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Sample records for oligonucleotide-displaced organic monolayer-protected

  1. A solvothermal method for synthesizing monolayer protected amorphous calcium carbonate clusters.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengtong; Gebauer, Denis; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-05-19

    A solvothermal method was developed for synthesizing organic monolayer protected amorphous calcium carbonate clusters using 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid as ligand, ethanol as solvent and NaHCO3 decomposition as CO2 source, which can be extended to synthesize other monolayer protected mineral clusters.

  2. Covalently networked monolayer-protected nanoparticle films.

    PubMed

    Tognarelli, D J; Miller, Robert B; Pompano, Rebecca R; Loftus, Andrew F; Sheibley, Daniel J; Leopold, Michael C

    2005-11-22

    Covalently networked films of nanoparticles can be assembled on various substrates from functionalized monolayer-protected clusters (MPCs) via ester coupling reactions. Exposure of a specifically modified substrate to alternating solutions of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid exchanged and 11-mercaptoundecanol exchanged MPCs, in the presence of ester coupling reagents, 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine, results in the formation of a multilayer film with ester bridges between individual nanoparticles. These films can be grown in a controlled manner to various thicknesses and exhibit certain properties that are consistent with films having other types of interparticle connectivity, including chemical vapor response behavior and quantized double layer charging. Ester coupling of MPCs into assembled films is a straightforward and highly versatile approach that results in robust films that can endure harsher chemical environments than other types of films. The stability of these covalent films is assessed and compared to other more traditional MPC film assemblies.

  3. Fluorescent monolayer protected gold nanoparticles - Preparation and structure elucidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, P.; Kuchukova, N.; Dobrikov, G. M.; Timtcheva, I.; Kostova, K.; Petkova, I.; Vauthey, E.

    2011-05-01

    A novel N-substituted 4-methoxy-1,8-naphthalimide (NAFTA 8) especially designed for fluorescent labeling of gold nanoparticles has been synthesized. NAFTA 8 bears a long methylene chain at the imide N atom and has a terminal SH group, which enables its chemical binding to gold nanostructures. The longest wavelength absorption maximum of NAFTA 8 in chloroform is at 370 nm, the fluorescent maximum is at 430 nm and the fluorescent quantum yield is 0.95. The newly synthesized fluorophore is applied for functionalization of gold nanoparticles with diameter 1.5 ± 0.5 nm prepared through chemical reduction. The obtained Monolayer Protected Clusters are characterized by elemental analysis, TEM, XPS, FT-IR, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The performed investigations provide evidence for the formation of chemical bond between the thiol ligand and the gold surface. They also show that the obtained metal/dielectric 3D structures are highly fluorescent.

  4. Dendritic functionalization of monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, Erin C.; Lundin, Erik; Garabato, B. Davis; Choi, Daeock; Shon, Young-Seok . E-mail: young.shon@wku.edu

    2007-06-05

    This paper describes the facile synthesis of nanoparticle-cored dendrimers (NCDs) and nanoparticle megamers from monolayer-protected gold clusters using either single or multi-step reactions. First, 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid/hexanethiolate-protected gold clusters were synthesized using the Schiffrin reaction followed by the ligand place-exchange reaction. A convergent approach for the synthesis of nanoparticle-cored dendrimers uses a single step reaction that is an ester coupling reaction of hydroxy-functionalized dendrons with carboxylic acid-functionalized gold clusters. A divergent approach, which is based on multi-step reactions, employs the repetition of an amide coupling reaction and a Michael addition reaction to build polyamidoamine dendritic architectures around a nanoparticle core. Nanoparticle megamers, which are large dendrimer-induced nanoparticle aggregates with an average diameter of more than 300 nm, were prepared by the amide coupling reaction between polyamiodoamine [G-2] dendrimers and carboxylic acid-functionalized gold clusters. {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for the characterization of these hybrid nanoparticles.

  5. Dual-chemiresistor GC detector employing monolayer-protected metal nanocluster interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qing-Yun; Zellers, Edward T

    2002-07-15

    The synthesis and testing of two gold-thiolate monolayer-protected (nano)clusters as interfacial layers on a dual-chemiresistor vapor sensor array are described. Responses (changes in dc resistance) to each of 11 organic solvent vapors are rapid, reversible, and linear with concentration at low vapor concentrations, becoming sublinear at higher concentrations. Limits of detection (LODs) range from 0.1 to 24 parts per million and vary inversely with solvent vapor pressure. When configured as a GC detector and used to analyze 0.5-L preconcentrated samples of the 11-vapor mixture, the array provides LODs of < or = 700 parts per trillion for most vapors, comparing favorably with those from an integrated array of polymer-coated surface acoustic wave sensors configured and tested similarly. This first report on the use of such an array as a GC detector shows that the combination of response patterns and GC retention times improves capabilities for vapor recognition compared to the sensor array alone or to single-detector GC systems. Spray-coated nanocluster thin films can be deposited reproducibly and exhibit response stability in air that ranges from fair to excellent for up to several months. Scaling the active device area down by a factor of 16 has no significant effect on sensitivity. Implications of these results for portable vapor sensing systems are discussed.

  6. Organo-Soluble Porphyrin Mixed Monolayer-Protected Gold Nanorods with Intercalated Fullerenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-16

    Plasmon Electronic Oscillations in Gold and Silver Nanodots and Nanorods . J. Phys. Chem. B 1999, 103, 8410- 8426. (7) Yu, C.; Irudayaraj, J...Mixed Monolayer- Protected Gold Nanorods with Intercalated Fullerenes Chenming Xue, Yongqian Xu, Yi Pang, Dingshan Yu, Liming Dai, Min Gao, Augustine...Protected Gold Nanorods with Intercalated Fullerenes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  7. Synthesis and characterization of mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods and their Raman activities

    SciTech Connect

    Mlambo, Mbuso; Mdluli, Phumlani S.; Shumbula, Poslet; Mpelane, Siyasanga; Moloto, Nosipho; Skepu, Amanda; Tshikhudo, Robert

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Gold nanorods surface functionalization. - Highlights: • Mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods. • Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. • HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin as a Raman active compound. - Abstract: The cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) gold nanorods (AuNRs) were prepared by seed-mediated route followed by the addition of a Raman active compound (HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin) on the gold nanorods surfaces. Different stoichiometric mixtures of HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin and HS-PEG-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}COOH were evaluated for their Raman activities. The lowest stoichiometric ratio HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin adsorbed on gold nanorods surface was detected and enhanced by Raman spectroscopy. The produced mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods were characterized by UV-vis spectrometer for optical properties, transmission electron microscope (TEM) for structural properties (shape and aspect ratio) and their zeta potentials (charges) were obtained from ZetaSizer to determine the stability of the produced mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods. The Raman results showed a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement at the lowest stoichiometric ratio of 1% HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin compared to high ratio of 50% HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin on the surface of gold nanorods.

  8. Synthesis of nanoparticle-cored dendrimers by convergent dendritic functionalization of monolayer-protected nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shon, Young-Seok; Choi, Daeock; Dare, Jonathan; Dinh, Tuong

    2008-06-01

    This article presents a synthesis method for nanoparticle-cored dendrimers (NCDs), which have dendritic architectures around a monolayer-protected gold nanoparticle. The synthesis method is based on a strategy in which the synthesis of monolayer-protected nanoparticles is followed by adding dendrons on functionalized nanoparticles by a single coupling reaction. NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) characterizations confirmed the successful coupling reaction between dendrons with different generations ([G1], [G2], and [G3]) and COOH-functionalized nanoparticles ( approximately Au201L71). The dendrimer wedge density also could be controlled by reacting nanoparticles having different loading of COOH groups ( approximately 60 and approximately 10% COOH of the 71 ligands per gold nanoparticle) with functionalized dendrons. Transmission electron microscope results showed that this synthesis strategy maintains the average size of the nanoparticle core during dendron coupling reactions. This control over the composition and core size makes the systematic study of NCDs with different generations possible. The chemical stability of NCDs was found to be affected by dendron generation around the nanoparticle core. The current-potential response of NCD films on microelectrode arrays exhibited better electrical conductivity for NCDs with lower dendron generation.

  9. The role of nanostructure in the wetting behavior of mixed-monolayer-protected metal nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Centrone, A.; Penzo, E.; Sharma, M.; Myerson, J. W.; Jackson, A. M.; Marzari, N.; Stellacci, F.

    2008-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayer-protected nanoparticles are promising candidates for applications, such as sensing and drug delivery, in which the molecular ligands' interactions with the surrounding environment play a crucial role. We recently showed that, when gold nanoparticles are coated with a binary mixture of immiscible ligands, ordered ribbon-like domains of alternating composition spontaneously form and that their width is comparable with the size of a single solvent molecule. It is usually assumed that nanoparticles' solubility depends solely on the core size and on the molecular composition of the ligand shell. Here, we show that this is not always the case. We find that the ligand shell morphology affects the solubility of these nanoparticles almost as much as the molecular composition. A possible explanation is offered through a molecular dynamics analysis of the surface energy of monolayers differing only in their domain structure. We find that the surface free energy of such model systems can vary significantly as a function of ordering, even at fixed composition. This combined experimental and theoretical study provides a unique insight into wetting phenomena at the nano- and subnanometer scale. PMID:18621710

  10. Quantitative imaging of 2 nm monolayer-protected gold nanoparticle distributions in tissues using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Elci, S Gokhan; Yan, Bo; Kim, Sung Tae; Saha, Krishnendu; Jiang, Ying; Klemmer, Gunnar A; Moyano, Daniel F; Tonga, Gulen Yesilbag; Rotello, Vincent M; Vachet, Richard W

    2016-04-21

    Functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have unique properties that make them important biomedical materials. Optimal use of these materials, though, requires an understanding of their fate in vivo. Here we describe the use of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to image the biodistributions of AuNPs in tissues from mice intravenously injected with AuNPs. We demonstrate for the first time that the distributions of very small (∼2 nm core) monolayer-protected AuNPs can be imaged in animal tissues at concentrations in the low parts-per-billion range. Moreover, the LA-ICP-MS images reveal that the monolayer coatings on the injected AuNPs influence their distributions, suggesting that the AuNPs remain intact in vivo and their surface chemistry influences how they interact with different organs. We also demonstrate that quantitative images of the AuNPs can be generated when the appropriate tissue homogenates are chosen for matrix matching. Overall, these results demonstrate the utility of LA-ICP-MS for tracking the fate of biomedically-relevant AuNPs in vivo, facilitating the design of improved AuNP-based therapeutics.

  11. Opto-electronic Properties of Monolayer-Protected Clusters of Au functionalized with a New Fluorescent Ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kountz, Thomas; Thanthirige, Viraj; Reber, Keith; Devadas, Mary Sajini

    Metal nanoclusters are the focus of intense study due to their interesting optical, electronic, and catalytic properties; specifically gold clusters. The applications of gold monolayer-protected clusters (MPCs) are being researched by a series of optical spectroscopic and voltammetric analyses to determine core size, atom-level composition, charge states, and optical/electrical properties. Understanding these fundamental properties is critical for both expansion of applications and creation of new MPCs. The purpose of this study is to expand the applications of gold MPCs, with the attachment of a new coumarin surface ligand - synthesized specifically for this experiment. Our focus in this research is on quantum clusters - specifically Au25(C6S)18. This MPC is researched particularly because of its inherent stability being a magic number cluster. It is created by means of a modified Burst-Schiffrin method. The applications that are influenced include but are not limited to: catalytic activity, solar energy conversion, size-tunable florescence, sensors, and optical electronics.

  12. Exploring the atomic structure of 1.8nm monolayer-protected gold clusters with aberration-corrected STEM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Jian, Nan; Ornelas, Isabel; Pattison, Alexander J; Lahtinen, Tanja; Salorinne, Kirsi; Häkkinen, Hannu; Palmer, Richard E

    2016-11-22

    Monolayer-protected (MP) Au clusters present attractive quantum systems with a range of potential applications e.g. in catalysis. Knowledge of the atomic structure is needed to obtain a full understanding of their intriguing physical and chemical properties. Here we employed aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (ac-STEM), combined with multislice simulations, to make a round-robin investigation of the atomic structure of chemically synthesised clusters with nominal composition Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 provided by two different research groups. The MP Au clusters were "weighed" by the atom counting method, based on their integrated intensities in the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) regime and calibrated exponent of the Z dependence. For atomic structure analysis, we compared experimental images of hundreds of clusters, with atomic resolution, against a variety of structural models. Across the size range 123-151 atoms, only 3% of clusters matched the theoretically predicted Au144(SR)60 structure, while a large proportion of the clusters were amorphous (i.e. did not match any model structure). However, a distinct ring-dot feature, characteristic of local icosahedral symmetry, was observed in about 20% of the clusters.

  13. Structure-function relationships affecting the sensing mechanism of monolayer-protected cluster doped xerogel amperometric glucose biosensors.

    PubMed

    DiPasquale, Luke T; Poulos, Nicholas G; Hall, Jackson R; Minocha, Aastha; Bui, Tram Anh; Leopold, Michael C

    2015-07-15

    A systematic study of the structure-function relationships critical to understanding the sensing mechanism of 1st generation amperometric glucose biosensors with an embedded nanoparticle (NP) network is presented. Xerogel-based films featuring embedded glucose oxidase enzyme and doped with alkanethiolate-protected gold NPs, known as monolayer protected clusters (MPCs), exhibit significantly enhanced performance compared to analogous systems without NPs including higher sensitivity, faster response time, and extended linear/dynamic ranges. The proposed mechanism involves diffusion of the glucose to glucose oxidase within the xerogel, enzymatic reaction production of H2O2 with subsequent diffusion to the embedded network of MPCs where it is oxidized, an event immediately reported via fast electron transfer (ET) through the MPC system to the working electrode. Various aspects of the film construct and strategy are systematically probed using amperometry, voltammetry, and solid-state electronic conductivity measurements, including the effects of MPC peripheral chain length, MPC functionalization via place-exchange reaction, MPC core size, and the MPC density or concentration within the xerogel composite films. The collective results of these experiments support the proposed mechanism and identify interparticle spacing and the electronic communication through the MPC network is the most significant factor in the sensing scheme with the diffusional aspects of the mechanism that may be affected by film/MPC hydrophobicity and functionality (i.e., glucose and H2O2 diffusion) shown to be less substantial contributors to the overall enhanced performance. Understanding the structure-function relationships of effective sensing schemes allows for the employment of the strategy for future biosensor design toward clinically relevant targets.

  14. Direct synthesis and bonding origins of monolayer-protected silver nanocrystals from silver nitrate through in situ ligand exchange.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwi Jong; Lee, Young-Il; Shim, In-Keun; Joung, Jaewoo; Oh, Yong Soo

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we attempt to present a direct synthesis of narrowly dispersed silver nanoparticles in a highly concentrated organic phase (>2 M) without the use of a size-selection process. The fully organic phase system contains silver nitrate as a silver precursor, n-butylamine as a medium dissolving the silver salt, dodecanoic acid as a capping molecule, toluene as a medium, and NaBH4 as a reducing reagent. Even using only generic chemicals, monodisperse silver nanocrystals with a size of 7 nm were easily synthesized on the 100-g scale in a 1-L reactor. In addition, systematic studies revealed that the silver nanocrystals synthesized through in situ ligand exchange were stabilized through bidentate bridging of carboxyl groups in dodecanoic acid.

  15. Structural Order in Ultrathin Films of the Monolayer Protected Clusters Based Upon 4-nm Gold Nanocrystals: An Experimental and Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Nabraj; Khanal, Subarna; Bahena, Daniel; Olmos-Asar, Jimena A.; Ponce, Arturo; Whetten, Robert L.; Mariscal, Marcelo M.; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The structural order in ultrathin films of monolayer protected clusters (MPCs) is important in a number of application areas but can be difficult to demonstrate by conventional methods, particularly when the metallic core dimension, d, is in the intermediate size-range, 1.5 < d < 5.0 nm. Here, improved techniques for the synthesis of monodisperse thiolate-protected gold nanoparticles have made possible the production of dodecane-thiolate saturated ~ 4 ± 0.5 nm Au clusters with single-crystal core structure and morphology. An ultrathin ordered film or superlattice of these nanocrystal-core MPCs is prepared and investigated using aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) which allowed imaging of long-range hexagonally ordered superlattices of the nanocrystals, separated by the thiolate groups. The lattice constants determined by direct imaging are in good agreement with those determined by small-angle electron diffraction. The STEM image revealed the characteristic grain boundary (GB) with sigma (Σ) 13 in the interface between two crystals. The formation and structures found are interpreted on the basis of theoretical calculations employing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and coarse-grained (CG) approach. PMID:24875295

  16. Monolayer-Protected Gold Nanoparticles as an Efficient Stationary Phase for Open Tubular Gas Chromatography using a Square Capillary Model for Chip-Based Gas Chromatography in Square Cornered Microfabricated Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Gwen M.; Grate, Jay W. ); Synovec, Robert E.

    2004-03-12

    The application of a dodecanethiol monolayer protected gold nanoparticle (MPN) stationary phase within a microchannel environment was explored using a square capillary column as a model for a high-speed, microfabricated gas chromatography (?GC). Successful deposition and evaluation of a dodecanethiol MPN phase within a 1.3 m long, 100?m by 100?m square capillary is reported. Depth of the MPN phase was evaluated using SEM analysis. An average thickness of 15 nm along the capillary walls was determined. While the film depth along the walls was very uniform, the corner depths were greater with the largest observed depth being 430 nm. Overall, an efficient chromatographic system was obtained with a minimum reduced plate height, hmin, of 1.2 for octane (k= 0.22). Characterization of the MPN column was completed using four compound classes (alkanes, alcohols, ketones, and aromatics) that were used to form a 7 component mixture with a 2 second separation. A mixture consisting of a nerve agent simulator in a sample containing analytes that may commonly interfere with detection was also separated in 2 seconds, much faster than a similar separation previously reported using a?GC system in 50 seconds. Application of the square capillary MPN column for a high-speed separation as the second column of a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography system (GC x GC) was also explored. Comparison of the MPN stationary phase was compared to phases employed in previously reported?GC systems.

  17. Kinetic evaluation of highly active supported gold catalysts prepared from monolayer-protected clusters: an experimental Michaelis-Menten approach for determining the oxygen binding constant during CO oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Long, Cormac G; Gilbertson, John D; Vijayaraghavan, Ganesh; Stevenson, Keith J; Pursell, Christopher J; Chandler, Bert D

    2008-08-06

    Thiol monolayer-protected Au clusters (MPCs) were prepared using dendrimer templates, deposited onto a high-surface-area titania, and then the thiol stabilizers were removed under H2/N2. The resulting Au catalysts were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed CO. The Au catalysts prepared via this route displayed minimal particle agglomeration during the deposition and activation steps. Structural data obtained from the physical characterization of the Au catalysts were comparable to features exhibited from a traditionally prepared standard Au catalyst obtained from the World Gold Council (WGC). A differential kinetic study of CO oxidation catalysis by the MPC-prepared Au and the standard WGC catalyst showed that these two catalyst systems have essentially the same reaction order and Arrhenius apparent activation energies (28 kJ/mol). However, the MPC-prepared Au catalyst shows 50% greater activity for CO oxidation. Using a Michaelis-Menten approach, the oxygen binding constants for the two catalyst systems were determined and found to be essentially the same within experimental error. To our knowledge, this kinetic evaluation is the first experimental determination of oxygen binding by supported Au nanoparticle catalysts under working conditions. The values for the oxygen binding equilibrium constant obtained from the Michaelis-Menten treatment (ca. 29-39) are consistent with ultra-high-vacuum measurements on model catalyst systems and support density functional theory calculations for oxygen binding at corner or edge atoms on Au nanoparticles and clusters.

  18. Advanced Organic Ligands for Protecting Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jonathan Ka-Wing

    Organic monolayer protected metal nanoparticles have been utilized in many different fields such as catalysis, drug delivery, and sensor chemistry. However, these nanomaterials are prone to increase in size consequently losing its function at the nanoscale. The stability these nanoparticles have been a great interest of research. This thesis focuses on the synthesis of a novel cross-linkable ligand for the protection of metal nanoparticles. Chapter 1 reviews key concepts of nanoparticles, its usefulness in applications, some of the stabilizing strategies employed, and the scope of the thesis project. Chapter 2 describes the synthetic attempts and optimization of the novel cross-linkable ligand. In addition, its characterization data is also included. Section 2.8 also highlights another fully synthesized novel hydrophobic ligand. Chapter 3 contains the summary of the work and closing remarks. Future works is also included to describe the prospects of the synthesis of the novel ligand. Chapter 4 entails the experimental data and supplementary information.

  19. Electron transfer catalysis with monolayer protected Au25 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, Sabrina; Hesari, Mahdi; Polo, Federico; Maran, Flavio

    2012-08-01

    Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ΔG° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ΔG°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors.Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ΔG° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ΔG°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors. This article was submitted as part of a Themed Issue on metallic clusters. Other papers on this topic can be found in issue 14 of vol. 4 (2012). This issue can be found from the Nanoscale homepage [http://www.rsc.org/nanoscale].

  20. Organics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  1. Organizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  2. Electrocrystallization of Monolayer-Protected Gold Clusters: Opening the Door to Quality, Quantity, and New Structures.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Sabrina; Dainese, Tiziano; Pan, Fangfang; Rissanen, Kari; Maran, Flavio

    2017-03-22

    Thiolate-protected metal clusters are materials of ever-growing importance in fundamental and applied research. Knowledge of their single-crystal X-ray structures has been instrumental to enable advanced molecular understanding of their intriguing properties. So far, however, a general, reliable, chemically clean approach to prepare single crystals suitable for accurate crystallographic analysis was missing. Here we show that single crystals of thiolate-protected clusters can be grown in large quantity and very high quality by electrocrystallization. This method relies on the fact that charged clusters display a higher solubility in polar solvents than their neutral counterparts. Nucleation of the electrogenerated insoluble clusters directly onto the electrode surface eventually leads to the formation of a dense forest of millimeter-long single crystals. Electrocrystallization of three known Au25(SR)18(0) clusters is described. A new cluster, Au25(S-nC5H11)18, was also prepared and found to crystallize by forming bundles of millimeter-long Au25 polymers.

  3. Mixed monolayer protected gold atom-oxide cluster synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Sindhu R; Aneesh, Padamadathil K; Sukumar, Chinthu; Rao, Talasila P

    2012-07-21

    Small atomic gold clusters in solution, Au(n), stabilized by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cysteine, have been synthesized potentiodynamically in quiescent aqueous solutions. The electrodissolution of gold to gold ions during an anodic scan and subsequent cluster formation during a cathodic scan in underpotential (UPDD) and overpotential dissolution-deposition (OPDD) regions were studied. The experimental potentiodynamic I-E profiles and chronoamperometric i-t transients are fit into reported theoretical models of adsorption and electrocrystallization. The plausible application of clusters/cluster film to cysteine sensing based on fluorescence quenching and square wave stripping voltammetry is demonstrated.

  4. Mixed monolayer protected gold atom-oxide cluster synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambiar, Sindhu R.; Aneesh, Padamadathil K.; Sukumar, Chinthu; Rao, Talasila P.

    2012-06-01

    Small atomic gold clusters in solution, Aun, stabilized by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cysteine, have been synthesized potentiodynamically in quiescent aqueous solutions. The electrodissolution of gold to gold ions during an anodic scan and subsequent cluster formation during a cathodic scan in underpotential (UPDD) and overpotential dissolution-deposition (OPDD) regions were studied. The experimental potentiodynamic I-E profiles and chronoamperometric i-t transients are fit into reported theoretical models of adsorption and electrocrystallization. The plausible application of clusters/cluster film to cysteine sensing based on fluorescence quenching and square wave stripping voltammetry is demonstrated.Small atomic gold clusters in solution, Aun, stabilized by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cysteine, have been synthesized potentiodynamically in quiescent aqueous solutions. The electrodissolution of gold to gold ions during an anodic scan and subsequent cluster formation during a cathodic scan in underpotential (UPDD) and overpotential dissolution-deposition (OPDD) regions were studied. The experimental potentiodynamic I-E profiles and chronoamperometric i-t transients are fit into reported theoretical models of adsorption and electrocrystallization. The plausible application of clusters/cluster film to cysteine sensing based on fluorescence quenching and square wave stripping voltammetry is demonstrated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30446e

  5. Mechanism of lipid bilayer penetration by mixed monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lehn, Reid; Atukorale, Prabhani; Carney, Randy; Stellacci, Francesco; Irvine, Darrell; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2013-03-01

    Recently, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) protected by a binary mixture of hydrophobic and hydrophilic alkanethiol ligands were observed to spontaneously penetrate cellular membranes via a non-specific mechanism. Penetration was observed even at low temperatures and in the presence of endocytotic inhibitors, implying that AuNPs crossed the membrane by a non-endocytotic process. Furthermore, penetration was shown to depend on the amphiphilicity and nanoscale morphology of the protecting monolayer. In this work, we use a variety of simulation techniques to elucidate the mechanism of lipid bilayer penetration and compare our results to experiments with lipid vesicles. We show that these AuNPs can stably embed within lipid bilayers by ``snorkeling'' charges out of the bilayer core; the stability of such a state is a function of particle size, the composition of the protecting monolayer, and other environmental conditions. We use detailed simulations to analyze structural changes in the surrounding lipids and show that the energy barrier for embedding is considerably reduced in the presence of bilayer defects. We expect that these results will enable the design of novel drug delivery carriers and biosensors.

  6. Determination of monolayer-protected gold nanoparticle ligand–shell morphology using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang; Yu, Miao; Kim, Hyewon; Mameli, Marta; Stellacci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    It is accepted that the ligand shell morphology of nanoparticles coated with a monolayer of molecules can be partly responsible for important properties such as cell membrane penetration and wetting. When binary mixtures of molecules coat a nanoparticle, they can arrange randomly or separate into domains, for example, forming Janus, patchy or striped particles. To date, there is no straightforward method for the determination of such structures. Here we show that a combination of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR can be used to determine the ligand shell structure of a series of particles covered with aliphatic and aromatic ligands of varying composition. This approach is a powerful way to determine the ligand shell structure of patchy particles; it has the limitation of needing a whole series of compositions and ligands' combinations with NMR peaks well separated and whose shifts due to the surrounding environment can be large enough. PMID:23149727

  7. Facile Attachment of TAT Peptide on Gold Monolayer Protected Clusters: Synthesis and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Sosibo, Ndabenhle M.; Keter, Frankline K.; Skepu, Amanda; Tshikhudo, Robert T.; Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2015-01-01

    High affinity thiolate-based polymeric capping ligands are known to impart stability onto nanosized gold nanoparticles. Due to the stable gold-sulfur bond, the ligand forms a protective layer around the gold core and subsequently controls the physicochemical properties of the resultant nanogold mononuclear protected clusters (AuMPCs). The choice of ligands to use as surfactants for AuMPCs largely depends on the desired degree of hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of the MPCs, normally dictated by the intended application. Subsequent surface modification of AuMPCs allows further conjugation of additional biomolecules yielding bilayer or multilayered clusters suitable for bioanalytical applications ranging from targeted drug delivery to diagnostics. In this study, we discuss our recent laboratory findings on a simple route for the introduction of Trans-Activator of Transcription (TAT) peptide onto the surface of biotin-derivatised gold MPCs via the biotin-strepavidin interaction. By changing the surface loading of biotin, controlled amounts of TAT could be attached. This bioconjugate system is very attractive as a carrier in intercellular delivery of various delivery cargoes such as antibodies, proteins and oligonucleotides.

  8. Charge-Transfer Effects in Ligand Exchange Reactions of Au25 Monolayer-Protected Clusters.

    PubMed

    Carducci, Tessa M; Blackwell, Raymond E; Murray, Royce W

    2015-04-16

    Reported here are second-order rate constants of associative ligand exchanges of Au25L18 nanoparticles (L = phenylethanethiolate) of various charge states, measured by proton nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature and below. Differences in second-order rate constants (M(-1) s(-1)) of ligand exchange (positive clusters ∼1.9 × 10(-5) versus negative ones ∼1.2 × 10(-4)) show that electron depletion retards ligand exchange. The ordering of rate constants between the ligands benzeneselenol > 4-bromobenzene thiol > benzenethiol reveals that exchange is accelerated by higher acidity and/or electron donation capability of the incoming ligand. Together, these observations indicate that partial charge transfer occurs between the nanoparticle and ligand during the exchange and that this is a rate-determining effect in the process.

  9. Hydrophilic Cucurbit[7]uril-Pseudorotaxane-Anchored-Monolayer-Protected Gold Nanorods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-20

    n]uril-based rotaxane or pseudorotaxane devices connected to gold electrode surfaces and spherical gold nanoparticles have previously been developed...PAL (blue), PAL@CB[7] (black), and RGNRs (red) recorded from a thin film coated onto glassy carbon electrodes in an electrolyte solution of Bu4NPF6...0.10 m) in acetonitrile with an Ag/AgCl (0.10 m) reference electrode . Scan rate: 0.05 V/s. Conclusions GNRs protected by a hydrophilic CB[7]-based-pseudo

  10. Emergence of complex chemistry on an organic monolayer.

    PubMed

    Prins, Leonard J

    2015-07-21

    In many origin-of-life scenarios, inorganic materials, such as FeS or mineral clays, play an important role owing to their ability to concentrate and select small organic molecules on their surface and facilitate their chemical transformations into new molecules. However, considering that life is made up of organic matter, at a certain stage during the evolution the role of the inorganic material must have been taken over by organic molecules. How this exactly happened is unclear, and, indeed, a big gap separates the rudimentary level of organization involving inorganic materials and the complex organization of cells, which are the building blocks of life. Over the past years, we have extensively studied the interaction of small molecules with monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) for the purpose of developing innovative sensing and catalytic systems. During the course of these studies, we realized that the functional role of this system is very similar to that typically attributed to inorganic surfaces in the early stages of life, with the important being difference that the functional properties (molecular recognition, catalysis, signaling, adaptation) originate entirely from the organic monolayer rather than the inorganic support. This led us to the proposition that this system may serve as a model that illustrates how the important role of inorganic surfaces in dictating chemical processes in the early stages of life may have been taken over by organic matter. Here, we reframe our previously obtained results in the context of the origin-of-life question. The following functional roles of Au NPs will be discussed: the ability to concentrate small molecules and create different local populations, the ability to catalyze the chemical transformation of bound molecules, and, finally, the ability to install rudimentary signaling pathways and display primitive adaptive behavior. In particular, we will show that many of the functional properties of the system

  11. Ligand-modulated interactions between charged monolayer-protected Au144(SR)60 gold nanoparticles in physiological saline.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Oscar D; Chen, Liao Y; Whetten, Robert L; Yacaman, Miguel J

    2015-02-07

    In order to determine how functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) interact in a near-physiological environment, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the icosahedral Au144 nanoparticles each coated with a homogeneous set of 60 thiolates selected from one of these five (5) types: 11-mercapto-1-undecanesulfonate -SC11H22(SO3(-)), 5-mercapto-1-pentanesulfonate -SC5H10(SO3(-)), 5-mercapto-1-pentaneamine -SC5H10(NH3(+)), 4-mercapto-benzoate -SPh(COO(-)), or 4-mercapto-benzamide -SPh(CONH3(+)). These thiolates were selected to elucidate how the aggregation behavior of AuNPs depends on ligand parameters, including the charge of the terminal group (anionic vs. cationic), and its length and conformational flexibility. For this purpose, each functionalized AuNP was paired with a copy of itself, placed in an aqueous cell, neutralized by 120 Na(+)/Cl(-) counter-ions and salinated with a 150 mM concentration of NaCl, to form five (5) systems of like-charged AuNPs pairs in a saline. We computed the potential of mean force (the reversible work of separation) as a function of the intra-pair distance and, based on which, the aggregation affinities. We found that the AuNPs coated with negatively charged, short ligands have very high affinities. Structurally, a significant number of Na(+) counter-ions reside on a plane between the AuNPs, mediating the interaction. Each such ion forms a "salt bridge" (or "ionic bonds") to both of the AuNPs when they are separated by its diameter plus 0.2-0.3 nm. The positively charged AuNPs have much weaker affinities, as Cl(-) counter-ions form fewer and weaker salt bridges between the AuNPs. In the case of Au144(SC11H22(SO3(-)))60 pair, the flexible ligands fluctuate much more than the other four cases. The large fluctuations disfavor the forming of salt bridges between two AuNPs, but enable hydrophobic contact between the exposed hydrocarbon chains of the two AuNPs, which are subject to an effective attraction at a separation much greater than the AuNP diameter and involve a higher concentration of counter ions in the inter-pair space.

  12. An in situ study on the coalescence of monolayer-protected Au-Ag nanoparticle deposits upon heating

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The structural evolution of thiolate-protected nanoparticles of gold, silver, and their alloys with various Au/Ag ratios (3:1, 1:1, and 1:3) upon heating was investigated by means of in situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction. The relationships between the coalescence and composition of nanoparticles, as well as the surfactant reactions, were clarified. Experimental results show that there existed a critical temperature ranging from 120°C to 164°C, above which the tiny broad X-ray diffraction peaks became sharp and strong due to particle coalescence. The coalescence temperatures for alloy nanoparticle deposits were clearly lower than those for pure metals, which can be ascribed to the rivalry between the thermodynamic effect due to alloying and the interactions between surface-assembled layers and the surface atoms of the nanoparticles. The strong affinity of thiolates to Ag and thus complex interactions give rise to a greater energy barrier for the coalescence of nanoparticles into the bulk and subsequent high coalescence temperature. The influences of particle coalescence on the optical and electrical properties of the nanoparticle deposits were also explored. PMID:25246861

  13. Ligand-modulated interactions between charged monolayer-protected Au144 (SR)60 gold nanoparticles in physiological saline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Oscar; Chen, Liao; Whetten, Robert; Yacaman, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    We studied the interactions of functionalized Au144 nanoparticles (NPs) in a near-physiological environment through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The AuNPs were coated with a homogeneous selection of 60 thiolates: 11-mercapto-1-undecanesulfonate, 5-mercapto-1-pentanesulfonate, 5-mercapto-1-pentane-amine, 4-mercapto-benzoate or 4-mercapto-benzamide. These ligands were selected to elucidate how the aggregation behavior depends on the ligands' sign of charge, length, and flexibility. Simulating the dynamics of a pair of identical AuNPs in a cell of saline of 150 mM NaCl in addition to 120 Na+/Cl- counter-ions, we computed the aggregation affinities from the potential of mean force as a function of the pair separation. We found that NPs coated with negatively charged, short ligands have the strongest affinities mediated by multiple Na+ counter-ions residing on a plane in-between the pair and forming ``salt bridges'' to both NPs. Positively charged NPs have weaker affinities, as Cl counter-ions form fewer and weaker salt bridges. The longer ligands' large fluctuations disfavor the forming of salt bridges, enable hydrophobic contact between the exposed hydrocarbon chains and interact at greater separations due to the fact that the screening effect is rather incomplete. Supported by the CONACYT, NIH, NSF and TACC.

  14. Ligand-modulated interactions between charged monolayer-protected Au144(SR)60 gold nanoparticles in physiological saline†

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Oscar D; Chen, Liao Y; Whetten, Robert L; Yacaman, Miguel J

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine how functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) interact in a near-physiological environment, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the icosahedral Au144 nanoparticles each coated with a homogeneous set of 60 thiolates selected from one of these five (5) types: 11-mercapto-1-undecanesulfonate −SC11H22−(SO3−), 5-mercapto-1-pentanesulfonate −SC5H10(SO3−), 5-mercapto-1-pentaneamine −S+10H(NH3+), 4-mercapto-benzoate −SPh(COO−), or 4-mercapto-benzamide −SPh(CONH3+3). These thiolates were selected to elucidate how the aggregation behavior of AuNPs depends on ligand parameters, including the charge of the terminal group (anionic vs. cationic), and its length and conformational flexibility. For this purpose, each functionalized AuNP was paired with a copy of itself, placed in an aqueous cell, neutralized by 120 Na+/Cl− counter-ions and salinated with a 150 mM concentration of NaCl, to form five (5) systems of like-charged AuNPs pairs in a saline. We computed the potential of mean force (the reversible work of separation) as a function of the intra-pair distance and, based on which, the aggregation affinities. We found that the AuNPs coated with negatively charged, short ligands have very high affinities. Structurally, a significant number of Na+ counter-ions reside on a plane between the AuNPs, mediating the interaction. Each such ion forms a “salt bridge” (or “ionic bonds”) to both of the AuNPs when they are separated by its diameter plus 0.2~0.3 nm. The positively charged AuNPs have much weaker affinities, as Cl− counter-ions form fewer and weaker salt bridges between the AuNPs. In the case of Au144(SC11H22(SO3−))60 pair, the flexible ligands fluctuate much more than the other four cases. The large fluctuations disfavor the forming of salt bridges between two AuNPs, but enable hydrophobic contact between the exposed hydrocarbon chains of the two AuNPs, which are subject to an effective attraction at a separation much greater than the AuNP diameter and involve a higher concentration of counter ions in the inter-pair space. PMID:25556346

  15. Chemical transformation of chiral monolayer-protected gold clusters: observation of ligand size effects on optical and chiroptical responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hiroshi; Kitaoka, Noriyuki; Sasaki, Akito

    2012-01-01

    Versatile functionalization of metal clusters is a key step in understanding the reactivity of protective monolayers. We here demonstrate that reaction of the outermost amino groups on (S)-/(R)-penicillamine-protected gold clusters with ethyl isocyanate readily modifies the chiral surface structure through carbamoylation. Interestingly, the clusters are electrophoretically separated by the size of the surface ligand, not by the size of the gold core, which is revealed by UV-vis, IR, and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy as well as SAXS measurements. The ligand size (or length) is extended through additional reactions of the carbamoylated amino groups with isocyanate, while the chemical similarity in ligand structures is realized by their IR spectral similarity. Optical and chiroptical responses of the separated cluster compounds are thus overall similar to each other, but a close inspection reveals that the ligand size has a small but distinct influence on the chiroptical response of the gold clusters.Versatile functionalization of metal clusters is a key step in understanding the reactivity of protective monolayers. We here demonstrate that reaction of the outermost amino groups on (S)-/(R)-penicillamine-protected gold clusters with ethyl isocyanate readily modifies the chiral surface structure through carbamoylation. Interestingly, the clusters are electrophoretically separated by the size of the surface ligand, not by the size of the gold core, which is revealed by UV-vis, IR, and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy as well as SAXS measurements. The ligand size (or length) is extended through additional reactions of the carbamoylated amino groups with isocyanate, while the chemical similarity in ligand structures is realized by their IR spectral similarity. Optical and chiroptical responses of the separated cluster compounds are thus overall similar to each other, but a close inspection reveals that the ligand size has a small but distinct influence on the chiroptical response of the gold clusters. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Typical EDX and FT-IR spectra, STEM images, phase transfer results of the gel separated cluster compounds 1R-3R, CD signal and absorption differences between the spectra of 1S/3S (and 1R/3R), a table of the excited states of (R)-(N-carbamoyl)penicillamine and the related biuret compound calculated by the TD-DFT method, together with illustrations of their HOMOs and LUMOs. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11544a

  16. Organ Donation

    MedlinePlus

    Organ donation takes healthy organs and tissues from one person for transplantation into another. Experts say that the ... lungs Skin Bone and bone marrow Cornea Most organ and tissue donations occur after the donor has died. But some ...

  17. Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Arthur

    2009-03-01

    In recent years a broad range of magnetoresistance phenomena have been reported for organic-based semiconductors, conductors and magnets. Organic systems illustrating magnetoresistance, include molecular- and polymer-based nonmagnetic semiconductors[1], organic-based spin polarized magnetic semiconductors,[2] nonmagnetic conducting polymers, and ferromagnet/organic semiconductor/ferromagnet heterojunctions. Examples of each of these organic-based systems will be presented together with a discussion of the roles of magnetotransport mechanisms including interconversion of singlets and triplets, compression of the electronic wavefunction in presence of a magnetic field, quantum interference phenomena, effects of a ``Coulomb gap'' in π* subbands of organic magnetic semiconductors with resulting near complete spin polarization in conduction and valence bands of magnetic organic semiconductors.[2,3] Opportunities for magnetotransport in Ferromagnet/Organic Semiconductor/Ferromagnet heterojunctions will be discussed.[4] [4pt] [1] V.N. Prigodin et al., Synth. Met. 156, 757 (2006); J.D. Bergeson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 067201 (2008) [0pt] [2] V.N. Prigodin et al., Adv. Mater. 14, 1230 (2002. [0pt] [3] J.B. Kortright et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, 257204 (2008). [0pt] [4] J.D. Bergeson, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 172505 (2008).

  18. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  19. Organic spintronics.

    PubMed

    Bergenti, I; Dediu, V; Prezioso, M; Riminucci, A

    2011-08-13

    Organic semiconductors are emerging materials in the field of spintronics. Successful achievements include their use as a tunnel barrier in magnetoresistive tunnelling devices and as a medium for spin-polarized current in transport devices. In this paper, we give an overview of the basic concepts of spin transport in organic semiconductors and present the results obtained in the field, highlighting the open questions that have to be addressed in order to improve devices performance and reproducibility. The most challenging perspectives will be discussed and a possible evolution of organic spin devices featuring multi-functional operation is presented.

  20. Organic Nomenclature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, David B.; Yindra, Laura R.

    2003-10-01

    Organic Nomenclature requires the following software, which is available for free download from the Internet: Netscape Navigator, version 6.2 or higher, or Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 5.0 or higher.

  1. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Karl

    2016-08-01

    Organic photovoltaics are on the verge of revolutionizing building-integrated photovoltaics. For other applications, however, several basic open scientific questions need answering to, in particular, further improve energy-conversion efficiency and lifetime.

  2. Organic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mielke

    2009-02-27

    Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

  3. Organizing chordates with an organizer.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi; D'Aniello, Salvatore; Escrivà, Hector

    2007-07-01

    Understanding how the chordate body plan originated and evolved is still controversial. The discovery by Spemann and Mangold in 1924 of the vertebrate organizer and its inductive properties in patterning the AP and DV axis was followed by a long gap until the 1960s when scientists started characterizing the molecular events responsible for such inductions. However, the evolutionary origin of the organizer itself remained obscure until very recently; did it appear together with the origin and radiation of vertebrates, or was it a chordate affair? A recent study by Yu and collaborators,1 which analyses the expression of several organizer-specific genes in amphioxus together with recent phylogenetic data that reversed the position of invertebrate extant chordates (e.g. urochordates and cephalochordates), indicates that the organizer probably appeared in early chordates. It likely had separate signalling centres generating BMP and Wnt signalling gradients along the DV and AP axis. The organizer was then lost in the urochordate lineage, most probably as an adaptation to a rapid and determinate development.

  4. Textual Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, David G.

    Aside from phonological and syntactical structures, text is organized by its dramatis personae, plot, figures, point of view, and theme. These are, respectively, the entities mentioned, the spatial-temporal and causal linkages of events, comparisons and contrasts, propositional attitudes, and correspondence to some pattern. These modes of…

  5. Classroom Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Good organization skills are key to running an efficient classroom, and having the right tools makes it easier to manage all of the tasks, save time, and be more productive. Having the power of information when and where anyone need it makes a difference in how well any teacher runs the classroom and knows his or her students. A Palm handheld…

  6. IVS Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  7. Organized DFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takashi; Honma, Michio; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Iriki, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Miyazaki, Norihiko; Onodera, Toshio; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Arima, Sumika; Kadota, Kazuya

    2009-04-01

    The category and objective of DFM production management are shown. DFM is not limited to an activity within a particular unit process in design and process. A new framework for DFM is required. DFM should be a total solution for the common problems of all processes. Each of them must be linked to one another organically. After passing through the whole of each process on the manufacturing platform, quality of final products is guaranteed and products are shipped to the market. The information platform is layered with DFM, APC, and AEC. Advanced DFM is not DFM for partial optimization of the lithography process and the design, etc. and it should be Organized DFM. They are managed with high-level organizational IQ. The interim quality between each step of the flow should be visualized. DFM will be quality engineering if it is Organized DFM and common metrics of the quality are provided. DFM becomes quality engineering through effective implementation of common industrial metrics and standardized technology. DFM is differential technology, but can leverage standards for efficient development.

  8. Organic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jérome, D.

    1994-10-01

    The discovery of organic superconductors in 1980 was an happy conclusion of a search for high T c superconductors (although T c was modestly in the Kelvin range). The first generation of organic superconductors belonged to a large family of quasi-one-dimensional conducting cation radical salts. Most of them exhibit a wide range of new phenomena, including the competition between ground states, the influence of a magnetic field on the non ordered phase of a quasi-one-dimensional electron gas and the onset of spin density wave phases at high magnetic field with quantized Hall effect. The extensive study of the (TM) 2X series has shown that electron interactions are repulsive and of the order of the electron bandwidth. However, the nature of the ground states relies essentially on the balance between charge localisation boosted by the Umklapp scattering and the interchain hopping intergal. Second and third generation organic superconductors are two and three dimensional molecular conductors respectively with maximum T c of 12K (ET) 2X and 33 K (fullerides).

  9. Organic superconductors.

    PubMed

    Saito, Gunzi; Yoshida, Yukihiro

    2011-06-01

    The present status of organic superconductors of charge-transfer (CT) type based on donor molecules is reviewed. Along with the superconducting phases of such materials and also of oxide superconductors, reside spin-ordered phases such as spin-density wave (SDW) and antiferromagnetic (AF) phases. We briefly describe the recent development of superconductors having a superconducting phase next to a spin-disorder state (quantum spin liquid state). In addition to the CT type superconductors, there are a few single-component superconductors under high pressure.

  10. Accelerating the initial rate of hydrolysis of methyl parathion with laser excitation using monolayer protected 10 nm Au nanoparticles capped with a Cu(bpy) catalyst.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Scott A; Nita, Rafaela; Moore, Martin; Zabetakis, Dan; Chang, Eddie; Knight, D Andrew

    2012-04-28

    Using a low power green laser, we have demonstrated a rate acceleration of ~2-fold for the hydrolysis of methyl parathion by irradiating the plasmon absorption band of Au nanoparticles capped with a Cu(bpy) catalyst.

  11. Optical modeling of the plasmon band of monolayer-protected nanometal clusters in pure and in polymer matrix thin films as a function of heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Sankaran; Anto, Bibin T.; Ho, Peter K.-H.

    2009-03-01

    The plasmon band shape of thin films of gold nanoparticles and their composites can be quantitatively modeled in a surprisingly simple way by taking into account (i) quantum-size effect of the Au core on its permittivity, (ii) nanostructure effect of the core shell and matrix on the effective medium, and (iii) optical properties of thin films in a transfer-matrix formalism. From the excellent agreement achieved with the optical spectra of these films, neat and when dispersed in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) matrices, details of the nanocrystal relaxation, desorption of the ligand shell, and ultimate surface melting and core-core coalescence to give percolating conductive paths during heat treatment were extracted.

  12. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Krebs, Frederik C.; Chen, Hongzheng

    2013-12-01

    Energy inflation, the constant encouragement to economize on energy consumption and the huge investments in developing alternative energy resources might seem to suggest that there is a global shortage of energy. Far from it, the energy the Sun beams on the Earth each hour is equivalent to a year's supply, even at our increasingly ravenous rate of global energy consumption [1]. But it's not what you have got it's what you do with it. Hence the intense focus on photovoltaic research to find more efficient ways to harness energy from the Sun. Recently much of this research has centred on organic solar cells since they offer simple, low-cost, light-weight and large-area flexible photovoltaic structures. This issue with guest editors Frederik C Krebs and Hongzheng Chen focuses on some of the developments at the frontier of organic photovoltaic technology. Improving the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic systems, while maintaining the inherent material, economic and fabrication benefits, has absorbed a great deal of research attention in recent years. Here significant progress has been made with reports now of organic photovoltaic devices with efficiencies of around 10%. Yet operating effectively across the electromagnetic spectrum remains a challenge. 'The trend is towards engineering low bandgap polymers with a wide optical absorption range and efficient hole/electron transport materials, so that light harvesting in the red and infrared region is enhanced and as much light of the solar spectrum as possible can be converted into an electrical current', explains Mukundan Thelakkat and colleagues in Germany, the US and UK. In this special issue they report on how charge carrier mobility and morphology of the active blend layer in thin film organic solar cells correlate with device parameters [2]. The work contributes to a better understanding of the solar-cell characteristics of polymer:fullerene blends, which form the material basis for some of the most

  13. The Organic Solid State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Dwaine O.; Wlygul, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews interesting and useful electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of the organic solid state. Offers speculation as to areas of fruitful research. Discusses organic superconductors, conducting organic polymers, organic metals, and traces recent history of creation of organic metals. (JM)

  14. Ordered organic-organic multilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lunt, Richard R.

    2016-04-05

    An ordered multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure is formed by depositing at least two layers of thin film crystalline organic materials successively wherein the at least two thin film layers are selected to have their surface energies within .+-.50% of each other, and preferably within .+-.15% of each other, whereby every thin film layer within the multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure exhibit a quasi-epitaxial relationship with the adjacent crystalline organic thin film.

  15. Ordered organic-organic multilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Lunt, Richard R

    2015-01-13

    An ordered multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure is formed by depositing at least two layers of thin film crystalline organic materials successively wherein the at least two thin film layers are selected to have their surface energies within .+-.50% of each other, and preferably within .+-.15% of each other, whereby every thin film layer within the multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure exhibit a quasi-epitaxial relationship with the adjacent crystalline organic thin film.

  16. Agriculture: Organic Farming

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Organic Farming - Organically grown food is food grown and processed using no synthetic fertilizers or pesticides. Pesticides derived from natural sources (such as biological pesticides) may be used in producing organically grown food.

  17. A Scarcity of Organs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Areen, Judith

    1988-01-01

    Resistance to organ donation and the continuing shortage of donated organs is discussed and four legal approaches to organ acquisition are examined. A fifth, based on the principle of supported individual autonomy, is proposed. (MSE)

  18. Yersinia enterocolitica organism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture shows the organism Yersinia enterocolitica . Yersinia organisms cause a wide range of disease but are most often associated with diarrhea or gastrointestinal symptoms. Yersinia infection is ...

  19. Successful organic dairy systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demand for organic dairy products has continually increased and at times outpaced supply for a number of years. This has created favorable milk pricing for certified organic dairy farmers, as the stability of organic milk prices has provided organic dairy farmers with a security not found in the con...

  20. Learning Organization Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on learning organization issues. "How Action Learning Builds the Learning Organization: A Conceptual Analysis" (Michael Marquardt, Ty Alexander) is a systematic examination of four subsystems of learning organizations (learning dynamics, organization renewal, people empowerment, knowledge…

  1. From Learning Organization to Practically Wise Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Jennifer; Gibbs, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although the notion of wisdom confronts the economic rationale of business organizations, this paper aims to argue that organizations are coming under increasing pressure not only to learn, change and adapt, but also to take actions that are ethically acceptable and respond to the expectations of multiple stakeholders, or in other words…

  2. Internet organ solicitation, explained.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark E

    2006-01-01

    The growth of internet-based communications and the increasing demand for living organ donors are resulting in more use of Web sites for organ solicitation. Web resources have the capacity to improve public awareness about both organ donations and transplant outcomes. Rules for organ donation and fair allocation must follow legal principles regarding organ solicitation. Categories of internet recipient/donor matching services include "clearing house," "membership," and "individual" sites. All these raise ethical concerns related to the individual recipient/donor relationship and to the current system of organ allocation. However, a lack of rules and regulations regarding internet solicitation exists. Several pragmatic steps are proposed.

  3. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  4. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  5. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs when the tissue and muscles of the pelvic floor no longer support the pelvic organs resulting in ... organ prolapse. Supporting muscles and tissue of the pelvic floor may become torn or stretched because of labor ...

  6. Campylobacter jejuni organism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... after a person has been exposed to the organism. Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common ... ill cat or dog. This is what campylobacter organisms look like through a microscope. (Image courtesy of ...

  7. Organics go hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzani, Guglielmo; Petrozza, Annamaria; Caironi, Mario

    2017-01-01

    From displays to solar cells, the field of organic optoelectronics has come a long way over the past 50 years, but the realization of an electrically pumped organic laser remains elusive. The answer may lie with hybrid organic-inorganic materials called perovskites.

  8. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  9. What is organic certification?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Certified organic crop production is a holistic approach to sustainable and healthy food production to enhance the well being of the consumer, while protecting natural resources. Organic certification was implemented by the National Organic Program (NOP) in 2002 in recognition of the necessity for c...

  10. Teaching Organic Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reemer, Rita, Ed.

    This teaching guide is designed as a text composed of factual outlines to help teachers interpret the organic method of gardening. Organized as a practical course for elementary through adult education levels, it presents examples and activities on how to plan, start, and maintain an organic garden. The first five chapters cover history and…

  11. Organizations as Social Inventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, T. Barr

    In discussing what is meant by the concept "organization," the author raises the questions, "What is an organization that it can have such a thing as a goal?" and, assuming it appropriate to speak of organizational goals, "how do the goals of individuals bear on those of the organization?" The author submits that answers to these questions raise…

  12. Inverted organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Bailey-Salzman, Rhonda F.

    2016-12-06

    The present disclosure relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices grown in an inverted manner. An inverted organic photosensitive optoelectronic device of the present disclosure comprises a reflective electrode, an organic donor-acceptor heterojunction over the reflective electrode, and a transparent electrode on top of the donor-acceptor heterojunction.

  13. Cultural Issues in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on cultural issues in organizations. "Emotion Management and Organizational Functions: A Study of Action in a Not-for-Profit Organization" (Jamie Callahan Fabian) uses Hochschild's emotion systems theory and Parsons' social systems theory to explain why members of an organization managed their…

  14. Organ Harvesting and Transplants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskette, Kimberly G.; Ritz, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and animals need healthy organs to live. Due to medical conditions and accidents, some organs fail to function properly. For these reasons, the medical community has experimented and can now perform successful organ transplants, allowing patients to continue to live their lives. Many countries have medical programs where individuals can…

  15. Organic watermelon production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing perception by consumers that organic food tastes better and is healthier continues to expand the demand for organically produced crops. Research investigating certified organic production requires a systems approach to determine the optimum combination of individual components to max...

  16. The Semantic Learning Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sicilia, Miguel-Angel; Lytras, Miltiadis D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is introducing the concept of a "semantic learning organization" (SLO) as an extension of the concept of "learning organization" in the technological domain. Design/methodology/approach: The paper takes existing definitions and conceptualizations of both learning organizations and Semantic Web technology to develop…

  17. Organic herbicide update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed research is the top research priority among organic producers. Very few chemical weed control options are approved for organic use (corn gluten meal, vinegar, clove oil, and most recently ammonium pelargonate ), but additional compounds are under investigation and pursuing organic approval. C...

  18. Organic chemistry in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Organic cosmochemistry, organic materials in space exploration, and biochemistry of man in space are briefly surveyed. A model of Jupiter's atmosphere is considered, and the search for organic molecules in the solar system and in interstellar space is discussed. Materials and analytical techniques relevant to space exploration are indicated, and the blood and urine analyses performed on Skylab are described.

  19. Challenges in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Beyar, Rafael

    2011-04-01

    Organ transplantation has progressed tremendously with improvements in surgical methods, organ preservation, and pharmaco-immunologic therapies and has become a critical pathway in the management of severe organ failure worldwide. The major sources of organs are deceased donors after brain death; however, a substantial number of organs come from live donations, and a significant number can also be obtained from non-heart-beating donors. Yet, despite progress in medical, pharmacologic, and surgical techniques, the shortage of organs is a worldwide problem that needs to be addressed internationally at the highest possible levels. This particular field involves medical ethics, religion, and society behavior and beliefs. Some of the critical ethical issues that require aggressive interference are organ trafficking, payments for organs, and the delicate balance in live donations between the benefit to the recipient and the possible harm to the donor and others. A major issue in organ transplantation is the definition of death and particularly brain death. Another major critical factor is the internal tendency of a specific society to donate organs. In the review below, we will discuss the various challenges that face organ donation worldwide, and particularly in Israel, and some proposed mechanisms to overcome this difficulty.

  20. Organs as inheritable property?

    PubMed

    Voo, Teck Chuan; Holm, Soren

    2014-01-01

    It has been argued that organs should be treated as individual tradable property like other material possessions and assets, on the basis that this would promote individual freedom and increase efficiency in addressing the shortage of organs for transplantation. If organs are to be treated as property, should they be inheritable? This paper seeks to contribute to the idea of organs as inheritable property by providing a defence of a default of the family of a dead person as inheritors of transplantable organs. In the course of discussion, various succession rules for organs and their justifications will be suggested. We then consider two objections to organs as inheritable property. Our intention here is to provoke further thought on whether ownership of one's body parts should be assimilated to property ownership.

  1. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Peumans, Peter; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2013-01-22

    A photoactive device is provided. The device includes a first electrode, a second electrode, and a photoactive region disposed between and electrically connected to the first and second electrodes. The photoactive region further includes an organic donor layer and an organic acceptor layer that form a donor-acceptor heterojunction. The mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region are different by a factor of at least 100, and more preferably a factor of at least 1000. At least one of the mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region is greater than 0.001 cm.sup.2/V-sec, and more preferably greater than 1 cm.sup.2/V-sec. The heterojunction may be of various types, including a planar heterojunction, a bulk heterojunction, a mixed heterojunction, and a hybrid planar-mixed heterojunction.

  2. Organic contaminant separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, Peter; Hemberger, Barbara J.

    1991-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a polyolefin tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.01 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the tube, (b) passing a solvent through the tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the tube. Further, a chromatographic apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a polyolefin tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.01 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the tube is disclosed.

  3. The Knowing Organization as Learning Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choo, Chun Wei

    2001-01-01

    In organizational knowledge cycles there is continuous flow of information between sensemaking, knowledge creation, and decision making. The outcome of information use in one provides the context and resources for use in another. The example of the World Health Organization's smallpox eradication program illustrates a continuous cycle of…

  4. Organics on Mars?

    PubMed

    ten Kate, Inge L

    2010-01-01

    Organics are expected to exist on Mars based on meteorite infall, in situ production, and any possible biological sources. Yet they have not been detected on the martian surface; are they there, or are we not capable enough to detect them? The Viking gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer did not detect organics in the headspace of heated soil samples with a detection limit of parts per billion. This null result strongly influenced the interpretation of the reactivity seen in the Viking biology experiments and led to the conclusion that life was not present and, instead, that there was some chemical reactivity in the soil. The detection of perchlorates in the martian soil by instruments on the Phoenix lander and the reports of methane in the martian atmosphere suggest that it may be time to reconsider the question of organics. The high-temperature oxidizing properties of perchlorate will promote combustion of organics in pyrolytic experiments and may have affected the ability of both Phoenix's organic analysis experiment and the Viking mass spectrometer experiments to detect organics. So the question of organics on Mars remains open. A primary focus of the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory will be the detection and identification of organic molecules by means of thermal volatilization, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry--as was done on Viking. However, to enhance organic detectability, some of the samples will be processed with liquid derivatization agents that will dissolve organics from the soil before pyrolysis, which may separate them from the soil perchlorates. Nonetheless, the problem of organics on Mars is not solved, and for future missions other organic detection techniques should therefore be considered as well.

  5. Organic substances in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeson, Phillip E.

    1981-01-01

    This is the third of several compilations of briefing papers on water quality by the U.S. Geological Survey. Each briefing paper is prepared in a simple, nontechnical, easy-to-understand manner. This U.S. Geological Survey Circular contains papers on selected organic substances in water. Briefing papers are included on ' Why study organic substances in water. ', ' Taste and odor in water ', and ' Classification and fractionation of organic solutes in natural waters'. (USGS)

  6. Origins of organic geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    When organic geochemistry actually began as a recognized geoscience is a matter of definition and perspective. Constraints on its beginning are placed by the historical development of its parent disciplines, geology and organic chemistry. These disciplines originated independently and developed in parallel, starting in the latter half of the 18th century and flourishing thereafter into the 21st century. Organic geochemistry began sometime between 1860 and 1983; I argue that 1930 is the best year to mark its origin.

  7. Organics on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Kate, Inge L.

    2010-08-01

    Organics are expected to exist on Mars based on meteorite infall, in situ production, and any possible biological sources. Yet they have not been detected on the martian surface; are they there, or are we not capable enough to detect them? The Viking gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer did not detect organics in the headspace of heated soil samples with a detection limit of parts per billion. This null result strongly influenced the interpretation of the reactivity seen in the Viking biology experiments and led to the conclusion that life was not present and, instead, that there was some chemical reactivity in the soil. The detection of perchlorates in the martian soil by instruments on the Phoenix lander and the reports of methane in the martian atmosphere suggest that it may be time to reconsider the question of organics. The high-temperature oxidizing properties of perchlorate will promote combustion of organics in pyrolytic experiments and may have affected the ability of both Phoenix's organic analysis experiment and the Viking mass spectrometer experiments to detect organics. So the question of organics on Mars remains open. A primary focus of the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory will be the detection and identification of organic molecules by means of thermal volatilization, followed by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry - as was done on Viking. However, to enhance organic detectability, some of the samples will be processed with liquid derivatization agents that will dissolve organics from the soil before pyrolysis, which may separate them from the soil perchlorates. Nonetheless, the problem of organics on Mars is not solved, and for future missions other organic detection techniques should therefore be considered as well.

  8. The organization of thanatology.

    PubMed

    Doka, Kenneth J; Heflin-Wells, E Neil; Martin, Terry L; Redmond, Lula M; Schachter, Sherry R

    2011-01-01

    This article explores, using Wilensky's Model of Professionalization, the emergence of professional organizations within the thanatology. The authors review the history of four organizations--The Foundation of Thanatology, Ars Moriendi, The Forum for Death Education and Counseling (now the Association for Death Education and Counseling: A Thanatology Organization [ADEC]), and The International Work Group on Death, Dying, and Bereavement (IWG). The authors speculate on some of the reasons that the first two failed while IWG and ADEC remain viable-while noting challenges that these remaining thanatological organizations will experience as they seek to continue to stay relevant.

  9. ORGANIC CATATONIA: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Niraj

    2000-01-01

    Catatonia is a clinical syndrome associated with a wide variety of psychiatric, medical and neurological disorders. Despite several reports in the literature of a wide range of medical and neurological diseases causing catatonia, there has been a tendency to consider catatonia as purely psychiatric disorder. The review attempts to look at the concept of organic catatonia from a historical viewpoint, including its place in the psychiatric classification, discusses the various etiological causes of organic catatonia, and them goes through some important management issues in organic catatonia. The review suggests that organic catatonic disorder must be first considered in every patient with catatonic signs, particularly in a patient with new onset catatonia. PMID:21407969

  10. Titan's organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager discovered nine simple organic molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. Complex organic solids, called tholins, produced by irradiation of the simulated Titanian atmosphere, are consistent with measured properties of Titan from ultraviolet to microwave frequencies and are the likely main constituents of the observed red aerosols. The tholins contain many of the organic building blocks central to life on earth. At least 100-m, and possibly kms thicknesses of complex organics have been produced on Titan during the age of the solar system, and may exist today as submarine deposits beneath an extensive ocean of simple hydrocarbons.

  11. Computer-Assisted Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, David James

    2009-01-01

    Organizing refers to methods of distributing physical and symbolic tasks among multiple agents in order to achieve goals. My dissertation investigates the dynamics of organizing in hybrid information processing systems that incorporate both humans and computers. To explain the behavior of these hybrid systems, I develop and partially test a theory…

  12. THE QUASI NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PIFER, ALAN

    ORGANIZED TO MEET URGENT NATIONAL NEEDS, PROVIDE INDEPENDENT JUDGMENT, AND OFFER FRESH SOLUTIONS TO COMPLEX PROBLEMS, THE QUASI NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION IS DEFINED AS A NONPROFIT ASSOCIATION OR INSTITUTION LODGED IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR OF SOCIETY BUT FINANCED LARGELY OR ENTIRELY BY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, RESPONSIBLE TO ITS OWN BOARD OF…

  13. Get Organized around Assets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferlazzo, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Educators, Ferlazzo claims, often perceive English language learners through a lens of deficits. We would serve these learners better, especially as readers, if we viewed them through a lens focused on assets. The author, who was a community organizer for 19 years before becoming an ESL teacher, relates the process of community organizing--helping…

  14. Sustainable Learning Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velazquez, Luis E.; Esquer, Javier; Munguia, Nora E.; Moure-Eraso, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to debate how companies may better become a sustainable learning organization by offering the most used and insightful concepts of sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: Through literature review, learning organization and sustainability perspectives are explored and compared. Findings: Learning…

  15. Resources for Community Organizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valadez, Cristina, Comp.

    This document is composed of two parts: a bibliography of community organizing and support materials and a directory of community organizing resource centers. The 25 bibliographic entries are grouped according to subject, and include author, title, publication date, publisher, number of pages, annotation, and ordering information. Subjects…

  16. Are Learning Organizations Pragmatic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleri, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the future prospects of the popular concept known as the learning organization; to trace the influence of philosophical pragmatism on the learning organization and to consider its potential impact on the future; and to emphasize how pragmatic theories have shaped the development of Deming's total…

  17. Organization Development. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains four papers on organization development and human resources. "Identification of Key Predictors of Rapid Change Adaptation in a Service Organization" (Constantine Kontoghiorghes, Carol Hansen) reports on the results of an exploratory study, which suggests that rapid change adaptation will be more likely to occur in…

  18. Enamides: valuable organic substrates.

    PubMed

    Carbery, David R

    2008-10-07

    Enamides display a fine balance of stability and reactivity, which is now leading to their increasing use in organic synthesis. Enamides offer multiple opportunities for the inclusion of nitrogen based functionality into organic systems. Recent examples of these compounds as substrates are discussed in this article.

  19. Stress and the Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Richard H., Ed.

    The proceedings of a conference on stress and the organization, sponsored by the Business Institute in Gerontology, are presented. The materials address the following areas of concern related to the problem of stress, including: (1) physiology and psychological effects; (2) organization-induced stress and its manifestations; (3) mid-life…

  20. HRD Function in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on the human resource development (HRD) function in organizations. In "Comparing Quality Profiles of Training Organizations--A Multi-Level Approach" (Martin Mulder), analysis of over 1,300 training projects indicates that variation in quality is almost entirely explained by the…

  1. Mr. Learning Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumaine, Brian

    1994-01-01

    Peter Senge's learning organization theory suggests that the new challenges of the information age demand radical transformation of businesses, schools, and governments. Examples from Ford, Federal Express, and GS Technologies illustrate the use of the tools of the learning organization. (JOW)

  2. Organization Theory as Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Thomas B.

    The theory that organizations are ideological inventions of the human mind is discussed. Organizational science is described as an ideology which is based upon social concepts and experiences. The main justification for organizational theory is that it attempts to answer why we behave as we do in social organizations. Ways in which ideas and…

  3. MICROWAVES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of microwaves, a non-ionizing radiation, on organic reactions is described both in polar solvents and under solvent-free conditions. The special applications are highlighted in the context of solventless organic synthesis which involve microwave (MW) exposure of neat r...

  4. Self-organizing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Sato, T.; Complexity Simulation Group

    1999-03-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to extract a grand view of self-organization through an extensive computer simulation of plasmas. The assertion is made that self-organization is governed by three key processes, i.e. the existence of an open complex system, the existence of information (energy) sources and the existence of entropy generation and expulsion processes. We find that self-organization takes place in an intermittent fashion when energy is supplied continuously from outside. In contrast, when the system state is suddenly changed into a non-equilibrium state externally, the system evolves stepwise and reaches a minimum energy state. We also find that the entropy production rate is maximized whenever a new ordered structure is created and that if the entropy generated during the self-organizing process is expelled from the system, then the self-organized structure becomes more prominent and clear.

  5. Organic chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    The course of organic chemical evolution preceding the emergence of life on earth is discussed based on evidence of processes occurring in interstellar space, the solar system and the primitive earth. Following a brief review of the equilibrium condensation model for the origin and evolution of the solar system, consideration is given to the nature and organic chemistry of interstellar clouds, comets, Jupiter, meteorites, Venus and Mars, and the prebiotic earth. Major issues to be resolved in the study of organic chemical evolution on earth are identified regarding condensation and accretion in the solar nebula, early geological evolution, the origin and evolution of the atmosphere, organic production rates, organic-inorganic interactions, environmental fluctuations, phase separation and molecular selectivity.

  6. Liver sharing and organ procurement organization performance.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Sommer E; Chow, Eric K H; Massie, Allan; Luo, Xun; Zaun, David; Snyder, Jon J; Israni, Ajay K; Kasiske, Bert; Segev, Dorry L

    2015-03-01

    Whether the liver allocation system shifts organs from better performing organ procurement organizations (OPOs) to poorer performing OPOs has been debated for many years. Models of OPO performance from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients make it possible to study this question in a data-driven manner. We investigated whether each OPO's net liver import was correlated with 2 performance metrics [observed to expected (O:E) liver yield and liver donor conversion ratio] as well as 2 alternative explanations [eligible deaths and incident listings above a Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score of 15]. We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that the allocation system transfers livers from better performing OPOs to centers with poorer performing OPOs. Also, having fewer eligible deaths was not associated with a net import. However, having more incident listings was strongly correlated with the net import, both before and after Share 35. Most importantly, the magnitude of the variation in OPO performance was much lower than the variation in demand: although the poorest performing OPOs differed from the best ones by less than 2-fold in the O:E liver yield, incident listings above a MELD score of 15 varied nearly 14-fold. Although it is imperative that all OPOs achieve the best possible results, the flow of livers is not explained by OPO performance metrics, and instead, it appears to be strongly related to differences in demand.

  7. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (<30%) consists of a rich organic inventory of soluble organic compounds, including key compounds important in terrestrial biochemistry [2-4]. Different carbonaceous meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10

  8. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  9. Organic Compounds in Stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Clemett. Simon J.; Sandford, Scott A.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Hoerz, Fredrich

    2011-01-01

    The successful return of the STARDUST spacecraft provides a unique opportunity to investigate the nature and distribution of organic matter in cometary dust particles collected from Comet 81P/Wild-2. Analysis of individual cometary impact tracks in silica aerogel using the technique of two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) demonstrates the presence of complex aromatic organic matter. While concerns remain as to the organic purity of the aerogel collection medium and the thermal effects associated with hypervelocity capture, the majority of the observed organic species appear indigenous to the impacting particles and are hence of cometary origin. While the aromatic fraction of the total organic matter present is believed to be small, it is notable in that it appears to be N-rich. Spectral analysis in combination with instrumental detection sensitivities suggest that N is incorporated predominantly in the form of aromatic nitriles (R-C N). While organic species in the STARDUST samples do share some similarities with those present in the matrices of carbonaceous chondrites, the closest match is found with stratospherically collected interplanetary dust particles. These findings are consistent with the notion that a fraction of interplanetary dust is of cometary origin. The presence of complex organic N-containing species in comets has astrobiological implications since comets are likely to have contributed to the prebiotic chemical inventory of both the Earth and Mars.

  10. Cryopreservation of Living Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasawa, Ichiro; Nagata, Shinichi; Kimura, Naohiro

    Cryopreservation is considered to be the most promising way of preserving living organs or tissues for a long period of time without casuing any damage to their biological functions. However, cryopreservation has been succeeded only for simple and small-size tissues such as spermatozoon, ovum, erythrocyte, bone marrow and cornea. Cryopreservation of more complex and large-scale organs are not yet succssful. The authors have attempted to establish a technique for cryopreservation of larger living organs. An experiment was carried out using daphnia (water flea). The optimum rates of freezing and thawing were determined together with the optimum selection of cryoprotectant. High recovery rate was achieved under these conditions.

  11. Hydrothermal organic synthesis experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Ways in which heat is useful in organic synthesis experiments are described, and experiments on the hydrothermal destruction and synthesis of organic compounds are discussed. It is pointed out that, if heat can overcome kinetic barriers to the formation of metastable states from reduced or oxidized starting materials, abiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions is a distinct possibility. However, carefully controlled experiments which replicate the descriptive variables of natural hydrothermal systems have not yet been conducted with the aim of testing the hypothesis of hydrothermal organic systems.

  12. Hospital development and the performance of organ procurement organizations.

    PubMed

    McKinney, M M; Begun, J W; Ozcan, Y A

    1998-06-01

    With more than 56,000 patients on the national waiting list for organ transplants and relatively little growth in the number of donors, organ procurement organizations now recognize the need to aggressively market their services and the range of donor procurement opportunities to hospital personnel. This study examines the types and levels of hospital development activities being conducted by organ procurement organizations, the characteristics of organ procurement organizations that are more involved in hospital development, and the relationship between hospital development and organ procurement. Results from a national survey indicate that, as of the mid-1990s, organ procurement organizations had not made major investments in hospital development despite an increased recognition of the importance of these activities. Organ procurement organizations whose directors were more committed to hospital development exhibited higher levels of hospital development activity. Efforts to formalize hospital development activities through the establishment of a hospital development department and evaluation standards were associated with more organs procured per donor.

  13. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Volatile Organic Compounds' Impact on Indoor Air Quality On this page: Introduction Sources Health Effects Levels ...

  14. Small Scale Organic Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, V.; Crist, DeLanson R.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using small scale experimentation in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Describes small scale filtration techniques as an example of a semi-micro method applied to small quantities of material. (MLH)

  15. Porous organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, James R.; Trewin, Abbie; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2010-11-01

    Most synthetic materials that show molecular-scale porosity consist of one-, two- or three-dimensional networks. Porous metal-organic frameworks in particular have attracted a lot of recent attention. By contrast, discrete molecules tend to pack efficiently in the solid state, leaving as little empty space as possible, which leads to non-porous materials. This Perspective discusses recent developments with discrete organic molecules that are porous in the solid state. Such molecules, which may be either crystalline or amorphous, can be categorized as either intrinsically porous (containing permanent covalent cavities) or extrinsically porous (inefficiently packed). We focus on the possible advantages of organic molecules over inorganic or hybrid systems in terms of molecular solubility, choice of components and functionalities, and structural mobility and responsiveness in non-covalent extended solids. We also highlight the potential for 'undiscovered' porous systems among the large number of cage-like organic molecules that are already known.

  16. The NASA Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This Handbook, effective 13 September 1994, documents the NASA organization, defines terms, and sets forth the policy and requirements for establishing, modifying, and documenting the NASA organizational structure and for assigning organizational responsibilities.

  17. Micro-Organ Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steven R.; Leslie, Julia; Chang, Robert C.; Starly, Binil; Sun, Wei; Culbertson, Christopher; Holtorf, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Micro-organ devices (MODs) are being developed to satisfy an emerging need for small, lightweight, reproducible, biological-experimentati on apparatuses that are amenable to automated operation and that imp ose minimal demands for resources (principally, power and fluids). I n simplest terms, a MOD is a microfluidic device containing a variety of microstructures and assemblies of cells, all designed to mimic a complex in vivo microenvironment by replicating one or more in vivo micro-organ structures, the architectures and composition of the extr acellular matrices in the organs of interest, and the in vivo fluid flows. In addition to microscopic flow channels, a MOD contains one or more micro-organ wells containing cells residing in microscopic e xtracellular matrices and/or scaffolds, the shapes and compositions o f which enable replication of the corresponding in vivo cell assembl ies and flows.

  18. Soil Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, G.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review is presented of some of the organic compounds and reactions that occur in soil. Included are nitrogenous compounds, compounds of phosphorus and sulfur, carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, and aliphatic acids. (BB)

  19. Biomaterials in Artificial Organs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kambic, Helen E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Biomaterials are substances or combinations of substances that can be used in a system that treats, augments, or replaces any tissue, organ, or body function. The nature and role of these substances, particularly in the cadiovascular system, are discussed. (JN)

  20. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  1. Trace Organic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ember, Lois R.

    1978-01-01

    Trace organic analysis (TOA) is seen as a more useful way to quantify environmental pollutants. Current practices and future trends are discussed in detail. Seven steps in TOA are identified: collection, storage, extraction, concentration, isolation, identification, and quantification. (MA)

  2. Virtual Organizations: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nami, Mohammad Reza

    The need to remain competitive in the open market forces companies to concentrate on their core competencies while searching for alliances when additional skills or resources are needed to fulfill business opportunities. The changing business situation of companies and customer needs have motivated researchers to introduce Virtual Organization (VO) idea. A Virtual Organization is always a form of partnership and managing partners and handling partnerships are crucial. Virtual organizations are defined as a temporary collection of enterprises that cooperate and share resources, knowledge, and competencies to better respond to business opportunities. This paper presents base concepts of virtual organizations including properties, management concepts, operational concepts, and main issues in collaboration such as security and authentication.

  3. Safety organizations and experts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, G.; Rubinstein, R. I.; Pinto, J. J.; Meschkow, S. Z.

    1977-01-01

    Handbook lists organizations and experts in specific, well defined areas of safety technology. Special emphasis is given to relevant safety information sources on aircraft fire hazards and aircraft interior flammability.

  4. Organic Chemistry in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical observations, theoretical modeling, laboratory simulation and analysis of extraterrestrial material have enhanced our knowledge of the inventory of organic matter in the interstellar medium (ISM) and on small bodies such as comets and asteroids (Ehrenfreund & Charnley 2000). Comets, asteroids and their fragments, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), contributed significant amounts of extraterrestrial organic matter to the young Earth. This material degraded and reacted in a terrestrial prebiotic chemistry to form organic structures that may have served as building blocks for life on the early Earth. In this talk I will summarize our current understanding of the organic composition and chemistry of interstellar clouds. Molecules of astrobiological relevance include the building blocks of our genetic material: nucleic acids, composed of subunits such as N-heterocycles (purines and pyrimidines), sugars and amino acids. Signatures indicative of inheritance of pristine and modified interstellar material in comets and meteorites will also be discussed.

  5. Underfunding in Terrorist Organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Jacob N.; Siegel, David A.

    A review of international terrorist activity reveals a pattern of financially strapped operatives working for organizations that seem to have plenty of money. To explain this observation, and to examine when restricting terrorists’ funds will reduce their lethality, we model a hierarchical terror organization in which leaders delegate financial and logistical tasks to middlemen, but cannot perfectly monitor them for security reasons. These middlemen do not always share their leaders’ interests: the temptation exists to skim funds from financial transactions. When middlemen are sufficiently greedy and organizations suffer from sufficiently strong budget constraints, leaders will not fund attacks because the costs of skimming are too great. Using general functional forms, we find important nonlinearities in terrorists’ responses to government counter-terrorism. Restricting terrorists’ funds may be ineffective until a critical threshold is reached, at which point cooperation within terrorist organizations begins to break down and further government actions have a disproportionately large impact.

  6. Organic magnetic field sensor

    DOEpatents

    McCamey, Dane; Boehme, Christoph

    2017-01-24

    An organic, spin-dependent magnetic field sensor (10) includes an active stack (12) having an organic material with a spin-dependence. The sensor (10) also includes a back electrical contact (14) electrically coupled to a back of the active stack (12) and a front electrical contact (16) electrically coupled to a front of the active stack (12). A magnetic field generator (18) is oriented so as to provide an oscillating magnetic field which penetrates the active stack (12).

  7. Long range chromatin organization

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Luciana I Gómez; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-01-01

    Splicing is a predominantly co-transcriptional process that has been shown to be tightly coupled to transcription. Chromatin structure is a key factor that mediates this functional coupling. In light of recent evidence that shows the importance of higher order chromatin organization in the coordination and regulation of gene expression, we discuss here the possible roles of long-range chromatin organization in splicing and alternative splicing regulation. PMID:25764333

  8. Inverted organic photosensitive device

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Tong, Xiaoran; Lee, Jun Yeob; Cho, Yong Joo

    2015-09-08

    There is disclosed a method for preparing the surface of a metal substrate. The present disclosure also relates to an organic photovoltaic device including a metal substrate made by such method. Also disclosed herein is an inverted photosensitive device including a stainless steel foil reflective electrode, an organic donor-acceptor heterojunction over the reflective electrode, and a transparent electrode over the donor-acceptor heterojunction.

  9. Deposition of organic facies

    SciTech Connect

    Huc, A.Y.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to present recent advances in organic sedimentology. The papers discuss a wide range of aspects of this field of research. The diverse nature of these papers includes modern environments, considered as present-day analogs of source rock formation; numerical modeling of paleoproductivity; and studies related to specific time periods during which organic matter accumulation has been particularly impressive (the Kimmeridgian, Cenomanian-Turonian, and others).

  10. Interstellar organic chemistry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1972-01-01

    Most of the interstellar organic molecules have been found in the large radio source Sagittarius B2 toward the galactic center, and in such regions as W51 and the IR source in the Orion nebula. Questions of the reliability of molecular identifications are discussed together with aspects of organic synthesis in condensing clouds, degradational origin, synthesis on grains, UV natural selection, interstellar biology, and contributions to planetary biology.

  11. Is old organic matter simple organic matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunan, Naoise; Lerch, Thomas; Pouteau, Valérie; Mora, Philippe; Changey, Fréderique; Kätterer, Thomas; Herrmann, Anke

    2016-04-01

    Bare fallow soils that have been deprived of fresh carbon inputs for prolonged periods contain mostly old, stable organic carbon. In order to shed light on the nature of this carbon, the functional diversity profiles (MicroResp™, Biolog™ and enzyme activity spectra) of the microbial communities of long-term barefallow soils were analysed and compared with those of the microbial communities from their cultivated counterparts. The study was based on the idea that microbial communities adapt to their environment and that therefore the catabolic and enzymatic profiles would reflect the type of substrates available to the microbial communities. The catabolic profiles suggested that the microbial communities in the long-term bare-fallow soil were exposed to a less diverse range of substrates and that these substrates tended to be of simpler molecular forms. Both the catabolic and enzyme activity profiles suggested that the microbial communities from the long-term bare-fallow soils were less adapted to using polymers. These results do not fit with the traditional view of old, stable carbon being composed of complex, recalcitrant polymers. An energetics analysis of the substrate use of the microbial communities for the different soils suggested that the microbial communities from the long-term bare-fallow soils were better adapted to using readily oxidizable,although energetically less rewarding, substrates. Microbial communities appear to adapt to the deprivation of fresh organic matter by using substrates that require little investment.

  12. Tubular organ epithelialisation

    PubMed Central

    Saksena, Rhea; Gao, Chuanyu; Wicox, Mathew; de Mel, Achala

    2016-01-01

    Hollow, tubular organs including oesophagus, trachea, stomach, intestine, bladder and urethra may require repair or replacement due to disease. Current treatment is considered an unmet clinical need, and tissue engineering strategies aim to overcome these by fabricating synthetic constructs as tissue replacements. Smart, functionalised synthetic materials can act as a scaffold base of an organ and multiple cell types, including stem cells can be used to repopulate these scaffolds to replace or repair the damaged or diseased organs. Epithelial cells have not yet completely shown to have efficacious cell–scaffold interactions or good functionality in artificial organs, thus limiting the success of tissue-engineered grafts. Epithelial cells play an essential part of respective organs to maintain their function. Without successful epithelialisation, hollow organs are liable to stenosis, collapse, extensive fibrosis and infection that limit patency. It is clear that the source of cells and physicochemical properties of scaffolds determine the successful epithelialisation. This article presents a review of tissue engineering studies on oesophagus, trachea, stomach, small intestine, bladder and urethral constructs conducted to actualise epithelialised grafts. PMID:28228931

  13. Building a learning organization.

    PubMed

    Garvin, D A

    1993-01-01

    Continuous improvement programs are proliferating as corporations seek to better themselves and gain an edge. Unfortunately, however, failed programs far outnumber successes, and improvement rates remain low. That's because most companies have failed to grasp a basic truth. Before people and companies can improve, they first must learn. And to do this, they need to look beyond rhetoric and high philosophy and focus on the fundamentals. Three critical issues must be addressed before a company can truly become a learning organization, writes HBS Professor David Garvin. First is the question of meaning: a well-grounded, easy-to-apply definition of a learning organization. Second comes management: clearer operational guidelines for practice. Finally, better tools for measurement can assess an organization's rate and level of learning. Using these "three Ms" as a framework, Garvin defines learning organizations as skilled at five main activities: systematic problem solving, experimentation with new approaches, learning from past experience, learning from the best practices of others, and transferring knowledge quickly and efficiently throughout the organization. And since you can't manage something if you can't measure it, a complete learning audit is a must. That includes measuring cognitive and behavioral changes as well as tangible improvements in results. No learning organization is built overnight. Success comes from carefully cultivated attitudes, commitments, and management processes that accrue slowly and steadily. The first step is to foster an environment conducive to learning. Analog Devices, Chaparral Steel, Xerox, GE, and other companies provide enlightened examples.

  14. Organizing a mucosal defense.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Rodney D; Lorenz, Robin G

    2005-08-01

    Gastrointestinal associated lymphoid tissue can be divided into loosely organized effector sites, which include the lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocytes, and more organized structures, such as mesenteric lymph nodes (LNs), Peyer's patches (PPs), isolated lymphoid follicles, and cryptopatches (CPs). These organized structures in the gastrointestinal tract have been hypothesized to play the role of primary lymphoid organ, supporting the extrathymic development of T lymphocytes (CPs), secondary lymphoid organs involved in the induction of the mucosal immune response (PPs), and tertiary lymphoid structures whose function is still under debate (isolated lymphoid follicles). The most widely studied lymphoid structure found in the small intestine is the PP. PPs are secondary lymphoid structures, and their development and function have been extensively investigated. However, single lymphoid aggregates resembling PPs have been also described in humans and in the murine small intestines. These isolated lymphoid follicles have both germinal centers and an overlying follicle-associated epithelium, suggesting that they also can function as inductive sites for the mucosal immune response. This review compares and contrasts the development and function of the four main organized gastrointestinal lymphoid tissues: CPs, isolated lymphoid follicles, PPs, and mesenteric LNs.

  15. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, M. J.; Coursin, D. B.

    1993-01-01

    The multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), though newly described, has manifested itself in intensive care unit (ICU) patients for several decades. As the name implies, it is a syndrome in which more than one organ system fails. Failure of these multiple organ systems may or may not be related to the initial injury or disease process for which the patient was admitted to the ICU. MODS is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in current ICU practice. While the pathophysiology of MODS is not completely known, much evidence indicates that, during the initial injury which precipitates ICU admission, a chain of events is initiated which results in activation of several endogenous metabolic pathways. These pathways release compounds which, in and of themselves, are usually cytoprotective. However, an over exuberant activation of these endogenous systems results in an inflammatory response which can lead to development of failure in distant organs. As these organs fail, they activate and propagate the systemic inflammatory response. No therapy has proven entirely efficacious at modulating this inflammatory response and the incidence and severity of MODS. In current ICU practice, treatment is focused on prevention and treating individual organ dysfunction as it develops. With increased understanding of the pathophysiology of MODS therapy will come newer modalities which inhibit or interfere with the propagation of the endogenous systemic inflammatory response. These newer therapies hold great promise and already some are undergoing clinical investigation. PMID:7825351

  16. Micro-organ device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); von Gustedt-Gonda, legal representative, Iris (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  17. Micro-Organ Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  18. Organic contaminant separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, P.

    1993-12-28

    A process is presented of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube. The solvent is capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus is presented for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium. The apparatus includes a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester. The composite tube has an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and has sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube. 2 figures.

  19. Organic contaminant separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, Peter

    1995-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube is disclosed.

  20. Organic containment separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, Peter

    1995-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube including a polymeric base material selected from the group of polyolefins and polyfluorocarbons and particles of a carbon allotrope material adfixed to the inner wall of the polymeric base material, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a composite tube including a polymeric base material selected from the group of polyolefins and polyfluorocarbons and particles of a carbon allotrope material adfixed to the inner wall of the polymeric base material, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube is disclosed.

  1. Organic contaminant separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube is disclosed.

  2. Organic contaminant separator

    DOEpatents

    Mar, Peter D.

    1994-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube including a polymeric base material selected from the group of polyolefins and polyfluorocarbons and particles of a carbon allotrope material adfixed to the inner wall of the polymeric base material, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a composite tube including a polymeric base material selected from the group of polyolefins and polyfluorocarbons and particles of a carbon allotrope material adfixed to the inner wall of the polymeric base material, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube is disclosed.

  3. Physics of Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brütting, Wolfgang

    2004-05-01

    Organic semiconductors are of steadily growing interest as active components in electronics and optoelectronics. Due to their flexibility, low cost and ease-of-production they represent a valid alternative to conventional inorganic semiconductor technology in a number of applications, such as flat panel displays and illumination, plastic integrated circuits or solar energy conversion. Although first commercial applications of this technology are being realized nowadays, there is still the need for a deeper scientific understanding in order to achieve optimum device performance.This special issue of physica status solidi (a) tries to give an overview of our present-day knowledge of the physics behind organic semiconductor devices. Contributions from 17 international research groups cover various aspects of this field ranging from the growth of organic layers and crystals, their electronic properties at interfaces, their photophysics and electrical transport properties to the application of these materials in different devices like organic field-effect transistors, photovoltaic cells and organic light-emitting diodes.Putting together such a special issue one soon realizes that it is simply impossible to fully cover the whole area of organic semiconductors. Nevertheless, we hope that the reader will find the collection of topics in this issue useful for getting an up-to-date review of a field which is still developing very dynamically.

  4. Hydrothermal organic synthesis experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    The serious scientific debate about spontaneous generation which raged for centuries reached a climax in the nineteenth century with the work of Spallanzani, Schwann, Tyndall, and Pasteur. These investigators demonstrated that spontaneous generation from dead organic matter does not occur. Although no aspects of these experiments addressed the issue of whether organic compounds could be synthesized abiotically, the impact of the experiments was great enough to cause many investigators to assume that life and its organic compounds were somehow fundamentally different than inorganic compounds. Meanwhile, other nineteenth-century investigators were showing that organic compounds could indeed be synthesized from inorganic compounds. In 1828 Friedrich Wohler synthesized urea in an attempt to form ammonium cyanate by heating a solution containing ammonia and cyanic acid. This experiment is generally recognized to be the first to bridge the artificial gap between organic and inorganic chemistry, but it also showed the usefulness of heat in organic synthesis. Not only does an increase in temperature enhance the rate of urea synthesis, but Walker and Hambly showed that equilibrium between urea and ammonium cyanate was attainable and reversible at 100 C. Wohler's synthesis of urea, and subsequent syntheses of organic compounds from inorganic compounds over the next several decades dealt serious blows to the 'vital force' concept which held that: (1) organic compounds owe their formation to the action of a special force in living organisms; and (2) forces which determine the behavior of inorganic compounds play no part in living systems. Nevertheless, such progress was overshadowed by Pasteur's refutation of spontaneous generation which nearly extinguished experimental investigations into the origins of life for several decades. Vitalism was dealt a deadly blow in the 1950's with Miller's famous spark-discharge experiments which were undertaken in the framework of the Oparin

  5. Organic bioelectronics in medicine.

    PubMed

    Löffler, S; Melican, K; Nilsson, K P R; Richter-Dahlfors, A

    2017-02-09

    A major challenge in the growing field of bioelectronic medicine is the development of tissue interface technologies promoting device integration with biological tissues. Materials based on organic bioelectronics show great promise due to a unique combination of electronic and ionic conductivity properties. In this review, we outline exciting developments in the field of organic bioelectronics and demonstrate the medical importance of these active, electronically controllable materials. Importantly, organic bioelectronics offer a means to control cell-surface attachment as required for many device-tissue applications. Experiments have shown that cells readily attach and proliferate on reduced but not oxidized organic bioelectronic materials. In another application, the active properties of organic bioelectronics were used to develop electronically triggered systems for drug release. After incorporating drugs by advanced loading strategies, small compound drugs were released upon electrochemical trigger, independent of charge. Another type of delivery device was used to achieve well-controlled, spatiotemporal delivery of cationic drugs. Via electrophoretic transport within a polymer, cations were delivered with single-cell precision. Finally, organic bioelectronic materials are commonly used as electrode coatings improving the electrical properties of recording and stimulation electrodes. Because such coatings drastically reduce the electrode impedance, smaller electrodes with improved signal-to-noise ratio can be fabricated. Thus, rapid technological advancement combined with the creation of tiny electronic devices reacting to changes in the tissue environment helps to promote the transition from standard pharmaceutical therapy to treatment based on 'electroceuticals'. Moreover, the widening repertoire of organic bioelectronics will expand the options for true biological interfaces, providing the basis for personalized bioelectronic medicine.

  6. Sustainable systems as organisms?

    PubMed

    Ho, Mae-Wan; Ulanowicz, Robert

    2005-10-01

    Schrödinger [Schrödinger, E., 1944. What is Life? Cambridge University Press, Cambridge] marvelled at how the organism is able to use metabolic energy to maintain and even increase its organisation, which could not be understood in terms of classical statistical thermodynamics. Ho [Ho, M.W., 1993. The Rainbow and the Worm, The Physics of Organisms, World Scientific, Singapore; Ho, M.W., 1998a. The Rainbow and the Worm, The Physics of Organisms, 2nd (enlarged) ed., reprinted 1999, 2001, 2003 (available online from ISIS website www.i-sis.org.uk)] outlined a novel "thermodynamics of organised complexity" based on a nested dynamical structure that enables the organism to maintain its organisation and simultaneously achieve non-equilibrium and equilibrium energy transfer at maximum efficiency. This thermodynamic model of the organism is reminiscent of the dynamical structure of steady state ecosystems identified by Ulanowicz [Ulanowicz, R.E., 1983. Identifying the structure of cycling in ecosystems. Math. Biosci. 65, 210-237; Ulanowicz, R.E., 2003. Some steps towards a central theory of ecosystem dynamics. Comput. Biol. Chem. 27, 523-530]. The healthy organism excels in maintaining its organisation and keeping away from thermodynamic equilibrium--death by another name--and in reproducing and providing for future generations. In those respects, it is the ideal sustainable system. We propose therefore to explore the common features between organisms and ecosystems, to see how far we can analyse sustainable systems in agriculture, ecology and economics as organisms, and to extract indicators of the system's health or sustainability. We find that looking at sustainable systems as organisms provides fresh insights on sustainability, and offers diagnostic criteria for sustainability that reflect the system's health. In the case of ecosystems, those diagnostic criteria of health translate into properties such as biodiversity and productivity, the richness of cycles, the

  7. Microtubule dynamics and organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogterom, Marileen

    2000-03-01

    Microtubules are rigid biopolymers found in all higher order cells. They are a mayor part of the cytoskeleton, the network of protein polymers that gives the cell its shape and rigidity and allows for various forms of (intra)cellular motility. The intracellular spatial organization of the microtubule network is constantly changing as the microtubules adapt to their different functions. In part, this spatial organization depends on the assembly dynamics (including microtubule nucleation) and forces generated by the microtubules themselves. To understand these mechanisms, we study the physical aspects connected with the assembly, force generation and spatial organization of microtubules in simplified model systems, in the absence of other cellular components. We measure the forces generated by individual microtubules by making them grow against a microfabricated barrier. These experiments show that a single microtubule can generate at least several picoNewton of force, comparable to what is known for motor proteins. Theoretical modeling of force-generation by multi-protofilament polymers is used to predict force-velocity relations that can be compared to experimental data. We study the self-organization of microtubules by confining them to microfabricated chambers that mimic the geometry of living cells. The distribution of microtubule nucleation sites in these chambers is controlled to study its effect on the organization of the microtubule network. We find that so-called microtubule asters position themselves in response to forces generated by dynamic microtubules. Experiments aimed at measuring the forces acting on these asters using optical trapping techniques will be described.

  8. Organic optical bistable switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jiangeng; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate an organic optical bistable switch by integrating an efficient organic photodetector on top of a transparent electrophosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (TOLED). The bistability is achieved with an external field-effect transistor providing positive feedback. In the "LOW" state, the TOLED is off and the current in the photodetector is solely its dark current. In the "HIGH" state, the TOLED emits light that is directly coupled into the integrated photodetector through the transparent cathode. The photocurrent then is fed back to the TOLED, maintaining it in the HIGH state. The green electrophosphorescent material, fac tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium [Ir(ppy)3] doped into a 4,4'-N,N'-dicarbazole-biphenyl host was used as the luminescent material in the TOLED, while alternating thin layers of copper phthalocyanine and 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic bis-benzimidazole were used as the active region of the organic photodetector. The circuit has a 3 dB bandwidth of 25 kHz, and can be switched between HIGH and LOW using pulses as narrow as 60 ns. The bistable switch can be both electrically and optically reset, making it a candidate for image-retaining displays (e.g., electronic paper) and other photonic logic applications. The integrated organic device also has broad use as a linear circuit element in applications such as automatic brightness control.

  9. Organ Transplants in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Baigenzhin, Abay; Doskaliyev, Zhaksylyk; Tuganbekova, Saltanat; Zharikov, Serik; Altynova, Sholpan; Gaipov, Abduzhappar

    2015-11-01

    The Republic of Kazakhstan is one of the fastest developing countries in the world and has a health care system that is unique in Central Asia. Its organ transplant services are also developing rapidly. We aimed to analyze and briefly report on the current status of organ transplant in the Republic of Kazakhstan. We analyzed organ transplant activities in that country for the period 2012 to 2014. All data were collected from the official database of the National Transplant Coordinating Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. At the end of 2014, the number of transplant centers had increased to 10, three of which could perform multiorgan transplants; during the same period, the number of deceased-donor organ-donating hospitals increased up to 37. By 2013, the transplant activity rate for all centers had reached 9.22 per million population. During the previous 3 years (2012-2014), there was a 3-fold increase in the number of living donors and an 18-fold increase in the number of kidney transplants. Between 2012 and 2014, the number of living-donor liver transplants increased from 17 to 25, and the number of deceased-donor transplants increased from 3 to 7. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), the number of heart transplants increased to 7 cases. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), Kazakhstan achieved a significant improvement in the organization of its transplant services, and a noticeable upward trend in the system continues.

  10. Organ transplantation in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Paris, Wayne; Nour, Bakr

    2010-09-01

    Concern has increasingly been expressed about the growing number of reports of medical personnel participating in the transplantation of human organs or tissues taken from the bodies of executed prisoners, handicapped patients, or poor persons who have agreed to part with their organs for commercial purposes. Such behavior has been universally considered as ethically and morally reprehensible, yet in some parts of the world the practice continues to flourish. The concept of justice demands that every person have an equal right to life, and to protect this right, society has an obligation to ensure that every person has equal access to medical care. Regrettably, the Egyptian system does not legally recognize brain death and continues to allow the buying and selling of organs. For more than 30 years in Egypt, the ability to pay has determined who receives an organ and economic need has determined who will be the donor. As transplant professionals, it is important that we advocate on behalf of all patients, potential recipients, and donors and for those who are left out and not likely to receive a donor organ in an economically based system. Current issues associated with this debate are reviewed and recommendations about how to address them in Egypt are discussed.

  11. Learning organizations: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Dowd, J F

    1999-01-01

    Many believe that successful companies beyond the year 2000 will all need to operate as learning organizations. Stimulating this vision have been Dr. Peter Senge of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Dr. James Milojkovic of Stanford University. As a learning organization, all members of a company will learn more about other parts of the organization and more about essential processes such as: helping each other learn, sharing, cooperating, leading, and participating in organizational decisions. This learning together will change existing stratifications, such as "bosses make decisions and employees implement the decisions without being consulted." A learning organization is a group of very different people who work together closely; bosses learn to treat each person as a responsible adult and hourly employees learn to participate in decisions. Learning organizations have a strong commitment to continual change. Each participant is expected to personally learn and grow. Everyone is expected to be open and share information, all while being tactful. The question that is continually before everyone in the company is "how can we do better?"

  12. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Directors. View all news articles Organ Procurement & Transplantation Network U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health ... Privacy Policy Questions? Contact Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network United Network for Organ Sharing Post Office Box ...

  13. Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Hujsak, Karl A.; Ferris, Daniel P.; Prokofjevs, Aleksandrs; Majerz, Irena; Szklarz, Przemysław; Zhang, Huacheng; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Jakubas, Ryszard; Hong, Seungbum; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2016-01-01

    Flexible organic materials possessing useful electrical properties, such as ferroelectricity, are of crucial importance in the engineering of electronic devices. Up until now, however, only ferroelectric polymers have intrinsically met this flexibility requirement, leaving small-molecule organic ferroelectrics with room for improvement. Since both flexibility and ferroelectricity are rare properties on their own, combining them in one crystalline organic material is challenging. Herein, we report that trisubstituted haloimidazoles not only display ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity—the properties that originate from their non-centrosymmetric crystal lattice—but also lend their crystalline mechanical properties to fine-tuning in a controllable manner by disrupting the weak halogen bonds between the molecules. This element of control makes it possible to deliver another unique and highly desirable property, namely crystal flexibility. Moreover, the electrical properties are maintained in the flexible crystals. PMID:27734829

  14. Organizing the thymus gland.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Juan José; García-Ceca, Javier; Alfaro, David; Stimamiglio, Marco Augusto; Cejalvo, Teresa; Jiménez, Eva; Zapata, Agustín G

    2009-02-01

    Eph receptors and their ligands, ephrins, are molecules involved in the morphogenesis of numerous tissues, including the central nervous system in which they play a key role in determining cell positioning and tissue domains containing or excluding nerve fibers. Because common features have been suggested to occur in the microenvironmental organization of brain and thymus, a highly compartmentalized organ central for T cell differentiation, we examined the expression and possible role of Eph/ephrins in the biology of the thymus gland. We reviewed numerous in vivo and in vitro results that confirm a role for Eph and ephrins in the maturation of the thymic epithelial cell (TEC) network and T cell differentiation. Their possible involvement in different steps of early thymus organogenesis, including thymus primordium branching, lymphoid colonization, and thymocyte-TEC interactions, that determine the organization of a mature three-dimensional thymic epithelial network is also analyzed.

  15. Groundwater and organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, H.E.

    1995-12-01

    Groundwater is a major source of drinking water for many communities. Unfortunately, organic chemicals such as dry cleaning fluids, solvent, fuels, and pesticides have contaminated groundwater in many areas, rendering the groundwater useless as a drinking water resource. In many cases, the groundwater cannot be cleaned up with current technologies, particularly if the groundwater has been contaminated with immiscible (low solubility) organic liquids. In this talk, I will describe the path I have followed from geologist to geochemist and finally to environmental engineer. As a geologist, I studied the chemistry of rock metamorphosis. As a geochemist, I explored for gold and other metals. Now as an environmental engineer, I investigate the behavior of organic liquids in the subsurface. While these fields all appear very different, in reality I have always focused on the interaction of rocks or sediments with the fluids with which they come in contact.

  16. Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Hujsak, Karl A.; Ferris, Daniel P.; Prokofjevs, Aleksandrs; Majerz, Irena; Szklarz, Przemysław; Zhang, Huacheng; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Jakubas, Ryszard; Hong, Seungbum; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2016-10-01

    Flexible organic materials possessing useful electrical properties, such as ferroelectricity, are of crucial importance in the engineering of electronic devices. Up until now, however, only ferroelectric polymers have intrinsically met this flexibility requirement, leaving small-molecule organic ferroelectrics with room for improvement. Since both flexibility and ferroelectricity are rare properties on their own, combining them in one crystalline organic material is challenging. Herein, we report that trisubstituted haloimidazoles not only display ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity--the properties that originate from their non-centrosymmetric crystal lattice--but also lend their crystalline mechanical properties to fine-tuning in a controllable manner by disrupting the weak halogen bonds between the molecules. This element of control makes it possible to deliver another unique and highly desirable property, namely crystal flexibility. Moreover, the electrical properties are maintained in the flexible crystals.

  17. The geothermal power organization

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, K.L.

    1997-12-31

    The Geothermal Power Organization is an industry-led advisory group organized to advance the state-of-the-art in geothermal energy conversion technologies. Its goal is to generate electricity from geothermal fluids in the most cost-effective, safe, and environmentally benign manner possible. The group achieves this goal by determining the Member`s interest in potential solutions to technological problems, advising the research and development community of the needs of the geothermal energy conversion industry, and communicating research and development results among its Members. With the creation and adoption of a new charter, the Geothermal Power Organization will now assist the industry in pursuing cost-shared research and development projects with the DOE`s Office of Geothermal Technologies.

  18. Stretchable Organic Semiconductor Devices.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yan; Zhang, Xinwen; Xie, Linghai; Qi, Dianpeng; Chandran, Bevita K; Chen, Xiaodong; Huang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Stretchable electronics are essential for the development of intensely packed collapsible and portable electronics, wearable electronics, epidermal and bioimplanted electronics, 3D surface compliable devices, bionics, prosthesis, and robotics. However, most stretchable devices are currently based on inorganic electronics, whose high cost of fabrication and limited processing area make it difficult to produce inexpensive, large-area devices. Therefore, organic stretchable electronics are highly attractive due to many advantages over their inorganic counterparts, such as their light weight, flexibility, low cost and large-area solution-processing, the reproducible semiconductor resources, and the easy tuning of their properties via molecular tailoring. Among them, stretchable organic semiconductor devices have become a hot and fast-growing research field, in which great advances have been made in recent years. These fantastic advances are summarized here, focusing on stretchable organic field-effect transistors, light-emitting devices, solar cells, and memory devices.

  19. Treatment of organic waste

    DOEpatents

    Grantham, LeRoy F.

    1979-01-01

    An organic waste containing at least one element selected from the group consisting of strontium, cesium, iodine and ruthenium is treated to achieve a substantial reduction in the volume of the waste and provide for fixation of the selected element in an inert salt. The method of treatment comprises introducing the organic waste and a source of oxygen into a molten salt bath maintained at an elevated temperature to produce solid and gaseous reaction products. The gaseous reaction products comprise carbon dioxide and water vapor, and the solid reaction products comprise the inorganic ash constituents of the organic waste and the selected element which is retained in the molten salt. The molten salt bath comprises one or more alkali metal carbonates, and may optionally include from 1 to about 25 wt.% of an alkali metal sulfate.

  20. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kong, Fung-Ming; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  1. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-06-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  2. Total Health Organization.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Total Health Organization is a holistic care an humanitarian relief agency with special emphasis on Africa and Third World countries. It was founded in 1987 with a focus on hunger relief, health assistance, handicap, habitat and human rights of destitutes, socially disadvantaged persons and communities which it has adopted as the socially forgotten people (SFP). Total Health Organization is a non-political, non-profit, and international non-governmental organization, having official relations with several national, regional and world bodies. Some of the project activities include: free mobile clinics to rural destitutes, AIDS and related health education, an information and research library, and an NGO Development Center. For more information, please contact: Dr. Obi Osisiogu, Founder and President, Total Health International Center, 147 Ikot-Ekpene Road, P.O. Box 1726, Aba, Abia State Nigeria, Tel: 082-222279, Telex: 63311 ANYA NG, Fax: 234-82-227512.

  3. Organic Chemistry of Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the molecular structures and C,N,H-isotopic compositions of organic matter in meteorites reveal a complex history beginning in the parent interstellar cloud which spawned the solar system. Incorporation of interstellar dust and gas in the protosolar nebula followed by further thermal and aqueous processing on primordial parent bodies of carbonaceous, meteorites have produced an inventory of diverse organic compounds including classes now utilized in biochemistry. This inventory represents one possible set of reactants for chemical models for the origin of living systems on the early Earth. Evidence bearing on the history of meteoritic organic matter from astronomical observations and laboratory investigations will be reviewed and future research directions discussed.

  4. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1979-01-01

    Features taken from various models of Titan's atmosphere are combined in a working composite model that provides environmental constraints within which different pathways for organic chemical synthesis are determined. Experimental results and theoretical modeling suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite is dominated by two processes: photochemistry and energetic particle bombardment. Photochemical reactions of CH4 in the upper atmosphere can account for the presence of C2 hydrocarbons. Reactions initiated at various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic rays, Saturn 'wind', and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4-N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the UV-visible absorbing stratospheric haze, the reddish appearance of the satellite, and some of the C2 hydrocarbons. In the lower atmosphere photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. It is concluded that the surface of Titan may contain ancient or recent organic matter (or both) produced in the atmosphere.

  5. Organic/Organic' heterojunctions: organic light emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Neal R; Wang, Weining; Alloway, Dana M; Placencia, Diogenes; Ratcliff, Erin; Brumbach, Michael

    2009-05-19

    Heterojunctions created from thin films of two dissimilar organic semiconductor materials [organic/organic' (O/O') heterojunctions] are an essential component of organic light emitting diode displays and lighting systems (OLEDs, PLEDs) and small molecule or polymer-based organic photovoltaic (solar cell) technologies (OPVs). O/O' heterojunctions are the site for exciton formation in OLEDs, and the site for exciton dissociation and photocurrent production in OPVs. Frontier orbital energy offsets in O/O' heterojunctions establish the excess free energy controlling rates of charge recombination and formation of emissive states in OLEDs and PLEDs. These energy offsets also establish the excess free energy which controls charge separation and the short-circuit photocurrent (J(SC) ) in OPVs, and set the upper limit for the open-circuit photopotential (V(OC) ). We review here how these frontier orbital energy offsets are determined using photoemission spectroscopies, how these energies change as a function of molecular environment, and the influence of interface dipoles on these frontier orbital energies. Recent examples of heterojunctions based on small molecule materials are shown, emphasizing those heterojunctions which are of interest for photovoltaic applications. These include heterojunctions of perylenebisimide dyes with trivalent metal phthalocyanines, and heterojunctions of titanyl phthalocyanine with C(60) , and with pentacene. Organic solar cells comprised of donor/acceptor pairs of each of these last three materials confirm that the V(OC) scales with the energy offsets between the HOMO of the donor and LUMO of the acceptor ($E_{{\\rm HOMO}^{\\rm D} } - E_{{\\rm LUMO}^{\\rm A} }$).

  6. Bioethics of organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    As the ability to transplant organs and tissues has grown, the demand for these procedures has increased as well--to the point at which it far exceeds the available supply creating the core ethical challenge for transplantation--rationing. The gap between supply and demand, although large, is worse than it appears to be. There are two key steps to gaining access to a transplant. First, one must gain access to a transplant center. Then, those waiting need to be selected for a transplant. Many potential recipients do not get admitted to a program. They are deemed too old, not of the right nationality, not appropriate for transplant as a result of severe mental impairment, criminal history, drug abuse, or simply because they do not have access to a competent primary care physician who can refer them to a transplant program. There are also financial obstacles to access to transplant waiting lists in the United States and other nations. In many poor nations, those needing transplants simply die because there is no capacity or a very limited capacity to perform transplants. Although the demand for organs now exceeds the supply, resulting in rationing, the size of waiting lists would quickly expand were there to suddenly be an equally large expansion in the number of organs available for transplantation. Still, even with the reality of unavoidable rationing, saving more lives by increasing organ supply is a moral good. Current public policies for obtaining organs from cadavers are not adequate in that they do not produce the number of organs that public polls of persons in the United States indicate people are willing to donate.

  7. Organic contaminants in mountains.

    PubMed

    Daly, Gillian L; Wania, Frank

    2005-01-15

    The study of organic contaminants at high altitudes is motivated by the potential risk that they pose to humans living in, or depending on resources derived from, mountains and to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in alpine areas. Mountains are also ideal settings to study contaminant transport and behavior along gradients of climate and surface cover. Information on organic contaminants in mountains is compiled from the literature and synthesized, with a focus on atmospheric transport and deposition, contaminant dynamics in alpine lakes and aquatic organisms, and concentration differences with altitude. Diurnal mountain winds, in connection with enhanced deposition at higher elevations caused by low temperatures and high precipitation rates, conspire to make mid-latitude mountains become convergence zones for selected persistent organic chemicals. In particular, the more volatile constituents of contaminant mixtures seem to become enriched, relative to the less volatile constituents at higher altitudes. For selected contaminants, concentration inversions (i.e., concentrations that increase with elevation) have been observed. A notable difference between cold trapping in high latitudes and high altitudes is the likely importance of precipitation. High rates of snow deposition in mid- and high-latitude mountains may lead to a large contaminant release during snowmelt. Regions above the tree line often have little capacity to retain the released contaminants, suggesting the potential for a highly dynamic contaminant fate situation during the snow-free season with significant revolatilization and runoff. The chemical and environmental factors that control the orographic cold trapping of organic contaminants should be examined further by measuring and comparatively interpreting concentration gradients along several mountain slopes with widely different characteristics. Future efforts should further focus on the bioaccumulation and potential effects of contaminants in

  8. Water purification using organic salts

    DOEpatents

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  9. [Infections after organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Kern, W V; Wagner, D; Hirsch, H H

    2005-06-01

    Early postoperative infections after transplantation vary according to the transplanted organ. During the subsequent course opportunistic infections such as cytomegalovirus reactivation, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia, invasive pneumococcal infection and mould infections predominate. Reactivated tuberculous infection appears to become more prevalent. Some of the opportunistic infections are preventable by chemoprophylaxis; others can be managed very effectively by monitoring and early preemptive therapy. Physicians caring for patients after organ transplantation need to early consider in the differential diagnosis rare pathogens which are often overlooked with standard diagnostic procedures.

  10. Fluoroalkylation of organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylov, D. Yu; Budnikova, Yu H.

    2013-09-01

    Data on fluoroalkylation and perfluoroalkylation methods in organic synthesis are analyzed, summarized and described systematically. The most practically important properties of compounds with fluoroalkyl substituents are illustrated. The key trends and the potential of this field of organic chemistry are considered. Electrochemical syntheses of perfluoroalkyl derivatives that are inaccessible or experimentally difficult to prepare by regular chemical techniques are presented. Particular attention is paid to processes involving organometallic compounds as well as to prospects for the development of this field of research. The bibliography includes 226 references.

  11. Mechanochemical organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guan-Wu

    2013-09-21

    Recently, mechanical milling using a mixer mill or planetary mill has been fruitfully utilized in organic synthesis under solvent-free conditions. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of various solvent-free mechanochemical organic reactions, including metal-mediated or -catalyzed reactions, condensation reactions, nucleophilic additions, cascade reactions, Diels-Alder reactions, oxidations, reductions, halogenation/aminohalogenation, etc. The ball milling technique has also been applied to the synthesis of calixarenes, rotaxanes and cage compounds, asymmetric synthesis as well as the transformation of biologically active compounds.

  12. Collagen in organ development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know whether microgravity will adversely affect developmental processes. Collagens are macromolecular structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which may be altered by perturbations in gravity. Interstitial collagens have been shown to be necessary for normal growth and morphogenesis in some embryonic organs, and in the mouse salivary gland, the biosynthetic pattern of these molecules changes during development. Determination of the effects of microgravity on epithelial organ development must be preceded by crucial ground-based studies. These will define control of normal synthesis, secretion, and deposition of ECM macromolecules and the relationship of these processes to morphogenesis.

  13. Covalently linked organic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsotsalas, Manuel; Addicoat, Matthew

    2015-02-01

    In this review, we intend to give an overview of the synthesis of well-defined covalently-bound organic network materials such as covalent organic frameworks (COFs), conjugated microporous frameworks (CMPs) and other “ideal polymer networks” and discuss the different approaches in their synthesis and their potential applications. In addition we will describe the common computational approaches and highlight recent achievements in the computational study of their structure and properties. For further information the interested reader is referred to several excellent and more detailed reviews dealing with the synthesis [Dawson 2012; Ding 2013; Feng 2012] and computational aspects [Han 2009; Colón 2014] of the materials presented here.

  14. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1984-11-21

    A device for detection of neutrons comprises: as an active neutron sensing element, a conductive organic polymer having an electrical conductivity and a cross-section for said neutrons whereby a detectable change in said conductivity is caused by impingement of said neutrons on the conductive organic polymer which is responsive to a property of said polymer which is altered by impingement of said neutrons on the polymer; and means for associating a change in said alterable property with the presence of neutrons at the location of said device.

  15. Organic greenhouse soil media + supplemental fertilizer = better organic tomato transplants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumer perceptions that organic food tastes better and is healthier are two major factors driving the increasing demand for organically produced crops in the U.S. All components entering into the organic crop production system must be approved for organic use, including seed, soil media, and fert...

  16. [Relationship-Based Organizations].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The six articles in this newsletter theme issue focus on three successful infant/family organizations serving families with young children either at risk for a disability or having a disability: Southwest Human Development (Phoenix, Arizona); The Ounce of Prevention Fund (Chicago, Illinois); and New Horizons Center for Children and Families of…

  17. Learning in Youth Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirshner, Ben

    2014-01-01

    This response identifies several strengths of the article, "Pushing the Boundaries: What Youth Organizers at Boston's Hyde Square Task Force Have to Teach Us about Civic Engagement" and draws connections to recent developments in sibling fields, including social and emotional learning and internet activism. These developments offer ideas…

  18. Vocational Youth Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumpf, Edwin L.

    The role of vocational education youth organizations in the instructional program is discussed in the brief pamphlet. Common aims and purposes as well as short summary statements are presented about Future Farmers of America (FFA), Future Homemakers of America (FHA), Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA), Vocational Industrial Clubs of…

  19. Learning in Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palos, Ramona; Veres Stancovici, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims at identifying the presence of the dimensions of learning capabilities and the characteristics of a learning organization within two companies in the field of services, as well as identifying the relationships between their learning capability and the organizational culture. Design/methodology/approach: This has been a…

  20. Change Process in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of four papers presented during a symposium on the change process in organizations moderated by John Redding at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). "Corporate Culture: Friend or Foe of Change?" (Joanne Burgess) reports a study of the characteristics of corporate culture that facilitate…

  1. Effects on saltwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Reish, D.J.; Oshida, P.S.; Wilkes, F.G.; Mearns, A.J.; Ginn, T.C.; Carr, R.S.

    1984-06-01

    A review of the literature reveals numerous articles dealing with the uptake of metals by marine organisms. Cadmium, copper, zinc, and methyl mercury have been shown to have toxic effects on fish, oysters, clams, lobsters, and other marine animals. Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the accumulation of these metals. 237 references.

  2. Organize, Evaluate, Appreciate Yourself.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Professional and personal systems to help keep teachers organized and at ease with the many tasks of teaching are described, including tracking supplies, preparing for substitute teachers, using technology, setting up for volunteers, providing stress relief, and knowing personal and professional limits. (CB)

  3. Cartoons as Advance Organizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalik, Cindy L.; Williams, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated student reaction to the use of cartoons as advance organizers for online discussions in an online course. A convenience sample of 15 students participated in the study by contributing cartoons, participating in online discussions, and completing a survey. Overall, survey results indicated student reaction to the…

  4. Change Processes in Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on change processes in organizations. "Mid-stream Corrections: Decisions Leaders Make during Organizational Change Processes" (David W. Frantz) analyzes three organizational leaders to determine whether and how they take corrective actions or adapt their decision-making processes when…

  5. Intergenerational Learning in Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ropes, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of intergenerational learning as a way for organizations to deal with an ageing worker population in a positive and constructive way. Design/methodology/approach: The paper employs a thematic synthesis of qualitative literature and considers all types of sources including quantitative…

  6. Photochemistry in Organized Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendler, Janos H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes common artificially produced organized media such as colloids, surfactants, and polymers and their usefulness in studying complex biochemical processes. Discusses selected recent photophysical and photochemical exploitations of these systems, including artificial photosynthesis, in situ generation of colloidal gold and platinum,…

  7. Organizing an Intramural Triathlon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Bruce

    1984-01-01

    Suggestions for developing an intramural triathlon consisting of a 1000-yard swim, 15-mile bike ride, and 5-mile run are presented in this article. Topics to consider when organizing this event include course selection, publicity, personnel, equipment, and awards. (DF)

  8. Student Veterans Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerlot, John; Green, Sean-Michael; Parker, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Students who have experienced conflict as members of the military come to college expecting to be supported, if not honored for their service. One way that campus administrators can facilitate transitions for student veterans is to assist in founding and maintaining campus-based student organizations for veterans. Military service is a bonding…

  9. Aging and Work Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrank, Harris T.; Waring, Joan M.

    Business firms are an integral part of the age stratification structure of society. Although the age structures of people and roles within the organization are dynamic, these structures yield a fairly stable strata in which norms exist to suggest the various roles expected of certain persons. Those in roles with greater financial rewards, power,…

  10. "High Stage" Organizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbert, William R.

    Although a psychological theory of stages of transformation in human development currently exists, organizational researchers have yet to elaborate and test any theory of organizational transformation of comparable elegance. According to the organizational stage theory being developed since 1974 by William Torbert, bureaucratic organization, which…

  11. Major Contemporary Terrorist Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, Bonnie

    1986-01-01

    This is a listing of over 100 guerrilla and terrorist organizations around the world, categorized by host country. The list was compiled from the Rand Corporation database on terrorism and the 1983 book by Peter Janke: "Guerrilla and Terrorist Organisations: A World Directory and Bibliography." (JDH)

  12. Oxenoids in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Minko, Yury; Marek, Ilan

    2014-03-14

    Experimental and theoretical studies of metalated peroxides confirmed their unique properties as oxenoids (electrophilic oxidants) allowing for a highly selective and efficient oxidation processes of nucleophilic organometallic species. In this short review we present the most prominent examples of the application of this class of reagents towards organic synthesis.

  13. Programmed Organic Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusler, Karl

    1975-01-01

    Describes recent attempts to program computers to map synthetic routes to organic compounds. The computer is provided with structural information for many molecules and reaction descriptions; when a target compound is specified, the computer lists possible precursors, thus indicating possible synthetic routes. (MLH)

  14. Matrix Embedded Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakolanu, U. G.; Freund, F. T.

    2016-05-01

    In the matrix of minerals such as olivine, a redox reaction of the low-z elements occurs. Oxygen is oxidized to the peroxy state while the low-Z-elements become chemically reduced. We assign them a formula [CxHyOzNiSj]n- and call them proto-organics.

  15. Defining performance of organizations.

    PubMed

    1993-07-01

    Quality is and always has been in the beholder's eye. It is therefore necessary, as argued in this excerpt from The Measurement Mandate, the latest text on the Joint Commission's Agenda for Change indicator development and testing methodology, to concentrate on the best ways to measure, assess, and improve the discernible, quantifiable dimensions of an organization's performance.

  16. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parke, A L; Liu, P T; Parke, D V

    2003-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and renal failure, is described, its clinical features outlined, its origins in tissue oxidative stress following severe infections, surgical trauma, ionizing radiation, high-dosage drugs and chemicals, severe hemorrhage, etc., are defined, and its prevention and treatment prescribed.

  17. World Presidents Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Members of the World Presidents' Organization enjoy exhibits at StenniSphere, the museum and visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center during a tour of the space facility Jan. 26. WPO members from several states toured Stennis facilities during a daylong visit that included a presentation by Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise of Biloxi.

  18. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  19. State Court Organization, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for State Courts, Williamsburg, VA.

    Information on state court organization as of January 1, 1980, in the 50 states, American Samoa, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands is provided. Data were collected from published sources and through questionnaires. There are two major parts. Part I consists of 36 tables containing comparative data from all the…

  20. Building a Healthy Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencioni, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    For the last 15 years, the author's firm has been helping organizations become healthier and maximize their human potential by using the model outlined in his latest book, "The Advantage," which is the culmination of his previous books and models. Schools and school districts have embraced the model and enjoyed the competitive advantage…

  1. Industrial Organic Electrosynthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagenknecht, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Four examples of industrial electrochemical synthesis of organic compounds are described. These include acrylonitrile dimerization, tetramethyl lead, electrochemical fluorination, and production of diacetone-2-keto-L-gulonic acid. Additional examples are also cited, including the production of several compounds by the BASF company of Germany. (JN)

  2. Training Student Organizers Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamm, Michael; Hurtado, Denise

    The purpose of this curriculum is to help teachers and field supervisors at the college, high school, and advanced junior high school level train students to organize environmental improvement projects. It can also be used by graduate/undergraduate students who are supervising secondary school students. The curriculum may be started at any point…

  3. Organic Pesticide Ingredients

    MedlinePlus

    ... W X Y Z A-Z Index Health & Environment Human Health Animal Health Safe Use Practices Food Safety ... Low-Risk Pesticides Organic Pesticide Ingredients Pesticide Incidents Human Exposure Pet Exposure Environmental Incident Illegal Pesticide Activity Problem With Labels or ...

  4. Milwaukee's NISE Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozlowicz, Grace H.

    1971-01-01

    Discusses the onset and organization of Nursing Inservice Educators of the Greater Milwaukee Area, NISE. Objectives of the group are to assist inservice educators in their professional growth and development by promoting the sharing of ideas among inservice educators in health facilities in Greater Milwaukee area and by identifying mutual problems…

  5. Organic Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silversmith, Ernest F.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a listing of 35 demonstrations designed to generate interest in organic chemistry and help put points across. Topics include opening lecture; molecular structure and properties; halogenation; nucleophilic substitution, alkenes and dienes, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, alcohols and phenols, aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, amines,…

  6. Budgeting in Nonprofit Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Lauren

    1985-01-01

    This description of the role of budgets in nonprofit organizations uses libraries as an example. Four types of budgets--legislative, management, cash, and capital--are critiqued in terms of cost effectiveness, implementation, and facilitation of organizational control and objectives. (CLB)

  7. Organizing in the Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    As in campaigns to organize graduate student employees, the way in which postdocs are classified by their institutions is important. A postdoc is no longer a student and should not expect to be treated like one. Frequently, however, the postdoc experience is little different from that of a graduate student, with perhaps slightly higher pay.…

  8. Organizing Preservation Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Michele

    This resource guide considers issues in the staffing and organization of preservation activities. It provides guidance in implementing a systematic preservation program and evaluates the structures of various types of preservation programs. The following articles complement the discussion of program models and implementation: (1)…

  9. Online Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janowicz, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    This is a comprehensive study of the many facets of an entirely online organic chemistry course. Online homework with structure-drawing capabilities was found to be more effective than written homework. Online lecture was found to be just as effective as in-person lecture, and students prefer an online lecture format with shorter Webcasts. Online…

  10. Organic Chemistry Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradt, Steve

    1998-01-01

    Student-led workshops are helping undergraduate students learn from each other as they tackle organic chemistry. Each week, small groups brainstorm tough problems in sessions guided by upper-class students who have taken and passed the course. Debating and discussing chemistry problems with peers engages students with the material and boosts…

  11. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of nonequilibrium phenomena on the Saturn satellite Titan indicate the occurrence of organic chemical evolution. Greenhouse and thermal inversion models of Titan's atmosphere provide environmental constraints within which various pathways for organic chemical synthesis are assessed. Experimental results and theoretical modeling studies suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite may be dominated by two atmospheric processes: energetic-particle bombardment and photochemistry. Reactions initiated in various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic ray, Saturn wind, and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4 - N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the C2-hydrocarbons, the UV-visible-absorbing stratospheric haze, and the reddish color of the satellite. Photochemical reactions of CH4 can also account for the presence of C2-hydrocarbons. In the lower Titan atmosphere, photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. Hot H-atom reactions initiated by photo-dissociation of NH3 can couple the chemical reactions of NH3 and CH4 and produce organic matter.

  12. Opposing Creationism: Scientists Organize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saladin, Kenneth S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the response of the scientific community to creationist activism. A symposium entitled "Science and Belief" was held at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science to debate creationism. A network was organized to facilitate communication and political efficiency among anticreationist citizen…

  13. Organic Elemental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, T. S.; Gutterson, Milton

    1980-01-01

    Reviews general developments in computerization and data processing of organic elemental analyses; carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen analyzers; procedures for determining oxygen, sulfur, and halogens, as well as other nometallic elements and organometallics. Selected papers on trace analysis of nonmetals and determination of metallic elements are…

  14. Organic Elemental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, T. S.; Wang, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a literature review on methods used to analyze organic elements. Topic areas include methods for: (1) analyzing carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen; (2) analyzing oxygen, sulfur, and halogens; (3) analyzing other elements; (4) simultaneously determining several elements; and (5) determing trace elements. (JN)

  15. Transforming your manufacturing organization into a learning organization.

    PubMed

    Kapp, K M

    1999-05-01

    Many experts believe the only sustainable advantage an organization will have in the future is its ability to learn faster than its competitors. This competitive advantage can be achieved by transforming the organization into a learning organization. This article describes the basic elements of a learning organization and how to transform an organization to focus on learning. The article also describes methods for evaluating the training and learning that occurs within the organization to ensure that training dollars are wisely spent. Finally, the article describes what individuals can do to focus on their own learning and personal development within an organization.

  16. Organics In Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sherwood

    1996-01-01

    The variety of classes of organic compounds that occur in carbonaceous meteorites suggests a rich pre-planetary chemistry with possible connections to interstellar, solar nebular and parent body processes. Structural diversity prevails within all classes examined in detail. Among amino acids for instance, all possible isomers are found up to species containing 4-6 carbon atoms, with abundances decreasing with increasing molecular weight. Such diversity seems limited to those carbonaceous meteorites which show evidence of having been exposed to liquid water; meteorites lacking such evidence also show much lower abundances and less structural diversity in their organic contents. This apparent dependency on water suggests a role for cometary ices in the chemical evolution of organic compounds on parent bodies. Measurements of the stable isotope compositions of C, H, N and S in classes of compounds and at the individual compound level show strong deviations from average chondritic values. These deviations are difficult to explain by solar system or parent body processes, and precedents for some of these isotopic anomalies exist in interstellar (e.g., high D/H ratios) and circumstellar chemistry. Therefore, presolar origins for much if not all of the meteoritic organic compounds (or their precursors) is a distinct possibility. In contrast, evidence of solar nebular origins is either lacking or suspect. Results from molecular and isotopic analyses of meteoritic organics, from laboratory simulations and from a model of interstellar grain reactions will be used to flesh out the hypothesis that this material originated with interstellar chemistry, was distributed within the early solar system as cometary ices, and was subsequently altered on meteorite parent bodies to yield the observed compounds.

  17. Cognition in organizations.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, Gerard P; Healey, Mark P

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews major developments from 2000 to early 2007 in the psychological analysis of cognition in organizations. Our review, the first in this series to survey cognitive theory and research spanning the entire field of industrial and organizational psychology, considers theoretical, empirical, and methodological advances across 10 substantive domains of application. Two major traditions, the human factors and organizational traditions, have dominated cognitively oriented research in this field. Our central message is that the technological and human systems underpinning contemporary organizational forms are evolving in ways that demand greater cooperation among researchers across both traditions. Such cooperation is necessary in order to gain theoretical insights of sufficient depth and complexity to refine the explanation and prediction of behavior in organizations and derive psychologically sound solutions to the unprecedented information-processing burdens confronting the twenty-first century workforce.

  18. Marketing in nursing organizations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, S B

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of chapter 3 is to provide a conceptual framework for understanding marketing. Although it is often considered to be, marketing is not really a new activity for nursing organizations. What is perhaps new to most nursing organizations is the conduct of marketing activities as a series of interrelated events that are part of a strategic marketing process. The increasingly volatile nursing environment requires a comprehensive approach to marketing. This chapter presents definitions of marketing, the marketing mix, the characteristics of nonprofit marketing, the relationship of strategic planning and strategic marketing, portfolio analysis, and a detailed description of the strategic marketing process. While this chapter focuses on marketing concepts, essential components, and presentation of the strategic marketing process, chapter 4 presents specific methods and techniques for implementing the strategic marketing process.

  19. Organic compounds in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, E.; Hayatsu, R.; Studier, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of whether organic compounds originated in meteorites as a primary condensate from a solar gas or whether they were introduced as a secondary product into the meteorite during its residence in a parent body is examined by initially attempting to reconstruct the physical conditions during condensation (temperature, pressure, time) from clues in the inorganic matrix of the meteorite. The condensation behavior of carbon under these conditions is then analyzed on the basis of thermodynamic calculations, and compounds synthesized in model experiments on the condensation of carbon are compared with those actually found in meteorites. Organic compounds in meteorites seem to have formed by catalytic reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and ammonia in the solar nebula at 360 to 400 K temperature and about 3 to 7.6 microtorr pressure. The onset of these reactions was triggered by the formation of suitable catalysts (magnetite, hydrated silicates) at these temperatures.

  20. B. F. Skinner, organism.

    PubMed

    Catania, A C

    1992-11-01

    B. F. Skinner illustrated the power of behavior analysis by turning it upon his own behavior. This article considers parallels in the life and work of Charles Darwin and places Skinner's views on life and death in the context of his selectionist paradigm for psychology. The term organism plays a special role, and the account shows why B. F. Skinner might have regarded it as an appropriate title.

  1. Change in Organizations,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    to the individual) or external. The reason for group, organi- keeping the definition general is that many people write about e, but not in changing in...organizations as planned change. Change, they im- es,- or goeragine, comes about when an agent introduces techniques in some to any type of...of ventions change (adaptation literature). The planned organizational venions change literature is devoted to methods and techniques . but the the

  2. The ambidextrous organization.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Charles A; Tushman, Michael L

    2004-04-01

    Corporate executives must constantly look backward, attending to the products and processes of the past, while also gazing forward, preparing for the innovations that will define the future. This mental balancing act is one of the toughest of all managerial challenges--it requires executives to explore new opportunities even as they work diligently to exploit existing capabilities--and it's no surprise that few companies do it well. But as every businessperson knows, there are companies that do. What's their secret? These organizations separate their new, exploratory units from their traditional, exploitative ones, allowing them to have different processes, structures, and cultures; at the same time, they maintain tight links across units at the senior executive level. Such "ambidextrous organizations," as the authors call them, allow executives to pioneer radical or disruptive innovations while also pursuing incremental gains. Of utmost importance to the ambidextrous organization are ambidextrous managers--executives who have the ability to understand and be sensitive to the needs of very different kinds of businesses. They possess the attributes of rigorous cost cutters and free-thinking entrepreneurs while also maintaining the objectivity required to make difficult trade-offs. Almost every company needs to renew itself through the creation of breakthrough products and processes, but it shouldn't do so at the expense of its traditional business. Building an ambidextrous organization is by no means easy, but the structure itself, combining organizational separation with senior team integration, is not difficult to understand. Given the executive will to make it happen, any company can become ambidextrous.

  3. Socialization in Work Organizations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    a new member learns and adapts to the value system, the norms, and the required behavior patterns of an organization, society, or group" (Schein...to help him or her learn the job. For example, Graves (1972) describes the process of becoming a skilled pipeline worker. First, the unskilled worker...between work and non-work areas appears in Feldman’s (1976) discussion of outcomes. Phrases such as "role management" (Feldman, 1976), " adaptation " (Louis

  4. Functional Organic Monolayers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-31

    is below since many authors do not follow the 200 word limit 14. SUBJECT TERMS Sensors, Organic Molecules, Diffraction Techniques, Lensless Imaging...Electron microscopy 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT UNCLASSIFIED NSN 7540-01-280-5500 John C. Spence, Jinsong Wu Arizona State University...been discovered and its structure determined. 4. A new method of lensless imaging for electrons and X-rays has been discovered. This method replaces

  5. World Presidents Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Members of the World Presidents' Organization take a try at 'piloting' a mock-up of the space shuttle cockpit during a Jan. 26 visit to StenniSphere, the museum and visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. WPO members from several states spent the day touring Stennis facilities and learning about the work of the nation's premier rocket engine testing site.

  6. World Presidents Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour speaks to members of the World Presidents' Organization during the group's visit to NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center on Jan. 26. WPO members from several states spent the day touring Stennis facilities and learning about the work of the nation's premier rocket engine testing site. Barbour visited with group members during a morning session in StenniSphere, the center's visitors center and museum.

  7. World Presidents Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Members of the World Presidents' Organization enjoy exhibits at StenniSphere, the visitor center and museum at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center during a Jan. 26 visit to the site. WPO members from several states spent the day touring Stennis facilities and learning about the work of the nation's premier rocket engine testing site. Exhibits enjoyed included a mockup of the International Space Station and the interactive Science on a Sphere globe.

  8. World Presidents Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Members of the World Presidents' Organization enjoy a buffet luncheon during a Jan. 26 visit to NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. WPO members from several states toured Stennis facilities during a daylong visit that included a river ride with Special Boat Team 22, the U.S. Navy's elite boat warriors group that trains at Stennis. Visiting president also had an opportunity to learn about the ongoing work of the nation's premier rocket engine testing site.

  9. Nitrite in organ protection

    PubMed Central

    Rassaf, Tienush; Ferdinandy, Peter; Schulz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has emerged to therapeutical importance. Modulation of endogenous nitrate and nitrite levels with the subsequent S-nitros(yl)ation of the downstream signalling cascade open the way for novel cytoprotective strategies. In the following, we summarize the actual literature and give a short overview on the potential of nitrite in organ protection. PMID:23826831

  10. Bugs digest chlorinated organics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    This article describes a new bioreactor that uses a consortium of aerobic bacteria to biodegrade chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. Methanotrophic bacteria are cultivated for their MMO enzyme. After the MMO enzyme breaks down the chlorinated organics by oxidation, non-methanotrophic bacteria consume the byproducts. Pilot-scale testing has demonstrated successful treatment of groundwater containing coal-tar constituents, toluene, trichloroethylene, vinyl chlorides, chlorobenzene, and methyl methacrylate from three Superfund sites.

  11. Organ transplantation in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    El Matri, Aziz; Ben Abdallah, Taieb

    2015-04-01

    Kidney transplants were first performed in Tunisia in 1986, and transplants soon extended to other organs including the heart, liver, and pancreas. Live-related donor and deceased-donor kidney transplants were both began in the summer of 1986. An organ procurement and transplant law was passed in March 1991, and the National Centre for Advancement of Organ Transplantation was created in 1995. The number of transplantation units has increased to 7 throughout the country, and the yearly transplant number has progressively increased to 139 in 2010, including 20% from deceased kidney donors. Despite these gains, the need continues to grow. Heart transplants began in January 1993, and Tunisia and Jordan are currently the only Arab countries where it is practiced. However, only 16 patients have received a heart transplant as of 2004, and the number of recipients has decreased in the past 10 years. Liver transplants are rare in other Arab countries, but began in Tunisia in January 1998. Over 10 years, 38 patients benefited from this procedure. After a few years of stagnation, the number of liver transplants is increasing. While all types of transplantation are needed, kidney transplantation is a priority in Tunisia. The target is to perform 400 transplants annually, which would require a long-term strategy to provide full financial coverage using the National Health Insurance Funds in both the public and private sectors.

  12. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  13. [Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cuenca Solanas, M

    1999-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is a clinical situation that has been described as a result of the rapid progress and advances that have been made in recent decades in the physiology, diagnosis, and therapeutic support of critically ill patients. In 1991, in view of the confusing terminology used to characterize processes coursing with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), a consensus conference was held. A series of basic definitions were established and the term "multiple organ failure" was replace by MODS. In response to outside aggression, the organism tries to defend itself with two mechanisms: a non-specific humoral and cellular response called inflammation, and a specific antigenic response that modifies the genetic codes of cells of the defense system and constitutes an immunological response. At present it is thought that the inflammatory response is activated (SIRS) in response to an uncontrolled aggression, but an antiinflammatory response syndrome (ARS) exists as well. An exaggerated SIRS can lead to MODS. MODS usually debuts with pulmonary dysfunction. If the aggression persists, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, coagulation, central nervous system, gastrointestinal metabolism, neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal failure follow. A series of causes often trigger this syndrome and certain factors favor it. Prevention of these causes and factors in fundamental for controlling the occurrence of MODS. At present, there is no clear treatment for MODS, although numerous studies designed to block the release of certain proinflammatory mediators or to neutralize antiinflammatory responses are being carried out.

  14. Pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Jelovsek, J Eric; Maher, Christopher; Barber, Matthew D

    2007-03-24

    Pelvic organ prolapse is downward descent of female pelvic organs, including the bladder, uterus or post-hysterectomy vaginal cuff, and the small or large bowel, resulting in protrusion of the vagina, uterus, or both. Prolapse development is multifactorial, with vaginal child birth, advancing age, and increasing body-mass index as the most consistent risk factors. Vaginal delivery, hysterectomy, chronic straining, normal ageing, and abnormalities of connective tissue or connective-tissue repair predispose some women to disruption, stretching, or dysfunction of the levator ani complex, connective-tissue attachments of the vagina, or both, resulting in prolapse. Patients generally present with several complaints, including bladder, bowel, and pelvic symptoms; however, with the exception of vaginal bulging, none is specific to prolapse. Women with symptoms suggestive of prolapse should undergo a pelvic examination and medical history check. Radiographic assessment is usually unnecessary. Many women with pelvic organ prolapse are asymptomatic and do not need treatment. When prolapse is symptomatic, options include observation, pessary use, and surgery. Surgical strategies for prolapse can be categorised broadly by reconstructive and obliterative techniques. Reconstructive procedures can be done by either an abdominal or vaginal approach. Although no effective prevention strategy for prolapse has been identified, considerations include weight loss, reduction of heavy lifting, treatment of constipation, modification or reduction of obstetric risk factors, and pelvic-floor physical therapy.

  15. Organic Synthesis in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk will review our current understanding of the synthesis of organic molecules in space, with particular emphasis on the synthesis of those compounds that may be of prebiotic interest. The talk will address the possibility that molecules created in the interstellar medium may play a role in the origin and evolution of life on planetary surfaces. The various organic and volatile compounds that are now known or suspected to exist in a variety of space environments (stellar outflows, the diffuse interstellar medium, dense molecular clouds, protostellar nebulae, and planetesimal parent bodies in planetary systems) will be reviewed. This information comes largely from the combined applications of observational infrared and radio spectroscopy, laboratory astrophysical simulations, and theoretical astrochemistry. This will be followed by a discussion of the evidence, largely gathered from the laboratory isotopic study of extraterrestrial materials (meteorites and cosmic dust), that interstellar materials, including organics, can and do survive the transition from the interstellar space into forming stellar systems. Once there, some of this material can be delivered largely unaltered to planetary surfaces where it can play key roles in the origin and subsequent evolution of life.

  16. Self-Organized Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Holliday, J. R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Klein, W.

    2011-12-01

    Self-Organized Criticality was proposed by the Per Bak et al. [1] as a means of explaining scaling laws observed in driven natural systems, usually in (slowly) driven threshold systems. The example used by Bak was a simple cellular automaton model of a sandpile, in which grains of sand were slowly dropped (randomly) onto a flat plate. After a period of time, during which the 'critical state' was approached, a series of self-similar avalanches would begin. Scaling exponents for the frequency-area statistics of the sandpile avalanches were found to be approximately 1, a value that characterizes 'flicker noise' in natural systems. SOC is associated with a critical point in the phase diagram of the system, and it was found that the usual 2-scaling field theory applies. A model related to SOC is the Self-Organized Spinodal (SOS), or intermittent criticality model. Here a slow but persistent driving force leads to quasi-periodic approach to, and retreat from, the classical limit of stability, or spinodal. Scaling exponents for this model can be related to Gutenberg-Richter and Omori exponents observed in earthquake systems. In contrast to SOC models, nucleation, both classical and non-classical types, is possible in SOS systems. Tunneling or nucleation rates can be computed from Langer-Klein-Landau-Ginzburg theories for comparison to observations. Nucleating droplets play a role similar to characteristic earthquake events. Simulations of these systems reveals much of the phenomenology associated with earthquakes and other types of "burst" dynamics. Whereas SOC is characterized by the full scaling spectrum of avalanches, SOS is characterized by both system-size events above the nominal frequency-size scaling curve, and scaling of small events. Applications to other systems including integrate-and-fire neural networks and financial crashes will be discussed. [1] P. Bak, C. Tang and K. Weisenfeld, Self-Organized Criticality, Phys. Rev. Lett., 59, 381 (1987).

  17. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  18. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W [Menlo Park, CA; Eggeman, Timothy J [Lakewood, CO

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  19. Committees and supporting organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    Advisory Committee:Organizing Committee: Marcello Baldo (Catania)Takaharu Otsuka (Tokyo), co-chair George Bertsch (Seattle)Michael Urban (Orsay), co-chair Jean-Paul Blaizot (Saclay)Taiichi Yamada (Yokohama) Michel Girod (Bruyères-le-Châtel)Nguyen van Giai (Orsay) Hisashi Horiuchi (Osaka)Shinichiro Fujii (Tokyo) Umberto Lombardo (Catania)Jérôme Margueron (Orsay) Gerd Röpke (Rostock)Kouichi Hagino (Sendai) Hiroyuki Sagawa (Aizu)Yoshiko Kanada-En'yo (Kyoto) Piet Van Isacker (Caen) Enrico Vigezzi (Milano) IPN logo    EFES logo    CNRS logo    ihp logo

  20. Brain Organization and Psychodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Avi; Geva, Amir B.

    1999-01-01

    Any attempt to link brain neural activity and psychodynamic concepts requires a tremendous conceptual leap. Such a leap may be facilitated if a common language between brain and mind can be devised. System theory proposes formulations that may aid in reconceptualizing psychodynamic descriptions in terms of neural organizations in the brain. Once adopted, these formulations can help to generate testable predictions about brain–psychodynamic relations and thus significantly affect the future of psychotherapy. (The Journal of Psychotherapy Practice and Research 1999; 8:24–39) PMID:9888105

  1. Just a Community Organizer: Community/Campus Connections through Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Judith; Kelly, Donald P.

    2010-01-01

    The 2008 presidential election catapulted "community organizers" into the media fray and raised awareness about community organizing. At the University of San Diego (USD), a course teaching consensus organizing techniques to address community issues was instituted in 2004. The course incorporates traditional undergraduate students and…

  2. Organic weed control in certified organic watermelon production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing perception by consumers that organic food tastes better and is healthier continues to expand the demand for organically produced crops. Field research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma to determine the impact of organic production systems on weed control and watermelon (Citrullus l...

  3. Organic contamination of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.

    1991-01-01

    A brown stain of varying thickness was present on most of the exterior surface of the retrieved Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Tape lifts of Earth-end LDEF surfaces taken showed that the surface particle cleanliness immediately after retrieval was very good, but faint footprints of the tape strips on the tested surfaces indicated a very faint film was removed by the tape. Solvent wipes of these surfaces showed that the stain was not amenable to standard organic solvent removal. Infrared spectra of optical windows from tray E5 show that the organic film is hydrocarbon in composition, but is not similar to the oil that seeped from tray C12. Very dark and heavy deposits of the stain is present at openings and vents to the interior of LDEF. Heavy brown and blue-green deposits are present in the interior of LDEF where sunlight penetrated through cracks and vent openings. The exterior of LDEF had significant areas painted with a white polyurethane paint for thermal control, and almost all of the interior was painted with a black polyurethane paint. Brown staining is consistent with outgassing of hydrocarbons from these paints by rapid solar UV induced polymerization of the outgassed hydrocarbons when they hit sunlight exposed areas.

  4. Organic contamination of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.

    1992-01-01

    A brown stain of varying thickness was present on most of the exterior surface of the retrieved Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Tape lifts of Earth-end LDEF surfaces taken in Feb. 1990 showed that the surface particle cleanliness immediately after retrieval was very good, but faint footprints of the tape strips on the tested surfaces indicated a very faint film was removed by the tape. Solvent wipes of these surfaces showed that the stain was not amenable to standard organic solvent removal. Infrared spectra of optical windows from tray E5 and scrapings indicate that the film is primarily of organic composition, but is not similar to the oil that seeped from tray C12. Very dark and heavy deposits of the stain are present at openings and vents to the interior of the LDEF. Heavy brown and blue-green deposits are present in the interior of LDEF where sunlight penetrated through cracks and vent openings. Photographs of the deintegrated LDEF graphically show the stain distribution. The exterior of the LDEF had significant areas painted with a white polyurethane paint for thermal control, and almost all of the interior was painted with a black polyurethane paint for thermal control. The brown staining of the LDEF is consistent with long-term outgassing of hydrocarbons from these paints followed by rapid solar-ultraviolet-induced polymerization of the outgassed hydrocarbons when the outgassed molecules stuck to surfaces exposed to sunlight.

  5. A Self Organizing Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Orvin E.

    2001-05-01

    First Feynman and Wheeler suggested in-out waves associated with elementary particles. Quantum field theory has waves propagating backward in time producing standing waves. The math suggests that the sun also produces its own in-out waves which spaced and now stabilize the planets. The same is true for the gaseous planets with their sattelites. I propose two postulates (suggested by my work). (1) Longitudinal waves are produced by electromagnetic sources. These waves become standing waves because space(or the vacuum)responds with an automatic return wave related to the inertial nature of space.(2)Larger sources such as the sun excite smaller sources such as the planets with successively smaller sources producing shorter and shorter wavelengths at lower and lower power. The hierarchical nature is suggested by 1/f phenomena. The standing waves from larger sources produce the organizing forces for galaxy and star formation as well as the repeating structures of the universe. The wave effects were first found in plant organization and then it was observed that the waves are everywhere. See the Wagner web site.

  6. United Network for Organ Sharing

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24, 2016, the OPTN/UNOS Liver and Intestinal Organ Transplantation Committee reviewed substantial feedback from the donation and ... pm View More… View all events Learn how organ transplantation works See the impact transplantation makes Give now ...

  7. Revolutionary advances in organic foods.

    PubMed

    Edlich, R F; Drake, D B; Rodeheaver, G T; Kelley, A; Greene, J A; Gubler, K D; Long, W B; Britt, L D; Lin, K Y; Tafel, J A

    2007-10-01

    'Organic' is a labelling term that denotes products produced under the authority of the Organic Foods Production Act. Before a product can be labelled 'organic', a government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer is following all the rules necessary to meet the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it gets to your local supermarket or restaurant must be certified, too. Along with the national organic standards, the USDA developed strict labelling rules to help consumers know the exact content of the food they buy. It is important to emphasise that the USDA has not made any health claims for organic foods. It is indeed fortunate that the US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USDA and the Environmental Protection Agency are now expanding their research to explore the scientific basis for the health benefits of organic foods.

  8. [Standard process of organ procurement].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Norihide

    2010-12-01

    As revised Japanese Organ Transplantation Law was issued on 17th July, 2010, standard process of organ procurement after brain death was changed as follows. After the patient is determined clinically brain dead, a doctor may tell his or her relatives the opportunity of organ donation and ask them whether they want to listen organ procurement by JOT coordinators. If they want to do so and to donate organs, brain death is determined by legally regulated method. Around this period, his or her organs are evaluated whether they are transplantable or not. After the patient was legally sentenced brain dead, transplant recipients are selected and procurement teams are sent from transplant centers. Organ function is evaluated again by procurement teams and then organs are procured and transplanted.

  9. Is organic food production feasible?

    PubMed

    Leckie, J

    1999-01-01

    The problems of modern agriculture and whether organic methods of food production offer a practical solution in modern society are reviewed and discussed, with frank admission of drawbacks in organic methods.

  10. Organic Superconductor, Made without Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The discovery of a superconducting organic compound is reported. The compound, (TMTSF)-2, has no metal in its composition, and the author believes that it is the precursor of a family of superconducting organics. (Author/SA)

  11. Organic Experiments for Introductory Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner-Canham, Geoff

    1985-01-01

    Describes test-tube organic chemistry procedures (using comparatively safe reagents) for the beginning student. These procedures are used to: examine differences between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons; compare structural isomers; and compare organic and inorganic acids and bases. (DH)

  12. The Birthday of Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benfey, Otto Theodor; Kaufman, George B.

    1979-01-01

    Describes how the synthesis of urea, 150 years ago, was a major factor in breaking the artificial barrier that existed between organic and inorganic chemistry, and this contributed to the rapid growth of organic chemistry. (GA)

  13. Thiazole-based organic semiconductors for organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuze; Fan, Haijun; Li, Yongfang; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2012-06-19

    Over the past two decades, organic semiconductors have been the subject of intensive academic and commercial interests. Thiazole is a common electron-accepting heterocycle due to electron-withdrawing nitrogen of imine (C=N), several moieties based on thiazole have been widely introduced into organic semiconductors, and yielded high performance in organic electronic devices. This article reviews recent developments in the area of thiazole-based organic semiconductors, particularly thiazole, bithiazole, thiazolothiazole and benzobisthiazole-based small molecules and polymers, for applications in organic field-effect transistors, solar cells and light-emitting diodes. The remaining problems and challenges, and the key research direction in near future are discussed.

  14. Advances in cryopreservation of organs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Pan, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Organ transplantation is an effective approach for the treatment of end-stage organ failures. Currently, the donor organs used for clinical transplantation are all preserved at above-zero temperatures. These preservation methods are well-established and simple but the storage time lasts for only 4-12 h. Some researchers tried to extend the organ storage time by improving protectant and HLA matching to raise the use of stored organs and prolong the long-term survival of organs. These efforts still fall short of the clinical demand for organ transplantation. Moreover, a great many organs were wasted due to limited storage time, HLA mismatch, patients' conditions or distance involved. Therefore, preserving organs for several weeks or even months and establishing Organ Bank are the tough challenges and have become a shared goal of global scholars. This article reviews some issues involved in the cryopreservation of organs, such as use of cryoprotecting agents, freezing and thawing methods in the cryopreservation of hearts, kidneys and other organs.

  15. Are you considering organic certification?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic certification was developed in recognition of the necessity for consistent standards across the U.S. for the benefit of producers, processors, wholesalers, retailers, and consumers. Prior to establishment of federal guidelines (National Organic Program) for organic certification in 2002, a ...

  16. Developing Organizations: Diagnosis and Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Paul R.; Lorsch, Jay W.

    This book represent s a personal statement of the authors' evolving experience as collaborators in the work of developing organizations. Focus is on three critical interfaces: the organization-environment, the group-group, and the individual organization. Close attention is paid to the attainment both of organizational goals and of individual…

  17. Organic Chemistry Software from COMPress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Sister Isabel

    1982-01-01

    Reviews three organic chemistry computer programs for TRS-80 and Apple microcomputers. Programs include "Introduction to Organic Chemistry,""Qualitative Organic Analysis," and a game called "Chemrain." Indicates that all three produce a readable screen, require exact responses, use graphics in an appealingly and…

  18. Six Pillars of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, Joseph J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an approach to teaching organic chemistry, which is to have students build their knowledge of organic chemistry upon a strong foundation of the fundamental concepts of the subject. Specifically, the article focuses upon a core set of concepts that I call "the six pillars of organic chemistry": electronegativity, polar…

  19. Leadership in the Learning Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratton, Margaret

    1993-01-01

    Offers insights into the features of a learning organization. Delineates a context for leadership without elaborate structures, chains of command, or approving and authorizing. Underscores the importance of personal networks in boundaryless organizations. Suggests that each part of the organization continually learns about the interrelatedness of…

  20. Text Genres in Information Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahotko, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Text genres used by so-called information organizers in the processes of information organization in information systems were explored in this research. Method: The research employed text genre socio-functional analysis. Five genre groups in information organization were distinguished. Every genre group used in information…

  1. Diagnostic Tools for Learning Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moilanen, Raili

    2001-01-01

    The Learning Organization Diamond Tool was designed for holistic analysis of 10 learning organization elements at the individual and organizational levels. A test in 25 Finnish organizations established validity. Comparison with existing tools showed that differences derive from their different purposes. (Contains 33 references.) (SK)

  2. Can Schools Become Learning Organizations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacson, Nancy; Bamburg, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    In "The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization" (1990), Peter Senge shows how educators can achieve meaningful change and transform schools into self-renewing learning organizations. Organizations must develop five disciplines: personal mastery, mental models, shared vision, team learning, and systems…

  3. Self-organized criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1999-10-01

    The concept of self-organized criticality was introduced to explain the behaviour of the sandpile model. In this model, particles are randomly dropped onto a square grid of boxes. When a box accumulates four particles they are redistributed to the four adjacent boxes or lost off the edge of the grid. Redistributions can lead to further instabilities with the possibility of more particles being lost from the grid, contributing to the size of each avalanche. These model 'avalanches' satisfied a power-law frequency-area distribution with a slope near unity. Other cellular-automata models, including the slider-block and forest-fire models, are also said to exhibit self-organized critical behaviour. It has been argued that earthquakes, landslides, forest fires, and species extinctions are examples of self-organized criticality in nature. In addition, wars and stock market crashes have been associated with this behaviour. The forest-fire model is particularly interesting in terms of its relation to the critical-point behaviour of the site-percolation model. In the basic forest-fire model, trees are randomly planted on a grid of points. Periodically in time, sparks are randomly dropped on the grid. If a spark drops on a tree, that tree and adjacent trees burn in a model fire. The fires are the `avalanches' and they are found to satisfy power-law frequency-area distributions with slopes near unity. This forest-fire model is closely related to the site-percolation model, that exhibits critical behaviour. In the forest-fire model there is an inverse cascade of trees from small clusters to large clusters, trees are lost primarily from model fires that destroy the largest clusters. This quasi steady-state cascade gives a power-law frequency-area distribution for both clusters of trees and smaller fires. The site-percolation model is equivalent to the forest-fire model without fires. In this case there is a transient cascade of trees from small to large clusters and a power

  4. Organic compounds in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies of carbonaceous chondrites provide evidence that certain organic compounds are indigenous and the result of an abiotic, chemical synthesis. The results of several investigators have established the presence of amino acids and precursors, mono- and dicarboxylic acids, N-heterocycles, and hydrocarbons as well as other compounds. For example, studies of the Murchison and Murray meteorites have revealed the presence of at least 40 amino acids with nearly equal abundances of D and L isomers. The population consists of both protein and nonprotein amino acids including a wide variety of linear, cyclic, and polyfunctional types. Results show a trend of decreasing concentration with increasing carbon number, with the most abundant being glycine (41 n Moles/g). These and other results to be reviewed provide persuasive support for the theory of chemical evolution and provide the only natural evidence for the protobiological subset of molecules from which life on earth may have arisen.

  5. Inverted organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Chang; Meng, Tianyu; Yi, Chao; Gong, Xiong

    2016-05-21

    The advance in lifestyle, modern industrialization and future technological revolution are always at high expense of energy consumption. Unfortunately, there exist serious issues such as limited storage, high cost and toxic contamination in conventional fossil fuel energy sources. Instead, solar energy represents a renewable, economic and green alternative in the future energy market. Among the photovoltaic technologies, organic photovoltaics (OPVs) demonstrate a cheap, flexible, clean and easy-processing way to convert solar energy into electricity. However, OPVs with a conventional device structure are still far away from industrialization mainly because of their short lifetime and the energy-intensive deposition of top metal electrode. To address the stability and cost issue simultaneously, an inverted device structure has been introduced into OPVs, bridging laboratory research with practical application. In this review, recent progress in device structures, working mechanisms, functions and advances of each component layer as well their correlations with the efficiency and stability of inverted OPVs are reviewed and illustrated.

  6. Total organic carbon analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Richard G.; Kosenka, Paul P.; Smith, Brian D.; Hutte, Richard S.; Webb, Johanna V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    The development and testing of a breadboard version of a highly sensitive total-organic-carbon (TOC) analyzer are reported. Attention is given to the system components including the CO2 sensor, oxidation reactor, acidification module, and the sample-inlet system. Research is reported for an experimental reagentless oxidation reactor, and good results are reported for linearity, sensitivity, and selectivity in the CO2 sensor. The TOC analyzer is developed with gravity-independent components and is designed for minimal additions of chemical reagents. The reagentless oxidation reactor is based on electrolysis and UV photolysis and is shown to be potentially useful. The stability of the breadboard instrument is shown to be good on a day-to-day basis, and the analyzer is capable of 5 sample analyses per day for a period of about 80 days. The instrument can provide accurate TOC and TIC measurements over a concentration range of 20 ppb to 50 ppm C.

  7. Organizing research data.

    PubMed

    Sestoft, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Research relies on ever larger amounts of data from experiments, automated production equipment, questionnaries, times series such as weather records, and so on. A major task in science is to combine, process and analyse such data to obtain evidence of patterns and correlations.Most research data are on digital form, which in principle ensures easy processing and analysis, easy long-term preservation, and easy reuse in future research, perhaps in entirely unanticipated ways. However, in practice, obstacles such as incompatible or undocumented data formats, poor data quality and lack of familiarity with current technology prevent researchers from making full use of available data.This paper argues that relational databases are excellent tools for veterinary research and animal production; provides a small example to introduce basic database concepts; and points out some concerns that must be addressed when organizing data for research purposes.

  8. Stacked organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Xue, Jiangeng; Uchida, Soichi; Rand, Barry P.

    2007-03-27

    A device is provided having a first electrode, a second electrode, a first photoactive region having a characteristic absorption wavelength .lamda..sub.1 and a second photoactive region having a characteristic absorption wavelength .lamda..sub.2. The photoactive regions are disposed between the first and second electrodes, and further positioned on the same side of a reflective layer, such that the first photoactive region is closer to the reflective layer than the second photoactive region. The materials comprising the photoactive regions may be selected such that .lamda..sub.1 is at least about 10% different from .lamda..sub.2. The device may further comprise an exciton blocking layer disposed adjacent to and in direct contact with the organic acceptor material of each photoactive region, wherein the LUMO of each exciton blocking layer other than that closest to the cathode is not more than about 0.3 eV greater than the LUMO of the acceptor material.

  9. Total organic carbon analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godec, Richard G.; Kosenka, Paul P.; Smith, Brian D.; Hutte, Richard S.; Webb, Johanna V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The development and testing of a breadboard version of a highly sensitive total-organic-carbon (TOC) analyzer are reported. Attention is given to the system components including the CO2 sensor, oxidation reactor, acidification module, and the sample-inlet system. Research is reported for an experimental reagentless oxidation reactor, and good results are reported for linearity, sensitivity, and selectivity in the CO2 sensor. The TOC analyzer is developed with gravity-independent components and is designed for minimal additions of chemical reagents. The reagentless oxidation reactor is based on electrolysis and UV photolysis and is shown to be potentially useful. The stability of the breadboard instrument is shown to be good on a day-to-day basis, and the analyzer is capable of 5 sample analyses per day for a period of about 80 days. The instrument can provide accurate TOC and TIC measurements over a concentration range of 20 ppb to 50 ppm C.

  10. Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Stieger, Bruno; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides or OATPs are central transporters in the disposition of drugs and other xenobiotics. In addition, they mediate transport of a wide variety of endogenous substrates. The critical role of OATPs in drug disposition has spurred research both in academia and in the pharmaceutical industry. Translational aspects with clinical questions are the focus in academia, while the pharmaceutical industry tries to define and understand the role these transporters play in pharmacotherapy. The present overview summarizes our knowledge on the interaction of food constituents with OATPs, and on the OATP transport mechanisms. Further, it gives an update on the available information on the structure-function relationship of the OATPs, and finally, covers the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of OATPs. PMID:24745984

  11. Community Organic Gardening Project

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, S.

    1982-01-01

    Final recommendations as to the further use and development of solar pods, developed by the participants of the Community Organic Gardening Project, are presented. The solar pods tested were dome-shaped, double glazed, fiberglass covers which were hinged to a permanent insulated frame enabling fall and late winter crops to survive outdoor temperatures as low as 10/sup 0/F. A list of materials and the instructions for constructing the pods is provided. Temperature performance and crop yields of the pods are briefly discussed. Very brief discussions of other solar gardening devices include Dutch lights and frames, slitted-row covers, and the Swiss made Xiro-Ag plant protection film. Cost information is included for each of the solar devices discussed. (BCS)

  12. Breakdown of organic insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    Solar cells and their associated electrical interconnects and leads were encapsulated in transparent elastomeric materials. Their purpose in a photovoltaic module, one of the most important for these elastomeric encapsulation materials, is to function as electrical insulation. This includes internal insulation between adjacent solar cells, between other encapsulated electrical parts, and between the total internal electrical circuitry and external metal frames, grounded areas, and module surfaces. Catastrophic electrical breakdown of the encapsulant insulation materials or electrical current through these materials or module edges to external locations can lead to module failure and can create hazards to humans. Electrical insulation stability, advanced elastomeric encapsulation materials are developed which are intended to be intrinsically free of in-situ ionic impurities, have ultralow water absorption, be weather-stable (UV, oxygen), and have high mechanical flexibility. Efforts to develop a method of assessing the life potential of organic insulation materials in photovoltaic modules are described.

  13. Drugs from marine organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Berlepsch, Klaus

    1980-07-01

    A modern approach to the search for biologically active substances of potential therapeutic use isolated from marine organisms is illustrated by a presentation of the multidisciplinary project pursued by the Roche Research Institute of Marine Pharmacology near Sydney, Australia. This specialized insitute is part of the world-wide research endeavour of our company and has now been in operation for five years. Following a brief outline of the technical functions the main scientific achievements published by the scientists of the institute are reviewed. This institute is, to our knowledge, the only one of its kind in private industry and we have attempted to demonstrate how its activities should be viewed in the overall context of today's drug or product development.

  14. Self-organizing biochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    I examine the plausibility of theories that postulate the development of complex chemical organization without requiring the replication of genetic polymers such as RNA. One conclusion is that theories that involve the organization of complex, small-molecule metabolic cycles such as the reductive citric acid cycle on mineral surfaces make unreasonable assumptions about the catalytic properties of minerals and the ability of minerals to organize sequences of disparate reactions. Another conclusion is that data in the Beilstein Handbook of Organic Chemistry that have been claimed to support the hypothesis that the reductive citric acid cycle originated as a self-organized cycle can more plausibly be interpreted in a different way.

  15. Managed care organizations and products.

    PubMed

    Behnke, L M

    1997-12-01

    Managed care organizations and their products will continue to change in response to consumer demands, competitive pressures, and regulatory requirements. Providers who gain an understanding of the world managed care organizations live in can also expect to influence these organizations for mutual benefit. Just as managed care organizations differ in the sophistication of their functional elements, providers and their organizations differ in their ability to shift their focus from the physician-patient relationship to improving the health of a population. As the future of managed care evolves, there are opportunities for those physicians who strive for a greater understanding of the broad spectrum of forces shaping the health care industry.

  16. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  17. From wooden limbs to biomaterial organs: the ethics of organ replacement and artificial organs.

    PubMed

    Kielstein, R; Sass, H M

    1995-05-01

    This paper discussed issues of ethical assessment and moral concern associated with organ replacement and physical enhancement: research, allocation, organ donation, artificial organs, xenografts, biomaterials, and neuromaterials. While emphasizing the medical and moral benefits over associated risks, it calls for a better integration of moral assessment into technology assessment and for the establishment of a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary International Ethics Committee for Organ Replacement Therapy.

  18. Food safety and organic meats.

    PubMed

    Van Loo, Ellen J; Alali, Walid; Ricke, Steven C

    2012-01-01

    The organic meat industry in the United States has grown substantially in the past decade in response to consumer demand for nonconventionally produced products. Consumers are often not aware that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) organic standards are based only on the methods used for production and processing of the product and not on the product's safety. Food safety hazards associated with organic meats remain unclear because of the limited research conducted to determine the safety of organic meat from farm-to-fork. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the published results on the microbiological safety of organic meats. In addition, antimicrobial resistance of microbes in organic food animal production is addressed. Determining the food safety risks associated with organic meat production requires systematic longitudinal studies that quantify the risks of microbial and nonmicrobial hazards from farm-to-fork.

  19. Organics in APOLLO Lunar Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    One of many unknowns prior to the Apollo landings concerned the possibility of life, its remains, or its organic precursors on the surface of the Moon. While the existence of lunar organisms was considered highly unlikely, a program of biological quarantine and testing for the astronauts, the Apollo Command Modules, and the lunar rock and soil samples, was instituted in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL). No conclusive evidence of lunar organisms, was detected and the quarantine program was ended after Apollo 14. Analyses for organic compounds were also con-ducted. Considerable effort was expended, during lunar surface operations and in the LRL, to minimize and quantify organic contamination. Post-Apollo curatorial operations and cleaning minimize contamination from particulates, oxygen, and water but no longer specifically address organic contamination. The organic compounds measured in Apollo samples are generally consistent with known sources of contamination.

  20. Ethical issues in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abouna, George M

    2003-01-01

    Clinical organ transplantation has been recognized as one of the most gripping medical advances of the century as it provides a way of giving the gift of life to patients with terminal failure of vital organs, which requires the participation of other fellow human beings and of society by donating organs from deceased or living individuals. The increasing incidence of vital organ failure and the inadequate supply of organs, especially from cadavers, has created a wide gap between organ supply and organ demand, which has resulted in very long waiting times to receive an organ as well as an increasing number of deaths while waiting. These events have raised many ethical, moral and societal issues regarding supply, the methods of organ allocation, the use of living donors as volunteers including minors. It has also led to the practice of organ sale by entrepreneurs for financial gains in some parts the world through exploitation of the poor, for the benefit of the wealthy. The current advances in immunology and tissue engineering and the use of animal organs, xenotransplantation, while offering very promising solutions to many of these problems, also raise additional ethical and medical issues which must be considered by the medical profession as well as society. This review deals with the ethical and moral issues generated by the current advances in organ transplantation, the problem of organ supply versus organ demand and the appropriate allocation of available organs. It deals with the risks and benefits of organ donation from living donors, the appropriate and acceptable methods to increase organ donation from the deceased through the adoption of the principle of 'presumed consent', the right methods of providing acceptable appreciation and compensation for the family of the deceased as well as volunteer and altruistic donors, and the duties and responsibilities of the medical profession and society to help fellow humans. The review also deals with the appropriate

  1. The Elusive Organic Ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letts, Nathan Percy

    A new thermally stable triplet, hexa(adamantylmethylene)hexaazatritetralin dication (ACH_2)HAT^ {+2} has been prepared as a test of the Breslow-McConnell model for organic ferromagnetism. Liquid helium Curie studies to 7.5 K are consistent with it being a ground state triplet or nearly degenerate triplet. Salts of (ACH_2)HAT were isolated and characterized as tests of the Wudl and Torrance models for an organic ferromagnet. Magnetic susceptibility studies were done on (ACH_2)HAT ^{+1}BF_4^ {-1}, (ACH_2)HAT ^{+1}SbF_6 ^{-1}, (ACH_2)HAT ^{+1}PF_6 ^{-1}, (ACH_2)HAT ^{+1.6}(SbF_6 ^{-1})_{1.6}, and (ACH_2)HAT^{+2 }(SbF_6^{-1}) _2. All are paramagnetic solids. The mixed valence compound shows antiferromagnetic interactions, which would be consistent with weakly interacting radicals. It was not a ferrimagnet as predicted by the Buchachenko model. Without a crystal structure it is impossible to know whether this is a valid test of these models. The parent compound H_6HAT was isolated and characterized. Two new discotic liquid crystals were synthesized by preparing the dodecanoyl and palmitoyl derivatives of H_6HAT. They show only narrow mesophases (2 and 5 degrees, respectively). Lastly semiempirical calculations were done on the following antiaromatic systems with D_{rm nh} symmetry: cyclopropenyl anion, cyclobutadiene, cyclopentadienyl cation and benzene dication. They all demonstrated triplet ground states by 37.0, 14.4, 7.0 and 6.8 kcal/mol, respectively. Stacks of the cyclopropenyl anion and radical were also high spin including the infinite chain. In the infinite chain the monomer (C_3H_3) _2^{-1} quartet is the ground state by 14.7 kcal/mol. Stacks in the cyclopentadienyl series are not high spin, but the trimer (C_5 H_5)_3^{+2} is a ground state quartet by 7.0 kcal/mol. The spin state of the cyclopentadienyl trimer is consistent with a Buchachenko model ferrimagnetic stack.

  2. Government influence on patient organizations.

    PubMed

    Van de Bovenkamp, Hester M; Trappenburg, Margo J

    2011-12-01

    Patient organizations increasingly play an important role in health care decision-making in Western countries. The Netherlands is one of the countries where this trend has gone furthest. In the literature some problems are identified, such as instrumental use of patient organizations by care providers, health insurers and the pharmaceutical industry. To strengthen the position of patient organizations government funding is often recommended as a solution. In this paper we analyze the ties between Dutch government and Dutch patient organizations to learn more about the effects of such a relationship between government and this part of civil society. Our study is based on official government documents and existing empirical research on patient organizations. We found that government influence on patient organizations has become quite substantial with government influencing the organizational structure of patient organizations, the activities these organizations perform and even their ideology. Financing patient organizations offers the government an important means to hold them accountable. Although the ties between patient organizations and the government enable the former to play a role that can be valued as positive by both parties, we argue that they raise problems as well which warrant a discussion on how much government influence on civil society is acceptable.

  3. Immune responses to bioengineered organs

    PubMed Central

    Ochando, Jordi; Charron, Dominique; Baptista, Pedro M.; Uygun, Basak E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Organ donation in the United States registered 9079 deceased organ donors in 2015. This high percentage of donations allowed organ transplantation in 29 851 recipients. Despite increasing numbers of transplants performed in comparison with previous years, the numbers of patients that are in need for a transplant increase every year at a higher rate. This reveals that the discrepancy between the demand and availability of organs remains fundamental problem in organ transplantation. Recent findings Development of bioengineered organs represents a promising approach to increase the pool of organs for transplantation. The technology involves obtaining complex three-dimensional scaffolds that support cellular activity and functional remodeling though tissue recellularization protocols using progenitor cells. This innovative approach integrates cross-thematic approaches from specific areas of transplant immunology, tissue engineering and stem cell biology, to potentially manufacture an unlimited source of donor organs for transplantation. Summary Although bioengineered organs are thought to escape immune recognition, the potential immune reactivity toward each of its components has not been studied in detail. Here, we summarize the host immune response toward different progenitor cells and discuss the potential implications of using nonself biological scaffolds to develop bioengineered organs. PMID:27926545

  4. The role of clinical nurse educators in organ procurement organizations.

    PubMed

    Swain, Sharon

    2011-12-01

    Clinical nurse educators are advanced practice nurses with preparation at the master's level or higher. Such nurses play an important role in organ procurement organizations. As leaders and members of the team, they provide structure and design to the training process. These educators oversee orientation of new employees, serve as mentors to preceptors, assess the learning needs of the organization, and provide ongoing training to veteran staff. Clinical nurse educators also contribute to continuous quality improvement for the organization and help to comply with regulatory standards.

  5. Orientation selectivity with organic photodetectors and an organic electrochemical transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkoupidenis, Paschalis; Rezaei-Mazinani, Shahab; Proctor, Christopher M.; Ismailova, Esma; Malliaras, George G.

    2016-11-01

    Neuroinspired device architectures offer the potential of higher order functionalities in information processing beyond their traditional microelectronic counterparts. Here we demonstrate a neuromorphic function of orientation selectivity, which is inspired from the visual system, with a combination of organic photodetectors and a multi-gated organic electrochemical transistor based on poly(3,4ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The device platform responds preferably to different orientations of light bars, a behaviour that resembles orientation selectivity of visual cortex cells. These results pave the way for organic-based neuromorphic devices with spatially correlated functionalities and potential applications in the area of organic bioelectronics.

  6. Structural organization of flagellin.

    PubMed

    Vonderviszt, F; Uedaira, H; Kidokoro, S; Namba, K

    1990-07-05

    The terminal regions of flagellin from Salmonella typhimurium have been reported to be disordered in solution, whereas the central part of the molecule contains protease-resistant, compact structural units. Here, conformational properties of flagellin and its proteolytic fragments were investigated and compared to characterize the domain organization and secondary structure of flagellin. Deconvolution analysis of the calorimetric melting profiles of flagellin and its fragments suggests that flagellin is composed of three co-operative units or domains. The central part of the molecule, residues 179 to 418, consists of two domains (G1 and G2), whereas the third domain (G3) is discontinuous, constructed from segments 67 to 178 and 419 to 448. Secondary structure prediction and analysis of far-ultraviolet circular dichroic spectra have revealed that G1 and G2 consist predominantly of beta-structure with a little alpha-helical content. G3 contains almost equal amounts of alpha and beta-structure, while in the terminal parts of flagellin the ordered secondary structure seems to be entirely alpha-helical.

  7. Color: an exosomatic organ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Brakel, Jaap; Saunders, Barbara

    2001-12-01

    According to the dominant view in cognitive science, in particular in its more popularized versions, color sensings or perceptions are located in a 'quality space'. This space has three dimensions: hue (the chromatic aspect of color), saturation (the 'intensity' of hue), and brightness. This space is structured further via a small number of primitive hues or landmark colors, usually four (red, yellow, green, blue) or six (if white and black are included). It has also been suggested that there are eleven semantic universals - the six colors previously mentioned plus orange, pink, brown, purple, and grey. Scientific evidence for these widely accepted theories is at best minimal, based on sloppy methodology and at worst non-existent. Against the standard view, it is argued that color might better be regarded as the outcome of a social-historical developmental trajectory in which there is mutual shaping of philosophical presuppositions, scientific theories, experimental practices, technological tools, industrial products, rhetorical frameworks, and their intercalated and recursive interactions with the practices of daily life. That is: color, the domain of color, is the outcome of interactive processes of scientific, instrumental, industrial, and everyday lifeworlds. That is: color might better be called an exosomatic organ, a second nature.

  8. Integrated organic photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potscavage, William J.; Yoo, Seunghyup; Domercq, Benoit; Kim, Jungbae; Holt, Joe; Kippelen, Bernard

    2007-09-01

    Methods for scalable output voltage and encapsulation of organic photovoltaic cells are addressed in this paper. To obtain scalable output voltages, integrated photovoltaic modules comprised of a bulk heterojunction of poly(3- hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and a soluble C 70 derivative, [6,6]-phenyl C 71 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM-70), were fabricated. Power conversion efficiency of individual P3HT/PCBM-70 cells was estimated to be 4.1 % for AM1.5 G illumination. Modules of one to four cells connected in series produced open-circuit voltages V OC that linearly depend on the number of cells N as V OC = N × 0.621 V with a nearly constant short-circuit current of 1.4 +/- 0.1 mA. Separately, shelf lifetimes of more than one year were achieved for pentacene/C 60 solar cells by encapsulation with a 200-nm-thick layer of Al IIO 3 deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In addition, the ALD process improved the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency of the solar cells by thermal annealing that occurs during the process.

  9. Physics of metabolic organization.

    PubMed

    Jusup, Marko; Sousa, Tânia; Domingos, Tiago; Labinac, Velimir; Marn, Nina; Wang, Zhen; Klanjšček, Tin

    2017-03-01

    We review the most comprehensive metabolic theory of life existing to date. A special focus is given to the thermodynamic roots of this theory and to implications that the laws of physics-such as the conservation of mass and energy-have on all life. Both the theoretical foundations and biological applications are covered. Hitherto, the foundations were more accessible to physicists or mathematicians, and the applications to biologists, causing a dichotomy in what always should have been a single body of work. To bridge the gap between the two aspects of the same theory, we (i) adhere to the theoretical formalism, (ii) try to minimize the amount of information that a reader needs to process, but also (iii) invoke examples from biology to motivate the introduction of new concepts and to justify the assumptions made, and (iv) show how the careful formalism of the general theory enables modular, self-consistent extensions that capture important features of the species and the problem in question. Perhaps the most difficult among the introduced concepts, the utilization (or mobilization) energy flow, is given particular attention in the form of an original and considerably simplified derivation. Specific examples illustrate a range of possible applications-from energy budgets of individual organisms, to population dynamics, to ecotoxicology.

  10. Physics of metabolic organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusup, Marko; Sousa, Tânia; Domingos, Tiago; Labinac, Velimir; Marn, Nina; Wang, Zhen; Klanjšček, Tin

    2017-03-01

    We review the most comprehensive metabolic theory of life existing to date. A special focus is given to the thermodynamic roots of this theory and to implications that the laws of physics-such as the conservation of mass and energy-have on all life. Both the theoretical foundations and biological applications are covered. Hitherto, the foundations were more accessible to physicists or mathematicians, and the applications to biologists, causing a dichotomy in what always should have been a single body of work. To bridge the gap between the two aspects of the same theory, we (i) adhere to the theoretical formalism, (ii) try to minimize the amount of information that a reader needs to process, but also (iii) invoke examples from biology to motivate the introduction of new concepts and to justify the assumptions made, and (iv) show how the careful formalism of the general theory enables modular, self-consistent extensions that capture important features of the species and the problem in question. Perhaps the most difficult among the introduced concepts, the utilization (or mobilization) energy flow, is given particular attention in the form of an original and considerably simplified derivation. Specific examples illustrate a range of possible applications-from energy budgets of individual organisms, to population dynamics, to ecotoxicology.

  11. Growth of Complex Organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes Amaral, Luis A.

    2000-03-01

    We analyze a database comprising all publicly-traded US firms within the years 1974--93(M.H.R. Stanley et al.), Nature 379, 804 (1996); L.A.N. Amaral et al., J. Phys. (France) I 7, 621 (1997). We find (i) that the distribution of the annual growth rates ---for companies with approximately the same size S--- decays as an exponential, and (ii) that the standard deviation σ of these distributions scales as σ ~ S^-β. We introduce a dynamical model in which we assume that each firm has a complex internal structure comprising many subunits(L.A.N. Amaral et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 1385 (1998). We study the case in which (i) each subunit grows in a multiplicative manner, and (ii) the interactions between the firms are mean field. We find agreement between our predictions and the empirical results for firms. We then analyze the fluctuations in the gross domestic product of 152 countries for the period 1950--92 and find a surprising agreement with the results for firm growth (Y. Lee et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 3275 (1998). Finally, we analyze the fluctuations in the research output and research input of US universities and find sinilar scaling laws(V. Plerou et al.), Nature 400, 433 (1999). Our empirical results and model suggest that the growth of organizations with complex structure are governed by similar mechanisms.

  12. Organic rankine cycle fluid

    DOEpatents

    Brasz, Joost J.; Jonsson, Ulf J.

    2006-09-05

    A method of operating an organic rankine cycle system wherein a liquid refrigerant is circulated to an evaporator where heat is introduced to the refrigerant to convert it to vapor. The vapor is then passed through a turbine, with the resulting cooled vapor then passing through a condenser for condensing the vapor to a liquid. The refrigerant is one of CF.sub.3CF.sub.2C(O)CF(CF.sub.3).sub.2, (CF.sub.3).sub.2 CFC(O)CF(CF.sub.3).sub.2, CF.sub.3(CF.sub.2).sub.2C(O)CF(CF.sub.3).sub.2, CF.sub.3(CF.sub.2).sub.3C(O)CF(CG.sub.3).sub.2, CF.sub.3(CF.sub.2).sub.5C(O)CF.sub.3, CF.sub.3CF.sub.2C(O)CF.sub.2CF.sub.2CF.sub.3, CF.sub.3C(O)CF(CF.sub.3).sub.2.

  13. Ultraflexible organic photonic skin

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Tomoyuki; Zalar, Peter; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Jinno, Hiroaki; Matsuhisa, Naoji; Kitanosako, Hiroki; Tachibana, Yutaro; Yukita, Wakako; Koizumi, Mari; Someya, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Thin-film electronics intimately laminated onto the skin imperceptibly equip the human body with electronic components for health-monitoring and information technologies. When electronic devices are worn, the mechanical flexibility and/or stretchability of thin-film devices helps to minimize the stress and discomfort associated with wear because of their conformability and softness. For industrial applications, it is important to fabricate wearable devices using processing methods that maximize throughput and minimize cost. We demonstrate ultraflexible and conformable three-color, highly efficient polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) and organic photodetectors (OPDs) to realize optoelectronic skins (oe-skins) that introduce multiple electronic functionalities such as sensing and displays on the surface of human skin. The total thickness of the devices, including the substrate and encapsulation layer, is only 3 μm, which is one order of magnitude thinner than the epidermal layer of human skin. By integrating green and red PLEDs with OPDs, we fabricate an ultraflexible reflective pulse oximeter. The device unobtrusively measures the oxygen concentration of blood when laminated on a finger. On-skin seven-segment digital displays and color indicators can visualize data directly on the body. PMID:27152354

  14. Stable States of Biological Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.; Yukalova, E. P.; Henry, J.-Y.; Cobb, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    A novel model of biological organisms is advanced, treating an organism as a self-consistent system subject to a pathogen flux. The principal novelty of the model is that it describes not some parts, but a biological organism as a whole. The organism is modeled by a five-dimensional dynamical system. The organism homeostasis is described by the evolution equations for five interacting components: healthy cells, ill cells, innate immune cells, specific immune cells, and pathogens. The stability analysis demonstrates that, in a wide domain of the parameter space, the system exhibits robust structural stability. There always exist four stable stationary solutions characterizing four qualitatively differing states of the organism: alive state, boundary state, critical state, and dead state.

  15. Teaching biology with model organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, Dolores A.

    The purpose of this study is to identify and use model organisms that represent each of the kingdoms biologists use to classify organisms, while experiencing the process of science through guided inquiry. The model organisms will be the basis for studying the four high school life science core ideas as identified by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): LS1-From molecules to organisms, LS2-Ecosystems, LS3- Heredity, and LS4- Biological Evolution. NGSS also have identified four categories of science and engineering practices which include developing and using models and planning and carrying out investigations. The living organisms will be utilized to increase student interest and knowledge within the discipline of Biology. Pre-test and posttest analysis utilizing student t-test analysis supported the hypothesis. This study shows increased student learning as a result of using living organisms as models for classification and working in an inquiry-based learning environment.

  16. Method of doping organic semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Kloc,; Christian Leo; Ramirez; Arthur Penn; So, Woo-Young

    2010-10-26

    An apparatus has a crystalline organic semiconducting region that includes polyaromatic molecules. A source electrode and a drain electrode of a field-effect transistor are both in contact with the crystalline organic semiconducting region. A gate electrode of the field-effect transistor is located to affect the conductivity of the crystalline organic semiconducting region between the source and drain electrodes. A dielectric layer of a first dielectric that is substantially impermeable to oxygen is in contact with the crystalline organic semiconducting region. The crystalline organic semiconducting region is located between the dielectric layer and a substrate. The gate electrode is located on the dielectric layer. A portion of the crystalline organic semiconducting region is in contact with a second dielectric via an opening in the dielectric layer. A physical interface is located between the second dielectric and the first dielectric.

  17. Organic photoresponse materials and devices.

    PubMed

    Dong, Huanli; Zhu, Hongfei; Meng, Qing; Gong, Xiong; Hu, Wenping

    2012-03-07

    Organic photoresponse materials and devices are critically important to organic optoelectronics and energy crises. The activities of photoresponse in organic materials can be summarized in three effects, photoconductive, photovoltaic and optical memory effects. Correspondingly, devices based on the three effects can be divided into (i) photoconductive devices such as photodetectors, photoreceptors, photoswitches and phototransistors, (ii) photovoltaic devices such as organic solar cells, and (iii) optical data storage devices. It is expected that this systematic analysis of photoresponse materials and devices could be a guide for the better understanding of structure-property relationships of organic materials and provide key clues for the fabrication of high performance organic optoelectronic devices, the integration of them in circuits and the application of them in renewable green energy strategies (critical review, 452 references).

  18. "Clickable" metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yuta; Sato, Hiroki; Shinkai, Seiji; Sada, Kazuki

    2008-11-05

    We demonstrated the metal-organic framework bearing the azide group in the organic linkers and in situ click reactions with some small alkynes. The XRPD patterns indicated that the click reaction proceeded without any decomposition of the original MOF network. Controlling the organic linkers and incorporation of the azide groups should provide the designer-made MOFs that have controlled molecular cavities with the desired steric dimensions and functionality.

  19. Microtubule organization during human parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Hisataka; Ugajin, Tomohisa; Murakami, Takashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Okamura, Kunihiro

    2009-04-01

    In human fertilization, the sperm centrosome plays a crucial role as a microtubule organizing center (MTOC). We studied microtubule organization during human parthenogenesis, which occurs when a human egg undergoes cleavage without a sperm centrosome. Multiple cytoplasmic asters were organized in the human oocyte after parthenogenetic activation, indicating that multiple MTOC are present in the human oocyte cytoplasm and function like a human sperm centrosome during parthenogenesis.

  20. Colloidal Covalent Organic Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) polymer networks with designed topology and chemical functionality, permanent porosity, and high surface areas. These features are potentially useful for a broad range of applications, including catalysis, optoelectronics, and energy storage devices. But current COF syntheses offer poor control over the material’s morphology and final form, generally providing insoluble and unprocessable microcrystalline powder aggregates. COF polymerizations are often performed under conditions in which the monomers are only partially soluble in the reaction solvent, and this heterogeneity has hindered understanding of their polymerization or crystallization processes. Here we report homogeneous polymerization conditions for boronate ester-linked, 2D COFs that inhibit crystallite precipitation, resulting in stable colloidal suspensions of 2D COF nanoparticles. The hexagonal, layered structures of the colloids are confirmed by small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, and kinetic characterization provides insight into the growth process. The colloid size is modulated by solvent conditions, and the technique is demonstrated for four 2D boronate ester-linked COFs. The diameter of individual COF nanoparticles in solution is monitored and quantified during COF growth and stabilization at elevated temperature using in situ variable-temperature liquid cell transmission electron microscopy imaging, a new characterization technique that complements conventional bulk scattering techniques. Solution casting of the colloids yields a free-standing transparent COF film with retained crystallinity and porosity, as well as preferential crystallite orientation. Collectively this structural control provides new opportunities for understanding COF formation and designing morphologies for device applications. PMID:28149954

  1. Physiologically relevant organs on chips.

    PubMed

    Yum, Kyungsuk; Hong, Soon Gweon; Healy, Kevin E; Lee, Luke P

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in integrating microengineering and tissue engineering have generated promising microengineered physiological models for experimental medicine and pharmaceutical research. Here we review the recent development of microengineered physiological systems, or also known as "ogans-on-chips", that reconstitute the physiologically critical features of specific human tissues and organs and their interactions. This technology uses microengineering approaches to construct organ-specific microenvironments, reconstituting tissue structures, tissue-tissue interactions and interfaces, and dynamic mechanical and biochemical stimuli found in specific organs, to direct cells to assemble into functional tissues. We first discuss microengineering approaches to reproduce the key elements of physiologically important, dynamic mechanical microenvironments, biochemical microenvironments, and microarchitectures of specific tissues and organs in microfluidic cell culture systems. This is followed by examples of microengineered individual organ models that incorporate the key elements of physiological microenvironments into single microfluidic cell culture systems to reproduce organ-level functions. Finally, microengineered multiple organ systems that simulate multiple organ interactions to better represent human physiology, including human responses to drugs, is covered in this review. This emerging organs-on-chips technology has the potential to become an alternative to 2D and 3D cell culture and animal models for experimental medicine, human disease modeling, drug development, and toxicology.

  2. Arctic River organic matter transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Peter; Gustafsson, Orjan; Vonk, Jorien; Spencer, Robert; McClelland, Jim

    2016-04-01

    Arctic Rivers have unique hydrology and biogeochemistry. They also have a large impact on the Arctic Ocean due to the large amount of riverine inflow and small ocean volume. With respect to organic matter, their influence is magnified by the large stores of soil carbon and distinct soil hydrology. Here we present a recap of what is known of Arctic River organic matter transport. We will present a summary of what is known of the ages and sources of Arctic River dissolved and particulate organic matter. We will also discuss the current status of what is known about changes in riverine organic matter export due to global change.

  3. Organic electrolytes for sodium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestergaard, B.

    1992-09-01

    A summary of earlier given status reports in connection with the project on organic electrolytes for sodium batteries is presented. The aim of the investigations was to develop new room temperature molten salts electrolytes mainly with radical substituted heterocyclic organic chlorides mixed with aluminum chloride. The new electrolytes should have an ionic conductivity comparable with MEIC1:AlCl3 or better. A computer model program MOPAC (Molecular Orbital Package) was to be included to calculate theoretically reduction potentials for a variety of organic cations. Furthermore, MOPAC could be utilized to predict the electron densities, and then give a prediction of the stability of the organic cation.

  4. How safe are engineered organisms?

    PubMed

    Kolata, G

    1985-07-05

    At a June 1985 conference on "Engineered Organisms in the Environment: Scientific Issues" organized by the American Society for Microbiology, ecologists voiced their concern to molecular biologists about the safety of releasing genetically-engineered organisms into the environment without proper regulation. Under discussion were four proposed experiments, three in agriculture and one involving the production of a genetically-engineered smallpox vaccine at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. The agricultural experiments involve organisms developed at the University of California, Berkeley, to make potato plants frost-resistant, a Monsanto microbial pesticide, and herbicide-tolerant plants developed by Calgene.

  5. Organ trade using social networks.

    PubMed

    Alrogy, Waleed; Jawdat, Dunia; Alsemari, Muhannad; Alharbi, Abdulrahman; Alasaad, Abdullah; Hajeer, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    Organ transplantation is recognized worldwide as an effective treatment for organ failure. However, due to the increase in the number of patients requiring a transplant, a shortage of suitable organs for transplantation has become a global problem. Human organ trade is an illegal practice of buying or selling organs and is universally sentenced. The aim of this study was to search social network for organ trade and offerings in Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted from June 22, 2015 to February 19, 2016. The search was conducted on Twitter, Google answers, and Facebook using the following terms: kidney for sale, kidneys for sale, liver for sale, kidney wanted, liver wanted, kidney donor, and liver donor. We found a total of 557 adverts on organ trade, 165 (30%) from donors or sellers, and 392 (70%) from recipients or buyers. On Twitter, we found 472 (85%) adverts, on Google answers 61 (11%), and on Facebook 24 (4%). Organ trade is a global problem, and yet it is increasingly seen in many countries. Although the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation by-laws specifically prohibits and monitors any form of commercial transplantation, it is still essential to enforce guidelines for medical professionals to detect and prevent such criminal acts.

  6. EFFECT OF NON-TARGET ORGANICS ON ORGANIC CHEMICAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To improve our standard of living, man has synthesized organic compounds for use in products considered essential for life. These compounds are having and will continue to have a significant impact on the terrestrial environment. Understanding organic chemical transport through s...

  7. Students' Understandings of Human Organs and Organ Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, Michael J.; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    2001-01-01

    Discusses students' understandings of their own internal structure. Analysis shows the extent to which student understanding increases with age and the degree to which students know more about some organs and organ systems than others. Gender differences in the drawings were generally not large and there were some intriguing differences in the…

  8. A New Way to Organize DFX in a Large Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyysalo, Jarkko; Aaramaa, Sanja; Similä, Jouni; Saukkonen, Samuli; Belt, Pekka; Lehto, Jari

    Efficient requirements engineering and design is a demanding task. Design for excellence (DFX) offers a way to bring together different views and harmonizing practices. There are still impediments, for example, in having internal and external customers valued appropriately. The organizational implementation of DFX in itself is a debated question. We present a new way to organize the DFX concept in a large organization. The results are based on experiences of a large organization that operates in the area of ICT systems, and has had a successful implementation of the DFX concept for several years. Contrary to the traditional way of managing the DFX within R&D it is beneficial to organize it within also other parts of the operational subsystem, as this makes the concept and its improvement more visible and widespread in the organization. However, this requires seeing the concepts of problem domain and solution domain from a new angle.

  9. Electronic and optical properties at organic/organic interfaces in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yost, Shane R; Hontz, Eric; McMahon, David P; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2014-01-01

    In organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices the formation of free charges from a singlet excited state is the key step in converting light to electrical energy. However, questions still remain as to why the process is so fast and efficient in some OPV devices while not in others. Currently, it is not understood how the binding energy of the charge transfer state formed at an organic/organic interface, ~40 kT, is overcome in order to create free charge carriers. Given the difficulty of experimentally probing the electronic processes occurring at the organic/organic interface, it falls to theoretical and computational studies to provide essential insights into the processes occurring on the microscopic level. In this review we will cover the contributions made by theoretical studies to improve our understanding of the organic/organic interface. We will address the advantages and disadvantages of different theoretical approaches to studying the numerous interesting effects observed, such as shifts in the HOMO and LUMO levels due to the electrostatic environment, increased localization due to disorder, and the general impact of molecular orientation on different molecular properties. Further, we will discuss the currently proposed mechanisms of charge separation at the organic/organic interface and the implications that these mechanisms have on the choice of materials for use in OPV devices.

  10. Mars 2007 Phoenix Scout mission Organic Free Blank: Method to distinguish Mars organics from terrestrial organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Woida, R.; Sutter, B.; Lauer, H. V.; Shinohara, C.; Golden, D. C.; Boynton, W. V.; Arvidson, R. E.; Stewart, R. L.; Tamppari, L. K.; Gross, M.; Smith, P.

    2008-10-01

    The Organic Free Blank (OFB) for the Mars 2007 Phoenix Scout mission provides an organic carbon null sample to compare against possible Martian organic signatures obtained by the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA). Major OFB requirements are an organic carbon content of <=10 ng C g-1 of sample, a nonporous structure, and strength and integrity that permits machining by the Robotic Arm (RA) Icy Soil Acquisition Device (ISAD). A specially fabricated form of commercial Macor™ (a machinable glass ceramic), made with nitrate salts replacing carbonate salts, was selected as the OFB material. The OFB has a total inorganic carbon content of approximately 1.6 μg C g-1 after fabrication, cleaning, and heat treatment in oxygen gas at 550°C. The detection limit for organic carbon is ~100 ng C g-1 of sample, or about a factor of 10 higher than the design goal. One scenario for OFB use on Mars is subsequent to the first TEGA detection of organic carbon. The OFB sample, acquired by the RA ISAD and delivered to TEGA, would come in contact with all surfaces in the sample transfer chain, collecting residual terrestrial contamination that accompanied the spacecraft to Mars. A second sample of the putative Martian organic-bearing material would then be obtained and analyzed by TEGA. Different organic contents and/or different mass spectrometer fragmentation patterns between the OFB material and the two Martian samples would indicate that the detected organic carbon is indigenous to Mars.

  11. Ensuring ethical behavior in organizations

    SciTech Connect

    Milter, R.G.

    1994-12-31

    This paper examines both the industrial-age and the information-age organization`s attempts to ensure ethical behavior. Organizational responses to deal with this task include establishing written codes, appointing ethics officers, developing ethics committees, training, and impacting educational systems.

  12. Strategies for Organization in Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieth, Ken

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important ways to increase the quality of classroom management is to look objectively and carefully at one's organizational skills. By streamlining one's ability to organize, one can work smarter and not just harder, thus saving time for more important things. This article offers some strategies for organization in art. Paying…

  13. Vote No! Managing Organized Opposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lifto, Don E.; Senden, J. Bradford

    2008-01-01

    Organized opposition from A to Z symbolizes both the breadth and the core values of organized opposition groups that have emerged across the nation in recent years. Technological advances have expanded the reach and impact of oppositional messages. Anti-public school websites, group e-mail, the mushrooming blogosphere and web-based marketing…

  14. Organ printing: promises and challenges.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Drake, Christopher; Markwald, Roger R

    2008-01-01

    Organ printing or biomedical application of rapid prototyping, also defined as additive layer-by-layer biomanufacturing, is an emerging transforming technology that has potential for surpassing traditional solid scaffold-based tissue engineering. Organ printing has certain advantages: it is an automated approach that offers a pathway for scalable reproducible mass production of tissue engineered products; it allows a precised simultaneous 3D positioning of several cell types; it enables creation tissue with a high level of cell density; it can solve the problem of vascularization in thick tissue constructs; finally, organ printing can be done in situ. The ultimate goal of organ-printing technology is to fabricate 3D vascularized functional living human organs suitable for clinical implantation. The main practical outcomes of organ-printing technology are industrial scalable robotic biofabrication of complex human tissues and organs, automated tissue-based in vitro assays for clinical diagnostics, drug discovery and drug toxicity, and complex in vitro models of human diseases. This article describes conceptual framework and recent developments in organ-printing technology, outlines main technological barriers and challenges, and presents potential future practical applications.

  15. Modeling and Measuring Organization Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkeson, Andrew; Kehoe, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    Manufacturing plants have a clear life cycle: they are born small, grow substantially with age, and eventually die. Economists have long thought that this life cycle is driven by organization capital, the accumulation of plant-specific knowledge. The location of plants in the life cycle determines the size of the payments, or organization rents,…

  16. Organic thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Klauk, Hagen

    2010-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, organic transistors have developed from a laboratory curiosity to a commercially viable technology. This critical review provides a short summary of several important aspects of organic transistors, including materials, microstructure, carrier transport, manufacturing, electrical properties, and performance limitations (200 references).

  17. Certified organic herb mulching demonstration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of organo-pestiphytology (the study of organic weed control) is to investigate and develop weed control strategies that are fundamental to the cropping system rather than afterthoughts to a production system. The scarcity of approved organic herbicides reinforces the necessity for org...

  18. Application of Organic Solid Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekido, S.

    1982-01-01

    If ions are considered to be solid material which transport electric charges, polymer materials can then be considered as organic solid electrolytes. The role of these electrolytes is discussed for (1) ion concentration sensors; (2) batteries using lithium as the cathode and a charge complex of organic material and iodine in the anode; and (3) elements applying electrical double layer capability.

  19. Organic solar cell exploratory research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalenty, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Principles governing the photovoltaic effect in organic materials on the molecular level are studied and applied to the design and fabrication of laboratory devices having a photovoltaic organic polymer film as their key element. Progress to date has been in three areas: (1) materials synthesis; (2) apparatus development; and (3) ultra-thin film fabrication.

  20. Training and Farmers' Organizations' Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miiro, Richard F.; Matsiko, Frank B.; Mazur, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study sought to determine the influence of training transfer factors and actual application of training on organization level outcomes among farmer owned produce marketing organizations in Uganda. Design/methodology/approach: Interviews based on the Learning Transfer Systems Inventory (LTSI) were conducted with 120 PMO leaders…

  1. The Tax Exempt Educational Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Law and Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Outlines the Internal Revenue Service interpretation of qualification for tax-exempt status for educational organizations. Points out that tax-exempt status is revocable and that not all income of tax-exempt organizations is tax free. Reviews the Revenue Act of 1950. (MD)

  2. Toward a Science of Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, R. Jean

    Major elements of the theory of social behavior formulated by Talcott Parsons are applied to a study of organization. The organizational model developed is based on Parsons' four functional imperatives of goal attainment, adaptation, integration, and pattern maintenance. Organizations are regarded as social systems distinguished by different…

  3. Organizing and Staffing Technology Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Lane B.

    2005-01-01

    The organization of technology leadership for school districts is as wide-ranging as the types of technology in our schools. And just as with different hardware and software applications, certain structures of leadership work better for some systems than others. Strong organization skills are needed to manage the myriad of dynamics involved in…

  4. University Organization for Environmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, John E.

    Whether or not environmental concerns provide a visable and continuing basis of university organization is the situation scrutinized in this speech. Apparently part of the problem has been the generation of some theme or model around which a core of interested faculty and students could work. It is implied that some conceptual organization of an…

  5. Diagnosing and Measuring Learning Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moilanen, Raili

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To explore and analyse various learning organizations and to attempt to outline the form of a holistic learning organization. Design/methodology/approach: The tool described in this article is a continuation of the work published in a Licentiate thesis in 1996 and developed further in a doctoral dissertation in 2001. The Learning…

  6. YOUTH ORGANIZATIONS OTHER THAN CHURCHES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SORENSON, ROY

    THIS PAPER PRESENTS THE ORGANIZATIONS, OTHER THAN CHURCHES, WHICH SERVE RURAL YOUTH. IT DESCRIBES PROGRAMS OF SUCH ORGANIZATIONS AS--(1) THE 4-H CLUB WHICH IS THE LARGEST IN VOLUME AND SPREAD, THE FUTURE FARMERS AND YOUNG FARMERS OF AMERICA, THE GRANGE, THE AMERICAN FARM BUREAU FEDERATION, THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF COOPERATION, THE FUTURE AND NEW…

  7. Organic Addict. And Why Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilliaud, Denis

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the practice of organic farming as used in Japan. Defines the biodynamic agricultural method based on the principle of the dynamics that control life on earth from the cosmos. Argues that organic farming does not benefit from chemicals used on neighboring farms. (MDH)

  8. Organic control of plant diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic agriculture refers to agricultural production systems that are managed according to a number of standards which vary by governing body or political entity, but which share a common philosophy and set of general management practices. In popular culture, organic crop production is generally un...

  9. Organic weed control in watermelons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrated pest management (IPM) is an essential element for certified organic crop production and producers place weed control as their highest research priority within their IPM programs. The objective of these experiments was to investigate the impact of integrated organic weed control systems o...

  10. The self-organizing consciousness.

    PubMed

    Perruchet, Pierre; Vinter, Annie

    2002-06-01

    We propose that the isomorphism generally observed between the representations composing our momentary phenomenal experience and the structure of the world is the end-product of a progressive organization that emerges thanks to elementary associative processes that take our conscious representations themselves as the stuff on which they operate, a thesis that we summarize in the concept of Self-Organizing Consciousness (SOC).

  11. Perfusion decellularization of whole organs.

    PubMed

    Guyette, Jacques P; Gilpin, Sarah E; Charest, Jonathan M; Tapias, Luis F; Ren, Xi; Ott, Harald C

    2014-01-01

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) outlines the architecture of organs and tissues. It provides a unique niche of composition and form, which serves as a foundational scaffold that supports organ-specific cell types and enables normal organ function. Here we describe a standard process for pressure-controlled perfusion decellularization of whole organs for generating acellular 3D scaffolds with preserved ECM protein content, architecture and perfusable vascular conduits. By applying antegrade perfusion of detergents and subsequent washes to arterial vasculature at low physiological pressures, successful decellularization of complex organs (i.e., hearts, lungs and kidneys) can be performed. By using appropriate modifications, pressure-controlled perfusion decellularization can be achieved in small-animal experimental models (rat organs, 4-5 d) and scaled to clinically relevant models (porcine and human organs, 12-14 d). Combining the unique structural and biochemical properties of native acellular scaffolds with subsequent recellularization techniques offers a novel platform for organ engineering and regeneration, for experimentation ex vivo and potential clinical application in vivo.

  12. Placeless Organizations: Collaborating for Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardi, Bonnie A.

    2007-01-01

    This article defines and discusses placeless organizations as sites and generators of learning on a large scale. The emphasis is on how placeless organizations structure themselves to carry out social transformation--necessarily involving intensive learning--on a national or global scale. The argument is made that place is not a necessary…

  13. Creating an Innovative Learning Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how to create an innovative learning (iLearning) organization. It begins by discussing the life cycle of knowledge in an organization, followed by a description of the theoretical foundation for iLearning. Next, the article presents an example of iLearning, followed by a description of the distributed nature of work, the…

  14. Envisioning and Leading Organizational Transformation: One Organ Procurement Organization's Journey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2012, one organ procurement organization (OPO) welcomed a new President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO). This OPO, LifeShare Transplant Donor Services of Oklahoma (LifeShare), had just celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2011. While LifeShare was well-established chronologically, growth in organ donors and organs transplanted from these donors had occurred at a much slower rate during the collaborative era and afterward (2003-2011) than the donor/transplant growth the United States (US), as a whole, had experienced. While this performance had been stable, it was in the lower quartile of US OPOs on a per capita basis (organs transplanted per donor), and conversion rates were unremarkable. It was the sense of the OPO and donation service area (DSA) constituents that there was an opportunity for growth. It was under this premise that the new CEO was recruited in late 2011 and assumed leadership in February 2012. Method: It important to note that the new CEO (the author) found LifeShare possessed numerous significant assets upon which to build. These included a strong core of committed and dedicated staff, a supportive Board, supportive transplant centers, and a strong state donor registry. Therefore, it was apparent that, while achieving the DSA's potential would require a transformation of the organization, the transformation did not necessarily require replacing core staff, often a common step undertaken by new chief executives. Beginning in 2012, the CEO sought to transform both the culture and the operation of the organization by focusing on a short list of key strategies. Culturally, three primary initiatives were undertaken: leadership development, staff development, and establishing "organizational clarity". Operationally, the primary focus was identifying organ donor potential and then, based upon the opportunities for improvement, focusing on operational policies and practices. As LifeShare's team began to identify pockets of

  15. Functional Integrative Levels in the Human Interactome Recapitulate Organ Organization

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Carlos; Benkahla, Alia; De Las Rivas, Javier; Brun, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Interactome networks represent sets of possible physical interactions between proteins. They lack spatio-temporal information by construction. However, the specialized functions of the differentiated cell types which are assembled into tissues or organs depend on the combinatorial arrangements of proteins and their physical interactions. Is tissue-specificity, therefore, encoded within the interactome? In order to address this question, we combined protein-protein interactions, expression data, functional annotations and interactome topology. We first identified a subnetwork formed exclusively of proteins whose interactions were observed in all tested tissues. These are mainly involved in housekeeping functions and are located at the topological center of the interactome. This ‘Largest Common Interactome Network’ represents a ‘functional interactome core’. Interestingly, two types of tissue-specific interactions are distinguished when considering function and network topology: tissue-specific interactions involved in regulatory and developmental functions are central whereas tissue-specific interactions involved in organ physiological functions are peripheral. Overall, the functional organization of the human interactome reflects several integrative levels of functions with housekeeping and regulatory tissue-specific functions at the center and physiological tissue-specific functions at the periphery. This gradient of functions recapitulates the organization of organs, from cells to organs. Given that several gradients have already been identified across interactomes, we propose that gradients may represent a general principle of protein-protein interaction network organization. PMID:21799769

  16. Organ Transplantation in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Faissal A M

    2016-07-01

    Organ transplantation started in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) in 1979 with a kidney transplanted from a live donor. The Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation has been established in 1985 as a governmental agency that supervises all national transplant activities in the KSA. Organ transplantation in the KSA has made great strides since 1985. Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation is playing a central role in all aspects of transplantation including education on all levels, allocation, coordination and procurement. A new initiative has started an ambitious program in 2014 to improve the identification and reporting of organ donors aiming at an annual rate of 15 donors per million populations within 3 years in the KSA.

  17. Progress in abdominal organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kosieradzki, Maciej; Lisik, Wojciech; Rowiński, Wojciech; Małkowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Summary The excellent results of vascularized organ transplantation have resulted in an increasing number of end-stage organ failure patients seeking such treatment. The results of organ transplantation depend on a number of factors – the quality of the donor (and an organ), living vs. deceased donation, magnitude of ischemic injury (and its prevention), and recipient-dependent factors. Ischemia/reperfusion injury in organ transplantation is a multifactorial process, which may lead to delayed graft function. In addition, surgical and preservation techniques, type of immunosuppressive regimens, complications after transplantation and post-transplant management may also have a significant impact on short- and long-term results of transplantation. In this paper we describe advances in transplantation in recent years, with particular emphasis on kidney, liver, intestines, whole pancreas and pancreatic islets. PMID:22129915

  18. Self-organizing biochemical cycles

    PubMed Central

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    2000-01-01

    I examine the plausibility of theories that postulate the development of complex chemical organization without requiring the replication of genetic polymers such as RNA. One conclusion is that theories that involve the organization of complex, small-molecule metabolic cycles such as the reductive citric acid cycle on mineral surfaces make unreasonable assumptions about the catalytic properties of minerals and the ability of minerals to organize sequences of disparate reactions. Another conclusion is that data in the Beilstein Handbook of Organic Chemistry that have been claimed to support the hypothesis that the reductive citric acid cycle originated as a self-organized cycle can more plausibly be interpreted in a different way. PMID:11058157

  19. Psychiatric Aspects of Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, G.; Desousa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Surgical transplantation of human organs from deceased as well as living donors to sick and dying patients began after the Second World War. Over the past 50 years the transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells has become a worldwide practice which has extended, and greatly enhanced the quality of hundreds of thousands of lives. The field of transplantation medicine provides an important chance for liaison between psychiatric professionals and other transplant physicians and surgeons. The discrepancy between the ever-increasing demand for organs but the decreasing supply makes it important to evaluate and prioritize individuals who are in dire need of the organ. However, this also gives rise to certain ethical questions. The following paper discusses various psychiatric aspects of organ transplantation in general. PMID:25013589

  20. Microfluidic organs-on-chips.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Ingber, Donald E

    2014-08-01

    An organ-on-a-chip is a microfluidic cell culture device created with microchip manufacturing methods that contains continuously perfused chambers inhabited by living cells arranged to simulate tissue- and organ-level physiology. By recapitulating the multicellular architectures, tissue-tissue interfaces, physicochemical microenvironments and vascular perfusion of the body, these devices produce levels of tissue and organ functionality not possible with conventional 2D or 3D culture systems. They also enable high-resolution, real-time imaging and in vitro analysis of biochemical, genetic and metabolic activities of living cells in a functional tissue and organ context. This technology has great potential to advance the study of tissue development, organ physiology and disease etiology. In the context of drug discovery and development, it should be especially valuable for the study of molecular mechanisms of action, prioritization of lead candidates, toxicity testing and biomarker identification.

  1. Metabolism of organically bound tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The classic methodology for estimating dose to man from environmental tritium ignores the fact that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs may be directly assimilated in the bound compartment of tissues without previous oxidation. We propose a four-compartment model consisting of a free body water compartment, two organic compartments, and a small, rapidly metabolizing compartment. The utility of this model lies in the ability to input organically bound tritium in foodstuffs directly into the organic compartments of the model. We found that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs can increase cumulative total body dose by a factor of 1.7 to 4.5 times the free body water dose alone, depending on the bound-to-loose ratio of tritium in the diet. Model predictions are compared with empirical measurements of tritium in human urine and tissue samples, and appear to be in close agreement. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Putting "Organizations" into an Organization Theory Course: A Hybrid CAO Model for Teaching Organization Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannah, David R.; Venkatachary, Ranga

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a retrospective analysis of an instructor's multiyear redesign of a course on organization theory into what is called a hybrid Classroom-as-Organization model. It is suggested that this new course design served to apprentice students to function in quasi-real organizational structures. The authors further argue…

  3. COSOLVENT EFFECTS ON ORGANIC CHEMICAL PARTITIONING TO SEDIMENT ORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption-desorption hysteresis, slow desorption kinetics and resultant bioavailability, and other nonideal phenomena have been attributed to the differing sorptive characteristics of the natural organic polymers associated with soils and sediments. The objectives of this study we...

  4. Density of organic thin films in organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Cindy X.; Xiao, Steven; Xu, Gu

    2015-07-01

    A practical parameter, the volume density of organic thin films, found to affect the electronic properties and in turn the performance of organic photovoltaics (OPVs), is investigated in order to benefit the polymer synthesis and thin film preparation in OPVs. To establish the correlation between film density and device performance, the density of organic thin films with various treatments was obtained, by two-dimensional X-ray diffraction measurement using the density mapping with respect to the crystallinity of thin films. Our results suggest that the OPV of higher performance has a denser photoactive layer, which may hopefully provide a solution to the question of whether the film density matters in organic electronics, and help to benefit the OPV industry in terms of better polymer design, standardized production, and quality control with less expenditure.

  5. A multilayer organic electroluminescent device using an organic dye salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueyuan; Gu, Yongdi; Zhang, Jiayu; Cui, Yiping

    2005-01-01

    Organic electroluminescent devices have received considerable attention due to their application in flat-panel displays. To achieve full-color displays, it is necessary to obtain organic layers emitting red, green, and blue light, but it is still a challenge to obtain efficient and stable organic layer emitting red light so far. Recently, we found that an organic salt, trans-4-[p-[N-ethyl-N-(hydroxyethyl)amino]styryl]-N-methylphridinium tetraphenylborate (ASPT), exhibits efficient red-light emission. In this paper, we report a multilayer electrolumicescent device incorporating a hole-transport layer, an ASPT layer, and an electron-transport layer. The dependence of the carrier transport and the luminescence on the device structure is investigated in detail. Compared to the monolayer device, the balance between hole and electron injections is significantly improved for the multilayer device, and thus the electroluminescent efficiency and intensity are enhanced.

  6. Theory of organic magnetoresistance in disordered organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas J.; Flatté, Michael E.

    2012-10-01

    The understanding of spin transport in organics has been challenged by the discovery of large magnetic field effects on properties such as conductivity and electroluminescence in a wide array of organic systems. To explain the large organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) phenomenon, we present and solve a model for magnetoresistance in positionally disordered organic materials using percolation theory. The model describes the effects of singlettriplet spin transitions on hopping transport by considering the role of spin dynamics on an effective density of hopping sites. Faster spin transitions open up `spin-blocked' pathways to become viable conduction channels and hence produce magnetoresistance. We concentrate on spin transitions under the effects of the hyperfine (isotropic and anisotropic), exchange, and dipolar interactions. The magnetoresistance can be found analytically in several regimes and explains several experimental observations

  7. Organizing Diverse, Distributed Project Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    SemanticOrganizer is a software application designed to organize and integrate information generated within a distributed organization or as part of a project that involves multiple, geographically dispersed collaborators. SemanticOrganizer incorporates the capabilities of database storage, document sharing, hypermedia navigation, and semantic-interlinking into a system that can be customized to satisfy the specific information-management needs of different user communities. The program provides a centralized repository of information that is both secure and accessible to project collaborators via the World Wide Web. SemanticOrganizer's repository can be used to collect diverse information (including forms, documents, notes, data, spreadsheets, images, and sounds) from computers at collaborators work sites. The program organizes the information using a unique network-structured conceptual framework, wherein each node represents a data record that contains not only the original information but also metadata (in effect, standardized data that characterize the information). Links among nodes express semantic relationships among the data records. The program features a Web interface through which users enter, interlink, and/or search for information in the repository. By use of this repository, the collaborators have immediate access to the most recent project information, as well as to archived information. A key advantage to SemanticOrganizer is its ability to interlink information together in a natural fashion using customized terminology and concepts that are familiar to a user community.

  8. Duties to Extraterrestrial Microscopic Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockell, C. S.

    Formulating a normative axiology for the treatment of extraterrestrial microscopic organisms, should they ever be found, requires an extension of environmental ethics to beyond the Earth. Using an ethical framework for the treatment of terrestrial micro-organisms, this paper elaborates a similar ethic for the treatment of extraterrestrial microscopic organisms. An ethic of `teloempathy' allows for the moral considerability of any organism that has `interests', based on rudimentary qualities of conativism, and therefore allows for an identical treatment of all life, related or not related to life on Earth. Although, according to this ethic, individual extraterrestrial microscopic organisms have a good of their own and even `rights', at this level the ethic can only be theoretical, allowing for the inevitable destruction of many individual organisms during the course of human exploratory missions, similarly to the daily destruction of microbes by humans on Earth. A holistic teloempathy, an operative ethic, not only provides a framework for human exploration, but it also has important implications for planetary protection and proposals to implement planetary-scale atmospheric alterations on other bodies. Even prior to the discovery of extraterrestrial life, or the discovery of a complete absence of such life, this exercise yields important insights into the moral philosophy that guides our treatment of terrestrial micro-organisms.

  9. Extraterrestrial Organic Compounds in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botta, Oliver; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Many organic compounds or their precursors found in meteorites originated in the interstellar or circumstellar medium and were later incorporated into planetesimals during the formation of the solar system. There they either survived intact or underwent further processing to synthesize secondary products on the meteorite parent body. The most distinct feature of CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites, two types of stony meteorites, is their high carbon content (up to 3% of weight), either in the form of carbonates or of organic compounds. The bulk of the organic carbon consists of an insoluble macromolecular material with a complex structure. Also present is a soluble organic fraction, which has been analyzed by several separation and analytical procedures. Low detection limits can be achieved by derivatization of the organic molecules with reagents that allow for analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. The CM meteorite Murchison has been found to contain more than 70 extraterrestrial amino acids and several other classes of compounds including carboxylic acids, hydroxy carboxylic acids, sulphonic and phosphonic acids, aliphatic, aromatic and polar hydrocarbons, fullerenes, heterocycles as well as carbonyl compounds, alcohols, amines and amides. The organic matter was found to be enriched in deuterium, and distinct organic compounds show isotopic enrichments of carbon and nitrogen relative to terrestrial matter.

  10. Engineering ethics, individuals, and organizations.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael

    2006-04-01

    This article evaluates a family of criticism of how engineering ethics is now generally taught. The short version of the criticism might be put this way: Teachers of engineering ethics devote too much time to individual decisions and not enough time to social context. There are at least six version of this criticism, each corresponding to a specific subject omitted. Teachers of engineering ethics do not (it is said) teach enough about: 1) the culture of organizations; 2) the organization of organizations; 3) the legal environment of organizations; 4) the role of professions in organizations; 5) the role of organizations in professions; or 6) the political environment of organizations. My conclusion is that, while all six are worthy subjects, there is neither much reason to believe that any of them are now absent from courses in engineering ethics nor an obvious way to decide whether they (individually or in combination) are (or are not) now being given their due. What we have here is a dispute about how much is enough. Such disputes are not to be settled without agreement concerning how we are to tell we have enough of this or that. Right now we seem to lack that agreement and not to have much reason to expect it any time soon.

  11. US organ donation breakthrough collaborative increases organ donation.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Teresa J; Wagner, Dennis; Chessare, John; Schall, Marie W; McBride, Virginia; Zampiello, Francis A; Perdue, Jade; O'Connor, Kevin; Lin, Monica J-Y; Burdick, James

    2008-01-01

    More than 92000 Americans are on waiting lists for organ transplants, and an average of 17 of them die each day while waiting. The US Organ Donation Breakthrough Collaborative (ODBC), which began in 2003 at the request of the Secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services, was a formal, concerted effort of the donation and transplantation community to bring about a major change to improve the organ donation system. The nationwide Collaborative was housed within a Health and Human Services agency, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Division of Transplantation, and included participation of the organ procurement organizations (OPOs) throughout the United States and the American hospitals with the largest organ-donor potential. HRSA leaders used the Breakthrough Series Collaborative method, originally developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, as the model for the intervention. Expert practitioners drawn from hospitals and OPOs that had already demonstrated their ability to achieve and sustain high organ donation rates were chosen as faculty for the collaborative and best practices were gleaned from their institutions. The number of organ donors in Collaborative hospitals increased 14.1% in the first year, a 70% greater increase than the 8.3% increase experienced by non-Collaborative hospitals. Moreover, the increased organ recovery continued into the post-Collaborative periods. Between October 2003 and September 2006, the number of total US organ donors increased 22.5%, an increase 4-fold greater than the 5.5% increase measured over the same number of years in the immediate pre-Collaborative period. The study did not involve a randomized design, but time-series analysis using statistical process control charts shows a highly significant discontinuity in the rate of increase in participating hospitals concurrent with the Collaborative program, and strongly suggests that the activities of the Collaborative were a major

  12. Uptake and reaction of atmospheric organic vapours on organic films.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, D J; Mmereki, Baagi T; Chaudhuri, Sri R; Handley, Susannah; Oh, Megan

    2005-01-01

    Films composed in whole or in part of organic compounds represent an important atmospheric interface. Urban surfaces are now known to be coated with a film ("grime") whose chemical composition somewhat resembles that of urban atmospheric aerosols. Such films may act as media in which atmospheric trace gases may be sequestered (leading to their removal from the gas phase); they may also act as reactive media, either as a "solvent" or as a source of reagents. Organic coatings on aqueous surfaces are also important, not just on ocean and lake surfaces ("biofilms") but also on the surfaces of fogwaters and atmospheric aerosol particles. We have initiated experimental uptake studies of trace gases into simple proxies for urban organic films using two techniques: a Knudsen cell effusion reactor and a laser-induced fluorescence method. We will discuss our first results on non-reactive uptake of organic compounds by organic films we use as proxies for urban grime coatings. In general, the measured uptake coefficients appear to track the octanol-air partition coefficients, at least qualitiatively. We have also measured the kinetics of reactions between gas-phase ozone and small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), when these are adsorbed at the air-aqueous interface or incorporated into an organic film. Reactions at the "clean" air-water interface and at a coated interface consisting of a monolayer of various amphiphilic organic compounds all follow a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, in which ozone first adsorbs to the air-aqueous interface, then reacts with already adsorbed PAH. By contrast, the reaction in the pure organic film occurs in the bulk phase. Under some circumstances, heterogeneous oxidation of PAHs by ozone may be as important in the atmosphere as their gas phase oxidation by OH.

  13. Extraterrestrial organic matter: a review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.

    1998-01-01

    We review the nature of the widespread organic material present in the Milky Way Galaxy and in the Solar System. Attention is given to the links between these environments and between primitive Solar System objects and the early Earth, indicating the preservation of organic material as an interstellar cloud collapsed to form the Solar System and as the Earth accreted such material from asteroids, comets and interplanetary dust particles. In the interstellar medium of the Milky Way Galaxy more than 100 molecular species, the bulk of them organic, have been securely identified, primarily through spectroscopy at the highest radio frequencies. There is considerable evidence for significantly heavier organic molecules, particularly polycyclic aromatics, although precise identification of individual species has not yet been obtained. The so-called diffuse interstellar bands are probably important in this context. The low temperature kinetics in interstellar clouds leads to very large isotopic fractionation, particularly for hydrogen, and this signature is present in organic components preserved in carbonaceous chondritic meteorites. Outer belt asteroids are the probable parent bodies of the carbonaceous chondrites, which may contain as much as 5% organic material, including a rich variety of amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, and other species of potential prebiotic interest. Richer in volatiles and hence less thermally processed are the comets, whose organic matter is abundant and poorly characterized. Cometary volatiles, observed after sublimation into the coma, include many species also present in the interstellar medium. There is evidence that most of the Earth's volatiles may have been supplied by a 'late' bombardment of comets and carbonaceous meteorites, scattered into the inner Solar System following the formation of the giant planets. How much in the way of intact organic molecules of potential prebiotic interest survived delivery to the Earth has become an

  14. Nonlinear ultrasonic nature of organic liquid and organic liquid mixture.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-gang; Zhang, Yang; Dong, Yan-wu

    2006-12-22

    Based on Jacobson's molecular free length theory in liquids and the relationship between ultrasonic velocity and the molecular free length in organic liquids, this paper deduces the equations for pressure coefficient and temperature coefficient of ultrasonic velocity and nonlinear acoustic parameter B/A in both of organic liquid and organic liquid binary mixtures. These nonlinear acoustic parameters are evaluated against the measured results and data from other sources. The equations reveal the connections between the nonlinear acoustic parameters and some internal structural of the medium or mixtures e.g. the sizes of molecule, several thermodynamic physical parameters and outside status e.g. condition of pressure and temperature of the liquid or liquid mixture. With the equations the nonlinear acoustic parameter B/A of organic liquid binary mixtures, which is impossible to know without the nonlinear acoustic parameter B/A of the tow components before, can be calculated based on the structural and physical parameters of organic liquid and organic liquid binary mixtures.

  15. Probing Molecular Organization and Electronic Dynamics at Buried Organic Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Sean

    2015-03-01

    Organic semiconductors are a promising class of materials due to their ability to meld the charge transport capabilities of semiconductors with many of the processing advantages of plastics. In thin film organic devices, interfacial charge transfer often comprises a crucial step in device operation. As molecular materials, the density of states within organic semiconductors often reflect their intermolecular organization. Truncation of the bulk structure of an organic semiconductor at an interface with another material can lead to substantial changes in the density of states near the interface that can significantly impact rates for interfacial charge and energy transfer. Here, we will present the results of experiments that utilize electronic sum frequency generation (ESFG) to probe buried interfaces in these materials. Within the electric dipole approximation, ESFG is only sensitive to regions of a sample that experience a breakage of symmetry, which occurs naturally at material interfaces. Through modeling of signals measured for thin organic films using a transfer matrix-based formalism, signals from buried interfaces between two materials can be isolated and used to uncover the interfacial density of states.

  16. Organ Procurement Organizations and the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Howard, R J; Cochran, L D; Cornell, D L

    2015-10-01

    The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) has adversely affected the ability of organ procurement organizations (OPOs) to perform their federally mandated function of honoring the donation decisions of families and donors who have signed the registry. The difficulties gaining access to potential donor medical record has meant that assessment, evaluation, and management of brain dead organ donors has become much more difficult. Delays can occur that can lead to potential recipients not receiving life-saving organs. For over 40 years, OPO personnel have had ready access to paper medical records. But the widespread adoption of EHRs has greatly limited the ability of OPO coordinators to readily gain access to patient medical records and to manage brain dead donors. Proposed solutions include the following: (1) hospitals could provide limited access to OPO personnel so that they could see only the potential donor's medical record; (2) OPOs could join with other transplant organizations to inform regulators of the problem; and (3) hospital organizations could be approached to work with Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to revise the Hospital Conditions of Participation to require OPOs be given access to donor medical records.

  17. Impact of Organic Contamination on Some Aquatic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Yasser, El-Nahhal; Shawkat, El-Najjar; Samir, Afifi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Contamination of water systems with organic compounds of agricultural uses pose threats to aquatic organisms. Carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, and diuron were considered as model aquatic pollutants in this study. The main objective of this study was to characterize the toxicity of organic contamination to two different aquatic organisms. Materials and Methods: Low concentrations (0.0–60 µmol/L) of carbaryl, diuron and very low concentration (0.0–0.14 µmol/L) of chlorpyrifos and their mixtures were tested against fish and Daphnia magna. Percentage of death and immobilization were taken as indicators of toxicity. Results: Toxicity results to fish and D. magna showed that chlorpyrifos was the most toxic compound (LC50 to fish and D. magna are 0.08, and 0.001 µmol/L respectively), followed by carbaryl (LC50 to fish and D. magna are 43.19 and 0.031 µmol/L), while diuron was the least toxic one (LC50 values for fish and D. magna are 43.48 and 32.11 µmol/L respectively). Mixture toxicity (binary and tertiary mixtures) showed antagonistic effects. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference among mixture toxicities to fish and D. magma. Conclusion: Fish and D. magam were sensitive to low concentrations. These data suggest potent threats to aquatic organisms from organic contamination. PMID:26862260

  18. Determination of Fluoride in Organic and Non-organic Wines.

    PubMed

    Paz, Soraya; Jaudenes, Juan Ramón; Gutiérrez, Angel José; Rubio, Carmen; Hardisson, Arturo; Revert, Consuelo

    2016-12-27

    Fluorine is an element of great importance to human health, as it is considered to be an essential element. However, both a deficiency and an excess, it can cause various problems. It is for this reason that values have been established regarding the recommended daily intake (RDI) and acceptable daily intake (ADI). The largest source of incorporation of fluoride is water, but it can be found in other foods and beverages, such as vegetables, tea, and wine. The aim of the study was to establish the fluoride concentration in organic and non-organic wines from different appellations of origin of the Canary Islands and mainland Spain, in order to assess the contribution of fluoride and toxic risk. A total of 53 samples of red, white, and rosé wines, both organic and non-organic, from different appellations of origin were analyzed. They were analyzed by potentiometric determination with ion-selective electrode for fluoride using the method of standard addition. The wines analyzed are within the recommended limits set by the International Organisation of Vine and Wine. RDI is not exceeded for adults, taking into account the data provided by the Spanish Agency for Consumer Affairs, Food Safety and Nutrition on the average consumption of "table wines" in Spain. Fluoride intake from wine poses no risk to the health of adults. The fluoride concentration of organic and non-organic wines is within the range of 0.03 to 0.70 mg/L.

  19. Organic geochemical analysis of sedimentary organic matter associated with uranium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leventhal, J.S.; Daws, T.A.; Frye, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of sedimentary organic matter from several geologic environments and ages which are enriched in uranium (56 ppm to 12%) have been characterized. The three analytical techniqyes used to study the samples were Rock-Eval pyrolysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and solid-state C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In samples with low uranium content, the pyrolysis-gas chromatography products contain oxygenated functional groups (as hydroxyl) and molecules with both aliphatic and aromatic carbon atoms. These samples with low uranium content give measurable Rock-Eval hydrocarbon and organic-CO2 yields, and C-13 NMR values of > 30% aliphatic carbon. In contrast, uranium-rich samples have few hydrocarbon pyrolysis products, increased Rock-Eval organic-CO2 contents and > 70% aromatic carbon contents from C-13 NMR. The increase in aromaticity and decrease in hydrocarbon pyrolysis yield are related to the amount of uranium and the age of the uranium minerals, which correspond to the degree of radiation damage. The three analytical techniques give complementary results. Increase in Rock-Eval organic-CO2 yield correlates with uranium content for samples from the Grants uranium region. Calculations show that the amount of organic-CO2 corresponds to the quantity of uranium chemically reduced by the organic matter for the Grants uranium region samples. ?? 1986.

  20. Strategic marketing for charitable organizations.

    PubMed

    Barnes, N G; Fitzgibbons, D A

    1992-01-01

    A new marketing strategy unites major for-profit corporations with charitable organizations in such a way that both benefit. Most major charitable organizations are finding cause related marketing a new strategy for fund raising. The largest charities in the country including the Red Cross, Special Olympics and the American Heart Association have all become involved with cause related marketing and have all realized its benefits. With these benefits come some risks. The decade of the 1990s should include increased awareness and participation among charitable organizations regarding cause related marketing.

  1. Photoredox Catalysis in Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, photoredox catalysis has come to the forefront in organic chemistry as a powerful strategy for the activation of small molecules. In a general sense, these approaches rely on the ability of metal complexes and organic dyes to convert visible light into chemical energy by engaging in single-electron transfer with organic substrates, thereby generating reactive intermediates. In this Perspective, we highlight the unique ability of photoredox catalysis to expedite the development of completely new reaction mechanisms, with particular emphasis placed on multicatalytic strategies that enable the construction of challenging carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bonds. PMID:27477076

  2. Hetero-organic thymus antigens.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, L V; Gnezditskaya, E V

    1985-01-01

    The use of sera containing antibodies to tissue-specific antigens of highly specialized organs (skeletal muscles, heart, skin, excretory glands) enabled us to detect, by immunofluorescence, cells capable of synthesizing analogous antigens (i.e. hetero-organic thymus antigens) in human and animal thymus. Detection of hetero-organic antigens in the thymus is the basis for the hypothesis that natural immunological tolerance to tissue self antigens is formed within the thymus in the course of T-lymphocyte maturation, with thymus antigens taking part in the process.

  3. Heterogeneous photocatalysts in organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevatskaya, M.; König, B.

    2014-03-01

    The review deals with the application of inorganic semiconductors in organic synthesis. Although the majority of reported reactions still aim at the photocatalytic decomposition of organic compounds, the number of examples in synthetic applications is growing. The principal mechanisms of heterogeneous semiconductor photocatalysis are considered and examples illustrating the use of inorganic semiconductors in organic synthesis are given. The discussion is arranged according to the required excitation wavelength (UV or visible light) and to the new bond that is formed (carbon-carbon or carbon-heteroatom bond). The bibliography includes 47 references.

  4. [Ethical problems in organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Valenta, J; Treska, V; Hasman, D

    1999-02-01

    Organ transplantation is an accepted therapeutic method with good results, but it is connected with many not only medical but also ethical problems. One of the most important problems is the donor programme. In cadaverous donors the main ethical and legal question is the decision who can issue the consent with organ retrieval; in living donors it is the problem of motivation and financial compensation. Allocation of organs with low compatibility or from non-ideal donors, and the recipient's consent in these cases may involve difficult decisions.

  5. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation

    PubMed Central

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung BK; Laub, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly one millimeter long, or approximately 1000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length-scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  6. Immunomodulation by Persistent Organic Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are widely distnbuted in the environment, are resistant to degradation, and increase in concentration (biomagnify) in the food chain. Concentrations in apical predators may be tens to hundreds of times greater than concentrations in their pref...

  7. Management Principles for Nonproliferation Organizations

    SciTech Connect

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Hund, Gretchen

    2012-03-06

    This paper identifies business models and six management principles that can be applied by a nonproliferation organization to maximize the value and effectiveness of its products. The organizations responsible for reducing the nuclear proliferation threat have experienced a substantial growth in responsibility and visibility since the September 11 attacks. Since then, the international community has witnessed revelations of clandestine nuclear facilities, nuclear black markets, periodic nuclear tests, and a resurgence of interest by countries worldwide in developing nuclear capabilities. The security environment will likely continue to evolve in unexpected ways since most of the proliferation threats with which the world will be forced to contend remain unforeseen. To better prepare for and respond to this evolving security environment, many nonproliferation organizations are interested in finding new or better ways to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of their operations. Of course, all organizations, whether they are market driven or non-profit, must operate effectively and efficiently if they are to succeed. Indeed, as this study demonstrates, many of the management principles that this study recommends can help all organizations succeed. However, this study pays particular attention to nonproliferation organizations because of the mission they are responsible for fulfilling. Nonproliferation organizations, including nonproliferation programs that operate within a larger national security organization, are responsible for reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. These organizations have an enduring mandate from the public and the international community not to fail in the completion of their mission for failure could have detrimental impacts on international security, public health and the environment. Moreover, the public expects nonproliferation organizations and programs to fulfill their mission, even when resources are limited

  8. Organic Text Authors Charge Plagiarism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Reports on the recent controversy involving two organic chemistry textbooks. The charge of plagiarism and the court litigations are the object of interest in the chemical community since many prominant scientists are planned as witnesses. (SA)

  9. Disinfection efficacy of organic chloramines.

    PubMed

    Donnermair, Martina M; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2003-04-01

    The disinfection efficacies of model organic chloramines were investigated. Twenty amino acids and two nucleic acid bases were chlorinated separately with sodium hypochlorite at a Cl:N molar ratio of 0.4:1, and were then used to treat an E. coli suspension for 60 min. DPD/FAS titration was carried out to obtain the concentration of the chlorinated nitrogenous organic compounds as a function of time. In addition, membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) was used to quantify inorganic chloramines (mono-, di-, and trichloramine). The results of these experiments showed that the organic chloramines examined in this research had little or no effect on the viability of E. coli. MIMS analyses demonstrated that there was no quantifiable formation of inorganic chloramines when the organic nitrogen compounds were chlorinated.

  10. Legionnaires' disease organism, legionella (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... after an outbreak of fatal pneumonia at a Legionnaires convention. The newly described organism which caused the disease was named Legionella pneumophila, shown in this picture. (Image courtesy of ...

  11. Multidimensional Adaptation in MAS Organizations.

    PubMed

    Alberola, Juan M; Julian, Vicente; Garcia-Fornes, Ana

    2013-04-01

    Organization adaptation requires determining the consequences of applying changes not only in terms of the benefits provided but also measuring the adaptation costs as well as the impact that these changes have on all of the components of the organization. In this paper, we provide an approach for adaptation in multiagent systems based on a multidimensional transition deliberation mechanism (MTDM). This approach considers transitions in multiple dimensions and is aimed at obtaining the adaptation with the highest potential for improvement in utility based on the costs of adaptation. The approach provides an accurate measurement of the impact of the adaptation since it determines the organization that is to be transitioned to as well as the changes required to carry out this transition. We show an example of adaptation in a service provider network environment in order to demonstrate that the measurement of the adaptation consequences taken by the MTDM improves the organization performance more than the other approaches.

  12. Shoshone Utility Organization NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit WY-0044580, the Shoshone Utility Organization is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility located in Fremont County, Wyoming to an unnamed irrigation drainage ditch tributary to the South Fork of the Little Wind R.

  13. Organic Chemicals: Angels or Goblins?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Lloyd N.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses some of the controversial organic chemical substances such as DDT, Red Dye No. 2, DES, Tris, Laetrile, cyclamate, and saccharin. Concludes that the use of some has to be considered on a benefit/risk ratio. (GA)

  14. Thienoacene-based organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Takimiya, Kazuo; Shinamura, Shoji; Osaka, Itaru; Miyazaki, Eigo

    2011-10-11

    Thienoacenes consist of fused thiophene rings in a ladder-type molecular structure and have been intensively studied as potential organic semiconductors for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) in the last decade. They are reviewed here. Despite their simple and similar molecular structures, the hitherto reported properties of thienoacene-based OFETs are rather diverse. This Review focuses on four classes of thienoacenes, which are classified in terms of their chemical structures, and elucidates the molecular electronic structure of each class. The packing structures of thienoacenes and the thus-estimated solid-state electronic structures are correlated to their carrier transport properties in OFET devices. With this perspective of the molecular structures of thienoacenes and their carrier transport properties in OFET devices, the structure-property relationships in thienoacene-based organic semiconductors are discussed. The discussion provides insight into new molecular design strategies for the development of superior organic semiconductors.

  15. Organ Transplantation: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and how many donors are available in your local area compared to the number of patients waiting. Share this: ... © 2017 Transplant Living. A service of the United Network for Organ Sharing , a non-profit 501(c)( ...

  16. Nanoscale metal-organic materials.

    PubMed

    Carné, Arnau; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Metal-organic materials are found to be a fascinating novel class of functional nanomaterials. The limitless combinations between inorganic and organic building blocks enable researchers to synthesize 0- and 1-D metal-organic discrete nanostructures with varied compositions, morphologies and sizes, fabricate 2-D metal-organic thin films and membranes, and even structure them on surfaces at the nanometre length scale. In this tutorial review, the synthetic methodologies for preparing these miniaturized materials as well as their potential properties and future applications are discussed. This review wants to offer a panoramic view of this embryonic class of nanoscale materials that will be of interest to a cross-section of researchers working in chemistry, physics, medicine, nanotechnology, materials chemistry, etc., in the next years.

  17. Unsteady swimming of small organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyan; Ardekani, Arezoo

    2012-11-01

    Small planktonic organisms ubiquitously display unsteady or impulsive motion to attack a prey or escape a predator in natural environments. Despite this, the role of unsteady hydrodynamic forces such as history and added mass forces on the low Reynolds number propulsion of small organisms is poorly understood. In this paper, we derive the fundamental equation of motion for an organism swimming by the means of surface distortion in a nonuniform flow at a low Reynolds number regime. We show that the history and added mass forces, that where traditionally neglected in the literature for small swimming organisms, cannot be neglected as the Stokes number increases above unity. For example, these unsteady inertial forces are of the same order as quasi-steady Stokes forces for Paramecium. Finally, we quantify the effects of convective inertial forces in the limit of small, but nonzero, Reynolds number regime. This work is supported by NSF grant CBET-1066545.

  18. Financial Management: An Organic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Although textbooks present corporate finance using a topical approach, good financial management requires an organic approach that integrates the various assignments financial managers confront every day. Breaking the tasks into meaningful subcategories, the current article offers one approach.

  19. The ethics of organ donation.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, G R

    1997-01-01

    As organ transplantation is physically possible within a tension between common biological properties and individual immunities, so it is ethically possible within a tension between individual personality in full integrity and the human community of which each member, social by nature, is an organic part. Ethical donation is by consent, explicit or presumed, spontaneously offered or procured by request. Altruism or commercial dealing is now a live issue in organ procurement, whether cadaveric or by live donation, related or unrelated. Attention is given to children in transplantation, and to new developments with fetal organs, neural tissue, bone marrow and xenografts. Given all that medical science and skill can now offer, patients are still free to decline.

  20. Green Power Partnership Eligible Organizations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. Many different types of organizations are eligible to become Partners.

  1. Directory of National Recreation Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Thirty national recreation organizations serving individuals with disabilities are listed, along with addresses and telephone numbers. Sample recreational activities covered include Boy Scouts and Girls Scouts, various wheelchair sports, skiing, golfing, and horticultural therapy. (JDD)

  2. A Key Concept: Spatial Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostrowicki, Jerzy

    1975-01-01

    The application of geography to spatial planning is discussed. Concepts presented include the regional concept, the typological concept, and spatial structure, spatial processes, and spatial organization. For address of journal see SO 504 028. (Author/RM)

  3. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-02-07

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  4. Photochemical dimerization of organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.; Muedas, Cesar A.; Ferguson, Richard R.

    1992-01-01

    At least one of selectivity and reaction rate of photosensitized vapor phase dimerizations, including dehydrodimerizations, hydrodimerizations and cross-dimerizations of saturated and unsaturated organic compounds is improved by conducting the dimerization in the presence of hydrogen or nitrous oxide.

  5. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  6. Organ donor screening practices for Trypanosoma cruzi infection among US Organ Procurement Organizations.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, B S; Paster, M; Ison, M G; Chin-Hong, P V

    2011-04-01

    Donor-derived Trypanosoma cruzi infection in solid organ transplant recipients is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Little is known about T. cruzi screening practices among U.S. organ procurement organizations (OPOs). We distributed a questionnaire to all U.S. OPO directors, requesting data on T. cruzi screening strategies, laboratory methods, number of donors screened, disposition of organs from positive donors and attitudes toward screening. Fifty-eight (100%) U.S. OPOs responded to the survey. Donor screening began in 2002 and is presently performed by 11 (19%) OPOs. Among screening OPOs, four screen all donors and seven use a risk-based strategy. Three different T. cruzi serology tests are used for donor screening. During 2008, 9/993 (0.9%) donors screened positive by a T. cruzi screening test, 6/9 (66%) had confirmatory tests performed and 4/6 (66%) had positive confirmatory tests. These results led to the nonuse of five donors and 17 organs. Five organs from three seropositive donors were transplanted in 2008 without recognized disease transmission. Variability of T. cruzi donor screening strategies, laboratory methods and disposition of organs from positive donors currently exists. Further research is needed to identify the risk of donor-derived T. cruzi infections to help inform the best screening strategy.

  7. Ambient-pressure organic superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Jack M.; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Beno, Mark A.

    1986-01-01

    A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K which is high for organic superconductors.

  8. Capgras' syndrome with organic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M. N.; Hawthorne, M. E.; Gribbin, N.; Jacobson, R.

    1990-01-01

    Capgras' syndrome, one form of the delusional misidentification syndromes, is described. Three patients with the syndrome are reported. The first had a right cerebral infarction, the second had nephrotic syndrome secondary to severe pre-eclampsia in the puerperium, and the third had uncontrolled diabetes mellitus with dementia. Evidence is reviewed regarding an organic aetiology for Capgras' syndrome. We conclude that, when the syndrome is present, a thorough search for organic disorder should be made. PMID:2084656

  9. Plutonium recovery from organic materials

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, R.L.; Silver, G.L.

    1973-12-11

    A method is described for removing plutonium or the like from organic material wherein the organic material is leached with a solution containing a strong reducing agent such as titanium (III) (Ti/sup +3None)/, chromium (II) (Cr/ sup +2/), vanadium (II) (V/sup +2/) ions, or ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), the leaching yielding a plutonium-containing solution that is further processed to recover plutonium. The leach solution may also contain citrate or tartrate ion. (Official Gazette)

  10. Secondary Metabolites from Polar Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Li, Yan-Ling; Zhao, Feng-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Polar organisms have been found to develop unique defences against the extreme environment environment, leading to the biosynthesis of novel molecules with diverse bioactivities. This review covers the 219 novel natural products described since 2001, from the Arctic and the Antarctic microoganisms, lichen, moss and marine faunas. The structures of the new compounds and details of the source organism, along with any relevant biological activities are presented. Where reported, synthetic and biosynthetic studies on the polar metabolites have also been included. PMID:28241505

  11. A market price for organs?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Has not the time fully come to lift the prohibition on a regulated market in organs for transplantation? Is there a price for such a market that would be too high to pay? The author revisits the cases for and against organ markets in the light of cultural shifts in society and asks whether the traditional insistence on altruism represents a hindrance to much needed developments or a safeguard for much valued public goods.

  12. [Body donation versus organ donation].

    PubMed

    Reis, Ria

    2010-01-01

    There appears to be a discrepancy between the oversupply of donated bodies 'for science' in anatomical institutions in the Netherlands and the shortage of donated organs. However, organ donation is not as straightforward as it seems, mainly because of its strict conditions, e.g. with respect to age and the required hospital setting of the dying. Since Dutch body donors are mainly elderly men, their attitudes to their body, death and science should be explored from a generational perspective.

  13. Organic contaminant amplification during snowmelt.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Torsten; Wania, Frank

    2008-04-01

    The release of organic contaminants from melting snow poses risks to aquatic and terrestrial organisms and to humans who rely on drinking water and food production from regions that are seasonally snow-covered. Measured and model-predicted spring peak concentrations in waters receiving snowmelt motivate a thorough investigation of organic contaminant behaviour during melting. On the basis of the current understanding of snow metamorphosis, snowmelt hydrology and chemical partitioning in snow, this critical review aims to provide a qualitative picture of the processes involved in the release of organic contaminants from a melting snowpack. The elution sequence of organic substances during snowmelt is strongly dependent on their environmental partitioning properties and the physical properties of the snowpack. Water-soluble organic contaminants can be discharged in greatly elevated concentrations at an early stage of melting, while the bulk of the hydrophobic chemicals attached to particles is often released at the end of the melt period. Melting of a highly metamorphosed and deep snowpack promotes such shock load releases, whereas a shallow snow cover over a relatively warm ground experiencing irregular melting over the winter season is unlikely to generate notable peak releases of organic substances. Meltwater runoff over frozen ground directly transfers contaminant shock loads into receiving water bodies, while permeable soils buffer and dilute the contaminants. A more quantitative understanding of the behaviour of organic contaminants in varying snowmelt scenarios will depend on controlled laboratory studies combined with field investigations. Reliable numerical process descriptions will need to be developed to integrate water quality and contaminant fate models.

  14. Atmospheric Convective Organization: Self-Organized Criticality or Homeostasis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric convection has a tendency organized on a hierarchy of scales ranging from the mesoscale to the planetary scales, with the latter especially manifested by the Madden-Julian oscillation. The present talk examines two major possible mechanisms of self-organization identified in wider literature from a phenomenological thermodynamic point of view by analysing a planetary-scale cloud-resolving model simulation. The first mechanism is self-organized criticality. A saturation tendency of precipitation rate with the increasing column-integrated water, reminiscence of critical phenomena, indicates self-organized criticality. The second is a self-regulation mechanism that is known as homeostasis in biology. A thermodynamic argument suggests that such self-regulation maintains the column-integrated water below a threshold by increasing the precipitation rate. Previous analyses of both observational data as well as cloud-resolving model (CRM) experiments give mixed results. A satellite data analysis suggests self-organized criticality. Some observational data as well as CRM experiments support homeostasis. Other analyses point to a combination of these two interpretations. In this study, a CRM experiment over a planetary-scale domain with a constant sea-surface temperature is analyzed. This analysis shows that the relation between the column-integrated total water and precipitation suggests self-organized criticality, whereas the one between the column-integrated water vapor and precipitation suggests homeostasis. The concurrent presence of these two mechanisms are further elaborated by detailed statistical and budget analyses. These statistics are scale invariant, reflecting a spatial scaling of precipitation processes. These self-organization mechanisms are most likely be best theoretically understood by the energy cycle of the convective systems consisting of the kinetic energy and the cloud-work function. The author has already investigated the behavior of this

  15. Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Grorge

    2001-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in soluble organic compounds. To date, these compounds provide the only record available to study a range of organic chemical processes in the early Solar System chemistry. The Murchison meteorite is the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorite with respect to organic chemistry. The study of its organic compounds has related principally to aqueous meteorite parent body chemistry and compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. Among the classes of organic compounds found in Murchison are amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, sulfonic acids, phosphonic acids, purines and pyrimidines (Table 1). Compounds such as these were quite likely delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets. Until now, polyhydroxylated compounds (polyols), including sugars (polyhydroxy aldehydes or ketones), sugar alcohols, sugar acids, etc., had not been identified in Murchison. Ribose and deoxyribose, five-carbon sugars, are central to the role of contemporary nucleic acids, DNA and RNA. Glycerol, a three-carbon sugar alcohol, is a constituent of all known biological membranes. Due to the relative lability of sugars, some researchers have questioned the lifetime of sugars under the presumed conditions on the early Earth and postulated other (more stable) compounds as constituents of the first replicating molecules. The identification of potential sources and/or formation mechanisms of pre-biotic polyols would add to the understanding of what organic compounds were available, and for what length of time, on the ancient Earth.

  16. Becoming a high reliability organization.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Marlys K; Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Miller, Melissa A; Iwashyna, Theodore J

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft carriers, electrical power grids, and wildland firefighting, though seemingly different, are exemplars of high reliability organizations (HROs)--organizations that have the potential for catastrophic failure yet engage in nearly error-free performance. HROs commit to safety at the highest level and adopt a special approach to its pursuit. High reliability organizing has been studied and discussed for some time in other industries and is receiving increasing attention in health care, particularly in high-risk settings like the intensive care unit (ICU). The essence of high reliability organizing is a set of principles that enable organizations to focus attention on emergent problems and to deploy the right set of resources to address those problems. HROs behave in ways that sometimes seem counterintuitive--they do not try to hide failures but rather celebrate them as windows into the health of the system, they seek out problems, they avoid focusing on just one aspect of work and are able to see how all the parts of work fit together, they expect unexpected events and develop the capability to manage them, and they defer decision making to local frontline experts who are empowered to solve problems. Given the complexity of patient care in the ICU, the potential for medical error, and the particular sensitivity of critically ill patients to harm, high reliability organizing principles hold promise for improving ICU patient care.

  17. 7 CFR 1160.114 - Eligible organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Eligible organization. 1160.114 Section 1160.114... Order Definitions § 1160.114 Eligible organization. Eligible organization means an organization eligible... organization pursuant to section 501(c) (3), (5), or (6) of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 501(c) (3),...

  18. 29 CFR 401.9 - Labor organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Labor organization. 401.9 Section 401.9 Labor Regulations... MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.9 Labor organization. Labor organization means a labor organization engaged in an industry affecting commerce and includes any organization of any kind, any...

  19. 29 CFR 401.9 - Labor organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Labor organization. 401.9 Section 401.9 Labor Regulations... MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.9 Labor organization. Labor organization means a labor organization engaged in an industry affecting commerce and includes any organization of any kind, any...

  20. 7 CFR 1160.114 - Eligible organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Eligible organization. 1160.114 Section 1160.114... Order Definitions § 1160.114 Eligible organization. Eligible organization means an organization eligible... organization pursuant to section 501(c) (3), (5), or (6) of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 501(c) (3),...

  1. 29 CFR 401.9 - Labor organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Labor organization. 401.9 Section 401.9 Labor Regulations... MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.9 Labor organization. Labor organization means a labor organization engaged in an industry affecting commerce and includes any organization of any kind, any...

  2. 29 CFR 401.9 - Labor organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Labor organization. 401.9 Section 401.9 Labor Regulations... MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.9 Labor organization. Labor organization means a labor organization engaged in an industry affecting commerce and includes any organization of any kind, any...

  3. 29 CFR 401.9 - Labor organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Labor organization. 401.9 Section 401.9 Labor Regulations... MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.9 Labor organization. Labor organization means a labor organization engaged in an industry affecting commerce and includes any organization of any kind, any...

  4. 7 CFR 1160.114 - Eligible organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Eligible organization. 1160.114 Section 1160.114... Order Definitions § 1160.114 Eligible organization. Eligible organization means an organization eligible... organization pursuant to section 501(c) (3), (5), or (6) of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 501(c) (3),...

  5. 7 CFR 1160.114 - Eligible organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Eligible organization. 1160.114 Section 1160.114... Order Definitions § 1160.114 Eligible organization. Eligible organization means an organization eligible... organization pursuant to section 501(c) (3), (5), or (6) of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 501(c) (3),...

  6. 9 CFR 300.3 - FSIS organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false FSIS organization. 300.3 Section 300.3... ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION AGENCY MISSION AND ORGANIZATION § 300.3 FSIS organization. (a) General. The organization of...

  7. 7 CFR 1160.114 - Eligible organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Eligible organization. 1160.114 Section 1160.114... Order Definitions § 1160.114 Eligible organization. Eligible organization means an organization eligible... organization pursuant to section 501(c) (3), (5), or (6) of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 501(c) (3),...

  8. Organism and artifact: Proper functions in Paley organisms.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sune

    2013-12-01

    In this paper I assess the explanatory powers of theories of function in the context of products that may result from synthetic biology. The aim is not to develop a new theory of functions, but to assess existing theories of function in relation to a new kind of biological and artifactual entity that might be produced in the not-too-distant future by means of synthetic biology. The paper thus investigates how to conceive of the functional nature of living systems that are not the result of evolution by natural selection, or instantly generated by cosmic coincidence, but which are products of intelligent design. The paper argues that the aetiological theory of proper functions in organisms and artifacts is inadequate as an account of proper functions in such 'Paley organisms' and defends an alternative organisational approach. The paper ends by considering the implications of the discussion of biological function for questions about the interests and moral status of non-sentient organisms.

  9. Students' Understandings of Human Organs and Organ Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Michael J.; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    2001-06-01

    How do people develop their understanding of what is inside them? This study looks at students' understandings of their internal structure. A cross-sectional approach was used involving a total of 158 students in England from six different age groups (ranging from four year old students to first year undergraduates). Students were given a blank piece of A4-sized paper and asked to draw what they thought was inside themselves. Repeated inspections of the completed drawings allowed us to construct a seven point scale of these representations. Our analysis shows the extent to which student understanding increases with age and the degree to which students know more about some organs and organ systems than others. While gender differences in the drawings were generally not large there were some intriguing differences in the ways males and females drew reproductive organs.

  10. Presolar Organic Globules in Astromaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    Presolar grains were identified in meteorite residues 20 years ago based on their exotic isotopic compositions [1]. Their study has provide new insights into stellar evolution and the first view of the original building blocks of the solar system. Organic matter in meteorites and IDPs is highly enriched in D/H and N-15/N-14 at micron scales, possibly due to presolar organic grains [2-4]. These anomalies are ascribed to the partial preservation of presolar cold molecular cloud material. Identifying the carriers of these anomalies and elucidating their physical and chemical properties may give new views of interstellar chemistry and better understanding of the original components of the protosolar disk. However, identifying the carriers has been hampered by their small size and the inability to chemically isolate them. Thanks to major advances in nano-scale analytical techniques and advanced sample preparation, we were able to show that in the Tagish Lake meteorite, the principle carriers of these isotopic anomalies are sub-microns, hollow organic globules [5]. The organic globules likely formed by photochemical processing of organic ices in a cold molecular cloud or the outermost regions of the protosolar disk [5]. Organic globules with similar physical, chemical, and isotopic properties are also recently found from Bells CM2 carbonaceous chondrite, in IDPs [6] and in the comet Wild-2 samples returned by Stardust [7]. These results support the view that microscopic organic grains were widespread constituents of the protoplanetary disk. Their exotic isotopic compositions trace their origins to the outermost portions of the protosolar disk or a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  11. Testing of the Sunstove Organization`s Sunstove Solar Oven

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, T.A.

    1997-03-01

    A Sunstove Organization`s Sunstove was tested at Sandia`s Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 115{degrees}C (240{degrees}F). It heated two liters of water from room temperature to 80{degrees}C (175{degrees}F) in about two hours. Observations were made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on the operation of the solar oven were also noted.

  12. Religious aspects of organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bruzzone, P

    2008-05-01

    No religion formally forbid donation or receipt of organs or is against transplantation from living or deceased donors. Only some orthodox jews may have religious objections to "opting in." However, transplantation from deceased donors may be discouraged by Native Americans, Roma Gypsies, Confucians, Shintoists, and some Orthodox rabbis. Some South Asia Muslim ulemas (scholars) and muftis (jurists) oppose donation from human living and deceased donors because the human body is an "amanat" (trusteeship) from God and must not be desecrated following death, but they encourage xenotransplantation research. No religion formally obliges one to donate or refuse organs. No religion formally obliges one to consider cadaveric organs "a societal resource" or considers organ donation "a religious duty" (except some rabbis and isolated Muslim and Christian scholars) No religion has a formal position on "bonus points," which is priority on the waiting list. Living organ donation is strongly encouraged only between jesus christians (15 of 28 jesus christians worldwide have donated a kidney). No religion forbid this practice. Directed organ donation to people of the same religion has been proposed only by some Orthodox Jews and some Islamic Ulemas/Muftis. Only some Muslim Ulemas/Muftis and some Asian religions may prefer living donation over cadaveric donation. No religion prefers cadaveric over living donation. No religion formally forbid non-heart-beating donors (nhbd) cadaveric donation or cross-over donation. Due to the sacrad of human life, the Catholic Church is against donation from anencephalic donors or after active euthanasia. No religion formally forbid xenotransplantation. Addressing the participants of the First International Congress of the Society for Organ Sharing in 1991, Pope John Paul II said "There are many questions of an ethical, legal and social nature which need to be more deeply investigated. There are even shameful abuses which call for determined action

  13. Photodissolution of soil organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayer, L.M.; Thornton, K.R.; Schick, L.L.; Jastrow, J.D.; Harden, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Sunlight has been shown to enhance loss of organic matter from aquatic sediments and terrestrial plant litter, so we tested for similar reactions in mineral soil horizons. Losses of up to a third of particulate organic carbon occurred after continuous exposure to full-strength sunlight for dozens of hours, with similar amounts appearing as photodissolved organic carbon. Nitrogen dissolved similarly, appearing partly as ammonium. Modified experiments with interruption of irradiation to include extended dark incubation periods increased loss of total organic carbon, implying remineralization by some combination of light and microbes. These photodissolution reactions respond strongly to water content, with reaction extent under air-dry to fully wet conditions increasing by a factor of 3-4 fold. Light limitation was explored using lamp intensity and soil depth experiments. Reaction extent varied linearly with lamp intensity. Depth experiments indicate that attenuation of reaction occurs within the top tens to hundreds of micrometers of soil depth. Our data allow only order-of-magnitude extrapolations to field conditions, but suggest that this type of reaction could induce loss of 10-20% of soil organic carbon in the top 10. cm horizon over a century. It may therefore have contributed to historical losses of soil carbon via agriculture, and should be considered in soil management on similar time scales. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Microbiological assay using bioluminescent organism

    SciTech Connect

    Stiffey, A.V.

    1987-12-21

    This invention relates to testing processes for toxicity involving microorganisms and, more particularly, to testing processes for toxicity involving bioluminescent organisms. The present known method of testing oil-well drilling fluids for toxicity employs the mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia) as the assay organism. The shrimp are difficult to raise and handle as laboratory assay organisms. This method is labor-intensive, because it requires a assay time of about 96 hours. Summary of the Invention: A microbiological assay in which the assay organism is the dinoflagellate, Pyrocystis lunula. A sample of a substance to be assayed is added to known numbers of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate and the mixture is agitated to subject the organisms to a shear stress causing them to emit light. The amount of light emitted is measured and compared with the amount of light emitted by a known non-toxic control mixture to determine if there is diminution or non-diminution of light emitted by the sample under test which is an indication of the presence or absence of toxicity, respectively. Accordingly, an object of the present invention is the provision of an improved method of testing substances for toxicity. A further object of the invention is the provision of an improved method of testing oil-well drilling fluids for toxicity using bioluminescent dinoflagellate (Pyrocystis lunula).

  15. What makes a model organism?

    PubMed

    Leonelli, Sabina; Ankeny, Rachel A

    2013-12-01

    This article explains the key role of model organisms within contemporary research, while at the same time acknowledging their limitations as biological models. We analyse the epistemic and social characteristics of model organism biology as a form of "big science", which includes the development of large, centralised infrastructures, a shared ethos and a specific long-term vision about the "right way" to do research. In order to make wise use of existing resources, researchers now find themselves committed to carrying out this vision with its accompanying assumptions. By clarifying the specific characteristics of model organism work, we aim to provide a framework to assess how much funding should be allocated to such research. On the one hand, it is imperative to exploit the resources and knowledge accumulated using these models to study more diverse groups of organisms. On the other hand, this type of research may be inappropriate for research programmes where the processes of interest are much more delimited, can be usefully studied in isolation and/or are simply not captured by model organism biology.

  16. Organic anion uptake by hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wolkoff, Allan W

    2014-10-01

    Many of the compounds taken up by the liver are organic anions that circulate tightly bound to protein carriers such as albumin. The fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver permits these compounds to have access to hepatocytes. Studies to characterize hepatic uptake of organic anions through kinetic analyses, suggested that it was carrier-mediated. Attempts to identify specific transporters by biochemical approaches were largely unsuccessful and were replaced by studies that utilized expression cloning. These studies led to identification of the organic anion transport proteins (oatps), a family of 12 transmembrane domain glycoproteins that have broad and often overlapping substrate specificities. The oatps mediate Na(+)-independent organic anion uptake. Other studies identified a seven transmembrane domain glycoprotein, Na(+)/taurocholate transporting protein (ntcp) as mediating Na(+)-dependent uptake of bile acids as well as other organic anions. Although mutations or deficiencies of specific members of the oatp family have been associated with transport abnormalities, there have been no such reports for ntcp, and its physiologic role remains to be determined, although expression of ntcp in vitro recapitulates the characteristics of Na(+)-dependent bile acid transport that is seen in vivo. Both ntcp and oatps traffic between the cell surface and intracellular vesicular pools. These vesicles move through the cell on microtubules, using the microtubule based motors dynein and kinesins. Factors that regulate this motility are under study and may provide a unique mechanism that can alter the plasma membrane content of these transporters and consequently their accessibility to circulating ligands.

  17. Toward an Organic Chemist's Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, H. K., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An analogy between electron transfer reactions of the elements and those of organic molecules is offered. Examples of organic electron transfer reactions are presented. The rationale of constructing an organic chemists' periodic table is also discussed. (HM)

  18. 75 FR 68941 - Organization and Purpose

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... 1 CFR Part 301 Organization and Purpose AGENCY: Administrative Conference of the United States...) is repromulgating updated rules identifying its purposes, organization and activities, as required by... operations. This regulation describes the agency's purposes, organization and activities in accordance...

  19. Certified organic vegetable production for market

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Federal guidelines for organic certification in 2002 provided structure for producers and processors to market certified organic foods. The guidelines provide general provisions and processes for obtaining and maintaining organic certification, but did not specify best management practices for crop...

  20. Bronchiolitis Obliterans with Organizing Pneumonia (BOOP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you tell me about cryptogenic organizing pneumonia? Answers from Teng Moua, M.D. Previously called bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a rare lung ...

  1. Polymer-Based Organic Batteries.

    PubMed

    Muench, Simon; Wild, Andreas; Friebe, Christian; Häupler, Bernhard; Janoschka, Tobias; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2016-08-24

    The storage of electric energy is of ever growing importance for our modern, technology-based society, and novel battery systems are in the focus of research. The substitution of conventional metals as redox-active material by organic materials offers a promising alternative for the next generation of rechargeable batteries since these organic batteries are excelling in charging speed and cycling stability. This review provides a comprehensive overview of these systems and discusses the numerous classes of organic, polymer-based active materials as well as auxiliary components of the battery, like additives or electrolytes. Moreover, a definition of important cell characteristics and an introduction to selected characterization techniques is provided, completed by the discussion of potential socio-economic impacts.

  2. Self-Organized Criticality Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    Contents: (1) Introduction - Norma B. Crosby --- (2) Theoretical Models of SOC Systems - Markus J. Aschwanden --- (3) SOC and Fractal Geometry - R. T. James McAteer --- (4) Percolation Models of Self-Organized Critical Phenomena - Alexander V. Milovanov --- (5) Criticality and Self-Organization in Branching Processes: Application to Natural Hazards - Álvaro Corral, Francesc Font-Clos --- (6) Power Laws of Recurrence Networks - Yong Zou, Jobst Heitzig, Jürgen Kurths --- (7) SOC computer simolations - Gunnar Pruessner --- (8) SOC Laboratory Experiments - Gunnar Pruessner --- (9) Self-Organizing Complex Earthquakes: Scaling in Data, Models, and Forecasting - Michael K. Sachs et al. --- (10) Wildfires and the Forest-Fire Model - Stefan Hergarten --- (11) SOC in Landslides - Stefan Hergarten --- (12) SOC and Solar Flares - Paul Charbonneau --- (13) SOC Systems in Astrophysics - Markus J. Aschwanden ---

  3. [Surgical techniques of organ transplants].

    PubMed

    Froněk, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The list of surgical procedures of solid organ transplantations appears very interesting and colorful, even with overlap among techniques. Liver transplantation is a life-saving procedure in a majority of cases, the liver can be transplanted as a full or partial graft. The liver graft can be split for two recipients; it can also be reduced for a small recipient if splitting is not indicated. Kidney transplantation is the most common solid organ transplant procedure, the majority of kidney grafts come from brain-dead donors whereas the number of live donor transplants is increasing, also thanks to paired donation and blood group incompatible transplantation methods. The small bowel and multivisceral transplantation are rare procedures; they serve selected patients with short bowel syndrome, some patients with retroperitoneal tumors or with extensive visceral thrombosis. Solid organ transplants are well established treatment methods with good and proven outcomes. A majority of patients can return to a normal life after their transplants.

  4. Strategic planning in healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Perera, Francisco de Paula; Peiró, Manel

    2012-08-01

    Strategic planning is a completely valid and useful tool for guiding all types of organizations, including healthcare organizations. The organizational level at which the strategic planning process is relevant depends on the unit's size, its complexity, and the differentiation of the service provided. A cardiology department, a hemodynamic unit, or an electrophysiology unit can be an appropriate level, as long as their plans align with other plans at higher levels. The leader of each unit is the person responsible for promoting the planning process, a core and essential part of his or her role. The process of strategic planning is programmable, systematic, rational, and holistic and integrates the short, medium, and long term, allowing the healthcare organization to focus on relevant and lasting transformations for the future.

  5. Muscle as a secretory organ.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body. Skeletal muscles are primarily characterized by their mechanical activity required for posture, movement, and breathing, which depends on muscle fiber contractions. However, skeletal muscle is not just a component in our locomotor system. Recent evidence has identified skeletal muscle as a secretory organ. We have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed, and released by muscle fibers and exert either autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine effects should be classified as "myokines." The muscle secretome consists of several hundred secreted peptides. This finding provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, bones, and brain. In addition, several myokines exert their effects within the muscle itself. Many proteins produced by skeletal muscle are dependent upon contraction. Therefore, it is likely that myokines may contribute in the mediation of the health benefits of exercise.

  6. Tribochemical processes in organic media

    SciTech Connect

    Chigarenko, G.G.; Barchan, G.P.; Ponomarenko, A.G.

    1982-11-01

    Investigates the influence of the chemical structure of a number of organic compounds of different classes on their lubricating properties and the processes in the friction zone. Uses monohydric, dihydric, and trihydric alcohols, aldehydes, alkylcarboxylic acids, dialkyl ethers, esters of monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids, and esters of hydroxy-acids as the lubricating medium. Finds that when friction takes place in a medium consisting of an organic compound that is less active than acids or aldehydes, an equilibrium optimal quantity of acid is formed by tribochemical means, and this tends to give a substantial reduction of the coefficient of friction and wear. Concludes that the formation of carboxyl-containing organic compounds is one of the tribochemical processes that are necessary to improve lubricity.

  7. From Bureaucratic Organizations to Learning Organizations: An Evolutionary Roadmap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamali, D.; Khoury, G.; Sahyoun, H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To track changes in management paradigms from the bureaucratic to the post-bureaucratic to the learning organization model, highlighting core differentiating features of each paradigm as well as necessary ingredients for successful evolution. Design/methodology/approach: The article takes the form of a literature review and critical…

  8. ESTIMATING DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR NONIONIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A literature search was performed for dissolved organic carbon/water partition coefficients for nonionic chemicals (Kdoc) and Kdoc data was taken from more than sixty references. The Kdoc data were evaluated as a function of the n-octanol/water partition coefficients (Kow). A pre...

  9. Organ donation consanguinity or universality.

    PubMed

    Kishore, R R

    1996-01-01

    1. Neither the "Diseased Persons" nor the "Genetic Relations" provide an answer to "trading" in human body parts. 2. Live human body constitutes a vital source of supply of organs and tissues and the possibilities of optimum utilisation should be explored. 3. There is no scope for dogmatic postures and open-mindedness should be the approach while dealing with the issue of Organ Transplantation. 4. Society owes a duty to save the file of a dying man and in the event of failure to do so, it is absolutely immoral to interfere with his own arrangements by making unrealistic laws. No immorality is involved if an individual disposes of his spare body parts for a valid consideration to a needy person. 5. The scarcity needs to be urgently overcome otherwise unwarranted trade and crime are liable to thrive. 6. Families are not unconnected or antagonistic fragments of humanity. After thousands of years of continuous efforts the individuals on this earth have attained the stage of organic and functional integration. Atomisation of society on the basis of consanguineous proximities amounts to reversing this holistic trend. Organ transplantation is a functional expression of a highly evolved pursuit with inherent and intimate interaction in the form of organic exchange at the individual level, independent of consanguineous inducements or motivations. As such there is absolutely no scope for restricting organ donations by strangers. 7. Commercialisation should be curbed by making the enforcement agencies more efficient and not by depriving a needy person of his genuine requirements. Legislative craftsmanship lies in providing an answer without curtailing the freedom of the people.

  10. Organic geochemical constraints on paleoelevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polissar, P. J.; Rowley, D. B.; Currie, B. S.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    The elevation history of the land surface is an important factor in the interpretation of past tectonic, climate and ecological processes. However, quantitative estimates of paleoelevation are difficult to produce and new techniques are needed. Organic geochemical approaches to quantifying paleoelevations provide a new perspective on this difficult task. The hydrogen isotopic composition of organic biomarker molecules synthesized by plants and algae is systematically related to the water used for growth. Organic molecules in ancient sediments can provide values for the isotopic composition of this water and thus elevation, provided the relationship between elevation and isotopic values is known. Molecular hydrogen isotope ratios from Cenozoic lake sediments on the Tibetan Plateau demonstrate the utility of a biomarker approach. Terrestrial plant-wax D/H values on Neogene sediments from the Namling-Oiyug Basin provide new paleoelevation estimates that compare well with previous studies. Plant wax D/H ratios paired with lacustrine carbonate oxygen isotope values from the Lunpola and Hoh-Xil basins illustrate how paired isotope systems can unravel the isotopic composition of precipitation from evaporative enrichment of lake waters. A potentially fruitful avenue for future research is illustrated by D/H analyses on older sediments from the Namling-Oiyug Basin. These sediments—like many that could be useful for paleoaltimetry—have experienced significant burial and heating. As temperatures approach the oil window it becomes possible to exchange hydrogen in both the extractable organic molecules (bitumen) and the insoluble organic residue (kerogen). The extent to which this exchange alters the original isotopic composition will determine the usefulness of D/H analyses on thermally mature organic matter. The potential payoff and pitfalls of D/H analyses on heated sediments is illustrated with thermally immature and mature samples from the Namling-Oiyug Basin.

  11. Effects of anonymous information about potential organ transplant recipients on attitudes toward organ transplantation and the willingness to donate organs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Michelle; Katz, Roger C; Beauchamp, Kenneth; Hannon, Roseann

    2002-10-01

    Two approaches for educating college students about the need for organ donors were compared. The experimental group (N = 162) watched a video-taped dramatization of an organ procurement coordinator asking the family members of a recently deceased loved one if they would donate their loved one's organs. Contained in this videotape was demographic information about three adults who needed an organ transplant. The control group (N = 169) saw the same videotape minus the demographic information. Extrapolating from research on altruism, we hypothesized that information about potential organ recipients would increase the viewer's willingness to donate a next-of-kin's organs and their own willingness to become an organ donor. Results supported this hypothesis. Compared to the control group, the experimental group was more willing to donate a next-of-kin's organs and take action to become an organ donor. We tentatively conclude that providing information about potential organ recipients increases the willingness of college students to become organ donors.

  12. Bacterial Chromosome Organization and Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Esteban; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are generally ∼1000 times longer than the cells in which they reside, and concurrent replication, segregation, and transcription/translation of this crowded mass of DNA poses a challenging organizational problem. Recent advances in cell-imaging technology with subdiffraction resolution have revealed that the bacterial nucleoid is reliably oriented and highly organized within the cell. Such organization is transmitted from one generation to the next by progressive segregation of daughter chromosomes and anchoring of DNA to the cell envelope. Active segregation by a mitotic machinery appears to be common; however, the mode of chromosome segregation varies significantly from species to species. PMID:20182613

  13. The Harvard organic photovoltaic dataset.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Steven A; Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O; Simm, Gregor N; Lutzow, Trevor; Li, Kewei; Seress, Laszlo R; Hachmann, Johannes; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-09-27

    The Harvard Organic Photovoltaic Dataset (HOPV15) presented in this work is a collation of experimental photovoltaic data from the literature, and corresponding quantum-chemical calculations performed over a range of conformers, each with quantum chemical results using a variety of density functionals and basis sets. It is anticipated that this dataset will be of use in both relating electronic structure calculations to experimental observations through the generation of calibration schemes, as well as for the creation of new semi-empirical methods and the benchmarking of current and future model chemistries for organic electronic applications.

  14. The Harvard organic photovoltaic dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Steven A.; Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Simm, Gregor N.; Lutzow, Trevor; Li, Kewei; Seress, Laszlo R.; Hachmann, Johannes; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-09-01

    The Harvard Organic Photovoltaic Dataset (HOPV15) presented in this work is a collation of experimental photovoltaic data from the literature, and corresponding quantum-chemical calculations performed over a range of conformers, each with quantum chemical results using a variety of density functionals and basis sets. It is anticipated that this dataset will be of use in both relating electronic structure calculations to experimental observations through the generation of calibration schemes, as well as for the creation of new semi-empirical methods and the benchmarking of current and future model chemistries for organic electronic applications.

  15. Radiolytic dechlorination of chlorinated organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghipour, Fariborz; Evans, Greg J.

    1997-02-01

    The radiolytic dechlorination of 12 low molecular weight chlorinated organic compounds present in pulp mill effluent was investigated. For most of these chloro-organic compounds more than 90% dechlorination was obtained for gamma doses up to 20 kGy. Parameters such as the number of chlorine atoms and aqueous solution concentration were found to affect the dechlorination rate. A reaction set was also created to model the behavior of irradiated 0.49-49 mol m -3 chloroform solutions, giving good agreement with experimental results.

  16. Perspectives on Computational Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Streitwieser, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The author reviews how his early love for theoretical organic chemistry led to experimental research and the extended search for quantitative correlations between experiment and quantum calculations. The experimental work led to ion pair acidities of alkali-organic compounds and most recently to equilibria and reactions of lithium and cesium enolates in THF. This chemistry is now being modeled by ab initio calculations. An important consideration is the treatment of solvation in which coordination of the alkali cation with the ether solvent plays a major role. PMID:19518150

  17. The Harvard organic photovoltaic dataset

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Steven A.; Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Simm, Gregor N.; Lutzow, Trevor; Li, Kewei; Seress, Laszlo R.; Hachmann, Johannes; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-01-01

    The Harvard Organic Photovoltaic Dataset (HOPV15) presented in this work is a collation of experimental photovoltaic data from the literature, and corresponding quantum-chemical calculations performed over a range of conformers, each with quantum chemical results using a variety of density functionals and basis sets. It is anticipated that this dataset will be of use in both relating electronic structure calculations to experimental observations through the generation of calibration schemes, as well as for the creation of new semi-empirical methods and the benchmarking of current and future model chemistries for organic electronic applications. PMID:27676312

  18. Theoretical Biology: Organisms and Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landauer, Christopher; Bellman, Kirstie L.

    2002-09-01

    The Theoretical Biology Program initiated by Robert Rosen is intended to identify the key theoretical characteristics of organisms, especially those that distinguish organisms from mechanisms, by looking for the proper abstractions and defining the appropriate relationships. There are strong claims about the distinctions in Rosen's book "Life Itself", along with some purported proofs of these assertions. Unfortunately, the Mathematics is incorrect, and the assertions remain unproven (and some of them are simply false). In this paper, we present the ideas of Rosen's approach, demonstrate that his Mathematical formulations and proofs are wrong, and then show how they might be made more successful.

  19. Electrical Transport through Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, C. N.; Chang, Shun-Chi; Williams, Stan

    2003-03-01

    We investigate electrical transport properties of single organic molecules using electromigration break junctions[1]. A self-assembled monolayer of various organic molecules such as 1,4-di(phenylethynyl-4'-methanethiol)benzene was grown on narrow metal wires, and single or a few molecules were incorporated into the junctions which were created by applying a large voltage and breaking the wires. The transport properties of these molecules were then measured at low temperatures. Latest experimental results will be discussed. [1] Park, J. et al, Nature, 417, 722 (2002); Liang W. et al, Nature, 417, 725 (2002).

  20. Indenylmetal Catalysis in Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Trost, Barry M; Ryan, Michael C

    2017-03-06

    Synthetic organic chemists have a long-standing appreciation for transition metal cyclopentadienyl complexes, of which many have been used as catalysts for organic transformations. Much less well known are the contributions of the benzo-fused relative of the cyclopentadienyl ligand, the indenyl ligand, whose unique properties have in many cases imparted differential reactivity in catalytic processes toward the synthesis of small molecules. In this Review, we present examples of indenylmetal complexes in catalysis and compare their reactivity to their cyclopentadienyl analogues, wherever possible.

  1. 11 CFR 115.3 - Corporations, labor organizations, membership organizations, cooperatives, and corporations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... organizations, cooperatives, and corporations without capital stock. 115.3 Section 115.3 Federal Elections..., membership organizations, cooperatives, and corporations without capital stock. (a) Corporations, labor organizations, membership organizations, cooperatives, and corporations without capital stock to which this...

  2. Organ trading, tourism, and trafficking within Europe.

    PubMed

    Pattinson, Shaun D

    2008-03-01

    This article argues for a regulatory and institutional response towards organ trading, tourism and trafficking that differs from extant approaches. European countries have hitherto adopted blanket prohibitions on organ trading (i.e. the buying or selling of human organs). This article advances the view that policy makers have thereby overreacted to legitimate public health concerns and the evils of organ trafficking (i.e. organ trading and tourism involving coercion or deception). It argues for a trial of a very tightly regulated system of organ trading that could eventually lead to a limited system of organ tourism (i.e. organ trading involving more than one jurisdiction).

  3. PREFACE: Self-organized nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, Sylvie; Ortega, Enrique

    2006-04-01

    In order to fabricate ordered arrays of nanostructures, two different strategies might be considered. The `top-down' approach consists of pushing the limit of lithography techniques down to the nanometre scale. However, beyond 10 nm lithography techniques will inevitably face major intrinsic limitations. An alternative method for elaborating ultimate-size nanostructures is based on the reverse `bottom-up' approach, i.e. building up nanostructures (and eventually assemble them to form functional circuits) from individual atoms or molecules. Scanning probe microscopies, including scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) invented in 1982, have made it possible to create (and visualize) individual structures atom by atom. However, such individual atomic manipulation is not suitable for industrial applications. Self-assembly or self-organization of nanostructures on solid surfaces is a bottom-up approach that allows one to fabricate and assemble nanostructure arrays in a one-step process. For applications, such as high density magnetic storage, self-assembly appears to be the simplest alternative to lithography for massive, parallel fabrication of nanostructure arrays with regular sizes and spacings. These are also necessary for investigating the physical properties of individual nanostructures by means of averaging techniques, i.e. all those using light or particle beams. The state-of-the-art and the current developments in the field of self-organization and physical properties of assembled nanostructures are reviewed in this issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. The papers have been selected from among the invited and oral presentations of the recent summer workshop held in Cargese (Corsica, France, 17-23 July 2005). All authors are world-renowned in the field. The workshop has been funded by the Marie Curie Actions: Marie Curie Conferences and Training Courses series named `NanosciencesTech' supported by the VI Framework Programme of the European Community, by

  4. SPECIATION OF ORGANICS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe herein a method for determining constants for simultaneously occurring, site-specific "microequilibria" (as with tautomers) for organics in water. The method is based in part on modeling temperature-variant Raman spectra according to the van't Hoff equation....

  5. Leadership in a Humane Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitrov, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the way leadership influences an organization to become humane through its features and behaviors; as well as the organizational circumstances in which humane leadership can be nurtured. The first empirical case study, in the fields of Human Resource Development (HRD) and hospitality management, to…

  6. Task Organizing for Urban Combat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-09

    varying urbanisation s-a exatmined in this chapter. Nine ex&aples of Soviet and German task organization employed in urban combat ranging frca emaml...in swaler vill •ges. ’rhus if a tank battalion supported an infantry battalion in small village actions, it covid have to support up to eight infantry

  7. Middle School Organization and Scheduling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Nancy J.

    The major purpose of this report is to present information about the organization of middle schools in the school district of Philadelphia. The report includes: (1) summary information on rostering/scheduling practices; and (2) comparisons of promotion/retention rates, average daily attendance, and suspension rates in middle schools with different…

  8. GLOBAL ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The book chapter discusses several aspects of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from vegetation. It begins with a section on emission measurements that includes a brief history of enclosure and above-canopy flux measurements as well as a discussion of existing d...

  9. Anaerobic digestion for household organics

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, R.; Kelleher, M.

    1995-04-01

    Considerable success in using anaerobic technology for processing household organics is being reported by several recently constructed facilities in Europe. Organic residuals collected separately in a Belgian town are processed to produce biogas and a compost-like material in less than one month. The dry anaerobic conversion process (DRANCO) was developed by Organic Waste Systems (OWS) in the 1980s, with the collaboration of Professor Willy Verstraete at the University of Ghent`s Laboratory of Applied Microbial Ecology. The patented process converts solid and semisolid organic residuals into biogas (for energy recovery) and a stable humus like product. The plant has competing odor sources such as the active landfill and the surrounding farmland - in fact, the smell of livestock manure is quite prevalent in this heavily agricultural area. Addition of the nonrecyclable paper fraction to the feedstock improves the carbon/nitrogen ratio, soaks up moisture, and absorbs odor. The entire Brecht facility does not occupy much space and total material retention time at the site is one month, compared to a number of months for aerobic systems. It also has a low staffing requirement, provides energy self-sufficiency, and the final soil enhancement product meets established quality standards.

  10. Designing the Successful Grounds Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratto, Fred

    2011-01-01

    The most important component of any service organization is people. This is especially true of grounds management, because effective maintenance is dependent on good supervision and knowledgeable people. The grounds management function, therefore, must have personnel who are competent and committed. They must fully understand the scope of their …

  11. Innovations and Organizations: Critical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van de Ven, Andrew H.; Rogers, Everett M.

    1988-01-01

    Presents an overview of research on innovations and organizations. Criticizes past research and calls for a focus on process research in future investigations, moving from a stage-by-stage conception of the innovation process to a dynamic, continuous conception in which the variables involved are sequenced and analyzed through time. (SR)

  12. Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... you may be able to go out-of-network for certain services, usually for a higher cost. This is called ... If you get health care outside the plan's network , you may have to pay the full cost. It's ... Resources Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) ...

  13. Three Puzzles for Organic Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, David; Pickering, Miles

    1988-01-01

    Notes that laboratory work should be more oriented towards puzzle solving rather than technique or illustration. Offers three organic laboratory puzzles which can be solved by melting point alone. Involves lab work at the 100-200-mg scale but still uses conventional glassware. (MVL)

  14. Enzymatic hydrolysis of organic phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orthophosphate-releasing enzymatic hydrolysis is an alternative means for characterizing organic phosphorus (Po) in animal manure. The approach is not only simple and fast, but can also provide information difficult to obtain by other methods. Currently, commercially available phosphatases are mainl...

  15. Toxic Leadership in Educational Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, James E.

    2014-01-01

    While research on the traits and skills of effective leaders is plentiful, only recently has the phenomenon of toxic leadership begun to be investigated. This research report focuses on toxic leadership in educational organizations--its prevalence, as well as the characteristics and early indicators. Using mixed methods, the study found four…

  16. Radiation Chemistry in Organized Assemblies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, J. K.; Chen, T. S.

    1981-01-01

    Expands the basic concepts regarding the radiation chemistry of simple aqueous systems to more complex, but well defined, organized assemblies. Discusses the differences in behavior in comparison to simple systems. Reviews these techniques: pulse radiolysis, laser flash, photolysis, and steady state irradiation by gamma rays or light. (CS)

  17. Liquid Crystals for Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Mary; Kelly, Stephen M.

    As discussed in Chaps. 2 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-0_2), 3 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-3), 5 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-5) and 6 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-6), columnar, smectic and, more recently, nematic liquid crystals are widely recognized as very promising charge-transporting organic semiconductors due to their ability to spontaneously self-assemble into highly ordered domains in uniform thin films over large areas. This and their broad absorption spectra make them suitable as active materials for organic photovoltaic devices. In this chapter, we discuss the use of liquid crystals in such devices. Firstly, we examine the principle of power generation via the photovoltaic effect in organic materials and the various device configurations that can optimise efficiency. Then we discuss photovoltaic devices incorporating columnar liquid crystals combined with electron accepting materials based on either perylene or fullerene. The use of nematic and sanditic liquid crystals in photovoltaics is investigated as well as a novel solar cell concentrator incorporating liquid crystals. Finally, we analyse the benefits and limitations of liquid-crystal-based photovoltaics in the context of the state-of-the-art for organics photovoltaics.

  18. The Social Organization of Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V., Ed.; Schneider, Barbara, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Schools are complex social settings where students, teachers, administrators, and parents interact to shape a child's educational experience. Any effort to improve educational outcomes for America's children requires a dynamic understanding of the environments in which children learn. In "The Social Organization of Schooling", editors Larry Hedges…

  19. A Program for Neurological Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Louis

    A program for neurological organization is explained and its purposes are stated. Hints are given for working with both child and parents; and form for evaluating measures of neuromotor fitness is included. Also provided is a checklist for rating motor exploration, including movements performed lying on the back, on the knees, or standing or on…

  20. Self-Organized Porphyrinic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Drain, Charles Michael; Varotto, Alessandro; Radivojevic, Ivana

    2009-01-01

    The self-assembly and self-organization of porphyrins and related macrocycles enables the bottom-up fabrication of photonic materials for fundamental studies of the photophysics of these materials and for diverse applications. This rapidly developing field encompasses a broad range of disciplines including molecular design and synthesis, materials formation and characterization, and the design and evaluation of devices. Since the self-assembly of porphyrins by electrostatic interactions in the late 1980s to the present, there has been an ever increasing degree of sophistication in the design of porphyrins that self-assemble into discrete arrays or self-organize into polymeric systems. These strategies exploit ionic interactions, hydrogen bonding, coordination chemistry, and dispersion forces to form supramolecular systems with varying degrees of hierarchical order. This review concentrates on the methods to form supramolecular porphyrinic systems by intermolecular interactions other than coordination chemistry, the characterization and properties of these photonic materials, and the prospects for using these in devices. The review is heuristically organized by the predominant intermolecular interactions used and emphasizes how the organization affects properties and potential performance in devices. PMID:19253946

  1. Organic Chemistry for the Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deBeer, W. H. J.

    In response to a serious shortage of chemists in South Africa, gifted secondary school students are enrolled in an enrichment program in organic chemistry and encouraged to consider chemistry or one of its related fields as a career. The introductory portion of the program involves approximately 90 hours over a 3-year period while the advanced…

  2. Social Comparison Processes in Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jerald; Ashton-James, Claire E.; Ashkanasy, Neal M.

    2007-01-01

    We systematically analyze the role of social comparison processes in organizations. Specifically, we describe how social comparison processes have been used to explain six key areas of organizational inquiry: (1) organizational justice, (2) performance appraisal, (3) virtual work environments, (4) affective behavior in the workplace, (5) stress,…

  3. Community Organizing. Technical Assistance Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    Community organizing can encompass coalition building or community development, each of which represents steps in getting something done in a community. Before undertaking a project, it is important to figure out the exact problem the community is trying to address. From there, it can be determined how to address it, who else will be involved, and…

  4. Photoprotective compounds from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Rajesh P; Richa; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Singh, Shailendra P; Häder, Donat-P

    2010-06-01

    The substantial loss in the stratospheric ozone layer and consequent increase in solar ultraviolet radiation on the earth's surface have augmented the interest in searching for natural photoprotective compounds in organisms of marine as well as freshwater ecosystems. A number of photoprotective compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), scytonemin, carotenoids and several other UV-absorbing substances of unknown chemical structure have been identified from different organisms. MAAs form the most common class of UV-absorbing compounds known to occur widely in various marine organisms; however, several compounds having UV-screening properties still need to be identified. The synthesis of scytonemin, a predominant UV-A-photoprotective pigment, is exclusively reported in cyanobacteria. Carotenoids are important components of the photosynthetic apparatus that serve both light-harvesting and photoprotective functions, either by direct quenching of the singlet oxygen or other toxic reactive oxygen species or by dissipating the excess energy in the photosynthetic apparatus. The production of photoprotective compounds is affected by several environmental factors such as different wavelengths of UVR, desiccation, nutrients, salt concentration, light as well as dark period, and still there is controversy about the biosynthesis of various photoprotective compounds. Recent studies have focused on marine organisms as a source of natural bioactive molecules having a photoprotective role, their biosynthesis and commercial application. However, there is a need for extensive work to explore the photoprotective role of various UV-absorbing compounds from marine habitats so that a range of biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications can be found.

  5. COPE: Computer Organized Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambdin, Dolly

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the need for and appropriate use of individual assessment in physical education and explains how computerized data management can combat the logistical difficulties of using the data. Describes project COPE (Computer Organized Physical Education), a computerized data management system for improving recordkeeping, planning, and…

  6. Vomeronasal organ and human pheromones.

    PubMed

    Trotier, D

    2011-09-01

    For many organisms, pheromonal communication is of particular importance in managing various aspects of reproduction. In tetrapods, the vomeronasal (Jacobson's) organ specializes in detecting pheromones in biological substrates of congeners. This information triggers behavioral changes associated, in the case of certain pheromones, with neuroendocrine correlates. In human embryos, the organ develops and the nerve fibers constitute a substrate for the migration of GnRH-secreting cells from the olfactory placode toward the hypothalamus. After this essential step for subsequent secretion of sex hormones by the anterior hypophysis, the organ regresses and the neural connections disappear. The vomeronasal cavities can still be observed by endoscopy in some adults, but they lack sensory neurons and nerve fibers. The genes which code for vomeronasal receptor proteins and the specific ionic channels involved in the transduction process are mutated and nonfunctional in humans. In addition, no accessory olfactory bulbs, which receive information from the vomeronasal receptor cells, are found. The vomeronasal sensory function is thus nonoperational in humans. Nevertheless, several steroids are considered to be putative human pheromones; some activate the anterior hypothalamus, but the effects observed are not comparable to those in other mammals. The signaling process (by neuronal detection and transmission to the brain or by systemic effect) remains to be clearly elucidated.

  7. The transformation of disabilities organizations.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Robert L; Verdugo, Miguel-Angel

    2013-08-01

    This article summarizes the five major characteristics of the transformation era and describes how intellectual and closely related developmental disabilities organizations can apply specific transformation strategies associated with each characteristic. Collectively, the characteristics and strategies provide a framework for transformation thinking, learning, and acting. Specific application examples are given.

  8. The Organization of Informal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogoff, Barbara; Callanan, Maureen; Gutiérrez, Kris D.; Erickson, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Informal learning is often treated as simply an alternative to formal, didactic instruction. This chapter discusses how the organization of informal learning differs across distinct settings but with important commonalities distinguishing informal learning from formal learning: Informal learning is nondidactic, is embedded in meaningful activity,…

  9. Sensory Hierarchical Organization and Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skapof, Jerome

    The purpose of this study was to judge the viability of an operational approach aimed at assessing response styles in reading using the hypothesis of sensory hierarchical organization. A sample of 103 middle-class children from a New York City public school, between the ages of five and seven, took part in a three phase experiment. Phase one…

  10. Students' Categorizations of Organic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domin, Daniel S.; Al-Masum, Mohammad; Mensah, John

    2008-01-01

    Categorization is a fundamental psychological ability necessary for problem solving and many other higher-level cognitive tasks. In organic chemistry, students must establish groupings of different chemical compounds in order not only to solve problems, but also to understand course content. Classic models of categorization emphasize similarity as…

  11. Grow Your Green Campus Organically!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    When it comes to environmental savvy, Delta College (Michigan) is like a lot of small institutions of higher education: It has a passel of green efforts underway, which could fall under all sorts of headings. The IT organization at the 11,000-student community college campus has virtualized its server operations and is on track to roll out a…

  12. Malevolent Creativity in Terrorist Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Paul; Horgan, John; Hunter, Samuel T.; Cushenbery, Lily D.

    2013-01-01

    Terrorist organizations are both imitative and innovative in character. While the drivers of imitation have been extensively modeled using concepts such as contagion and diffusion, creativity and innovation remain relatively underdeveloped ideas in the context of terrorist behavior. This article seeks to redress this deficiency by presenting a…

  13. [Organic agriculture and sustainable development].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Wang, Gang

    2004-12-01

    Basing on the research and practice of organic agriculture at home and abroad, this paper discussed the objectives of developing green food and the principles that must be persisted in the practice in China. In the light of the arguments concerning with sustainable agriculture, we also discussed the significance of "alternative agriculture" in theory and practice. Compared with conventional high-intensity agriculture, the production approaches of organic alternatives can improve soil fertility and have fewer detrimental effects on the environment. It is unclear whether conventional agriculture can be sustained because of the shortcomings presented in this paper, and it has taken scientists approximately one century to research and practice organic farming as a representative of alternative agriculture. The development of green food in China has only gone through more than ten years, and there would be some practical and theoretical effects on the development of China's green food if we exploit an environment-friendly production pattern of organic agriculture which majors in keeping human health and maintaining sustainable agriculture.

  14. Virtual Worlds for Virtual Organizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoten, Diana; Lutters, Wayne

    The members and resources of a virtual organization are dispersed across time and space, yet they function as a coherent entity through the use of technologies, networks, and alliances. As virtual organizations proliferate and become increasingly important in society, many may exploit the technical architecture s of virtual worlds, which are the confluence of computer-mediated communication, telepresence, and virtual reality originally created for gaming. A brief socio-technical history describes their early origins and the waves of progress followed by stasis that brought us to the current period of renewed enthusiasm. Examination of contemporary examples demonstrates how three genres of virtual worlds have enabled new arenas for virtual organizing: developer-defined closed worlds, user-modifiable quasi-open worlds, and user-generated open worlds. Among expected future trends are an increase in collaboration born virtually rather than imported from existing organizations, a tension between high-fidelity recreations of the physical world and hyper-stylized imaginations of fantasy worlds, and the growth of specialized worlds optimized for particular sectors, companies, or cultures.

  15. Organ donation: a communitarian approach.

    PubMed

    Etzioni, Amitai

    2003-03-01

    Recently, various suggestions have been made to respond to the increasingly great shortage of organs by paying for them. Because of the undesirable side effects of such approaches (commodification, injustice, and costs), a communitarian approach should be tried first. A communitarian approach to the problem of organ shortage entails changing the moral culture so that members of society will recognize that donating one's organs, once they are no longer of use to the donor, is the moral (right) thing to do. This approach requires much greater and deeper efforts than sharing information and making public service announcements. It entails a moral dialogue, in which the public is engaged, leading to a change in what people expect from one another. Among the devices that could help change the moral culture are a public statement, endorsed by community members and leaders, that expresses the community sense that donation "is what a good person does" and a community-specific web page that lists those who have made the commitment. A change in law so that a person's wishes in the matter are recognized as final and binding are also desired. This position paper deals only with cadaver organs and not living donors.

  16. Innovation in a Professional Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savenije, Bas; Van Rosmalen, Karel

    1988-01-01

    Two innovative projects at the University of Utrecht, women's studies and the management and policy program, and the role of incentives in these particular cases are evaluated. Problems with innovation and decision making, entrepreneurial innovation and the planning process, and the organization of innovative projects are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  17. Organic materials for printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berggren, M.; Nilsson, D.; Robinson, N. D.

    2007-01-01

    Organic materials can offer a low-cost alternative for printed electronics and flexible displays. However, research in these systems must exploit the differences - via molecular-level control of functionality - compared with inorganic electronics if they are to become commercially viable.

  18. Imaging Alternative Future School Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popper, Samuel H., Ed.

    This publication presents the proceedings of the University of Minnesota UCEA Career Development Seminar on alternative school organization for the future. Participants addressed themselves to how both universities and public school systems must adapt to changing social aspirations if they are to remain effective. This entails education…

  19. Space research with intact organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert W.; Haddy, Francis J.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of space exposure on intact organisms are briefly reviewed, and examples of future experiments that might provide new information on the role of gravity in the evolution of life are suggested. It is noted that long term experiments with intact plant and animals for studying gravitational thresholds will provide important new insights.

  20. Ethical Issues in Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coad, Peter; Coad, Raylene

    1985-01-01

    Suggests that a literature survey can alert students to real-life ethical problems surrounding many organic compounds. Topic areas students could explore include: hazards in the workplace, toxic chemicals, and nerve gas structures. Background information and an extensive bibliography are given. (DH)

  1. Why Audit Communication in Organizations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Noel D.; Greenbaum, Howard H.

    The purpose of this paper is to present a common sense proposal, as opposed to a documented proposal, arguing for the adoption of a periodic communication audit procedure in organizations. The paper presents an approach and information the communication consultant can utilize in addressing management practitioners on the topic: "Why Audit…

  2. Identification of micro-organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.; Zaloguev, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    Manual presents detailed laboratory procedures for identifying aerobic or microaerobic bacteria, yeast or yeastible organisms, and filamentous fungi and conducting other microbiological or immunological evaluations of samples taken from human subjects. Standardized procedures should be useful to researchers and clinicians in laboratories, hospitals and other biological test facilities.

  3. Organized Labor at the Crossroads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Wei-Chiao, Ed.

    These papers are organized around the theme that labor unions in the United States, having suffered a precipitous decline in membership and influence, must reassess their past practices and strategies and seek new methods and solutions. Following an introduction by Wei-Chiao Huang, the document includes "Bargaining Realities: Responding to a…

  4. Method of doping organic semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Kloc, Christian Leo [Constance, DE; Ramirez, Arthur Penn [Summit, NJ; So, Woo-Young [New Providence, NJ

    2012-02-28

    A method includes the steps of forming a contiguous semiconducting region and heating the region. The semiconducting region includes polyaromatic molecules. The heating raises the semiconducting region to a temperature above room temperature. The heating is performed in the presence of a dopant gas and the absence of light to form a doped organic semiconducting region.

  5. Chemistry of Covalent Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Waller, Peter J; Gándara, Felipe; Yaghi, Omar M

    2015-12-15

    Linking organic molecules by covalent bonds into extended solids typically generates amorphous, disordered materials. The ability to develop strategies for obtaining crystals of such solids is of interest because it opens the way for precise control of the geometry and functionality of the extended structure, and the stereochemical orientation of its constituents. Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are a new class of porous covalent organic structures whose backbone is composed entirely of light elements (B, C, N, O, Si) that represent a successful demonstration of how crystalline materials of covalent solids can be achieved. COFs are made by combination of organic building units covalently linked into extended structures to make crystalline materials. The attainment of crystals is done by several techniques in which a balance is struck between the thermodynamic reversibility of the linking reactions and their kinetics. This success has led to the expansion of COF materials to include organic units linked by these strong covalent bonds: B-O, C-N, B-N, and B-O-Si. Since the organic constituents of COFs, when linked, do not undergo significant change in their overall geometry, it has been possible to predict the structures of the resulting COFs, and this advantage has facilitated their characterization using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) techniques. It has also allowed for the synthesis of COF structures by design and for their formation with the desired composition, pore size, and aperture. In practice, the modeled PXRD pattern for a given expected COF is compared with the experimental one, and depending on the quality of the match, this is used as a starting point for solving and then refining the crystal structure of the target COF. These characteristics make COFs an attractive class of new porous materials. Accordingly, they have been used as gas storage materials for energy applications, solid supports for catalysis, and optoelectronic devices. A large and

  6. Did the first chordates organize without the organizer?

    PubMed

    Kourakis, Matthew J; Smith, William C

    2005-09-01

    Models of vertebrate development frequently portray the organizer as acting on a largely unpatterned embryo to induce major components of the body plan, such as the neural plate and somites. Recent experiments examining the molecular and genetic basis of major inductive events of vertebrate embryogenesis force a re-examination of this view. These newer observations, along with a proposed revised fate map for the frog Xenopus laevis, suggest a possible reconciliation between the seemingly disparate mechanisms present in the ontogeny of the common chordate body plan of vertebrate and invertebrate chordates. Here, we review data from vertebrates and from an ascidian urochordate and propose that the organizer was not present at the base of the chordate lineage, but could have been a later innovation in the lineage leading to vertebrates, where its role was more permissive than instructive.

  7. Weaving of organic threads into a crystalline covalent organic framework.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuzhong; Ma, Yanhang; Zhao, Yingbo; Sun, Xixi; Gándara, Felipe; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Liu, Zheng; Zhu, Hanyu; Zhu, Chenhui; Suenaga, Kazutomo; Oleynikov, Peter; Alshammari, Ahmad S; Zhang, Xiang; Terasaki, Osamu; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-01-22

    A three-dimensional covalent organic framework (COF-505) constructed from helical organic threads, designed to be mutually weaving at regular intervals, has been synthesized by imine condensation reactions of aldehyde functionalized copper(I)-bisphenanthroline tetrafluoroborate, Cu(PDB)2(BF4), and benzidine (BZ). The copper centers are topologically independent of the weaving within the COF structure and serve as templates for bringing the threads into a woven pattern rather than the more commonly observed parallel arrangement. The copper(I) ions can be reversibly removed and added without loss of the COF structure, for which a tenfold increase in elasticity accompanies its demetalation. The threads in COF-505 have many degrees of freedom for enormous deviations to take place between them, throughout the material, without undoing the weaving of the overall structure.

  8. Lymphoid Neogenesis and Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in Transplanted Organs

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Alice; Thaunat, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The progressive organization of immune effectors into functional ectopic lymphoid structures, named tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO), has been observed in many conditions in which target antigens fail to be eliminated by the immune system. Not surprisingly, TLO have been recurrently identified in chronically rejected allografts. Although significant progress has been made over the last decades in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in TLO development (a process named lymphoid neogenesis), the role of intragraft TLO (if any) in chronic rejection remains elusive. The prevailing dogma is that TLO contribute to graft rejection by generating and propagating local humoral and cellular alloimmune responses. However, TLO have been recently observed in long-term accepting allografts, suggesting that they might also be able to regulate alloimmune responses. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TLO are induced and propose a unified model in which TLO can play deleterious or regulatory roles and therefore actively modulate the kinetics of chronic rejection. PMID:28082981

  9. Photon Upconversion at Crystalline Organic-Organic Heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Michael; Turshatov, Andrey; Busko, Dmitry; Wollgarten, Stephanie; Adams, Michael; Baroni, Nicolò; Welle, Alexander; Redel, Engelbert; Wöll, Christof; Richards, Bryce S; Howard, Ian A

    2016-10-01

    Triplet transfer across a surface-anchored metal-organic-framework heterojunction is demonstrated by the observation of triplet-triplet annihilation photon -upconversion in a sensitizer-emitter heterostructure. Upconversion thresholds under 1 mW cm(-2) are achieved. In the broader context, the double-electron-exchange mechanism of triplet transfer indicates that the heterojunction quality is sufficient for electrons to move between layers in this solution-processed crystalline heterostructure.

  10. Organic and hybrid organic-inorganic photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGehee, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The performance and limitations of the world's best organic and dye sensitized solar cells will be presented along with plans to increase the energy conversion efficiency to 15%. Topics of more detailed discussion could include the formation of polymer-fullerene co-crystals and their implications for recombination, the use of energy transfer to improve light harvesting~in~dye sensitized solar cells, solution deposited transparent electrodes or the use of plasmonics to improve light absorption.

  11. Laser applications of self-organized organic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumi, Seiichi

    2008-08-01

    In this presentation, I report on the self-organized photonic crystals (PCs) of organic and polymer materials for laser applications. Here the self-organized PCs correspond to chiral liquid crystals (CLCs) and colloidal crystals (CCs). First, CLC molecules self-organize the supramolecular helical arrangement by the helical twisting power like as 1-D PC structure. When the fluorescent dye-doped CLC is optically excited with a linearly polarized beam, the laser emission appears at the photonic band gap (PBG) edge(s) of CLC hosts. The optically excited laser emission shows circularly polarized characteristic, even though the excitation beam is linearly polarized. Applying voltages to the optically excited CLC cells enables reversible switching of the laser action as a result of changes in the supramolecular helical structure of CLC host. Moreover, we succeed in the phototunable laser emission by using photoreactive CLCs. Second research topic is establishment of new potential utilities of CC structures of polymer micro-particles. Monodispersed micro-particles have an intrinsic capability to self-assemble the face-centered cubic lattice structures like as 3-D PCs on substrates from the suspension solutions. The highly ordered architectures of colloidal particles are called as the CCs. The laser cavity structure consists of an intermediate light-emitting layer of a fluorescent dye sandwiched between a pair of polymeric CC films. Optical excitation of the device gives rise to the laser oscillation within the photonic band-gap of the CC films. Interestingly, the laser action can be generated by optical excitation even though the CC laser device of all-polymer materials becomes bent shape by mechanical stress.

  12. Organizing to Implement Technology in the NASA Science Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert; Pasciuto, Michael

    2005-01-01

    As part of a NASA reorganization to support the new Vision for Space Exploration, a number of space and Earth science activities were combined into a single organization. This merger provided an opportunity to review and revise technology development within the new entity. While this process has yet to be finalized, an overview . of some of the options and considerations is provided. Examples from one portion of the new entity, the Earth-Sun System Technology program, are used as illustrations.

  13. Organizing for success -- A guide for making organizations more productive

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.J.

    1996-09-01

    Defense Fuel Region-South (DFR-S) the largest field office of the Defense Fuel Supply Center is located in Houston, Texas. The Region is part of the Defense Fuel Supply Center (DFSC). DFSC is the energy supplier to the Department of Defense and other Federal Agencies. DFSC spends about $4 Billion per year in acquisition of fuel, storage and transportation services. DFR-S is responsible for supplying military activities in the 13 states in the southern US, the Caribbean and Latin America. Existing commercial pipeline, barge, tank truck, rail car, and ocean shipping are used for 98% of the movements. Intermediate storage points can be one of 20 Defense fuel Support Points or some 23 commercial pipeline tariff operated terminals. Originally the region organized as a functional supply, transportation and quality organization. However, during the last two years it was radically re-engineered into a flat multi-functional, team oriented organization. Six factors were found critical to this successful re-engineering effort. Those are as follows: leadership; vision; the look, think, plan, do, look, adjust model; your customers; your employees--the social contract; and your facilities.

  14. Evolution of quality at the Organ Center of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/United Network for Organ Sharing.

    PubMed

    Brown, Roger S; Belton, A Matthew; Martin, Judith M; Simmons, Dee Dee; Taylor, Gloria J; Willard, Ellie

    2009-09-01

    One of the goals of the Organ Center of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/United Network for Organ Sharing is to increase the efficiency of equitable organ allocation in the United States. Recognizing the ever-growing need for organ donors and transplants, leaders at the Organ Center increased its commitment to quality improvement initiatives through the development of a quality management team in 2001. The Organ Center began to focus on ways to capture data on processes and pinpoint areas for improvement. As the collection and analysis of data evolved, the Organ Center embraced formal quality standards, such as improvement cycles. Using these cycles, the Organ Center has seen significant improvement. One initiative involving lifesaving heart, lung, and liver placement showed success by doubling the Organ Center's organ placement rate. Another project involving the validation of donor information demonstrated that the accuracy of organ allocation can be improved by 5% on a consistent basis. As stewards for the gift of life and leaders in organ allocation, the Organ Center uses continuous quality improvement to achieve the goal of increasing the efficiency of equitable organ allocation.

  15. 42 CFR 121.6 - Organ procurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Organ procurement. 121.6 Section 121.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.6 Organ procurement. The suitability of organs donated...

  16. 42 CFR 121.6 - Organ procurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Organ procurement. 121.6 Section 121.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.6 Organ procurement. The suitability of organs donated...

  17. 42 CFR 121.6 - Organ procurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Organ procurement. 121.6 Section 121.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.6 Organ procurement. The suitability of organs donated...

  18. 42 CFR 121.6 - Organ procurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Organ procurement. 121.6 Section 121.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.6 Organ procurement. The suitability of organs donated...

  19. 42 CFR 121.6 - Organ procurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Organ procurement. 121.6 Section 121.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.6 Organ procurement. The suitability of organs donated...

  20. 7 CFR 1400.103 - Charitable organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Charitable organizations. 1400.103 Section 1400.103... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Limitation § 1400.103 Charitable organizations. (a) A charitable organization, including a club, society, fraternal organization, or...