on combinations of resin duct and growth characteristics from recent 5- through 20-year growth intervals. DA models using measures from only the most recent 5 years of growth correctly categorized 72 and 81% of lodgepole and limber pines, respectively. Comparing resistant to susceptible trees independent of species identity led to the correct categorization of 82% of trees based on factors from 5- to 20-year intervals, and 73% of trees using only resin duct counts from the most recent 5 years. We conclude that resin duct characteristics can be used to assess tree resistance to bark beetles across pine species, and offer a metric for management to enhance pest resistance. PMID:24305863

  17. Toxic carriers in pepper sprays may cause corneal erosion.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Juha M; Moilanen, Jukka A O; Hack, Tapani; Tervo, Timo M T

    2003-02-01

    We describe four patients who developed corneal erosion after an exposure to a pepper spray containing toxic carriers. Two of these patients were exposed to a pepper gas containing 5% oleoresin capsicum (OC) as an irritant and 92% trichlorethylene or unknown amount of dichloromethane as a carrier. One patient was exposed to a mock (containing 92% trichlorethylene as a carrier) training pepper gas without OC. The fourth patient was exposed to an unidentified Russian pepper gas spray. Two of the patients were examined by in vivo confocal microscopy to demonstrate the depth and quality of the stromal damage. To test the toxicity of the commercial tear spray, it was analyzed and test sprayed on a soft contact lens and into a plastic cup. Visual acuity was measured and the eyes were examined with a slit-lamp up to 5 months. Physical damage to a soft contact lens was visually acquired. All patients showed a long-lasting, deep corneal and conjuctival erosion, which resolved partly with medical therapy during the following weeks/months. Confocal microscopy revealed corneal nerve damage, and keratocyte activation reaching two-thirds of stroma for one patient. The spray caused serious damage to both the soft contact lens and the plastic cup. The safety of the commercially available pepper sprays should be assessed before marketing, and a list of acceptable ingredients created. The sprays should also have instructions on the use of the compound as well as on the first aid measures after the exposure. Solvents known to be toxic should not be used.

  18. Anti-coccidial effect of Commiphora molmol in the domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus domesticus L.).

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Hanadi B; Al-Mathal, Ebtesam M

    2010-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of oleo-gum-resin of Commiphora monlmol Engler (Family: Burceraceae) known as Myrrh and the commercial extract known as Mirazid as a treatment against hepatic coccidiosis induced by the parasite Eimeria stiedae in domestic rabbits. Rabbits were infected with 1000 parasite sporulated oocysts and subjected to two treatment regimens, using crude myrrh suspension and the oleo-resin extract, mirazid, each administered at 500 mg/kg rabbit body weight. Treatments of infected rabbits resulted in significant reduction of the mean oocyst numbers in rabbit faeces by 52.38% in the crude-treated rabbits and by 90.90% mirazid-treated rabbits, compared to the untreated infected rabbits at day 21 post-infection (pi). At day 28 pi no oocysts parasite were observed in the faeces of rabbits. Both treatments resulted in significant recovery of infected rabbits from all symptoms of infection compared to the untreated infected group and healthy control groups. Histopathological examination of liver showed remarkable improvement in all histopathological parameters in G5 and G8 compared with the infected untreated G2. These included an almost complete healing of the hemorrhagic tissue and partial healing of the endothelial lining and hepatocytes encircling the central vein, the hepatocytes laminate regained their original radial shape and disappearance of fat vacuoles from the tissue and remarkable reduction in lymphocytes infiltration, decreased hyperplasia of the epithelial cells with significant decreasing of the parasite stage numbers. Results also indicate that mirazid was more effective than crude myrrh, probably due to higher content of purified active ingredients. PMID:21268535

  19. Efficacy of Myrrh in the treatment of schistosomiasis (haematobium and mansoni) in Ezbet El-Bakly, Tamyia Center, El-Fayoum Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abo-Madyan, Ahmed A; Morsy, Tosson A; Motawea, Saad M

    2004-08-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a public health problem in Egypt, despite the continuous control effort. Most of the anti-schistosomal drugs have deleterious side effects or low efficacy. This necessitates a search for new safe and effective drug. A field survey was done in Ezbet El-Bakly (Tamyia Center) El-Fayoum Governorate to determine the magnitude of schistosomiasis haematobium and mansoni and to evaluate the efficacy of Mirazid (the oleo-resin extract from Myrrh of Commiphora molmol tree, family: Burseraceae) in the treatment of both types of schistosomiasis. Among the 1019 individuals parasitologically examined, the prevalence of S. haematobium and S. mansoni were 4.2% and 2.4% respectively and the geometric mean egg count (GMEC) were 33.2 eggs/10 ml urine and 113.3 eggs/gram stools. Most of the patients with haematobiasis and mansoniasis were <15 years (56.4% & 53.8%), males (56.4% & 53.8%) & illiterates (46.2% & 46.2%). All cases were treated by Myrrh (Mirazid) as two capsules (600 mg) on an empty stomach an hour before breakfast for six consecutive days and were followed up clinically and parasitologically by urine analysis by the sedimentation and nucleopore techniques and by hatching test and by stool analysis by sedimentation and Kato-Katz techniques and by hatching test. The parasitological cure rate after three months was 97.4% and 96.2% for S. haematobium and S. mansoni cases with the marvelous clinical cure without any side-effects. Patients not completely responded to a single course of treatment showed marked reduction of egg intensity. It is concluded that Mirazid proved to be safe and very effective in treatment of S. haematobium and S. mansoni infections under field conditions. PMID:15287168

  20. The pathology of lethal exposure to the Riot Control Agents: towards a forensics-based methodology for determining misuse.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Sadik; Ersoy, Gokhan; Hart, John; Clevestig, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this is to review deaths associated with the use of Riot Control Agents (RCAs) and to assess how the presenting pathologies is such cases may better inform cause of death conclusions upon autopsy. We also sought to present which additional steps should be added to the Minnesota protocol and the European harmonization of medico-legal autopsy rules in suspected cases of deaths associated with the use of RCAs. We included 10 lethal cases in our study. In three cases, RCAs were found to be the sole cause of death, in three cases RCAs were ruled a secondary cause of death due asphyxia or asthma subsequent to exposure to RCAs and in four cases RCAs were contributory factors to death. In three cases the responsible agents were identified as Chloroacetophenone (CN), Chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS) and Oleoresin capsicum (OC) and in the remaining 7 cases, the agent was OC alone. As there are no specific findings in suspected cases of death associated with RCA use, establishing cause of death and whether RCAs are the sole cause or only a contributory factor will be based on the elimination of other possible causes of death. For this reason, a specifically structured autopsy is essential. This specifically structured autopsy should contain basic principles of the Minnesota Protocol and the European harmonization of medico-legal autopsy rules with the following additional steps taken: examination of clothing, eyes, and skin; examination of pharyngeal, tracheobronchial, and eusophegeal mucosas; and a thorough recording of the steps taken by the party conducting the arrest, including other possible causes of in-custody death, as well as a detailed medical history of the deceased.

  1. Evolution of Diterpene Metabolism: Sitka Spruce CYP720B4 Catalyzes Multiple Oxidations in Resin Acid Biosynthesis of Conifer Defense against Insects1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hamberger, Björn; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Hamberger, Britta; Séguin, Armand; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are specialized (secondary) metabolites of the oleoresin defense of conifers produced by diterpene synthases and cytochrome P450s of the CYP720B family. The evolution of DRA metabolism shares common origins with the biosynthesis of ent-kaurenoic acid, which is highly conserved in general (primary) metabolism of gibberellin biosynthesis. Transcriptome mining in species of spruce (Picea) and pine (Pinus) revealed CYP720Bs of four distinct clades. We cloned a comprehensive set of 12 different Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) CYP720Bs as full-length cDNAs. Spatial expression profiles, methyl jasmonate induction, and transcript enrichment in terpenoid-producing resin ducts suggested a role of CYP720B4 in DRA biosynthesis. CYP720B4 was characterized as a multisubstrate, multifunctional enzyme by the formation of oxygenated diterpenoids in metabolically engineered yeast, yeast in vivo transformation of diterpene substrates, in vitro assays with CYP720B4 protein produced in Escherichia coli, and alteration of DRA profiles in RNA interference-suppressed spruce seedlings. CYP720B4 was active with 24 different diterpenoid substrates, catalyzing consecutive C-18 oxidations in the biosynthesis of an array of diterpene alcohols, aldehydes, and acids. CYP720B4 was most active in the formation of dehydroabietic acid, a compound associated with insect resistance of Sitka spruce. We identified patterns of convergent evolution of CYP720B4 in DRA metabolism and ent-kaurene oxidase CYP701 in gibberellin metabolism and revealed differences in the evolution of specialized and general diterpene metabolism in a gymnosperm. The genomic and functional characterization of the gymnosperm CYP720B family highlights that the evolution of specialized metabolism involves substantial diversification relative to conserved, general metabolism. PMID:21994349

  2. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Functional Lipophilic Compounds from Arthrospira platensis.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Hernández, Diego A; López, Víctor H; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José; Alemán-Nava, Gibrán S; Cuéllar-Bermúdez, Sara P; Rostro-Alanis, Magdalena; Parra-Saldívar, Roberto

    2016-05-05

    Arthrospira platensis biomass was used in order to obtain functional lipophilic compounds through green extraction technologies such as supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction (SFE) and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). The temperature (T) factor was evaluated for MAE, while for SFE, pressure (P), temperature (T), and co-solvent (ethanol) (CS) were evaluated. The maximum extraction yield of the obtained oleoresin was (4.07% ± 0.14%) and (4.27% ± 0.10%) for SFE and MAE, respectively. Extracts were characterized by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). The maximum contents of functional lipophilic compounds in the SFE and MAE extracts were: for carotenoids 283 ± 0.10 μg/g and 629 ± 0.13 μg/g, respectively; for tocopherols 5.01 ± 0.05 μg/g and 2.46 ± 0.09 μg/g, respectively; and for fatty acids 34.76 ± 0.08 mg/g and 15.88 ± 0.06 mg/g, respectively. In conclusion, the SFE process at P 450 bar, T 60 °C and CS 53.33% of CO₂ produced the highest yield of tocopherols, carotenoids and fatty acids. The MAE process at 400 W and 50 °C gives the best extracts in terms of tocopherols and carotenoids. For yield and fatty acids, the MAE process at 400 W and 70 °C produced the highest values. Both SFE and MAE showed to be suitable green extraction technologies for obtaining functional lipophilic compounds from Arthrospira platensis.

  3. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Functional Lipophilic Compounds from Arthrospira platensis

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Hernández, Diego A.; López, Víctor H.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José; Alemán-Nava, Gibrán S.; Cuéllar-Bermúdez, Sara P.; Rostro-Alanis, Magdalena; Parra-Saldívar, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Arthrospira platensis biomass was used in order to obtain functional lipophilic compounds through green extraction technologies such as supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction (SFE) and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). The temperature (T) factor was evaluated for MAE, while for SFE, pressure (P), temperature (T), and co-solvent (ethanol) (CS) were evaluated. The maximum extraction yield of the obtained oleoresin was (4.07% ± 0.14%) and (4.27% ± 0.10%) for SFE and MAE, respectively. Extracts were characterized by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). The maximum contents of functional lipophilic compounds in the SFE and MAE extracts were: for carotenoids 283 ± 0.10 μg/g and 629 ± 0.13 μg/g, respectively; for tocopherols 5.01 ± 0.05 μg/g and 2.46 ± 0.09 μg/g, respectively; and for fatty acids 34.76 ± 0.08 mg/g and 15.88 ± 0.06 mg/g, respectively. In conclusion, the SFE process at P 450 bar, T 60 °C and CS 53.33% of CO2 produced the highest yield of tocopherols, carotenoids and fatty acids. The MAE process at 400 W and 50 °C gives the best extracts in terms of tocopherols and carotenoids. For yield and fatty acids, the MAE process at 400 W and 70 °C produced the highest values. Both SFE and MAE showed to be suitable green extraction technologies for obtaining functional lipophilic compounds from Arthrospira platensis. PMID:27164081

  4. Evolution of diterpene metabolism: Sitka spruce CYP720B4 catalyzes multiple oxidations in resin acid biosynthesis of conifer defense against insects.

    PubMed

    Hamberger, Björn; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Hamberger, Britta; Séguin, Armand; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are specialized (secondary) metabolites of the oleoresin defense of conifers produced by diterpene synthases and cytochrome P450s of the CYP720B family. The evolution of DRA metabolism shares common origins with the biosynthesis of ent-kaurenoic acid, which is highly conserved in general (primary) metabolism of gibberellin biosynthesis. Transcriptome mining in species of spruce (Picea) and pine (Pinus) revealed CYP720Bs of four distinct clades. We cloned a comprehensive set of 12 different Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) CYP720Bs as full-length cDNAs. Spatial expression profiles, methyl jasmonate induction, and transcript enrichment in terpenoid-producing resin ducts suggested a role of CYP720B4 in DRA biosynthesis. CYP720B4 was characterized as a multisubstrate, multifunctional enzyme by the formation of oxygenated diterpenoids in metabolically engineered yeast, yeast in vivo transformation of diterpene substrates, in vitro assays with CYP720B4 protein produced in Escherichia coli, and alteration of DRA profiles in RNA interference-suppressed spruce seedlings. CYP720B4 was active with 24 different diterpenoid substrates, catalyzing consecutive C-18 oxidations in the biosynthesis of an array of diterpene alcohols, aldehydes, and acids. CYP720B4 was most active in the formation of dehydroabietic acid, a compound associated with insect resistance of Sitka spruce. We identified patterns of convergent evolution of CYP720B4 in DRA metabolism and ent-kaurene oxidase CYP701 in gibberellin metabolism and revealed differences in the evolution of specialized and general diterpene metabolism in a gymnosperm. The genomic and functional characterization of the gymnosperm CYP720B family highlights that the evolution of specialized metabolism involves substantial diversification relative to conserved, general metabolism. PMID:21994349

  5. Immunofluorescence localization of levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase in methyl jasmonate treated stems of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) shows activation of diterpenoid biosynthesis in cortical and developing traumatic resin ducts.

    PubMed

    Zulak, Katherine G; Dullat, Harpreet K; Keeling, Christopher I; Lippert, Dustin; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2010-10-01

    Conifers produce terpenoid-rich oleoresin in specialized resin ducts as a main line of defence against pests and pathogens. In spruce species (Picea spp.), axial resin ducts are either present constitutively in the cortex tissue (cortical resin ducts, CRDs) or are formed de novo as traumatic resin ducts (TRDs) in the cambial zone upon attack by insects, fungi or treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Using immunofluorescence localization we tested if previously formed CRDs respond to MeJA treatment with increased capacity for diterpenoid biosynthesis. We also tested the dynamics of diterpene synthase localization in the cambial zone. Immunofluorescence localization was performed using an antibody against a diterpene synthase, levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase (LAS), in stem cross-sections of untreated and 0.1% MeJA-treated 4-year old Sitka spruce (P. sitchensis) trees. No fluorescence signal was observed in untreated stem cross-sections; however, signal was present 2 days after treatment with MeJA exclusively in the epithelial cells of CRDs. Fluorescence steadily increased in the CRD epithelial cells 4 and 8 days after treatment. At 8days, additional fluorescence was observed in developing epithelial cells of traumatic resin ducts TRDs in the cambial zone. These results confirm that resin duct epithelial cells are the main site of diterpene biosynthesis in Sitka spruce, diterpenoid biosynthesis is induced in CRD epithelial cells early upon treatment with MeJA, and immature developing TRD epithelial cells produce diterpene synthase enzyme. Overall, the results of this work improve our understanding of spatial and temporal patterns of induced diterpene resin acid biosynthesis in conifers.

  6. An integrated genomic, proteomic and biochemical analysis of (+)-3-carene biosynthesis in Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) genotypes that are resistant or susceptible to white pine weevil.

    PubMed

    Hall, Dawn E; Robert, Jeanne A; Keeling, Christopher I; Domanski, Dominik; Quesada, Alfonso Lara; Jancsik, Sharon; Kuzyk, Michael A; Hamberger, Britta; Borchers, Christoph H; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2011-03-01

    Conifers are extremely long-lived plants that have evolved complex chemical defenses in the form of oleoresin terpenoids to resist attack from pathogens and herbivores. In these species, terpenoid diversity is determined by the size and composition of the terpene synthase (TPS) gene family and the single- and multi-product profiles of these enzymes. The monoterpene (+)-3-carene is associated with resistance of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) to white pine weevil (Pissodes strobi). We used a combined genomic, proteomic and biochemical approach to analyze the (+)-3-carene phenotype in two contrasting Sitka spruce genotypes. Resistant trees produced significantly higher levels of (+)-3-carene than susceptible trees, in which only trace amounts were detected. Biosynthesis of (+)-3-carene is controlled, at the genome level, by a small family of closely related (+)-3-carene synthase (PsTPS-3car) genes (82-95% amino acid sequence identity). Transcript profiling identified one PsTPS-3car gene (PsTPS-3car1) that is expressed in both genotypes, one gene (PsTPS-3car2) that is expressed only in resistant trees, and one gene (PsTPS-3car3) that is expressed only in susceptible trees. The PsTPS-3car2 gene was not detected in genomic DNA of susceptible trees. Target-specific selected reaction monitoring confirmed this pattern of differential expression of members of the PsTPS-3car family at the proteome level. Kinetic characterization of the recombinant PsTPS-3car enzymes identified differences in the activities of PsTPS-3car2 and PsTPS-3car3 as a factor contributing to the different (+)-3-carene profiles of resistant and susceptible trees. In conclusion, variation of the (+)-3-carene phenotype is controlled by copy number variation of PsTPS-3car genes, variation of gene and protein expression, and variation in catalytic efficiencies.

  7. Sulphur-containing compounds in the essential oil of Ferula alliacea roots and their mass spectral fragmentation patterns.

    PubMed

    Kasaian, Jamal; Asili, Javad; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2016-10-01

    Context GC-MS analysis is the best way to characterize volatile sulphur-containing compounds. Ferula (Apiaceae) is a genus of perennial herbs. Due to the occurrence of essential oils or oleoresins in the Ferula species, these plants usually possess strong aromatic scent. Terpenoid compounds were the most abundant constituents of Ferula oils, however, in some of Ferula species, the essential oils were dominated by volatile sulphur-containing compounds. Objectives Ferula alliacea Boiss. is considered one of the sources of the oleo-gum-resin asafoetida. In this study, we analyzed the hydrodistilled essential oil from its dried roots and provide new data about retention indices and mass fragmentation patterns of some volatile sulphur-containing compounds that are useful for future studies on this class of compounds. Materials and methods The roots of F. alliacea were collected during the flowering stage of plant, from Bezgh, Kashmar to Neishabour road, Khorasan-Razavi province, Iran, in June 2012. The oil was obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger apparatus and analyzed by GC-MS. Results This is the first report on phytochemical analysis of F. alliacea roots. Seventy-six components, representing 99.5% of the oil, were characterized. The major components were 10-epi-γ-eudesmol (22.3%), valerianol (12.5%), hinesol (8.3%), guaiol (7.3%) and Z-propenyl-sec-butyl trisulphide (6.5%). Predominant mass fragment ions of the identified sulphur-containing compounds are explained in this paper. Conclusion The volatile oil of F. alliacea mostly contains oxygenated sesquiterpenes, however, its odour was dominated by sulphur-containing compounds. The most abundant sulphur-containing compound includes Z-propenyl-sec-butyl trisulphide (6.5%).

  8. Black pepper and health claims: a comprehensive treatise.

    PubMed

    Butt, Masood Sadiq; Pasha, Imran; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Randhawa, Muhammad Atif; Saeed, Farhan; Ahmed, Waqas

    2013-01-01

    For millennia, spices have been an integral part of human diets and commerce. Recently, the widespread recognition of diet-health linkages bolsters their dietary importance. The bioactive components present in them are of considerable significance owing to their therapeutic potential against various ailments. They provide physiological benefits or prevent chronic ailment in addition to the fundamental nutrition and often included in the category of functional foods. Black pepper (Piper Nigrum L.) is an important healthy food owing to its antioxidant, antimicrobial potential and gastro-protective modules. Black pepper, with piperine as an active ingredient, holds rich phytochemistry that also includes volatile oil, oleoresins, and alkaloids. More recently, cell-culture studies and animal modeling predicted the role of black pepper against number of maladies. The free-radical scavenging activity of black pepper and its active ingredients might be helpful in chemoprevention and controlling progression of tumor growth. Additionally, the key alkaloid components of Piper Nigrum, that is, piperine assist in cognitive brain functioning, boost nutrient's absorption and improve gastrointestinal functionality. In this comprehensive treatise, efforts are made to elucidate the antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, gastro-protective, and antidepressant activities of black pepper. Moreover, the synergistic interaction of black pepper with different drugs and nutrients is the limelight of the manuscript. However, the aforementioned health-promoting benefits associated with black pepper are proven in animal modeling. Thus, there is a need to conduct controlled randomized trials in human subjects, cohort studies, and meta-analyses. Such future studies would be helpful in recommending its application in diet-based regimens to prevent various ailments.

  9. Effects of spray-dried porcine plasma and plant extracts on intestinal morphology and on leukocyte cell subsets of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Nofrarías, M; Manzanilla, E G; Pujols, J; Gibert, X; Majó, N; Segalés, J; Gasa, J

    2006-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of a 6% spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) and a plant extracts mixture (XT; 5% carvacrol, 3% cinnamaldehyde, and 2% capsicum oleoresin) on the productive performance, intestinal morphology, and leukocyte cell subsets of early-weaned pigs compared with a control group. Morphometry of the jejunum, ileum, and colon, and immune cell analysis of blood, ileocolic lymph node (LN), and ileal Peyer's patches were done in 24 weaned pigs (20 +/- 2 d) at 19 or 21 d postweaning. Although SDPP and XT treatments did not increase ADG or ADFI, SDPP improved the G:F ratio (P = 0.024) compared with the control group. Dietary SDPP reduced the percentages of blood monocytes (P = 0.006) and macrophages in ileal Peyer's patches and LN (P = 0.04), of B lymphocytes (P = 0.04) and gammadelta+ T cells in LN (P = 0.009), and of intraepithelial lymphocytes (P = 0.026) as well as the density of lamina propria cells in the colon (P < 0.01). Dietary XT reduced intraepithelial lymphocyte numbers in jejunum (P = 0.034) and the percentages of blood cytotoxic cells (P = 0.07) and B lymphocytes in LN (P = 0.03); however, XT increased blood monocytes (P = 0.038) and the density of lamina propria lymphocytes in the colon (P = 0.003). These results indicate that dietary SDPP and plant extracts can affect intestinal morphology and immune cell subsets of gut tissues and blood in weaned pigs. Furthermore, the effects of SDPP suggest lower activation of the immune system of the piglets. PMID:16971575

  10. Evolution of diterpene metabolism: Sitka spruce CYP720B4 catalyzes multiple oxidations in resin acid biosynthesis of conifer defense against insects.

    PubMed

    Hamberger, Björn; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Hamberger, Britta; Séguin, Armand; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are specialized (secondary) metabolites of the oleoresin defense of conifers produced by diterpene synthases and cytochrome P450s of the CYP720B family. The evolution of DRA metabolism shares common origins with the biosynthesis of ent-kaurenoic acid, which is highly conserved in general (primary) metabolism of gibberellin biosynthesis. Transcriptome mining in species of spruce (Picea) and pine (Pinus) revealed CYP720Bs of four distinct clades. We cloned a comprehensive set of 12 different Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) CYP720Bs as full-length cDNAs. Spatial expression profiles, methyl jasmonate induction, and transcript enrichment in terpenoid-producing resin ducts suggested a role of CYP720B4 in DRA biosynthesis. CYP720B4 was characterized as a multisubstrate, multifunctional enzyme by the formation of oxygenated diterpenoids in metabolically engineered yeast, yeast in vivo transformation of diterpene substrates, in vitro assays with CYP720B4 protein produced in Escherichia coli, and alteration of DRA profiles in RNA interference-suppressed spruce seedlings. CYP720B4 was active with 24 different diterpenoid substrates, catalyzing consecutive C-18 oxidations in the biosynthesis of an array of diterpene alcohols, aldehydes, and acids. CYP720B4 was most active in the formation of dehydroabietic acid, a compound associated with insect resistance of Sitka spruce. We identified patterns of convergent evolution of CYP720B4 in DRA metabolism and ent-kaurene oxidase CYP701 in gibberellin metabolism and revealed differences in the evolution of specialized and general diterpene metabolism in a gymnosperm. The genomic and functional characterization of the gymnosperm CYP720B family highlights that the evolution of specialized metabolism involves substantial diversification relative to conserved, general metabolism.

  11. [6]-Gingerol inhibits metastasis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Seo, Eun Young; Kang, Nam E; Kim, Woo Kyung

    2008-05-01

    Gingerol (Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Zingiberaceae) is one of the most frequently and heavily consumed dietary condiments throughout the world. The oleoresin from rhizomes of ginger contains [6]-gingerol (1-[4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl]-5-hydroxy-3-decanone) and its homologs which are pungent ingredients that have been found to possess many interesting pharmacological and physiological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antihepatotoxic and cardiotonic effects. However, the effects of [6]-gingerol on metastatic processes in breast cancer cells are not currently well known. Therefore, in this study, we examined the effects of [6]-gingerol on adhesion, invasion, motility, activity and the amount of MMP-2 or -9 in the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line. We cultured MDA-MB-231 cells in the presence of various concentrations of [6]-gingerol (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 microM). [6]-Gingerol had no effect on cell adhesion up to 5 microM, but resulted in a 16% reduction at 10 microM. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with increasing concentrations of [6]-gingerol led to a concentration-dependent decrease in cell migration and motility. The activities of MMP-2 or MMP-9 in MDA-MB-231 cells were decreased by treatment with [6]-gingerol and occurred in a dose-dependent manner. The amount of MMP-2 protein was decreased in a dose-dependent manner, although there was no change in the MMP-9 protein levels following treatment with [6]-gingerol. MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expression were decreased by [6]-gingerol treatment. In conclusion, we have shown that [6]-gingerol inhibits cell adhesion, invasion, motility and activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines. PMID:17683926

  12. Evolution of Conifer Diterpene Synthases: Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis in Lodgepole Pine and Jack Pine Involves Monofunctional and Bifunctional Diterpene Synthases1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Dawn E.; Zerbe, Philipp; Jancsik, Sharon; Quesada, Alfonso Lara; Dullat, Harpreet; Madilao, Lina L.; Yuen, Macaire; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are major components of pine (Pinus spp.) oleoresin. They play critical roles in conifer defense against insects and pathogens and as a renewable resource for industrial bioproducts. The core structures of DRAs are formed in secondary (i.e. specialized) metabolism via cycloisomerization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) by diterpene synthases (diTPSs). Previously described gymnosperm diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze the initial bicyclization of GGPP followed by rearrangement of a (+)-copalyl diphosphate intermediate at two discrete class II and class I active sites. In contrast, similar diterpenes of gibberellin primary (i.e. general) metabolism are produced by the consecutive activity of two monofunctional class II and class I diTPSs. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we discovered 11 diTPS from jack pine (Pinus banksiana) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). Three of these were orthologous to known conifer bifunctional levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthases. Surprisingly, two sets of orthologous PbdiTPSs and PcdiTPSs were monofunctional class I enzymes that lacked functional class II active sites and converted (+)-copalyl diphosphate, but not GGPP, into isopimaradiene and pimaradiene as major products. Diterpene profiles and transcriptome sequences of lodgepole pine and jack pine are consistent with roles for these diTPSs in DRA biosynthesis. The monofunctional class I diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis form a new clade within the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d3 subfamily that evolved from bifunctional diTPS rather than monofunctional enzymes (TPS-c and TPS-e) of gibberellin metabolism. Homology modeling suggested alterations in the class I active site that may have contributed to their functional specialization relative to other conifer diTPSs. PMID:23370714

  13. Genetics, phosphorus availability, and herbivore-derived induction as sources of phenotypic variation of leaf volatile terpenes in a pine species.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Luis; Moreira, Xoaquín; Llusia, Joan; Peñuelas, Josep; Zas, Rafael

    2010-10-01

    Oleoresin produced and stored in pine tree leaves provides direct resistance to herbivores, while leaf volatile terpenes (LVT) in the resin are also powerful airborne infochemicals. Resin concentration and profile show considerable spatial and temporal phenotypic variation within and among pine populations. LVT biochemistry is known to be under genetic control, and although LVT should be plastic to diverse abiotic and biotic environmental factors such as nutrient availability and herbivore attack, little is known about their relative contributions and interactive effects. The aim of this paper was to clarify whether reduced phosphorus availability could increase the LVT concentration and affect the expression of herbivore-derived induced defences, and how plasticity would contribute to the phenotypic variation of LVT. The constitutive and methyl-jasmonate (MeJa) induced LVT concentration and profile were analysed in 17 half-sib Pinus pinaster families growing under two levels of P-availability (complete and P-limited fertilization). Individual terpene concentrations showed large additive genetic variation, which was more pronounced in the control than in MeJa-induced pines. MeJa application did not affect the LVT concentration, but significantly modified the LVT profile by depleting the α-pinene content and reducing the sesquiterpene fraction. Low P-availability strongly reduced plant growth and foliar nutrient concentrations, but did not affect LVT concentration and profile, and did not interact with MeJa-induction. Results indicate a strong homeostasis of LVT concentration to P-availability, and minor changes in the LVT profile due to MeJa-induction. Genetic variation appears to be the main source of phenotypic variation affecting the LVT concentration in this pine species.

  14. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Functional Lipophilic Compounds from Arthrospira platensis.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Hernández, Diego A; López, Víctor H; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José; Alemán-Nava, Gibrán S; Cuéllar-Bermúdez, Sara P; Rostro-Alanis, Magdalena; Parra-Saldívar, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Arthrospira platensis biomass was used in order to obtain functional lipophilic compounds through green extraction technologies such as supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction (SFE) and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). The temperature (T) factor was evaluated for MAE, while for SFE, pressure (P), temperature (T), and co-solvent (ethanol) (CS) were evaluated. The maximum extraction yield of the obtained oleoresin was (4.07% ± 0.14%) and (4.27% ± 0.10%) for SFE and MAE, respectively. Extracts were characterized by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). The maximum contents of functional lipophilic compounds in the SFE and MAE extracts were: for carotenoids 283 ± 0.10 μg/g and 629 ± 0.13 μg/g, respectively; for tocopherols 5.01 ± 0.05 μg/g and 2.46 ± 0.09 μg/g, respectively; and for fatty acids 34.76 ± 0.08 mg/g and 15.88 ± 0.06 mg/g, respectively. In conclusion, the SFE process at P 450 bar, T 60 °C and CS 53.33% of CO₂ produced the highest yield of tocopherols, carotenoids and fatty acids. The MAE process at 400 W and 50 °C gives the best extracts in terms of tocopherols and carotenoids. For yield and fatty acids, the MAE process at 400 W and 70 °C produced the highest values. Both SFE and MAE showed to be suitable green extraction technologies for obtaining functional lipophilic compounds from Arthrospira platensis. PMID:27164081

  15. Prophylactic strategies in recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: a 2-year study testing a phytonutrient vs itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Chopra, V; Marotta, F; Kumari, A; Bishier, M P; He, F; Zerbinati, N; Agarwal, C; Naito, Y; Tomella, C; Sharma, A; Solimene, U

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical efficacy of a one week/month treatment with a phytocompound with antimycotic properties (K-712, with following 100 mg composition: 10 mg of oleoresin from Pseudowintera colorata at 30 percent concentration in Polygodial together with trace amounts of Olea europea) in recurrent vulvo-vaginal candidiasis (RVVC), as compared to once a week treatment with an azole drug for 24 months follow up. This prospective randomized study involving 122 women (19 to 63 years old) with a history of proven episodes of RVVC in the prior 12 months. Patients were allocated in two treatment groups of 61 patients each and given A) Itraconazole 200 mg orally once a week or B) 1 tab twice a day of K-712 for one week/month. Each treatment schedule was well tolerated with 19 patients in the azole group complaining of transient mild symptoms (nausea, abdominal discomfort, unpleasant taste), while only 3 patients on K-712 reported slight dyspepsia. The number of relapses was significantly lower in the K-712-treated group as compared to the itraconazole-group (22 vs 39, p less than 0.05). Moreover, the former group showed a significantly decreased number of cases resistant or dose-dependent susceptible as compared to group A (p less than 0.05 vs itraconazole) and the same occurred for the occurrence of non-albicans species (group A 64.1 percent vs group B 31.8 percent, p less than 0.05). The overall mycological cure at the end of the 2-year study showed a comparable benefit between the two groups. From these data it appears that the present antifungal phytonutrient is equally effective as itraconazole in the overall treatment of RVVC over a 2-year follow-up, but yielding a significantly better prophylactic effect and also maintenance benefit with lower relapse rate, antifungal susceptibility and growth of azole-resistant species.

  16. Aqueous foam as a less-than-lethal technology for prison applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goolsby, Tommy D.

    1997-01-01

    High expansion aqueous foam is an aggregation of bubbles that has the appearance of soap suds and is used to isolate individuals both visually and acoustically. It was developed in the 1920's in England to fight coal mine fires and has been widely used since for fire fighting and dust suppression. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 1970's for nuclear safeguards and security applications. In late 1994, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of high expansion aqueous foam for correctional applications. NIJ funded the project as part of its search for new and better less-than-lethal weapons for responding to violent and dangerous individuals, where other means of force could lead to serious injuries. The phase one objectives of the project were to select a low-to-no toxicity foam concentrate with physical characteristics suited for use in a single cell or large prison disturbances, and to determine if the selected foam concentrate could serve as a carrier for Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) irritant. The phase two objective were to conduct an extensive toxicology review of the selected foam concentrate and OC irritant, and to conduct respiration simulation experiments in the selected high expansion aqueous foam. The phase three objectives were to build a prototype individual cell aqueous foam system and to study the feasibility of aqueous foams for large prison facility disturbances. The phase four and five objectives were to use the prototype system to do large scale foam physical characteristics testing of the selected foam concentrate, and to have the prototype single cell system further evaluated by correctional representatives. Prison rather than street scenarios were evaluated as the first and most likely place for using the aqueous foam since prisons have recurrent incidents where officers and inmates might be seriously injured during

  17. Light microscopic study of the effect of new antischistosmal drug (myrrh extract) on the liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Massoud, Ahmed M A; el Ebiary, Faika H; Ibrahim, Suzi H

    2005-12-01

    The efficacy of purified oleo-resin extract of myrrh derived from Commiphora molmol tree, (known as Mirazid) was studied against an Egyptian strain of Schistosoma mansoni in mice. Seventy adult male mice were used in this study. They were divided into 4 groups: G.I: consisted of control noninfected nontreated mice. G.II: comprised the noninfected treated mice and was subdivided into two subgroups, subgroup II-A: included mice which received Myrrh extract dissolved in cremophore EL and subgroup II-B: included mice which were treated with cremophore EL. G.III: consisted of the infected nontreated animals and G.IV: included infected mice which were treated with myrrh extract. The drug was given 8 weeks post infection in a dose of 500 mg/kg body weight/day for 5 successive days. All animals were sacrificed after 12 weeks from the beginning of the experiment. Liver paraffin sections were prepared and stained with H&E, Masson's Trichrome stain, PAS stain and Wilder's technique. A morphometric study was performed for the mean number and perimeter of the granulomas. Area percentage of the total collagen content around central veins as well as in portal areas was also estimated. The livers of the animals in G.II which received either myrrh extract (subgroup II-A) or cremophore EL (subgroup II-B) showed a more or less normal histological profile when compared to G.I (noninfected-nontreated group). G.IV (Infected treated G.) showed complete preservation of the hepatic architecture. Most of the hepatocytes appeared almost normal. The reticular network in the central part of the granulomas as well as in the portal tracts appeared rarefied. The hepatic reticular network was preserved. A significant decrease in the number and size of granulomas with significant reduction in the collagen content deposition in portal tracts and around central veins was detected when compared to G.III (infected nontreated mice). The data of this study proved the efficacy of myrrh as a promising

  18. Effect of plant extracts and formic acid on the intestinal equilibrium of early-weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, E G; Perez, J F; Martin, M; Kamel, C; Baucells, F; Gasa, J

    2004-11-01

    We evaluated the effects of a plant extracts mixture (XT) standardized in 5% (wt/wt) carvacrol, 3% cinnamaldehyde, and 2% capsicum oleoresin (oregano, cinnamon and Mexican pepper), alone or in combination with formic acid (FA), on the productive performance and the intestinal ecosystem of the early-weaned pig. Pigs weaned at 20 +/- 1 d of age (n = 216) were allocated in 24 pens and fed a standard medicated prestarter diet for 12 d. Twelve days after weaning, a stress management system based on social and dietary stress factors was applied to the animals, after which, each group was allocated to one of six dietary treatments, which followed a factorial arrangement, with three levels (as-fed basis) of the XT (0, 150, and 300 mg/kg) and two levels of FA (0 and 0.5%). On d 24 and 25 after the stress episode, eight pigs per treatment were killed to examine variables describing some aspects of the gastrointestinal ecology. Two days after the stress episode, an Escherichia coli K88 diarrhea episode occurred, and five casualties were registered. Four of the five deaths occurred in pens of pigs not fed the XT. The FA resulted in better G:F (P = 0.040) in coincidence with shorter villous height (P = 0.073) and lower rectal total microbial mass (P = 0.078). Both XT and FA addition increased stomach content (P = 0.006 and 0.003, respectively) and percentage of DM (P = 0.089 and 0.010, respectively), suggesting an increased gastric retention time; consequently, pH was also increased (P = 0.005 and 0.060, respectively). The XT decreased ileum total microbial mass (P = 0.025) and increased the lactobacilli:enterobacteria ratio (P = 0.002). The VFA profile in the cecum and colon was modified by XT inclusion, increasing the proportion of acetate (P = 0.018 and 0.025, respectively) and diminishing the proportion of butyrate (P = 0.096 and 0.040, respectively) and valerate (P = 0.001 and 0.039, respectively). Both XT and FA were shown to be effective in modifying the gastrointestinal

  19. Dietary protein modifies effect of plant extracts in the intestinal ecosystem of the pig at weaning.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, E G; Pérez, J F; Martín, M; Blandón, J C; Baucells, F; Kamel, C; Gasa, J

    2009-06-01

    The plant extract mixture (XT) used in the present experiment, containing carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and capsicum oleoresin, has previously been shown to decrease diarrhea mortality and to modify the intestinal environment of pigs after weaning. However, results obtained among experiments have not been consistent. We hypothesized that dietary protein could be a main factor determining the effect of plant extracts on intestinal environment. Thus, in the present study we assessed the effects of XT in piglet diets with different protein sources and amounts. Pigs weaned at 20 +/- 1 d of age (n = 240) were allocated to 1 of 6 treatments, which followed a factorial arrangement, with 2 amounts (as-fed basis) of the XT (0 and 200 mg/kg) and 3 diets with various amounts of CP and protein sources. Diet FM18 contained 10% of low-temperature fish meal (LT-FM) and a CP level of 18%; diet SBM18 contained 5% of LT-FM plus 9% of full fat extruded soy and a CP level of 18%; and SBM20 diet contained 10% of LT-FM plus 6.3% of full fat extruded soy and a CP level of 20%. Growth performance of the animals was recorded for 14 d, but no differences were detected among treatments. Eight pigs per treatment were killed to examine variables describing aspects of gastrointestinal ecology. For diets containing 18% CP, FM18 and SBM18, XT tended to decrease ileal digestibility of OM (P = 0.064 and 0.071, respectively) and decreased starch digestibility (P = 0.032 and 0.014, respectively). It also reduced villi length (P = 0.003 and 0.013, respectively) and tended to decrease intraepithelial lymphocyte number (P = 0.051 and 0.100, respectively) in the proximal jejunum. The XT inclusion also increased ileal lactobacilli:enterobacteria (P = 0.017) ratio and decreased VFA production in the cecum (P = 0.045) for all diets. A decreased CP level appeared to favor the effects of the studied plant extracts in a positive or negative way depending on the variable measured. The microbial differences

  20. Effect of plant extracts and formic acid on the intestinal equilibrium of early-weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, E G; Perez, J F; Martin, M; Kamel, C; Baucells, F; Gasa, J

    2004-11-01

    We evaluated the effects of a plant extracts mixture (XT) standardized in 5% (wt/wt) carvacrol, 3% cinnamaldehyde, and 2% capsicum oleoresin (oregano, cinnamon and Mexican pepper), alone or in combination with formic acid (FA), on the productive performance and the intestinal ecosystem of the early-weaned pig. Pigs weaned at 20 +/- 1 d of age (n = 216) were allocated in 24 pens and fed a standard medicated prestarter diet for 12 d. Twelve days after weaning, a stress management system based on social and dietary stress factors was applied to the animals, after which, each group was allocated to one of six dietary treatments, which followed a factorial arrangement, with three levels (as-fed basis) of the XT (0, 150, and 300 mg/kg) and two levels of FA (0 and 0.5%). On d 24 and 25 after the stress episode, eight pigs per treatment were killed to examine variables describing some aspects of the gastrointestinal ecology. Two days after the stress episode, an Escherichia coli K88 diarrhea episode occurred, and five casualties were registered. Four of the five deaths occurred in pens of pigs not fed the XT. The FA resulted in better G:F (P = 0.040) in coincidence with shorter villous height (P = 0.073) and lower rectal total microbial mass (P = 0.078). Both XT and FA addition increased stomach content (P = 0.006 and 0.003, respectively) and percentage of DM (P = 0.089 and 0.010, respectively), suggesting an increased gastric retention time; consequently, pH was also increased (P = 0.005 and 0.060, respectively). The XT decreased ileum total microbial mass (P = 0.025) and increased the lactobacilli:enterobacteria ratio (P = 0.002). The VFA profile in the cecum and colon was modified by XT inclusion, increasing the proportion of acetate (P = 0.018 and 0.025, respectively) and diminishing the proportion of butyrate (P = 0.096 and 0.040, respectively) and valerate (P = 0.001 and 0.039, respectively). Both XT and FA were shown to be effective in modifying the gastrointestinal

  1. Effects of butyrate, avilamycin, and a plant extract combination on the intestinal equilibrium of early-weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, E G; Nofrarías, M; Anguita, M; Castillo, M; Perez, J F; Martín-Orúe, S M; Kamel, C; Gasa, J

    2006-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of 3 additives, sodium butyrate (AC), avilamycin (AB), and a combination of plant extracts (XT), on the productive performance and the intestinal environment of the early-weaned pig. The XT was a standardized mixture with 5% (wt/wt) carvacrol (from Origanum spp.), 3% cinnamaldehyde (from Cinnamonum spp.), and 2% capsicum oleoresin (from Capsicum annum). Pigs (n = 32) weaned at 18 to 22 d of age with an initial BW of 6.0 +/- 0.10 kg were allocated to 8 pens that, in turn, were allocated to 4 treatments. The treatments included a basal diet (CT) or the basal diet supplemented with 0.3% of AC, 0.04% of AB, or 0.03% of XT. Productive performance was determined during the initial 14 d postweaning. On d 19 and 21 of the experiment, the pigs were killed to allow collection of digesta and intestinal tissue to evaluate variables indicative of aspects of the gastrointestinal environment. Treatments AB and AC improved G:F (P = 0.012 and 0.003, respectively) compared with the CT. Butyrate included in the diet was only detected in the stomach but not in cranial jejunum. When compared with CT, AC produced a lower ileal starch digestibility (P = 0.002) and a lower whole-tract OM and starch digestibility (P = 0.001 and 0.003, respectively), related to a lower VFA concentration in the cranial colon (P = 0.082) and a numerically reduced branched VFA percentage in the rectum. The AB treatment diminished propionate production in caudal colon (P = 0.002) and rectum (P = 0.012) compared with CT. The AC group exhibited deeper crypt depth in the jejunum without variations in villus height compared with CT (P = 0.042). The AC and AB groups also increased goblet cell presence in the colon (P = 0.001 and 0.032, respectively). On the other hand, AB and XT diminished intraepithelial lymphocytes in the jejunum (P = 0.003 and 0.034, respectively). The XT increased lymphocyte presence in the colon (P = 0.003). These results show the important influence of AB and AC on

  2. The response of gastrointestinal microbiota to avilamycin, butyrate, and plant extracts in early-weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Castillo, M; Martín-Orúe, S M; Roca, M; Manzanilla, E G; Badiola, I; Perez, J F; Gasa, J

    2006-10-01

    An experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of 3 different additives on the gastrointestinal microbiota of early-weaned pigs. Early-weaned (18 to 22 d; n = 32) pigs (6.0 +/- 0.10 kg of BW) from 8 litters were randomly distributed into 8 pens. Each pen was assigned 1 of 4 dietary treatments: a prestarter or control diet, the control diet with 0.04% avilamycin (AB), with 0.3% sodium butyrate, or with 0.03% plant extract mixture (XT; standardized mixture with 5% (wt/wt) carvacrol extracted from Origanum spp., 3% cinnamaldehyde extracted from Cinnamonum spp., and 2% capsicum oleoresin from Capsicum annum). At the end of the experimental period, 8 pigs per treatment were killed, and samples of their intestinal content were taken. The total bacterial load along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT; stomach, jejunum, cecum, and distal colon) and the lactobacilli and enterobacteria in the jejunum and cecum were measured by quantitative PCR. The total microbial counts along the GIT did not differ among the diets, but there was an increase in the lactobacilli:enterobacteria ratio in the cecum of the piglets on the XT diet (P = 0.003). Restriction fragment length polymorphism of the PCR-amplified V3, V4, and V5 regions of the 16S rDNA gene showed changes in the structure of the microbial community in the jejunum. Dendrograms grouped animals by diets; control with 0.3% sodium butyrate was the treatment that promoted the biggest changes in the microbial ecosystem, followed by AB and then XT. Biodiversity increased when using additives compared with the control diet (P = 0.002). Microbial metabolic activity along the hindgut was studied using the concentration of purine bases and carbohydrase activities. Different patterns for purine bases were observed between diets (diet x intestinal section, P = 0.01). The control diet reached a maximum purine base concentration at the end of the colon, whereas that of the AB diet was reached at the cecum. We could not detect any cellulase

  3. Effects of butyrate, avilamycin, and a plant extract combination on the intestinal equilibrium of early-weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, E G; Nofrarías, M; Anguita, M; Castillo, M; Perez, J F; Martín-Orúe, S M; Kamel, C; Gasa, J

    2006-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of 3 additives, sodium butyrate (AC), avilamycin (AB), and a combination of plant extracts (XT), on the productive performance and the intestinal environment of the early-weaned pig. The XT was a standardized mixture with 5% (wt/wt) carvacrol (from Origanum spp.), 3% cinnamaldehyde (from Cinnamonum spp.), and 2% capsicum oleoresin (from Capsicum annum). Pigs (n = 32) weaned at 18 to 22 d of age with an initial BW of 6.0 +/- 0.10 kg were allocated to 8 pens that, in turn, were allocated to 4 treatments. The treatments included a basal diet (CT) or the basal diet supplemented with 0.3% of AC, 0.04% of AB, or 0.03% of XT. Productive performance was determined during the initial 14 d postweaning. On d 19 and 21 of the experiment, the pigs were killed to allow collection of digesta and intestinal tissue to evaluate variables indicative of aspects of the gastrointestinal environment. Treatments AB and AC improved G:F (P = 0.012 and 0.003, respectively) compared with the CT. Butyrate included in the diet was only detected in the stomach but not in cranial jejunum. When compared with CT, AC produced a lower ileal starch digestibility (P = 0.002) and a lower whole-tract OM and starch digestibility (P = 0.001 and 0.003, respectively), related to a lower VFA concentration in the cranial colon (P = 0.082) and a numerically reduced branched VFA percentage in the rectum. The AB treatment diminished propionate production in caudal colon (P = 0.002) and rectum (P = 0.012) compared with CT. The AC group exhibited deeper crypt depth in the jejunum without variations in villus height compared with CT (P = 0.042). The AC and AB groups also increased goblet cell presence in the colon (P = 0.001 and 0.032, respectively). On the other hand, AB and XT diminished intraepithelial lymphocytes in the jejunum (P = 0.003 and 0.034, respectively). The XT increased lymphocyte presence in the colon (P = 0.003). These results show the important influence of AB and AC on

  4. The response of gastrointestinal microbiota to avilamycin, butyrate, and plant extracts in early-weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Castillo, M; Martín-Orúe, S M; Roca, M; Manzanilla, E G; Badiola, I; Perez, J F; Gasa, J

    2006-10-01

    An experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of 3 different additives on the gastrointestinal microbiota of early-weaned pigs. Early-weaned (18 to 22 d; n = 32) pigs (6.0 +/- 0.10 kg of BW) from 8 litters were randomly distributed into 8 pens. Each pen was assigned 1 of 4 dietary treatments: a prestarter or control diet, the control diet with 0.04% avilamycin (AB), with 0.3% sodium butyrate, or with 0.03% plant extract mixture (XT; standardized mixture with 5% (wt/wt) carvacrol extracted from Origanum spp., 3% cinnamaldehyde extracted from Cinnamonum spp., and 2% capsicum oleoresin from Capsicum annum). At the end of the experimental period, 8 pigs per treatment were killed, and samples of their intestinal content were taken. The total bacterial load along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT; stomach, jejunum, cecum, and distal colon) and the lactobacilli and enterobacteria in the jejunum and cecum were measured by quantitative PCR. The total microbial counts along the GIT did not differ among the diets, but there was an increase in the lactobacilli:enterobacteria ratio in the cecum of the piglets on the XT diet (P = 0.003). Restriction fragment length polymorphism of the PCR-amplified V3, V4, and V5 regions of the 16S rDNA gene showed changes in the structure of the microbial community in the jejunum. Dendrograms grouped animals by diets; control with 0.3% sodium butyrate was the treatment that promoted the biggest changes in the microbial ecosystem, followed by AB and then XT. Biodiversity increased when using additives compared with the control diet (P = 0.002). Microbial metabolic activity along the hindgut was studied using the concentration of purine bases and carbohydrase activities. Different patterns for purine bases were observed between diets (diet x intestinal section, P = 0.01). The control diet reached a maximum purine base concentration at the end of the colon, whereas that of the AB diet was reached at the cecum. We could not detect any cellulase

  5. Materials Applications for Non-Lethal: Aqueous Foams

    SciTech Connect

    GOOLSBY,TOMMY D.; SCOTT,STEVEN H.

    1999-09-15

    High expansion aqueous foam is an aggregation of bubbles that has the appearance of soap suds and is used to isolate individuals both visually and acoustically. It was developed in the 1920's in England to fight coal mine fires and has been widely used since for fire fighting and dust suppression. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 1970's for nuclear safeguards and security applications. In the mid-1990s, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of high expansion aqueous foam for correctional applications. NIJ funded the project as part of its search for new and better less-than-lethal weapons for responding to violent and dangerous individuals, where other means of force could lead to serious injuries. The phase one objectives of the project were to select a low-to-no toxicity foam concentrate (foaming agent) with physical characteristics suited for use in a single cell or large prison disturbances, and to determine if the selected foam concentrate could serve as a carrier for Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) irritant. The phase two objectives were to conduct an extensive toxicology review of the selected foam concentrate and OC irritant, and to conduct respiration simulation experiments in the selected high expansion aqueous foam. The phase three objectives were to build a prototype individual cell aqueous foam system and to study the feasibility of aqueous foams for large prison facility disturbances. The phase four and five objectives were to use the prototype system to do large scale foam physical characteristics testing of the selected foam concentrate, and to have the prototype single cell system further evaluated by correctional representatives. Prison rather than street scenarios were evaluated as the first and most likely place for using the aqueous foam since prisons have recurrent incidents where officers and inmates might be

  6. Final report on the safety assessment of capsicum annuum extract, capsicum annuum fruit extract, capsicum annuum resin, capsicum annuum fruit powder, capsicum frutescens fruit, capsicum frutescens fruit extract, capsicum frutescens resin, and capsaicin.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    Capsicum-derived ingredients function as skin-conditioning agents--miscellaneous, external analgesics, flavoring agents, or fragrance components in cosmetics. These ingredients are used in 19 cosmetic products at concentrations as high as 5%. Cosmetic-grade material may be extracted using hexane, ethanol, or vegetable oil and contain the full range of phytocompounds that are found in the Capsicum annuum or Capsicum frutescens plant (aka red chiles), including Capsaicin. Aflatoxin and N-nitroso compounds (N-nitrosodimethylamine and N-nitrosopyrrolidine) have been detected as contaminants. The ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectrum for Capsicum Annuum Fruit Extract indicates a small peak at approximately 275 nm, and a gradual increase in absorbance, beginning at approximately 400 nm. Capsicum and paprika are generally recognized as safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in food. Hexane, chloroform, and ethyl acetate extracts of Capsicum Frutescens Fruit at 200 mg/kg resulted in death of all mice. In a short-term inhalation toxicity study using rats, no difference was found between vehicle control and a 7% Capsicum Oleoresin solution. In a 4-week feeding study, red chilli (Capsicum annuum) in the diet at concentrations up to 10% was relatively nontoxic in groups of male mice. In an 8-week feeding study using rats, intestinal exfoliation, cytoplasmic fatty vacuolation and centrilobular necrosis of hepatocytes, and aggregation of lymphocytes in the portal areas were seen at 10% Capsicum Frutescens Fruit, but not 2%. Rats fed 0.5 g/kg day-1 crude Capsicum Fruit Extract for 60 days exhibited no significant gross pathology at necropsy, but slight hyperemia of the liver and reddening of the gastric mucosa were observed. Weanling rats fed basal diets supplemented with whole red pepper at concentrations up to 5.0% for up to 8 weeks had no pathology of the large intestines, livers, and kidneys, but destruction of the taste buds and keratinization and erosion of

  7. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Dichloromethane (Methylene Chloride) (CAS No. 75-09-2) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies).

    PubMed

    1986-01-01

    Dichloromethane is widely used in industrial processes, food preparation, and agriculture. In industry, dichloromethane is used as a solvent in paint removers, degreasing agents, aerosol propellants, and triacetate solutions; as a blowing agent in flexible urethane foams; and as a process solvent in the manufacture of steroids, antibiotics, vitamins, and tablet coatings. The use of dichloromethane as an extraction solvent for spice oleoresins, hops, and caffeine from coffee has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dichloromethane has been used as an inhalation anesthetic and as a fumigant for grain and strawberries. Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of dichloromethane (99% pure) were conducted by inhalation exposure of groups of 50 male and 50 female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice 6 hours per day, 5 days per week, for 102 weeks. The exposure concentrations used (0, 1,000, 2,000, or 4,000 ppm for rats and 0, 2,000, or 4,000 ppm for mice) were selected on the basis of results from 13-week inhalation studies in which groups of 10 rats and 10 mice of each sex were exposed to dichloromethane at concentrations of 525-8,400 ppm 6 hours per day, 5 days per week. During the 2-year studies in rats, body weight gains for exposed males and females were comparable to those of the chamber controls. The survival of exposed male rats was comparable to that of the chamber controls; however, the survival of all groups of males at the termination of the study was low (control, 16/50; low dose, 16/50; mid dose, 17/50; high dose, 9/50). Most of the early deaths among male rats occurred during the final weeks of the study; the survival of male rats through week 86 of the study was 36/50, 39/50, 37/50, and 33/50. This decreased survival is believed to be related to the high incidence of leukemia (34/50; 26/50; 32/50; 35/50). Survival of female rats exposed at 4,000 ppm was reduced relative to that of the chamber controls (30/50; 22/50; 22/50; 15/50); leukemia occurred

  8. Medical management of the traumatic consequences of civil unrest incidents: causation, clinical approaches, needs and advanced planning criteria.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    , tasers and (rarely) live ammunition. All of these physical measures are associated with pain and immobilisation, and there is a high potential for soft tissue and bone injuries. Some of the more severe physical methods, including plastic and rubber bullets, may cause lethal injuries. The basis for using chemicals in civil unrest incidents is that they cause distraction, transient harassment and incapacitation, temporary impairment of the conduct of coordinated tasks and cause a desire to vacate the area of unrest. Although screening smokes and malodors have sometimes been employed, the major group of chemicals used are peripheral chemosensory irritants (PCSIs), which reversibly interact with sensory nerve receptors in exposed skin and mucosal surfaces, resulting in the production of local uncomfortable sensations and associated reflexes. Major effects are on the eye, respiratory tract and (to a lesser degree) skin. Thus, the induced transient pain and discomfort in the eye, respiratory tract and skin, together with associated lacrimation, blepharospasm, rhinorrhoea, sialorrhoea, cough and breathing difficulties, produce temporary incapacitation and interference with the conduct of coordinated tasks, and form the basis for harassment of malefactors. Currently used peripheral chemosensory irritants are 1-chloroacetophenone, 2-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile, dibenz(b.f)-1,4-oxazepine, oleoresin capsicum and pelargonic acid vanillylamide. Depending on operational circumstances, irritants may be dispersed as a smoke, powder cloud, aerosol, vapour, or in solution; the mode of generation and dispersion of irritant can influence hazard. Brief acute exposure to chemosensory irritants produces effects that generally resolve within an hour, leaving no long-term sequelae. However, sustained exposure to high concentrations may produce tissue injury, notably to the eye, respiratory tract and skin. With solutions of sensory irritants, other formulation constituents may enhance PCSI